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Sample records for adsorbed molecular species

  1. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  2. Characterization of molecular and atomic species adsorbed on ferroelectric and semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath, Satyaveda Chavi

    In order to clarify the mechanisms behind the adsorption of atomic and molecular species adsorbed on ferroelectric surfaces, single crystalline lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN), 'Z-cut' along the (0001) plane, has been prepared, characterized and subsequently exposed to molecular and atomic species. 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystal was chosen as a polar molecule for our model system for this study. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface contact angles (CA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surface of LN as well as the nature of the liquid crystal films grown on the surface. Atomically flat LN surfaces were prepared as a support for monolayer thick, 8CB molecular domains. Also, for the purpose of gaining a fundamental understanding of low coverage interactions of metal atoms on ferroelectric surfaces, we choose to deposit gold onto the LN surface. These gold atomic layers were grown under UHV conditions and characterized. Understanding anchoring mechanisms and thin film organization for LC molecules and metal atoms on uniformly poled surfaces allows for a fuller appreciation of how molecular deposition of other polarizable molecules on patterned poled LN surfaces would occur as well as yielding greater insight on the atomic characteristics of metal on ferroelectric interfaces. Also, to reveal the mechanisms involved in the adsorption of organic aromatic molecules on high-index Si surfaces, thiophene (C4H 4S) and pyrrole (C4H5N) molecules were dosed on prepared Si(5 5 12)-2x1 surfaces as our experimental system. The Si(5 5 12) surface was prepared to produce a 2x1 reconstruction after which molecules were dosed at low exposure to observe the preferred adsorption sites on the surface. All surface preparation and experiments were performed in UHV and measurements of the surface before and after deposition were performed using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Fundamental

  3. Direct Identification and Determination of Conformational Response in Adsorbed Individual Nonplanar Molecular Species Using Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Florian; Bischoff, Felix; Auwärter, Willi; Barth, Johannes V; Repp, Jascha

    2016-12-14

    In recent years atomic force microscopy (AFM) at highest resolution was widely applied to mostly planar molecules, while its application toward exploring species with structural flexibility and a distinct 3D character remains a challenge. Herein, the scope of noncontact AFM is widened by investigating subtle conformational differences occurring in the well-studied reference systems 2H-TPP and Cu-TPP on Cu(111). Different saddle-shape conformations of both species can be recognized in conventional constant-height AFM images. To unambiguously identify the behavior of specific molecular moieties, we extend data acquisition to distances that are inaccessible with constant-height measurements by introducing vertical imaging, that is, AFM mapping in a plane perpendicular to the sample surface. Making use of this novel technique the vertical displacement of the central Cu atom upon tip-induced conformational switching of Cu-TPP is quantified. Further, for 2H-TPP two drastically different geometries are observed, which are systematically characterized. Our results underscore the importance of structural flexibility in adsorbed molecules with large conformational variability and, consequently, the objective to characterize their geometry at the single-molecule level in real space.

  4. Characterization of polar molecular species adsorbed on LiNbO3 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath, Satyaveda; Pearl, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    In order to explore the mechanisms of adsorption on ferroelectric surfaces, single crystalline lithium niobate (LiNbO3: LN), `Z-cut'; along the (0001) plane, has been prepared and characterized and subsequently exposed to a polar molecule. 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystal was chosen as our model system. Low-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, surface contact angle measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface of LN as well as the nature of the films grown on the surface. Atomically flat LN surfaces were prepared as a support for monolayer thick, 8CB molecular domains. Preferential attachment for positive domains was observed indicating an interaction between the polar end group of the molecule and the surface charge of the surface. Understanding anchoring mechanisms for polarizable molecules on uniformly poled surfaces allows for a fuller appreciation of how ferroelectric surfaces can be used for controlling molecular organization.

  5. Molecularly Imprinted Filtering Adsorbents for Odor Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Sho; Chiyomaru, You; Sassa, Fumihiro; Liu, Chuanjun; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    Versatile odor sensors that can discriminate among huge numbers of environmental odorants are desired in many fields, including robotics, environmental monitoring, and food production. However, odor sensors comparable to an animal’s nose have not yet been developed. An animal’s olfactory system recognizes odor clusters with specific molecular properties and uses this combinatorial information in odor discrimination. This suggests that measurement and clustering of odor molecular properties (e.g., polarity, size) using an artificial sensor is a promising approach to odor sensing. Here, adsorbents composed of composite materials with molecular recognition properties were developed for odor sensing. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the adsorbent materials, so specific polymeric materials with particular solubility parameters were chosen to adsorb odorants with various properties. The adsorption properties of the adsorbents could be modified by mixing adsorbent materials. Moreover, a novel molecularly imprinted filtering adsorbent (MIFA), composed of an adsorbent substrate covered with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer, was developed to improve the odor molecular recognition ability. The combination of the adsorbent and MIP layer provided a higher specificity toward target molecules. The MIFA thus provides a useful technique for the design and control of adsorbents with adsorption properties specific to particular odor molecules. PMID:27886070

  6. Time Resolved Studies Of Adsorbed Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J.; Nicol, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A time-resolved Fourier transform IR study of ethyne adsorbed on ZnNaA zeolite yields results very different from those reported for related systems. Initially two species (A and B) are formed by the interaction of C2H2 with the cations. Whereas species A (π-bonded C2H2) was found to be removed immediately on evacuation, species B (probably Zn-acetylide) was not fully removed after 60 mins evacuation. In the presence of the gas phase, bands due to Species A decreased slowly in intensity as new bands due to adsorbed ethanal were observed.

  7. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  8. Development and testing of molecular adsorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulas that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  9. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  10. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  11. NASA Applications of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a new, innovative technology that was developed to reduce the risk of molecular contamination on spaceflight applications. Outgassing from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, and potting compounds, pose a significant threat to the spacecraft and the lifetime of missions. As a coating made of highly porous inorganic materials, MAC offers impressive adsorptive capabilities that help capture and trap contaminants. Past research efforts have demonstrated the coating's promising adhesion performance, optical properties, acoustic durability, and thermal stability. These results advocate its use near or on surfaces that are targeted by outgassed materials, such as internal optics, electronics, detectors, baffles, sensitive instruments, thermal control coatings, and vacuum chamber test environments. The MAC technology has significantly progressed in development over the recent years. This presentation summarizes the many NASA spaceflight applications of MAC and how the coatings technology has been integrated as a mitigation tool for outgassed contaminants. For example, this sprayable paint technology has been beneficial for use in various vacuum chambers for contamination control and hardware bake-outs. The coating has also been used in small instrument cavities within spaceflight instrument for NASA missions.

  12. To-date spacecraft applications and demonstration testing results, and future product development for new molecular adsorber technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Shaun; Hansen, Patricia; Straka, Sharon; Chen, Philip; Triolo, Jack; Bettini, Ron; Carosso, Paolo; Carosso, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    The use of molecular adsorbers, in order to aid in the reduction of the spacecraft contamination levels, is discussed. Molecular adsorbers are characterized by an extremely large surface area, molecularly-porous substructure, and processing charged sites capable of retaining molecular contaminant species. Molecular adsorbers were applied on two Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions, as well as on the tropical rainfall measuring mission. The use of molecular adsorbers carries the potential for low cost, easy fabrication and integration of reliable means for reducing the contamination level around spacecraft.

  13. Multiple species of noninteracting molecules adsorbed on a Bethe lattice.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael; Harris, A B

    2008-10-01

    A simple method, previously used to calculate the equilibrium concentration of dimers adsorbed on a Bethe lattice as a function of the dimer activity, is generalized to solve the problem of a Bethe lattice in contact with a reservoir containing a mixture of molecules. The molecules may have arbitrary sizes and shapes consistent with the geometry of the lattice and the molecules do not interact with one another except for the hard-core restriction that two molecules cannot touch the same site. We obtain a set of simultaneous nonlinear equations, one equation for each species of molecule, which determines the equilibrium concentration of each type of molecule as a function of the (arbitrary) activities of the various species. Surprisingly, regardless of the number of species, the equilibrium concentrations are given explicitly in terms of the solution of a single equation in one unknown which can be solved numerically, if need be. Some numerical examples show that increasing the activity of one species need not necessarily decrease the equilibrium concentration of all other species. We also calculate the adsorption isotherm of an "annealed" Bethe lattice consisting of two types of sites which differently influence the activity of an adsorbed molecule. We prove that if the reservoir contains a finite number of molecular species, regions of two different polymer densities cannot simultaneously exist on the lattice. The widely used Guggenheim theory of mixtures, which can also be construed as a theory of adsorption, assumes for simplicity that the molecules in the mixture are composed of elementary units, which occupy sites of a lattice of coordination number q . Guggenheim's analysis relies on approximate combinatorial formulas which become exact on a Bethe lattice of the same coordination number, as we show in an appendix. Our analysis involves no combinatorics and relies only on recognizing the statistical independence of certain quantities. Despite the nominal

  14. Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating and Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Kenneth M.; Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed two unique coating formulations that will keep surfaces clean and sanitary and contain contaminants.The Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating, modeled after the self-cleaning, water-repellant lotus leaf, disallows buildup of dust, dirt, water, and more on surfaces. This coating, has been successfully tested on painted, aluminum, glass, silica, and some composite surfaces, could aid in keeping medical assets clean.The Molecular Adsorber Coating is a zeolite-based, sprayable molecular adsorber coating, designed to prevent outgassing in materials in vacuums. The coating works well to adsorb volatiles and contaminates in manufacturing and processing, such as in pharmaceutical production. The addition of a biocide would also aid in controlling bacteria levels.

  15. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, Harvey R.; Fanslow, Glenn E.

    1983-01-01

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed.

  16. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, H.R.; Fanslow, G.E.

    1983-12-20

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed. 8 figs.

  17. Development of the Molecular Adsorber Coating for Spacecraft and Instrument Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin

    2011-01-01

    On-orbit Molecular Contamination occurs when materials outgas and deposit onto very sensitive interior surfaces of the spacecraft and instruments. The current solution, Molecular Adsorber Pucks, has disadvantages, which are reviewed. A new innovative solution, Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC), is currently being formulated, optimized, and tested. It is a sprayable alternative composed of Zeolite-based coating with adsorbing properties.

  18. Molecular switches from benzene derivatives adsorbed on metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Filimonov, Sergey N.; Carrasco, Javier; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Transient precursor states are often experimentally observed for molecules adsorbing on surfaces. However, such precursor states are typically rather short-lived, quickly yielding to more stable adsorption configurations. Here we employ first-principles calculations to systematically explore the interaction mechanism for benzene derivatives on metal surfaces, enabling us to selectively tune the stability and the barrier between two metastable adsorption states. In particular, in the case of the tetrachloropyrazine molecule, two equally stable adsorption states are identified with a moderate and conceivably reversible barrier between them. We address the feasibility of experimentally detecting the predicted bistable behaviour and discuss its potential usefulness in a molecular switch. PMID:24157660

  19. Molecular insights into the pH-dependent adsorption and removal of ionizable antibiotic oxytetracycline by adsorbent cyclodextrin polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Cai, Xiyun; Xiong, Weina; Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Haitong; Yang, Xianhai; Li, Chao; Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Effects of pH on adsorption and removal efficiency of ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) by environmental adsorbents are an area of debate, because of its dual mediation towards adsorbents and adsorbate. Here, we probe the pH-dependent adsorption of ionizable antibiotic oxytetracycline (comprising OTCH2 (+), OTCH(±), OTC(-), and OTC(2-)) onto cyclodextrin polymers (CDPs) with the nature of molecular recognition and pH inertness. OTCH(±) commonly has high adsorption affinity, OTC(-) exhibits moderate affinity, and the other two species have negligible affinity. These species are evidenced to selectively interact with structural units (e.g., CD cavity, pore channel, and network) of the polymers and thus immobilized onto the adsorbents to different extents. The differences in adsorption affinity and mechanisms of the species account for the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. The mathematical equations are derived from the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of quantitatively relating adsorption affinity of OTC at varying pH to adsorbent properties. A combination of the MLR analysis for OTC and molecular recognition of adsorption of the species illustrates the nature of the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. Based on this finding, γ-HP-CDP is chosen to adsorb and remove OTC at pH 5.0 and 7.0, showing high removal efficiency and strong resistance to the interference of coexisting components.

  20. Molecular adsorbates as probes of the local properties of doped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Van Dong; Joucken, Frédéric; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Sporken, Robert; Santos, Maria Cristina dos; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Graphene-based sensors are among the most promising of graphene’s applications. The ability to signal the presence of molecular species adsorbed on this atomically thin substrate has been explored from electric measurements to light scattering. Here we show that the adsorbed molecules can be used to sense graphene properties. The interaction of porphyrin molecules with nitrogen-doped graphene has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations. Molecular manipulation was used to reveal the surface below the adsorbed molecules allowing to achieve an atomic-scale measure of the interaction of molecules with doped graphene. The adsorbate’s frontier electronic states are downshifted in energy as the molecule approaches the doping site, with largest effect when the molecule sits over the nitrogen dopant. Theoretical calculations showed that, due to graphene’s high polarizability, the adsorption of porphyrin induces a charge rearrangement on the substrate similar to the image charges on a metal. This charge polarization is enhanced around nitrogen site, leading to an increased interaction of molecules with their image charges on graphene. Consequently, the molecular states are stabilized and shift to lower energies. These findings reveal the local variation of polarizability induced by nitrogen dopant opening new routes towards the electronic tuning of graphene. PMID:27097555

  1. Gold nanoparticle-aluminum oxide adsorbent for efficient removal of mercury species from natural waters.

    PubMed

    Lo, Sut-I; Chen, Po-Cheng; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2012-03-06

    We report a new adsorbent for removal of mercury species. By mixing Au nanoparticles (NPs) 13 nm in diameter with aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) particles 50-200 μm in diameter, Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbents are easily prepared. Three adsorbents, Al(2)O(3), Au NPs, and Au NP-Al(2)O(3), were tested for removal of mercury species [Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)), and phenylmercury (PhHg(+))]. The Au NP adsorbent has a higher binding affinity (dissociation constant; K(d) = 0.3 nM) for Hg(2+) ions than the Al(2)O(3) adsorbent (K(d) = 52.9 nM). The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent has a higher affinity for mercury species and other tested metal ions than the Al(2)O(3) and Au NP adsorbents. The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent provides a synergic effect and, thus, is effective for removal of most tested metal ions and organic mercury species. After preconcentration of mercury ions by an Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent, analysis of mercury ions down to the subppq level in aqueous solution was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent allows effective removal of mercury species spiked in lake water, groundwater, and seawater with efficiencies greater than 97%. We also used Al(2)O(3) and Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbents sequentially for selectively removing Hg(2+) and MeHg(+) ions from water. The low-cost, effective, and stable Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent shows great potential for economical removal of various mercury species.

  2. Modulation of the molecular spintronic properties of adsorbed copper corroles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Liu, Jie; Mishra, Puneet; Komeda, Tadahiro; Mack, John; Chang, Yi; Kobayashi, Nagao; Shen, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The ability to modulate the spin states of adsorbed molecules is in high demand for molecular spintronics applications. Here, we demonstrate that the spin state of a corrole complex can be tuned by expanding its fused ring as a result of the modification to the d–π interaction between the metal and ligand. A bicyclo[2.2.2]octadiene-fused copper corrole can readily be converted into a tetrabenzocorrole radical on an Au(111) substrate during the sublimation process. In the scanning tunnelling spectroscopy spectrum, a sharp Kondo resonance appears near the Fermi level on the corrole ligand of the tetrabenzocorrole molecule. In contrast, a non-fused-ring-expanded copper corrole molecule, copper 5,10,15-triphenylcorrole, shows no such Kondo feature. Mapping of the Kondo resonance demonstrates that the spin distribution of the tetrabenzocorrole molecule can be further modified by the rotation of the meso-aryl groups, in a manner that could lead to applications in molecular spintronics. PMID:26112968

  3. Surface-enhanced raman spectra and molecular orientation of phthalazine adsorbed on a silver electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Machiko; Fujita, Masato; Ito, Masatoki

    1984-08-01

    SERS from phthalazine adsorbed on an Ag electrode was investigated under several conditions of applied voltage and solution concentration. Spectral assignments of the Raman bands were successfully performed and two differently oriented adsorbates, i.e. flat and end-on species, were identified. The contribution of the image field to the SERS intensity was considerable.

  4. Photoluminescence Enhancement of Adsorbed Species on Si Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Taketoshi; Maeda, Masanori; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    We have fabricated Si nanoparticles from Si swarf using the beads milling method. The mode diameter of produced Si nanoparticles was between 4.8 and 5.2 nm. Si nanoparticles in hexane show photoluminescence (PL) spectra with peaks at 2.56, 2.73, 2.91, and 3.09 eV. The peaked PL spectra are attributed to the vibronic structure of adsorbed dimethylanthracene (DMA) impurity in hexane. The PL intensity of hexane with DMA increases by ~3000 times by adsorption on Si nanoparticles. The PL enhancement results from an increase in absorption probability of incident light by DMA caused by adsorption on the surface of Si nanoparticles.

  5. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) molecular adsorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Moore, Sonya; Soules, David; Voecks, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    A device has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, for the adsorption of contaminants inside a space instrument during flight. The molecular adsorber was developed for use on the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, and it has been shown to perform at its design specifications in the WFPC-2. The basic principle of the molecular adsorber is a zeolite-coated ceramic honeycomb. The arrangement is efficient for adsorption and also provides the needed rigidity to retain the special zeolite coating during the launch vibrational environment. The adsorber, on other forms, is expected to be useful for all flight instruments sensitive to internal sources of contamination. Typically, some internal contamination is unavoidable. A common design solution is to increase the venting to the exterior. However, for truly sensitive instruments, the external contamination environment is more severe. The molecular adsorber acts as a one-way vent to solve this problem. Continued development is planned for this device.

  6. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  7. Molecular separations with breathing metal-organic frameworks: modelling packed bed adsorbers.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Tom R C; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2016-03-14

    Various metal-organic framework (MOFs) adsorbents show peculiar adsorption behaviour as they can adopt different crystal phases, each phase with its own adsorption characteristics. Besides external stimuli such as temperature or light, different species of guest adsorbate can trigger a transition (breathing) of the host structure at a different pressure. Such phase transitions also occur during dynamic separations on a packed bed of adsorbent, where the concentrations of the adsorbates vary throughout axial column distance and time. This work presents a general strategy to model the adsorption behavior of such phase changing adsorbents during column separations and focuses on remarkable model predictions for pure components and binary mixtures in diluted and non-diluted conditions. During binary breakthrough experiments, the behaviour of flexible adsorbents is quite complex. A succession of complete or even partial phase transformations (resulting in phase coexistence) can occur during the adsorption process. A variety of unusual breakthrough profiles is observed for diluted binary mixtures. Simulations reveal at least five types of breakthrough profiles to emerge. The occurrence of these cases can be rationalized by the hodograph technique, combined with the phase diagram of the adsorbent. The remarkable experimental breakthrough profiles observed for ortho-xylene/ethylbenzene (diluted) and CO2/CH4 (non-diluted) separation on the flexible MIL-53 framework can be rationalized by application of the proposed model strategy.

  8. Rotational Spectromicroscopy: Imaging the Orbital Interaction between Molecular Hydrogen and an Adsorbed Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Yuan, Dingwang; Yu, Arthur; Czap, Gregory; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, W.

    2015-05-01

    A hydrogen molecule can diffuse freely on the surface and be trapped above an adsorbed molecule within the junction of a scanning tunneling microscope. The trapped dihydrogen exhibits the properties of a free rotor. Here we show that the intermolecular interaction between dihydrogen and Mg-porphyrin (MgP) can be visualized by imaging j =0 to 2 rotational excitation of dihydrogen. The interaction leads to a weakened H-H bond and modest electron donation from the dihydrogen to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of MgP, a process similarly observed for the interaction between dihydrogen and an adsorbed Au atom.

  9. Shock compression and flash-heating of molecular adsorbates on the picosecond time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Christopher Michael

    An ultrafast nonlinear coherent laser spectroscopy termed broadband multiplex vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) with nonresonant suppression was employed to monitor vibrational transitions of molecular adsorbates on metallic substrates during laser-driven shock compression and flash-heating. Adsorbates were in the form of well-ordered self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and included molecular explosive simulants, such as nitroaromatics, and long chain-length alkanethiols. Based on reflectance measurements of the metallic substrates, femtosecond flash-heating pulses were capable of producing large-amplitude temperature jumps with DeltaT = 500 K. Laser-driven shock compression of SAMs produced pressures up to 2 GPa, where 1 GPa ≈ 1 x 104 atm. Shock pressures were estimated via comparison with frequency shifts observed in the monolayer vibrational transitions during hydrostatic pressure measurements in a SiC anvil cell. Molecular dynamics during flash-heating and shock loading were probed with vibrational SFG spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution. Flash-heating studies of 4-nitrobenzenethiolate (NBT) on Au provided insight into effects from hot-electron excitation of the molecular adsorbates at early pump-probe delay times. At longer delay times, effects from the excitation of SAM lattice modes and lower-energy NBT vibrations were shown. In addition, flash-heating studies of alkanethiolates demonstrated chain disordering behaviors as well as interface thermal conductances across the Au-SAM junction, which was of specific interest within the context of molecular electronics. Shock compression studies of molecular explosive simulants, such as 4-nitrobenzoate (NBA), demonstrated the proficiency of this technique to observe shock-induced molecular dynamics, in this case orientational dynamics, on the picosecond time scale. Results validated the utilization of these refined shock loading techniques to probe the shock

  10. Application of the Molecular Adsorber Coating Technology on the Ionospheric Connection Explorer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Secunda, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a zeolite based highly porous coating technology that was developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to capture outgassed contaminants, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, potting compounds, and other similar materials. This paper describes the use of the MAC technology to address molecular contamination concerns on NASAs Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) program led by the University of California (UC) Berkeleys Space Sciences Laboratory. The sprayable paint technology was applied onto plates that were installed within the instrument cavity of ICONs Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FUV). However, due to the instruments particulate sensitivity, the coating surface was vibrationally cleaned through simulated acoustics to reduce the risk of particle fall-out contamination. This paper summarizes the coating application efforts on the FUV adsorber plates, the simulated laboratory acoustic level cleaning test methods, particulation characteristics, and future plans for the MAC technology.

  11. Application of the Molecular Adsorber Coating technology on the Ionospheric Connection Explorer program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Secunda, Mark S.

    2016-09-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a zeolite based highly porous coating technology that was developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to capture outgassed contaminants, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, potting compounds, and other similar materials. This paper describes the use of the MAC technology to address molecular contamination concerns on NASA's Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) program led by the University of California (UC) Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory. The sprayable paint technology was applied onto plates that were installed within the instrument cavity of ICON's Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FUV). However, due to the instrument's particulate sensitivity, the coating surface was vibrationally cleaned through simulated acoustics to reduce the risk of particle fall-out contamination. This paper summarizes the coating application efforts on the FUV adsorber plates, the simulated laboratory acoustic level cleaning test methods, particulation characteristics, and future plans for the MAC technology.

  12. Radiolytic and thermal dechlorination of organic chlorides adsorbed on molecular sieve 13X.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Tagawa, S

    2001-05-15

    Reductive dechlorination of chlorobenzene (PhCl), trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), 1- and 2-chlorobutanes, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, and 1,1,1- and 1,1,2-trichloroethanes adsorbed on molecular sieve 13X was investigated. The molecular sieve adsorbing the organic chlorides was irradiated with gamma-rays, heated, or allowed to stand at room temperature in a sealed ampule and was then soaked in water. The dechlorination yields were determined from the Cl- concentrations of the supernatant aqueous solutions. It was found that the chlorinated alkanes adsorbed on the molecular sieve are readily dechlorinated on standing at room temperature. The dechlorination at room temperature was limited for TCE and PCE. PhCl was quite stable even at 200 degrees C. gamma-Radiolysis was examined for PhCl, TCE, and PCE at room temperature. The radiation chemical yields of the dechlorination, G(Cl-), were 1.9, 40, and 30 for PhCl, TCE, and PCE, respectively. After 5 h of heating at 200 degrees C, the dechlorination yields for TCE and PCE were 24.5 and 4.3%, respectively. TCE is much more reactive than PCE in the thermal dechlorination, whereas their radiolytic dechlorination yields are comparable. The pH of the supernatant solutions decreased along with the dechlorination.

  13. Molecular weight distribution effects on the structure of strongly adsorbed polymers by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppa, Vikram K.

    2012-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported to study the structure of polymers adsorbed from solution onto strongly attractive, perfectly smooth substrates. Six systems spanning a range of molecular weight distributions are investigated with a coarse-grained united atom model for freely rotating chains. By employing a global replica exchange algorithm and topology altering Monte Carlo moves, a range of monomer-surface attraction from weak (0.27kT) to strong (4kT) is simultaneously explored. Thus for the first time ever, equilibrium polymer adsorption on highly attractive surfaces is studied, with all adsorbed molecules displaying similar properties and statistics. The architecture of the adsorbed layers, including density profiles, bond orientation order parameters, radii of gyration, and distribution of the adsorbed chain fractions, is shown to be highly dependent on the polydispersity of the polymer phase. The homology of polymer chains, and the ergodicity of states explored by the molecules is in contrast to the metastable, kinetically constrained paradigm of irreversible adsorption. The structure of more monodisperse systems is qualitatively similar to experimental results and theoretical predictions, but result from very different chain conformations and statistics. The polydispersity-dependent behavior is explained in the context of the competition between polymers to make contact with the surface.

  14. Contributions of the substrate electric field to the molecular adsorbate optical nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Zouari, M.; Villaeys, A.A.

    2005-10-15

    The nonlinear optical response of an adsorbate, whose structure is altered by the inhomogeneous electrostatic field of the substrate, has been evaluated with a particular emphasis on the sum-frequency generation process. In the limiting case of an homogeneous electrostatic field, besides the contributions associated with the induced dipole moments, we have additional contributions which only exist if the adsorbed molecule has permanent dipole moments. Also, the Franck-Condon factors of the unperturbed molecule weight the internal couplings induced by the electrostatic field. For the more general inhomogeneous electrostatic field case, while the main observations remain valid, the Franck-Condon factors are modified by the molecular structure changes induced by the electrostatic field. In addition, we have a strong redistribution of the vibronic couplings resulting from the analytical Q dependence of the partial charge distribution which is a signature of the field inhomogeneities.

  15. Atomic and molecular oxygen adsorbed on (111) transition metal surfaces: Cu and Ni

    SciTech Connect

    López-Moreno, S.; Romero, A. H.

    2015-04-21

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the reaction of oxygen with clean copper and nickel [111]-surfaces. We study several alternative adsorption sites for atomic and molecular oxygen on both surfaces. The minimal energy geometries and adsorption energies are in good agreement with previous theoretical studies and experimental data. From all considered adsorption sites, we found a new O{sub 2} molecular precursor with two possible dissociation paths on the Cu(111) surface. Cross barrier energies for the molecular oxygen dissociation have been calculated by using the climbing image nudge elastic band method, and direct comparison with experimental results is performed. Finally, the structural changes and adsorption energies of oxygen adsorbed on surface when there is a vacancy nearby the adsorption site are also considered.

  16. Mixed brush of chemically and physically adsorbed polymers under shear: inverse transport of the physisorbed species.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, C; Müller, M

    2014-01-07

    We study mixed brushes under shear flow by molecular dynamics simulation with an explicit solvent. The primary brush is formed by chemically grafting polymers to a solid substrate, the secondary brush is comprised of shorter, physically end-adsorbed molecules that can laterally diffuse. By virtue of the immobility of the grafted end-points of the primary brush, its individual macromolecules perform a cyclic motion. If there is a well defined solvent-brush interface, this cyclic motion of the primary brush molecules will collectively result in the reversal of the flow inside of the primary brush. This backflow, linear in the shear rate, gives rise to the transport of the shorter, physically end-adsorbed molecules in the opposite direction of the solvent flow. We discuss which conditions are necessary to observe this counter-intuitive phenomenon. Comparing Poiseuille and Couette flow we demonstrate that the magnitude of the local shear rate at the brush-liquid interface dictates the cyclic motion and concomitant inversion of transport but that these universal effects are independent of the type of driving the flow.

  17. Nanopore reactive adsorbents for the high-efficiency removal of waste species

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2005-01-04

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g., metal, enzyme, etc., particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as ions, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  18. Molecular Weight Distribution Effects on the Structure of Strongly Adsorbed Polymers by Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppa, Vikram

    2012-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the adsorption of polymers from solution onto strongly attractive, perfectly smooth substrates. Using a coarse-grained united atom model for freely rotating polymer chains, three systems with different polydispersities are studied. The structure of the adsorbed layers, exemplified by density profiles, bond orientation order parameters, radii of gyration, and distribution of the adsorbed chain fractions, is shown to be highly dependent on the molecular weight distribution of the polymer phase. The results for the more monodisperse polymer systems are qualitatively similar to experimental and theoretical investigations, but devolve from very different chain conformations and statistics. For the first time ever, equilibrium polymer adsorption on highly attractive surface is studied, with all molecules in the adsorbed layers demonstrated to be indistinguishable from each other. The ergodicity of states explored by the polymer chains is in contrast to the kinetically constrained viewpoint of irreversible adsorption, and the observed behavior is explained in the context of the competition between polymers to make contact with the surface.

  19. Adsorbate shape selectivity: Separation of the HF/134a azeotrope over carbogenic molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, A.; Mariwala, R.K.; Kane, M.S.; Foley, H.C.

    1995-03-01

    Experimental evidence is provided for adsorptive shape selectivity in the separation of the azeotrope between HF and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (134a) over pyrolyzed poly(furfuryl alcohol)-derived carbogenic molecular sieve (PPFA-CMS). The separation can be accomplished over coconut charcoal or Carbosieve G on the basis of the differences in the extent of equilibrium adsorption of HF and 134a. On these adsorbents 134a is more strongly bound than HF, thus it elutes much more slowly from the bed. The heat of adsorption for 134a in the vicinity of 200 C on Carbosieve G is {approximately}8.8 kcal/mol. In contrast, when the same azeotropic mixture is separated over PPFA-CMS prepared at 500 C, 134a is not adsorbed. As a result 134a elutes from the bed first, followed by HF. The reversal is brought about by the narrower pore size and pore size distribution of the PPFA-CMS versus that for Carbosieve G. Thus the separation over PPFA-CMS is an example of adsorbate shape selectivity and represents a limiting case of kinetic separation.

  20. Photoinduced Reconfiguration Cycle in a Molecular Adsorbate Layer Studied by Femtosecond Inner-Shell Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dachraoui, H.; Michelswirth, M.; Bartz, P.; Pfeiffer, W.; Heinzmann, U.; Siffalovic, P.; Schaefer, C.; Schnatwinkel, B.; Mattay, J.; Drescher, M.

    2011-03-11

    A time-resolved study of core-level chemical shifts in a monolayer of aromatic molecules reveals complex photoinduced reaction dynamics. The combination of electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and ultrashort pulse excitation in the extreme ultraviolet allows performing time-correlated 4d-core-level spectroscopy of iodine atoms that probe the local chemical environment in the adsorbate molecule. The selectivity of the method unveils metastable molecular configurations that appear about 50 ps after the excitation and are efficiently quenched back to the ground state.

  1. Electronic Friction-Based Vibrational Lifetimes of Molecular Adsorbates: Beyond the Independent-Atom Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittmeyer, Simon P.; Meyer, Jörg; Juaristi, J. Iñaki; Reuter, Karsten

    2015-07-01

    We assess the accuracy of vibrational damping rates of diatomic adsorbates on metal surfaces as calculated within the local-density friction approximation (LDFA). An atoms-in-molecules (AIM) type charge partitioning scheme accounts for intramolecular contributions and overcomes the systematic underestimation of the nonadiabatic losses obtained within the prevalent independent-atom approximation. The quantitative agreement obtained with theoretical and experimental benchmark data suggests the LDFA-AIM scheme as an efficient and reliable approach to account for electronic dissipation in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of surface chemical reactions.

  2. Rod-like cyanophenyl probe molecules nanoconfined to oxide particles: Density of adsorbed surface species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunza, Stefan; Frunza, Ligia; Ganea, Constantin Paul; Zgura, Irina; Brás, Ana Rita; Schönhals, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Surface layers have already been observed by broadband dielectric spectroscopy for composite systems formed by adsorption of rod-like cyanophenyl derivates as probe molecules on the surface of oxide particles. In this work, features of the surface layer are reported; samples with different amounts of the probe molecules adsorbed onto oxide (nano) particles were prepared in order to study their interactions with the surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to analyze the amount of loaded probe molecules. The density of the surface species ns was introduced and its values were estimated from quantitative Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with TGA. This parameter allows discriminating the composites into several groups assuming a similar interaction of the probe molecules with the hosts of a given group. An influence factor H is further proposed as the ratio of the number of molecules in the surface layer showing a glassy dynamics and the number of molecules adsorbed tightly on the surface of the support: It was found for aerosil composites and used for calculating the maximum filling degree of partially filled silica MCM-41 composites showing only one dielectric process characteristic for glass-forming liquids and a bulk behavior for higher filling degrees.

  3. Stability of therapeutic albumin solutions used for molecular adsorbent recirculating system-based liver dialysis.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, Tom; Meijers, Björn; Evenepoel, Pieter; Laub, Ruth; Willems, Ludo; Augustijns, Patrick; Annaert, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests beneficial effects of albumin dialysis-based liver support in patients suffering from acute-on-chronic liver failure. Molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is a nonbiological liver support device, based on the exchange of albumin-bound toxins between the patient's blood and a 20% human serum albumin solution in a secondary circuit. Bound toxins are continuously removed from the circulating albumin by exposure to activated charcoal and an ion-exchange resin. The aim of the present in vitro study was to determine the impact of exposure to charcoal and resin on the ligand binding properties of albumins, containing various levels of stabilizers and obtained from different suppliers (Baxter, CAF-DCF [Red Cross], and Sigma-Aldrich). Albumin binding properties were assessed by measuring equilibrium binding properties of warfarin, diazepam, and salicylate before and after incubation (for up to 7 h) with adsorbing materials; albumin-associated esterase-like activities were also determined. Notable changes in albumin binding upon incubation with adsorbing materials were only observed when using warfarin as a ligand. Affinity of warfarin for the Baxter and Sigma albumins showed a pronounced decrease (higher K(d) ) after the 1-7-h exposure to charcoal or resin. In the absence of adsorbing materials, similar effects were found, indicating that incubation time per se affects albumin binding properties. Following exposure to resin, Baxter albumin binding capacity (B(max)) increased about twofold. For albumin obtained from CAF-DCF, binding affinity and capacity for warfarin were constant under all conditions tested. Esterase-like activities associated with these albumins were either maintained or enhanced (up to 2.5-fold in case of Sigma albumin) following 7-h incubations with adsorbing materials. Our data suggest limited direct influence of the presence of stabilizers in therapeutic albumin solutions on baseline binding properties of human

  4. In situ UV-visible reflection absorption wavelength modulation spectroscopy of species irreversibly adsorbed on electrode surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sunghyun; Scherson, D.A. )

    1992-12-15

    A method is herein described for the in situ detection of species adsorbed on electrode surfaces which employs a vibrating grating to modulate the wavelength of the incident light. This technique denoted as reflection absorption wavelength modulation spectroscopy (RAWMS) has made it possible to obtain at a fixed electrode potential normalized, differential UV-visible spectra of a single, irreversibly adsorbed monolayer of cobalt tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (Co[sup II]TsPc) on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG(bp)) and of methylene blue (MB) on graphite. The (wavelength) integrated difference RAWMS spectra for these adsorbed species were remarkably similar to those observed for the same compounds in aqueous solutions when present in the monomeric form. Complementary wavelength modulation experiments involving a conventional transmission geometry have shown that the instrument involved in the in situ RAWMS measurements is capable of resolving absorbance changes on the order of 0.002 units. 20 refs.

  5. Custom-tailored adsorbers: A molecular dynamics study on optimal design of ion exchange chromatography material.

    PubMed

    Lang, Katharina M H; Kittelmann, Jörg; Pilgram, Florian; Osberghaus, Anna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-09-25

    The performance of functionalized materials, e.g., ion exchange resins, depends on multiple resin characteristics, such as type of ligand, ligand density, the pore accessibility for a molecule, and backbone characteristics. Therefore, the screening and identification process for optimal resin characteristics for separation is very time and material consuming. Previous studies on the influence of resin characteristics have focused on an experimental approach and to a lesser extent on the mechanistic understanding of the adsorption mechanism. In this in silico study, a previously developed molecular dynamics (MD) tool is used, which simulates any given biomolecule on resins with varying ligand densities. We describe a set of simulations and experiments with four proteins and six resins varying in ligand density, and show that simulations and experiments correlate well in a wide range of ligand density. With this new approach simulations can be used as pre-experimental screening for optimal adsorber characteristics, reducing the actual number of screening experiments, which results in a faster and more knowledge-based development of custom-tailored adsorbers.

  6. Molecular electrocatalysis for oxygen reduction by cobalt porphyrins adsorbed at liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Hatay, Imren; Trojánek, Antonín; Samec, Zdenek; Khoury, Tony; Gros, Claude P; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Daina, Antoine; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Girault, Hubert H

    2010-03-03

    Molecular electrocatalysis for oxygen reduction at a polarized water/1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) interface was studied, involving aqueous protons, ferrocene (Fc) in DCE and amphiphilic cobalt porphyrin catalysts adsorbed at the interface. The catalyst, (2,8,13,17-tetraethyl-3,7,12,18-tetramethyl-5-p-amino-phenylporphyrin) cobalt(II) (CoAP), functions like conventional cobalt porphyrins, activating O(2) via coordination by the formation of a superoxide structure. Furthermore, due to the hydrophilic nature of the aminophenyl group, CoAP has a strong affinity for the water/DCE interface as evidenced by lipophilicity mapping calculations and surface tension measurements, facilitating the protonation of the CoAP-O(2) complex and its reduction by ferrocene. The reaction is electrocatalytic as its rate depends on the applied Galvani potential difference between the two phases.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Fonsecaea Species

    PubMed Central

    Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Sun, Jiufeng; Vicente, Vania A.; Klaassen, Corne H.W.; Bonifaz, Alexandro; van den Ende, A.H.G. Gerrits; Menken, Steph B.J.

    2011-01-01

    To assess population diversities among 81 strains of fungi in the genus Fonsecaea that had been identified down to species level, we applied amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) technology and sequenced the internal transcribed spacer regions and the partial cell division cycle, β-tubulin, and actin genes. Many species of the genus Fonsecaea cause human chromoblastomycosis. Strains originated from a global sampling of clinical and environmental sources in the Western Hemisphere, Asia, Africa, and Europe. According to AFLP fingerprinting, Fonsecaea isolates clustered in 5 groups corresponding with F. pedrosoi, F. monophora, and F. nubica: the latter 2 species each comprised 2 groups, and F. pedrosoi appeared to be of monophyletic origin. F. pedrosoi was found nearly exclusively in Central and South America. F. monophora and F. nubica were distributed worldwide, but both showed substantial geographic structuring. Clinical cases outside areas where Fonsecaea is endemic were probably distributed by human migration. PMID:21392438

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Fonsecaea species.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Sun, Jiufeng; Vicente, Vania A; Klaassen, Corne H W; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Gerrits van den Ende, A H G; Menken, Steph B J; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2011-03-01

    To assess population diversities among 81 strains of fungi in the genus Fonsecaea that had been identified down to species level, we applied amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) technology and sequenced the internal transcribed spacer regions and the partial cell division cycle, beta-tubulin, and actin genes. Many species of the genus Fonsecaea cause human chromoblastomycosis. Strains originated from a global sampling of clinical and environmental sources in the Western Hemisphere, Asia, Africa, and Europe. According to AFLP fingerprinting, Fonsecaea isolates clustered in 5 groups corresponding with F. pedrosoi, F. monophora, and F. nubica: the latter 2 species each comprised 2 groups, and F. pedrosoi appeared to be of monophyletic origin. F. pedrosoi was found nearly exclusively in Central and South America. F. monophora and F. nubica were distributed worldwide, but both showed substantial geographic structuring. Clinical cases outside areas where Fonsecaea is endemic were probably distributed by human migration.

  9. OZONE REACTION WITH N-ALDEHYDES (N=4-10), BENZALDEHYDE, ETHANOL, ISOPROPANOL, AND N-PROPANOL ADSORBED ON A DUAL-BED GRAPHITIZED CARBON/CARBON MOLECULAR SIEVE ADSORBENT CARTRIDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone reacts with n-aldehydes (n = 4 - 10), benzaldehyde, ethanol, isopropanol, and n-propanol adsorbed on a dual-bed graphitized carbon/carbon molecular sieve adsorbent cartridge. Destruction of n-aldehydes increases with n number and with ozone concentration. In some samp...

  10. A Comprehensive Study of Hydrogen Adsorbing to Amorphous Water ice: Defining Adsorption in Classical Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, John L.; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C.

    2016-11-01

    Gas-grain and gas-phase reactions dominate the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas-grain reactions require a substrate (e.g., a dust or ice grain) on which the reaction is able to occur. The formation of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the ISM is the prototypical example of a gas-grain reaction. In these reactions, an atom of hydrogen will strike a surface, stick to it, and diffuse across it. When it encounters another adsorbed hydrogen atom, the two can react to form molecular hydrogen and then be ejected from the surface by the energy released in the reaction. We perform in-depth classical molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen atoms interacting with an amorphous water-ice surface. This study focuses on the first step in the formation process; the sticking of the hydrogen atom to the substrate. We find that careful attention must be paid in dealing with the ambiguities in defining a sticking event. The technical definition of a sticking event will affect the computed sticking probabilities and coefficients. Here, using our new definition of a sticking event, we report sticking probabilities and sticking coefficients for nine different incident kinetic energies of hydrogen atoms [5-400 K] across seven different temperatures of dust grains [10-70 K]. We find that probabilities and coefficients vary both as a function of grain temperature and incident kinetic energy over the range of 0.99-0.22.

  11. Effect of Amine Surface Coverage on the Co-Adsorption of CO2 and Water: Spectral Deconvolution of Adsorbed Species.

    PubMed

    Didas, Stephanie A; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten; Jones, Christopher W

    2014-12-04

    Three primary amine materials functionalized onto mesoporous silica with low, medium, and high surface amine coverages are prepared and evaluated for binary CO2/H2O adsorption under dilute conditions. Enhancement of amine efficiency due to humid adsorption is most pronounced for low surface amine coverage materials. In situ FT-IR spectra of adsorbed CO2 on these materials suggest this enhancement may be associated with the formation of bicarbonate species during adsorption on materials with low surface amine coverage, though such species are not observed on high surface coverage materials. On the materials with the lowest amine loading, bicarbonate is observed on longer time scales of adsorption, but only after spectral contributions from rapidly forming alkylammonium carbamate species are removed. This is the first time that direct evidence for bicarbonate formation, which is known to occur in liquid aqueous amine solutions, has been presented for CO2 adsorption on solid amine adsorbents.

  12. Molecular resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by plasmonic nanoscissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenglong; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zheng, Hairong; Xu, Hongxing; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-04-01

    The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis, photosynthesis and the degradation of plastic, it is hard to break individual molecular bonds for those molecules adsorbed on the surface because of the weak light-absorption in molecules and the redistribution of the resulting vibrational energy both inside the molecule and to its surrounding environment. Here we show how to overcome these obstacles with a plasmonic hot-electron mediated process and demonstrate a new method that allows the sensitive control of resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by `plasmonic' scissors. To that end, we used a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) setup to dissociate resonantly excited NC2H6 fragments from Malachite green. The surface plasmons (SPs) excited at the sharp metal tip not only enhance the local electric field to harvest the light incident from the laser, but crucially supply `hot electrons' whose energy can be transferred to individual bonds. These processes are resonant Raman, which result in some active chemical bonds and then weaken these bonds, followed by dumping in lots of indiscriminant energy and breaking the weakest bond. The method allows for sensitive control of both the rate and probability of dissociation through their dependence on the density of hot electrons, which can be manipulated by tuning the laser intensity or tunneling current/bias voltage in the HV-TERS setup, respectively. The concepts of plasmonic scissors open up new versatile avenues for the deep understanding of in situ surface-catalyzed chemistry.The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis

  13. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization.

  14. A vibrational and TDS study of sulfur adsorbates on Cu(100): Evidence for CH 3S species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, B. A.; Nyberg, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrational (EELS) and TDS data for methyl mercaptan (CH 3SH), dimethyl sulfide (CH 3) 2S and dimethyl disulfide (CH 3S) 2 are analyzed to determine the nature of the adsorption states on Cu(100). Dimethyl sulfide is reversibly adsorbed on Cu(100); no dissociation (CS bond breaking) was found. By contrast, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl disulfide dissociate below 300 K to form adsorbed CH 3S (methyl mercaptide) species. Depending on the coverage, two orientations of methyl mercaptide are found: linear and bent. The two different orientations can be distinguished via the surface dipole selection rule by different intensities of the methyl rocking and deformation vibrations. By contrast with the methoxy species, which on Cu(100) decomposes to formaldehyde, no H 2C=S is liberated during decomposition of CH 3S. The mercaptide is stable to ˜ 350 K, but decomposes at higher temperatures to form adsorbed sulfur and recombinant methane, hydrogen and ethane. The methane appears to be formed by methyl-hydrogen recombination when the C-S bond scission occurs. TDS results show that sulfur released from the decomposition poisons the surface toward further adsorption. In addition, the selectivity toward methane versus ethane can be altered by pre-titrating the adsorbed hydrogen with oxygen, thereby changing the relative methyl-hydrogen and methyl-methyl recombination probabilities.

  15. Electrochemical hydrogenation of a homogeneous nickel complex to form a surface adsorbed hydrogen-evolving species.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel J; McCarthy, Brian D; Donley, Carrie L; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2015-03-28

    A Ni(II) complex degrades electrochemically in the presence of acid in acetonitrile to form an electrode adsorbed film that catalytically evolves hydrogen. Comparison with a similar compound permitted investigation of the degradation mechanism.

  16. The role of molecular adsorbent recirculating system dialysis for extracorporeal liver support in children.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Betti; Schmitt, Claus Peter

    2013-09-01

    The majority of children with acute, acute-on-chronic, and progressive chronic liver failure require liver transplantation. Since organ availability is limited, extracorporeal liver support systems are increasingly applied to bridge the time until transplantation. At present, four different devices are available: the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS), Prometheus dialysis, plasma exchange combined with hemodialysis (PE/HD), and single-pass albumin dialysis (SPAD). Randomized trials in adults have demonstrated efficient toxin removal, improved portal hypertension, hemodynamic stability, and improved hepatic encephalopathy compared with standard medical therapy. None of the liver support systems has yet been evaluated systematically in children. Knowledge of the specific indications and technical features of the different devices is essential if applied in children. MARS combines albumin dialysis with conventional hemodialysis and allows for efficient removal of water and protein-bound toxins without exogenous protein delivery and the associated infectious and allergic risks. It has successfully been applied in children with otherwise intractable cholestatic pruritus and with liver failure. The benefits, however, need to be balanced against the costs and the risk of volume and nitrogen overload if repeated plasma infusion is required. In cases of active bleeding, plasma exchange in combination with hemodialysis should be preferred.

  17. Effect of molecular adsorbent recirculating system in hepatitis C virus-related intractable pruritus.

    PubMed

    Doria, Cataldo; Mandalá, Lucio; Smith, Jan; Vitale, Claudio H; Lauro, Augusto; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Marino, Ignazio R; Foglieni, Carlo Scotti; Magnone, Mario; Scott, Victor L

    2003-04-01

    Intractable pruritus is more common in cholestatic liver diseases and may be the presenting symptom and/or major complaint of hepatitis C and/or hepatitic C virus-related cirrhosis. From September 2000 to May 2002, three patients affected by intractable pruritus secondary to hepatitis C cirrhosis that failed medical treatment were treated with a molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS). MARS is an artificial liver support system that aims to clear the blood of metabolic waste products normally metabolized by the liver. Each patient underwent seven MARS sessions. Liver function tests, the 36-Item Short Form quality-of-life test, visual analog scale for itching, and bile acid measurement in the serum, albumin circuit and ultrafiltrate were performed before and after each MARS session. Moreover, at hospital admission, each patient underwent a psychological workup and abdominal imaging study. Subjective improvement in pruritus and quality of life, along with a decrease in serum bile acid concentration, was observed in every patient; no patient underwent retreatment and/or liver transplantation up to a 9-month follow-up. One patient died 201 days after MARS treatment. Although we observed a decreased level of serum bile acids, one cannot conclude that this was the mechanism of action for the reduction in pruritus intensity in patients in our series. Different toxins and/or a placebo effect might have had a role in this setting.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of Palmitic acid adsorbed on NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovrić, Josip; Brizquez, Stéphane; Duflot, Denis; Monnerville, Maurice; Pouilly, Brigitte; Toubin, Céline

    2015-04-01

    The aerosol and gases effects in the atmosphere play an important role on health, air quality and climate, affecting both political decisions and economic activities around the world [1]. Among the several approaches of studying the origin of these effects, computational modeling is of fundamental importance, providing insights on the elementary chemical processes. Sea salts are the most important aerosol in the troposphere (109T/year) [2]. Our theoretical work consists in modeling a (100) NaCl surface coated with palmitic acid (PA) molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out with the GROMACS package [3], in the NPT ensemble at different temperatures, different PA coverages and various humidity. We focus on two aspects of the PA organization at the salt surface: the first one is related to transition in molecular orientation of the adsorbate as a function of PA coverage. The second one implies the effect of humidity, by adding water molecules, on the organization of the fatty acid at the salt surface, and especially on the occurrence of PA isolated islands as observed in the experiments [4]. For high humidity conditions, PA are removed from the salt surface and form islands on top of the water. This effect is enhanced when temperature increases. Acknowledgments: this research has been supported by the CaPPA project (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere), funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR) through the PIA (Programme d'Investissement d'Avenir) under contract ANR-10-LABX-005. [1] O. Boucher et al, 5th Assessment Report IPCC, (2013) [2] B. J. Finlayson-Pitts, Chem. Rev.103, 4801-4822 (2003) [3] http://www.gromacs.org/ [4] S. Sobanska et al, private communication

  19. Molecular-scale interface engineering of nanocrystalline titania by co-adsorbents for solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingkui; Plogmaker, Stefan; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Pechy, Peter; Rensmo, Håkan; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2012-01-09

    The use of mixed self-assembled monolayers, combining hydrophobic co-adsorbents with the sensitizer, has been demonstrated to enhance the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Herein, the influence of the anchoring groups of the co-adsorbents on the performance of the DSCs is carefully examined by selecting two model molecules: neohexyl phosphonic acid (NHOOP) and bis-(3,3-dimethyl-butyl)-phosphinic acid (DINHOP). The effect of these co-adsorbents on the photovoltaic performance (J-V curves, incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency) is investigated. Photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are performed to assess the spatial configuration of adsorbed dye and co-adsorbent molecules. The photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate that the ligands of the ruthenium complex, containing thiophene groups, point out away from the surface of TiO(2) in comparison with the NCS group.

  20. Can the state of platinum species be unambiguously determined by the stretching frequency of an adsorbed CO probe molecule?

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Neyman, Konstantin M; Hadjiivanov, Konstantin I; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2016-08-10

    The paper addresses possible ambiguities in the determination of the state of platinum species by the stretching frequency of a CO probe, which is a common technique for characterization of platinum-containing catalytic systems. We present a comprehensive comparison of the available experimental data with our theoretical modeling (density functional) results of pertinent systems - platinum surfaces, nanoparticles and clusters as well as reduced or oxidized platinum moieties on a ceria support. Our results for CO adsorbed on-top on metallic Pt(0), with C-O vibrational frequencies in the region 2018-2077 cm(-1), suggest that a decrease of the coordination number of the platinum atom, to which CO is bound, by one lowers the CO frequency by about 7 cm(-1). This trend corroborates the Kappers-van der Maas correlation derived from the analysis of the experimental stretching frequency of CO adsorbed on platinum-containing samples on different supports. We also analyzed the effect of the charge of platinum species on the CO frequency. Based on the calculated vibrational frequencies of CO in various model systems, we concluded that the actual state of the platinum species may be mistaken based only on the measured value of the C-O vibrational frequency due to overlapping regions of frequencies corresponding to different types of species. In order to identify the actual state of platinum species one has to combine this powerful technique with other approaches.

  1. The structure, energetics, and nature of the chemical bonding of phenylthiol adsorbed on the Au(111) surface: implications for density-functional calculations of molecular-electronic conduction.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Ante; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of phenylthiol on the Au(111) surface is modeled using Perdew and Wang density-functional calculations. Both direct molecular physisorption and dissociative chemisorption via S-H bond cleavage are considered as well as dimerization to form disulfides. For the major observed product, the chemisorbed thiol, an extensive potential-energy surface is produced as a function of both the azimuthal orientation of the adsorbate and the linear translation of the adsorbate through the key fcc, hcp, bridge, and top binding sites. Key structures are characterized, the lowest-energy one being a broad minimum of tilted orientation ranging from the bridge structure halfway towards the fcc one. The vertically oriented threefold binding sites, often assumed to dominate molecular electronics measurements, are identified as transition states at low coverage but become favored in dense monolayers. A similar surface is also produced for chemisorption of phenylthiol on Ag(111); this displays significant qualitative differences, consistent with the qualitatively different observed structures for thiol chemisorption on Ag and Au. Full contours of the minimum potential energy as a function of sulfur translation over the crystal face are described, from which the barrier to diffusion is deduced to be 5.8 kcal mol(-1), indicating that the potential-energy surface has low corrugation. The calculated bond lengths, adsorbate charge and spin density, and the density of electronic states all indicate that, at all sulfur locations, the adsorbate can be regarded as a thiyl species that forms a net single covalent bond to the surface of strength 31 kcal mol(-1). No detectable thiolate character is predicted, however, contrary to experimental results for alkyl thiols that indicate up to 20%-30% thiolate involvement. This effect is attributed to the asymptotic-potential error of all modern density functionals that becomes manifest through a 3-4 eV error in the lineup of the adsorbate and

  2. How to Predict Molecular Interactions between Species?

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Sylvie; Schleicher, Jana; Guthke, Reinhard; Linde, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Organisms constantly interact with other species through physical contact which leads to changes on the molecular level, for example the transcriptome. These changes can be monitored for all genes, with the help of high-throughput experiments such as RNA-seq or microarrays. The adaptation of the gene expression to environmental changes within cells is mediated through complex gene regulatory networks. Often, our knowledge of these networks is incomplete. Network inference predicts gene regulatory interactions based on transcriptome data. An emerging application of high-throughput transcriptome studies are dual transcriptomics experiments. Here, the transcriptome of two or more interacting species is measured simultaneously. Based on a dual RNA-seq data set of murine dendritic cells infected with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the software tool NetGenerator was applied to predict an inter-species gene regulatory network. To promote further investigations of molecular inter-species interactions, we recently discussed dual RNA-seq experiments for host-pathogen interactions and extended the applied tool NetGenerator (Schulze et al., 2015). The updated version of NetGenerator makes use of measurement variances in the algorithmic procedure and accepts gene expression time series data with missing values. Additionally, we tested multiple modeling scenarios regarding the stimuli functions of the gene regulatory network. Here, we summarize the work by Schulze et al. (2015) and put it into a broader context. We review various studies making use of the dual transcriptomics approach to investigate the molecular basis of interacting species. Besides the application to host-pathogen interactions, dual transcriptomics data are also utilized to study mutualistic and commensalistic interactions. Furthermore, we give a short introduction into additional approaches for the prediction of gene regulatory networks and discuss their application to dual transcriptomics data. We

  3. Polymer composite adsorbents using particles of molecularly imprinted polymers or aluminium oxide nanoparticles for treatment of arsenic contaminated waters.

    PubMed

    Önnby, L; Pakade, V; Mattiasson, B; Kirsebom, H

    2012-09-01

    Removal of As(V) by adsorption from water solutions was studied using three different synthetic adsorbents. The adsorbents, (a) aluminium nanoparticles (Alu-NPs, <50 nm) incorporated in amine rich cryogels (Alu-cryo), (b) molecular imprinted polymers (<38 μm) in polyacrylamide cryogels (MIP-cryo) and (c) thiol functionalised cryogels (SH-cryo) were evaluated regarding material characteristics and arsenic removal in batch test and continuous mode. Results revealed that a composite design with particles incorporated in cryogels was a successful means for applying small particles (nano- and micro- scale) in water solutions with maintained adsorption capacity and kinetics. Low capacity was obtained from SH-cryo and this adsorbent was hence excluded from the study. The adsorption capacities for the composites were 20.3 ± 0.8 mg/g adsorbent (Alu-cryo) and 7.9 ± 0.7 mg/g adsorbent (MIP-cryo) respectively. From SEM images it was seen that particles were homogeneously distributed in Alu-cryo and heterogeneously distributed in MIP-cryo. The particle incorporation increased the mechanical stability and the polymer backbones of pure polyacrylamide (MIP-cryo) were of better stability than the amine containing polymer backbone (Alu-cryo). Both composites worked well in the studied pH range of pH 2-8. Adsorption tested in real wastewater spiked with arsenic showed that co-ions (nitrate, sulphate and phosphate) affected arsenic removal for Alu-cryo more than for MIP-cryo. Both composites still adsorbed well in the presence of counter-ions (copper and zinc) present at low concentrations (μg/l). The unchanged and selective adsorption in realistic water observed for MIP-cryo was concluded to be due to a successful imprinting, here controlled using a non-imprinted polymer (NIP). A development of MIP-cryo is needed, considering its low adsorption capacity.

  4. Theoretical estimation of the vibrational perturbation of the molecular properties of hydrogen adsorbed within a zeolite A framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, A. V.; Jousse, F.; Leherte, L.; Vercauteren, D. P.

    1997-08-01

    An iterative numerical procedure is proposed to evaluate the variation of the dependence versus the internuclear distance of several molecular properties (polarizabilities, multipole moments) of hydrogen adsorbed within zeolite A. Dealing with a method which includes only the vibrational perturbation, it is shown that the dependence on internuclear distance of the properties of H 2 does not change upon adsorption in NaA as compared to the gas.

  5. Prometheus versus molecular adsorbents recirculating system: comparison of efficiency in two different liver detoxification devices.

    PubMed

    Evenepoel, Pieter; Laleman, Wim; Wilmer, Alexander; Claes, Kathleen; Kuypers, Dirk; Bammens, Bert; Nevens, Frederik; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2006-04-01

    Albumin dialysis by the molecular adsorbents recirculating system (MARS) and by fractionated plasma separation, adsorption, and dialysis (Prometheus[PROM]) represent novel nonbiological liver support systems specifically designed to remove albumin-bound substances. Preliminary evidence suggests a favorable impact of MARS on the course and outcome of liver failure. This study aimed at comparing the detoxification capacity of both devices. For this purpose, we performed a retrospective analysis on data prospectively collected in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure treated with either the MARS (n = 9) or the PROM (n = 9) device on 2-5 consecutive days. Each treatment was performed for at least 5 h at identical blood and dialysate flows. Blood clearances were calculated during the first treatment session for urea nitrogen, creatinine, total bilirubin, and bile acids from paired arterial and venous line samples after 1, 4, and 6 h of treatment. Reduction ratios for all single-treatment sessions, and the overall treatment phase, were calculated from pretreatment and post-treatment values. For all markers but bile acids, the single-treatment as well as the overall treatment phase reduction ratios obtained with PROM were significantly higher compared with those obtained with MARS. PROM led at all time points to higher clearances for all evaluated solutes. Blood clearances of protein-bound substances declined over time with MARS, but not with PROM. In conclusion, a significant decline in the serum level of water-soluble and protein-bound toxins was achieved with both devices. PROM produces higher blood clearances for most toxins, which results in higher delivered treatment doses compared with a matching treatment with MARS.

  6. Adsorbents with high selectivity for uremic middle molecular peptides containing the Asp-Phe-Leu-Ala-Glu sequence.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yitao; Zhao, Jianxin; Li, Pinglin; Wang, Jun; Feng, Jing; Wang, Wei; Sun, Hongwei; Ma, Yi; Yuan, Zhi

    2010-05-18

    Asp-Phe-Leu-Ala-Glu (DE5) is a frequent sequence of many toxic middle molecular peptides that accumulate in uremic patients. To eliminate these peptides by hemoperfusion, three adsorbents (CP1-Zn(2+), CP2-Zn(2+), and CP3-Zn(2+)) were designed on the basis of coordination and hydrophobic interactions. Adsorption experiments indicated that CP2-Zn(2+) had the highest affinity for DE5 among these three adsorbents. Also, the adsorption capacity of CP2-Zn(2+) in DE5 and DE5-containing peptides was about 2-6 times higher than that of peptides without the DE5 sequence. Linear polymers bearing the same functional groups of the adsorbents were used as models to study the adsorption mechanism via isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and computer-aided analyses. The results indicated that coordination and hydrophobic interactions played the most important roles in their affinity. When two carboxyl moieties on Asp and Glu residues coordinated to CP2-Zn(2+), the hydrophobic interaction took place by the aggregation of the hydrophobic amino acid residues with phenyl group on CP2-Zn(2+). The optimal collaboration of these interactions led to the tight binding and selective adsorption of DE5-containing peptides onto CP2-Zn(2+). These results may provide new insight into the design of affinity adsorbents for peptides containing DE5-like sequences.

  7. Nano-Sized Cyclodextrin-Based Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Adsorbents for Perfluorinated Compounds—A Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Karoyo, Abdalla H.; Wilson, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts have been directed towards the design of efficient and contaminant selective remediation technology for the removal of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) from soils, sediments, and aquatic environments. While there is a general consensus on adsorption-based processes as the most suitable methodology for the removal of PFCs from aquatic environments, challenges exist regarding the optimal materials design of sorbents for selective uptake of PFCs. This article reviews the sorptive uptake of PFCs using cyclodextrin (CD)-based polymer adsorbents with nano- to micron-sized structural attributes. The relationship between synthesis of adsorbent materials and their structure relate to the overall sorption properties. Hence, the adsorptive uptake properties of CD-based molecularly imprinted polymers (CD-MIPs) are reviewed and compared with conventional MIPs. Further comparison is made with non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) that are based on cross-linking of pre-polymer units such as chitosan with epichlorohydrin in the absence of a molecular template. In general, MIPs offer the advantage of selectivity, chemical tunability, high stability and mechanical strength, ease of regeneration, and overall lower cost compared to NIPs. In particular, CD-MIPs offer the added advantage of possessing multiple binding sites with unique physicochemical properties such as tunable surface properties and morphology that may vary considerably. This mini-review provides a rationale for the design of unique polymer adsorbent materials that employ an intrinsic porogen via incorporation of a macrocyclic compound in the polymer framework to afford adsorbent materials with tunable physicochemical properties and unique nanostructure properties. PMID:28347047

  8. Multiple-overtone resonance Raman scattering and fluorescence from I{sub 2} species adsorbed on silver surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbald, M.S.; Chumanov, G.; Small, G.; Cotton, T.M.

    1998-07-01

    A detailed excitation profile of a Raman progression consisting of up to six overtones and a fundamental band at 123 cm{sup {minus}1} observed from iodide adsorbed on an electrochemically roughened silver surface at 20 K is analyzed. The excitation profile was constructed from 77 spectra obtained by tuning the laser wavelength in {approximately}0.25 nm steps through the spectral range 409 nm{endash}433 nm. The shift between resonances in the excitation profile, corresponding to the spacing between vibronic levels in the excited state, is also equal to 123 cm{sup {minus}1} indicating that the ground state and excited state potential energy surfaces have the same shape. Only two distinct resonances spaced three vibrational quanta apart were evident in the profile for each band in the progression. Curve fitting of the Raman band shapes indicates that each overtone is composed of one sharp and one broad band, whereas the fundamental contains only one sharp component. The measured width of the fundamental was less than 2.5 cm{sup {minus}1} FWHM, limited by the instrument function. It is proposed that the sharp Raman bands represent a normal vibrational mode of a surface-adsorbed I{sub 2}-like species with the width determined by the intrinsic vibrational dephasing in the ground state. On the other hand, the broad Raman bands reflect vibronic coupling between different I{sub 2}-like species adsorbed on the same Ag cluster. The broad bandwidths result from both dephasing associated with the vibronic coupling and the intrinsic vibrational dephasing. Other weak emission bands are attributed to resonance fluorescence corresponding to direct transitions from higher vibronic levels of the excited state to the ground state. An emission at 429.9 nm is assigned to exciton recombination in small silver iodide clusters which are formed after spontaneous oxidation of the iodide-modified silver surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Adsorbed Proteins Influence the Biological Activity and Molecular Targeting of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Debamitra; Sundaram, S. K.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Riley, Brian J.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Kaysen, George A.; Moudgil, Brij M.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2007-11-01

    The possible combination of unique physicochemical properties operating at unique sites of action within cells and tissues has led to considerable uncertainty surrounding nanomaterial toxic potential. Here we have investigated the relative importance of proteins adsorbed onto nanomaterial surfaces in guiding uptake and toxicity to determine whether a priori identification of adsorbed proteins will contribute to nanomaterial toxicity assessment. Albumin was identified as the major protein adsorbed onto single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) following incubation with fetal bovine or human serum/plasma, but not when plasma from the Nagase Analbuminemic Rat (NAR) was used, and precoating SWCNTs with a non-ionic surfactant (Pluronic F127) inhibited albumin adsorption. Damaged or structurally altered albumin is rapidly cleared by scavenger receptors. In the RAW 264.7 macrophage-like model, we observed that SWCNTs inhibited the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 ng/ml, 6 hr) and this anti-inflammatory response was inhibited by fucoidan (scavenger receptor antagonist) and by precoating SWCNTs with Pluronic F127. Fucoidan also reduced the uptake of fluorescent SWCNTs (Alexa647) in RAW 264.7 cells. Albumin-coated SWCNTs reduced LPS-mediated Cox-2 induction. SWCNTs did not appear to reduce binding of a fluorescent LPS (Alexa488) to RAW 264.7 cells. The profile of proteins adsorbed onto amorphous silica (50 – 1000 nm) was qualitatively different, relative to SWCNTs, and coating amorphous silica with Pluronic F127 dramatically reduced protein binding and toxicity. Collectively, these observations are consistent with an important role for adsorbed proteins in guiding nanomaterial disposition and toxicity.

  10. Recent progress for the selective pharmaceutical analyses using molecularly imprinted adsorbents and their related techniques: A review.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takuya; Otsuka, Koji

    2016-10-25

    A well-organized molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) provides the amazing selective molecular recognition ability, which have been close to natural enzymes and antibodies. One of the most efficient applications of MIPs is a selective separation and detection of pharmaceutical compounds in biological and/or environmental samples. MIP-based solid phase extraction now capacitates the selective concentration of the targeting compound from real samples. Also, many of the attractive methodological approaches and applications regarding the analysis of pharmaceutical samples using molecular imprinting technologies (MITs) have been reported in recent years. In this review, we summarize a part of the recent these works related to a new preparation concept of the adsorption adsorbents, sensitive sensor techniques, cell/bacteria separation, and drug delivery system. We believe that our concise summary will be of assistance to additional methodological MITs and highly selective separations/detections.

  11. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  12. In situ infrared study of adsorbed species during catalytic oxidation and carbon dioxide adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rajesh A.

    2005-11-01

    of the Ni-Re/CeO2 catalyst was reduced by only 20% in the presence of sulfur compared to a 50% reduction with the Ni/CeO 2 catalyst. These results show that Re not only promotes the water-gas shift reaction but also enhances the sulfur tolerance of the Ni/CeO2 catalyst. Novel amine based solid sorbents have been developed to capture CO 2 reversibly using temperature-swing adsorption process. The IR study shows that CO2 adsorbs on amine grafted SBA-15 to form carbonates and bicarbonates. Comparison of monoamine and diamine-grafted SBA-15 showed that diamine grafted SBA-15 provides almost twice the active sites for CO 2 adsorption. The adsorption of SO2 on the amine-grafted SBA-15 revealed that SO2 adsorbs irreversibly and the sorbent cannot be regenerated under normal operating conditions. Results of these studies can be used to enhance the overall conversion of CH4 to H2 thus lowering the cost of H2 product.

  13. Isocyanide ligands adsorbed on metal surfaces: applications in catalysis, nanochemistry, and molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Angelici, Robert J; Lazar, Mihaela

    2008-10-20

    Knowledge of the coordination chemistry and reactivity of isocyanide ligands in transition-metal complexes forms the basis for understanding the adsorption and reactions of isocyanides on metal surfaces. In this overview, we explore reactions (often catalytic) of isocyanides adsorbed on metal surfaces that reflect their patterns of reactivity in metal complexes. We also examine applications of isocyanide adsorption to the stabilization of metal nanoparticles, the functionalization of metal electrodes, and the creation of conducting organic-metal junctions in molecule-scale electronic devices.

  14. [Leaf micro-morphology and features in adsorbing air suspended particulate matter and accumulating heavy metals in seven trees species].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Fang, Yan-Ming; Wang, Shun-Chang; Xie, Ying; Yang, Dan-Dan

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between tree leaf micro-morphology and features in adsorbing air suspended particulate matter and accumulating heavy metals. Seven tree species, including Ginkgo biloba, at heavy traffic density site in Huainan were selected to analyze the frequency of air particulate matter retained by leaves, the particle amount of different sizes per unit leaf area retained by leaves and its related micro-morphology structure, and the relationship between particle amount of different sizes per unit leaf area retained by leaves and its related accumulation of heavy metals. We found that the species characterized by small leaf area, special epidemis with abundant fax, and highly uneven cell wall, as well as big and dense stomata and without trichomes mainly absorbed fine particulate matter; while those species with many trichomes mainly retained coarse particulate matter. Accumulation of heavy metals in leaves of the seven species was significantly different except for Ph. Tree species with high capacities in heavy metal accumulation were Ginkgo biloba, Ligustrum lucidum, and Cinnamomum camphora. Accumulation of Cd, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu and total heavy metal concentration for seven tree species was positively related to the amount of particulate matter absorbed. Correlation coefficients of d10 vs d2.5, d10 vs d1.0, d2.5 vs d1.0 were 0.987, 0.971, 0.996, respective, and the correlate level was significant. The ratios of d2.5/d10, d1.0/d10, d1.0/d2.5 were 0.844, 0.763, 0.822, indicating that the particulate matter from traffic was mainly fine particulates.

  15. Ozone reaction with n-aldehydes (n=4-10), benzaldehyde, ethanol, isopropanol, and n-propanol adsorbed on a dual-bed graphitized carbon-carbon molecular sieve adsorbent cartridge.

    PubMed

    McClenny, W A; Colón, M; Oliver, K D

    2001-09-21

    Ozone reacts with n-aldehydes (n=4-10), benzaldehyde, ethanol, isopropanol and n-propanol adsorbed on a dual-bed graphitized carbon-carbon molecular sieve adsorbent cartridge. Destruction of n-aldehydes increases with n number and with ozone concentration. In some sampling experiments both generation and destruction of n-aldehydes by ozone are observed. In field experiments the results of sample analysis for n-aldehydes and benzaldehyde are frequently not proportional to sample volume whereas results for toluene and isoprene, and sometimes for total carbon, are. A simple theory is developed to simulate the net result of three processes: the adsorption of compounds from an air stream onto a solid adsorbent, the generation of compounds by reaction of ozone with materials upstream of or on the adsorbent, and the destruction by ozone of pre-existing compounds and compounds adsorbed from the sample stream. The use of distributed volume pairs is recommended as a way to identify loss of sample integrity during air monitoring experiments.

  16. Method for Controlling Electrical Properties of Single-Layer Graphene Nanoribbons via Adsorbed Planar Molecular Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Arima, Ryo; Fukumori, Minoru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Negishi, Ryota; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Seiya; Yamada, Toyo Kazu; Ogawa, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for fabricating single-layer graphene nanoribbons (sGNRs) from double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) was developed. A sonication treatment was employed to unzip the DWNTs by inducing defects in them through annealing at 500 °C. The unzipped DWNTs yielded double-layered GNRs (dGNRs). Further sonication allowed each dGNR to be unpeeled into two sGNRs. Purification performed using a high-speed centrifuge ensured that more than 99% of the formed GNRs were sGNRs. The changes induced in the electrical properties of the obtained sGNR by the absorption of nanoparticles of planar molecule, naphthalenediimide (NDI), were investigated. The shape of the I-V curve of the sGNRs varied with the number of NDI nanoparticles adsorbed. This was suggestive of the existence of a band gap at the narrow-necked part near the NDI-adsorbing area of the sGNRs. PMID:26205209

  17. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1987-11-30

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the adsorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  18. Transition from a molecular to a metallic adsorbate system:mCore-hole creation and decay dynamics for CO coordinated to Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandell, A.; Libuda, J.; Brüauthwiler, P. A.; Andersson, S.; Bäautumer, M.; Maxwell, A. J.; M&; Artensson, N.; Freund, H.-J.

    1997-03-01

    Two alternative methods to experimentally monitor the development of a CO-adsorption system that gradually changes from molecular to metallic are presented: firstly by adsorption of CO on Pd islands of increasing size deposited under UHV conditions, and secondly by growth of a Pd carbonyl-like species, formed by Pd deposition in CO atmosphere. The change in screening dynamics as a function of the number of metal atoms was investigated, using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and core-hole-decay techniques. For CO adsorbed on UHV-deposited islands, the electronic properties of the whole CO-Pd complex is strongly dependent on island size and CO coverage: large amounts of CO result in a reduced screening ability, and small effects characteristic of molecular systems can be detected even for islands containing about 100 Pd atoms. If about half of the CO overlayer is desorbed, the CO-Pd complex exhibits a relaxation upon core ionization that is nearly as efficient as for metallic systems, even for the smallest islands (of the order of 10 Pd atoms). The growth of the carbonyl-like compound proceeds via formation of Pd-Pd bonds and has a relatively well-defined local structure. It is demonstrated that the properties of this compound approach those of an extended system for increasing coverages, and it may therefore also serve as an important link between a carbonyl and CO adsorbed on a metallic surface. A brief discussion is also given in which the results are discussed in terms of electronic properties of the thin alumina film versus bulk alumina and the applicability of the former to the construction of model catalysts.

  19. Molecular sieve adsorbents and membranes for applications in the production of renewable fuels and chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Rajiv

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF), a new class of porous materials, have emerged as promising candidate for gas storage, separation membrane and chemical sensors. We used secondary growth method to grow microporous metal organic framework (MMOF) films on porous alumina supports. Examination of the film using SEM and XRD showed that the crystals were well inter-grown and preferentially oriented. Gas permeation study showed that membranes were defect free and moderate selectivity was achieved for H2/N2 gas pairs. The next project had to do with ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass as an alternate energy source. However, toxic inhibitors produced from the hydrolysis of biomass decrease ethanol yield during the fermentation process. We demonstrated the use of zeolites for the pretreatment of hydrolyzate in order to remove inhibitors like 5-Hydroxymethylfurfuraldehyde (HMF) and furfural from aqueous solution. Zeolites exhibit preferential adsorption of the inhibitors and in effect improve the ethanol yield during fermentation. Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST) was also used to predict adsorption isotherms for HMF-furfural mixtures using single component adsorption data. We also studied production of HMF, a potential substitute as a building block for plastic and chemical production, from renewable biomass resources. Catalytic dehydration of fructose for HMF production faces problems like low conversion and yield. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) can be used as the solvent as well as the catalyst resulting in high HMF yield. We studied a reaction-separation system for this dehydration reaction where the product (HMF) could be recovered by selective adsorption on solid adsorbents from the reaction mixture.

  20. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; ...

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  1. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  2. Theoretical estimation for equilibrium Mo isotope fractionations between dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed complexes on (Fe,Mn)-oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Liu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Although Mo isotopes have been increasingly used as a paleoredox proxy in the study of paleo-oceanographic condition changes (Barling et al., 2001; Siebert et al., 2003, 2005,2006; Arnold et al., 2004; Poulson et al., 2006), some very basic aspects of Mo isotopes geochemistry have not been obtained yet. First, although there are several previous studies on equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors(Tossell,2005; Weeks et al.,2007; Wasylenki et al.,2008), these studies were dealing with situations in vacuum and we find unfortunately the solvation effects for Ge species in solution cannot be ignored. Therefore, accurate Ge fractionation factors are actually not determined yet. Second, except the dominant dissolved Mo species in seawater which is known as molybdate ion (MoO42-), the forms of possible other minor species remain elusive. Third, the Mo removal mechanisms from seawater are only known for the anoxia and euxinic conditions (e.g. Helz et al., 1996; Zheng et al., 2000), the Mo removal mechanism under oxic condition are still arguing. Fourth, the adsorption effects on Mo isotope fractionation are almost completely unknown. Especially, without the adsorption fractionation knowledge, it is difficult to understand many distinct fractionations found in a number of geologic systems and it is difficult to explain the exceptionally long residence time of Mo in seawater. Urey model or Bigeleisen-Mayer equation based theoretical method and the super-molecule clusters are used to precisely evaluate the fractionation factors. The B3LYP/(6-311+G(2df,p),LANL2DZ) level method is used for frequencies calculation. 24 water molecules are used to form the supermolecues surrounding the Mo species. At least 4 different conformers for each supermolecule are used to prevent the errors from the diversity of configurations in solution. This study provides accurate equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors between possible dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed Mo species on the

  3. Albumin dialysis with molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in liver failure.

    PubMed

    Kobashi-Margáin, Ramón A; Gavilanes-Espinar, Juan G; Gutiérrez-Grobe, Ylse; Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Angel A; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Méndez Sánchez, Nahum

    2011-06-01

    Acute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver diseases are major health issues worldwide, and most cases end with the need for liver transplantation. Up to 90% of the patients die waiting for an organ to be transplanted. Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric syndrome that usually accompanies liver failure and impacts greatly on the quality of life. The molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is a recently developed form of artificial liver support that functions on a base of albumin dialysis. It facilitates the dialysis of albumin-bound and water-soluble toxins, allowing the patient to survive and even improving some clinical features of liver failure. The following manuscript reviews the technical features of MARS operation and some of the clinical trials that analyze the efficacy of the system in the therapy of liver diseases.

  4. Removal of adsorbed gases with CO2 snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    1991-09-01

    During the outgassing of orbiting astronomical observatories, the condensation of molecular species on optical surfaces can create difficulties for astronomers. The problem is particularly severe in ultraviolet astronomy where the adsorption of only a few atomic layers of some substances can be very damaging. In this paper the removal of adsorbed atomic layers using carbon dioxide snow is discussed. The rate of removal of adsorbed layers of isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF, and deionized distilled water on Teflon substrates was experimentally determined. The removal of fingerprints (containing fatty acids such as stearic acid) from optical surfaces is also demonstrated. The presence and rate of removal of the multilayers was monitored by detecting the molecular dipole field of adsorbed molecular species. For isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF (trichlorotrifluoroethane), and water adsorbed multilayers were removed in under 1.5 seconds. Fingerprint removal was much more difficult and required 20 seconds of spraying with a mixture of carbon dioxide snow flakes and atomized microdroplets of isopropyl alcohol.

  5. Surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects and detection of adsorbed molecular monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.; Chen, C.K.; Heinz, T.F.; Ricard, D.

    1981-01-01

    The observation of a number of surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects is discussed. The feasibility of using second-harmonic generation to detect the adsorption of molecular monolayers on a metal surface in an electrolytic solution is shown.

  6. Anisotropic orientational motion of molecular adsorbates at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zimdars, D.; Dadap, J.I.; Eisenthal, K.B.; Heinz, T.F.

    1999-04-29

    The ultrafast orientational motions of coumarin 314 (C314) adsorbed at the air/water interface were investigated by time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TRSHG). The theory and method of using TRSHG to detect both out-of-plane and in-plane orientational motions are discussed. The interfacial solute motions were found to be anisotropic, with differing out-of-plane and in-plane reorientation time constants. This report presents the first direct observation of in-plane orientational motion of a molecule (C314) at the air/water interface using TRSHG. The in-plane reorientation time constant is 600 {+-} 40 ps. The out-of-plane reorientation time constant is 350 {+-} 20 ps. The out-of-plane orientational motion of C314 is similar to the previous results on rhodamine 6G at the air/water interface which indicated increased interfacial friction compared with bulk aqueous solution. The surface reorientation times are 2--3 times slower than the bulk isotropic orientational diffusion time.

  7. Density matrix calculations of gaseous and adsorbate dynamics in electronically excited molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micha, David A.

    This contribution deals with two approaches for localized phenomena in excited many-atom systems. The first approach develops a quantum quasi-classical treatment for the density operator, including all atoms. It is based on a partial Wigner representation and is illustrated with applications to photodissociation of NaI, and to light emission of excited Li interacting with a He cluster. This second application describes the direct dynamics with a time-dependent electronic density matrix, expanded in a basis set of atomic functions. It shows that such an approach can deal with electronically excited many-atom systems involving tens of quantum states and hundreds of classical variables. The second approach makes use of the reduced density operator description for a system in a medium. This allows for dissipative dynamics, which can be instantaneous or delayed. An application is presented for femtosecond photodesorption using a Markovian dissipation and construction of the density operator from density amplitudes, for CO/Cu(001). A second application of a reduced density operator has been made to vibrational relaxation of adsorbates, solving integrodifferential equations to compare delayed, instantaneous, and Markovian dissipation. It is concluded that delayed dissipation is needed at short times and that a Markovian treatment is suitable for the interpretation of cross-sectional measurements that involve long-term dynamics.

  8. Reaction of deuterium with olefins on nickel catalysts: evidence for adsorbed vinylic species

    SciTech Connect

    Mintsa-Eya, V.; Hilaire, L.; Choplin, A.; Touroude, R.; Gault, F.G.

    1983-08-01

    The interaction of deuterium with 1,2-dimethylcyclopentene, 2,3-dimethylcyclopentene, 1-methyl-2-methylenecyclopentane, 1,2-dimethylcyclobutene, 1-methyl-2-methylenecyclobutane, bicyclo(2,2,1)heptene, but-1-ene, and cis-but-2-ene was studied from -85 to 50/sup 0/C on nickel films in a static apparatus and on Ni/pumice in a flow system. Unexpected d/sub 3/ and d/sub 4/ molecules were obtained in the deuteration of bicyclo(2,2,1)heptene. The position of the double bond in the ring of the other cycloolefins was the main factor governing their behavior: in the deuteration of 1,2-dimethylcycloalkenes, the saturated products, especially the trans somers, were much more exchanged and the percentage of trans was lower than when the starting material consisted of the olefins with the double bond in 2,3 or exocyclic positions. The hyperfine distribution, obtained by microwave analysis, of the exchanged d/sub 1/ but-1-ene, revealed that the major part of the deuterium was introduced on C/sub 2/; the cis-trans isomerization was much faster than the double bond migration with the introduction of zero or one deuterium atom while the isomerized but-1-ene showed a multiple exchange up to d/sub 4/; in the isomerized d/sub 1/ but-1-ene, the deuterium atom was distributed on the three carbon atoms C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, C/sub 3/. Most of these results clearly show that the classical Horiuti-Polanyi mechanism is not the only one taking part in the reactions. The introduction of other intermediaries, sigma-vinylic, sigma-vinylic ..pi..-olefinic, and sigma-vinylic ..pi..-allylic species, provides a coherent explanation for all our findings. It is shown that nickel and iron behave in a very similar way. 5 tables.

  9. Molecular orientation of molybdate ions adsorbed on goethite nanoparticles revealed by polarized in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davantès, Athénaïs; Lefèvre, Grégory

    2016-11-01

    The speciation of species adsorbed on nanoparticles is a major concern for several fields, as environmental pollution and remediation, surface functionalization, or catalysis. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) was amongst the rare methods able to give in situ information about the geometry of surface complexes on nanoparticles. A new possibility using this technique is illustrated here with the MoO42 -/goethite system. Using deuterated goethite to avoid spectral interferences, adsorption of molybdate ions on a spontaneous oriented film of nanoparticles has been followed using a polarized infrared beam. From the decomposition of spectra in the x, y and z directions, a monodentate surface complex on the {101} faces has been found as the most probable geometry. This result demonstrates that polarized ATR-IR allows to characterize in more details adsorption mode at the atomic scale, in comparison with usual ATR-IR spectroscopy.

  10. Determination of ractopamine in pork using a magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer as adsorbent followed by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yiwei; Gao, Jingwen; Liu, Xiuying; Lan, Jianxing; Gao, Xue; Ma, Yong; Li, Min; Li, Jianrong

    2016-06-15

    A new magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) for separation and concentration of ractopamine (RAC) were prepared using surface molecular imprinting technique with methacryloyl chloride as functional monomer and RAC as template. The MMIPs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The results of re-binding experiments indicated that the MMIPs had fast adsorption kinetics and could reach binding equilibrium within 20 min, and the adsorption capacity of the MMIPs was 2.87-fold higher than that of the corresponding non-imprinted polymer. The selectivity of the MMIPs was evaluated according to its recognition to RAC and its analogues. The synthesized MMIPs were successfully applied to extraction, followed by high performance liquid chromatography to determine RAC in real food samples. Spiked recoveries ranged from 73.60% to 94.5%, with relative standard deviations of <11.17%.

  11. Theoretical modeling of 2D porous matrices with tunable architecture: From cruciform molecular building blocks to enantioselective adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasperski, Adam; Rżysko, Wojciech; Szabelski, Paweł

    2016-12-01

    The ability of capturing guest molecules in a selective way is one of desirable properties of modern structured adsorbents. This refers to a wide class of guest molecules, especially to those which are chiral and whose enantiomers are to be efficiently separated. In this contribution, using Monte Carlo modeling, we show how simple molecular building blocks with cruciform shape can be used to create 2D porous matrices with tunable adsorptive properties. To that end we consider different self-assembled structures comprising cross-shaped molecules and probe their ability to retain model guest molecules differing in size and shape. In particular we focus on the adsorption of enantiomeric pairs on these substrates and quantify the associated selectivity. The obtained results show that a suitable choice of the building block, including size and aspect ratio allows for the creation of 2D functional matrices with programmed adsorption performance. The findings of our theoretical investigations can be helpful in designing molecular guest-host systems with potential applications in separations, sensing and heterogeneous catalysis.

  12. Molecular species identification boosts bat diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Frieder; Dietz, Christian; Kiefer, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The lack of obvious morphological differences between species impedes the identification of species in many groups of organisms. Meanwhile, DNA-based approaches are increasingly used to survey biological diversity. In this study we show that sequencing the mitochondrial protein-coding gene NADH dehydrogenase, subunit 1 (nd1) from 534 bats of the Western Palaearctic region corroborates the promise of DNA barcodes in two major respects. First, species described with classical taxonomic tools can be genetically identified with only a few exceptions. Second, substantial sequence divergence suggests an unexpected high number of undiscovered species. PMID:17295921

  13. The soft x-ray photochemistry of physisorbed SiF4. I. Reactions of the molecular species through desorption and dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigo, S. P.; Simons, J. K.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    1995-12-01

    We present evidence that demonstrates photolysis of SiF4 adsorbed on Ge(100) at 30 K. Silicon 2p soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (PES) indicates that upon irradiation, the molecularly adsorbed SiF4 dissociates into SiFn species (where n=0,1,2,3) and desorbs as molecular SiF4. Also, the Si 2p PES from undissociated molecules exhibits a number of distinct kinetic-energy shifts. These are attributed to anisotropic adsorption in which different molecular sites have different apparent Si 2p binding energies. A structure of the adsorbate layer is proposed to account for the varying core hole screening. Examination of the gas phase during irradiation confirms molecular desorption and shows the system to have a significant neutral molecular desorption yield. Changes in the valence-level photoemission structure and signal intensity are consistent with the observed fragmentation and desorption, both of which lead to disappearance of the molecularly adsorbed species.

  14. Reliable determination of oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios in atmospheric water vapour adsorbed on 3A molecular sieve.

    PubMed

    Han, Liang-Feng; Gröning, Manfred; Aggarwal, Pradeep; Helliker, Brent R

    2006-01-01

    The isotope ratio of atmospheric water vapour is determined by wide-ranging feedback effects from the isotope ratio of water in biological water pools, soil surface horizons, open water bodies and precipitation. Accurate determination of atmospheric water vapour isotope ratios is important for a broad range of research areas from leaf-scale to global-scale isotope studies. In spite of the importance of stable isotopic measurements of atmospheric water vapour, there is a paucity of published data available, largely because of the requirement for liquid nitrogen or dry ice for quantitative trapping of water vapour. We report results from a non-cryogenic method for quantitatively trapping atmospheric water vapour using 3A molecular sieve, although water is removed from the column using standard cryogenic methods. The molecular sieve column was conditioned with water of a known isotope ratio to 'set' the background signature of the molecular sieve. Two separate prototypes were developed, one for large collection volumes (3 mL) and one for small collection volumes (90 microL). Atmospheric water vapour was adsorbed to the column by pulling air through the column for several days to reach the desired final volume. Water was recovered from the column by baking at 250 degrees C in a dry helium or nitrogen air stream and cryogenically trapped. For the large-volume apparatus, the recovered water differed from water that was simultaneously trapped by liquid nitrogen (the experimental control) by 2.6 per thousand with a standard deviation (SD) of 1.5 per thousand for delta(2)H and by 0.3 per thousand with a SD of 0.2 per thousand for delta(18)O. Water-vapour recovery was not satisfactory for the small volume apparatus.

  15. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-21

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53–75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  16. Composition of cardiolipin molecular species in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, K; Kanamoto, R; Kito, M

    1980-01-01

    The composition of the molecular species of acidic phospholipids in Escherichia coli B during the late exponential growth phase at 37 degrees C was determined. Two phosphatidyl groups of cardiolipin, the 3-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) and 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) moieties of cardiolipin, were isolated by limited hydrolysis with phospholipase C. No significant difference in the composition of the molecular species was found between the 3-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) and 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) moieties. On the other hand, the composition of the molecular species of phosphatidylglycerol was different from that of cardiolipin. Phosphatidylglycerol contained more of the 1-palmitoyl 2-cis-9,10-methylenehexadecanoyl and 1-palmitoyl 2-cis-11,12-methyleneoctadecanoyl species than did cardiolipin. The difference in the composition of the molecular species between cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol may depend on the difference in the turnover rates of both phospholipids. PMID:6988400

  17. A molecular dynamics study on the transport of a charged biomolecule in a polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto a charged ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Wang, J.-C.; Liapis, A. I.

    2010-08-01

    The transport of a charged adsorbate biomolecule in a porous polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto the covalently immobilized ligands have been modeled and investigated using molecular dynamics modeling and simulations as the third part of a novel fundamental methodology developed for studying ion-exchange chromatography based bioseparations. To overcome computational challenges, a novel simulation approach is devised where appropriate atomistic and coarse grain models are employed simultaneously and the transport of the adsorbate is characterized through a number of locations representative of the progress of the transport process. The adsorbate biomolecule for the system studied in this work changes shape, orientation, and lateral position in order to proceed toward the site where adsorption occurs and exhibits decreased mass transport coefficients as it approaches closer to the immobilized ligand. Furthermore, because the ligands are surrounded by counterions carrying the same type of charge as the adsorbate biomolecule, it takes the biomolecule repeated attempts to approach toward a ligand in order to displace the counterions in the proximity of the ligand and to finally become adsorbed. The formed adsorbate-ligand complex interacts with the counterions and polymeric molecules and is found to evolve slowly and continuously from one-site (monovalent) interaction to multisite (multivalent) interactions. Such a transition of the nature of adsorption reduces the overall adsorption capacity of the ligands in the adsorbent medium and results in a type of surface exclusion effect. Also, the adsorption of the biomolecule also presents certain volume exclusion effects by not only directly reducing the pore volume and the availability of the ligands in the adjacent regions, but also causing the polymeric molecules to change to more compact structures that could further shield certain ligands from being accessible to subsequent adsorbate molecules. These

  18. A molecular dynamics study on the transport of a charged biomolecule in a polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto a charged ligand.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, E; Wang, J-C; Liapis, A I

    2010-08-28

    The transport of a charged adsorbate biomolecule in a porous polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto the covalently immobilized ligands have been modeled and investigated using molecular dynamics modeling and simulations as the third part of a novel fundamental methodology developed for studying ion-exchange chromatography based bioseparations. To overcome computational challenges, a novel simulation approach is devised where appropriate atomistic and coarse grain models are employed simultaneously and the transport of the adsorbate is characterized through a number of locations representative of the progress of the transport process. The adsorbate biomolecule for the system studied in this work changes shape, orientation, and lateral position in order to proceed toward the site where adsorption occurs and exhibits decreased mass transport coefficients as it approaches closer to the immobilized ligand. Furthermore, because the ligands are surrounded by counterions carrying the same type of charge as the adsorbate biomolecule, it takes the biomolecule repeated attempts to approach toward a ligand in order to displace the counterions in the proximity of the ligand and to finally become adsorbed. The formed adsorbate-ligand complex interacts with the counterions and polymeric molecules and is found to evolve slowly and continuously from one-site (monovalent) interaction to multisite (multivalent) interactions. Such a transition of the nature of adsorption reduces the overall adsorption capacity of the ligands in the adsorbent medium and results in a type of surface exclusion effect. Also, the adsorption of the biomolecule also presents certain volume exclusion effects by not only directly reducing the pore volume and the availability of the ligands in the adjacent regions, but also causing the polymeric molecules to change to more compact structures that could further shield certain ligands from being accessible to subsequent adsorbate molecules. These

  19. Molecular characterization of Eimeria species in macropods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Fenwick, Stan; Potter, Abbey; Elliot, Aileen; Power, Michelle; Beveridge, Ian; Ryan, Una

    2012-10-01

    A total of 597 faecal samples were collected from western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus), Euros (M. robustus), red kangaroos (M. rufus) in Western Australia and Eastern Grey Kangaroos (M. giganteus) from Victoria and screened for the presence of Eimeria by PCR at the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) locus. The overall prevalence was 24.3% (145/597). At the 18S rRNA locus, sequences were obtained for 25 of the 145 positives. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all the macropod-derived Eimeria species grouped in a separate marsupial clade that included Eimeria trichosuri from brushtail possums. At least 6 different clades were identified within the marsupial isolates and many of the genotypes identified are likely to be valid species, however morphological and biological data need to be collected to match sequences to previously characterized Eimeria species or identify if they are new species.

  20. Molecular recognition using corona phase complexes made of synthetic polymers adsorbed on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P; Barone, Paul W; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Boghossian, Ardemis A; Hilmer, Andrew J; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Şen, Fatih; Şen, Selda; Croy, Robert G; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Heller, Daniel A; Essigmann, John M; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Understanding molecular recognition is of fundamental importance in applications such as therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensor design. The most common recognition motifs involve biological macromolecules such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to biorecognition consists of a unique three-dimensional structure formed by a folded and constrained bioheteropolymer that creates a binding pocket, or an interface, able to recognize a specific molecule. Here, we show that synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymer-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and oestradiol. In each case, the recognition was predicted using a two-dimensional thermodynamic model of surface interactions in which the dissociation constants can be tuned by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatiotemporal sensors based on modulation of the carbon nanotube photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages.

  1. Molecular recognition using corona phase complexes made of synthetic polymers adsorbed on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P.; Barone, Paul W.; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W.; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Hilmer, Andrew J.; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C.; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A.; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Şen, Fatih; Şen, Selda; Croy, Robert G.; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Heller, Daniel A.; Essigmann, John M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding molecular recognition is of fundamental importance in applications such as therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensor design. The most common recognition motifs involve biological macromolecules such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to biorecognition consists of a unique three-dimensional structure formed by a folded and constrained bioheteropolymer that creates a binding pocket, or an interface, able to recognize a specific molecule. Here, we show that synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymer-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and oestradiol. In each case, the recognition was predicted using a two-dimensional thermodynamic model of surface interactions in which the dissociation constants can be tuned by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatiotemporal sensors based on modulation of the carbon nanotube photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages.

  2. Electronic and molecular properties of an adsorbed protein monolayer probed by two-color sum-frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dreesen, L; Humbert, C; Sartenaer, Y; Caudano, Y; Volcke, C; Mani, A A; Peremans, A; Thiry, P A; Hanique, S; Frère, J-M

    2004-08-17

    Two-color sum-frequency generation spectroscopy (2C-SFG) is used to probe the molecular and electronic properties of an adsorbed layer of the green fluorescent protein mutant 2 (GFPmut2) on a platinum (111) substrate. First, the spectroscopic measurements, performed under different polarization combinations, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) show that the GFPmut2 proteins form a fairly ordered monolayer on the platinum surface. Next, the nonlinear spectroscopic data provide evidence of particular coupling phenomena between the GFPmut2 vibrational and electronic properties. This is revealed by the occurrence of two doubly resonant sum-frequency generation processes for molecules having both their Raman and infrared transition moments in a direction perpendicular to the sample plane. Finally, our 2C-SFG analysis reveals two electronic transitions corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence energy levels which are related to two different GFPmut2 conformations: the B (anionic) and I forms, respectively. Their observation and wavelength positions attest the keeping of the GFPmut2 electronic properties upon adsorption on the metallic surface.

  3. Synthesis of molecularly imprinted polypyrrole as an adsorbent for solid-phase extraction of warfarin from human plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    Peyrovi, Moazameh; Hadjmohammadi, Mohammadreza

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method for the clean-up and preconcentration of warfarin from biological sample employing a new molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) as a selective adsorbent for solid-phase extraction (SPE). This MIP was synthesized using warfarin as a template, pyrrole as a functional monomer and vinyl triethoxysilane as a cross-linker. The molar ratio of 1:4:20 (template-functional monomer-cross-linker) showed the best results. Nonimprinted polymers (NIPs) were prepared and treated with the same method, but in the absence of warfarin. The prepared polymer was characterized by Fourier transmission infrared spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. An adsorption process (SPE) for the removal of warfarin using the fabricated MIPs and NIPs was evaluated under various conditions. Effective parameters on warfarin extraction, for example, type and volume of elution solvent, pH of sample solution, breakthrough volume and maximum loading capacity, were studied. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.0035-0.0050 µg mL(-1). Linearity of the method was determined in the range of 0.0165-10.0000 µg mL(-1) for plasma and 0.0115-10.0000 µg mL(-1) for urine with coefficients of determination (R(2)) ranging from 0.9975 to 0.9985. The recoveries for plasma and urine samples were >95%.

  4. David Adler Lectureship Award Talk: Friction and energy dissipation mechanisms in adsorbed molecules and molecularly thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krim, Jacqueline

    2015-03-01

    Studies of the fundamental origins of friction have undergone rapid progress in recent years, with the development of new experimental and computational techniques for measuring and simulating friction at atomic length and time scales. The increased interest has sparked a variety of discussions and debates concerning the nature of the atomic-scale and quantum mechanisms that dominate the dissipative process by which mechanical energy is transformed into heat. Measurements of the sliding friction of physisorbed monolayers and bilayers can provide information on the relative contributions of these various dissipative mechanisms. Adsorbed films, whether intentionally applied or present as trace levels of physisorbed contaminants, moreover are ubiquitous at virtually all surfaces. As such, they impact a wide range of applications whose progress depends on precise control and/or knowledge of surface diffusion processes. Examples include nanoscale assembly, directed transport of Brownian particles, material flow through restricted geometries such as graphene membranes and molecular sieves, passivation and edge effects in carbon-based lubricants, and the stability of granular materials associated with frictional and frictionless contacts. Work supported by NSFDMR1310456.

  5. Chemical Potential of Triethylene Glycol Adsorbed on Surfaces Relevant to Gas Transport and Processing - Studies Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, B.; Olsen, R.; Sjöblom, S.; Leirvik, K. N.; Kuznetsova, T.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas will inevitably contain trace amounts of water and other impurities during different stages of processing and transport. Glycols, such as triethylene glycol (TEG), will in many cases follow the water. The glycol contents of the gas can originate from preceding glycol-drying units or it can be a residue from the direct injection of glycols used to prevent hydrate formation. Thus, it is important to know how glycol contents will affect the different paths leading to hydrate formation. Glycols may in some cases dominate the condensed water phase. If this occurs, it will lead to the well-documented shift in the hydrate stability curve, due to the altered activity of the water. A great deal of information on the molecular path of a glycol through the system can be obtained from calculating the chemical potential. Due to difficulties in measuring interfacial chemical potentials, these often need to be estimated using theoretical tools. We used molecular dynamics (MD) to study how TEG behaves in the vicinity of mineral surfaces such as calcite and hematite. Many methods exist for estimating chemical potentials based on MD trajectories. These include techniques such as free energy perturbation theory (FEP) and thermodynamic integration (TI). Such methods require sufficient sampling of configurations where free energy is to be estimated. Thus, it can be difficult to estimate chemical potentials on surfaces. There are several methods to circumvent this problem, such as blue moon sampling and umbrella sampling. These have been considered and the most important have been used to estimate chemical potentials of TEG adsorbed on the mineral surfaces. The resulting chemical potentials were compared to the chemical potential of TEG in bulk water, which was estimated using temperature thermodynamic integration.

  6. Molecular Diagnosis of Pathogenic Sporothrix Species

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, G. Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Background Sporotrichosis is a chronic (sub)cutaneous infection caused by thermodimorphic fungi in the order, Ophiostomatales. These fungi are characterized by major differences in routes of transmission, host predilections, species virulence, and susceptibilities to antifungals. Sporothrix species emerge in the form of outbreaks. Large zoonoses and sapronoses are ongoing in Brazil and China, respectively. Current diagnostic methods based on morphology and physiology are inaccurate due to closely related phenotypes with overlapping components between pathogenic and non-pathogenic Sporothrix. There is a critical need for new diagnostic tools that are specific, sensitive, and cost-effective. Methodology We developed a panel of novel markers, based on calmodulin (CAL) gene sequences, for the large-scale diagnosis and epidemiology of clinically relevant members of the Sporothrix genus, and its relative, Ophiostoma. We identified specific PCR-based markers for S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, and O. stenoceras. We employed a murine model of disseminated sporotrichosis to optimize a PCR assay for detecting Sporothrix in clinical specimens. Results Primer-BLAST searches revealed candidate sequences that were conserved within a single species. Species-specific primers showed no significant homology with human, mouse, or microorganisms outside the Sporothrix genus. The detection limit was 10–100 fg of DNA in a single round of PCR for identifying S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, S. globosa, S. mexicana, and S. pallida. A simple, direct PCR assay, with conidia as a source of DNA, was effective for rapid, low-cost genotyping. Samples from a murine model of disseminated sporotrichosis confirmed the feasibility of detecting S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii DNA in spleen, liver, lungs, heart, brain, kidney, tail, and feces of infected animals. Conclusions This PCR-based method could successfully detect and identify a single species in samples

  7. Molecular Differentiation of Seven Malassezia Species

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditya K.; Kohli, Yatika; Summerbell, Richard C.

    2000-01-01

    A system based on PCR and restriction endonuclease analysis was developed to distinguish the seven currently recognized Malassezia species. Seventy-eight strains, including authentic culture collection strains and routine clinical isolates, were investigated for variation in the ribosomal DNA repeat units. Two genomic regions, namely, the large subunit of the ribosomal gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, were amplified by PCR, and products were digested with restriction endonucleases. The patterns generated were useful in identification of five out of seven Malassezia species. M. sympodialis was readily distinguishable in that its ITS region yielded a 700-bp amplified fragment, whereas the other six species yielded an 800-bp fragment. M. globosa and M. restricta were very similar in the regions studied and could be distinguished only by performing a hot start-touchdown PCR on primers for the β-tubulin gene. Primers based on the conserved areas of the Candida cylindracea lipase gene, which were used in an attempt to amplify Malassezia lipases, yielded an amplification product after annealing at 55°C only with M. pachydermatis. This specific amplification may facilitate the rapid identification of this organism. PMID:10790115

  8. Characterization of Capsicum species using anatomical and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Dias, G B; Gomes, V M; Moraes, T M S; Zottich, U P; Rabelo, G R; Carvalho, A O; Moulin, M; Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Da Cunha, M

    2013-02-28

    Capsicum species are frequently described in terms of genetic divergence, considering morphological, agronomic, and molecular databases. However, descriptions of genetic differences based on anatomical characters are rare. We examined the anatomy and the micromorphology of vegetative and reproductive organs of several Capsicum species. Four Capsicum accessions representing the species C. annuum var. annuum, C. baccatum var. pendulum, C. chinense, and C. frutescens were cultivated in a greenhouse; leaves, fruits and seeds were sampled and their organ structure analyzed by light and scanning electronic microscopy. Molecular accession characterization was made using ISSR markers. Polymorphism was observed among tector trichomes and also in fruit color and shape. High variability among accessions was detected by ISSR markers. Despite the species studied present a wide morphological and molecular variability that was not reflected by anatomical features.

  9. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1988-11-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  10. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  11. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  12. Low molecular weight species in humic and fulvic fractions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Collin, P.J.; Malcolm, R.L.; Perdue, E.M.; Cresswell, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fourier transform solution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry with homogated water peak irradiation is a useful method for detecting low molecular weight substances in humic extracts. Succinate, acetate, methanol, formate, lactate and some aryl methoxyl compounds have been detected in extracts from a wide range of sources. In view of the controversy over whether low molecular weight substances are contaminants in humic extracts introduced by the concentration procedure, we report that some of these materials are not contaminants since 1H-NMR can be used to follow their formation from higher molecular weight species. ?? 1988.

  13. Molecular species delimitation in the genus Eumerus (Diptera: Syrphidae).

    PubMed

    Chroni, A; Djan, M; Vidaković, D Obreht; Petanidou, T; Vujić, A

    2017-02-01

    Eumerus is one of the most diverse genera of hoverfly worldwide. Species delimitation within genus is considered to be difficult due to: (a) lack of an efficient key; (b) non-defined taxonomical status of a large number of species; and (c) blurred nomenclature. Here, we present the first molecular study to delimit species of the genus by using a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome-c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) gene. We assessed 75 specimens assigned to 28 taxa originating from two biogeographic zones: 22 from the western Palaearctic and six from the Afrotropical region. Two datasets were generated based on different sequence lengths to explore the significance of availability of more polymorphic sites for species delimitation; dataset A with a total length of 647 bp and dataset B with 746 bp. Various tree inference approaches and Poisson tree processes models were applied to evaluate the putative 'taxonomical' vs. 'molecular' taxa clusters. All analyses resulted in high taxonomic resolution and clear species delimitation for both the dataset lengths. Furthermore, we revealed a high number of mitochondrial haplotypes and high intraspecific variability. We report two major monophyletic clades, and seven 'molecular' groups of taxa formed, which are congruent with morphology-based taxonomy. Our results support the use of the mitochondrial COI gene in species diagnosis of Eumerus.

  14. Laser-Induced Thermal Desorption and Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Molecular Adsorbates on Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Donald Paul

    The field of surface science is growing rapidly, fueled by the needs to refine petroleum more efficiently, to clean up automobile exhaust, to protect against corrosion and wear, and to shrink the size of electronic components and information storage systems. These are important aspects of daily life, all of which could benefit from a better understanding of the fundamental processes that occur at the interfaces between different phases of matter. For the technologies mentioned, the most important interface is that between the gas and the solid phases. The technique described in this dissertation merges several recently established methods into a powerful instrument for the analysis of the solid-gas interface, yielding information on the chemical nature of species at this interface, relative concentrations, and even reactivities and intermediates. Details of the design and construction of the instrument are followed by a performance evaluation and a presentation of characterization studies for postionization methods, including electron impact ionization, resonance -enhanced multiphoton ionization, and chemical ionization. The use of the technique for the analysis of unknowns on surfaces is then detailed, highlighting the ability to obtain accurate mass measurement using the high resolution capabilities of FTMS. The use of ion storage techniques results in further unique analysis methods via gas-phase charge exchange reactions. This technique opens the door to the study of more complex molecules on surfaces, as well as mixtures of surface species, because FT mass spectrometry is well suited for such analyses. In this dissertation, data is presented for desorption of tens of molecular species encompassing nearly every organic functional group and including species as widely varying as cyanogen, ethylene, cyclohexane, methanol, and even a tetra-peptide. In-depth analyses of the kinetics of ethylene dehydrogenation and the identification of cyclohexene and 1,6-hexa

  15. Molecular Systematic Comparison of North American Lygus Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Lygus is widely distributed in North America and Eurasia. The tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), is one of the most serious pest species within this genus. This pest has over 300 known host plants. We employed various molecular markers to investigate both inter- a...

  16. Improved Molecular Technique for the Differentiation of Neotropical Anopheline Species

    PubMed Central

    Matson, Ryan; Rios, Carlos Tong; Chavez, Cesar Banda; Gilman, Robert H.; Florin, David; Sifuentes, Victor Lopez; Greffa, Roldan Cardenas; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Fernandez, Roberto; Portocarrero, Daniel Velasquez; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Kosek, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated a PCR-RFLP of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 region (ITS2) to distinguish species of Anopheles commonly reported in the Amazon and validated this method using reared F1 offspring. The following species of Anopheles were used for molecular analysis: An. (Nys.) benarrochi, An. (Nys.) darlingi, An. (Nys.) nuneztovari, An. (Nys.) konderi, An. (Nys.) rangeli, and An. (Nys.) triannulatus sensu lato (s.l.). In addition, three species of the subgenus Anopheles, An. (Ano.) forattini, An. (Ano.) mattogrossensis, and An. (Ano.) peryassui were included for testing. Each of the nine species tested yielded diagnostic banding patterns. The PCR-RFLP method was successful in identifying all life stages including exuviae with small fractions of the sample. The assay is rapid and can be applied as an unbiased confirmatory method for identification of morphologic variants, disputed samples, imperfectly preserved specimens, and life stages from which taxonomic keys do not allow for definitive species determination. PMID:18337348

  17. A single molecular marker to distinguish between species of Dioscorea.

    PubMed

    Techen, Natascha; Parveen, Iffat; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    Yams are species of the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae), which consists of approximately 630 species. The majority of the world production of yams occurs in Africa with 58.8 million t annually, but they are also produced in the Americas and Asia. The saponins in yams have been reported to possess various properties to improve health. The tuber and aerial parts of various species often share morphological similarities, which can cause problems in the proper identification of sample material. For example, the rootstocks and aerial parts of Dioscorea villosa L. share similarities with Dioscorea polystachia Turcz. Dioscorea bulbifera L. may be mistaken for Dioscorea alata L. owing to similar morphologies. Various molecular analyses have been published to help with the identification of species and varieties within the genus Dioscorea. The multi-loci or single-locus analysis has resulted in varying success, some with only a limited discrimination rate. In the present study, a single nuclear genomic region, biparentally inherited, was analyzed for its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification and discrimination between D. bulbifera, D. villosa, D. nipponica, D. alata, D. caucasica, and D. deltoidea samples. The results of this study show that the LFY genomic region can be useful as a molecular marker to distinguish between samples.

  18. Corroborating molecular species discovery: Four new pine-feeding species of Chionaspis (Hemiptera, Diaspididae)

    PubMed Central

    Vea, Isabelle M.; Gwiazdowski, Rodger A.; Normark, Benjamin B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genus Chionaspis (Hemiptera, Diaspididae) includes two North American species of armored scale insects feeding on Pinaceae: Chionaspis heterophyllae Cooley, and Chionaspis pinifoliae (Fitch). Despite the economic impact of conifer-feeding Chionaspis on horticulture, the species diversity in this group has only recently been systematically investigated using samples from across the group’s geographic and host range. This paper provides morphological recognition characters for four new species that were recently hypothesized to exist on the basis of molecular evidence. The new species, here described, are Chionaspis brachycephalon Vea sp. n., Chionaspis caudata Vea sp. n., Chionaspis sonorae Vea sp. n. and Chionaspis torreyanae Vea sp. n.  One of the new species, Chionaspis caudata Vea, has a gland spine at the apex of the pygidium, between the median lobes, unlike any other species of Chionaspis. An identification key to the species of Chionaspis feeding on pine in North America is provided. PMID:23717184

  19. Progress in our understanding of structure bonding and reactivity of metal surfaces and adsorbed monolayers at the molecular level: A 25 year perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somorjai, G. A.

    1995-12-01

    Over fifty techniques have been developed during the past 25 years that permit molecular level investigation of structure and bonding of the surface monolayer. Among them, low-energy electron diffraction surface crystallography and vibrational spectroscopies using photons and electrons have contributed the lion's share of quantitative experimental data. (Most of these investigations have utilized small area (~1 cm 2) external surfaces, although microporous large internal surface area samples were also scrutinized.) From these studies, the physical picture of the surface which emerges is one of a separate phase with distinct structure, composition, and bonding that is distinguishable from the solid bulk. The new surface phenomena which were discovered include clean surface reconstruction, adsorbate-induced restructuring, ordering and reactivity of surface defects (steps and kinks), cluster-like bonding, the large mobility of adsorbates, and the coadsorption bond. Techniques were also developed that permit in situ molecular level study of surfaces during reactions at high pressures and temperatures with good time resolution (10 -12-10 -3 sec). Molecular surface science has had a great impact in major applications involving surface phenomena-selective adsorption, heterogeneous catalysis, coatings, microelectronics, electrochemistry, and tribology-and spawned new surface technologies. The demands of these applications focus attention on the behavior of the buried interface, both solid-liquid and solid-solid.

  20. Molecular approaches to identify cryptic species and polymorphic species within a complex community of fig wasps.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin-Hua; Wang, Ning-Xin; Li, Yan-Wei; Murphy, Robert W; Wan, Dong-Guang; Niu, Li-Ming; Hu, Hao-Yuan; Fu, Yue-Guan; Huang, Da-Wei

    2010-11-29

    Cryptic and polymorphic species can complicate traditional taxonomic research and both of these concerns are common in fig wasp communities. Species identification is very difficult, despite great effort and the ecological importance of fig wasps. Herein, we try to identify all chalcidoid wasp species hosted by one species of fig, using both morphological and molecular methods. We compare the efficiency of four different DNA regions and find that ITS2 is highly effective for species identification, while mitochondrial COI and Cytb regions appear less reliable, possibly due to the interference signals from either nuclear copies of mtDNA, i.e. NUMTs, or the effects of Wolbachia infections. The analyses suggest that combining multiple markers is the best choice for inferring species identifications as any one marker may be unsuitable in a given case.

  1. Analysis of lidar systems for profiling aurorally excited molecular species.

    PubMed

    Collins, R L; Lummerzheim, D; Smith, R W

    1997-08-20

    We report a detailed analysis of lidar systems that profile aurorally excited molecular species in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere ( ~80 -300 km). Current profiling of this region is performed with incoherent scatter radars that determine the total electron and ion concentrations but not the individual species. Studies of the aeronomy of the thermosphere requires knowledge of the species present and their relative populations in the different vibrational and rotational states. We review the spectroscopy of nitrogen to determine an optimized lidar system. We combine these results with current auroral observations and models to determine the performance of an actual lidar system. The study shows that such systems can provide high-resolution (1 km, 100 s) measurements of these species with current laser technology.

  2. Molecular phylogenetics of geographically restricted Acropora species: implications for threatened species conservation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Z T; Miller, D J; Wallace, C C

    2013-12-01

    To better understand the underlying causes of rarity and extinction risk in Acropora (staghorn coral), we contrast the minimum divergence ages and nucleotide diversity of an array of species with different range sizes and levels of threat. Time-calibrated Bayesian analyses based upon concatenated nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data implied contemporary range size and vulnerability are linked to species age. However, contrary to previous hypotheses that suggest geographically restricted Acropora species evolved in the Plio-Pleistocene, the molecular phylogeny depicts some Indo-Australian species have greater antiquity, diverging in the Miocene. Species age is not related to range size as a simple positive linear function and interpreting the precise tempo of evolution in this genus is greatly complicated by morphological homoplasy and a sparse fossil record. Our phylogenetic reconstructions provide new examples of how morphology conceals cryptic evolutionary relationships in this keystone genus, and offers limited support for the species groupings currently used in Acropora systematics. We hypothesize that in addition to age, other mechanisms (such as a reticulate ancestry) delimit the contemporary range of some Acropora species, as evidenced by the complex patterns of allele sharing and paraphyly we uncover. Overall, both new and ancient evolutionary information may be lost if geographically restricted and threatened Acropora species are forced to extinction. In order to protect coral biodiversity and resolve the evolutionary history of staghorn coral, further analyses based on comprehensive and heterogeneous morphological and molecular data utilizing reticulate models of evolution are needed.

  3. Molecular characterization and RAPD analysis of Juniperus species from Iran.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, J; Behravan, J; Hassany, M; Emami, S A; Shahriari, F; Khayyat, M H

    2011-06-07

    The genus Juniperus L. (Cupressaceae), an aromatic evergreen plant, consists of up to 68 species around the world. We classified five species of Juniperus found in Iran using molecular markers to provide a means for molecular identification of Iranian species. Plants were collected (three samples of each species) from two different provinces of Iran (Golestan and East Azarbayejan). The DNA was extracted from the leaves using a Qiagen Dneasy Plant Mini Kit. Amplification was performed using 18 ten-mer RAPD primers. Genetic distances were estimated based on 187 RAPD bands to construct a dendrogram by means of unweighted pair group method of arithmetic means. It was found that J. communis and J. oblonga were differentiated from the other species. Genetic distance values ranged from 0.19 (J. communis and J. oblonga) to 0.68 (J. communis and J. excelsa). Juniperus foetidissima was found to be most similar to J. sabina. Juniperus excelsa subspecies excelsa and J. excelsa subspecies polycarpos formed a distinct group.

  4. Molecular delineation of species in the coral holobiont.

    PubMed

    Stat, Michael; Baker, Andrew C; Bourne, David G; Correa, Adrienne M S; Forsman, Zac; Huggett, Megan J; Pochon, Xavier; Skillings, Derek; Toonen, Robert J; van Oppen, Madeleine J H; Gates, Ruth D

    2012-01-01

    The coral holobiont is a complex assemblage of organisms spanning a diverse taxonomic range including a cnidarian host, as well as various dinoflagellate, prokaryotic and acellular symbionts. With the accumulating information on the molecular diversity of these groups, binomial species classification and a reassessment of species boundaries for the partners in the coral holobiont is a logical extension of this work and will help enhance the capacity for comparative research among studies. To aid in this endeavour, we review the current literature on species diversity for the three best studied partners of the coral holobiont (coral, Symbiodinium, prokaryotes) and provide suggestions for future work on systematics within these taxa. We advocate for an integrative approach to the delineation of species using both molecular genetics in combination with phenetic characters. We also suggest that an a priori set of criteria be developed for each taxonomic group as no one species concept or accompanying set of guidelines is appropriate for delineating all members of the coral holobiont.

  5. Molecular Identification of Cryptosporidium Species from Pet Snakes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Yimming, Benjarat; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Sanyathitiseree, Pornchai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing gastrointestinal disease in snakes and is distributed worldwide. The main objectives of this study were to detect and identify Cryptosporidium species in captive snakes from exotic pet shops and snake farms in Thailand. In total, 165 fecal samples were examined from 8 snake species, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor), corn snake (Elaphe guttata), ball python (Python regius), milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), king snake (Lampropeltis getula), rock python (Python sebae), rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria), and carpet python (Morelia spilota). Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined using the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-modified acid-fast staining and a molecular method based on nested-PCR, PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing amplification of the SSU rRNA gene. DMSO-modified acid-fast staining revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 12 out of 165 (7.3%) samples, whereas PCR produced positive results in 40 (24.2%) samples. Molecular characterization indicated the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (mouse genotype) as the most common species in 24 samples (60%) from 5 species of snake followed by Cryptosporidium serpentis in 9 samples (22.5%) from 2 species of snake and Cryptosporidium muris in 3 samples (7.5%) from P. regius. PMID:27658593

  6. Molecular Identification of Cryptosporidium Species from Pet Snakes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yimming, Benjarat; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Sanyathitiseree, Pornchai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2016-08-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing gastrointestinal disease in snakes and is distributed worldwide. The main objectives of this study were to detect and identify Cryptosporidium species in captive snakes from exotic pet shops and snake farms in Thailand. In total, 165 fecal samples were examined from 8 snake species, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor), corn snake (Elaphe guttata), ball python (Python regius), milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), king snake (Lampropeltis getula), rock python (Python sebae), rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria), and carpet python (Morelia spilota). Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined using the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-modified acid-fast staining and a molecular method based on nested-PCR, PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing amplification of the SSU rRNA gene. DMSO-modified acid-fast staining revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 12 out of 165 (7.3%) samples, whereas PCR produced positive results in 40 (24.2%) samples. Molecular characterization indicated the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (mouse genotype) as the most common species in 24 samples (60%) from 5 species of snake followed by Cryptosporidium serpentis in 9 samples (22.5%) from 2 species of snake and Cryptosporidium muris in 3 samples (7.5%) from P. regius.

  7. Variable soft sphere molecular model for air species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Katsuhisa; Matsumoto, Hiroaki

    1992-05-01

    A reliable set of cross-section parameters of the variable soft sphere (VSS) molecular model is determined for the Monte Carlo simulation of air species from the transport collision integrals or potential parameters provided by Cubley and Mason (1975) over the high-temperature range 300-15,000 K. The VSS cross-section parameters for the inverse-power-law potential are also determined from the viscosity coefficients recommended by Maitland and Smith (1972) for common species in the low (20-300 K) and high (300-2000 K) temperature ranges.

  8. Variable soft sphere molecular model for air species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Katsuhisa; Matsumoto, Hiroaki

    1992-05-01

    A reliable set of cross-section parameters of the variable soft sphere (VSS) molecular model is determined for the Monte Carlo simulation of air species from the transport collision integrals or potential parameters provided by Cubley and Mason [Phys. Fluids 18, 1109 (1975)] over the high-temperature range 300-15 000 K. The VSS cross-section parameters for the inverse-power-law potential are also determined from the viscosity coefficients recommended by Maitland and Smith [J. Chem. Eng. Data 17, 150 (1972)] for common species in the low (20-300 K) and high (300-2000 K) temperature ranges.

  9. Identification of Pseudallescheria and Scedosporium Species by Three Molecular Methods▿

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiaoyun; Gerrits van den Ende, A. H. G.; Bakkers, J. M. J. E.; Sun, Jiufeng; Lackner, M.; Najafzadeh, M. J.; Melchers, W. J. G.; Li, Ruoyu; de Hoog, G. S.

    2011-01-01

    The major clinically relevant species in Scedosporium (teleomorph Pseudallescheria) are Pseudallescheria boydii, Scedosporium aurantiacum, Scedosporium apiospermum, and Scedosporium prolificans, while Pseudallescheria minutispora, Petriellopsis desertorum, and Scedosporium dehoogii are exceptional agents of disease. Three molecular methods targeting the partial β-tubulin gene were developed and evaluated to identify six closely related species of the S. apiospermum complex using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), PCR-based reverse line blot (PCR-RLB), and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). qPCR was not specific enough for the identification of all species but had the highest sensitivity. The PCR-RLB assay was efficient for the identification of five species. LAMP distinguished all six species unambiguously. The analytical sensitivities of qPCR, PCR-RLB, and LAMP combined with MagNAPure, CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide), and FTA filter (Whatman) extraction were 50, 5 × 103, and 5 × 102 cells/μl, respectively. When LAMP was combined with a simplified DNA extraction method using an FTA filter, identification to the species level was achieved within 2 h, including DNA extraction. The FTA-LAMP assay is therefore recommended as a cost-effective, simple, and rapid method for the identification of Scedosporium species. PMID:21177887

  10. Phthalocyaninato complexes with peripheral alkylthio chains: disk-like adsorbate species for the vertical anchoring of ligands on gold surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Siemeling, Ulrich; Schirrmacher, Christian; Glebe, Ulrich; Bruhn, Clemens; Baio, Joe E.; Árnadóttir, Líney; Castner, David G.; Weidner, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Thin metalorganic films were prepared on gold by self-assembly of thioether-functionalised phthalocyaninato complexes from solution. The phthalocyaninato ligands used contain eight peripheral, β-positioned, alkylthio substituents SR (1a: R = n-C8H17, 1b: R = n-C12H25), which serve as headgroups for surface binding and promote lateral assembly, while the disk-like phthalocyaninato core offers the scope for the attachment of axial ligands to the adsorbed molecules. This process was mimicked by coordination of pyridine (Py) to [Zn(1a)] and [Zn(1b)], respectively. The crystal structures of the products [Zn(1a)(Py)] and [Zn(1b)(Py)] were determined. The crystal structures of 4,5-bis(octylthio)phthalodinitrile and 4,5-bis(dodecylthio)phthalodinitrile were also determined. The films fabricated from [Mn(1a)Cl] and [Mn(1b)Cl] on gold were characterised by XPS, ToF-SIMS and NEXAFS spectroscopy, which revealed the presence of well-defined and homogeneous self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), whose constituents are bound to the substrate by thioether–gold linkages. The orientation of the macrocycles is predominantly parallel to the surface. Strong electronic interaction of the manganese(III) centre with the substrate leads to Cl loss upon adsorption and its reduction to MnII. PMID:21857743

  11. Molecular characterization of Ephedra species found in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ghafoor, S; Shah, M M; Ahmad, H; Swati, Z A; Shah, S H; Pervez, A; Farooq, U

    2007-12-11

    Ephedra, also known as "ma huang", is a dioecious, drought- and frost-resistant, perennial, evergreen shrub with compelling medicinal value. The genus is represented by 42 species around the world, 9 of which were provisionally reported from Pakistan. Species of the genus have a controversial taxonomy due to their overlapping morphological features. Conventional tools alone are not sufficient for characterizing the species. The objective of present study was to assess the genetic variability present in different biotypes of Ephedra growing in Pakistan using molecular markers. A total of six genotypes collected from diverse geographic zones of Pakistan were used. The DNA of all genotypes was amplified using nine randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers to study genetic variability at the molecular level. The dissimilarity coefficient matrix based on the data of 9 RAPD primers was used to construct a dendrogram which was then used to group the genotypes in clusters. Based on the dendrogram and dissimilarity coefficient matrix, the RAPD markers used here revealed a moderate to high level of genetic polymorphism (6 to 49%) among the genotypes. It was found that the collection of genotype accessions from Swat Valley in northwestern Pakistan was most distantly related to the other five collections. More molecular markers including functional genes and ribosomal spacer regions are suggested to find a better estimate of the genetic diversity present in Ephedra growing in Pakistan. The information provided here is useful for identifying valuable Ephedra variants which will be used for medicinal purposes and earning foreign currency.

  12. Molecular species delimitation methods recover most song-delimited cicada species in the European Cicadetta montana complex.

    PubMed

    Wade, E J; Hertach, T; Gogala, M; Trilar, T; Simon, C

    2015-12-01

    Molecular species delimitation is increasingly being used to discover and illuminate species level diversity, and a number of methods have been developed. Here, we compare the ability of two molecular species delimitation methods to recover song-delimited species in the Cicadetta montana cryptic species complex throughout Europe. Recent bioacoustics studies of male calling songs (premating reproductive barriers) have revealed cryptic species diversity in this complex. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses were used to analyse the mitochondrial genes COI and COII and the nuclear genes EF1α and period for thirteen European Cicadetta species as well as the closely related monotypic genus Euboeana. Two molecular species delimitation methods, general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) and Bayesian phylogenetics and phylogeography, identified the majority of song-delimited species and were largely congruent with each other. None of the molecular delimitation methods were able to fully recover a recent radiation of four Greek species.

  13. Molecular and Morphological Inference of Three Cryptic Species within the Merodon aureus Species Group (Diptera: Syrphidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ačanski, Jelena; Vujić, Ante; Ståhls, Gunilla; Radenković, Snežana; Milić, Dubravka; Obreht Vidaković, Dragana; Đan, Mihajla

    2016-01-01

    The Merodon aureus species group (Diptera: Syrphidae: Eristalinae) comprises a number of different sub-groups and species complexes. In this study we focus on resolving the taxonomic status of the entity previously identified as M. cinereus B, here identified as M. atratus species complex. We used an integrative approach based on morphological descriptions, combined with supporting characters that were obtained from molecular analyses of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene as well as from geometric morphometry of wing and surstylus shapes and environmental niche comparisons. All applied data and methods distinguished and supported three morphologically cryptic species: M. atratus stat. nov., M. virgatus sp. nov. and M. balkanicus sp. nov., which constitute the M. atratus species complex. We present an identification key for the sub-groups and species complexes of the M. aureus species group occurring in Europe, describe the taxa and discuss the utility of the applied methods for species delimitation. The estimated divergence times for the species splits of these taxa coincide with the Pleistocene Günz-Mindel interglaciation and the Great interglaciation (between the Ris and Mindel glacial periods). PMID:27532618

  14. Leaf carbon assimilation and molecular phylogeny in Cattleya species (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Andrade-Souza, V; Almeida, A-A F; Corrêa, R X; Costa, M A; Mielke, M S; Gomes, F P

    2009-08-11

    We examined leaf CO(2) assimilation and how it varied among species within the orchid genus Cattleya. Measurements of CO(2) assimilation and maximum quantum yield of PS II (Fv/Fm) were made for mature leaves of nine species using a portable system for photosynthesis measurement and a portable fluorometer. Leaf area was measured with an area meter, and the specific leaf mass was determined. DNA of nine Cattleya species and two species of Hadrolaelia was extracted using the CTAB protocol. Each sample was amplified and sequenced using primers for the trnL gene. The phylogenetic analyses, using neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods, retrieved a group that included Cattleya and Hadrolaelia species, in which the unifoliate species were separated from the bifoliates. The topologies of the two cladograms showed some similarities. However, C. guttata (bifoliate) was placed in the unifoliate clade in the neighbor-joining tree, while C. warneri (unifoliate) was not placed in this clade in the maximum parsimony tree. Most Cattleya species keep the leaf stomata closed from 6 am to 4 pm. We suggest that C. elongata, C. tigrina and C. tenuis have C(3)-crassulacean acid metabolism since they open their stomata around 12 am. The Fv/Fm values remained relatively constant during the measurements of CO(2) assimilation. The same was observed for the specific leaf mass values, although great variations were found in the leaf area values. When the species were grouped using molecular data in the neighbor-joining analysis, no relation was observed with CO(2) assimilation.

  15. Reliable molecular identification of nine tropical whitefly species

    PubMed Central

    Ovalle, Tatiana M; Parsa, Soroush; Hernández, Maria P; Becerra Lopez-Lavalle, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    The identification of whitefly species in adult stage is problematic. Morphological differentiation of pupae is one of the better methods for determining identity of species, but it may vary depending on the host plant on which they develop which can lead to misidentifications and erroneous naming of new species. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment amplified from the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene is often used for mitochondrial haplotype identification that can be associated with specific species. Our objective was to compare morphometric traits against DNA barcode sequences to develop and implement a diagnostic molecular kit based on a RFLP-PCR method using the COI gene for the rapid identification of whiteflies. This study will allow for the rapid diagnosis of the diverse community of whiteflies attacking plants of economic interest in Colombia. It also provides access to the COI sequence that can be used to develop predator conservation techniques by establishing which predators have a trophic linkage with the focal whitefly pest species. PMID:25614792

  16. Zoonotic potential and molecular epidemiology of Giardia species and giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Molecular diagnostic tools have been used recently in assessing the taxonomy, zoonotic potential, and transmission of Giardia species and giardiasis in humans and animals. The results of these studies have firmly established giardiasis as a zoonotic disease, although host adaptation at the genotype and subtype levels has reduced the likelihood of zoonotic transmission. These studies have also identified variations in the distribution of Giardia duodenalis genotypes among geographic areas and between domestic and wild ruminants and differences in clinical manifestations and outbreak potentials of assemblages A and B. Nevertheless, our efforts in characterizing the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis and the roles of various animals in the transmission of human giardiasis are compromised by the lack of case-control and longitudinal cohort studies and the sampling and testing of humans and animals living in the same community, the frequent occurrence of infections with mixed genotypes and subtypes, and the apparent heterozygosity at some genetic loci for some G. duodenalis genotypes. With the increased usage of multilocus genotyping tools, the development of next-generation subtyping tools, the integration of molecular analysis in epidemiological studies, and an improved understanding of the population genetics of G. duodenalis in humans and animals, we should soon have a better appreciation of the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis, the disease burden of zoonotic transmission, the taxonomy status and virulences of various G. duodenalis genotypes, and the ecology of environmental contamination.

  17. Structure-acidity correlation of supported tungsten(VI)-oxo-species: FT-IR and TPD studies of adsorbed pyridine and catalytic decomposition of 2-propanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, M. I.; Mekhemer, G. A. H.; Fouad, N. E.; Rabee, A. I. M.

    2014-07-01

    The amount of 10 wt%-WO3 was supported on alumina, titania or silica by impregnation with aqueous solution of ammonium paratungstate and subsequent calcination at 500 °C for 10 h. Tungstate-related chemical and physical changes in the calcination products were resolved by ex-situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Nature of exposed surface acid sites were probed by in-situ IR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine (Py) molecules at room temperature (RT). The relative strength of the acid sites thus probed was gauged by combining results of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements of the RT-adsorbed Py with those communicated by in-situ IR spectra of residual Py on the surface after a brief thermoevacuation at high temperatures (100-300 °C). Reactivity of the surface acid sites was tested toward 2-propanal catalytic decomposition, and observed by in-situ IR gas phase spectra. Results obtained were correlated with predominant structures assumed by the supported tungstate species. Accordingly, polymerization of the supported tungstate into 2-/3-dimensional structures, was found to be relatively most advanced on favorable locations of titania surfaces as compared to the case on alumina or silica surfaces. Consequently, the Lewis acidity was strengthened, and strong Bronsted acidity was evolved, leading to a 2-propanol dehydration catalyst (tungstate/titania) of optimal activity and selectivity. Strong tungstate/support interfacial interactions were found to hamper the formation of the strongly acidic and catalytically active polymeric structures of the supported tungstate (i.e., the case on alumina or silica).

  18. On the widths of Stokes lines in Raman scattering from molecules adsorbed at metal surfaces and in molecular conduction junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Within a generic model we analyze the Stokes linewidth in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from molecules embedded as bridges in molecular junctions. We identify four main contributions to the off-resonant Stokes signal and show that under zero voltage bias (a situation pertaining also to standard SERS experiments) and at low bias junctions only one of these contributions is pronounced. The linewidth of this component is determined by the molecular vibrational relaxation rate, which is dominated by interactions with the essentially bosonic thermal environment when the relevant molecular electronic energy is far from the metal(s) Fermi energy(ies). It increases when the molecular electronic level is close to the metal Fermi level so that an additional vibrational relaxation channel due to electron-hole (eh) exciton in the molecule opens. Other contributions to the Raman signal, of considerably broader linewidths, can become important at larger junction bias.

  19. From an equilibrium based MOF adsorbent to a kinetic selective carbon molecular sieve for paraffin/iso-paraffin separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Baiyan; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Zhang, Yiming; Bhatt, Prashant M; He, Hongming; Zhang, Daliang; Han, Yu; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Perman, Jason A; Ma, Shengqian

    2016-11-24

    We unveil a unique kinetic driven separation material for selectively removing linear paraffins from iso-paraffins via a molecular sieving mechanism. Subsequent carbonization and thermal treatment of CD-MOF-2, the cyclodextrin metal-organic framework, afforded a carbon molecular sieve with a uniform and reduced pore size of ca. 5.0 Å, and it exhibited highly selective kinetic separation of n-butane and n-pentane from iso-butane and iso-pentane, respectively.

  20. Molecular identification of entomopathogenic Fusarium species associated with Tribolium species in stored grains.

    PubMed

    Chehri, Khosrow

    2017-03-01

    Fusarium species are common pathogens of plants, animals and insects worldwide, including Iran. The occurrence of entomopathogenic Fusarium species isolated from Tribolium species as one of the most important insect pests of stored grains were sampled from various provinces in western Iran. In total, 15 Tribolium species belonging to T. castaneum (Herbst) and T. confusum (Du Val) (Col: Tenebrionidae) were detected and 8 isolates from Fusarium spp. were collected from them. Based on morphological features, the Fusarium isolates were classified into F. keratoplasticum and F. proliferatum. The phylogenetic trees based on tef1 dataset clearly separated all morphological taxa. DNA sequences of ITS regions and β-tubulin gene were also confirmed morphological taxa. All of the Fusarium isolates were evaluated for their pathogenicity on T. confusum. Maximum mortality rate was observed for F. keratoplasticum (isolate FSSCker2) and this isolate may be considered as a good candidate for biological control in the ecosystem of stored grains. This is the first report on molecular identification of Fusarium species isolated from insects in Iran and F. keratoplasticum and F. proliferatum were isolated for the first time from Tribolium species as two entomopathogenic fungi.

  1. Molecular detection of Anaplasma species in dogs in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernandez, Giovanni; André, Marcos Rogério; Cendales, Diana Maria; Sousa, Keyla Carstens Marques de; Gonçalves, Luiz Ricardo; Rondelli, Mariana Cristina Hoeppner; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Anaplasma platys and A. phagocytophilum are tick-borne pathogens that parasitize platelets and neutrophils, respectively, of humans and animals. The former is the etiological agent of canine cyclic thrombocytopenia, while the latter is that of canine granulocytic anaplasmosis. This work involved the detection and identification of Anaplasma species in blood samples from dogs in Colombia, using molecular techniques. Between December 2008 and April 2009, blood samples were drawn from the cephalic vein of 91 dogs in the central-western region of Colombia (cities of Bogota, Villavicencio and Bucaramanga) and stored in tubes containing EDTA. These samples were used in 16S rRNA-Anaplasma spp. nPCR and the preparation of blood smears. One (1.1%) of the 91 sampled dogs showed inclusions suggestive of Anaplasmataceae agents in the cytoplasm of platelets. Based on PCR followed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, A. platys and Anaplasma sp. closed related to A. phagocytophilum were detected in two and one dog, respectively. Interestingly, all the samples were negative for specific msp-2-A. phagocytophilum real-time qPCR, suggesting the circulation of an Anaplasma species phylogenetically related to A. phagocytophilum in dogs in the aforementioned region. Hence, Anaplasma spp. circulates among dogs in Colombia, albeit with low frequency. To the best of authors' knowledge, this is the first molecular detection of Anaplasma spp. in dogs in Colombia.

  2. Adsorbed molecular shuttlecocks: An NIXSW study of Sn phthalocyanine on Ag(1 1 1) using Auger electron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, R. A. J.; Martin, C. P.; Miller, G.; Dhanak, V. R.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2007-03-01

    Normal incidence X-ray standing wave (NIXSW) spectroscopy has been used to determine the orientation of Sn phthalocyanine (SnPc) molecules in a highly ordered, but incommensurate, monolayer on the Ag(1 1 1) surface. Our sample preparation procedure differs from that used in previous work on this system [C. Stadler, S. Hansen, F. Pollinger, C. Kumpf, E. Umbach, T.-L. Lee, J. Zegenhagen, Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 035404] and leads to a different unit cell with basis vector lengths of ˜15.0 Å and 15.3 Å ( γ = 98°) which is oriented at an angle of ˜5° to the underlying Ag(1 1 1) lattice. Structural parameters extracted from Sn MNN NIXSW spectra indicate that SnPc, a buckled, 'shuttlecock' phthalocyanine, adsorbs in a Sn-down geometry with the Sn atom approximately 2.3 Å above the Ag(1 1 1) surface plane. Despite the incommensurate nature of the overlayer, we find a surprisingly high coherent fraction for standing wave data taken for the (1¯ 1 1) reflection and argue that this arises from the small domain size of the superstructure.

  3. Molecular analysis of phylogenetic relationships among Myrmecophytic macaranga species (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Blattner, F R; Weising, K; Bänfer, G; Maschwitz, U; Fiala, B

    2001-06-01

    Many species of the paleotropical pioneer tree genus Macaranga Thou. (Euphorbiaceae) live in association with ants. Various types of mutualistic interactions exist, ranging from the attraction of unspecific ant visitors to obligate myrmecophytism. In the latter, nesting space and food bodies are exchanged for protection by highly specific ant partners (mainly species of the myrmicine genus Crematogaster). As a first step toward elucidating the coevolution of ant-plant interactions in the Macaranga-Crematogaster system, we have initiated a molecular investigation of the plant partners' phylogeny. Nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were analyzed for 73 accessions from 47 Macaranga species, representing 17 sections or informally described species groups. Three accessions from the putative sister taxon Mallotus Lour, were included as outgroups. Cladograms of the ITS data revealed Macaranga to be nested within Mallotus. ITS sequences are highly similar within section Pachystemon s.str., suggesting a relatively recent and rapid radiation of obligate myrmecophytes within this section. Forty-three accessions, mainly of ant-inhabited species, were additionally investigated by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellite-primed PCR (MP-PCR) techniques. Phenetic analysis of RAPD and MP-PCR banding profiles generally confirmed the ITS results. Best resolutions for individual clades were obtained when ITS and RAPD/MP-PCR data were combined into a single matrix and analyzed phenetically. The combined analysis suggests multiple (four) rather than a single evolutionary origin of myrmecophytism, at least one reversal from obligate myrmecophytism to nonmyrmecophytism, and one loss of mutualistic specifity.

  4. Molecular Species Delimitation in the Racomitrium canescens Complex (Grimmiaceae) and Implications for DNA Barcoding of Species Complexes in Mosses

    PubMed Central

    Stech, Michael; Veldman, Sarina; Larraín, Juan; Muñoz, Jesús; Quandt, Dietmar; Hassel, Kristian; Kruijer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In bryophytes a morphological species concept is still most commonly employed, but delimitation of closely related species based on morphological characters is often difficult. Here we test morphological species circumscriptions in a species complex of the moss genus Racomitrium, the R. canescens complex, based on variable DNA sequence markers from the plastid (rps4-trnT-trnL region) and nuclear (nrITS) genomes. The extensive morphological variability within the complex has led to different opinions about the number of species and intraspecific taxa to be distinguished. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions allowed to clearly distinguish all eight currently recognised species of the complex plus a ninth species that was inferred to belong to the complex in earlier molecular analyses. The taxonomic significance of intraspecific sequence variation is discussed. The present molecular data do not support the division of the R. canescens complex into two groups of species (subsections or sections). Most morphological characters, albeit being in part difficult to apply, are reliable for species identification in the R. canescens complex. However, misidentification of collections that were morphologically intermediate between species questioned the suitability of leaf shape as diagnostic character. Four partitions of the molecular markers (rps4-trnT, trnT-trnL, ITS1, ITS2) that could potentially be used for molecular species identification (DNA barcoding) performed almost equally well concerning amplification and sequencing success. Of these, ITS1 provided the highest species discrimination capacity and should be considered as a DNA barcoding marker for mosses, especially in complexes of closely related species. Molecular species identification should be complemented by redefining morphological characters, to develop a set of easy-to-use molecular and non-molecular identification tools for improving biodiversity assessments and ecological research including mosses. PMID

  5. Molecular species delimitation in the Racomitrium canescens complex (Grimmiaceae) and implications for DNA barcoding of species complexes in mosses.

    PubMed

    Stech, Michael; Veldman, Sarina; Larraín, Juan; Muñoz, Jesús; Quandt, Dietmar; Hassel, Kristian; Kruijer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In bryophytes a morphological species concept is still most commonly employed, but delimitation of closely related species based on morphological characters is often difficult. Here we test morphological species circumscriptions in a species complex of the moss genus Racomitrium, the R. canescens complex, based on variable DNA sequence markers from the plastid (rps4-trnT-trnL region) and nuclear (nrITS) genomes. The extensive morphological variability within the complex has led to different opinions about the number of species and intraspecific taxa to be distinguished. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions allowed to clearly distinguish all eight currently recognised species of the complex plus a ninth species that was inferred to belong to the complex in earlier molecular analyses. The taxonomic significance of intraspecific sequence variation is discussed. The present molecular data do not support the division of the R. canescens complex into two groups of species (subsections or sections). Most morphological characters, albeit being in part difficult to apply, are reliable for species identification in the R. canescens complex. However, misidentification of collections that were morphologically intermediate between species questioned the suitability of leaf shape as diagnostic character. Four partitions of the molecular markers (rps4-trnT, trnT-trnL, ITS1, ITS2) that could potentially be used for molecular species identification (DNA barcoding) performed almost equally well concerning amplification and sequencing success. Of these, ITS1 provided the highest species discrimination capacity and should be considered as a DNA barcoding marker for mosses, especially in complexes of closely related species. Molecular species identification should be complemented by redefining morphological characters, to develop a set of easy-to-use molecular and non-molecular identification tools for improving biodiversity assessments and ecological research including mosses.

  6. Defining species-specific immunodominant B cell epitopes for molecular serology of Chlamydia species.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan U; Poudel, Anil; Ruettger, Anke; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Urgently needed species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies against Chlamydia spp. have been elusive due to high cross-reactivity of chlamydial antigens. To identify Chlamydia species-specific B cell epitopes for such assays, we ranked the potential epitopes of immunodominant chlamydial proteins that are polymorphic among all Chlamydia species. High-scoring peptides were synthesized with N-terminal biotin, followed by a serine-glycine-serine-glycine spacer, immobilized onto streptavidin-coated microtiter plates, and tested with mono-specific mouse hyperimmune sera against each Chlamydia species in chemiluminescent ELISAs. For each of nine Chlamydia species, three to nine dominant polymorphic B cell epitope regions were identified on OmpA, CT618, PmpD, IncA, CT529, CT442, IncG, Omp2, TarP, and IncE proteins. Peptides corresponding to 16- to 40-amino-acid species-specific sequences of these epitopes reacted highly and with absolute specificity with homologous, but not heterologous, Chlamydia monospecies-specific sera. Host-independent reactivity of such epitopes was confirmed by testing of six C. pecorum-specific peptides from five proteins with C. pecorum-reactive sera from cattle, the natural host of C. pecorum. The probability of cross-reactivity of peptide antigens from closely related chlamydial species or strains correlated with percent sequence identity and declined to zero at <50% sequence identity. Thus, phylograms of B cell epitope regions predict the specificity of peptide antigens for rational use in the genus-, species-, or serovar-specific molecular serology of Chlamydia spp. We anticipate that these peptide antigens will improve chlamydial serology by providing easily accessible assays to nonspecialist laboratories. Our approach also lends itself to the identification of relevant epitopes of other microbial pathogens.

  7. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, Stanley M.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    1988-01-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber (13, 13a to 13e) having a metal coating (22, 22a to 22e) on at least a portion of a light transmissive core (17, 17a to 17d). The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector (16, 16d, 16e) analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode (13e) may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell (53) while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface.

  8. Characterization of silver-kaolinite (AgK): an adsorbent for long-lived (129)I species.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Sivachidambaram; Rao, Sudhakar M

    2016-01-01

    Bentonite is a preferred buffer and backfill material for deep geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). Bentonite does not retain anions by virtue of its negatively charged basal surface. Imparting anion retention ability to bentonite is important to enable the expansive clay to retain long-lived (129)I (iodine-129; half-life = 16 million years) species that may escape from the HLW geological repository. Silver-kaolinite (AgK) material is prepared as an additive to improve the iodide retention capacity of bentonite. The AgK is prepared by heating kaolinite-silver nitrate mix at 400 °C to study the kaolinite influence on the transition metal ion when reacting at its dehydroxylation temperature. Thermo gravimetric-Evolved Gas Detection analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy and electron probe micro analysis indicated that silver occurs as AgO/Ag2O surface coating on thermally reacting kaolinite with silver nitrate at 400 °C.

  9. ToF-SIMS Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: Principal Component Analysis of the Primary Ion Species Effect on the Protein Fragmentation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Graham, Daniel J; Wagner, Matthew S; Lee, Tae Geol; Moon, Dae Won; Castner, David G

    2011-12-15

    In time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), the choice of primary ion used for analysis can influence the resulting mass spectrum. This is because different primary ion types can produce different fragmentation pathways. In this study, analysis of single-component protein monolayers were performed using monatomic, tri-atomic, and polyatomic primary ion sources. Eight primary ions (Cs(+), Au(+), Au(3) (+), Bi(+), Bi(3) (+), Bi(3) (++), C(60) (+)) were used to examine to the low mass (m/z < 200) fragmentation patterns from five different proteins (bovine serum albumin, bovine serum fibrinogen, bovine immunoglobulin G and chicken egg white lysozyme) adsorbed onto mica surfaces. Principal component analysis (PCA) processing of the ToF-SIMS data showed that variation in peak intensity caused by the primary ions was greater than differences in protein composition. The spectra generated by Cs(+), Au(+) and Bi(+) primary ions were similar, but the spectra generated by monatomic, tri-atomic and polyatomic primary ion ions varied significantly. C(60) primary ions increased fragmentation of the adsorbed proteins in the m/z < 200 region, resulting in more intense low m/z peaks. Thus, comparison of data obtained by one primary ion species with that obtained by another primary ion species should be done with caution. However, for the spectra generated using a given primary ion beam, discrimination between the spectra of different proteins followed similar trends. Therefore, a PCA model of proteins created with a given ion source should only be applied to datasets obtained using the same ion source. The type of information obtained from PCA depended on the peak set used. When only amino acid peaks were used, PCA was able to identify the relationship between proteins by their amino acid composition. When all peaks from m/z 12-200 were used, PCA separated proteins based on a ratio of C(4)H(8)N(+) to K(+) peak intensities. This ratio correlated with the thickness

  10. Computer modelling of the 4-n-alkyl-4'-cyanobiphenyls adsorbed on graphite: energy minimizations and molecular dynamics of periodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaver, D. J.; Callaway, M. J.; Forester, T.; Smith, W.; Tildesley, D. J.

    The structures adopted within adsorbed monolayers of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8-CB) molecules have been investigated using energy minimizations and molecular dynamics simulations of periodic systems. Using a smooth substrate potential, the most favourable energy of adsorption is found for a system with an eight-molecule unit-cell structure. This result is entirely consistent with scanning tunnelling microscopy studies of such systems, and differs from previous results using simulations of short strips which suggested a four-molecule unit cell. Molecular dynamics simulations of this 8-CB monolayer show that while the system exhibits smectic ordering at 150 K, the detailed eight-molecule unit-cell structure is lost. Simulations performed on a bilayer system indicate that the presence of a second molecular layer stabilizes the unit cell structure, except in the regions where there is partial penetration by the second layer molecules into the first layer. A third set of molecular dynamics simulations where the monolayer is confined between the substrate and a planar probe, shows that the eight-molecule unit cell is stable when out-of-plane motion is restricted by the probe. The effect of the molecular chain length on the intramolecular structure is also investigated: energy minimizations performed using the longer molecule 10-CB indicate that the eight-molecule unit cell is not the most stable configuration for this molecule. In this system, six- and ten-molecule unit cells both give lower energy arrangements than the eight-molecule cell adopted by 8-CB.

  11. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  12. Molecular evidence for species-level distinctions in clouded leopards.

    PubMed

    Buckley-Beason, Valerie A; Johnson, Warren E; Nash, Willliam G; Stanyon, Roscoe; Menninger, Joan C; Driscoll, Carlos A; Howard, JoGayle; Bush, Mitch; Page, John E; Roelke, Melody E; Stone, Gary; Martelli, Paolo P; Wen, Ci; Ling, Lin; Duraisingam, Ratna K; Lam, Phan V; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2006-12-05

    Among the 37 living species of Felidae, the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) is generally classified as a monotypic genus basal to the Panthera lineage of great cats. This secretive, mid-sized (16-23 kg) carnivore, now severely endangered, is traditionally subdivided into four southeast Asian subspecies (Figure 1A). We used molecular genetic methods to re-evaluate subspecies partitions and to quantify patterns of population genetic variation among 109 clouded leopards of known geographic origin (Figure 1A, Tables S1 ans S2 in the Supplemental Data available online). We found strong phylogeographic monophyly and large genetic distances between N. n. nebulosa (mainland) and N. n. diardi (Borneo; n = 3 individuals) with mtDNA (771 bp), nuclear DNA (3100 bp), and 51 microsatellite loci. Thirty-six fixed mitochondrial and nuclear nucleotide differences and 20 microsatellite loci with nonoverlapping allele-size ranges distinguished N. n. nebulosa from N. n. diardi. Along with fixed subspecies-specific chromosomal differences, this degree of differentiation is equivalent to, or greater than, comparable measures among five recognized Panthera species (lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, and snow leopard). These distinctions increase the urgency of clouded leopard conservation efforts, and if affirmed by morphological analysis and wider sampling of N. n. diardi in Borneo and Sumatra, would support reclassification of N. n. diardi as a new species (Neofelis diardi).

  13. Ixodes ventalloi: morphological and molecular support for species integrity.

    PubMed

    Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Giannelli, Alessio; Persichetti, Maria Flaminia; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Brianti, Emanuele; Parisi, Antonio; Wall, Richard; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Despite their medical and veterinary importance, some tick species are so poorly studied, that their role within pathogen vector transmission cycles is difficult to assess. The tick Ixodes ventalloi is one such species, and its biology and phylogenetic status remain an issue of debate. In the present study, specimens of adult I. ventalloi (n = 65 females; n = 31 males) infesting cats in the Lipari Island (Aeolian archipelago, Sicily, southern Italy) were characterized morphologically and molecularly, the latter based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes. The genetic data and phylogenetic analyses for both mitochondrial genes suggest the existence of two distinct genogroups. The ecological and epidemiological significance of the genetic structure within the I. ventalloi endemic population remains to be determined. The results highlight the need for further analysis of this tick species, including whole mitochondrial genome sequencing and crossbreeding studies, which will be pivotal to complement features of its status as a vector of pathogens.

  14. The hydrophobic character of nonsulfide mineral surfaces as influenced by double-bond reactions of adsorbed unsaturated collector species. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    The primary goal of this research is to improve the flotation efficiency of nonsulfide mineral systems by establishing the fundamental features of collector adsorption reactions and developing appropriate chemical control strategies. In situ real-time FR-IR/IRS measurements, nonequilibrium electrophoresis, vacuum flotation, contact-angle goniometry, and laser Raman spectroscopy have been used to accomplish this goal. These experimental techniques have led to the determination of important information concerning collector adsorption phenomena in each nonsulfide mineral system. For example, the demonstration of polymerization of adsorbed unsaturated surfactant species has added a new dimension to semi-soluble salt flotation chemistry and may have more general utility. Furthermore, refinement of the in situ FT-IR/IRS analysis has been accomplished particularly for the examination of surfactant aggregation phenomena at nonsulfide mineral surfaces. Finally, the significance of the lattice ion hydration theory has been demonstrated by nonequilibrium electrophoretic mobility measurements, and the new results will provide a better basis for the understanding of soluble-salt flotation phenomena.

  15. Adsorbate Diffusion on Transition Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    systematically studied adsorption and diffusion of atomic and diatomic species (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) on nanometer-sized Pt and Cu nanoparticles with...species and two diatomic molecules (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) as adsorbates and study the adsorption and diffusion of these adsorbates across the edges

  16. Molecular parentage of radical species in the comae of comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin K.

    Understanding the chemical composition of comets is of great interest to the scientific community. In this work, an integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph is used to detect emissions of C2, C3, CH, CN, and NH2. The azimuthal average profile (line integral of the column density as a function of radial distance from the center of the nucleus) is simulated by the Haser model. The Haser model simulates the outgassing and photo-dissociate of molecular species in the coma. In this work, the lifetime of the parent molecule in the photo-dissociation chain is set as a free parameter. The best fit parent lifetimes for observations of comets 4P/Faye, 10P/Tempel 2, and C/2009 P1 Garradd are obtained. The results are compared to parent lifetimes cited in other studies. HCN as a likely dominant parent for CN is eliminated. Constraints on likely parent molecules for C3 and NH 2 are discussed.

  17. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Tadatsugu

    2007-05-21

    Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.

  18. Biomass-based palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve as gas separation adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Sumathi; Bashir, Mohammed Jk; Akbar, Zinatizadeh Ali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely recognised as a potential low-cost source for the production of high added value materials and proved to be a good precursor for the production of activated carbons. One of such valuable biomasses used for the production of activated carbons is palm shell. Palm shell (endocarp) is an abundant by-product produced from the palm oil industries throughout tropical countries. Palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve has been widely applied in various environmental pollution control technologies, mainly owing to its high adsorption performance, well-developed porosity and low cost, leading to potential applications in gas-phase separation using adsorption processes. This mini-review represents a comprehensive overview of the palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve preparation method, physicochemical properties and feasibility of palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve in gas separation processes. Some of the limitations are outlined and suggestions for future improvements are pointed out.

  19. The use of the Molecular Adsorber Coating technology to mitigate vacuum chamber contamination during Pathfinder testing for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Wooldridge, Eve M.; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly A.

    2016-09-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This paper describes the recent use of the MAC technology during Pathfinder testing of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap persistent outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone based diffusion pump oil, from within JSC's cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This paper summarizes the sample fabrication, installation, laboratory testing, post-test chemical analysis results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination.

  20. The Use of the Molecular Adsorber Coating Technology to Mitigate Vacuum Chamber Contamination During Pathfinder Testing for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Wooldridge, Eve M.; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This paper describes the recent use of the MAC technology during Pathfinder testing of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap persistent outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone based diffusion pump oil, from within JSC's cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This paper summarizes the sample fabrication, installation, laboratory testing, post-test chemical analysis results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination.

  1. Spectral identification/elimination of molecular species in spacecraft glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, B. D.; Marinelli, W. J.; Rawlins, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Computer models of molecular electronic and vibrational emission intensities were developed. Known radiative emission rates (Einstein coefficients) permit the determination of relative excited state densities from spectral intensities. These codes were applied to the published spectra of glow above shuttle surface and to the Spacelab 1 results of Torr and Torr. The theoretical high-resolution spectra were convolved with the appropriate instrumental slit functions to allow accurate comparison with data. The published spacelab spectrum is complex but N2+ Meinel emission can be clearly identified in the ram spectrum. M2 First Positive emission does not correlate well with observed features, nor does the CN Red System. Spectral overlay comparisons are presented. The spectrum of glow above shuttle surfaces, in contrast to the ISO data, is not highly structured. Diatomic molecular emission was matched to the observed spectral shape. Source excitation mechanisms such as (oxygen atom)-(surface species) reaction product chemiluminescence, surface recombination, or resonance fluorescent re-emission will be discussed for each tentative assignment. These assignments are the necessary first analytical step toward mechanism identification. Different glow mechanisms will occur above surfaces under different orbital conditions.

  2. Spectral identification/elimination of molecular species in spacecraft glow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, B. D.; Marinelli, W. J.; Rawlins, W. T.

    1985-09-01

    Computer models of molecular electronic and vibrational emission intensities were developed. Known radiative emission rates (Einstein coefficients) permit the determination of relative excited state densities from spectral intensities. These codes were applied to the published spectra of glow above shuttle surface and to the Spacelab 1 results of Torr and Torr. The theoretical high-resolution spectra were convolved with the appropriate instrumental slit functions to allow accurate comparison with data. The published spacelab spectrum is complex but N2+ Meinel emission can be clearly identified in the ram spectrum. M2 First Positive emission does not correlate well with observed features, nor does the CN Red System. Spectral overlay comparisons are presented. The spectrum of glow above shuttle surfaces, in contrast to the ISO data, is not highly structured. Diatomic molecular emission was matched to the observed spectral shape. Source excitation mechanisms such as (oxygen atom)-(surface species) reaction product chemiluminescence, surface recombination, or resonance fluorescent re-emission will be discussed for each tentative assignment. These assignments are the necessary first analytical step toward mechanism identification. Different glow mechanisms will occur above surfaces under different orbital conditions.

  3. Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Wild Musa Species

    PubMed Central

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Christelová, Pavla; Van den Houwe, Ines; Häkkinen, Markku; Roux, Nicolas; Swennen, Rony; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The production of bananas is threatened by rapid spreading of various diseases and adverse environmental conditions. The preservation and characterization of banana diversity is essential for the purposes of crop improvement. The world's largest banana germplasm collection maintained at the Bioversity International Transit Centre (ITC) in Belgium is continuously expanded by new accessions of edible cultivars and wild species. Detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the accessions is necessary for efficient management of the collection and utilization of banana diversity. In this work, nuclear DNA content and genomic distribution of 45S and 5S rDNA were examined in 21 diploid accessions recently added to ITC collection, representing both sections of the genus Musa. 2C DNA content in the section Musa ranged from 1.217 to 1.315 pg. Species belonging to section Callimusa had 2C DNA contents ranging from 1.390 to 1.772 pg. While the number of 45S rDNA loci was conserved in the section Musa, it was highly variable in Callimusa species. 5S rRNA gene clusters were found on two to eight chromosomes per diploid cell. The accessions were genotyped using a set of 19 microsatellite markers to establish their relationships with the remaining accessions held at ITC. Genetic diversity done by SSR genotyping platform was extended by phylogenetic analysis of ITS region. ITS sequence data supported the clustering obtained by SSR analysis for most of the accessions. High level of nucleotide diversity and presence of more than two types of ITS sequences in eight wild diploids pointed to their origin by hybridization of different genotypes. This study significantly expands the number of wild Musa species where nuclear genome size and genomic distribution of rDNA loci is known. SSR genotyping identified Musa species that are closely related to the previously characterized accessions and provided data to aid in their classification. Sequence analysis of ITS region

  4. Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Wild Musa Species.

    PubMed

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Christelová, Pavla; Van den Houwe, Ines; Häkkinen, Markku; Roux, Nicolas; Swennen, Rony; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The production of bananas is threatened by rapid spreading of various diseases and adverse environmental conditions. The preservation and characterization of banana diversity is essential for the purposes of crop improvement. The world's largest banana germplasm collection maintained at the Bioversity International Transit Centre (ITC) in Belgium is continuously expanded by new accessions of edible cultivars and wild species. Detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the accessions is necessary for efficient management of the collection and utilization of banana diversity. In this work, nuclear DNA content and genomic distribution of 45S and 5S rDNA were examined in 21 diploid accessions recently added to ITC collection, representing both sections of the genus Musa. 2C DNA content in the section Musa ranged from 1.217 to 1.315 pg. Species belonging to section Callimusa had 2C DNA contents ranging from 1.390 to 1.772 pg. While the number of 45S rDNA loci was conserved in the section Musa, it was highly variable in Callimusa species. 5S rRNA gene clusters were found on two to eight chromosomes per diploid cell. The accessions were genotyped using a set of 19 microsatellite markers to establish their relationships with the remaining accessions held at ITC. Genetic diversity done by SSR genotyping platform was extended by phylogenetic analysis of ITS region. ITS sequence data supported the clustering obtained by SSR analysis for most of the accessions. High level of nucleotide diversity and presence of more than two types of ITS sequences in eight wild diploids pointed to their origin by hybridization of different genotypes. This study significantly expands the number of wild Musa species where nuclear genome size and genomic distribution of rDNA loci is known. SSR genotyping identified Musa species that are closely related to the previously characterized accessions and provided data to aid in their classification. Sequence analysis of ITS region

  5. Orbital tomography: Molecular band maps, momentum maps and the imaging of real space orbitals of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, Hannes; Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Puschnig, Peter; Ramsey, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    The frontier orbitals of molecules are the prime determinants of their chemical, optical and electronic properties. Arguably, the most direct method of addressing the (filled) frontier orbitals is ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Although UPS is a mature technique from the early 1970s on, the angular distribution of the photoemitted electrons was thought to be too complex to be analysed quantitatively. Recently angle resolved UPS (ARUPS) work on conjugated molecules both, in ordered thick films and chemisorbed monolayers, has shown that the angular (momentum) distribution of the photocurrent from orbital emissions can be simply understood. The approach, based on the assumption of a plane wave final state is becoming known as orbital tomography. Here we will demonstrate, with selected examples of pentacene (5A) and sexiphenyl (6P), the potential of orbital tomography. First it will be shown how the full angular distribution of the photocurrent (momentum map) from a specific orbital is related to the real space orbital by a Fourier transform. Examples of the reconstruction of 5A orbitals will be given and the procedure for recovering the lost phase information will be outlined. We then move to examples of sexiphenyl where we interrogate the original band maps of thick sexiphenyl in the light of our understanding of orbital tomography that has developed since then. With comparison to theoretical simulations of the molecular band maps, the molecular conformation and orientation will be concluded. New results for the sexiphenyl monolayer on Al(1 1 0) will then be presented. From the band maps it will be concluded that the molecule is planarised and adopts a tilted geometry. Finally the momentum maps down to HOMO-11 will be analysed and real space orbitals reconstructed.

  6. Integrating a Numerical Taxonomic Method and Molecular Phylogeny for Species Delimitation of Melampsora Species (Melampsoraceae, Pucciniales) on Willows in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Wang, Qing-Hong; Tian, Cheng-Ming; Kakishima, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The species in genus Melampsora are the causal agents of leaf rust diseases on willows in natural habitats and plantations. However, the classification and recognition of species diversity are challenging because morphological characteristics are scant and morphological variation in Melampsora on willows has not been thoroughly evaluated. Thus, the taxonomy of Melampsora species on willows remains confused, especially in China where 31 species were reported based on either European or Japanese taxonomic systems. To clarify the species boundaries of Melampsora species on willows in China, we tested two approaches for species delimitation inferred from morphological and molecular variations. Morphological species boundaries were determined based on numerical taxonomic analyses of morphological characteristics in the uredinial and telial stages by cluster analysis and one-way analysis of variance. Phylogenetic species boundaries were delineated based on the generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions including the 5.8S and D1/D2 regions of the large nuclear subunit of the ribosomal RNA gene. Numerical taxonomic analyses of 14 morphological characteristics recognized in the uredinial-telial stages revealed 22 morphological species, whereas the GMYC results recovered 29 phylogenetic species. In total, 17 morphological species were in concordance with the phylogenetic species and 5 morphological species were in concordance with 12 phylogenetic species. Both the morphological and molecular data supported 14 morphological characteristics, including 5 newly recognized characteristics and 9 traditionally emphasized characteristics, as effective for the differentiation of Melampsora species on willows in China. Based on the concordance and discordance of the two species delimitation approaches, we concluded that integrative taxonomy by using both morphological and molecular variations was

  7. Integrating a Numerical Taxonomic Method and Molecular Phylogeny for Species Delimitation of Melampsora Species (Melampsoraceae, Pucciniales) on Willows in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peng; Wang, Qing-Hong; Tian, Cheng-Ming; Kakishima, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The species in genus Melampsora are the causal agents of leaf rust diseases on willows in natural habitats and plantations. However, the classification and recognition of species diversity are challenging because morphological characteristics are scant and morphological variation in Melampsora on willows has not been thoroughly evaluated. Thus, the taxonomy of Melampsora species on willows remains confused, especially in China where 31 species were reported based on either European or Japanese taxonomic systems. To clarify the species boundaries of Melampsora species on willows in China, we tested two approaches for species delimitation inferred from morphological and molecular variations. Morphological species boundaries were determined based on numerical taxonomic analyses of morphological characteristics in the uredinial and telial stages by cluster analysis and one-way analysis of variance. Phylogenetic species boundaries were delineated based on the generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions including the 5.8S and D1/D2 regions of the large nuclear subunit of the ribosomal RNA gene. Numerical taxonomic analyses of 14 morphological characteristics recognized in the uredinial-telial stages revealed 22 morphological species, whereas the GMYC results recovered 29 phylogenetic species. In total, 17 morphological species were in concordance with the phylogenetic species and 5 morphological species were in concordance with 12 phylogenetic species. Both the morphological and molecular data supported 14 morphological characteristics, including 5 newly recognized characteristics and 9 traditionally emphasized characteristics, as effective for the differentiation of Melampsora species on willows in China. Based on the concordance and discordance of the two species delimitation approaches, we concluded that integrative taxonomy by using both morphological and molecular variations was

  8. Production of a new adsorbent from Moroccan oil shale by chemical activation and its adsorption characteristics for U and Th bearing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouya, E.; Fakhi, S.; Hannache, H.; Ichcho, S.; Pailler, R.; Naslain, R.; Abbe, J. C.

    2005-03-01

    New adsorbents were prepared from Moroccan oil shale of Tarfaya (layer R3) by chemical activation with sulphuric acid diluted at 80%. The influence of activation temperature, atmosphere gas, holding time in oven and weight ratio of sulphuric acid to precursor was investigated by determination of yield of adsorbents and adsorption capacity of methylene blue. The best adsorbent properties were found for a particular combination of the chosen parameters: temperature and time of activation respectively equal to 250° C and 2 hours, the gas vector being nitrogen (N{2}). The adsorption capacity for methylene blue and specific surface (SBET) of the new adsorbent were equal to 300 mg/g and 270 m2/g respectively. The batch mode experiment was used to explore the feasibility of this adsorbent for removal of radionuclides (U and Th) from aqueous solution. Applicability of the adsorbent was examined for synthetic solution prepared from hydrated uranyl nitrate (UO{2}(NO{3})2.6H{2}O) and hydrated thorium nitrate (Th(NO{3})4.5H{2}O). The parameters of adsorption for the two radioelements were determined by application of the Langmuir, Freundlich and Elovich models.

  9. Molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and assessment of zoonotic transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular characterization of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is essential for accurately identifying organisms and assessing zoonotic transmission. Results of recent molecular epidemiologic studies strongly suggest that zoonotic transmission plays an important role in crypt...

  10. Identification of the Active Species in Photochemical Hole Scavenging Reactions of Methanol on TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-11-03

    Molecular and dissociative methanol adsorption species were prepared on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces to study photocatalytic oxidation of methanol in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Adsorbed methoxy groups (CH3O-) were found to be the photoactive form of adsorbed methanol converted to adsorbed formaldehyde and a surface OH group by hole-mediated C-H bond cleavage. These results suggest that adsorbed methoxy is the effective hole scavenger in photochemical reactions involving methanol.

  11. Determination of anisotropic optical constants and surface coverage of molecular films using polarized visible ATR spectroscopy. Application to adsorbed cytochrome c films.

    PubMed

    Runge, Anne F; Rasmussen, Nicole C; Saavedra, S Scott; Mendes, Sergio B

    2005-01-13

    This article describes a method to determine the anisotropic optical constants and surface coverage of molecular films using polarized attenuated total reflectance (ATR) absorbance measurements. We have extended the transfer-matrix formalism to describe birefringent and dichroic films in ATR geometries and have combined it with an iterative numerical procedure to determine the anisotropic values of both the real (n) and imaginary (k) parts of the complex refractive index of the film under investigation. Anisotropic values of the imaginary part of the refractive index (k) allow for the determination of the surface coverage and one order parameter of the film. To illustrate this approach, we have used cytochrome c (cyt c) protein films adsorbed to glass and indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces. Experimental results show that cyt c films on these surfaces, which were formed under identical conditions, have significant differences in their surface coverages (11.2 +/- 0.4 pmol/cm(2) on glass and 21.7 +/- 0.9 pmol/cm(2) on ITO); however, their order parameters are similar (0.30 +/- 0.02 on glass and 0.36 +/- 0.04 on ITO).

  12. Molecular identification of iridoviruses infecting various sturgeon species in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bigarré, L; Lesne, M; Lautraite, A; Chesneau, V; Leroux, A; Jamin, M; Boitard, P M; Toffan, A; Prearo, M; Labrut, S; Daniel, P

    2017-01-01

    Iridoviridae are known to cause disease in sturgeons in North America. Here, histological and molecular methods were used to screen for this family of virus in sturgeons from various European farms with low-to-high morbidity. Some histological samples revealed basophilic cells in the gill and labial epithelia, strongly suggesting the accumulation of iridovirus particles. Newly developed generic PCR tests targeting the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of sturgeon iridoviruses identified in North America, namely the white sturgeon iridovirus and the Namao virus (NV), produced positive signals in most samples from four sturgeon species: Russian (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), Siberian (A. baerii), Adriatic (A. naccarii) and beluga (Huso huso). The sequences of the PCR products were generally highly similar one another, with nucleotide identities greater than 98%. They were also related to (74-88%), although distinct from, American sturgeon iridoviruses. These European viruses were thus considered variants of a single new virus, provisionally named Acipenser iridovirus-European (AcIV-E). Moreover, three samples infected with AcIV-E showed genetic heterogeneity, with the co-existence of two sequences differing by five nucleotides. One of our European samples carried a virus distinct from AcIV-E, but closely related to NV identified in Canada (95%). This study demonstrates the presence of two distinct sturgeon iridoviruses in Europe: a new genotype AcIV-E and an NV-related virus.

  13. Molecular Evidence of Different Rickettsia Species in Villeta, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro A; Ramírez-Hernández, Alejandro; Forero-Becerra, Elkin; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús A; Escandón, Patricia; Rodas, Juan D; Palomar, Ana M; Portillo, Aránzazu; Oteo, José A; Hidalgo, Marylin

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to detect and identify Rickettsia species in ticks collected in rural areas of Villeta, Colombia. Tick specimens were collected from domestic animals and walls of houses in five rural villages of Villeta town and from humans in Naranjal village (same town). Moreover, a flea collected from the same area was also processed. DNA was extracted and tested by conventional, semi-nested, and nested PCR reactions targeting rickettsial genes. In the ticks collected from humans from Naranjal village, a nymph of Amblyomma cajennense sensu lato was amplified using primers for ompA and sequenced (100% identity with "Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii"). Last, three amplicons from the Ctenocephalides felis flea, corresponding to gltA, ompB, and 16S rRNA genes, showed high identity with R. felis (98.5%, 97.3%, and 99.2%, respectively) and "Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis" (99.7% and 100%, respectively). To our knowledge, these results correspond to the first molecular detection in Colombia of "Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii" and "Ca. Rickettsia asemboensis" in fleas.

  14. Molecular studies on the species complex of Trichosirocalus horridus in the biological control of Carduinae weeds.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Trichosirocalus Colonnelli, 1979, (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Ceutorhynchinae) includes 17 Palaearctic species mainly feeding on Plantaginaceae and Asteraceae. We studied the taxonomic status of the species complex of Trichosirocalus horridus (TH) by means of molecular markers. We used bot...

  15. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS(®)) removal of piperacillin/tazobactam in a patient with acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Ruggero, M A; Argento, A C; Heavner, M S; Topal, J E

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to illustrate the pharmacokinetic removal of piperacillin/tazobactam in an anuric patient on Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS(®)). The patient was a 32-year-old woman who presented to a medical intensive care unit with acute liver failure secondary to an acetaminophen overdose. While awaiting transplant, she was started on MARS therapy as a bridge to liver transplant and empirically started on piperacillin/tazobactam therapy. MARS is an extracorporeal hemofiltration device, which incorporates a continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVHD) machine linked to an albumin-enriched dialysate filter to normalize excess electrolytes, metabolic waste, and protein-bound toxins. In addition to protein-bound waste, MARS removes water-soluble, low molecular-weight molecules. The patient received piperacillin/tazobactam 4.5 g infused intravenously over 3 h. A steep decline in serum levels occurred between hours 4 and 6 while MARS continued and no antibiotic was infused. The elimination rate constant (k(e)) for the removal of piperacillin in this patent was 0.453 h(-1) and the half-life (λ) was 1.53 h. The k(e) was 2.9-fold higher than with CVVHD alone and the λ was 3.7-fold shorter. Low levels of piperacillin are achieved during MARS therapy, but in the treatment of more resistant organisms, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, these low levels may not be adequate to achieve bactericidal activity. Drug levels following a standard infusion of 30 min would likely be even lower. Formalized pharmacokinetic studies of piperacillin/tazobactam removal in patients on MARS therapy are necessary to make clear dosing recommendations.

  16. Rubber molecular weight regulation, in vitro, in plant species that produce high and low molecular weights in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cornish, K; Castillón, J; Scott, D J

    2000-01-01

    In three rubber-producing species, in vitro, the rates of initiation and polymerization and the biopolymer molecular weight produced were affected by the concentration of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) initiator and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) elongation substrate (monomer). Ficus elastica, a low molecular weight-producer in vivo, synthesized rubber polymers approximately twice the molecular weight of those made by Hevea brasiliensis or Parthenium argentatum (which produce high molecular weights in vivo), possibly due to its lower IPP Km. In all species, increasing FPP concentrations increased rubber biosynthetic rate and new molecules initiated but decreased molecular weight by competition with the allylic diphosphate (APP) end of elongating rubber molecules for the APP binding site. Increasing IPP concentrations increased rubber biosynthetic rate and rubber molecular weight, but only when FPP concentrations were below the FPP Km's or where negative cooperativity operated. In conclusion, rubber transferase is not the prime regulator of rubber molecular weight in vivo.

  17. Chronic ethanol consumption alters the selective usage of phosphatidylethanolamine molecular species by methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, J.S.; Pukys, T.; Rubin, E. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors have examined the effects of chronic ethanol consumption on phospholipid methyltransferases, which may play a special role by synthesizing phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules containing predominantly polyunsaturated fatty acids. Rat liver microsomes from adenosylmethionine to convert endogenous phoshatidylethanolamine (PE) to radiolabeled PC, which was separated into its individual molecular species by reversed-phase HPLC. To assess the selective usage of PE molecular species for methylation, the authors determined the mole % of the PE molecular species in microsomes from control and ethanol-fed rats. Chronic ethanol consumption increased the selective usage of phospholipid molecular species containing palmitic acid combined with arachidonic acid or docosahexaenoic acid, whereas it did not affect the use of the corresponding stearic acid species. These results suggest that the long term interference with cellular physiology by altering the metabolism of a specific metabolic pool of molecular species is a mechanism by which chronic ethanol consumption could exert adverse effects of the liver.

  18. Effect of extracorporeal liver support by molecular adsorbents recirculating system and Prometheus on redox state of albumin in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Oettl, Karl; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Krisper, Peter; Stauber, Rudolf E

    2009-10-01

    Oxidative stress is believed to play an important role in acute-on-chronic liver failure (AoCLF). Albumin, an important transport vehicle, was found to be severely oxidized in AoCLF patients. Extracorporeal liver support systems may exert beneficial effects in AoCLF via removal of albumin-bound toxins. At present, two systems are commercially available, the molecular adsorbents recirculating system (MARS) and fractionated plasma separation, adsorption and dialysis (FPAD, also known as Prometheus). The aim of this study was to compare the effect of MARS and Prometheus treatments on the redox state of human serum albumin. Eight patients with AoCLF underwent alternating treatments with either MARS or Prometheus in a randomized cross-over design. Sixteen treatments (eight MARS and eight Prometheus) were available for analysis. The fraction of human mercaptalbumin (HMA), human nonmercaptalbumin-1 (HNA1), and human nonmercaptalbumin-2 (HNA2) were measured before and after single MARS and Prometheus treatments and during follow-up. In AoCLF patients the oxidized fractions of albumin, HNA1, and HNA2 were markedly increased. Both MARS and Prometheus treatments resulted in a shift of HNA1 to HMA, while HNA2 was not significantly affected. This shift in albumin fractions was transient and disappeared within 24 h after treatment. There were no significant differences between MARS and Prometheus treatments with respect to the redox state of albumin. Both MARS and Prometheus treatments lead to transient improvements of the redox state of albumin, which could be beneficial in the treatment of AoCLF.

  19. Molecular identification of Pilobolus species from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Foos, K Michael; Sheehan, Kathy B

    2011-01-01

    Pilobolus, a widely distributed coprophilous fungus, grows on herbivore dung. Species of Pilobolus traditionally are described with imprecise morphological characteristics potentially leading to misidentification. In this study we used PCR analysis of taxonomically informative sequences to provide more consistent species identification from isolates obtained in Yellowstone National Park. We collected Pilobolus park-wide from six taxa of herbivores over 9 y. Multiple transfers of single sporangium isolates provided pure cultures from which DNA was extracted. Sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of DNA that code for rRNA genes were used to distinguish among similar species. We describe several species of Pilobolus associated with herbivores in various habitats, including two species not previously reported, P. heterosporus and P. sphaerosporus. Our results show that phylogenetic species identification of Pilobolus based on sequence analysis of pure culture isolates provides a more reliable means of identifying species than traditional methods.

  20. Phylogenetic Molecular Species Delimitations Unravel Potential New Species in the Pest Genus Spodoptera Guenée, 1852 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Pascaline; Barbut, Jérôme; Le Ru, Bruno; Silvain, Jean-François; Clamens, Anne-Laure; d’Alençon, Emmanuelle; Kergoat, Gael J.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays molecular species delimitation methods promote the identification of species boundaries within complex taxonomic groups by adopting innovative species concepts and theories (e.g. branching patterns, coalescence). As some of them can efficiently deal with large single-locus datasets, they could speed up the process of species discovery compared to more time consuming molecular methods, and benefit from the existence of large public datasets; these methods can also particularly favour scientific research and actions dealing with threatened or economically important taxa. In this study we aim to investigate and clarify the status of economically important moths species belonging to the genus Spodoptera (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), a complex group in which previous phylogenetic analyses and integrative approaches already suggested the possible occurrence of cryptic species and taxonomic ambiguities. In this work, the effectiveness of innovative (and faster) species delimitation approaches to infer putative species boundaries has been successfully tested in Spodoptera, by processing the most comprehensive dataset (in terms of number of species and specimens) ever achieved; results are congruent and reliable, irrespective of the set of parameters and phylogenetic models applied. Our analyses confirm the existence of three potential new species clusters (for S. exigua (Hübner, 1808), S. frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797) and S. mauritia (Boisduval, 1833)) and support the synonymy of S. marima (Schaus, 1904) with S. ornithogalli (Guenée, 1852). They also highlight the ambiguity of the status of S. cosmiodes (Walker, 1858) and S. descoinsi Lalanne-Cassou & Silvain, 1994. This case study highlights the interest of molecular species delimitation methods as valuable tools for species discovery and to emphasize taxonomic ambiguities. PMID:25853412

  1. Elucidation of molecular dynamics of invasive species of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated rice fields are aggressively invaded by weedy rice in the U.S. and worldwide. Weedy rice results in loss of yield and seed contamination. The molecular dynamics of the evolutionary adaptive traits of weedy rice are not fully understood. To understand the molecular basis and identify the i...

  2. Development of magnetic graphene oxide adsorbent for the removal and preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) species from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Rashidi Nodeh, Hamid; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Ali, Imran; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2016-05-01

    New-generation adsorbent, Fe3O4@SiO2/GO, was developed by modification of graphene oxide (GO) with silica-coated (SiO2) magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4). The synthesized adsorbent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The developed adsorbent was used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from environmental waters prior to ICP-MS analysis. Fe3O4@SiO2/GO provided high adsorption capacities, i.e., 7.51 and 11.46 mg g(-1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively, at pH 4.0. Adsorption isotherm, kinetic, and thermodynamic were investigated for As(III) and As(V) adsorption. Preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) were studied using magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) method at pH 9.0 as the adsorbent showed selective adsorption for As(III) only in pH range 7-10. MSPE using Fe3O4@SiO2/GO was developed with good linearities (0.05-2.0 ng mL(-1)) and high coefficient of determination (R (2) = 0.9992 and 0.9985) for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) (3× SD/m, n = 3) obtained were 7.9 pg mL(-1) for As(III) and 28.0 pg mL(-1) for As(V). The LOD obtained is 357-1265× lower than the WHO maximum permissible limit of 10.0 ng mL(-1). The developed MSPE method showed good relative recoveries (72.55-109.71 %) and good RSDs (0.1-4.3 %, n = 3) for spring water, lake, river, and tap water samples. The new-generation adsorbent can be used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from water samples successfully. The adsorbent removal for As(III) is better than As(V).

  3. Molecular characterisation of the species of the genus Zygosaccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Zorman, Tina; Belloch, Carmela; Querol, Amparo

    2003-09-01

    The restriction fragments polymorphisms of the mitochondrial DNA and the PCR fragment that comprised the internal transcribes spacers and the 5.8S rRNA gene, together with the electrophoretic karyotypes of 40 strains from the 10 species of the genus Zygosaccharomyces, including the new species Z. lentus were examined. The RFLP's of the ITS-5.8S region showed a specific restriction pattern for each species, including the new species Z. lentus. The only exception were the species Z. cidri and Z. fermentati that produced identical restriction profiles. The electrophoretic chromosome patterns confirmed the differences between the species of this genus, including the phylogenetic closest species Z. cidri and Z. fermentati. They present few chromosomes ranging from 3 bands (4 or 5 chromosomes) for Z. florentinus to 7 bands (8 to 10 chromosomes) for Z. cidri and Z. fermentati. The strain level resolution power of RFLP's of mtDNA of this genus enabled the characterisation of strains from the same species, even where they are isolated from the same substrate. However, in the cases of Z. bailii and Z. lentus, electrophoretic karyotyping there was considerable variation.

  4. The structures and dynamics of atomic and molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hyungsuk Alexander

    1996-12-01

    Studies of surface structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces are presented. My research has focused on understanding the nature of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions through surface studies of coverage dependency and coadsorption using both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The effect of adsorbate coverage on the surface structures of sulfur on Pt(111) and Rh(111) was examined. On Pt(111), sulfur forms p(2x2) at 0.25 ML of sulfur, which transforms into a more compressed (√3x√3)R30° at 0.33 ML. On both structures, it was found that sulfur adsorbs only in fcc sites. When the coverage of sulfur exceeds 0.33 ML, it formed more complex c(√3x7)rect structure with 3 sulfur atoms per unit cell. In this structure, two different adsorption sites for sulfur atoms were observed - two on fcc sites and one on hcp site within the unit cell.

  5. Tunable controlled release of molecular species from Halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elumalai, Divya Narayan

    Encouraged by potential applications in rust coatings, self-healing composites, selective delivery of drugs, and catalysis, the transport of molecular species through Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), specifically the storage and controlled release of these molecules, has attracted strong interest in recent years. HNTs are a naturally occurring biocompatible nanomaterial that are abundantly and readily available. They are alumosilicate based tubular clay nanotubes with an inner lumen of 15 nm and a length of 600-900 nm. The size of the inner lumen of HNTs may be adjusted by etching. The lumen can be loaded with functional agents like antioxidants, anticorrosion agents, flame-retardant agents, drugs, or proteins, allowing for a sustained release of these agents for hours. The release times can be further tuned for days and months by the addition of tube end-stoppers. In this work a three-dimensional, time-quantified Monte Carlo model that efficiently describes diffusion through and from nanotubes is implemented. Controlled delivery from Halloysite Nanotubes (HNT) is modeled based on interactions between the HNT's inner wall and the nanoparticles (NP) and among NPs themselves. The model was validated using experimental data published in the literature. The validated model is then used to study the effect of multiple parameters like HNT diameter and length, particle charge, ambient temperature and the creation of smart caps at the tube ends on the release of encapsulated NPs. The results show that release profiles depend on the size distribution of the HNT batch used for the experiment, as delivery is sensitive to HNT lumen and length. The effect of the addition of end-caps to the HNTs, on the rate of release of encapsulated NPs is also studied here. The results show that the release profiles are significantly affected by the addition of end caps to the HNTs and is sensitive to the end-cap pore lumen. A very good agreement with the experiment is observed when a weight

  6. Ecology has contrasting effects on genetic variation within species versus rates of molecular evolution across species in water beetles

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Tomochika; Vogler, Alfried P.; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analysis is a potentially powerful approach to study the effects of ecological traits on genetic variation and rate of evolution across species. However, the lack of suitable datasets means that comparative studies of correlates of genetic traits across an entire clade have been rare. Here, we use a large DNA-barcode dataset (5062 sequences) of water beetles to test the effects of species ecology and geographical distribution on genetic variation within species and rates of molecular evolution across species. We investigated species traits predicted to influence their genetic characteristics, such as surrogate measures of species population size, latitudinal distribution and habitat types, taking phylogeny into account. Genetic variation of cytochrome oxidase I in water beetles was positively correlated with occupancy (numbers of sites of species presence) and negatively with latitude, whereas substitution rates across species depended mainly on habitat types, and running water specialists had the highest rate. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions from nearly-neutral theories of evolution, and suggest that the comparative analysis using large databases can give insights into correlates of genetic variation and molecular evolution. PMID:25621335

  7. Ecology has contrasting effects on genetic variation within species versus rates of molecular evolution across species in water beetles.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Tomochika; Vogler, Alfried P; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2015-01-22

    Comparative analysis is a potentially powerful approach to study the effects of ecological traits on genetic variation and rate of evolution across species. However, the lack of suitable datasets means that comparative studies of correlates of genetic traits across an entire clade have been rare. Here, we use a large DNA-barcode dataset (5062 sequences) of water beetles to test the effects of species ecology and geographical distribution on genetic variation within species and rates of molecular evolution across species. We investigated species traits predicted to influence their genetic characteristics, such as surrogate measures of species population size, latitudinal distribution and habitat types, taking phylogeny into account. Genetic variation of cytochrome oxidase I in water beetles was positively correlated with occupancy (numbers of sites of species presence) and negatively with latitude, whereas substitution rates across species depended mainly on habitat types, and running water specialists had the highest rate. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions from nearly-neutral theories of evolution, and suggest that the comparative analysis using large databases can give insights into correlates of genetic variation and molecular evolution.

  8. Dynamics of Molecules Adsorbed in Zeolitic Systems: Neutron Scattering and MD Simulation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Sharma, V. K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2011-07-01

    Zeolites represent a class of technologically important materials because of their characteristic properties of molecular sieving and catalysis, which makes them indispensable in the petroleum industries. While the catalytic properties depend upon many factors, a major role is played by the dynamics of hydrocarbon gases. In order to be able to tailor make these materials for use in industry for catalytic and sieving purposes, it is important to understand the dynamical properties of the guest molecules adsorbed in the zeolitic materials. It is of interest to study the effects of size and shape of guest molecules and also the host zeolitic structure, governing the diffusion mechanism of the adsorbed species. Here we report the results of Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of two hydrocarbons namely acetylene and propylene adsorbed in two structurally different zeolites Na-Y and ZSM-5.

  9. Molecular identification of Paragonimus species by DNA pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Srichantaratsamee, Chutatip; Anamnart, Witthaya; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-06-01

    DNA pyrosequencing for PCR amplicons is an attractive strategy for the identification of microorganisms because of its short time performance for large number of samples. In this study, the primers targeting the fragment of ITS2 region of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene were newly developed for pyrosequencing-based identification of 6 Paragonimus species, Paragonimus bangkokensis, Paragonimus harinasutai, Paragonimus heterotremus, Paragonimus macrorchis, Paragonimus siamensis and Paragonimus westermani. Pyrosequencing determination of 39 nucleotides of partial ITS2 region could discriminate 6 Paragonimus species, and could also detect intra-species genetic variation of P. macrorchis. This DNA pyrosequencing-based identification can be a valuable tool to improve species-level identification of Paragonimus in the endemic areas.

  10. Blood cytokine, chemokine and gene expression in cholestasis patients with intractable pruritus treated with a molecular adsorbent recirculating system: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Lisboa, Luiz F; Asthana, Sonal; Kremer, Andreas E; Swain, Mark; Bagshaw, Sean M; Gibney, Noel; Karvellas, Constantine J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is an albumin-dialysis modality that has been investigated predominantly in patients with acute and acute-on-chronic liver failure. OBJECTIVES: To report the clinical efficacy and safety of MARS therapy for intractable pruritus in cholestasis patients with stable chronic liver disease, characterizing the impact of MARS on cytokine levels and on the transcriptome in the blood compartment. METHODS: MARS therapy was performed on three patients with cholestatic liver disease using 8 h runs for two consecutive days. The expression levels of 65 cytokines/chemokines and 24,000 genes were profiled by Luminex (Luminex Corporation, USA) and microarray, respectively. RESULTS: A quality-of-life assessment demonstrated a marked improvement during therapy, which was sustained in two of three patients. No bleeding or infectious complications were observed. Bile acid levels were markedly reduced following MARS (mean [± SD] pretreatment 478.9±112.2 μmol/L versus post-treatment 89.7±68.8 μmol/L). Concordant decreases in cytokine/chemokine levels were noted for interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 (p40), RANTES, tranforming growth factor-alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and thrombopoietin following MARS. On microarray profiling, biologically relevant concordant changes among all patients were evident for 20 different genes (10 upregulated and 10 downregulated). The upregulation of several potentially immune suppressive/regulatory genes (eg, early growth response 3 [EGR-3], ephrin-A2 [EFNA2] and serum amyloid A1 [SAA1]), concurrent with downregulation of genes involved in innate immunity (eg, toll-like receptor 4 interactor with leucine-rich repeats [TRIL]) and inflammation (eg, ephrin receptor B1 [EPHB1]), was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This investigative approach offers new insights into intractable pruritus and suggests future therapeutic targets. The clinical benefit of MARS in cholestasis patients with

  11. Molecular identification of Entamoeba species in savanna woodland chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii).

    PubMed

    Jirků-Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Čepička, Ivan; Kalousová, Barbora; Jirků, Milan; Stewart, Fiona; Levecke, Bruno; Modrý, David; Piel, Alex K; Petrželková, Klára J

    2016-05-01

    To address the molecular diversity and occurrence of pathogenic species of the genus Entamoeba spp. in wild non-human primates (NHP) we conducted molecular-phylogenetic analyses on Entamoeba from wild chimpanzees living in the Issa Valley, Tanzania. We compared the sensitivity of molecular [using a genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)] and coproscopic detection (merthiolate-iodine-formaldehyde concentration) of Entamoeba spp. We identified Entamoeba spp. in 72 chimpanzee fecal samples (79%) subjected to species-specific PCRs for six Entamoeba species/groups (Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba nuttalli, Entamoeba dispar, Entamoeba moshkovskii, Entamoeba coli and Entamoeba polecki ST2). We recorded three Entamoeba species: E. coli (47%), E. dispar (16%), Entamoeba hartmanni (51%). Coproscopically, we could only distinguish the cysts of complex E. histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii/nuttalli and E. coli. Molecular prevalence of entamoebas was higher than the prevalence based on the coproscopic examination. Our molecular phylogenies showed that sequences of E. dispar and E. coli from Issa chimpanzees are closely related to sequences from humans and other NHP from GenBank. The results showed that wild chimpanzees harbour Entamoeba species similar to those occurring in humans; however, no pathogenic species were detected. Molecular-phylogenetic methods are critical to improve diagnostics of entamoebas in wild NHP and for determining an accurate prevalence of Entamoeba species.

  12. Molecular approaches identify known species, reveal cryptic species and verify host specificity of Chinese Philotrypesis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mei-Jiao; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Bian, Sheng-Nan; Li, Yan-Wei; Niu, Li-Ming; Hu, Hao-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Shan; Murphy, Robert W; Huang, Da-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Philotrypesis, a major component of the fig wasp community (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), is a model taxon for studying male fighting and mating behaviour. Its extreme sexual dimorphism and male polymorphism render species identification uncertain and in-depth research on its ecology, behaviour and other evolutionary topics challenging. The fig wasps' enclosed habitat within the syconia makes their mating behaviour inaccessible, to the extent of matching conspecific females and males. In this study, we combine morphological and molecular analyses to identify species of Philotrypesis sampled from south China and to associate their extraordinarily dimorphic genders and labile male morphologies. Morphological evaluations of females identify 22 species and 28 male morphs. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 data detect 21 species using females, and 15 species among the males. Most of the males match the species as delimited by females. Both markers reveal cryptic species in P. quadrisetosa on Ficus vasculosa. Most species of wasps live on one species of fig but three species co-occur in two hosts (F. microcarpa and F. benjamina), which indicates host switching.

  13. Molecular characterization of DSC1 orthologs in invertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying-Jun; Yu, Lin-Lin; Xu, Hai-Jun; Dong, Ke; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2012-05-01

    DSC1 and BSC1 are two founding members of a novel family of invertebrate voltage-gated cation channels with close structural and evolutionary relationships to voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels. In this study, we searched the published genome sequences for DSC1 orthologs. DSC1 orthologs were found in all 48 insect species, and in other invertebrate species belonging to phyla Mollusca, Cnidaria, Hemichordata and Echinodermata. However, DSC1 orthologs were not found in four arachnid species, Ixodes scapularis, Rhipicephalus microplus, Tetranychus urticae and Varroa destructor, two species in Annelida or any vertebrate species. We then cloned and sequenced NlSC1 and BmSC1 full-length cDNAs from the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) and the silkworm (Bombyx mori), respectively. NlSC1 and BmSC1 share about 50% identity with DSC1, and the expression of NlSC1 and BmSC1 transcripts was most abundant in the head and antenna in adults. All DSC1 orthologs contain a unique and conserved DEEA motif, instead of the EEEE or EEDD motif in classical calcium channels or the DEKA motif in sodium channels. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that DSC1 and its orthologs form a separate group distinct from the classical voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels and constitute a unique family of cation channels. The DSC1/BSC1-family channels could be potential targets of new and safe insecticides for pest control.

  14. Molecular and biochemical properties of storage mites (except Blomia species).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Iraola, Victor; Carnés, Jerónimo

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the allergological importance of different mite species not belonging to the family Pyroglyphidae has been demonstrated. These mites, commonly named storage mites, include Lepidoglyphus destructor, Glycyphagus domesticus, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Acarus siro, Aleuroglyphus ovatus, Suidasia medanensis and Thyreophagus entomophagus. Several allergens from these species have been purified, sequenced and cloned. Many of these allergens have shown sequence homology and a biological function similar to those previously described in Blomia tropicalis and the Dermatophagoides spp. The main allergens described in storage mites include fatty acid binding proteins, tropomysin and paramyosin homologues, apoliphorine like proteins, alfa-tubulines and other, such as group 2, 5 and 7 allergens, which definitive biological function has not been described yet. Besides the purification and characterization of allergens, the allergenicity of other species such as Acarus farris, Austroglycyphagus malaysiensis, Blomia kulagini and B. tjibodas, Cheyletus eruditus, Chortoglyphus arcuatus, Gohieria fusca, Thyreophagus entomophagus and Tyrophagus longior has been investigated. Research has also been conducted to identify allergens in parasitic mites, such as Psoroptes ovis, Sarcoptes scabiei, Varroa jacobsoni, Diplaegidia columbae and Hemisarcoptes cooremani. The allergenicity of mites present in agricultural environments has been investigated. Crossreactivity studies have also been performed to elucidate to what extent all these mites share common, or species specific epitopes. Herein we present a comprehensive review of the allergenicity of mite species which have been implicated in human respiratory and/or dermatological diseases.

  15. Molecular analysis of Malassezia species isolated from hospitalized neonates.

    PubMed

    Zomorodain, Kamiar; Mirhendi, Hossein; Tarazooie, Bita; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Zeraati, Hojjat; Nayeri, Fatemeh

    2008-01-01

    Malassezia species are a part of the skin microflora of neonates. Under certain circumstances, they can cause diseases ranging from simple pustulosis to lifethreatening fungemia in newborn infants. Little information is available about the epidemiology of Malassezia species in neonates. In the present study, we successfully isolated Malassezia yeasts from 68.7% of hospitalized neonates. Using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFPL), M. furfur (88.06%) was identified as the most isolated species, followed in frequency by M. globosa (10.48%), M. obtusa (0.73%), and M. slooffiae (0.73%). Among the variables studied, only a longer stay in the ward resulted in a higher colonization rate. Using multiple logistic regression, only the type of hospital and ward had some effects on the colonization rate. Our results supported the hypothesis that neonates acquire Malassezia flora through direct contact with their mothers or hospital personnel.

  16. Altered expression of ganglioside GM3 molecular species and a potential regulatory role during myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Go, Shinji; Go, Shiori; Veillon, Lucas; Ciampa, Maria Grazia; Mauri, Laura; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken; Prinetti, Alessandro; Sonnino, Sandro; Inokuchi, Jin-Ichi

    2017-03-08

    Gangliosides (sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids) help regulate many important biological processes, including cell proliferation, signal transduction, and differentiation, via formation of functional microdomains in plasma membranes. The structural diversity of gangliosides arises from both the ceramide moiety and glycan portion. Recently, differing molecular species of a given ganglioside are suggested to have distinct biological properties, and regulate specific and distinct biological events. Elucidation of the function of each molecular species is important and will provide new insights into ganglioside biology. Gangliosides are also suggested to be involved in skeletal muscle differentiation; however, the differential roles of ganglioside molecular species remain unclear. We describe here striking changes in quantity and quality of gangliosides (particularly GM3) during differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblast cells, and key roles played by distinct GM3 molecular species at each step of the process.

  17. Use of Sloppy Molecular Beacon Probes for Identification of Mycobacterial Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    El-Hajj, Hiyam H.; Marras, Salvatore A. E.; Tyagi, Sanjay; Shashkina, Elena; Kamboj, Mini; Kiehn, Timothy E.; Glickman, Michael S.; Kramer, Fred Russell; Alland, David

    2009-01-01

    We report here the use of novel “sloppy” molecular beacon probes in homogeneous PCR screening assays in which thermal denaturation of the resulting probe-amplicon hybrids provides a characteristic set of amplicon melting temperature (Tm) values that identify which species is present in a sample. Sloppy molecular beacons possess relatively long probe sequences, enabling them to form hybrids with amplicons from many different species despite the presence of mismatched base pairs. By using four sloppy molecular beacons, each possessing a different probe sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, four different Tm values can be determined simultaneously. We tested this technique with 27 different species of mycobacteria and found that each species generates a unique, highly reproducible signature that is unaffected by the initial bacterial DNA concentration. Utilizing this general paradigm, screening assays can be designed for the identification of a wide range of species. PMID:19171684

  18. Distribution and Molecular Diversity of Arborescent Gossypium Species.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mexico is a center of diversity of Gossypium. As currently circumscribed, arborescent Gossypium species (Section Erioxylum) are widely distributed in dry deciduous forests located from the central state of Sinaloa at the north of its range to the eastern state of Oaxaca in the south. However, extens...

  19. Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Govind, Niranjan; Walter, Eric D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Devaraj, Arun; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Karim, Ayman M.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-01-01

    Ability to predict the solubility and stability of lithium polysulfide is vital in realizing longer lasting lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein we report a combined computational and experimental spectroscopic analysis to understand the dissolution mechanism of lithium polysulfide species in an aprotic solvent medium. Multinuclear NMR and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) analysis reveals that the lithium exchange between polysulfide species and solvent molecule constitutes the first step in the dissolution process. Lithium exchange leads to de-lithiated polysulfide ions which subsequently forms highly reactive free radicals through disproportion reaction. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility.

  20. Molecular detection of a potentially toxic diatom species.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Bidhan Chandra; Cimarelli, Lucia; Singh, Kumar Saurabh; Brandi, Letizia; Brandi, Anna; Puccinelli, Camilla; Marcheggiani, Stefania; Spurio, Roberto

    2015-05-06

    A few diatom species produce toxins that affect human and animal health. Among these, members of the Pseudo-nitzschia genus were the first diatoms unambiguously identified as producer of domoic acid, a neurotoxin affecting molluscan shell-fish, birds, marine mammals, and humans. Evidence exists indicating the involvement of another diatom genus, Amphora, as a potential producer of domoic acid. We present a strategy for the detection of the diatom species Amphora coffeaeformis based on the development of species-specific oligonucleotide probes and their application in microarray hybridization experiments. This approach is based on the use of two marker genes highly conserved in all diatoms, but endowed with sufficient genetic divergence to discriminate diatoms at the species level. A region of approximately 450 bp of these previously unexplored marker genes, coding for elongation factor 1-a (eEF1-a) and silicic acid transporter (SIT), was used to design oligonucleotide probes that were tested for specificity in combination with the corresponding fluorescently labeled DNA targets. The results presented in this work suggest a possible use of this DNA chip technology for the selective detection of A. coffeaeformis in environmental settings where the presence of this potential toxin producer may represent a threat to human and animal health. In addition, the same basic approach can be adapted to a wider range of diatoms for the simultaneous detection of microorganisms used as biomarkers of different water quality levels.

  1. Identification of molecular species of acylglycerols of Philippine wild edible mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild edible mushrooms are widely consumed in many countries. We successfully cultivated four edible, medicinal Philippine mushrooms in liquid culture. Recently, we identified the molecular species of acylglycerols in the lipid extract of mushroom G. lucidum NRRL66208. One hundred and three molecular...

  2. The role of surface oxygenated-species and adsorbed hydrogen in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism and product selectivity on Pd-based catalysts in acid media.

    PubMed

    Rahul, R; Singh, R K; Bera, B; Devivaraprasad, R; Neergat, M

    2015-06-21

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is investigated on bulk PdO-based catalysts (oxides of Pd and Pd3Co) in oxygen-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 to establish the role of surface oxides and adsorbed hydrogen in the activity and product selectivity (H2O/H2O2). The initial voltammetric features suggest that the oxides are inactive toward ORR. The evolution of the ORR voltammograms and potential-dependent H2O2 generation features on the PdO catalyst suggest gradual and parallel in situ reduction of the bulk PdO phase below ∼0.4 V in the hydrogen underpotential deposition (Hupd) region; the reduction of the bulk PdO catalyst is confirmed from the X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. The potential-dependent H2O2 generation features originate due to the presence of surface oxides and adsorbed hydrogen; this is further confirmed using halide ions (Cl(-) and Br(-)) and peroxide as the external impurities.

  3. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  4. Characterization of glycerophospholipid molecular species in six species of edible clams by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Yuan; Zhou, Da-Yong; Zhao, Qi; Yin, Fa-Wen; Hu, Xiao-Pei; Song, Liang; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Jian-Run; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2017-03-15

    The molecular species of glycerophosphocholine (GPCho), glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPEtn), glycerophosphoserine (GPSer), lysoglycerophosphocholine (LGPCho) and lysoglycerophosphoethanolamine (LGPEtn) from six species of edible clams were characterized by using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. At least 435, 453, 468, 443, 427 and 444 glycerophospholipid (GP) molecular species were characterized, respectively, from Cyclina sinensis, Mactra chinensis Philippi, Mactra veneriformis Reeve, Meretrix meretrix, Ruditapes philippinarum and Saxidomus purpurata. Most of the predominant GP molecular species in clam contained polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), indicating that clam is a potential resource of GP enriched PUFA. According to the amount of the major molecular species containing EPA and DHA, Cyclina sinensis was the best fit species for GPCho, Mactra veneriformis Reeve was the best fit species for GPEtn, Mactra chinensis Philippi was the best fit species for GPSer and LGPEtn, and Saxidomus purpurata was the best fit species for LGPCho.

  5. Molecular identification and differentiation of Brevibacterium species and strains.

    PubMed

    Hoppe-Seyler, Tobias-Simon; Jaeger, Beate; Bockelmann, Wilhelm; Geis, Arnold; Heller, Knut-Jochem

    2007-01-01

    Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction enzyme analysis (ARDRA), pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping were used to differentiate among 24 strains of Brevibacterium linens, Brevibacterium casei and Brevibacterium epidermidis obtained from type culture collections or isolated from various smear ripened cheeses. ARDRA was applied to the 16S rDNA. B. linens was shown to be a quite heterogenic group with 2 to at least 4 copies of rrn operons per strain with aberrant nucleotide sequences. AccI gave genus specific restriction patterns and was used to separate Brevibacterium from Corynebacterium species. The expected species specificity of TaqI applied to B. linens type culture strains, but not to all strains isolated from cheese. By AvaI restriction, B. casei and B. linens were differentiated from B. epidermidis and the orange pigmented Arthrobacter casei, a new species of coryneform bacteria; by XmnI restriction, B. linens and B. epidermidis were differentiated from B. casei. One of 4 B. linens genotypes could not be distinguished from B. casei by this method. Here, the typical orange B. linens pigments were used for classification, which was confirmed by partial sequencing of the 16S rDNA.

  6. Quantitative analysis of phosphatidylcholine molecular species using HPLC and light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, J F; Gadella, B M; van Golde, L M; Tielens, A G

    1998-02-01

    A number of HPLC chromatographic procedures can be used to separate intact molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (PC), but on-line quantification has remained problematic due to insensitivity of UV-detection for saturated species. Here, a new method is presented, separating all major PC molecular species from a variety of biological samples in intact form using a single, short and isocratic run. Species were separated on two RP18 reverse-phase columns in series and all species displayed an exponential relation between retention time and the percentage of acetonitrile or triethylamine in the mobile phase, allowing optimization of the mobile phase on a theoretical base, rather than on time-consuming test-runs. The use of triethylamine as a volatile additive instead of choline chloride allowed the use of light scattering detection. On a molar base, the response of the detector was invariant between species and allowed quantification of as little as 50 pmoles. The method was tested using phosphatidylcholines with widely different molecular species patterns, such a PC from rat liver, porcine pulmonary surfactant, bovine heart, boar sperm cells, and the parasite Schistosoma mansoni. As only volatile components are present in the solvents, individual molecular species can easily be recovered in pure form from the column effluent, enabling their further analysis (e.g., scintillation counting).

  7. Molecular method for Bartonella species identification in clinical and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    García-Esteban, Coral; Gil, Horacio; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; Gerrikagoitia, Xeider; Barandika, Jesse; Escudero, Raquel; Jado, Isabel; García-Amil, Cristina; Barral, Marta; García-Pérez, Ana L; Bhide, Mangesh; Anda, Pedro

    2008-02-01

    A new, efficient molecular method for detection of Bartonella, based on the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer and 16S rRNA amplification by multiplex PCR combined with reverse line blotting, was designed. This assay could simultaneously detect 20 different known species and other Bartonella species not described previously.

  8. A Molecular Orbital Study of Atmospherically Important Species.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    from the OH to the H2 0 upon formation of the hydrogen bond. The electron density is transferred to the oxygen and terminal hydrogen of the water ...Method," J. Chem. Phys., 52, 3362-3368, 1970. • -o . ..-.. . -34- 48. Chipman, D.M. "Effect of Molecular Geometry on the Electron Affinity of Water ...34 J. Phvs. Chem., 82, 1080-1083, 1978. 49. Benedict, W.S., N. Gailar, and E.K. Plvler, "Rotation-Vibration Spectra of Deuteriated Water Vapor," J. Chem

  9. Molecular characterization of Babesia and Cytauxzoon species in wild South-African meerkats.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, Sarah; Menard, Sandie; Berry, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Piroplasms, including Babesia, Cytauxzoon and Theileria species, frequently infect domestic and wild mammals. At present, there is no information on the occurrence and molecular identity of these tick-borne blood parasites in the meerkat, one of South Africa's most endearing wildlife celebrities. Meerkats live in territorial groups, which may occur on ranchland in close proximity to humans, pets and livestock. Blood collected from 46 healthy meerkats living in the South-African Kalahari desert was screened by microscopy and molecular methods, using PCR and DNA sequencing of 18S rRNA and ITS1 genes. We found that meerkats were infected by 2 species: one species related to Babesia sp. and one species related to Cytauxzoon sp. Ninety one percent of the meerkats were infected by the Cytauxzoon and/or the Babesia species. Co-infection occurred in 46% of meerkats. The pathogenicity and vectors of these two piroplasm species remains to be determined.

  10. DNA Barcoding and Molecular Phylogeny of Drosophila lini and Its Sibling Species.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Feng; Wen, Shuo-Yang; Kawai, Kuniko; Gao, Jian-Jun; Hu, Yao-Guang; Segawa, Ryoko; Toda, Masanori J

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila lini and its two sibling species, D. ohnishii and D. ogumai, are hardly distinguishable from one another in morphology. These species are more or less reproductively isolated. The mitochondrial ND2 and COI-COII and the nuclear ITS1-ITS2 regions were sequenced to seek for the possibility of DNA barcoding and to reconstruct the phylogeny of them. The character-based approach for DNA barcoding detected some diagnostic nucleotides only for monophyletic D. ogumai, but no informative sites for the other two very closely species, D. lini and D. ohnishii, of which strains intermingled in the molecular phylogenetic trees. Thus, this study provides another case of limited applicability of DNA barcoding in species delineation, as in other cases of related Drosophila species. The molecular phylogenetic tree inferred from the concatenated sequences strongly supported the monophyly of the cluster of the three species, that is, the lini clade. We propose some hypotheses of evolutionary events in this clade.

  11. A perfect time to harness advanced molecular technologies to explore the fundamental biology of Toxocara species.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Robin B

    2013-04-15

    Toxocarosis is of major canine health and socioeconomic importance worldwide. Although many studies have given insights into toxocarosis, to date, there has been limited exploration of the molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, epidemiology and ecology of Toxocara species as well as parasite-host interactions using '-omic' technologies. The present article gives a background on Toxocara species and toxocarosis, describes molecular tools for specific identification and genetic analysis, and provides a prospective view of the benefits that advanced molecular technologies will have towards better understanding the parasites and disease. Tackling key biological questions employing a 'systems biology' approach should lead to new and improved strategies for the treatment, diagnosis and control of toxocarosis.

  12. Molecular characterization of Theileria species associated with mortality in four species of African antelopes.

    PubMed

    Nijhof, A M; Pillay, V; Steyl, J; Prozesky, L; Stoltsz, W H; Lawrence, J A; Penzhorn, B L; Jongejan, F

    2005-12-01

    Pathogen DNA was isolated from roan antelope (Hippotragus equinus), sable antelope (Hippotragus niger), greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), and common gray duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia) in South Africa whose deaths were attributed to either theileriosis or cytauxzoonosis. We developed Theileria species-specific probes used in combination with reverse line blot hybridization assays and identified three different species of Theileria in four African antelope species. The close phylogenetic relationship between members of the genera Theileria and Cytauxzoon, similarities in the morphologies of developmental stages, and confusion in the literature regarding theileriosis or cytauxzoonosis are discussed.

  13. Molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and assessment of zoonotic transmission.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lihua; Fayer, Ronald

    2008-09-01

    The molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is essential for accurately identifying organisms and assessing zoonotic transmission. Results of recent molecular epidemiological studies strongly suggest that zoonotic transmission plays an important role in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology. In such cases the most prevalent zoonotic species is Cryptosporidium parvum. Genotyping and subtyping data suggest that zoonotic transmission is not as prevalent in the epidemiology of giardiasis. Molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is a relatively recent application that is evolving as new genes are found that increase the accuracy of identification while discovering a greater diversity of species and yet unnamed taxa within these two important genera. As molecular data accumulate, our understanding of the role of zoonotic transmission in epidemiology and clinical manifestations is becoming clearer.

  14. How to describe a cryptic species? Practical challenges of molecular taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular methods of species delineation are rapidly developing and widely considered as fast and efficient means to discover species and face the 'taxonomic impediment’ in times of biodiversity crisis. So far, however, this form of DNA taxonomy frequently remains incomplete, lacking the final step of formal species description, thus enhancing rather than reducing impediments in taxonomy. DNA sequence information contributes valuable diagnostic characters and –at least for cryptic species – could even serve as the backbone of a taxonomic description. To this end solutions for a number of practical problems must be found, including a way in which molecular data can be presented to fulfill the formal requirements every description must meet. Multi-gene barcoding and a combined molecular species delineation approach recently revealed a radiation of at least 12 more or less cryptic species in the marine meiofaunal slug genus Pontohedyle (Acochlidia, Heterobranchia). All identified candidate species are well delimited by a consensus across different methods based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers. Results The detailed microanatomical redescription of Pontohedyle verrucosa provided in the present paper does not reveal reliable characters for diagnosing even the two major clades identified within the genus on molecular data. We thus characterize three previously valid Pontohedyle species based on four genetic markers (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 16S rRNA, nuclear 28S and 18S rRNA) and formally describe nine cryptic new species (P. kepii sp. nov., P. joni sp. nov., P. neridae sp. nov., P. liliae sp. nov., P. wiggi sp. nov., P. wenzli sp. nov., P. peteryalli sp. nov., P. martynovi sp. nov., P. yurihookeri sp. nov.) applying molecular taxonomy, based on diagnostic nucleotides in DNA sequences of the four markers. Due to the minute size of the animals, entire specimens were used for extraction, consequently the holotype is a voucher of

  15. Hybridization and endangered species protection in the molecular era.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Robert K; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-06-01

    After decades of discussion, there is little consensus on the extent to which hybrids between endangered and nonendangered species should be protected by US law. As increasingly larger, genome-scale data sets are developed, we can identify individuals and populations with even trace levels of genetic admixture, making the 'hybrid problem' all the more difficult. We developed a decision-tree framework for evaluating hybrid protection, including both the processes that produced hybrids (human-mediated or natural) and the ecological impact of hybrids on natural ecosystems. We then evaluated our decision tree for four case studies drawn from our own work and briefly discuss several other cases from the literature. Throughout, we highlight the management outcomes that our approach provides and the nuances of hybridization as a conservation problem.

  16. Molecular evidence of Sarcocystis species in captive snakes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Abe, Niichiro; Matsubara, Katsuki; Tamukai, Kenichi; Miwa, Yasutsugu; Takami, Kazutoshi

    2015-08-01

    Sarcocystis nesbitti, using snakes as the definitive host, is a causative agent of acute human muscular sarcocystosis in Malaysia. Therefore, it is important to explore the distribution and prevalence of S. nesbitti in snakes. Nevertheless, epizootiological information of S. nesbitti in snakes remains insufficient because few surveys have assessed Sarcocystis infection in snakes in endemic countries. In Japan, snakes are popular exotic pet animals that are imported from overseas, but the degree of Sarcocystis infection in them remains unclear. The possibility exists that muscular sarcocystosis by S. nesbitti occurs in contact with captive snakes in non-endemic countries. For a total of 125 snake faecal samples from 67 snake species collected at animal hospitals, pet shops and a zoo, this study investigated the presence of Sarcocystis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the 18S ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA). Four (3.2%) faecal samples were positive by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rDNA sequences obtained from four amplification products revealed one isolate from a beauty snake (Elaphe taeniura), Sarcocystis zuoi, which uses rat snakes as the definitive host. The isolate from a Macklot's python (Liasis mackloti) was closely related with unidentified Sarcocystis sp. from reticulated pythons in Malaysia. The remaining two isolates from tree boas (Corallus spp.) were closely related with Sarcocystis lacertae, Sarcocystis gallotiae and unidentified Sarcocystis sp. from smooth snakes, Tenerife lizards and European shrews, respectively. This report is the first of a study examining the distribution of Sarcocystis species in captive snakes in Japan.

  17. Molecular and morphologic data reveal multiple species in Peromyscus pectoralis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert D.; Schmidly, David J.; Amman, Brian R.; Platt, Roy N.; Neumann, Kathy M.; Huynh, Howard M.; Muñiz-Martínez, Raúl; López-González, Celia; Ordóñez-Garza, Nicté

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequence and morphometric data were used to re-evaluate the taxonomy and systematics of Peromyscus pectoralis. Phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference) of DNA sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene in 44 samples of P. pectoralis indicated 2 well-supported monophyletic clades. The 1st clade contained specimens from Texas historically assigned to P. p. laceianus; the 2nd was comprised of specimens previously referable to P. p. collinus, P. p. laceianus, and P. p. pectoralis obtained from northern and eastern Mexico. Levels of genetic variation (~7%) between these 2 clades indicated that the genetic divergence typically exceeded that reported for other species of Peromyscus. Samples of P. p. laceianus north and south of the Río Grande were not monophyletic. In addition, samples representing P. p. collinus and P. p. pectoralis formed 2 clades that differed genetically by 7.14%. Multivariate analyses of external and cranial measurements from 63 populations of P. pectoralis revealed 4 morpho-groups consistent with clades in the DNA sequence analysis: 1 from Texas and New Mexico assignable to P. p. laceianus; a 2nd from western and southern Mexico assignable to P. p. pectoralis; a 3rd from northern and central Mexico previously assigned to P. p. pectoralis but herein shown to represent an undescribed taxon; and a 4th from southeastern Mexico assignable to P. p. collinus. Based on the concordance of these results, populations from the United States are referred to as P. laceianus, whereas populations from Mexico are referred to as P. pectoralis (including some samples historically assigned to P. p. collinus, P. p. laceianus, and P. p. pectoralis). A new subspecies is described to represent populations south of the Río Grande in northern and central Mexico. Additional research is needed to discern if P. p. collinus warrants species recognition. PMID:26937045

  18. Thermochemistry of new molecular species: SBr and HSBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornellas, Fernando R.

    2007-05-01

    Total energies, optimized geometries, and vibrational frequencies of SBr and HSBr have been evaluated at the coupled cluster level of theory with the correlation consistent basis sets. Extrapolated to the complete basis set limit and with corrections for core-valence, scalar relativistic, and spin-orbit effects, atomization energies were computed and then combined with the experimental heats of formation of the atomic species to generate very accurate heats of formation for the species SBr and HSBr. For SBr, we predict 37.45 and 36.07kcal/mol for ΔHf(0K ) and ΔHf (298.15K ), respectively, in very good agreement with the inferred experimental values of 37.98 and 36.15kcal/mol. For HSBr, the estimate turns out to be 10.38 and 8.29kcal/mol for ΔHf (0K ) and ΔHf (298.15K ), respectively. Using the more recent HBrO experimental heat of formation at 298.15K of Lock et al., [J. Phys. Chem. 100, 7972 (1996)] the inferred experimental value for HSBr is predicted to be 8.15kcal/mol, compared with 8.65kcal/mol derived from the data of Ruscic and Berkowitz [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 7795 (1994)]. Considering the better agreement of the result with that predicted using the experimental value of ΔHf(298.15K ) of Lock et al., the author also supports the suggestion made by Denis [J. Phys. Chem. A. 110, 5887 (2006)] that the result of Lock et al. should be preferred over the one of Ruscic and Berkowitz. For ΔHf(0K ), the author found 10.38 and 10.56kcal/mol, respectively, for the theoretical and inferred experimental estimates.

  19. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms in teratogenesis involving reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; Bhuller, Yadvinder; Chen, Connie S; Jeng, Winnie; Kasapinovic, Sonja; Kennedy, Julia C; Kim, Perry M; Laposa, Rebecca R; McCallum, Gordon P; Nicol, Christopher J; Parman, Toufan; Wiley, Michael J; Wong, Andrea W

    2005-09-01

    Developmental pathologies may result from endogenous or xenobiotic-enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules and/or alter signal transduction. This minireview focuses upon several model drugs (phenytoin, thalidomide, methamphetamine), environmental chemicals (benzo[a]pyrene) and gamma irradiation to examine this hypothesis in vivo and in embryo culture using mouse, rat and rabbit models. Embryonic prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) and lipoxygenases bioactivate xenobiotics to free radical intermediates that initiate ROS formation, resulting in oxidation of proteins, lipids and DNA. Oxidative DNA damage and embryopathies are reduced in PHS knockout mice, and in mice treated with PHS inhibitors, antioxidative enzymes, antioxidants and free radical trapping agents. Thalidomide causes embryonic DNA oxidation in susceptible (rabbit) but not resistant (mouse) species. Embryopathies are increased in mutant mice deficient in the antioxidative enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), or by glutathione (GSH) depletion, or inhibition of GSH peroxidase or GSH reductase. Inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice are partially protected. Inhibition of Ras or NF-kB pathways reduces embryopathies, implicating ROS-mediated signal transduction. Atm and p53 knockout mice deficient in DNA damage response/repair are more susceptible to xenobiotic or radiation embryopathies, suggesting a teratological role for DNA damage, consistent with enhanced susceptibility to methamphetamine in ogg1 knockout mice with deficient repair of oxidative DNA damage. Even endogenous embryonic oxidative stress carries a risk, since untreated G6PD- or ATM-deficient mice have increased embryopathies. Thus, embryonic processes regulating the balance of ROS formation, oxidative DNA damage and repair, and ROS-mediated signal transduction may be important determinants of teratological risk.

  20. Delimitating cryptic species in the Gracilaria domingensis complex (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta) using molecular and morphological data.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Goia de M; Gurgel, C Frederico D; Costa, Emmanuelle da S; de Jesus, Priscila B; Oliveira, Mariana C; Oliveira, Eurico C; Davis, Charles C; Nunes, José Marcos de Castro

    2016-12-01

    Species in the genus Gracilaria that display conspicuously flattened vegetative morphologies are a taxonomically challenging group of marine benthic red algae. This is a result of their species richness, morphological similarity, and broad phenotypic plasticity. Within this group, the Gracilaria domingensis complex is one of the most common, conspicuous, and morphologically variable species along the tropical western Atlantic Ocean. Previous research has identified that members of this complex belong to two distantly related clades. However, despite this increased phylogentic resolution, species delimitations within each of these clades remain unclear. Our study assessed the species diversity within this difficult complex using morphological and molecular data from three genetic markers (cox1, UPA, and rbcL). We additionally applied six single-marker species delimitation methods (SDM: ABGD, GMYCs, GMYCm, SPN, bPTP, and PTP) to rbcL, which were largely in agreement regarding species delimitation. These results, combined with our analysis of morphology, indicate that the G. domingensis complex includes seven distinct species, each of which are not all most closely related: G. cervicornis; a ressurected G. ferox; G. apiculata subsp. apiculata; a new species, Gracilaria baiana sp. nov.; G. intermedia subsp. intermedia; G. venezuelensis; and G. domingensis sensu stricto, which includes the later heterotypic synonym, G. yoneshigueana. Our study demonstrates the value of multipronged strategies, including the use of both molecular and morphological approaches, to decipher cryptic species of red algae.

  1. Biosynthesis of glycerolipid molecular species in photoreceptor membranes of frog retina

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, R.D.; Louie, K.; Anderson, R.E. )

    1987-05-01

    Phospholipid (PL) molecular species of vertebrate retinal photoreceptor cells are unique in that they contain two polyunsaturated fatty acids per molecule. Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 {omega}3) is the major component of these dipolyunsaturate species (DPS), which also contain 20:4{omega}6, 22:4{omega}6, 22:5{omega}6, and 22:5{omega}3. We have studied the de novo synthesis and metabolism of the (DPS) and other PL molecular species in frog rod outer segments (ROS) following intravitreal injection of 2-({sup 3}H)-glycerol. At 1, 2, 4, and 8 days after injection, ROS were prepared, PL extracted, and phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylserine (PS) isolated. PC, PE, and PS were converted to diglycerides (DG's) with phospholipase C. DG's were derivatized, fractionated into molecular species by HPLC, quantitated, and counted for radioactivity. The following were observed: (1) Specific activities (SA) of the PC DPS were 3-5 times higher than the same species in either PE or PS. (2) SA of the PC monopolyunsaturate species (MPS) (species which contain 22:6{omega}3 and/or 16:0 or 18:0) were 3-5 times lower than the SA of the PC DPS. In contrast, SA of PE MPS were 2-5 times higher than the SA of the PE DPS. (3) The major PS MPS synthesized contained 18:0 and 22:6{omega}3. SA of that species were similar to SA of the PS DPS. The data support the suggestion that PC DPS are synthesized and/or incorporated in ROS at a greater rate than the same species in either PE or PS. Our study thus provides evidence for different rates of synthesis and/or incorporation of the various molecular species of PC, PE, and PS in ROS.

  2. Molecular identification of three Indian snake species using simple PCR-RFLP method.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Bhawna; Meganathan, P R; Haque, Ikramul

    2010-07-01

    Three endangered Indian snake species, Python molurus, Naja naja, and Xenochrophis piscator are known to be significantly involved in illegal trade. Effective authentication of species is required to curb this illegal trade. In the absence of morphological features, molecular identification techniques hold promise to address the issue of species identification. We present an effective PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method for easy identification of the three endangered snake species, Python molurus, Naja naja, and Xenochrophis piscator. A 431-bp amplicon from cytochrome b gene was amplified using novel snake-specific primers following restriction digestion with enzymes Mbo II and Fok I. The species-specific reference fragment patterns were obtained for the target species, which enabled successful identification of even highly degraded shed skin sample confirming the utility of the technique in case of poor-quality DNA. The assay could be effectively used for forensic authentication of three Indian snake species and would help strengthen conservation efforts.

  3. Morphological and molecular characterization of two novel species of Agaricus section Xanthodermatei.

    PubMed

    Callac, Philippe; Guinberteau, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Agaricus specimens collected in France belong to two novel entities resembling small forms of A. moelleri and A. xanthodermus, two common species in section Xanthodermatei. Molecular (IT1+ITS2 DNA sequence) and morphological comparisons between eight presumed similar taxa of the section support the elevation of both entities to species rank. The new entities are described as A. parvitigrinus and A. xanthodermulus. They form a group with A. laskibarii, a rare species also recently described from France, and A. californicus, a North-American species. The well known A. moelleri and A. xanthodermus are the most related species among the studied sample. Like other species of the section, both new species have a phenolic odor and are probably toxic.

  4. Quantitation of Interacting Molecular Species and Measurement of Molecular Avidity by Single Radial (Immuno) Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    FIGURE LEGEND 1lL ;Ta ,j - ’V y ilii INTRODUCTION Mancini et al. (1965) developed a single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) method for the quantitation of...quantitation of antigens by single radial immunodiffusion . Immunochem, 2, 5. Mancini , G., Nash, D. R. and Heremans, J. F. (1970) Further studies on...FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Single radial immunodiffusion , Single radial diffusion, Molecular interaction, Molecular avidity, endotoxin ’-." 19 A63TRACT

  5. Molecular evidence for cryptic speciation in the Cyclophorus fulguratus (Pfeiffer, 1854) species complex (Caenogastropoda: Cyclophoridae) with description of new species.

    PubMed

    Nantarat, Nattawadee; Wade, Christopher M; Jeratthitikul, Ekgachai; Sutcharit, Chirasak; Panha, Somsak

    2014-01-01

    A high degree of intraspecific variation, both genetic and in shell morphology, of the operculate land snail Cyclophorus fulguratus (Pfeiffer, 1854) suggests that its classification as a single species warrants reconsideration. We sequenced two nuclear (18S and 28S) and two mitochondrial (16S and COI) genes of 46 C. fulguratus specimens and used them to estimate the phylogeny and to determine the validity of species boundaries. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed the presence of three lineages corresponding to three geographically disjunctive populations of C. fulguratus in Thailand. Likelihood tests of topologies significantly supported the non-monophyly of the C. fulguratus-complex and Bayesian species delimitation analysis significantly supported the potential representation as distinct species of these three lineages. Discriminant function analysis based on geometric-morphometrics of shell shape allowed for significant distinction of these three candidate species, although they revealed a considerable degree of overlap of shell shape reflecting their crypsis morphologically. The diagnostic characters are provided by color pattern, pattern of protoconch and pattern of jaw. In conclusion, the results support that the C. fulguratus s.l., as currently recognized, consists of three distinct species in Thailand: C. fulguratus s.s., C. rangunensis and C. abditus sp.nov., which are described herein.

  6. Molecular species of acylglycerols incorporating radiolabeled fatty acids from castor (Ricinus communis L.) microsomal incubations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiann-Tsyh; Chen, Jennifer M; Liao, Lucy P; McKeon, Thomas A

    2002-08-28

    Sixty-one molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) and diacylglycerols produced from castor microsomal incubations incorporating six different (14)C-labeled fatty acids have been identified and quantified. The preference for incorporation into TAG was in the order ricinoleate > oleate > linoleate > linolenate > stearate > palmitate. Ricinoleate was the major fatty acid incorporated, whereas stearate, linolenate, and palmitate were incorporated at low levels. Twenty-one molecular species of acylglycerols (HPLC peaks) in castor oil have also been assigned. The levels of TAG in castor oil are RRR (triricinolein) > RR-TAG > R-TAG > no R-TAG. The levels of the molecular species within the groups of RR-TAG, RL-TAG, and LL-TAG individually are ricinoleate > linoleate > oleate > linolenate, stearate, and palmitate. The results of the labeled fatty acid incorporation are consistent with ricinoleate being preferentially driven into TAG and oleate being converted to ricinoleate in castor oil biosynthesis.

  7. European species of Clavaria (Agaricales, Agaricomycetes) with dark basidiomata - a morphological and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Kautmanová, I; Tomšovský, M; Dueñas, M; Martín, M P

    2012-12-01

    Clavaria species with dark basidiomata occurring in Europe were analysed using morphological and molecular methods. Morphological analyses revealed four groups containing seven Clavaria species with dark basidiomata. Phylogenetic analysis of the LSU nrDNA region confirmed the separate positions of all seven Clavaria species within the genus. All sequences were grouped in four well-supported clades, mostly corresponding to defined morphological species. The results of the molecular study are inconsistent with the infrageneric classification of Clavaria based on the presence or absence of clamps on the bases of basidia and two widely accepted subgenera. Clavaria and Holocoryne appear to be polyphyletic. A new approach in species delimitation is presented: 1) C. asperulispora and C. atrofusca are two distinct species recognized by the shape of their spores, and the name C. neo-nigrita is a possible synonym of C. asperulispora; 2) species with clustered fragile basidiomata, C. fumosa and Clavaria cf. fuscoferruginea, which are almost identical in shape and size of spores differing only in the darker basidiomata of the latter, are phylogenetically unrelated; 3) Clavaria atrobadia is a dubious species, the name being most likely a synonym of C. fuscoferruginea; 4) two species with close morphological and phylogenetic affinity, C. atroumbrina and C. pullei, are distinguished based on the more oblong and narrower spores of the former. Comparison of European and North American material suggests the transatlantic nature of the distribution of C. asperulispora, C. atroumbrina and C. fumosa.

  8. Influences of Dilute Organic Adsorbates on the Hydration of Low-Surface-Area Silicates.

    PubMed

    Sangodkar, Rahul P; Smith, Benjamin J; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J; Roberts, Lawrence R; Funkhouser, Gary P; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2015-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of dilute quantities of certain organic molecules and water at silicate surfaces strongly influence the rates of silicate dissolution, hydration, and crystallization. Here, we determine the molecular-level structures, compositions, and site-specific interactions of adsorbed organic molecules at low absolute bulk concentrations on heterogeneous silicate particle surfaces at early stages of hydration. Specifically, dilute quantities (∼0.1% by weight of solids) of the disaccharide sucrose or industrially important phosphonic acid species slow dramatically the hydration of low-surface-area (∼1 m(2)/g) silicate particles. Here, the physicochemically distinct adsorption interactions of these organic species are established by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced solid-state NMR techniques. These measurements provide significantly improved signal sensitivity for near-surface species that is crucial for the detection and analysis of dilute adsorbed organic molecules and silicate species on low-surface-area particles, which until now have been infeasible to characterize. DNP-enhanced 2D (29)Si{(1)H}, (13)C{(1)H}, and (31)P{(1)H} heteronuclear correlation and 1D (29)Si{(13)C} rotational-echo double-resonance NMR measurements establish hydrogen-bond-mediated adsorption of sucrose at distinct nonhydrated and hydrated silicate surface sites and electrostatic interactions with surface Ca(2+) cations. By comparison, phosphonic acid molecules are found to adsorb electrostatically at or near cationic calcium surface sites to form Ca(2+)-phosphonate complexes. Although dilute quantities of both types of organic molecules effectively inhibit hydration, they do so by adsorbing in distinct ways that depend on their specific architectures and physicochemical interactions. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNP-enhanced NMR techniques to measure and assess dilute adsorbed molecules and their molecular interactions on low

  9. Method of molecular specie alteration by nonresonant laser induced dielectric breakdown

    DOEpatents

    Ronn, Avigdor M.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of a molecular specie by itself or in the presence of a secondary material at a pressure above a threshold value for the particular system by a laser of predetermined minimum power and having a frequency displaced from an absorption line of the specie causes severance of the weakest bond and a yield of products containing at least one dissociative fragment from said specie. A Rogowski type TEA CO.sub.2 --N.sub.2 --He laser has been used successfully on a wide variety of molecular species. Solid, liquid and gaseous end products have been obtained depending upon the starting materials. When solids have been produced they are in the form of microfine particles or microfine aggregates. A neodymium glass laser has also been used successfully.

  10. In Situ Investigation the Photolysis of the PAHs Adsorbed on Mangrove Leaf Surfaces by Synchronous Solid Surface Fluorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Wu, Tun-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    An established synchronous solid surface fluorimetry (S-SSF) was utilized for in situ study the photolysis processes of anthracene (An) and pyrene (Py) adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of Kandelia obovata seedlings (Ko) and Aegiceras corniculata (L.) Blanco seedlings (Ac). Experimental results demonstrated that the photolysis of An and Py adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of two mangrove species under the laboratory conditions, followed first-order kinetics with their photolysis rates in the order of Ac>Ko. In addition, with the same amount of substances, the photolysis rate of An adsorbed on the same mangrove leaf surfaces was much faster than the adsorbed Py. In order to investigate further, the photolysis processes of An and Py in water were also studied for comparison. And the photolysis of An and Py in water also followed first-order kinetics. Moreover, for the same initial amount, the photolysis rate of the PAH in water was faster than that adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of two mangrove species. Therefore, photochemical behaviors of PAHs were dependent not only on their molecular structures but also the physical-chemical properties of the substrates on which they are adsorbed. PMID:24404158

  11. Molecular Species Delimitation and Morphology of Aquatic and Sub-Aquatic Bugs (Heteroptera) in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Philippe; Chen, Ping-Ping; Nieser, Nico; Guilbert, Eric; Njiokou, Flobert; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François; Pluot-Sigwalt, Dominique; Eyangoh, Sara; Harry, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic and semi-aquatic bugs (Heteroptera) represent a remarkable diversity and a resurging interest has been given to documenting at the species level these insects inhabiting Cameroon in Central Africa due to their potential implication in the transmission of the bacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causal agent of Buruli ulcer, an emerging human disease. A survey was carried out over two years in Cameroon. Morphological analyses were done in two steps. A first step consisted in separating the specimens based on broadly shared characters into morphotypes. The specimens were then separated into two independent batches containing each the same representation of each morphotype. One batch (309 specimens) was used by taxonomy experts on aquatic bugs for species level identification and/or to reconcile nymph with their corresponding adult species. The second batch (188 specimens) was used to define species based on the COI DNA sequences (standard sequence used for “DNA barcoding”) and using the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) method. The first morphological analysis step separated the specimens into 63 different morphotypes (49 adults and 14 nymphs), which were then found to belong to 54 morphological species in the infra-orders Gerromorpha and Nepomorpha based on the species-level morphological identification, and 41–45 putative molecular species according to the gap value retained in the ABGD. Integrating morphology and “DNA barcoding” reconciled all the specimens into 62 aquatic bug species in Cameroon. Generally, we obtained a good congruence between species a priori identified based on morphology from adult morphotypes and molecular putative species. Moreover, molecular identification has allowed the association of 86% of nymphs with adults. This work illustrates the importance of integrative taxonomy. PMID:27149077

  12. Molecular Species Delimitation and Morphology of Aquatic and Sub-Aquatic Bugs (Heteroptera) in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Meyin A Ebong, Solange; Petit, Elsa; Le Gall, Philippe; Chen, Ping-Ping; Nieser, Nico; Guilbert, Eric; Njiokou, Flobert; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François; Pluot-Sigwalt, Dominique; Eyangoh, Sara; Harry, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic and semi-aquatic bugs (Heteroptera) represent a remarkable diversity and a resurging interest has been given to documenting at the species level these insects inhabiting Cameroon in Central Africa due to their potential implication in the transmission of the bacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causal agent of Buruli ulcer, an emerging human disease. A survey was carried out over two years in Cameroon. Morphological analyses were done in two steps. A first step consisted in separating the specimens based on broadly shared characters into morphotypes. The specimens were then separated into two independent batches containing each the same representation of each morphotype. One batch (309 specimens) was used by taxonomy experts on aquatic bugs for species level identification and/or to reconcile nymph with their corresponding adult species. The second batch (188 specimens) was used to define species based on the COI DNA sequences (standard sequence used for "DNA barcoding") and using the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) method. The first morphological analysis step separated the specimens into 63 different morphotypes (49 adults and 14 nymphs), which were then found to belong to 54 morphological species in the infra-orders Gerromorpha and Nepomorpha based on the species-level morphological identification, and 41-45 putative molecular species according to the gap value retained in the ABGD. Integrating morphology and "DNA barcoding" reconciled all the specimens into 62 aquatic bug species in Cameroon. Generally, we obtained a good congruence between species a priori identified based on morphology from adult morphotypes and molecular putative species. Moreover, molecular identification has allowed the association of 86% of nymphs with adults. This work illustrates the importance of integrative taxonomy.

  13. Molecular and morphological description of two new species of Stemphylium from China and France.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Geng, Yun; Pei, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Xiu-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Two new species of Stemphylium (anamorphic Pleospora) are described on the basis of morphological characters and molecular phylogenetic analyses. Stemphylium phaseolina and S. variabilis were isolated respectively from diseased leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. in Hebei Province, China, and from diseased leaves of Allium sativum L. in Angres, France. The two species exhibit characteristic Stemphylium morphology but are distinct from similar species based on the morphology and development of conidia. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) nuclear rDNA region and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) genes were sequenced. The results of maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analyses of the combined DNA sequences of these two gene regions supported S. phaseolina and S. variabilis as two distinct phylogenetic species. The taxonomic descriptions of the new species and their comparison with related species are presented, together with the phylogenetic analysis based on combined DNA sequences of ITS and gpd gene regions.

  14. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  15. Comparative molecular species delimitation in the charismatic Nawab butterflies (Nymphalidae, Charaxinae, Polyura).

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Emmanuel F A; Morinière, Jérôme; Müller, Chris J; Kunte, Krushnamegh; Turlin, Bernard; Hausmann, Axel; Balke, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The charismatic tropical Polyura Nawab butterflies are distributed across twelve biodiversity hotspots in the Indomalayan/Australasian archipelago. In this study, we tested an array of species delimitation methods and compared the results to existing morphology-based taxonomy. We sequenced two mitochondrial and two nuclear gene fragments to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships within Polyura using both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood. Based on this phylogenetic framework, we used the recently introduced bGMYC, BPP and PTP methods to investigate species boundaries. Based on our results, we describe two new species Polyura paulettae Toussaint sp. n. and Polyura smilesi Toussaint sp. n., propose one synonym, and five populations are raised to species status. Most of the newly recognized species are single-island endemics likely resulting from the recent highly complex geological history of the Indomalayan-Australasian archipelago. Surprisingly, we also find two newly recognized species in the Indomalayan region where additional biotic or abiotic factors have fostered speciation. Species delimitation methods were largely congruent and succeeded to cross-validate most extant morphological species. PTP and BPP seem to yield more consistent and robust estimations of species boundaries with respect to morphological characters while bGMYC delivered contrasting results depending on the different gene trees considered. Our findings demonstrate the efficiency of comparative approaches using molecular species delimitation methods on empirical data. They also pave the way for the investigation of less well-known groups to unveil patterns of species richness and catalogue Earth's concealed, therefore unappreciated diversity.

  16. Two new species of Maritrema Nicoll, 1907 (Digenea: Microphallidae) from New Zealand: morphological and molecular characterisation.

    PubMed

    Presswell, Bronwen; Blasco-Costa, Isabel; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2014-05-01

    Two new species of the microphallid genus Maritrema (Maritrema) Nicoll, 1907 are described from freshwaters in the South Island of New Zealand. Maritrema deblocki n. sp. occurs as an adult in the mallard Anas platyrhynchos (L.); Maritrema poulini n. sp. is found as sporocysts/cercariae in Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray) and as metacercariae in two species of amphipod and two species of isopod. We use morphological and molecular characterisation to distinguish between the two species, and compare them to their four morphologically closest congeners. M. deblocki n. sp. and M. poulini n. sp. are distinguished from each other by the relative sucker size, the positions of the genital pore and ovary, the convergence of the vitelline ribbons, and overall size. With the aid of molecular data, we matched life cycle stages of M. poulini n. sp. and assessed its use of multiple second intermediate hosts. Phylogenetic analyses included sequences for the two new species and the available microphallid sequences for the large ribosomal subunit and the internal transcribed spacer 1 of the ribosomal RNA gene. Closer to each other than to any other species, the sister species together with Maritrema novaezealandense Martorelli, Fredensborg, Mouritsen & Poulin, 2004, Maritrema heardi (Kinsella & Deblock, 1994), Maritrema eroliae Yamaguti, 1939 and Maritrema oocysta (Lebour, 1907) formed a well-supported clade. In addition, we clarify the taxonomic identity of several unidentified Microphallus spp. in the recent ecological literature from New Zealand and propose corrected spellings for a number of Maritrema species epithets.

  17. Integrating molecular and morphological approaches for characterizing parasite cryptic species: implications for parasitology.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Steven A; DE León, Gerardo Pérez-Ponce

    2011-11-01

    Herein we review theoretical and methodological considerations important for finding and delimiting cryptic species of parasites (species that are difficult to recognize using traditional systematic methods). Applications of molecular data in empirical investigations of cryptic species are discussed from an historical perspective, and we evaluate advantages and disadvantages of approaches that have been used to date. Developments concerning the theory and practice of species delimitation are emphasized because theory is critical to interpretation of data. The advantages and disadvantages of different molecular methodologies, including the number and kind of loci, are discussed relative to tree-based approaches for detecting and delimiting cryptic species. We conclude by discussing some implications that cryptic species have for research programmes in parasitology, emphasizing that careful attention to the theory and operational practices involved in finding, delimiting, and describing new species (including cryptic species) is essential, not only for fully characterizing parasite biodiversity and broader aspects of comparative biology such as systematics, evolution, ecology and biogeography, but to applied research efforts that strive to improve development and understanding of epidemiology, diagnostics, control and potential eradication of parasitic diseases.

  18. Use of Repetitive Sequences for Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Avena Species from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Diana; Rodrigues, Joana; Varela, Ana; Veloso, Maria Manuela; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2016-02-04

    Genomic diversity of Portuguese accessions of Avena species--diploid A. strigosa and hexaploids A. sativa and A. sterilis--was evaluated through molecular and cytological analysis of 45S rDNA, and other repetitive sequences previously studied in cereal species--rye subtelomeric sequence (pSc200) and cereal centromeric sequence (CCS1). Additionally, retrotransposons and microsatellites targeting methodologies--IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism)--were performed. A very high homology was detected for ribosomal internal transcribed sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) between the species analyzed, although nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed distinct number of Nor loci between diploid and hexaploid species. Moreover, morphological diversity, evidenced by FISH signals with different sizes, was observed between distinct accessions within each species. pSc200 sequences were for the first time isolated from Avena species but proven to be highly similar in all genotypes analyzed. The use of primers designed for CCS1 unraveled a sequence homologous to the Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon Cereba, that was mapped to centromeric regions of diploid and hexaploid species, being however restricted to the more related A and D haplomes. Retrotransposon-based methodologies disclosed species- and accessions-specific bands essential for the accurate discrimination of all genotypes studied. Centromeric, IRAP and REMAP profiles therefore allowed accurate assessment of inter and intraspecific variability, demonstrating the potential of these molecular markers on future oat breeding programs.

  19. A molecular contribution to the assessment of the Tricholoma equestre species complex.

    PubMed

    Moukha, Serge; Férandon, Cyril; Beroard, Erika; Guinberteau, Jacques; Castandet, Benoît; Callac, Philippe; Creppy, Edmond; Barroso, Gérard

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, interest in the Tricholoma equestre species complex has increased because of several cases of severe and sometimes fatal rhabdomyolysis reported in France and Poland. These occurred after repeated consumption of large portions of T. equestre sporophores during consecutive meals, despite the fact that this species is renowned as a tasty edible wild mushroom. The T. equestre species complex includes three ectomycorrhizal species Tricholoma flavovirens (Pers.) S. Lundell, Tricholoma auratum (Paulet) Gillet, and T. equestre (L.) P. Kummer. All these species produce sporophores with intense yellow gills but are difficult to distinguish by morphological analyses at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. In T. equestre, two additional varieties are recognized: T. equestre var. populinum (Christensen & Noordeloos) associated with Populus sp. and/or Betula sp. trees and sometimes recognized as Tricholoma frondosae (Kalamees & Shchukin) and T. equestre var. pallidifolia characterized by pale to white gills, frequently recognized as Tricholoma joachimii (Bon & Riva). To explore the taxonomic (species delimitation), ecological, and geographical extent and limits of the T. equestre species complex, we have carried out a molecular comparison of worldwide strains belonging to this complex by using sequences of two molecular markers: the internal transcript spacer (ITS)1/5.8S/ITS2 region of the nuclear ribosomal unit and the 5' part of the mitochondrial cox1 gene. Phylogenetic analyses support the placement of European T. equestre, T. flavovirens, and T. auratum strains as representatives of a single species. This species appears associated with various conifers trees, depending on the geographic origin (Pinus pinaster for T. auratum, Pinus sylvestris or Abies alba for T. equestre and T. flavovirens). However, in the context of a single T. equestre species, the geographical location could lead to the characterization of sub-species or varieties, as suggested

  20. Synthesis of mimic molecularly imprinted ordered mesoporous silica adsorbent by thermally reversible semicovalent approach for pipette-tip solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography fluorescence determination of estradiol in milk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yan, Hongyuan; Yang, Chunliu; Li, Zan; Qiao, Fengxia

    2016-07-22

    A mimic molecularly imprinted ordered mesoporous silica (MIOMS) adsorbent was prepared utilizing a thermally reversible semicovalent approach. The thermally reversible covalent template-monomer complex was firstly synthesized by employing 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol (BPS) and (3-isocyanatopropyl) triethoxysilane (ICPTES) as template and monomer, respectively. The template-monomer complex was incorporated into ordered mesoporous silica via a simple self-assembly process. The adsorption experiment illustrated that the imprint-removed silica (MIOMS-ir) had higher special recognition ability (250μgg(-1)) for estradiol (E2) than the non-imprinted silica (NIOMS-ir) (25μgg(-1)). MIOMS-ir was applied as an adsorbent in pipette-tip solid-phase extraction (PT-SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector (LC-FLD) for determination of E2 in milk samples. Under the optimized conditions, only 3mg of the adsorbent, 0.3mL of water as washing solvent, and 0.5mL of acetonitrile-acetic acid (96:4, v/v) as elution solvent were used in the pretreatment procedure of milk samples. Good calibration linearity was obtained in a range of 25ngL(-1) to 1000ngL(-1), and the recoveries at three spiked levels were ranged from 95.4% to 107.0% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ≤3.1% (n=3). The proposed MIOMS-ir-PT-SPE-LC-FLD method combined the advantages of PT-SPE and ordered mesoporous material such as ease assembly, low cost, high extraction efficiency and large specific surface area, so it is a potential pretreatment strategy for the extraction and determination of E2 in complex milk samples.

  1. Molecular characterization of the species Salvinia (Salviniaceae) from the upper Paraná River floodplain.

    PubMed

    Machado, S A; Oliveira, A V; Fabrin, T M C; Prioli, S M A P; Prioli, A J

    2016-08-12

    The pteridophytes Salvinia minima, S. herzogii, and S. auriculata are among the most abundant aquatic macrophytes in the upper Paraná River floodplain. Since some species have highly similar morphological features, it is very difficult to identify members of this genus to the species level. An indication of this difficulty is a set of poorly differentiated taxa comprising S. auriculata and S. herzogii known as the 'S. auriculata complex', which is found in the Paraná River together with other Salvinia species such as S. biloba and S. molesta. Some authors have reported the existence of inter-species hybrids. Despite the complex Salvinia taxonomy, few genetic studies have been performed on purported species within the genus to resolve this complexity. The present study was conducted to determine useful molecular sequences for the discrimination of Salvinia species of the upper Paraná River floodplain. Molecular data were compared with data of other species of the genus to clarify phylogenetic relationships, employing the nucleotide sequence trnL-trnF from the chloroplast DNA. The results revealed that Salvinia populations in the upper Paraná River floodplain belong to different species and indicated that species of the S. auriculata complex may be distinguished from one another after the division of the S. minima group, corroborating results by other researchers. Although the taxonomic position of S. oblongifolia was clarified, as high closeness between S. oblongifolia and the S. auriculata complex was reported, Salvinia kinship is still not thoroughly established and further investigations in morphology and molecular diversity are required.

  2. Association of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancer tissues with molecular features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kei; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Matsunaga, Yasutaka; Ito, Miki; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Naito, Takafumi; Adachi, Yasushi; Tachibana, Mami; Tanuma, Tokuma; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Toshiya; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Imamura, Masafumi; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Maruyama, Reo; Suzuki, Hiromu; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-03-30

    Recently, bacterial infection causing periodontal disease has attracted considerable attention as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fusobacterium species is an oral bacterial group of the human microbiome. Some evidence suggests that Fusobacterium species promote colorectal cancer development; however, no previous studies have reported the association between Fusobacterium species and pancreatic cancer. Therefore, we examined whether Fusobacterium species exist in pancreatic cancer tissue. Using a database of 283 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we tested cancer tissue specimens for Fusobacterium species. We also tested the specimens for KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations and measured microRNA-21 and microRNA-31. In addition, we assessed epigenetic alterations, including CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Our data showed an 8.8% detection rate of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancers; however, tumor Fusobacterium status was not associated with any clinical and molecular features. In contrast, in multivariate Cox regression analysis, compared with the Fusobacterium species-negative group, we observed significantly higher cancer-specific mortality rates in the positive group (p = 0.023). In conclusion, Fusobacterium species were detected in pancreatic cancer tissue. Tumor Fusobacterium species status is independently associated with a worse prognosis of pancreatic cancer, suggesting that Fusobacterium species may be a prognostic biomarker of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Morphometric variation and molecular characterization of snow trout species from Kashmir valley, India.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Amir; Bisht, Balwant Singh; Mir, Javaid Iqbal; Patiyal, Rabindar Singh; Kumar, Rohit

    2016-11-01

    There is a significant taxonomic ambiguity among snow trout species due to their morphometric similarities. In view of this, a morphometric and molecular study was conducted on five different species of genus Schizothorax that have been reported from Kashmir valley. Morphometric data analyzed using multivariate statistics (Principal component analysis and cluster analysis) indicated the significant grouping of species to individual clusters. Mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene analysis revealed 0.2%-4.5% genetic divergence among the five species. This study confirms that utility of cytochrome oxidase I in species delineation along with morphometric data. Phylogenetic tree obtained using Neighbor-Joining method revealed that all the five species represented distinct species group. The Schizothorax genus formed two distinct clades; one containing S. niger, S. curvifrons and S. plagiostomus, while other clade containing S. esocinus and S. labiatus. This phlogeny trend was also supported by cluster analysis of morphometric characters. The phylogenetic analysis with other published COI sequences revealed distinct nature of these five species. The study may aid in the taxonomic identification of snow trout species in India. This may further increase the knowledge of the ichthyologists in planning conservation and management strategies for these important fish species along with their natural habitat.

  4. Unrecognized diversity in New Guinean crayfish species (Decapoda, Parastacidae): The evidence from molecular data.

    PubMed

    Bláha, Martin; Patoka, Jiří; Kozák, Pavel; Kouba, Antonín

    2016-11-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among imported ornamental crayfish belonging to the genus Cherax were inferred from a combined dataset of 3 mitochondrial genes (COI, 16S and 12S) and by comparison with available GenBank sequences of 14 Cherax species. Furthermore, the concordance of previously described species obtained from a wholesaler (Cherax boesemani, C. holthuisi and C. peknyi) with available GenBank sequences was verified based on COI with special respect to comparison with sequences assigned as Cherax species. Recently described species C. gherardiae, C. pulcher and C. subterigneus belong to the northern group of Cherax species. Comparison and analysis with other GenBank COI sequences show previously unreported diversity of New Guinean species, suggesting 5 putative new species. Surprisingly, species assigned to the subgenus Astaconephrops do not form a monophyletic clade; this subgenus should be reappraised relative to the purported typical morphological characteristic of the uncalcified patch on male chelae. Increasing importation of crayfish underscores the importance of accurate species identification. Use of basic molecular methods is a necessary requisite for documenting occurrence, abundance and population trends of target species. Consequently, it helps to support eventual conservation decision-making by stakeholders.

  5. Quantum chemical investigation on the role of Li adsorbed on anatase (101) surface nano-materials on the storage of molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Srinivasadesikan, V; Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2015-06-01

    Lithiation of TiO2 has been shown to enhance the storage of hydrogen up to 5.6 wt% (Hu et al. J Am Chem Soc 128:11740-11741, 2006). The mechanism for the process is still unknown. In this work we have carried out a study on the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on the surface and migration into subsurface layers of anatase (101) by periodic density functional theory calculations implementing on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U). The model consists of 24 [TiO2] units with 11.097 × 7.655 Å(2) surface area. Adsorption energies have been calculated for different Li atoms (1-14) on the surface. A maximum of 13 Li atoms can be accommodated on the surface at two bridged O, Ti-O, and Ti atom adsorption sites, with 83 kcal mol(-1) adsorption energy for a single Li atom adsorbed between two bridged O atoms from where it can migrate into the subsurface layer with 27 kcal mol(-1) energy barrier. The predicted adsorption energies for H2 on the lithiated TiO2 (101) surface with 1-10 Li atoms revealed that the highest adsorption energies occurred on 1-Li, 5-Li, and 9-Li surfaces with 3.5, 4.4, and 7.6 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The values decrease rapidly with additional H2 co-adsorbed on the lithiated surfaces; the maximum H2 adsorption on the 9Li-TiO2(a) surface was estimated to be only 0.32 wt% under 100 atm H2 pressure at 77 K. The result of Bader charge analysis indicated that the reduction of Ti occurred depending on the Li atoms covered on the TiO2 surface.

  6. Quantification of the molecular species of tetraacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) Oil by HPLC and MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirteen molecular species of tetraacylglycerols in the seed oil of Physaria fendleri were recently identified. We report here the quantification of these tetraacylglycerols using HPLC with evaporative light scattering detector and the MS of the HPLC fractions. Ion signal intensities of MS1 from th...

  7. Three novel species of Stemphylium from Sinkiang, China: their morphological and molecular characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three new species of Stemphylium were isolated from diseased leaves of Luffa cylindrica, Lycium chinense and Cucumis melo growing in the Sinkiang province of Northwest China. Stemphylium luffae, S. lycii and S. cucumis are described by morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses. The principal...

  8. EMERGING MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPLATIONS: A WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benson, W.H., R.T. Di Giulio, J.C. Cook, J. Freedman, R.L. Malek, C. Thompson and D. Versteeg. In press. Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolations: A Workshop Summary Report (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-...

  9. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratios of regioisomers of 74 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using HPLC and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lequerella oil. The ratios of relative abundances of the fragment ions fr...

  10. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratios of regioisomers of 72 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lesquerella oil. The ratios of ion signal intensities (or relative abundances) of ...

  11. Species identification in the genus Saprolegnia (Oomycetes): defining DNA-based molecular operational taxonomic units.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Sierra, Jose Vladimir; Martín, María P; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2014-07-01

    The lack of a robust taxonomy in the genus Saprolegnia is leading to the presence of incorrectly named isolates in culture collections and of an increasing number of misassigned sequences in DNA databases. Accurate species delimitation is critical for most biological disciplines. A recently proposed approach to solve species delimitation (taxonomic diagnosis system) of difficult organisms is the definition of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). We have used 961 sequences of nrDNA ITS from culture collections (461 sequences) and GenBank (500 sequences), to perform phylogenetic and clustering optimization analyses. As result, we have identified 29 DNA-based MOTUs in agreement with phylogenetic studies. The resulting molecular clusters support the validity of 18 species of Saprolegnia and identify 11 potential new ones. We have also listed a number of incorrectly named isolates in culture collections, misassigned species names to GenBank sequences, and reference sequences for the species. We conclude that GenBank represents the main source of errors for identifying Saprolegnia species since it possesses sequences with misassigned names and also sequencing errors. The presented taxonomic diagnosis system might help setting the basis for a suitable identification of species in this economically important genus.

  12. The role of vdW interactions in coverage dependent adsorption energies of atomic adsorbates on Pt(111) and Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, Hari; Kitchin, John R.

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption, a fundamental process in heterogeneous catalysis is known to be dependent on the adsorbate-adsorbate and surface-adsorbate bonds. van der Waals (vdW) interactions are one of the types of interactions that have not been examined thoroughly as a function of adsorbate coverage. In this work we quantify the vdW interactions for atomic adsorbates on late transition metal surfaces, and determine how these long range forces affect the coverage dependent adsorption energies. We calculate the adsorption energies of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, fluorine, bromine and chlorine species on Pt(111) and Pd(111) at coverages ranging from 1/4 to 1 ML using the BEEF-vdW functional. We observe that adsorption energies remain coverage dependent, and this coverage dependence is shown to be statistically significant. vdW interactions are found to be coverage dependent, but more significantly, they are found to be dependent on molecular properties such as adsorbate size, and consequently, correlate with the adsorbate effective nuclear charge. We observe that these interactions account for a reduction in the binding energy of the system, due to the destabilizing attractive interactions between the adsorbates which weaken its bond with the surface.

  13. Acanthamoeba keratitis: improving the Scottish diagnostic service for the rapid molecular detection of Acanthamoeba species.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Claire Low; Coyne, Michael; Jones, Brian; Anijeet, Deepa

    2015-07-01

    Acanthamoeba species are responsible for causing the potentially sight-threatening condition, Acanthamoeba keratitis, which is commonly associated with contact lens use. In this report, we highlight the challenges faced using conventional laboratory identification methods to identify this often under-reported pathogen, and discuss the reasons for introducing the first national service in Scotland for the rapid and sensitive molecular identification of Acanthamoeba species. By comparing culture and molecular testing data from a total of 63 patients (n = 80 samples) throughout Scotland presenting with ocular eye disease, we describe the improvement in detection rates where an additional four positive cases were identified using a molecular assay versus culture. The testing of a further ten patients by confocal imaging is also presented. This report emphasizes the importance of continuing to improve clinical laboratory services to ensure a prompt, correct diagnosis and better prognosis, in addition to raising awareness of this potentially debilitating opportunistic pathogen.

  14. Molecular mechanism of species-dependent sweet taste toward artificial sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Ha, Matthew; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Kaur, Tanno; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Zhe; Jiang, Peihua; Li, Xia; Cui, Meng

    2011-07-27

    The heterodimer of Tas1R2 and Tas1R3 is a broadly acting sweet taste receptor, which mediates mammalian sweet taste toward natural and artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. Perception of sweet taste is a species-selective physiological process. For instance, artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame taste sweet to humans, apes, and Old World monkeys but not to New World monkeys and rodents. Although specific regions determining the activation of the receptors by these sweeteners have been identified, the molecular mechanism of species-dependent sweet taste remains elusive. Using human/squirrel monkey chimeras, mutagenesis, and molecular modeling, we reveal that the different responses of mammalian species toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame are determined by the steric effect of a combination of a few residues in the ligand binding pocket. Residues S40 and D142 in the human Tas1R2, which correspond to residues T40 and E142 in the squirrel monkey Tas1R2, were found to be the critical residues for the species-dependent difference in sweet taste. In addition, human Tas1R2 residue I67, which corresponds to S67 in squirrel monkey receptor, modulates the higher affinity of neotame than of aspartame. Our studies not only shed light on the molecular mechanism of species-dependent sweet taste toward artificial sweeteners, but also provide guidance for designing novel effective artificial sweet compounds.

  15. Molecular ecology studies of species radiations: current research gaps, opportunities, and challenges.

    PubMed

    de la Harpe, Marylaure; Paris, Margot; Karger, Dirk N; Rolland, Jonathan; Kessler, Michael; Salamin, Nicolas; Lexer, Christian

    2017-03-18

    Understanding the drivers and limits of species radiations is a crucial goal of evolutionary genetics and molecular ecology, yet research on this topic has been hampered by the notorious difficulty of connecting micro- and macro-evolutionary approaches to studying the drivers of diversification. To chart the current research gaps, opportunities, and challenges of molecular ecology approaches to studying radiations, we examine the literature in the journal Molecular Ecology and re-visit recent high-profile examples of evolutionary genomic research on radiations. We find that available studies of radiations are highly unevenly distributed among taxa, with many ecologically important and species-rich organismal groups remaining severely understudied, including arthropods, plants, and fungi. Most studies employed molecular methods suitable over either short or long evolutionary time scales, such as microsatellites or Restriction site Associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) in the former case and conventional amplicon sequencing of organellar DNA in the latter. The potential of molecular ecology studies to address and resolve patterns and processes around the species level in radiating groups of taxa is currently limited primarily by sample size and a dearth of information on radiating nuclear genomes as opposed to organellar ones. Based on our literature survey and personal experience, we suggest possible ways forward in the coming years. We touch on the potential and current limitations of whole genome sequencing (WGS) in studies of radiations. We suggest that WGS and targeted ('capture') resequencing emerge as the methods of choice for scaling up the sampling of populations, species, and genomes, including currently understudied organismal groups and the genes or regulatory elements expected to matter most to species radiations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G.

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  17. Single-strand conformation polymorphism for molecular variability studies of six viroid species.

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Amine; Hamdi, Imen; Bessaies, Nabiha; Fakhfakh, Hatem

    2013-01-01

    Molecular diversity within six viroid species and different molecular variants, in each species infecting fruit trees was first estimated by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique and then by direct sequencing analysis. The different variants studied are to three Australian grapevine viroids(AGVd), four citrus dwarfing viroids (CDVd), eleven grapevine yellow speckle viroids type-1 (GYSVd-1), four hop stunt viroids (HSVd), seven peach latent mosaic viroids (PLMVd), and eight pear blister canker viroids (PBCVd). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) conditions were compared and optimized to improve the sensitivity of the existing SSCP parameters. The relationships among the various SSCP profiles observed and the variation in nucleotide sequences was studied. The results indicate that the variations of some parameters of electrophoresis for each species allowed higher resolution and hence detection of single nucleotide variations among clones initially clustered into the same group.

  18. Molecular strategies for detection and quantification of mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species: a review.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liang; Jiang, Yueming; Chen, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Fusarium contamination is considered a major agricultural problem, which could not only significantly reduce yield and quality of agricultural products, but produce mycotoxins that are virulence factors responsible for many diseases of humans and farm animals. One strategy to identify toxigenic Fusarium species is the use of modern molecular methods, which include the analysis of DNA target regions for differentiation of the Fusarium species, particularly the mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species such as F. verticillioides and F. graminearum. Additionally, polymerase chain reaction assays are used to determine the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the toxins in order to facilitate a qualitative and quantitative detection of Fusarium-producing mycotoxins. Also, it is worth mentioning that some factors that modulate the biosynthesis of mycotoxins are not only determined by their biosynthetic gene clusters, but also by environmental conditions. Therefore, all of the aforementioned factors which may affect the molecular diagnosis of mycotoxins will be reviewed and discussed in this paper.

  19. Desorption of isopropyl alcohol from adsorbent with non-thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Chen Han; Pan, Kuan Lun; Yu, Sheng Jen; Yan, Shaw Yi; Chang, Moo Been

    2016-11-24

    Effective desorption of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) from adsorbents with non-thermal plasma is developed. In this system, IPA is effectively adsorbed with activated carbon while dielectric barrier discharge is applied to replace the conventional thermal desorption process to achieve good desorption efficiency, making the treatment equipment smaller in size. Various adsorbents including molecular sieves and activated carbon are evaluated for IPA adsorption capacity. The results indicate that BAC has the highest IPA adsorption capacity (280.31 mg IPA/g) under the operating conditions of room temperature, IPA of 400 ppm, and residence time of 0.283 s among 5 adsorbents tested. For the plasma desorption process, the IPA selectivity of 89% is achieved with BAC as N2 is used as desorbing gas. In addition, as air or O2 is used as desorbing gas, the IPA desorption concentration is reduced, because air and O2 plasmas generate active species to oxidize IPA to form acetone, CO2, and even CO. Furthermore, the results of the durability test indicate that the amount of IPA desorbed increases with increasing desorption times and plasma desorption process has a higher energy efficiency if compared with thermal desorption. Overall, this study indicates that non-thermal plasma is a viable process for removing VOCs to regenerate adsorbent.

  20. Molecular Identification of Candida Species Isolated from Onychomycosis in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaobo; Ling, Bo; Yang, Xianwei; Liao, Wanqing; Pan, Weihua; Yao, Zhirong

    2015-12-01

    Candida is a common cause of onychomycosis, especially for fingernail onychomycosis. In this study, two simple PCR-based assays combined with the internal transcribed spacers sequencing were performed to reveal the prevalence of Candida species including emerging species in onychomycosis, and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for Candida species were also evaluated. Among 210 Candida strains isolated from onychomycosis, Candida parapsilosis was the most common species (54.3%), followed by C. albicans (23.3%) and C. metapsilosis (9.5%). However, C. metapsilosis became the second leading species in toenail onychomycosis and accounted for 19.5% of Candida isolates from toenail samples. C. nivariensis, an emerging species, was firstly recovered from a toenail sample. Other emerging species such as C. orthopsilosis, C. pararugosa and C. fabryi were also identified by molecular tools. C. metapsilosis isolates exhibited significantly higher fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentrations than those exhibited by C. parapsilosis and C. albicans (P < 0.001). This study provides insight into the prevalence, distribution and susceptibility profiles of Candida species including emerging Candida species in onychomycosis.

  1. First molecular evidence for underestimated biodiversity of Rhachotropis (Crustacea, Amphipoda), with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Lörz, Anne-Nina; Linse, Katrin; Smith, Peter J; Steinke, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The crustacean genus Rhachotropis has a worldwide distribution and amongst the largest bathymetric range known from any amphipod genus. DNA barcoding of new material from around New Zealand and the Ross Sea indicated depth-related biogeographic patterns. New Zealand Rhachotropis do not form a monophyletic clade. Species from bathyal depths on the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand, show lower sequence divergence to bathyal species from California and the Arctic than to abyssal New Zealand species. Species sampled in the Kermadec Trench, north of New Zealand below 5000 m, seem to be more closely related to Ross Sea abyssal species than to the New Zealand shelf species. The worldwide geographic and bathymetric distribution for all Rhachotropis species is presented here. Depth may have a greater influence on phylogeny than geographic distance.Molecular and morphological investigations of Rhachotropis specimens from the Chatham Rise, New Zealand revealed a species new to science which is described in detail, including scanning electron microscopy. This increases the number of described species of Rhachotropis to 60 worldwide.

  2. Green approach for ultratrace determination of divalent metal ions and arsenic species using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and mercapto-modified graphene oxide nanosheets as a novel adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Sitko, Rafal; Janik, Paulina; Zawisza, Beata; Talik, Ewa; Margui, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi

    2015-03-17

    A new method based on dispersive microsolid phase extraction (DMSPE) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) is proposed for multielemental ultratrace determination of heavy metal ions and arsenic species. In the developed methodology, the crucial issue is a novel adsorbent synthesized by grafting 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on a graphene oxide (GO) surface. Mercapto-modified graphene oxide (GO-SH) can be applied in quantitative adsorption of cobalt, nickel, copper, cadmium, and lead ions. Moreover, GO-SH demonstrates selectivity toward arsenite in the presence of arsenate. Due to such features of GO-SH nanosheets as wrinkled structure and excellent dispersibility in water, GO-SH seems to be ideal for fast and simple preconcentration and determination of heavy metal ions using methodology based on DMSPE and TXRF measurement. The suspension of GO-SH was injected into an analyzed water sample; after filtration, the GO-SH nanosheets with adsorbed metal ions were redispersed in a small volume of internal standard solution and deposited onto a quartz reflector. The high enrichment factor of 150 allows obtaining detection limits of 0.11, 0.078, 0.079, 0.064, 0.054, and 0.083 ng mL(-1) for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), As(III), Cd(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Such low detection limits can be obtained using a benchtop TXRF system without cooling media and gas consumption. The method is suitable for the analysis of water, including high salinity samples difficult to analyze using other spectroscopy techniques. Moreover, GO-SH can be applied to the arsenic speciation due to its selectivity toward arsenite.

  3. Morphological and molecular affinities of two East Asian species of Stenhelia (Crustacea, Copepoda, Harpacticoida)

    PubMed Central

    Karanovic, Tomislav; Kim, Kichoon; Lee, Wonchoel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Definition of monophyletic supraspecific units in the harpacticoid subfamily Stenheliinae Brady, 1880 has been considered problematic and hindered by the lack of molecular or morphology based phylogenies, as well as by incomplete original descriptions of many species. Presence of a modified seta on the fifth leg endopod has been suggested recently as a synapomorphy of eight species comprising the redefined genus Stenhelia Boeck, 1865, although its presence was not known in S. pubescens Chislenko, 1978. We redescribe this species in detail here, based on our freshly collected topotypes from the Russian Far East. The other species redescribed in this paper was collected from the southern coast of South Korea and identified as the Chinese S. taiae Mu & Huys, 2002, which represents its second record ever and the first one in Korea. A fragment of the mtCOI gene was successfully PCR-amplified from two specimens of each species, which represents the first molecular data for this genus, and from additional 19 specimens belonging to six different species of other stenheliins from Korea and Russia. Reconstructed phylogenies confirm previously postulated monophyly of Stenhelia and polyphyly of the closely related genus Delavalia Brady, 1869. Average pairwise maximum likelihood distances between S. pubescens and S. taiae are only slightly above 10%, suggesting a very close relationship despite numerous newly discovered micro-morphological differences and despite macro-morphological similarities being probable plesiomorphies. PMID:24899857

  4. Species identification refined by molecular scatology in a community of sympatric carnivores in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Laguardia, Alice; Wang, Jun; Shi, Fang-Lei; Shi, Kun; Riordan, Philip

    2015-03-18

    Many ecological studies and conservation management plans employ noninvasive scat sampling based on the assumption that species' scats can be correctly identified in the field. However, in habitats with sympatric similarly sized carnivores, misidentification of scats is frequent and can lead to bias in research results. To address the scat identification dilemma, molecular scatology techniques have been developed to extract DNA from the donor cells present on the outer lining of the scat samples. A total of 100 samples were collected in the winter of 2009 and 2011 in Taxkorgan region of Xinjiang, China. DNA was extracted successfully from 88% of samples and genetic species identification showed that more than half the scats identified in the field as snow leopard (Panthera uncia) actually belonged to fox (Vulpes vulpes). Correlation between scat characteristics and species were investigated, showing that diameter and dry weight of the scat were significantly different between the species. However it was not possible to define a precise range of values for each species because of extensive overlap between the morphological values. This preliminary study confirms that identification of snow leopard feces in the field is misleading. Research that relies upon scat samples to assess distribution or diet of the snow leopard should therefore employ molecular scatology techniques. These methods are financially accessible and employ relatively simple laboratory procedures that can give an indisputable response to species identification from scats.

  5. Use of Repetitive Sequences for Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Avena Species from Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Diana; Rodrigues, Joana; Varela, Ana; Veloso, Maria Manuela; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Genomic diversity of Portuguese accessions of Avena species—diploid A. strigosa and hexaploids A. sativa and A. sterilis—was evaluated through molecular and cytological analysis of 45S rDNA, and other repetitive sequences previously studied in cereal species—rye subtelomeric sequence (pSc200) and cereal centromeric sequence (CCS1). Additionally, retrotransposons and microsatellites targeting methodologies—IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism)—were performed. A very high homology was detected for ribosomal internal transcribed sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) between the species analyzed, although nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed distinct number of Nor loci between diploid and hexaploid species. Moreover, morphological diversity, evidenced by FISH signals with different sizes, was observed between distinct accessions within each species. pSc200 sequences were for the first time isolated from Avena species but proven to be highly similar in all genotypes analyzed. The use of primers designed for CCS1 unraveled a sequence homologous to the Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon Cereba, that was mapped to centromeric regions of diploid and hexaploid species, being however restricted to the more related A and D haplomes. Retrotransposon-based methodologies disclosed species- and accessions-specific bands essential for the accurate discrimination of all genotypes studied. Centromeric, IRAP and REMAP profiles therefore allowed accurate assessment of inter and intraspecific variability, demonstrating the potential of these molecular markers on future oat breeding programs. PMID:26861283

  6. Coupled biophysical global ocean model and molecular genetic analyses identify multiple introductions of cryptogenic species.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Michael N; Sen Gupta, Alex; England, Matthew H

    2005-08-23

    The anthropogenic introduction of exotic species is one of the greatest modern threats to marine biodiversity. Yet exotic species introductions remain difficult to predict and are easily misunderstood because knowledge of natural dispersal patterns, species diversity, and biogeography is often insufficient to distinguish between a broadly dispersed natural population and an exotic one. Here we compare a global molecular phylogeny of a representative marine meroplanktonic taxon, the moon-jellyfish Aurelia, with natural dispersion patterns predicted by a global biophysical ocean model. Despite assumed high dispersal ability, the phylogeny reveals many cryptic species and predominantly regional structure with one notable exception: the globally distributed Aurelia sp.1, which, molecular data suggest, may occasionally traverse the Pacific unaided. This possibility is refuted by the ocean model, which shows much more limited dispersion and patterns of distribution broadly consistent with modern biogeographic zones, thus identifying multiple introductions worldwide of this cryptogenic species. This approach also supports existing evidence that (i) the occurrence in Hawaii of Aurelia sp. 4 and other native Indo-West Pacific species with similar life histories is most likely due to anthropogenic translocation, and (ii) there may be a route for rare natural colonization of northeast North America by the European marine snail Littorina littorea, whose status as endemic or exotic is unclear.

  7. [DNA molecular identification of Herba Dendrobii and its adulterant species based on ITS sequence analysis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, Tao; Chun, Ze

    2009-11-01

    To identify Herba Dendrobii and its adulterant species on molecular level, the rDNA ITS sequences of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii were studied. Genomic DNA of Dendrobium was extracted using the modified cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method. The PCR products of the rDNA ITS sequences of Dendrobium (32 materials) were purified and then sequenced. The characteristic of the sequences and the genetic distance were compared between Bulbophyllum odoratissimum and Dendrobium, Dendrobium interspecies and different populations. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using the UPGMA method by the biology softwares including BioEdit, MEGA4.0 etc. The PCR products were purified and then sequenced. It was built up that the database of rDNA ITS sequences of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii (32 materials). The ITS1 was 228-234 bp, the GC content accounting for 45.7%-53.0%. Its variable sites were 167, accounting for 67.34%. The Parsim-Informative positions were 106, accounting for 42.74%. The ITS2 was 241-247 bp, the GC accounting for 44.8% - 55.7%. The variable sites were 165, accounting for 66.27%. The Parsim-Informative positions were 115, accounting for 46.18%. The genetic distance between B. odoratissimum and Dendrobium was 0.295. The average genetic distance was 0.142 between Dendrobium species, and there were 2-156 variable nucleotides. The average genetic distance between different populations was 0.002, and there were 2-156 variable nucleotides. The genetic distance between B. odoratissimum and Dendrobium was greater than that of Denrobium interspecies. Meanwhile, the genetic distance between Denrobium species was also greater than that of different populations (varieties). The molecular phylogeny tree was constructed on the database of rDNA ITS the sequences of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii using the biology softwares. Then 10 materials on molecular level were authenticated. It is concluded that using of the whole sequences database of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii

  8. Rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis using a species-specific molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Wong, M; Marras, S A; Cross, E W; Kiehn, T E; Chaturvedi, V; Tyagi, S; Perlin, D S

    2000-08-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that has been linked to oral candidiasis in AIDS patients, although it has recently been isolated from other body sites. DNA sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of rRNA genes from reference Candida strains was used to develop molecular beacon probes for rapid, high-fidelity identification of C. dubliniensis as well as C. albicans. Molecular beacons are small nucleic acid hairpin probes that brightly fluoresce when they are bound to their targets and have a significant advantage over conventional nucleic acid probes because they exhibit a higher degree of specificity with better signal-to-noise ratios. When applied to an unknown collection of 23 strains that largely contained C. albicans and a smaller amount of C. dubliniensis, the species-specific probes were 100% accurate in identifying both species following PCR amplification of the ITS2 region. The results obtained with the molecular beacons were independently verified by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis-based genotyping and by restriction enzyme analysis with enzymes BsmAI and NspBII, which cleave recognition sequences within the ITS2 regions of C. dubliniensis and C. albicans, respectively. Molecular beacons are promising new probes for the rapid detection of Candida species.

  9. Molecular Phylogeny of the Pseudallescheria boydii Species Complex: Proposal of Two New Species†

    PubMed Central

    Gilgado, Felix; Cano, Josep; Gené, Josepa; Guarro, Josep

    2005-01-01

    Pseudallescheria boydii (anamorph Scedosporium apiospermum) is the species responsible for human scedosporiosis, a fungal infection with a high mortality rate and which is difficult to treat. Recently, it has been demonstrated that high genetic variation exists within this species. We have performed a morphological and molecular study involving numerous strains of clinical or environmental origins and from different countries. The analysis of partial sequences of the β-tubulin (two loci) and calmodulin genes and the internal transcribed spacer region of the rRNA gene has demonstrated that P. boydii is a species complex. The combined analysis of the sequences of the four loci of 60 strains has showed the presence of 44 haplotypes in the ingroup. Three species morphologically related to P. boydii sensu stricto, i.e., Pseudallescheria angusta, Pseudallescheria ellipsoidea, and Pseudallescheria fusoidea, which had previously been considered synonyms, could be differentiated genetically from P. boydii in our study. It is relevant that two of the three strains now included in P. ellipsoidea have caused invasive infections. The species Pseudallescheria minutispora and Scedosporium aurantiacum are clearly phylogenetically separated from the other species studied and are here proposed as new. Morphological features support this proposal. All the strains included in S. aurantiacum species have a clinical origin, while those included in P. minutispora are environmental. Further studies are needed to demonstrate whether all the species included in the P. boydii complex have different clinical spectra and antifungal susceptibility. PMID:16207945

  10. Molecular evidence for convergent evolution and allopolyploid speciation within the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The moss Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp. is an important experimental model system for evolutionary-developmental studies. In order to shed light on the evolutionary history of Physcomitrella and related species within the Funariaceae, we analyzed the natural genetic diversity of the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex. Results Molecular analysis of the nuclear single copy gene BRK1 reveals that three Physcomitrium species feature larger genome sizes than Physcomitrella patens and encode two expressed BRK1 homeologs (polyploidization-derived paralogs), indicating that they may be allopolyploid hybrids. Phylogenetic analyses of BRK1 as well as microsatellite simple sequence repeat (SSR) data confirm a polyphyletic origin for three Physcomitrella lineages. Differences in the conservation of mitochondrial editing sites further support hybridization and cryptic speciation within the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex. Conclusions We propose a revised classification of the previously described four subspecies of Physcomitrella patens into three distinct species, namely Physcomitrella patens, Physcomitrella readeri and Physcomitrella magdalenae. We argue that secondary reduction of sporophyte complexity in these species is due to the establishment of an ecological niche, namely spores resting in mud and possible spore dispersal by migratory birds. Besides the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex, the Funariaceae are host to their type species, Funaria hygrometrica, featuring a sporophyte morphology which is more complex. Their considerable developmental variation among closely related lineages and remarkable trait evolution render the Funariaceae an interesting group for evolutionary and genetic research. PMID:25015729

  11. Molecular identification of python species: development and validation of a novel assay for forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Ciavaglia, Sherryn A; Tobe, Shanan S; Donnellan, Stephen C; Henry, Julianne M; Linacre, Adrian M T

    2015-05-01

    Python snake species are often encountered in illegal activities and the question of species identity can be pertinent to such criminal investigations. Morphological identification of species of pythons can be confounded by many issues and molecular examination by DNA analysis can provide an alternative and objective means of identification. Our paper reports on the development and validation of a PCR primer pair that amplifies a segment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene that has been suggested previously as a good candidate locus for differentiating python species. We used this DNA region to perform species identification of pythons, even when the template DNA was of poor quality, as might be the case with forensic evidentiary items. Validation tests are presented to demonstrate the characteristics of the assay. Tests involved the cross-species amplification of this marker in non-target species, minimum amount of DNA template required, effects of degradation on product amplification and a blind trial to simulate a casework scenario that provided 100% correct identity. Our results demonstrate that this assay performs reliably and robustly on pythons and can be applied directly to forensic investigations where the presence of a species of python is in question.

  12. A molecular identification protocol for roots of boreal forest tree species1

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Morgan J.; Karst, Justine; Pec, Gregory J.; Davis, Corey S.; Hall, Jocelyn C.; Cahill, James F.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Roots play a key role in many ecological processes, yet our ability to identify species from bulk root samples is limited. Molecular tools may be used to identify species from root samples, but they have not yet been developed for most systems. Here we present a PCR-based method previously used to identify roots of grassland species, modified for use in boreal forests. • Methods: We used repeatable interspecific size differences in fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphisms of three noncoding chloroplast DNA regions to identify seven woody species common to boreal forests in Alberta, Canada. • Results: Abies balsamea, Alnus crispa, Betula papyrifera, Pinus contorta, and Populus tremuloides were identifiable to species, while Picea glauca and Picea mariana were identifiable to genus. In mixtures of known composition of foliar DNA, species were identified with 98% accuracy using one region. Mixed root samples of unknown composition were identified with 100% accuracy; four species were identified using one region, while three species were identified using two regions. • Discussion: This methodology is accurate, efficient, and inexpensive, and thus a valuable approach for ecological studies of roots. Furthermore, this method has now been validated for both grassland and boreal forest systems, and thus may also have applications in any plant community. PMID:25383267

  13. Morphological and molecular characterization of Cladosporium cladosporioides species complex causing pecan tree leaf spot.

    PubMed

    Walker, C; Muniz, M F B; Rolim, J M; Martins, R R O; Rosenthal, V C; Maciel, C G; Mezzomo, R; Reiniger, L R S

    2016-09-16

    The objective of this study was to characterize species of the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex isolated from pecan trees (Carya illinoinensis) with symptoms of leaf spot, based on morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological attributes were assessed using monosporic cultures on potato dextrose agar medium, which were examined for mycelial growth, sporulation, color, and conidia and ramoconidia size. Molecular characterization comprised isolation of DNA and subsequent amplification of the translation elongation factor 1α (TEF-1α) region. Three species of the C. cladosporioides complex were identified: C. cladosporioides, Cladosporium pseudocladosporioides, and Cladosporium subuliforme. Sporulation was the most important characteristic differentiating species of this genus. However, morphological features must be considered together with molecular analysis, as certain characters are indistinguishable between species. TEF-1αcan be effectively used to identify and group isolates belonging to the C. cladosporioides complex. The present study provides an important example of a methodology to ascertain similarity between isolates of this complex causing leaf spot in pecan trees, which should facilitate future pathogenicity studies.

  14. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  15. Taxonomic revision and molecular phylogenetics of the Idarnes incertus species-group (Hymenoptera, Agaonidae, Sycophaginae).

    PubMed

    Farache, Fernando H A; Cruaud, Astrid; Genson, Gwenaëlle; Rasplus, Jean-Yves; Pereira, Rodrigo A S

    2017-01-01

    Sycophaginae is a group of non-pollinating fig wasps considered closely related to the fig pollinators (Agaoninae, Tetrapusiinae, and Kradibiinae) in the most recent phylogenetic analyses. They occur in all tropical regions and are associated with Ficus subgenera Urostigma and Sycomorus. There are six described genera of Sycophaginae, and two are native and confined to the Neotropics, namely Idarnes Walker, 1843 and Anidarnes Bouček, 1993. Genus Idarnes is divided into three morphologically distinct groups that were proven to be monophyletic by recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. In this paper we reviewed the Idarnes incertus species-group and provide detailed morphological descriptions and illustrations for the species belonging to this group. Three previously described species were redescribed: I. brasiliensis (Mayr, 1906) comb. nov., I. hansoni Bouček, 1993, and I. incertus (Ashmead, 1900). Seventeen new species are described by Farache and Rasplus: I. amacayacuensissp. n., I. amazonicussp. n., I. americanaesp. n., I. badiovertexsp. n., I. brevissp. n., I. brunneussp. n., I. comptonisp. n., I. cremersiaesp. n., I. dimorphicussp. n., I. flavicrussp. n., I. flaviventrissp. n., I. gibberosussp. n., I. gordhisp. n., I. maximussp. n., I. nigriventrissp. n., I. pseudoflavussp. n. and I. ramirezisp. n. We provided keys for the identification of the species as well as for recognising the different species-groups of Idarnes and a closely related genus (Sycophaga Westwood, 1840). Additionally, phylogenetic relationships among 13 species of the I. incertus species-group were inferred using four molecular markers and discussed in the light of Ficus taxonomy and host specificity.

  16. Taxonomic revision and molecular phylogenetics of the Idarnes incertus species-group (Hymenoptera, Agaonidae, Sycophaginae)

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Astrid; Genson, Gwenaëlle; Rasplus, Jean-Yves; Pereira, Rodrigo A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Sycophaginae is a group of non-pollinating fig wasps considered closely related to the fig pollinators (Agaoninae, Tetrapusiinae, and Kradibiinae) in the most recent phylogenetic analyses. They occur in all tropical regions and are associated with Ficus subgenera Urostigma and Sycomorus. There are six described genera of Sycophaginae, and two are native and confined to the Neotropics, namely Idarnes Walker, 1843 and Anidarnes Bouček, 1993. Genus Idarnes is divided into three morphologically distinct groups that were proven to be monophyletic by recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. In this paper we reviewed the Idarnes incertus species-group and provide detailed morphological descriptions and illustrations for the species belonging to this group. Three previously described species were redescribed: I. brasiliensis (Mayr, 1906) comb. nov., I. hansoni Bouček, 1993, and I. incertus (Ashmead, 1900). Seventeen new species are described by Farache and Rasplus: I. amacayacuensis sp. n., I. amazonicus sp. n., I. americanae sp. n., I. badiovertex sp. n., I. brevis sp. n., I. brunneus sp. n., I. comptoni sp. n., I. cremersiae sp. n., I. dimorphicus sp. n., I. flavicrus sp. n., I. flaviventris sp. n., I. gibberosus sp. n., I. gordhi sp. n., I. maximus sp. n., I. nigriventris sp. n., I. pseudoflavus sp. n. and I. ramirezi sp. n. We provided keys for the identification of the species as well as for recognising the different species-groups of Idarnes and a closely related genus (Sycophaga Westwood, 1840). Additionally, phylogenetic relationships among 13 species of the I. incertus species-group were inferred using four molecular markers and discussed in the light of Ficus taxonomy and host specificity. PMID:28168097

  17. Molecular Phylogeny of the Neotropical Genus Christensonella (Orchidaceae, Maxillariinae): Species Delimitation and Insights into Chromosome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Samantha; Cabral, Juliano S.; Whitten, W. Mark; Williams, Norris H.; Singer, Rodrigo B.; Neubig, Kurt M.; Guerra, Marcelo; Souza, Anete P.; Amaral, Maria do Carmo E.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Species' boundaries applied within Christensonella have varied due to the continuous pattern of variation and mosaic distribution of diagnostic characters. The main goals of this study were to revise the species' delimitation and propose a more stable classification for this genus. In order to achieve these aims phylogenetic relationships were inferred using DNA sequence data and cytological diversity within Christensonella was examined based on chromosome counts and heterochromatin patterns. The results presented describe sets of diagnostic morphological characters that can be used for species' identification. Methods Phylogenetic studies were based on sequence data of nuclear and plastid regions, analysed using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood criteria. Cytogenetic observations of mitotic cells were conducted using CMA and DAPI fluorochromes. Key Results Six of 21 currently accepted species were recovered. The results also support recognition of the ‘C. pumila’ clade as a single species. Molecular phylogenetic relationships within the ‘C. acicularis–C. madida’ and ‘C. ferdinandiana–C. neowiedii’ species' complexes were not resolved and require further study. Deeper relationships were incongruent between plastid and nuclear trees, but with no strong bootstrap support for either, except for the position of C. vernicosa. Cytogenetic data indicated chromosome numbers of 2n = 36, 38 and 76, and with substantial variation in the presence and location of CMA/DAPI heterochromatin bands. Conclusions The recognition of ten species of Christensonella is proposed according to the molecular and cytogenetic patterns observed. In addition, diagnostic morphological characters are presented for each recognized species. Banding patterns and chromosome counts suggest the occurrence of centric fusion/fission events, especially for C. ferdinandiana. The results suggest that 2n = 36 karyotypes evolved from 2n = 38 through descendent

  18. The role of positive selection in determining the molecular cause of species differences in disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Related species, such as humans and chimpanzees, often experience the same disease with varying degrees of pathology, as seen in the cases of Alzheimer's disease, or differing symptomatology as in AIDS. Furthermore, certain diseases such as schizophrenia, epithelial cancers and autoimmune disorders are far more frequent in humans than in other species for reasons not associated with lifestyle. Genes that have undergone positive selection during species evolution are indicative of functional adaptations that drive species differences. Thus we investigate whether biomedical disease differences between species can be attributed to positively selected genes. Results We identified genes that putatively underwent positive selection during the evolution of humans and four mammals which are often used to model human diseases (mouse, rat, chimpanzee and dog). We show that genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection pressure during human evolution are implicated in diseases such as epithelial cancers, schizophrenia, autoimmune diseases and Alzheimer's disease, all of which differ in prevalence and symptomatology between humans and their mammalian relatives. In agreement with previous studies, the chimpanzee lineage was found to have more genes under positive selection than any of the other lineages. In addition, we found new evidence to support the hypothesis that genes that have undergone positive selection tend to interact with each other. This is the first such evidence to be detected widely among mammalian genes and may be important in identifying molecular pathways causative of species differences. Conclusion Our dataset of genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection in five species serves as an informative resource that can be consulted prior to selecting appropriate animal models during drug target validation. We conclude that studying the evolution of functional and biomedical disease differences between species is an

  19. Molecular phylogeny of black flies in the Simulium tuberosum (Diptera: Simuliidae) species group in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sriphirom, Paradee; Sopaladawan, Piyamas Nanork; Wongpakam, Komgrit; Pramual, Pairot

    2014-01-01

    Black flies are medically and ecologically significant insects. They are also interesting from an evolutionary standpoint regarding the role of chromosomal change and ecological adaptation. In this study, molecular genetic markers based on multiple gene sequences were used to assess genetic diversity and to infer phylogenetic relationships for a group of cytologically highly diverse black flies of the Simulium tuberosum species group in Thailand. Ecological affinities of the species were also investigated. High levels of genetic diversity were found in cytological species complexes, S. tani and S. doipuiense, and also in S. rufibasis, which was cytologically nearly monomorphic. The results highlight the necessity of integrating multilevel markers for fully understanding black fly biodiversity. Phylogenetic relationships based on multiple gene sequences were consistent with an existing dendrogram inferred from cytological and morphological data. Simulium tani is the most distinctive taxa among the members of the S. tubersosum species group in Thailand based on its divergent morphological characters. Molecular data supported the monophyletic status of S. tani, S. weji, and S. yuphae, but S. doipuiense and S. rufibasis were polyphyletic, most likely due to incomplete lineage sorting and inadequate phylogenetic signals. Ecological analyses revealed that members of the S. tuberosum species group have clearly different ecological niches. The results thus supported previous views of the importance of ecology in black fly evolution.

  20. Species identification refined by molecular scatology in a community of sympatric carnivores in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    LAGUARDIA, Alice; WANG, Jun; SHI, Fang-Lei; SHI, Kun; RIORDAN, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Many ecological studies and conservation management plans employ noninvasive scat sampling based on the assumption that species’ scats can be correctly identified in the field. However, in habitats with sympatric similarly sized carnivores, misidentification of scats is frequent and can lead to bias in research results. To address the scat identification dilemma, molecular scatology techniques have been developed to extract DNA from the donor cells present on the outer lining of the scat samples. A total of 100 samples were collected in the winter of 2009 and 2011 in Taxkorgan region of Xinjiang, China. DNA was extracted successfully from 88% of samples and genetic species identification showed that more than half the scats identified in the field as snow leopard (Panthera uncia) actually belonged to fox (Vulpes vulpes). Correlation between scat characteristics and species were investigated, showing that diameter and dry weight of the scat were significantly different between the species. However it was not possible to define a precise range of values for each species because of extensive overlap between the morphological values. This preliminary study confirms that identification of snow leopard feces in the field is misleading. Research that relies upon scat samples to assess distribution or diet of the snow leopard should therefore employ molecular scatology techniques. These methods are financially accessible and employ relatively simple laboratory procedures that can give an indisputable response to species identification from scats. PMID:25855225

  1. Efficiency of rep-PCR fingerprinting as a useful technique for molecular typing of plant pathogenic fungal species: Botryosphaeriaceae species as a case study.

    PubMed

    Abdollahzadeh, Jafar; Zolfaghari, Sajedeh

    2014-12-01

    Progress in molecular biology and the advent of rapid and accurate molecular techniques have contributed to precise and rapid detection and differentiation of microbial pathogens. Identification of the Botryosphaeriaceae species based on morphology has been problematic over time. In this study, we used rep-PCR technique as a molecular tool for typing and differentiation of the Botryosphaeriaceae species, well-known and cosmopolitan fungal pathogens on woody plants. Three primer sets BOX, ERIC and REP were used to differentiate 27 species belong to eight genera. The majority of them were examined in terms of typing and differentiation using molecular methods for the first time. All the primer sets were able to generate species-specific DNA fingerprints from all the tested strains, with two exceptions in the genera Diplodia and Spencermartinsia. Despite the deficiency of each primer sets to separate a few species, cluster analysis of combined data sets indicated the ability of rep-PCR technique to separate 26 out of 27 examined species in highly supported clusters corresponded to the species recognized based on DNA sequence data. Our findings revealed the efficiency of rep-PCR for detection and differentiation of the Botryosphaeriaceae species, especially cryptic species with the same ITS sequences and similar morphology.

  2. Molecular phylogeny of extant horseshoe crabs (Xiphosura, Limulidae) indicates Paleogene diversification of Asian species.

    PubMed

    Obst, Matthias; Faurby, Søren; Bussarawit, Somchai; Funch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Horseshoe crabs are marine invertebrates well known for their exceptionally low rates of diversification during their entire evolutionary history. Despite the low species diversity in the group, the phylogenetic relationships among the extant species, especially among the three Asian species are still unresolved. Here we apply a new set of molecular genetic data in combination with a wide geographic sampling of the intra-specific diversity to reinvestigate the evolutionary history among the four living limulid xiphosurans. Our analysis of the intraspecific diversity reveals low levels of connectivity among Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda lineages, which can be explained by the estuarine-bound ecology of this species. Moreover, a clear genetic break across the Thai-Malay Peninsula suggests the presence of cryptic species in C. rotundicauda. The limulid phylogeny finds strong support for a monophyletic genus Tachypleus and a diversification of the three Asian species during the Paleogene period, with speciation events well separated in time by several million years. The tree topology suggests that the three Asian species originated in central South East Asia from a marine stem group that inhabited the shallow coastal waters between the Andaman Sea, Vietnam, and Borneo. In this region C. rotundicauda probably separated from the Tachypleus stem group by invading estuarine habitats, while Tachypleus tridentatus most likely migrated northeast along the Southern coast of China and towards Japan.

  3. Advances in conservation endocrinology: the application of molecular approaches to the conservation of endangered species.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, Christopher; McDonough, Caitlin E; Felton, Rachel; Milnes, Matthew R

    2014-07-01

    Among the numerous societal benefits of comparative endocrinology is the application of our collective knowledge of hormone signaling towards the conservation of threatened and endangered species - conservation endocrinology. For several decades endocrinologists have used longitudinal hormone profiles to monitor reproductive status in a multitude of species. Knowledge of reproductive status among individuals has been used to assist in the management of captive and free-ranging populations. More recently, researchers have begun utilizing molecular and cell-based techniques to gain a more complete understanding of hormone signaling in wildlife species, and to identify potential causes of disrupted hormone signaling. In this review we examine various in vitro approaches we have used to compare estrogen receptor binding and activation by endogenous hormones and phytoestrogens in two species of rhinoceros; southern white and greater one-horned. We have found many of these techniques valuable and practical in species where access to research subjects and/or tissues is limited due to their conservation status. From cell-free, competitive binding assays to full-length receptor activation assays; each technique has strengths and weaknesses related to cost, sensitivity, complexity of the protocols, and relevance to in vivo signaling. We then present a novel approach, in which receptor activation assays are performed in primary cell lines derived from the species of interest, to minimize the artifacts of traditional heterologous expression systems. Finally, we speculate on the promise of next generation sequencing and transcriptome profiling as tools for characterizing hormone signaling in threatened and endangered species.

  4. Molecular perspective on the American transisthmian species of Macrobrachium (Caridea, Palaemonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pileggi, Leonardo G.; Rossi, Natália; Wehrtmann, Ingo S.; Mantelatto, Fernando L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The closure of the Isthmus of Panama (about 3.1 million years ago) separated previously continuous populations and created two groups of extant species, which live now in the Pacific and Atlantic drainage systems. This relatively recent event was a trigger to diversification of various species in the Neotropics, nonetheless there are exemplars that do not show sufficient morphologic variability to separate them by traditional morphological tools. About 60 years ago, some freshwater decapod species with high morphological similarity were separate by previous researchers, based on geographical distribution, in Pacific and Atlantic and considered as “sister species”. However, the complete isolation of these prawns by this geographical barrier is questionable, and it has generated doubts about the status of the following transisthmian pairs of sibling species: Macrobrachium occidentale × Macrobrachium heterochirus, Macrobrachium americanum × Macrobrachium carcinus, Macrobrachium digueti × Macrobrachium olfersii, Macrobrachium hancocki × Macrobrachium crenulatum, Macrobrachium tenellum × Macrobrachium acanthurus and Macrobrachium panamense × Macrobrachium amazonicum. Here we evaluated the relation among these pairs of sibling species in a molecular phylogenetic context. We generated 95 new sequences: 26 sequences of 16S rDNA, 25 of COI mtDNA and 44 of 18S nDNA. In total, 181 sequences were analyzed by maximum likelihood phylogenetic method, including 12 Macrobrachium transisthmian species, as well as seven other American Macrobrachium species, and two other palaemonids. Our analysis corroborated the morphological proximity of the sibling species. Despite the high degree of morphological similarities and considerable genetic diversification encountered among the transisthmian sister species, our data support the conclusion that all species included in sibling groups studied herein are valid taxonomic entities, but not all pairs of siblings form natural

  5. Taxonomic and Molecular Identification of Mesocriconema and Criconemoides Species (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Marco A.; Robbins, Robert T.; Szalanski, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Populations of Mesocriconema curvatum, M. kirjanovae, M. onoense, M. ornatum, M. sphaerocephala, M. surinamense, M. vadense, M. xenoplax, and Criconemoides informis from different geographical areas in the continental United States were characterized morphologically and molecularly. A new ring nematode from Washington County, Arkansas, is also described and named Mesocriconema ozarkiense n. sp., This new species is characterized by females with small flattened submedian lobes, lower than or at the same level as the labial disc, vagina straight, very well developed spermatheca without sperm, no more than one anastomoses, L=379-512 μm, V=89-93, stylet length = 49-61 μm, R=107-119, annuli with slightly crenate margins on tail portion and a simple anterior vulval lip. The molecular characterization of M. ozarkiense n. sp. using the ITS rRNA gene sequence and the phylogenesis relationship of this new species with the ring nematodes included in this study are provided. PMID:23482878

  6. Taxonomic identification of algae (morphological and molecular): species concepts, methodologies, and their implications for ecological bioassessment.

    PubMed

    Manoylov, Kalina M

    2014-06-01

    Algal taxonomy is a key discipline in phycology and is critical for algal genetics, physiology, ecology, applied phycology, and particularly bioassessment. Taxonomic identification is the most common analysis and hypothesis-testing endeavor in science. Errors of identification are often related to the inherent problem of small organisms with morphologies that are difficult to distinguish without research-grade microscopes and taxonomic expertise in phycology. Proposed molecular approaches for taxonomic identification from environmental samples promise rapid, potentially inexpensive, and more thorough culture-independent identification of all algal species present in a sample of interest. Molecular identification has been used in biodiversity and conservation, but it also has great potential for applications in bioassessment. Comparisons of morphological and molecular identification of benthic algal communities are improved by the identification of more taxa; however, automated identification technology does not allow for the simultaneous analysis of thousands of samples. Currently, morphological identification is used to verify molecular taxonomic identities, but with the increased number of taxa verified in algal gene libraries, molecular identification will become a universal tool in biological studies. Thus, in this report, successful application of molecular techniques related to algal bioassessment is discussed.

  7. Molecular phylogenetics, seed morphometrics, chromosome number evolution and systematics of European Elatine L. (Elatinaceae) species.

    PubMed

    Sramkó, Gábor; Molnár V, Attila; Tóth, János Pál; Laczkó, Levente; Kalinka, Anna; Horváth, Orsolya; Skuza, Lidia; Lukács, Balázs András; Popiela, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The genus Elatine contains ca 25 species, all of which are small, herbaceous annuals distributed in ephemeral waters on both hemispheres. However, due to a high degree of morphological variability (as a consequence of their amphibious life-style), the taxonomy of this genus remains controversial. Thus, to fill this gap in knowledge, we present a detailed molecular phylogenetic study of this genus based on nuclear (rITS) and plastid (accD-psaI, psbJ-petA, ycf6-psbM-trnD) sequences using 27 samples from 13 species. On the basis of this phylogenetic analysis, we provide a solid phylogenetic background for the modern taxonomy of the European members of the genus. Traditionally accepted sections of this tree (i.e., Crypta and Elatinella) were found to be monophyletic; only E. borchoni-found to be a basal member of the genus-has to be excluded from the latter lineage to achieve monophyly. A number of taxonomic conclusions can also be drawn: E. hexandra, a high-ploid species, is most likely a stabilised hybrid between the main sections; E. campylosperma merits full species status based on both molecular and morphological evidence; E. gussonei is a more widespread and genetically diverse species with two main lineages; and the presence of the Asian E. ambigua in the European flora is questionable. The main lineages recovered in this analysis are also supported by a number of synapomorphic morphological characters as well as uniform chromosome counts. Based on all the evidence presented here, two new subsections within Elatinella are described: subsection Hydropipera consisting of the temperate species of the section, and subsection Macropodae including the Mediterranean species of the section.

  8. The Syllis gracilis species complex: A molecular approach to a difficult taxonomic problem (Annelida, Syllidae).

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Campos, Patricia; Giribet, Gonzalo; Riesgo, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Syllis gracilis is an emblematic member of the subfamily Syllinae (Syllidae, Annelida), which inhabits shallow, temperate coastal waters and can be found on algae, coral rubble, and sponges. Their distinctive ypsiloid chaetae, usually found in specimens from populations all around the world, led to the consideration of the species as cosmopolitan, even though four other species have similar chaetae: Syllis magellanica, S. picta, S. mayeri and S. ypsiloides. The discovery of deeply divergent lineages in the Mediterranean Sea, that were morphologically similar, questioned the cosmopolitanism of S. gracilis and suggested the possibility of it being a species complex. In order to assess the speciation patterns within the putative S. gracilis complex, we undertook species delimitation and phylogenetic analyses on 61 specimens morphologically ascribed to Syllis gracilis and closely related species using a multilocus molecular dataset (two mitochondrial and two nuclear markers). Our results suggest high levels of genetic differentiation between the S. gracilis populations analyzed, some of which have morphologically distinctive features. Five to eight distinct lineages (depending on the analysis) were identified, all with geographically restricted distributions. Although the presence of ypsiloid chaetae has been traditionally considered the main character to identify S. gracilis, we conclude that this feature is homoplastic. Instead, we propose that characters such as the degree of fusion of blades and shafts in chaetae, the morphology of the posterior chaetae or the animal color pattern should be considered to differentiate lineages within the S. gracilis species complex. Our study does not support the cosmopolitanism of S. gracilis, and instead provides morphological and molecular evidence of the existence of a complex of pseudo-cryptic species.

  9. Molecular phylogenetics, seed morphometrics, chromosome number evolution and systematics of European Elatine L. (Elatinaceae) species

    PubMed Central

    Sramkó, Gábor; Tóth, János Pál; Laczkó, Levente; Kalinka, Anna; Horváth, Orsolya; Skuza, Lidia; Lukács, Balázs András; Popiela, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The genus Elatine contains ca 25 species, all of which are small, herbaceous annuals distributed in ephemeral waters on both hemispheres. However, due to a high degree of morphological variability (as a consequence of their amphibious life-style), the taxonomy of this genus remains controversial. Thus, to fill this gap in knowledge, we present a detailed molecular phylogenetic study of this genus based on nuclear (rITS) and plastid (accD-psaI, psbJ-petA, ycf6-psbM-trnD) sequences using 27 samples from 13 species. On the basis of this phylogenetic analysis, we provide a solid phylogenetic background for the modern taxonomy of the European members of the genus. Traditionally accepted sections of this tree (i.e., Crypta and Elatinella) were found to be monophyletic; only E. borchoni—found to be a basal member of the genus—has to be excluded from the latter lineage to achieve monophyly. A number of taxonomic conclusions can also be drawn: E. hexandra, a high-ploid species, is most likely a stabilised hybrid between the main sections; E. campylosperma merits full species status based on both molecular and morphological evidence; E. gussonei is a more widespread and genetically diverse species with two main lineages; and the presence of the Asian E. ambigua in the European flora is questionable. The main lineages recovered in this analysis are also supported by a number of synapomorphic morphological characters as well as uniform chromosome counts. Based on all the evidence presented here, two new subsections within Elatinella are described: subsection Hydropipera consisting of the temperate species of the section, and subsection Macropodae including the Mediterranean species of the section. PMID:28028470

  10. Molecular Diversity of Seed-borne Fusarium Species Associated with Maize in India

    PubMed Central

    Aiyaz, Mohammed; Divakara, Shetty Thimmappa; Mudili, Venkataramana; Moore, Geromy George; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; Yli-Mattila, Tapani; Nayaka, Siddaiah Chandra; Niranjana, Siddapura Ramachandrappa

    2016-01-01

    A total of 106 maize seed samples were collected from different agro-climatic regions of India. Sixty-two Fusarium isolates were recovered, 90% of which were identified as Fusarium verticillioides based on morphological and molecular characters. Use of the tef-1α gene corrected/refined the morphological species identifications of 11 isolates, and confirmed those of the remaining isolates. Genetic diversity among the Fusarium isolates involved multilocus fingerprinting profiles by Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) UPGMA and tef-1α gene phenetic analyses; for which, we observed no significant differences among the isolates based on geographic origin or fumonisin production; most of the subdivision related to species. Genotyping was performed on the F. verticillioides isolates, using 12 primer sets from the fumonisin pathway, to elucidate the molec-ular basis of fumonisin production or non-production. One fumonisin-negative isolate, UOMMF-16, was unable to amplify nine of the 12 fumonisin cluster genes tested. We also used the CD-ELISA method to confirm fumonisin production for our 62 Fusarium isolates. Only 15 isolates were found to be fumonisin-negative. Interestingly, genotypic characterization re-vealed six isolates with various gene deletion patterns that also tested positive for the production of fumonisins via CD-ELISA. Our findings confirm the importance of molecular studies for species delimitation, and for observing genetic and phenotypic diversity, among the Fusaria. PMID:27226769

  11. Molecular typing of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex from Northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    González, Gloria M; Casillas-Vega, Néstor; Garza-González, Elvira; Hernández-Bello, Romel; Rivera, Gildardo; Rodríguez, Jesús Ancer; Bocanegra-Garcia, Virgilio

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by members of the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex. Based on molecular identification, these two species have been further differentiated into molecular types. The aim of this work was to characterize clinical cryptococcal isolates recovered from six hospitals in Northeast Mexico from 1995 to 2011. One hundred and sixty-six isolates, which were characterized by biochemical tests and in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole, and M13 PCR fingerprinting, were included in this study. Utilizing phenotypic tests, 153 isolates (92.16 %) were identified as C. neoformans and 13 (7.83 %) as C. gattii. All isolates were susceptible to all antifungals tested. Employing M13 PCR fingerprinting, eight molecular types were detected. VNI was the most common genotype (124 cases; 74.6 %), followed by VNII (15 cases; 9 %), VNIII (8 cases; 4.8 %), VNIV (6 cases; 3.6 %), VGI (6 cases; 3.6 %), VGII (3 cases; 1.8 %), and VGIII and VGIV (2 cases, 1.2 % each). We confirm the presence of C. gattii in clinical isolates in Northeast Mexico, and a high clonal diversity in the studied strains of C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex.

  12. Structure of water adsorbed on a single graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, M. C.; Martí, J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the result of molecular-dynamics simulations of water adsorbed on top of a single graphene layer at temperatures between 25 and 50°C . The analysis of the energy per particle and the density profiles indicate that the behavior of the adsorbed liquid is similar to the case of multiple graphene layers (graphite) with the only difference being the values of configurational energy. Other structural properties, such as stability ranges, hydrogen bond distributions, and molecular orientations are also presented.

  13. The species flocks of East African cichlid fishes: recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and population genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    With more than 3,000 species, the fish family Cichlidae is one of the most species-rich families of vertebrates. Cichlids occur in southern and central America, Africa, Madagascar, and India. The hotspot of their biodiversity is East Africa, where they form adaptive radiations composed of hundreds of endemic species in several lakes of various sizes and ages. The unparalleled species richness of East African cichlids has been something of a conundrum for evolutionary biologists and ecologists, since it has been in doubt whether these hundreds of species arose by allopatric speciation or whether it is necessary to invoke somewhat less traditional models of speciation, such as micro-allopatric, peripatric, or even sympatric speciation or evolution through sexual selection mediated by female choice. Ernst Mayr's analyses of these evolutionary uniquely diverse species assemblages have contributed to a more direct approach to this problem and have led to a deeper understanding of the patterns and processes that caused the formation of these huge groups of species. We review here recent molecular data on population differentiation and phylogenetics, which have helped to unravel, to some extent, the patterns and processes that led to the formation and ecological maintenance of cichlid species flocks. It is becoming apparent that sexually selected traits do play an important role in speciation in micro-allopatric or even sympatric settings. Species richness seems to be roughly correlated with the surface area, but not the age, of the lakes. We observe that the oldest lineages of a species flock of cichlids are often less species-rich and live in the open water or deepwater habitats. While the species flocks of the Lake Malawai and the Lake Victoria areas were shown to be monophyletic, the cichlid assemblage of Lake Tanganyika seems to consist of several independent species flocks. Cichlids emerge as an evolutionary model system in which many fundamental questions in

  14. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  15. Molecular Identification and Prevalence of Malassezia Species in Pityriasis Versicolor Patients From Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Talaee, Rezvan; Katiraee, Farzad; Ghaderi, Maryam; Erami, Mahzad; Kazemi Alavi, Azam; Nazeri, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malassezia species are lipophilic yeasts found on the skin surface of humans and other warm-blooded vertebrates. It is associated with various human diseases, especially pityriasis versicolor, which is a chronic superficial skin disorder. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify Malassezia species isolated from patients’ samples affected by pityriasis versicolor, using molecular methods in Kashan, Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 140 subjects, suspected of having pityriasis versicolor from Kashan, were clinically diagnosed and then confirmed by direct microscopic examination. The scraped skin specimens were inoculated in modified Dixon’s medium. DNA was extracted from the colonies and PCR amplification was carried out for the 26s rDNA region. PCR products were used to further restriction fragment length polymorphism by CfoI enzyme. Results: Direct examination was positive in 93.3% of suspected pityriasis versicolor lesions. No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of Malassezia species between women and men. The highest prevalence of tinea versicolor was seen in patients 21–30 years-of-age. No difference could be seen in the frequency of Malassezia species depending on the age of the patients. In total, 65% of patients with pityriasis versicolor had hyperhidrosis. The most commonly isolated Malassezia species in the pityriasis versicolor lesions were; Malassezia globosa (66%), M. furfur (26%), M. restricta (3%), M. sympodialis (3%), and M. slooffiae (2%). Malassezia species were mainly isolated from the neck and chest. Conclusions: This study showed M. globosa to be the most common Malassezia species isolated from Malassezia skin disorders in Kashan, Iran. The PCR-RFLP method was useful in the rapid identification of the Malassezia species. By using these methods, the detection and identification of individual Malassezia species from clinical samples was substantially easier. PMID:25485051

  16. Species limits in Diaporthe: molecular re-assessment of D. citri, D. foeniculina and D. rudis with a new species on Citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species of Diaporthe are important plant pathogens associated with a wide range of hosts throughout the world. In the present study, the species causing melanose and stem end rot diseases on Citrus spp. were revised. Morphology and molecular phylogenetic analyses of the complete nuclear ribosomal in...

  17. Characterization of phospholipid molecular species and peptide molecules in wheat sprout hydroalcoholic extract.

    PubMed

    Lucci, Paolo; Pacetti, Deborah; Calzuola, Isabella; Marsili, Valeria; Perni, Stefano; Giavarini, Flavio; Frega, Natale Giuseppe; Gianfranceschi, Gian Luigi

    2013-11-27

    The phospholipid molecular species and the main peptide molecules of wheat sprout hydroalcoholic extract have been fully characterized by normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled online with positive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The extract that resulted was rich in phospholipid molecular species formed by the combination of the two essential fatty acids (α-linoleic and α-linolenic). These species accounted for 51.7% of total phosphatidic acid, 47.3% of total phosphatidylethanolamine, 37.7% of total phosphatidylcholine, and 14.1% of total phosphatidylinositol. The last one showed the highest amounts of species containing palmitic acid, thus representing the most saturated phospholipid class. The extract was also shown to contain several peptide sequences with both potential antioxidant domains and interaction sites for phospholipids (i.e., H-Ala-Gly-Ser-Met-Met-Cys-NH2, H-Tyr-Met-Thr-Val-Val-Ala-Cys-NH2, etc.); this latter finding can have a highly positive impact on the poor peptides bioavailability. Because of the presence of essential fatty acids-rich phospholipids and bioactive peptides, wheat sprout hydroalcoholic extract can be considered a potential functional food ingredient.

  18. Molecular analyses reveal high species diversity of trematodes in a sub-Arctic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soldánová, Miroslava; Georgieva, Simona; Roháčováa, Jana; Knudsen, Rune; Kuhn, Jesper A.; Henriksen, Eirik H.; Siwertsson, Anna; Shaw, Jenny C.; Kuris, Armand M.; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Scholz, Tomáš; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    To identify trematode diversity and life-cycles in the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, Norway, we characterised 120 trematode isolates from mollusc first intermediate hosts, metacercariae from second intermediate host fishes and invertebrates, and adults from fish and invertebrate definitive hosts, using molecular techniques. Phylogenies based on nuclear and/or mtDNA revealed high species richness (24 species or species-level genetic lineages), and uncovered trematode diversity (16 putative new species) from five families typical in lake ecosystems (Allocreadiidae, Diplostomidae, Plagiorchiidae, Schistosomatidae and Strigeidae). Sampling potential invertebrate hosts allowed matching of sequence data for different stages, thus achieving molecular elucidation of trematode life-cycles and exploration of host-parasite interactions. Phylogenetic analyses also helped identify three major mollusc intermediate hosts (Radix balthica, Pisidium casertanum and Sphaerium sp.) in the lake. Our findings increase the known trematode diversity at the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, showing that digenean diversity is high in this otherwise depauperate sub-Arctic freshwater ecosystem, and indicating that sub-Arctic and Arctic ecosystems may be characterised by unique trematode assemblages.

  19. Molecular analyses reveal high species diversity of trematodes in a sub-Arctic lake.

    PubMed

    Soldánová, Miroslava; Georgieva, Simona; Roháčová, Jana; Knudsen, Rune; Kuhn, Jesper A; Henriksen, Eirik H; Siwertsson, Anna; Shaw, Jenny C; Kuris, Armand M; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Scholz, Tomáš; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2017-03-14

    To identify trematode diversity and life-cycles in the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, Norway, we characterised 120 trematode isolates from mollusc first intermediate hosts, metacercariae from second intermediate host fishes and invertebrates, and adults from fish and invertebrate definitive hosts, using molecular techniques. Phylogenies based on nuclear and/or mtDNA revealed high species richness (24 species or species-level genetic lineages), and uncovered trematode diversity (16 putative new species) from five families typical in lake ecosystems (Allocreadiidae, Diplostomidae, Plagiorchiidae, Schistosomatidae and Strigeidae). Sampling potential invertebrate hosts allowed matching of sequence data for different stages, thus achieving molecular elucidation of trematode life-cycles and exploration of host-parasite interactions. Phylogenetic analyses also helped identify three major mollusc intermediate hosts (Radix balthica, Pisidium casertanum and Sphaerium sp.) in the lake. Our findings increase the known trematode diversity at the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, showing that digenean diversity is high in this otherwise depauperate sub-Arctic freshwater ecosystem, and indicating that sub-Arctic and Arctic ecosystems may be characterised by unique trematode assemblages.

  20. The taxonomic foundation, species circumscription and continental endemisms of Singerocybe: evidence from morphological and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiao; Feng, Bang; Yang, Zhu L; Li, Yan-Chun; Ratkowsky, David; Gates, Genevieve; Takahashi, Haruki; Rexer, Karl-Heinz; Kost, Gerhard W; Karunarathna, Samantha C

    2014-01-01

    The genus Singerocybe (Tricholomataceae, Agaricales, Basidiomycota) has been the subject of controversy since its proposal in 1988. Its taxonomic foundation, species circumscription and geographical distribution have not yet been examined with molecular sequence data. In this study phylogenetic analyses on this group of fungi were conducted based on collections from Europe, eastern Asia, southern Asia, North America and Australia, with four nuclear markers, ITS, nrLSU, tef1-α and rpb2. Molecular phylogenetic analyses, together with morphological observations, strongly support Singerocybe as a monophyletic group and identify the vesicles in the pileal and stipe cuticle as a synapomorphy of this genus. Seven species are recognized in the genus, including one new species and four new combinations. Clitocybe trogioides and Clitocybe trogioides var. odorifera are synonyms of Singerocybe humilis and Singerocybe alboinfundibuliformis respectively. Most of these species are geographically restricted in their distributions. Furthermore our study expands the distribution range of Singerocybe from the North Temperate Zone to Australia (Tasmania) and tropical southern Asia.

  1. Assessment of two new molecular methods for identification of Candida parapsilosis sensu lato species.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Canton, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Dilger, Amanda; Romá, Eva; Perlin, David S

    2011-09-01

    Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis replaced C. parapsilosis groups I, II, and III in 2005. Since then, an increased interest in studying their epidemiology has arisen based on the observed differences in antifungal susceptibilities and virulence the three species. A strict differentiation of these species cannot be achieved by phenotypic methods. We evaluate two new molecular methodologies to differentiate among these species by the use of a collection of 293 bloodstream infection isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu lato. For the first method, the isolates were studied using PCR amplification of a fragment of the C. parapsilosis sensu lato FKS1 gene and a universal primer pair followed by EcoRI enzyme digestion. The other method used the allele discrimination ability of molecular beacons in a multiplex real-time PCR format. Both methods of identification showed 100% concordance with internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1)/ITS2 sequencing and proved to be effective for clinical applications, even with mixed-species DNAs.

  2. Molecular and morphological identification of mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Brazilian vineyards.

    PubMed

    Pacheco da Silva, Vitor C; Bertin, Aline; Blin, Aurélie; Germain, Jean-François; Bernardi, Daniel; Rignol, Guylène; Botton, Marcos; Malausa, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are pests constraining the international trade of Brazilian table grapes. They damage grapes by transmitting viruses and toxins, causing defoliation, chlorosis, and vigor losses and favoring the development of sooty mold. Difficulties in mealybug identification remain an obstacle to the adequate management of these pests. In this study, our primary aim was to identify the principal mealybug species infesting the major table grape-producing regions in Brazil, by morphological and molecular characterization. Our secondary aim was to develop a rapid identification kit based on species-specific Polymerase Chain Reactions, to facilitate the routine identification of the most common pest species. We surveyed 40 sites infested with mealybugs and identified 17 species: Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell), Dysmicoccus sylvarum Williams and Granara de Willink, Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley), Ferrisia cristinae Kaydan and Gullan, Ferrisia meridionalis Williams, Ferrisia terani Williams and Granara de Willink, Phenacoccus baccharidis Williams, Phenacoccus parvus Morrison, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, Planococcus citri (Risso), Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret), Pseudococcus cryptus Hempel, four taxa closely related each of to Pseudococcus viburni, Pseudococcus sociabilis Hambleton, Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn) and Pseudococcus meridionalis Prado, and one specimen from the genus Pseudococcus Westwood. The PCR method developed effectively identified five mealybug species of economic interest on grape in Brazil: D. brevipes, Pl. citri, Ps. viburni, Ph. solenopsis and Planococcus ficus (Signoret). Nevertheless, it is not possible to assure that this procedure is reliable for taxa that have not been sampled already and might be very closely related to the target species.

  3. The calmodulin intergenic spacer as molecular target for characterization of Leishmania species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human leishmaniasis is a neglected disease caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania. Clinical aspects of this disease can vary significantly, reflecting the wide range of parasites in the genus Leishmania. Knowing accurately the Leishmania species infecting humans is important for clinical case management and evaluation of epidemiological risk. Calmodulin is an essential gene in trypanosomatids that modulates the calcium metabolism in various cellular activities. Despite its strong conservation in trypanosomatids, it has been recently observed that its untranslated regions (UTR) diverge among species. Methods In this study we analyzed the sequences and the absolute dinucleotide frequency of the intergenic spacer of the calmodulin gene (containing both, 3′ and 5′UTR) in nine reference Leishmania species and ten clinical isolates obtained from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Results We show that the short calmodulin intergenic spacers exhibit features that make them interesting for applications in molecular characterization and phylogenetic studies of Leishmania. Dendrograms based on sequence alignments and on the dinucleotide frequency indicate that this particular region of calmodulin gene might be useful for species typing between the Leishmania and Viannia subgenera. Conclusions Mutations and composition of the calmodulin intergenic spacer from Leishmania species might have taxonomic value as parameters to define if an isolate is identical to a certain species or belongs to one of the two current subgenera. PMID:24438764

  4. Molecular and Morphological Identification of Mealybug Species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Brazilian Vineyards

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco da Silva, Vitor C.; Bertin, Aline; Blin, Aurélie; Germain, Jean-François; Bernardi, Daniel; Rignol, Guylène; Botton, Marcos; Malausa, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are pests constraining the international trade of Brazilian table grapes. They damage grapes by transmitting viruses and toxins, causing defoliation, chlorosis, and vigor losses and favoring the development of sooty mold. Difficulties in mealybug identification remain an obstacle to the adequate management of these pests. In this study, our primary aim was to identify the principal mealybug species infesting the major table grape-producing regions in Brazil, by morphological and molecular characterization. Our secondary aim was to develop a rapid identification kit based on species-specific Polymerase Chain Reactions, to facilitate the routine identification of the most common pest species. We surveyed 40 sites infested with mealybugs and identified 17 species: Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell), Dysmicoccus sylvarum Williams and Granara de Willink, Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley), Ferrisia cristinae Kaydan and Gullan, Ferrisia meridionalis Williams, Ferrisia terani Williams and Granara de Willink, Phenacoccus baccharidis Williams, Phenacoccus parvus Morrison, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, Planococcus citri (Risso), Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret), Pseudococcus cryptus Hempel, four taxa closely related each of to Pseudococcus viburni, Pseudococcus sociabilis Hambleton, Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn) and Pseudococcus meridionalis Prado, and one specimen from the genus Pseudococcus Westwood. The PCR method developed effectively identified five mealybug species of economic interest on grape in Brazil: D. brevipes, Pl. citri, Ps. viburni, Ph. solenopsis and Planococcus ficus (Signoret). Nevertheless, it is not possible to assure that this procedure is reliable for taxa that have not been sampled already and might be very closely related to the target species. PMID:25062012

  5. Molecular characterization of Morchella species from the Western Himalayan region of India.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Harpreet Kaur; Acharya, Karan; Ramesh, G; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2011-04-01

    The molecular diversity of thirty-two different Morchella cultures/fruiting bodies, collected from the Western Himalayan region was studied in this investigation. Considerable taxonomic confusion exists regarding many species of Morchella. Although classical taxonomy is helpful in identification for many ascomycetes, morels exhibit considerable morphological diversity and there is disagreement in the identification of morel species. Phylogenetic analyses based on DNA sequences could help in sorting out morel taxonomy which is essential to better define the morel diversity. In this study, sequence analysis revealed that in the Western Himalayan region of India, both yellow (M. crassipes, M. spongiola) and black morels (M. elata, M. angusticeps, and M. gigas) were prominent along with two Verpa species. Phylogenetic analysis by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference revealed two different clades and a clear distinction between yellow and black morels.

  6. Morphological and Molecular Phylogenetic Data Reveal a New Species of Primula (Primulaceae) from Hunan, China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xun-Lin; Hu, Chi-Ming; Hao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Primulaceae, Primula undulifolia, is described from the hilly area of Hunan province in south-central China. Its morphology and distributional range suggest that it is allied to P. kwangtungensis, both adapted to subtropical climate, having contiguous distribution and similar habitat, growing on shady and moist cliffs. Petioles, scapes and pedicels of them are densely covered with rusty multicellular hairs, but the new species can be easily distinguished by its smaller flowers and narrowly oblong leaves with undulate margins. Molecular phylogenetic analysis based on four DNA markers (ITS, matK, trnL-F and rps16) confirmed the new species as an independent lineage and constitutes a main clade together with P. kwangtungensis, P. kweichouensis, P. wangii and P. hunanensis of Primula sect. Carolinella. PMID:27579832

  7. Molecular, biochemical, and morphometric characterization of Fasciola species potentially causing zoonotic disease in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Rahimy, Hoda H; Mahgoub, Abeer M A; El-Gebaly, Naglaa Saad M; Mousa, Wahid M A; Antably, Abeer S A E

    2012-09-01

    Fascioliasis is an important disease caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. The distributions of both species overlap in many areas of Asia and Africa including Egypt. Fifty adult Fasciola worms were collected from livers of cattle and sheep slaughtered in abattoirs, Cairo, Egypt. They were subjected to morphological and metric assessment of external features of fresh adults, morphological and metric assessment of internal anatomy of stained mounted worms, determination of electrophorezed bands of crude adult homogenates using SDS-PAGE, and molecular characterization of species-specific DNA segments using RFLP-PCR. It was found that the correlation between conventional morphology and its morphotype was statistically significant (P value = 0.00). Using SDS-PAGE, 13 bands were detected among both genotypes of Fasciola (35.7, 33.6, 32.4, 29.3, 27.5, 26, 24.4, 23, 21.45, 19, 16.75, 12.5, and 9.1 kDa).The most prevalent bands were that with a molecular weight of 29.3, 26, and 19 kDa. Bands detected were common for both species, but protein bands could not distinguish between F. hepatica and F. gigantica. The result of PCR for the amplification of the selected 28S rDNA fragment with the designed primer set yielded 618 bp long PCR products for F. hepatica and F. gigantica. Different band patterns generated after digestion of the 618 bp segment by the enzyme AvaII obtained with F. hepatica showed segments of the length 529, 62, 27 bp, while with F. gigantica 322, 269, 27 bp bands were obtained. Genotyping revealed no equivocal results. The conventional morphological parameters for species determination of Fasciola spp. endemic in Egypt were evaluated versus protein bands characterization and genotyping. It was concluded that conventional morphological and metric assessments were not useful for differentiation between F. gigantica and F. hepatica due to extensive overlap in the relative ranges. Similar conclusion was reached concerning protein band

  8. Molecular characterisation of Anaplasma species from African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Danielle; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Jolles, Anna; Beechler, Brianna; Jabbar, Abdul

    2017-03-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis is a tick-borne disease, mainly caused by Anaplasma marginale and A. centrale and is distributed in tropical and sub-tropical areas. This study aimed to characterise A. marginale and A. centrale from African buffaloes in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa, using the DNA sequences of the genes coding for major surface protein (msp1β) and heat shock protein (groEL), respectively. A total of 747 blood samples were collected from February 2014 to August 2016 from African buffaloes kept in KNP, and DNAs were tested using a molecular-phylogenetic approach. Out of 747 samples tested, 129 (17.3%) and 98 (13.1%) were positive for single infection with A. marginale and A. centrale, respectively; whereas 113 (15.1%) were positive for both Anaplasma spp. Pairwise difference of 1.6-8.5% was observed in msp1β sequences of A. marginale whereas that was only 0.3-2.4% for groEL sequences of A. centrale. Separate phylogenetic analyses of msp1β and groEL sequences of A. marginale and A. centrale, respectively, revealed that sequences of Anaplasma spp. from African buffaloes were unique and they grouped separately when compared with previously published sequences of both species. This is the first study to characterise A. marginale and A. centrale from African buffalo using species specific molecular markers. This study will pave the way for future studies to assess genetic variation among Anaplasma spp. from wild ruminants using molecular markers that are better at differentiating between species and strains than the more commonly used 16S rRNA gene, and help to undertake health and fitness studies and host-parasite dynamics using quantitative molecular tools.

  9. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of a New Trichuris Species (Nematoda- Trichuridae), and Phylogenetic Relationships of Trichuris Species of Cricetid Rodents from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Robles, María del Rosario; Cutillas, Cristina; Panei, Carlos Javier; Callejón, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Populations of Trichuris spp. isolated from six species of sigmodontine rodents from Argentina were analyzed based on morphological characteristics and ITS2 (rDNA) region sequences. Molecular data provided an opportunity to discuss the phylogenetic relationships among the Trichuris spp. from Noth and South America (mainly from Argentina). Trichuris specimens were identified morphologically as Trichuris pardinasi, T. navonae, Trichuris sp. and Trichuris new species, described in this paper. Sequences analyzed by Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference methods showed four main clades corresponding with the four different species regardless of geographical origin and host species. These four species from sigmodontine rodents clustered together and separated from Trichuris species isolated from murine and arvicoline rodents (outgroup). Different genetic lineages observed among Trichuris species from sigmodontine rodents which supported the proposal of a new species. Moreover, host distribution showed correspondence with the different tribes within the subfamily Sigmodontinae. PMID:25393618

  10. A test of color-based taxonomy in nudibranchs: Molecular phylogeny and species delimitation of the Felimida clenchi (Mollusca: Chromodorididae) species complex.

    PubMed

    Padula, Vinicius; Bahia, Juliana; Stöger, Isabella; Camacho-García, Yolanda; Malaquias, Manuel António E; Cervera, Juan Lucas; Schrödl, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, species identification in nudibranch gastropods relies heavily on body color pattern. The Felimida clenchi species complex, a group of brightly colored Atlantic and Mediterranean species in the family Chromodorididae, has a history of exceptional controversy and discussion among taxonomists. The most widely accepted hypothesis is that the complex includes four species (Felimida clenchi, F. neona, F. binza and F. britoi), each with a characteristic body color pattern. In this study, we investigated the taxonomic value of coloration in the Felimida clenchi complex, using molecular phylogenetics, species-delimitation analyses (ABGD, GMYC, PTP), haplotype-network methods, and the anatomy of the reproductive system. None of our analyses recovered the traditional separation into four species. Our results indicated the existence of three species, a result inconsistent with previous taxonomic hypotheses. We distinguished an undescribed species of Felimida and redefined the concepts of F. clenchi and F. binza, both highly polychromatic species. For the first time, molecular data support the existence of extreme color polymorphism in chromatic nudibranch species, with direct implications for the taxonomy of the group and its diversity. The polychromatism observed in the F. clenchi complex apparently correlates with the regional occurrence of similar color patterns in congeneric species, suggesting different mimicry circles. This may represent a parallel in the marine environment to the mechanisms that play a major role in the diversification of color in terrestrial and fresh-water chromatic groups, such as heliconian butterflies.

  11. Adsorption of organosulfur species at aqueous surfaces: molecular bonding and orientation.

    PubMed

    Tarbuck, Teresa L; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2005-11-10

    Four sulfur-containing compounds important to tropospheric chemistry have been examined at the vapor/H2O and vapor/D2O interfaces. These adsorbates, DMS, DMSO, DMSO2, and DMSO3, were studied by surface tension and vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy (VSFS). Each adsorbate is surface active and each orients with the hydrophobic methyl groups pointed out of the plane of the interface. Their influence on the interfacial water structure is adsorbate dependent. Strong and weak interactions with surface water are observed as well as reorientation of subsurface water molecules, resulting in an increase in interfacial thickness.

  12. Removal of acutely hazardous pharmaceuticals from water using multi-template imprinted polymer adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Avinash; Chopra, Nikita; Krupadam, Reddithota J

    2014-05-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer adsorbent has been prepared to remove a group of recalcitrant and acutely hazardous (p-type) chemicals from water and wastewaters. The polymer adsorbent exhibited twofold higher adsorption capacity than the commercially used polystyrene divinylbenzene resin (XAD) and powdered activated carbon adsorbents. Higher adsorption capacity of the polymer adsorbent was explained on the basis of high specific surface area formed during molecular imprinting process. Freundlich isotherms drawn showed that the adsorption of p-type chemicals onto polymer adsorbent was kinetically faster than the other reference adsorbents. Matrix effect on adsorption of p-type chemicals was minimal, and also polymer adsorbent was amenable to regeneration by washing with water/methanol (3:1, v/v) solution. The polymer adsorbent was unaltered in its adsorption capacity up to 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption, which will be more desirable in cost reduction of treatment compared with single-time-use activated carbon.

  13. Molecular phylogeny and morphometric analyses reveal deep divergence between Amazonia and Atlantic Forest species of Dendrophryniscus.

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Antoine; Recoder, Renato; Teixeira, Mauro; Cassimiro, José; Amaro, Renata Cecília; Camacho, Agustín; Damasceno, Roberta; Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Moritz, Craig; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut

    2012-03-01

    Dendrophryniscus is an early diverging clade of bufonids represented by few small-bodied species distributed in Amazonia and the Atlantic Forest. We used mitochondrial (414 bp of 12S, 575 bp of 16S genes) and nuclear DNA (785 bp of RAG-1) to investigate phylogenetic relationships and the timing of diversification within the genus. These molecular data were gathered from 23 specimens from 19 populations, including eight out of the 10 nominal species of the genus as well as Rhinella boulengeri. Analyses also included sequences of representatives of 18 other bufonid genera that were publically available. We also examined morphological characters to analyze differences within Dendrophryniscus. We found deep genetic divergence between an Amazonian and an Atlantic Forest clade, dating back to Eocene. Morphological data corroborate this distinction. We thus propose to assign the Amazonian species to a new genus, Amazonella. The species currently named R. boulengeri, which has been previously assigned to the genus Rhamphophryne, is shown to be closely related to Dendrophryniscus species. Our findings illustrate cryptic trends in bufonid morphological evolution, and point to a deep history of persistence and diversification within the Amazonian and Atlantic rainforests. We discuss our results in light of available paleoecological data and the biogeographic patterns observed in other similarly distributed groups.

  14. Molecular evidence for species status of the endangered Hainan peacock pheasant.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiang; Wang, Biao; Zhang, Yang-Yun; Liu, Ying; Liang, Wei; Wang, Ji-Chao; Shi, Hai-Tao; Su, Wen-Ba; Zhang, Zheng-Wang

    2008-01-01

    The Hainan peacock pheasant is an endangered taxon found only on Hainan Island of China. Due to lack of detailed taxonomic studies, whether it is a subspecies of the grey peacock pheasant (Polyplectron bicalcaratum katsumatae) or a full species (Polyplectron katsumatae) remained unclear. We used molecular markers, including the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and intron G of the nuclear ovomucoid gene, to reevaluate the taxonomy of the Hainan peacock pheasant. The results showed phylogeographic monophyly and large genetic distance between the Hainan peacock pheasant and the grey peacock pheasant. Sequence differences corroborated the species-level distinction between these two peacock pheasants, which were inferred to have diverged about 1.4+/-0.3 million years ago, near the time Hainan Island became separated from mainland China. Because the population density of the Hainan peacock pheasant is very low in its tropical forest on the island and the wild population is declining, it is now becoming severely endangered and should be ranked as the rarest species in the Order Galliformes in China. Our results increase the urgency of getting more morphological data to support the classification of the Hainan peacock pheasant as a distinct species and taking more conservation action immediately to protect this endangered island species.

  15. Molecular Variation in Chloroplast DNA Regions in Ancestral Species of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, N. T.; Mori, N.; Tsunewaki, K.

    1994-01-01

    Restriction map variation in two 5-6-kb chloroplast DNA regions of five diploid Aegilops species in the section Sitopsis and two wild tetraploid wheats, Triticum dicoccoides and Triticum araraticum, was investigated with a battery of four-cutter restriction enzymes. A single accession each of Triticum durum, Triticum timopheevi and Triticum aestivum was included as a reference. More than 250 restriction sites were scored, of which only seven sites were found polymorphic in Aegilops speltoides. No restriction site polymorphisms were detected in all of the other diploid and tetraploid species. In addition, six insertion/deletion polymorphisms were detected, but they were mostly unique or species-specific. Estimated nucleotide diversity was 0.0006 for A. speltoides, and 0.0000 for all the other investigated species. In A. speltoides, none of Tajima's D values was significant, indicating no clear deviation from the neutrality of molecular polymorphisms. Significant non-random association was detected for three combinations out of 10 possible pairs between polymorphic restriction sites in A. speltoides. Phylogenetic relationship among all the plastotypes (plastid genotype) suggested the diphyletic origin of T. dicoccoides and T. araraticum. A plastotype of one A. speltoides accession was identical to the major type of T. araraticum (T. timopheevi inclusively). Three of the plastotypes found in the Sitopsis species are very similar, but not identical, to that of T. dicoccoides, T. durum and T. aestivum. PMID:7916310

  16. Phylogenetic relationships among Neoechinorhynchus species (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from North-East Asia based on molecular data.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Mikhailova, Ekaterina; Denisova, Galina

    2014-02-01

    Phylogenetic and statistical analyses of DNA sequences of two genes, cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox 1) of the mitochondrial DNA and 18S subunit of the nuclear ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), was used to characterize Neoechinorhynchus species from fishes collected in different localities of North-East Asia. It has been found that four species can be clearly recognized using molecular markers-Neoechinorhynchus tumidus, Neoechinorhynchus beringianus, Neoechinorhynchus simansularis and Neoechinorhynchus salmonis. 18S sequences ascribed to Neoechinorhynchus crassus specimens from North-East Asia were identical to those of N. tumidus, but differed substantially from North American N. crassus. We renamed North-East Asian N. crassus specimens to N. sp., although the possibility that they represent a subspecies of N. tumidus cannot be excluded, taking into account a relatively small distance between cox 1 sequences of North-East Asian specimens of N. crassus and N. tumidus. Maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference analyses were performed for phylogeny reconstruction. All the phylogenetic trees showed that North-East Asian species of Neoechinorhynchus analyzed in this study represent independent clades, with the only exception of N. tumidus and N. sp. for 18S data. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that the majority of species sampled (N. tumidus+N. sp., N. simansularis and N. beringianus) are probably very closely related, while N. salmonis occupies separate position in the trees, possibly indicating a North American origin of this species.

  17. Taxonomic and Molecular Identification of Hemicaloosia, Hemicycliophora, Gracilacus and Paratylenchus Species (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cordero López, Marco A.; Robbins, Robert T.; Szalanski, Allen L.

    2013-01-01

    Populations of Hemicycliophora epicharoides, H. gigas, H. labiata, H. pruni, H. shepherdi, H. vidua, H. zuckermani, Gracilacus straeleni, and Paratylenchus labiosus were obtained from different geographical areas in the continental United States and characterized morphological and molecularly. Two new species of Hemicycliophorinae: Hemicaloosia uarki n. sp from Pinetree, St. Francis County, Arkansas, and Hemicycliophora wyei n. sp from Wayne County, North Carolina, are also described. Hemicaloosia uarki n. sp. is characterized by having two lip annuli separated from the rest of body and directed anteriorly, a long stylet (106-124 μm), long body length (1,081-1,326 μm) and a single lateral fields demarcated by interruptions of the body annuli. Hemicycliophora wyei n. sp. showed a lateral fields demarked by two faint lines with transverse anastomoses and/or breaks of the striae; an elongated not offset conical tail with distinct annulations and a rounded tip and long vulval lips with a vulval sleeve. The molecular characterizations of the new (H. uarki n. sp. and H. wyei n. sp.) and known species of Criconematidae using the ITS1 rDNA gene sequence and the molecular phylogenetic relationships are provided. PMID:24115782

  18. Taxonomic and Molecular Identification of Bakernema, Criconema, Hemicriconemoides, Ogma and Xenocriconemella Species (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Marco A.; Robbins, Robert T.; Szalanski, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Populations of Bakernema inaequale, C. petasum, C. sphagni, C. mutabile, Ogma octangulare, Xenocriconemella macrodora and Hemicriconemoides chitwoodi were identified and re-described from different geographical areas in the continental United States and molecularly characterized. Two new species of spine nematodes Criconema arkaense n. sp. from Washington County and Lee County, Arkansas and Criconema warrenense n. sp from Warren, Bradley County, Arkansas are also described and named. Criconema arkaense is characterize by having a conspicuous lip region offset from the body with two annuli, short rounded tail with a thin cuticular sheath and subterminal anus. Criconema warrenense n. sp. has two lip region annuli about the same width, first annulus directed posteriorly, separated by a narrow neck annulus and a short conoid tail, unilobed non-folded annulus. The molecular characterization of Criconema arkaense and Criconema warrenense using ITS1 rDNA gene sequence and the molecular phylogenetic relationships of these new species along with the known spines nematodes are provided. PMID:23482683

  19. Molecular shifts in limb identity underlie development of feathered feet in two domestic avian species

    PubMed Central

    Domyan, Eric T; Kronenberg, Zev; Infante, Carlos R; Vickrey, Anna I; Stringham, Sydney A; Bruders, Rebecca; Guernsey, Michael W; Park, Sungdae; Payne, Jason; Beckstead, Robert B; Kardon, Gabrielle; Menke, Douglas B; Yandell, Mark; Shapiro, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Birds display remarkable diversity in the distribution and morphology of scales and feathers on their feet, yet the genetic and developmental mechanisms governing this diversity remain unknown. Domestic pigeons have striking variation in foot feathering within a single species, providing a tractable model to investigate the molecular basis of skin appendage differences. We found that feathered feet in pigeons result from a partial transformation from hindlimb to forelimb identity mediated by cis-regulatory changes in the genes encoding the hindlimb-specific transcription factor Pitx1 and forelimb-specific transcription factor Tbx5. We also found that ectopic expression of Tbx5 is associated with foot feathers in chickens, suggesting similar molecular pathways underlie phenotypic convergence between these two species. These results show how changes in expression of regional patterning genes can generate localized changes in organ fate and morphology, and provide viable molecular mechanisms for diversity in hindlimb scale and feather distribution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12115.001 PMID:26977633

  20. Molecular Survey on Brucellosis in Rodents and Shrews - Natural Reservoirs of Novel Brucella Species in Germany?

    PubMed

    Hammerl, J A; Ulrich, R G; Imholt, C; Scholz, H C; Jacob, J; Kratzmann, N; Nöckler, K; Al Dahouk, S

    2017-04-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease introduced from animal reservoirs to humans. In Germany, bovine and ovine/caprine brucellosis were eradicated more than a decade ago and mandatory measures in livestock have been implemented to keep the officially brucellosis-free status. In contrast, surveillance of wildlife is still challenging, and reliable data on the prevalence of brucellae in small mammal populations do not exist. To assess the epidemiology of Brucella spp. in rodents and shrews, a molecular survey was carried out. A total of 537 rodents and shrews were trapped in four federal states located throughout Germany and investigated for the presence of Brucella. Using a two-step molecular assay based on the detection of the Brucella-specific bcsp31 and IS711 sequences in tissue samples, 14.2% (n = 76) of the tested animals were positive. These originated mainly from western and south-western Germany, where preliminary analyses indicate population density-dependent Brucella prevalence in voles (Myodes glareolus) and mice (Apodemus spp.). recA typing revealed a close relationship to a potentially novel Brucella species recently isolated from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Austria. The molecular detection of brucellae in various rodent taxa and for the first time in shrew species shows that these animals may be naturally infected or at least have a history of exposure to Brucella spp.

  1. In situ DRIFTS-MS studies on the oxidation of adsorbed NH3 by NOx over a Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haiyang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2013-04-30

    DRIFT spectroscopy combined with mass spectrometry was used to investigate the oxidation of adsorbed ammonia by NO2, NO+O2 and NO2+O2 on a copper ion exchanged SSZ 13 (Cu-SSZ-13) zeolite. Compared with both NO2 and NO, the adsorption of ammonia is much stronger on the Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite. Two adsorbed ammonia species were found over the Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite studied here; notably ammonia on Brönsted acid sites (proton) and ammonia on Lewis acid sites (copper ions). These adsorbed ammonia species present different activity profiles and selectivity to N2 during NH3 oxidation. The results obtained suggest that ammonia adsorbed onto copper ions in Cu-SSZ-13 are more active at low temperatures than proton-adsorbed NH3, and give rise to a higher selectivity to N2. The formation of N2O is associated primarily with the reaction of NOx with proton-adsorbed NH3 via the formation and subsequent thermal decomposition of NH4NO3. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Portions of this work were performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  2. Using Combined Morphological, Allometric and Molecular Approaches to Identify Species of the Genus Raillietiella (Pentastomida)

    PubMed Central

    Kelehear, Crystal; Spratt, David M.; Dubey, Sylvain; Brown, Gregory P.; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomic studies of parasites can be severely compromised if the host species affects parasite morphology; an uncritical analysis might recognize multiple taxa simply because of phenotypically plastic responses of parasite morphology to host physiology. Pentastomids of the genus Raillietiella are endoparasitic crustaceans primarily infecting the respiratory system of carnivorous reptiles, but also recorded from bufonid anurans. The delineation of pentastomids at the generic level is clear, but the taxonomic status of many species is not. We collected raillietiellids from lungs of the invasive cane toad (Rhinella marina), the invasive Asian house gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus), and a native tree frog (Litoria caerulea) in tropical Australia, and employed a combination of genetic analyses, and traditional and novel morphological methods to clarify their identity. Conventional analyses of parasite morphology (which focus on raw values of morphological traits) revealed two discrete clusters in terms of pentastome hook size, implying two different species of pentastomes: one from toads and a tree frog (Raillietiella indica) and another from lizards (Raillietiella frenatus). However, these clusters disappeared in allometric analyses that took pentastome body size into account, suggesting that only a single pentastome taxon may be involved. Our molecular data revealed no genetic differences between parasites in toads versus lizards, confirming that there was only one species: R. frenatus. This pentastome (previously known only from lizards) clearly is also capable of maturing in anurans. Our analyses show that the morphological features used in pentastomid taxonomy change as the parasite transitions through developmental stages in the definitive host. To facilitate valid descriptions of new species of pentastomes, future taxonomic work should include both morphological measurements (incorporating quantitative measures of body size and hook bluntness) and molecular data

  3. Relationships of the Woody Medicago Species (Section Dendrotelis) Assessed by Molecular Cytogenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Castro, Mercedes; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The organization of rDNA genes in the woody medic species from the agronomically important Medicago section Dendrotelis was analysed to gain insight into their taxonomic relationships, to assess the levels of infraspecific variation concerning ribosomal loci in a restricted and fragmented insular species (M. citrina) and to assess the nature of its polyploidy. Methods Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA genes in the three species of section Dendrotelis (M. arborea, M. citrina, M. strasseri) and the related M. marina from section Medicago. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to assess the genomic relationships of the polyploid M. citrina with the putatively related species from section Dendrotelis. Key Results The diploid (2n = 16) M. marina has a single 45S and two 5S rDNA loci, a pattern usually detected in previous studies of Medicago diploid species. However, polyploid species from section Dendrotelis depart from expectations. The tetraploid species (2n = 32) M. arborea and M. strasseri have one 45S rDNA locus and two 5S rDNA loci, whereas in the hexaploid (2n = 48) M. citrina four 45S rDNA and five 5S rDNA loci have been detected. No single chromosome of M. citrina was uniformly labelled after using genomic probes from M. arborea and M. strasseri. Instead, cross-hybridization signals in M. citrina were restricted to terminal chromosome arms and NOR regions. Conclusions FISH results support the close taxonomic interrelationship between M. arborea and M. strasseri. In these tetraploid species, NOR loci have experienced a diploidization event through physical loss of sequences, a cytogenetic feature so far not reported in other species of the genus. The high number of rDNA loci and GISH results support the specific status for the hexaploid M. citrina, and it is suggested that this species is not an autopolyploid derivative of M. arborea or M. strasseri. Further, molecular

  4. Preparation of High Purity, High Molecular-Weight Chitin from Ionic Liquids for Use as an Adsorbate for the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Robin

    2013-12-21

    Ensuring a domestic supply of uranium is a key issue facing the wider implementation of nuclear power. Uranium is mostly mined in Kazakhstan, Australia, and Canada, and there are few high-grade uranium reserves left worldwide. Therefore, one of the most appealing potential sources of uranium is the vast quantity dissolved in the oceans (estimated to be 4.4 billion tons worldwide). There have been research efforts centered on finding a means to extract uranium from seawater for decades, but so far none have resulted in an economically viable product, due in part to the fact that the materials that have been successfully demonstrated to date are too costly (in terms of money and energy) to produce on the necessary scale. Ionic Liquids (salts which melt below 100{degrees}C) can completely dissolve raw crustacean shells, leading to recovery of a high purity, high molecular weight chitin powder and to fibers and films which can be spun directly from the extract solution suggesting that continuous processing might be feasible. The work proposed here will utilize the unprecedented control this makes possible over the chitin fiber a) to prepare electrospun nanofibers of very high surface area and in specific architectures, b) to modify the fiber surfaces chemically with selective extractant capacity, and c) to demonstrate their utility in the direct extraction and recovery of uranium from seawater. This approach will 1) provide direct extraction of chitin from shellfish waste thus saving energy over the current industrial process for obtaining chitin; 2) allow continuous processing of nanofibers for very high surface area fibers in an economical operation; 3) provide a unique high molecular weight chitin not available from the current industrial process, leading to stronger, more durable fibers; and 4) allow easy chemical modification of the large surface areas of the fibers for appending uranyl selective functionality providing selectivity and ease of stripping. The

  5. Widespread utility of highly informative AFLP molecular markers across divergent shark species.

    PubMed

    Zenger, Kyall R; Stow, Adam J; Peddemors, Victor; Briscoe, David A; Harcourt, Robert G

    2006-01-01

    Population numbers of many shark species are declining rapidly around the world. Despite the commercial and conservation significance, little is known on even the most fundamental aspects of their population biology. Data collection that relies on direct observation can be logistically challenging with sharks. Consequently, molecular methods are becoming increasingly important to obtain knowledge that is critical for conservation and management. Here we describe an amplified fragment length polymorphism method that can be applied universally to sharks to identify highly informative genome-wide polymorphisms from 12 primer pairs. We demonstrate the value of our method on 15 divergent shark species within the superorder Galeomorphii, including endangered species which are notorious for low levels of genetic diversity. Both the endangered sand tiger shark (Carcharodon taurus, N = 18) and the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, N = 7) displayed relatively high levels of allelic diversity. A total of 59 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.373) and 78 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.316) were resolved in C. taurus and C. carcharias, respectively. Results from other sharks (e.g., Orectolobus ornatus, Orectolobus sp., and Galeocerdo cuvier) produced remarkably high numbers of polymorphic loci (106, 94, and 86, respectively) from a limited sample size of only 2. A major constraint to obtaining much needed genetic data from sharks is the time-consuming process of developing molecular markers. Here we demonstrate the general utility of a technique that provides large numbers of informative loci in sharks.

  6. Simultaneous analysis of glycolipids and phospholids molecular species in avocado (Persea americana Mill) fruit.

    PubMed

    Pacetti, Deborah; Boselli, Emanuele; Lucci, Paolo; Frega, Natale G

    2007-05-25

    The molecular species of phospholipids (PLs) and glycolipids (GLs) were simultaneously characterized in the pulp and almond of the avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill) of four varieties by means of high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry. In the pulp, the predominant species of monoglycosyldiglycerides (MGD) were m/z 796.6 (oleic/linolenic and linoleic/linoleic acids) and m/z 800.4 (stearic/linoleic and oleic/oleic acids). One of the main diglycosyldiglycerides (DGD) both in the pulp and almond was m/z 958.5 (oleic/linolenic); however, the pulp was also rich of m/z 962.4 (oleic/oleic), whereas in the almond, m/z 934.5 (palmitic/linoleic and palmitoleic/oleic) and m/z 960.5 (oleic/linoleic and stearic/linolenic) were more abundant. In the almond, the main PL classes (phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI)) contained always palmitic/linoleic acids. Alpha-linolenic acid was contained as MGD (linolenic/linolenic) and DGD (linolenic/linolenic), more present in the pulp than in the almond. The major molecular species of glycocerebrosides (GCer) in the pulp and almond carried hydroxy-palmitic acid (C(16h:0))/4,8-sphyngadienine (d(18:2)).

  7. First molecular characterization of a Hepatozoon species (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) infecting birds and description of a new species infecting storm petrels (Aves: Hydrobatidae).

    PubMed

    Merino, Santiago; Martínez, Javier; Masello, Juan F; Bedolla, Yuliana; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2014-06-01

    During a survey of blood parasites in a population of Leach's and black storm petrels ( Oceanodroma leucorhoa and Oceanodroma melania) in Mexico, infection by a Hepatozoon species in erythrocytes of several birds was noted. Here we describe the species as Hepatozoon peircei sp. nov. Some species of Hepatozoon described from birds have been identified as lankesterellids when DNA molecular analyses were conducted. However, a sequence of 1,774 bp of the parasite found infecting storm petrels in this study clearly show the parasite is a species of the genus Hepatozoon. This is the first Hepatozoon species infecting birds to be characterized at the molecular level and the first found infecting erythrocytes and not leucocytes.

  8. Molecular tools for species and sex identification in the mixed-species flocks of bean geese and white-fronted geese.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-kyung; Lee, Sang-im; Lee, Hang; Lee, Sangdon

    2012-11-01

    Genetic studies on protected species can be difficult, particularly when they form a mixed-species flock with other species. The bean goose (Anser fabalis), which is internationally recognized as a threatened species, was observed to form overwintering foraging flocks with white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) at agricultural lands to feed on the grains in Korea. Non-invasive samples such as feces and feather that are readily available in their foraging ground can be useful for understanding the structure and composition of populations, but they often require specific experimental conditions due to small amount or low quality of DNA. In this study, we designed sets of primers that would allow efficient molecular identification of species and sex of individuals of bean geese and white-fronted geese. Species-specific primers (WFG-F/BG-F and G-R), developed from ND2 region of mitochondrial DNA, produced PCR products with different sizes which allow easy species identification without further sequencing. Based on published CHD 1 sequences, we designed internal primers (Gsex-F and Gsex-R) for sex determination that can be used in nested PCR after applying P2/P8 primers, and our methods clearly showed high success rate of molecular sexing from non-invasive samples. These molecular tools open the possibilities for genetic studies using non-invasive samples collected from a mixed-species aggregation containing bean geese and white-fronted geese.

  9. The Value of Molecular vs. Morphometric and Acoustic Information for Species Identification Using Sympatric Molossid Bats

    PubMed Central

    Gager, Yann; Tarland, Emilia; Lieckfeldt, Dietmar; Ménage, Matthieu; Botero-Castro, Fidel; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Kraus, Robert H. S.; Ludwig, Arne; Dechmann, Dina K. N.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental condition for any work with free-ranging animals is correct species identification. However, in case of bats, information on local species assemblies is frequently limited especially in regions with high biodiversity such as the Neotropics. The bat genus Molossus is a typical example of this, with morphologically similar species often occurring in sympatry. We used a multi-method approach based on molecular, morphometric and acoustic information collected from 962 individuals of Molossus bondae, M. coibensis, and M. molossus captured in Panama. We distinguished M. bondae based on size and pelage coloration. We identified two robust species clusters composed of M. molossus and M. coibensis based on 18 microsatellite markers but also on a more stringently determined set of four markers. Phylogenetic reconstructions using the mitochondrial gene co1 (DNA barcode) were used to diagnose these microsatellite clusters as M. molossus and M. coibensis. To differentiate species, morphological information was only reliable when forearm length and body mass were combined in a linear discriminant function (95.9% correctly identified individuals). When looking in more detail at M. molossus and M. coibensis, only four out of 13 wing parameters were informative for species differentiation, with M. coibensis showing lower values for hand wing area and hand wing length and higher values for wing loading. Acoustic recordings after release required categorization of calls into types, yielding only two informative subsets: approach calls and two-toned search calls. Our data emphasizes the importance of combining morphological traits and independent genetic data to inform the best choice and combination of discriminatory information used in the field. Because parameters can vary geographically, the multi-method approach may need to be adjusted to local species assemblies and populations to be entirely informative. PMID:26943355

  10. Systematics and molecular phylogeny of the family oscarellidae (homoscleromorpha) with description of two new oscarella species.

    PubMed

    Gazave, Eve; Lavrov, Dennis V; Cabrol, Jory; Renard, Emmanuelle; Rocher, Caroline; Vacelet, Jean; Adamska, Maja; Borchiellini, Carole; Ereskovsky, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    The family Oscarellidae is one of the two families in the class Homoscleromorpha (phylum Porifera) and is characterized by the absence of a skeleton and the presence of a specific mitochondrial gene, tatC. This family currently encompasses sponges in two genera: Oscarella with 17 described species and Pseudocorticium with one described species. Although sponges in this group are relatively well-studied, phylogenetic relationships among members of Oscarellidae and the validity of genus Pseudocorticium remain open questions. Here we present a phylogenetic analysis of Oscarellidae using four markers (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, atp6, tatC), and argue that it should become a mono-generic family, with Pseudocorticium being synonymized with Oscarella, and with the transfer of Pseudocorticium jarrei to Oscarella jarrei. We show that the genus Oscarella can be subdivided into four clades, each of which is supported by either a small number of morphological characters or by molecular synapomorphies. In addition, we describe two new species of Oscarella from Norwegian fjords: O. bergenensis sp. nov. and O. nicolae sp. nov., and we compare their morphology, anatomy, and cytology with other species in this genus. Internal anatomical characters are similar in both species, but details of external morphology and particularly of cytological characters provide diagnostic features. Our study also confirms that O. lobularis and O. tuberculata are two distinct polychromic sibling species. This study highlights the difficulties of species identification in skeleton-less sponges and, more generally, in groups where morphological characters are scarce. Adopting a multi-marker approach is thus highly suitable for these groups.

  11. Systematics and Molecular Phylogeny of the Family Oscarellidae (Homoscleromorpha) with Description of Two New Oscarella Species

    PubMed Central

    Gazave, Eve; Lavrov, Dennis V.; Cabrol, Jory; Renard, Emmanuelle; Rocher, Caroline; Vacelet, Jean; Adamska, Maja; Borchiellini, Carole; Ereskovsky, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    The family Oscarellidae is one of the two families in the class Homoscleromorpha (phylum Porifera) and is characterized by the absence of a skeleton and the presence of a specific mitochondrial gene, tatC. This family currently encompasses sponges in two genera: Oscarella with 17 described species and Pseudocorticium with one described species. Although sponges in this group are relatively well-studied, phylogenetic relationships among members of Oscarellidae and the validity of genus Pseudocorticium remain open questions. Here we present a phylogenetic analysis of Oscarellidae using four markers (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, atp6, tatC), and argue that it should become a mono-generic family, with Pseudocorticium being synonymized with Oscarella, and with the transfer of Pseudocorticium jarrei to Oscarella jarrei. We show that the genus Oscarella can be subdivided into four clades, each of which is supported by either a small number of morphological characters or by molecular synapomorphies. In addition, we describe two new species of Oscarella from Norwegian fjords: O. bergenensis sp. nov. and O. nicolae sp. nov., and we compare their morphology, anatomy, and cytology with other species in this genus. Internal anatomical characters are similar in both species, but details of external morphology and particularly of cytological characters provide diagnostic features. Our study also confirms that O. lobularis and O. tuberculata are two distinct polychromic sibling species. This study highlights the difficulties of species identification in skeleton-less sponges and, more generally, in groups where morphological characters are scarce. Adopting a multi-marker approach is thus highly suitable for these groups. PMID:23737959

  12. Molecular and Morphological Evidence Demonstrating Two Species of Helicometrina Linton 1910 (Digenea: Opecoelidae) in Northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Marcelo E; Valdivia, Isabel M; Chavez, Rosa A; Molina, Horacio; Cárdenas, Leyla

    2015-12-01

    The opecoelid Helicometrina nimia Linton, 1910 has been reported from numerous marine fishes along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of the Americas. Along the Chilean coast, H. nimia is found in fishes belonging to at least 9 families. This surprisingly low host specificity of H. nimia raises question about the correct identification of specimens assigned to this species. Here we evaluate whether H. nimia specimens isolated from sympatric fish species in northern Chile but with different diets and found in different habitats (water column and demersal) are the same species. Our results demonstrate that specimens from the shallow benthic fish Labrisomus philippii (Steindachner) do not correspond to H. nimia but instead belong to a new species of Helicometrina. This species is described and distinguished from H. nimia using morphological descriptions and 2 molecular markers (the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene and the V4 region of the SSU rRNA gene). The new species Helicometrina labrisomi (Digenea: Opecoelidae), is found in the intestine of L. philippii (Steindachner, 1866) (Pisces: Labrisomidae), a shallow benthic fish that inhabits the northern coast of Chile. We also studied the related Helicometrina nimia Linton, 1910 from the benthopelagic fishes Paralabrax humeralis (Valenciennes, 1828) and Acanthistius pictus (Tschudi, 1846) (Serranidae). The new species differs from H. nimia by a combination of characters that include ovary shape, number of uterine loops, and position of the genital pore. Our results indicate that morphological characteristics, such as body size, extent of the vitellarium, shape of the testes, and cirrus sac size and extent, traditionally used in the taxonomy of Helicometrina are highly variable. In contrast, meristic and morphological characteristics, such as a lobed ovary, the number of uterine loops, dimensions of the pharynx, and the opening of the genital pore, are highly constant.

  13. Molecular identification, antifungal susceptibility profile, and biofilm formation of clinical and environmental Rhodotorula species isolates.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Jorge Meneses; Bizerra, Fernando César; Ferreira, Renata Carmona E; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC(50)/MIC(90), 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula

  14. Molecular Identification, Antifungal Susceptibility Profile, and Biofilm Formation of Clinical and Environmental Rhodotorula Species Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Jorge Meneses; Bizerra, Fernando César; Ferreira, Renata Carmona e

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC50/MIC90, 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula species

  15. Long-Term Retention of Small, Volatile Molecular Species within Metallic Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, James P; Tasker, Alison L; Baxter, Elaine A; Biggs, Simon; Cayre, Olivier J

    2015-07-15

    Encapsulation and full retention of small molecular weight active ingredients is a challenging task that remains unsolved by current technologies used in industry and academia. In particular, certain everyday product formulations provide difficult environments in which preventing active leakage through capsule walls is not feasible. For example, a continuous phase that can fully dissolve an encapsulated active will typically force full release over a fraction of the intended lifetime of a product. This is due to the inherent porosity of polymeric membranes typically used as capsule wall material in current technologies. In this study, we demonstrate a method for preventing undesired loss of encapsulated actives under these extreme conditions using a simple threestep process. Our developed methodology, which forms an impermeable metal film around polymer microcapsules, prevents loss of small, volatile oils within an ethanol continuous phase for at least 21 days while polymeric capsules lose their entire content in less than 30 min under the same conditions. Polymer shell-oil core microcapsules are produced using a well-known cosolvent extraction method to precipitate a polymeric shell around the oil core. Subsequently, metallic catalytic nanoparticles are physically adsorbed onto the microcapsule polymeric shells. Finally, this nanoparticle coating is used to catalyze the growth of a secondary metallic film. Specifically, this work shows that it is possible to coat polymeric microcapsules containing a model oil system or a typical fragrance oil with a continuous metal shell. It also shows that the coverage of nanoparticles on the capsule surface can be controlled, which is paramount for obtaining a continuous impermeable metal film. In addition, control over the metal shell thickness is demonstrated without altering the capability of the metal film to retain the encapsulated oils.

  16. Analytical supercritical fluid extraction of adsorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Wright, C.W.; Gale, R.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The use of supercritical fluids for the analytical extraction of semivolatile and higher molecular weight materials from various adsorbent and particulate matrices was investigated. Instrumentation was designed to allow gram quantities of the matrix to be extracted at pressures up to 400 bar and temperatures to 235 /sup 0/C with collection of the effluent in a sealed liquid-nitrogen-cooled flask. Carbon dioxide, isobutane, and methanol modified (20 mol %) carbon dioxide fluid systems were evaluated and compared to liquid Soxhlet extraction. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) provided very rapid (approx. =30 min) extraction with comparable efficiency to the Soxhlet methods, and both more rapid and more efficient extractions appear feasible. The more polar carbon dioxide-methanol fluid system gave higher extraction efficiencies for the more polar adsorbates and the isobutane system was more efficient for the higher molecular weight and less polar compounds.

  17. Molecular species-sensitive optical coherence tomography using coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Bredfeldt, Jeremy; Hambir, Selezion; Dlott, Dana D.; Kitchell, Barbara; Gruebele, Martin; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2003-07-01

    We present our progress in developing a novel technique and instrument that images specific molecular species in biological tissues using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Standard OCT instruments measure only the scattering from structural features, such as refractive index changes. We utilize Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Spectroscopy, a nonlinear optics technique that can selectively stimulate molecular groups, to gather compositional information from the sample. Being a coherent process, our instrument will produce interference between the nonlinear anti-Stokes signal produced in the sample and a reference molecular sample to both exclude background and nonresonant signals and range features in the tissue. Because of this, we will also gain the benefits of sensitivity that interferometry can provide. By utilizing the tunability of an optical parametric oscillator, we can address a range of molecular resonances from 1500 cm-1 to 3500 cm-1. This frequency range offers the possibility of measuring the distributions and densities of proteins, lipids, and nuclear material that we believe will be useful for determining the early presence of epithelial carcinomas. We demonstrate the principle of this imaging method by producing interference between two separately produced CARS signals from the same probe and Stokes beams.

  18. Molecular signatures of transgenerational response to ocean acidification in a species of reef fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunter, Celia; Welch, Megan J.; Ryu, Taewoo; Zhang, Huoming; Berumen, Michael L.; Nilsson, Göran E.; Munday, Philip L.; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    The impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems will depend on species capacity to adapt. Recent studies show that the behaviour of reef fishes is impaired at projected CO 2 levels; however, individual variation exists that might promote adaptation. Here, we show a clear signature of parental sensitivity to high CO 2 in the brain molecular phenotype of juvenile spiny damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, primarily driven by circadian rhythm genes. Offspring of CO 2-tolerant and CO 2-sensitive parents were reared at near-future CO 2 (754 μatm) or present-day control levels (414 μatm). By integrating 33 brain transcriptomes and proteomes with a de novo assembled genome we investigate the molecular responses of the fish brain to increased CO 2 and the expression of parental tolerance to high CO 2 in the offspring molecular phenotype. Exposure to high CO 2 resulted in differential regulation of 173 and 62 genes and 109 and 68 proteins in the tolerant and sensitive groups, respectively. Importantly, the majority of differences between offspring of tolerant and sensitive parents occurred in high CO 2 conditions. This transgenerational molecular signature suggests that individual variation in CO 2 sensitivity could facilitate adaptation of fish populations to ocean acidification.

  19. Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chili peppers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Julius, David

    2002-02-08

    Chili peppers produce the pungent vanilloid compound capsaicin, which offers protection from predatory mammals. Birds are indifferent to the pain-producing effects of capsaicin and therefore serve as vectors for seed dispersal. Here, we determine the molecular basis for this species-specific behavioral response by identifying a domain of the rat vanilloid receptor that confers sensitivity to capsaicin to the normally insensitive chicken ortholog. Like its mammalian counterpart, the chicken receptor is activated by heat or protons, consistent with the fact that both mammals and birds detect noxious heat and experience thermal hypersensitivity. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the ecological phenomenon of directed deterence and suggest that the capacity to detect capsaicin-like inflammatory substances is a recent acquisition of mammalian vanilloid receptors.

  20. Cryptic species of hairworm parasites revealed by molecular data and crowdsourcing of specimen collections.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, Ben; Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas; Bolek, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing cryptic species promotes a better understanding of biodiversity, systematics, evolutionary biology, and biogeography. When cryptic species are disease-causing organisms, such as parasites, their correct recognition has important implications for the study of epidemiology, disease ecology, and host-parasite relationships. Freshwater nematomorphs (Nematomorpha: Gordiida) or hairworms, are an enigmatic yet fascinating group of parasites that are known to manipulate host behavior to aid transition from the parasitic phase, within terrestrial insects, to the free-living aquatic stage. Hairworm taxonomy has been hampered by a paucity of informative diagnostic characters and it has long been suspected that this group contains numerous cryptic species. Study of single hairworm species over large geographical areas has been difficult due to extremely rare encounters and unreliable methods of collecting adult worms. Here we report that by using crowdsourcing, citizen scientists have collected and submitted samples of Gordius cf. robustus from throughout its range in North America making its genetic study possible. Combined with our own collections, we examined samples from 28 localities within the USA; despite the collection of numerous hairworms from Canada and Mexico, G. cf. robustus were not collected outside of the contiguous United States. Mitochondrial CO1 genetic distances revealed that specimens grouped into 8 clades separated by 8-24.3%. In addition, molecular evidence from mitochondrial (CO1 and cytB) and nuclear (partial 28S, ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) DNA suggests that these 8 clades are distinct species and that this group of species is paraphyletic, since the North American species G. attoni and the European species G. aquaticus and G. balticus group among the G. robustus lineages. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between genetic (CO1) and geographic distance between the 8 Gordius species. This study demonstrates the value of involving the

  1. Synthesis of metronidazole-imprinted molecularly imprinted polymers by distillation precipitation polymerization and their use as a solid-phase adsorbent and chromatographic filler.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Lu; Li Han Song, Le; Liu, Yuan; Tang, Hui; Li, Yingchun

    2015-04-01

    Metronidazole-imprinted polymers with superior recognition properties were prepared by a novel strategy called distillation-precipitation polymerization. The as-obtained polymers were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, laser particle size determination and scanning electron microscopy, and their binding performances were evaluated in detail by static, kinetic and dynamic rebinding tests, and Scatchard analysis. The results showed that when the fraction of the monomers was 5 vol% in the whole reaction system, the prepared polymers afforded good morphology, monodispersity, and high adsorption capacity and excellent selectivity to the target molecule, metronidazole. The optimal binding performance is 12.41 mg/g for metronidazole just before leakage occurred and 38.51 mg/g at saturation in dynamic rebinding tests. Metronidazole-imprinted polymers were further applied as packing agents in solid-phase extraction and as chromatographic filler, both of which served for the detection of metronidazole in fish tissue. The results illustrated the recoveries of spiked samples ranged from 82.97 to 87.83% by using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction combined with a C18 commercial column and 93.7 to 101.2% by directly using the polymer-packed chromatographic column. The relative standard deviation of both methods was less than 6%.

  2. Molecular phylogeny of Ascotricha, including two new marine algae-associated species.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Cai, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on a broad taxonomic sampling of Ascotricha were conducted using the sequences of nuc rDNA region encompassing the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, along with the 5.8S rDNA (ITS), partial nuc 18S rDNA (18S) and partial β-tubulin gene (TUB2). Hypoxyloid Xylariaceae and xylarioid Xylariaceae were inferred as two distinct lineages in the Xylariaceae in the combined ITS-TUB2 phylogeny. Within xylarioid Xylariaceae species of Ascotricha form a monophyletic group. Two new marine algae-associated fungi, Ascotricha longipila and A. parvispora, are described on the basis of morphological and molecular characters and the combination, A. sinuosa, is proposed. A synopsis of the morphological characters and a dichotomous key to Ascotricha species are provided.

  3. Morphological and molecular evidence for two new species of Laetiporus (Basidiomycota, Polyporales) from southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Chen, Yuanyuan; Cui, Baokai; Liu, Honggao; Wang, Yuanzhong

    2014-01-01

    Two Laetiporus species, L. ailaoshanensis and L. zonatus spp. nov., are described from southwestern China based on morphological and molecular characters. Laetiporus ailaoshanensis is characterized by orange-yellow to reddish orange pileal surface and cream to buff pores when fresh, azonate to faintly zonate pileus, ovoid to ellipsoid basidiospores (5.0-6.2 × 4.0-5.0 μm), and it has been observed only on Lithocarpus. Laetiporus zonatus is characterized by white to cream pileal surface with buff to clay-buff base when fresh, concentrically zonate basidiocarps, ellipsoid to pyriform or drop-shaped basidiospores (5.8-7.2 × 4.3-5.5 μm), and it has been found only on Quercus. The phylogenetic relationships of all recognized Laetiporus species were inferred from a combined dataset of ITS and nLSU-rDNA sequences, and L. ailaoshanensis and L. zonatus represent two new lineages in this group.

  4. Development of a novel, simple and rapid molecular identification system for clinical Candida species.

    PubMed

    Deák, R; Bodai, L; Aarts, H J M; Maráz, A

    2004-08-01

    Identification of clinical yeast isolates causing candidiasis is routinely performed by commercial yeast identification systems based on biochemical, morphological and physiological tests. These systems require 3-5 days and the proportion of identifications that are incorrect is high. Our novel and rapid molecular identification system for clinical Candida species is based on the analysis of restriction patterns obtained from PCR-generated ribosomal DNA sequences using five restriction enzymes. A software package (CandID) was designed to include a database of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns for 29 Candida species. For 'in-house' validation, 122 clinical isolates that had previously identified in clinical laboratories were typed by this system. These clinical isolates were also independently re-identified by the API 20C AUX system. The ribosomal DNA RFLP database in the context of supporting analytical software allowed simple and rapid (1 work day) identification.

  5. Molecular data for Crenavolva species (Gastropoda, Ovulidae) reveals the synonymy of C. chiapponii

    PubMed Central

    Reijnen, Bastian T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During fieldwork in Indonesia and Malaysia, eight lots containing 33 specimens belonging to the genus Crenavolva (Ovulidae) were collected. Species were initially identified as Crenavolva aureola, Crenavolva chiapponii, Crenavolva striatula and Crenavolva trailli, respectively. For Crenavolva chiapponii this is the second record. In contrast to the ecological data available from the original description of this species, it was found in shallow water on a gorgonian host coral, i.e. Acanthogorgia sp. A molecular analysis based on COI and 16S mtDNA markers, including sequence data obtained from GenBank, showed that Crenavolva chiapponii should be considered a junior synonym of Crenavolva aureola and that previously identified ovulid specimens are probably misidentified. PMID:25987877

  6. Chemical and structural characterization of copper adsorbed on mosses (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    González, Aridane G; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Adamo, Paola; Pokrovsky, Oleg S

    2016-05-05

    The adsorption of copper on passive biomonitors (devitalized mosses Hypnum sp., Sphagnum denticulatum, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachythecium rutabulum) was studied under different experimental conditions such as a function of pH and Cu concentration in solution. Cu assimilation by living Physcomitrella patents was also investigated. Molecular structure of surface adsorbed and incorporated Cu was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Devitalized mosses exhibited the universal adsorption pattern of Cu as a function of pH, with a total binding sites number 0.05-0.06 mmolg(dry)(-1) and a maximal adsorption capacity of 0.93-1.25 mmolg(dry)(-1) for these devitalized species. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) fit of the first neighbor demonstrated that for all studied mosses there are ∼4.5 O/N atoms around Cu at ∼1.95 Å likely in a pseudo-square geometry. The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis demonstrated that Cu(II)-cellulose (representing carboxylate groups) and Cu(II)-phosphate are the main moss surface binding moieties, and the percentage of these sites varies as a function of solution pH. P. patens exposed during one month to Cu(2+) yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu-S(CN) complexes, suggesting metabolically-controlled reduction of adsorbed and assimilated Cu(2+).

  7. Phylogenomics and molecular signatures for species from the plant pathogen-containing order xanthomonadales.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Gupta, Radhey S

    2013-01-01

    The species from the order Xanthomonadales, which harbors many important plant pathogens and some human pathogens, are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA tree. No molecular or biochemical characteristic is known that is specific for these bacteria. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses were conducted on 26 sequenced Xanthomonadales genomes to delineate their branching order and to identify molecular signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in protein sequences that are specific for these bacteria. In a phylogenetic tree based upon sequences for 28 proteins, Xanthomonadales species formed a strongly supported clade with Rhodanobacter sp. 2APBS1 as its deepest branch. Comparative analyses of protein sequences have identified 13 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as GlnRS, TypA, MscL, LysRS, LipA, Tgt, LpxA, TolQ, ParE, PolA and TyrB that are unique to all species/strains from this order, but not found in any other bacteria. Fifteen additional CSIs in proteins (viz. CoxD, DnaE, PolA, SucA, AsnB, RecA, PyrG, LigA, MutS and TrmD) are uniquely shared by different Xanthomonadales except Rhodanobacter and in a few cases by Pseudoxanthomonas species, providing further support for the deep branching of these two genera. Five other CSIs are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and 1-3 species from the orders Chromatiales, Methylococcales and Cardiobacteriales suggesting that these deep branching orders of Gammaproteobacteria might be specifically related. Lastly, 7 CSIs in ValRS, CarB, PyrE, GlyS, RnhB, MinD and X001065 are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and a limited number of Beta- or Gamma-proteobacteria. Our analysis indicates that these CSIs have likely originated independently and they are not due to lateral gene transfers. The Xanthomonadales-specific CSIs reported here provide novel molecular markers for the identification of these important plant and human pathogens and also as potential targets

  8. Phylogenomics and Molecular Signatures for Species from the Plant Pathogen-Containing Order Xanthomonadales

    PubMed Central

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2013-01-01

    The species from the order Xanthomonadales, which harbors many important plant pathogens and some human pathogens, are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA tree. No molecular or biochemical characteristic is known that is specific for these bacteria. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses were conducted on 26 sequenced Xanthomonadales genomes to delineate their branching order and to identify molecular signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in protein sequences that are specific for these bacteria. In a phylogenetic tree based upon sequences for 28 proteins, Xanthomonadales species formed a strongly supported clade with Rhodanobacter sp. 2APBS1 as its deepest branch. Comparative analyses of protein sequences have identified 13 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as GlnRS, TypA, MscL, LysRS, LipA, Tgt, LpxA, TolQ, ParE, PolA and TyrB that are unique to all species/strains from this order, but not found in any other bacteria. Fifteen additional CSIs in proteins (viz. CoxD, DnaE, PolA, SucA, AsnB, RecA, PyrG, LigA, MutS and TrmD) are uniquely shared by different Xanthomonadales except Rhodanobacter and in a few cases by Pseudoxanthomonas species, providing further support for the deep branching of these two genera. Five other CSIs are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and 1–3 species from the orders Chromatiales, Methylococcales and Cardiobacteriales suggesting that these deep branching orders of Gammaproteobacteria might be specifically related. Lastly, 7 CSIs in ValRS, CarB, PyrE, GlyS, RnhB, MinD and X001065 are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and a limited number of Beta- or Gamma-proteobacteria. Our analysis indicates that these CSIs have likely originated independently and they are not due to lateral gene transfers. The Xanthomonadales-specific CSIs reported here provide novel molecular markers for the identification of these important plant and human pathogens and also as potential

  9. Putative hybrids between two Anisakis cryptic species: molecular genotyping using High Resolution Melting.

    PubMed

    Cavallero, S; Costa, A; Caracappa, S; Gambetta, B; D'Amelio, S

    2014-11-01

    The genus Anisakis includes nine recognized species and the complex of cryptic species Anisakis simplex s. l. is often associated with the human disease known as anisakiasis. During the last decades the use of nuclear ribosomal ITS allowed the identification and description of numerous anisakid nematodes and the discovery of recombinant genotypes or putative hybrids even in other parasitic helminths, such as those between A. simplex sensu stricto and A. pegreffii. The existence of pure hybrids of the two sibling species has been long debated due to the large recovery of larval forms from sympatric areas and the rare observation of adult hybrids. The aims of the present report were to identify anisakid nematodes collected from Stenella coeruleoalba using PCR-RFLP of ITS and to focus the interest on hybrid forms using a High Resolution Melting (HRM) and direct sequencing analyses, since the new record of putative hybrid at adult stage. The PCR-RFLP analysis enabled to identify A. simplex s.s., A. pegreffii, the heterozygous genotype of the two species and A. physeteris. The use of the genotyping approach based on HRM confirmed the profiles of the two species A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii, and of the hybrid individuals. The new record of adult hybrids in definitive hosts rekindles the long debate about their existence and their evolutionary meaning. Since the reproductive isolation between A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii is the assumption for their existence as separated species, the use of alternative molecular markers and population genetic studies on adult anisakids are recommended.

  10. Molecular Identification of Closely Related Candida Species Using Two Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Fingerprinting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Sendid, Boualem; Fradin, Chantal; Gaillardin, Claude; Poulain, Daniel; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2011-01-01

    Recent changes in the epidemiology of candidiasis highlighted an increase in non- Candida albicans species emphasizing the need for reliable identification methods. Molecular diagnostics in fungal infections may improve species characterization, particularly in cases of the closely related species in the Candida complexes. We developed two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, targeting either a part of the intergenic spacer 2 or the entire intergenic spacer (IGS) of ribosomal DNA using a panel of 270 isolates. A part of the intergenic spacer was used for discrimination between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and between species of the C. glabrata complex (C. glabrata/C. bracarensis/C. nivariensis). The whole IGS was applied to C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis, and to separate C. famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) from C. guilliermondii (Pichia guilliermondii) and from the other species within this complex (ie, C. carpophila, C. fermentati and C. xestobii). Sharing similar biochemical patterns, Pichia norvegensis and C. inconspicua exhibited specific IGS profiles. Our study confirmed that isolates of C. guilliermondii were frequently mis-identified as C. famata. As much as 67% of the clinical isolates phenotypically determined as C. famata were recognized mostly as true P. guilliermondii. Conversely, 44% of the isolates initially identified as C. guilliermondii were corrected by the IGS fingerprints as C. parapsilosis, C. fermentati, or C. zeylanoides. These two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism methods may be used as reference tools [either alternatively or adjunctively to the existing ribosomal DNA (26S or ITS) sequence comparisons] for unambiguous determination of the Candida species for which phenotypic characterization remains problematic. PMID:21227390

  11. Molecular Phylogeny and Zoogeography of the Capoeta damascina Species Complex (Pisces: Teleostei: Cyprinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Nisreen; Esmaeili, Hamid-Reza; Krupp, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Capoeta damascina was earlier considered by many authors as one of the most common freshwater fish species found throughout the Levant, Mesopotamia, Turkey, and Iran. However, owing to a high variation in morphological characters among and within its various populations, 17 nominal species were described, several of which were regarded as valid by subsequent revising authors. Capoeta damascina proved to be a complex of closely related species, which had been poorly studied. The current study aims at defining C. damascina and the C. damascina species complex. It investigates phylogenetic relationships among the various members of the C. damascina complex, based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Phylogenetic relationships were projected against paleogeographical events to interpret the geographic distribution of the taxa under consideration in relation to the area’s geological history. Samples were obtained from throughout the geographic range and were subjected to genetic analyses, using two molecular markers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (n = 103) and the two adjacent divergence regions (D1-D2) of the nuclear 28S rRNA genes (n = 65). Six closely related species were recognized within the C. damascina complex, constituting two main lineages: A western lineage represented by C. caelestis, C. damascina, and C. umbla and an eastern lineage represented by C. buhsei, C. coadi, and C. saadii. The results indicate that speciation of these taxa is rather a recent event. Dispersal occurred during the Pleistocene, resulting in present-day distribution patterns. A coherent picture of the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of the C. damascina species complex is drawn, explaining the current patterns of distribution as a result of paleogeographic events and ecological adaptations. PMID:27309854

  12. Species-specific size expansion and molecular evolution of the oleosins in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Sun, Yepeng; Su, Wujie; Yang, Jing; Liu, Xiuming; Wang, Yanfang; Wang, Fawei; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiaokun

    2012-11-10

    Oleosins are hydrophobic plant proteins thought to be important for the formation of oil bodies, which supply energy for seed germination and subsequent seedling growth. To better understand the evolutionary history and diversity of the oleosin gene family in plants, especially angiosperms, we systematically investigated the molecular evolution of this family using eight representative angiosperm species. A total of 73 oleosin members were identified, with six members in each of four monocot species and a greater but variable number in the four eudicots. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the angiosperm oleosin genes belonged to three monophyletic lineages. Species-specific gene duplications, caused mainly by segmental duplication, led to the great expansion of oleosin genes and occurred frequently in eudicots after the monocot-eudicot divergence. Functional divergence analyses indicate that significant amino acid site-specific selective constraints acted on the different clades of oleosins. Adaptive evolution analyses demonstrate that oleosin genes were subject to strong purifying selection after their species-specific duplications and that rapid evolution occurred with a high degree of evolutionary dynamics in the pollen-specific oleosin genes. In conclusion, this study serves as a foundation for genome-wide analyses of the oleosins. These findings provide insight into the function and evolution of this gene family in angiosperms and pave the way for studies in other plants.

  13. Characterization of Metarhizium species and varieties based on molecular analysis, heat tolerance and cold activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandes, E.K.K.; Keyser, C.A.; Chong, J.P.; Rangel, D.E.N.; Miller, M.P.; Roberts, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The genetic relationships and conidial tolerances to high and low temperatures were determined for isolates of several Metarhizium species and varieties. Methods and Results: Molecular-based techniques [AFLP and rDNA (ITS1, ITS2 and 5??8S) gene sequencing] were used to characterize morphologically identified Metarhizium spp. isolates from a wide range of sources. Conidial suspensions of isolates were exposed to wet heat (45 ?? 0??2??C) and plated on potato dextrose agar plus yeast extract (PDAY) medium. After 8-h exposure, the isolates divided clearly into two groups: (i) all isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae (Ma-an) and Metarhizium from the flavoviride complex (Mf) had virtually zero conidial relative germination (RG), (ii) Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum (Ma-ac) isolates demonstrated high heat tolerance (c. 70-100% RG). Conidial suspensions also were plated on PDAY and incubated at 5??C for 15 days, during which time RGs for Ma-an and Ma-ac isolates were virtually zero, whereas the two Mf were highly cold active (100% RG). Conclusions: Heat and cold exposures can be used as rapid tools to tentatively identify some important Metarhizium species and varieties. Significance and Impact of the Study: Identification of Metarhizium spp. currently relies primarily on DNA-based methods; we suggest a simple temperature-based screen to quickly obtain tentative identification of isolates as to species or species complexes. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Diversity of Clonostachys species assessed by molecular phylogenetics and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Lucas M; Moreira, Gláucia M; Ferreira, Douglas; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Pfenning, Ludwig H

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the species diversity among 45 strains of Clonostachys from different substrates and localities in Brazil using molecular phylogenetics, and compared the results with the phenotypic classification of strains obtained from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Phylogenetic analyses were based on beta tubulin (Tub), ITS-LSU rDNA, and a combined Tub-ITS DNA dataset. MALDI-TOF MS analyses were performed using intact conidia and conidiophores of strains cultivated on oatmeal agar and 4% malt extract agar. Six known species were identified: Clonostachys byssicola, Clonostachys candelabrum, Clonostachys pseudochroleuca, Clonostachys rhizophaga, Clonostachys rogersoniana, and Clonostachys rosea. Two clades and two singleton lineages did not correspond to known species represented in the reference DNA dataset and were identified as Clonostachys sp. 1-4. Multivariate cluster analyses of MALDI-TOF MS data classified the strains into eight clusters and three singletons, corresponding to the ten identified species plus one additional cluster containing two strains of C. rogersoniana that split from the other co-specific strains. The consistent results of MALDI-TOF MS supported the identification of strains assigned to C. byssicola and C. pseudochroleuca, which did not form well supported clades in all phylogenetic analyses, but formed distinct clusters in the MALDI-TOF dendrograms.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Cyclamen Species Collected from Different Parts of Turkey by RAPD and SRAP Markers.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Ozhan; Curuk, Pembe; Aslan, Fatma; Bayramoglu, Melda; Izgu, Tolga; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Kacar, Yildiz Aka; Mendi, Yesim Yalcin

    2017-02-01

    The genus Cyclamen (family Myrsinaceae) contains about 20 species, most of which occur in the Mediterranean region. Turkey has critically important Cyclamen genetic resources. Molecular characterization of plant materials collected from different regions of Turkey in which Cyclamen species grow naturally, namely Adana, Antalya, Aydın, Muğla, İzmir, Denizli, Kahramanmaraş, Osmaniye, Eskişehir, Trabzon, and Rize provinces, was performed using RAPD and SRAP markers. DNA was successfully amplified by 30 RAPD primers and 14 SRAP primer pairs. Among the 470 bands generated by the RAPD primers, 467 were polymorphic. The number of bands detected by a single primer set ranged from 11 to 22 (average of 15.6). The percentage polymorphism was 99.3 % based on the RAPD data. In the SRAP analysis, a total of 216 bands were generated, showing 100 % polymorphism. The number of bands detected by a single primer set ranged from 9 to 22 (average of 15.4). All data were scored and UPGMA dendrograms were constructed with similar results in both marker systems, i.e., different species from nine provinces of Turkey were separated from each other in the dendrograms with the same species being clustered together.

  16. First Molecular Characterization of Leishmania Species Causing Visceral Leishmaniasis among Children in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Saif-Ali, Reyadh; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Eryani, Samira M; Lim, Yvonne A L; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a debilitating, often fatal disease caused by Leishmania donovani complex; however, it is a neglected tropical disease. L. donovani complex comprises two closely related species, L. donovani that is mostly anthroponotic and L. infantum that is zoonotic. Differentiation between these two species is critical due to the differences in their epidemiology and pathology. However, they cannot be differentiated morphologically, and their speciation using isoenzyme-based methods poses a difficult task and may be unreliable. Molecular characterization is now the most reliable method to differentiate between them and to determine their phylogenetic relationships. The present study aims to characterize Leishmania species isolated from bone marrows of Yemeni pediatric patients using sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1) gene. Out of 41 isolates from Giemsa-stained bone marrow smears, 25 isolates were successfully amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction and sequenced in both directions. Phylogenetic analysis using neighbor joining method placed all study isolates in one cluster with L. donovani complex (99% bootstrap). The analysis of ITS1 for microsatellite repeat numbers identified L. infantum in 11 isolates and L. donovani in 14 isolates. These data suggest the possibility of both anthroponotic and zoonotic transmission of VL-causing Leishmania species in Yemen. Exploring the possible animal reservoir hosts is therefore needed for effective control to be achieved.

  17. Molecular and morphological divergence in a pair of bird species and their ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, Noah K; Dosanjh, Vishal S; Palma, Ricardo L; Hull, Joshua M; Kimball, Rebecca T; Sánchez, Pablo; Sarasola, José Hernán; Parker, Patricia G

    2009-12-01

    In an evolutionary context, parasites tend to be morphologically conservative relative to their hosts. However, the rate of neutral molecular evolution across many parasite lineages is faster than in their hosts. Although this relationship is apparent at the macroevolutionary scale, insight into the processes underpinning it may be gained through investigations at the microevolutionary scale. Birds and their ectoparasitic lice have served as important natural experiments in co-evolution. Here, we compared mitochondrial and morphological divergence in 2 recently diverged avian host lineages and their parasites. Gálapagos hawks (Buteo galapagoensis) are phenotypically divergent from their closest mainland relatives, the Swainson's hawk (Buteo swainsoni). Both species are host to a feather louse species of Craspedorrhynchus (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Ischnocera, Philopteridae). We sequenced the 5′ end of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI) from a set of hawks and lice. Although this fragment allowed unambiguous identification of host and parasite lineages on the islands and the mainland, only a single variable site was present in the 2 hosts, but 2 major Craspedorrhynchus clades divergent by ~10% were recovered that sorted perfectly with host species. We found significant population genetic structure within the Galápagos Craspedorrhynchus lineage. While the host species are highly differentiated phenotypically, the 2 Craspedorrhynchus louse lineages are phenotypically overlapping, although subtle but significant morphological differences exist.

  18. Molecular Diagnosis and Identification of Leishmania Species in Jordan from Saved Dry Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hijjawi, Nawal; Kanani, Kalil A.; Rasheed, Malak; Atoum, Manar; Abdel-Dayem, Mona; Irhimeh, Mohammad R.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of the endemic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Jordan relies on patient clinical presentation and microscopic identification. Studies toward improved identification of the causative Leishmania species, especially in regions where multiple species exist, and the introduction of these techniques into medical diagnosis is paramount. This study looked at the current epidemiology of CL in Jordan. Clinically diagnosed 41 patients with CL were tested for the presence of Leishmania parasite using both Giemsa staining from skin scraps on glass slides and ITS1-PCR from samples blotted onto storage cards (NucleoCards®). Microscopically, 28 out of the 41 (68.3%) collected samples were positive for amastigotes, whereas the molecular ITS1-PCR amplification successfully identified 30 of the 41 samples (73.2%). Furthermore, PCR-RFLP analysis allowed species identification which is impossible microscopically. Of the 30 PCR positive samples, 28 were Leishmania major positive and the other two samples were Leishmania tropica. This indicates that L. major is the most prevalent species in Jordan and the two L. tropica cases originated from Syria indicating possible future L. tropica outbreaks. Diagnosis of CL based on clinical presentation only may falsely increase its prevalence. Although PCR is more sensitive, it is still not available in our medical laboratories in Jordan. PMID:27403435

  19. Morphological and molecular variation in Tylototriton (Caudata: Salamandridae) in Laos, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Phimmachak, Somphouthone; Aowphol, Anchalee; Stuart, Bryan L

    2015-08-24

    The salamandrid genus Tylototriton is poorly known in Laos, with one described species and unverified reports of two others. We undertook new fieldwork and obtained samples of Tylototriton at six localities across northern Laos during 2009-2013. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA, principal component analyses of 13 mensural characters, and qualitative morphological comparisons with samples from across the geographic range of Tylototriton were performed. Samples from Laos fell into four molecular and morphological groups, consisting of T. notialis, T. panhai, T. anguliceps, and a fourth lineage that is hypothesized here to be an undescribed species. Tylototriton podichthys sp. nov. is distinguished from its congeners by having distinct mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and in characteristics of the glandular skin on the head and body, shape of the rib nodules, and coloration of the body and limbs. This study expands the number of confirmed Tylototriton species in Laos from one to four, with the description of one species and extension of the ranges of T. panhai and T. anguliceps to Laos. An improved understanding of the geographic ranges of T. podichthys sp. nov. and T. anguliceps within Laos is needed.

  20. Molecular detection and species identification of Alexandrium (Dinophyceae) causing harmful algal blooms along the Chilean coastline

    PubMed Central

    Jedlicki, Ana; Fernández, Gonzalo; Astorga, Marcela; Oyarzún, Pablo; Toro, Jorge E.; Navarro, Jorge M.; Martínez, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims On the basis of morphological evidence, the species involved in South American Pacific coast harmful algal blooms (HABs) has been traditionally recognized as Alexandrium catenella (Dinophyceae). However, these observations have not been confirmed using evidence based on genomic sequence variability. Our principal objective was to accurately determine the species of Alexandrium involved in local HABs in order to implement a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for its rapid and easy detection on filter-feeding shellfish, such as mussels. Methodology For species-specific determination, the intergenic spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S subunit, ITS2 and the hypervariable genomic regions D1–D5 of the large ribosomal subunit of local strains were sequenced and compared with two data sets of other Alexandrium sequences. Species-specific primers were used to amplify signature sequences within the genomic DNA of the studied species by conventional and real-time PCR. Principal results Phylogenetic analysis determined that the Chilean strain falls into Group I of the tamarensis complex. Our results support the allocation of the Chilean Alexandrium species as a toxic Alexandrium tamarense rather than A. catenella, as currently defined. Once local species were determined to belong to Group I of the tamarensis complex, a highly sensitive and accurate real-time PCR procedure was developed to detect dinoflagellate presence in Mytilus spp. (Bivalvia) samples after being fed (challenged) in vitro with the Chilean Alexandrium strain. The results show that real-time PCR is useful to detect Alexandrium intake in filter-feeding molluscs. Conclusions It has been shown that the classification of local Alexandrium using morphological evidence is not very accurate. Molecular methods enabled the HAB dinoflagellate species of the Chilean coast to be assigned as A. tamarense rather than A. catenella. Real-time PCR analysis based on A. tamarense primers allowed the

  1. Synthesis and characterization of the core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (Fe₃O₄@MIPs) adsorbents for effective extraction and determination of sulfonamides in the poultry feed.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xuan; Gao, Ruixia; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-07-06

    In this study, we present a general method to prepare the core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) nanoparticles (NPs) for sulfamethazine (SMZ). The resulting Fe₃O₄@MIPs NPs possess a highly improved imprinting effect, fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity, and can be applied to extract sulfonamide in the poultry feed. In this protocol, the magnetite NPs were synthesized by co-precipitating Fe²⁺ and Fe³⁺ in an ammonia solution first. Silica was then coated on the Fe₃O₄ NPs using a sol-gel method to obtain silica shell magnetic NPs. Subsequently, the vinyl groups were grated onto silica-modified Fe₃O₄ surface by 3-methacryloyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. Finally, the MIPs films were formed on the surface of Fe₃O₄@SiO₂ by the copolymerization of vinyl end groups with functional monomer, methacrylic acid, cross-linking agent, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, the initiator azo-bis-isobutyronitrile and template molecule, sulfamethazine. The morphology, magnetic, adsorption and recognition properties of Fe₃O₄@MIPs NPs were characterized using transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and re-binding experiments. The results showed that the binding sites of Fe₃O₄@MIPs were good accessibility, fast adsorption rate and the maximum adsorption capacity of Fe₃O₄@MIPs to SMZ was 344.8 μg g⁻¹. The selectivity of the obtained Fe₃O₄@MIPs NPs were elucidated by the different rebinding capability of SMZ and structural related sulfonamides in the mixed solution. The results indicated that the Fe₃O₄@MIPs had high imprinting factor 9.5 and significant selectivity. A method was developed for enrichment and determination of SMZ in the poultry feed samples with recoveries of duck and chicken feed ranging from 63.3 to 76.5% and 68.7 to 74.7%, respectively and the relative standard deviations (RSD

  2. Morphological redescription and molecular characterization of three species of Travassosinematidae (Nematoda: Oxyurida: Thelastomatoidea) from Gryllotalpa africana Beauv (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Chaudhary, Anshu; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2013-01-01

    Binema mirzaia (Basir, 1942a) Basir, 1956, Cameronia nisari (Parveen and Jairajpuri, 1985) Adamson and Van Waerebeke, 1992a and Mirzaiella meerutensis Singh and Malti, 2003 are redescribed morphologically along with molecular identification from the intestine of mole cricket Gryllotalpa africana. Molecular characterization was carried out using the D2-D3 expansion domains of the 18S ribosomal DNA region. This study first time presents molecular data for the above three nematode species.

  3. Molecular phylogenetic and dating analysis of pierid butterfly species using complete mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Hao, J S; Sun, X Y; Zheng, B; Yang, Q

    2016-12-02

    Pieridae is a butterfly family whose evolutionary history is poorly understood. Due to the difficulties in identifying morphological synapomorphies within the group and the scarcity of the fossil records, only a few studies on higher phylogeny of Pieridae have been reported to date. In this study, we describe the complete mitochondrial genomes of four pierid butterfly species (Aporia martineti, Aporia hippia, Aporia bieti, and Mesapia peloria), in order to better characterize the pierid butterfly mitogenomes and perform the phylogenetic analyses using all available mitogenomic sequence data (13PCGs, rRNAs, and tRNAs) from the 18 pierid butterfly species comprising the three main subfamilies (Dismorphiinae, Coliadinae and Pierinae). Our analysis shows that the four new mitogenomes share similar features with other known pierid mitogenomes in gene order and organization. Phylogenetic analyses by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference show that the pierid higher-level relationship is: Dismorphiinae + (Coliadinae + Pierinae), which corroborates the results of some previous molecular and morphological studies. However, we found that the Hebomoia and Anthocharis make a sister group, supporting the traditional tribe Anthocharidini; in addition, the Mesapia peloria was shown to be clustered within the Aporia group, suggesting that the genus Mesapia should be reduced to the taxonomic status of subgenus. Our molecular dating analysis indicates that the family Pieridae began to diverge during the Late Cretaceous about 92 million years ago (mya), while the subfamily Pierinae diverged from the Coliadinae at about 86 mya (Late Cretaceous).

  4. Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of the widely distributed Amanita species, A. muscaria and A. pantherina.

    PubMed

    Oda, Takashi; Tanaka, Chihiro; Tsuda, Mitsuya

    2004-08-01

    The molecular phylogeny and biogeography of two widely distributed Amanita species, A. muscaria and A. pantherina, were studied based on specimens from diverse localities. Analyses of both a partial sequence of the ITS region of nuclear DNA and a partial sequence of the beta-tubulin gene were able to resolve specimens of each species. Analyses revealed a greater divergence of the beta-tubulin region than the ITS region. Based on molecular phylogeny of the combination of the ITS and beta-tubulin regions, A. muscaria could be separated into at least three groups (Eurasian, Eurasian subalpine, and North American), and A. pantherina could be separated into at least two groups (North American and Eurasian). We hypothesize that the speciation of A. muscaria occurred in Eurasia with subsequent migration to North America via land bridges. However, it is impossible to determine whether A. pantherina moved from Eurasia to North America or vice versa. For both A. muscaria and A. pantherina, the intracontinental relationships of both Eurasia and North America were closer than the relationships between eastern Asia and eastern North America.

  5. Molecular signatures of plastic phenotypes in two eusocial insect species with simple societies.

    PubMed

    Patalano, Solenn; Vlasova, Anna; Wyatt, Chris; Ewels, Philip; Camara, Francisco; Ferreira, Pedro G; Asher, Claire L; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Bachman, Martin; González-Navarrete, Irene; Minoche, André E; Krueger, Felix; Lowy, Ernesto; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rodriguez-Ales, Jose Luis; Nascimento, Fabio S; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Gabaldon, Toni; Tarver, James E; Andrews, Simon; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Hughes, William O H; Guigó, Roderic; Reik, Wolf; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-11-10

    Phenotypic plasticity is important in adaptation and shapes the evolution of organisms. However, we understand little about what aspects of the genome are important in facilitating plasticity. Eusocial insect societies produce plastic phenotypes from the same genome, as reproductives (queens) and nonreproductives (workers). The greatest plasticity is found in the simple eusocial insect societies in which individuals retain the ability to switch between reproductive and nonreproductive phenotypes as adults. We lack comprehensive data on the molecular basis of plastic phenotypes. Here, we sequenced genomes, microRNAs (miRNAs), and multiple transcriptomes and methylomes from individual brains in a wasp (Polistes canadensis) and an ant (Dinoponera quadriceps) that live in simple eusocial societies. In both species, we found few differences between phenotypes at the transcriptional level, with little functional specialization, and no evidence that phenotype-specific gene expression is driven by DNA methylation or miRNAs. Instead, phenotypic differentiation was defined more subtly by nonrandom transcriptional network organization, with roles in these networks for both conserved and taxon-restricted genes. The general lack of highly methylated regions or methylome patterning in both species may be an important mechanism for achieving plasticity among phenotypes during adulthood. These findings define previously unidentified hypotheses on the genomic processes that facilitate plasticity and suggest that the molecular hallmarks of social behavior are likely to differ with the level of social complexity.

  6. Molecular Identification of Mucor and Lichtheimia Species in Pure Cultures of Zygomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Ziaee, Ardeshir; Zia, Mohammadali; Bayat, Mansour; Hashemi, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Background The Mucorales are an important opportunistic fungi that can cause mucormycosis in immunocompromised patients. The fast and precise diagnosis of mucormycosis is very important because, if the diagnosis is not made early enough, dissemination often occurs. It is now well established that molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) are feasible and reliable tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of mucormycosis agents. Objectives The present study was conducted to evaluate the validity of PCR-RFLP for the identification of Mucorales and some important Mucor and Lichtheimia species in pure cultures of Zygomycetes. Materials and Methods Specific sense and anti-sense primers were used to amplify the Mucorales, Mucor, and Lichtheimia DNA. The PCR products were digested by AfIII, XmnI, and AcII restriction enzymes, and the resultant restriction pattern was analyzed. Results On the basis of the molecular and morphological data, we identified Mucor plumbeus (10.83%), M. circinelloides (9.17%), Lichtheimia corymbifera (9.17%), M. racemosus (5.83%), M. ramosissimus (3.33%), and L. blakesleeana (0.83%). Conclusions It seems that PCR-RFLP is a suitable technique for the identification of Mucorales at the species level. PMID:27284399

  7. Molecular signatures of plastic phenotypes in two eusocial insect species with simple societies

    PubMed Central

    Patalano, Solenn; Vlasova, Anna; Wyatt, Chris; Ewels, Philip; Camara, Francisco; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Asher, Claire L.; Jurkowski, Tomasz P.; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Bachman, Martin; González-Navarrete, Irene; Minoche, André E.; Krueger, Felix; Lowy, Ernesto; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rodriguez-Ales, Jose Luis; Nascimento, Fabio S.; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Gabaldon, Toni; Tarver, James E.; Andrews, Simon; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Hughes, William O. H.; Guigó, Roderic; Reik, Wolf; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is important in adaptation and shapes the evolution of organisms. However, we understand little about what aspects of the genome are important in facilitating plasticity. Eusocial insect societies produce plastic phenotypes from the same genome, as reproductives (queens) and nonreproductives (workers). The greatest plasticity is found in the simple eusocial insect societies in which individuals retain the ability to switch between reproductive and nonreproductive phenotypes as adults. We lack comprehensive data on the molecular basis of plastic phenotypes. Here, we sequenced genomes, microRNAs (miRNAs), and multiple transcriptomes and methylomes from individual brains in a wasp (Polistes canadensis) and an ant (Dinoponera quadriceps) that live in simple eusocial societies. In both species, we found few differences between phenotypes at the transcriptional level, with little functional specialization, and no evidence that phenotype-specific gene expression is driven by DNA methylation or miRNAs. Instead, phenotypic differentiation was defined more subtly by nonrandom transcriptional network organization, with roles in these networks for both conserved and taxon-restricted genes. The general lack of highly methylated regions or methylome patterning in both species may be an important mechanism for achieving plasticity among phenotypes during adulthood. These findings define previously unidentified hypotheses on the genomic processes that facilitate plasticity and suggest that the molecular hallmarks of social behavior are likely to differ with the level of social complexity. PMID:26483466

  8. Two known and one new species of Proctoeces from Australian teleosts: Variable host-specificity for closely related species identified through multi-locus molecular data.

    PubMed

    Wee, Nicholas Q-X; Cribb, Thomas H; Bray, Rodney A; Cutmore, Scott C

    2017-04-01

    Species of Proctoeces Odhner, 1911 (Trematoda: Fellodistomidae) have been reported from a wide range of marine animals globally. Members of the genus tend to lack strongly distinguishing morphological features for diagnosis, making identification difficult and the true number of species in the genus contentious. Combined morphological and molecular analyses were used to characterise three species of Proctoeces from Moreton Bay and the southern Great Barrier Reef. Data for two ribosomal regions and one mitochondrial region were generated for specimens collected from Australia. Three unique 18S-genotypes were identified which corresponded to subtle, but reliable, morphological differences. Two species of Proctoeces were identified from fishes of Moreton Bay, Proctoeces insolitus (Nicoll, 1915) Yamaguti, 1953 and P. major Yamaguti, 1934, and a third, P. choerodoni n. sp. from off Heron Island on the southern Great Barrier Reef. Phylogenetic analyses of partial 18S and partial 28S rDNA indicated that these three species differ from the four species reported outside of Australia for which sequence data are available. Phylogenetically, Proctoeces proved to be a reliable concept, with all species of Proctoeces that have been characterised genetically forming a well-supported clade in all analyses. Dramatically different patterns of host-specificity were identified for each of the three Australian species; P. insolitus apparently infects a single species of fish, P. choerodoni n. sp. infects multiple species of a single genus of fish, and P. major infects multiple species of two teleost orders.

  9. Sarcocystis in moose (Alces alces): molecular identification and phylogeny of six Sarcocystis species in moose, and a morphological description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Stina S; Gjerde, Bjørn

    2008-06-01

    Muscle tissues from 34 moose from Southeastern Norway and two moose from Canada were examined. Sarcocysts were excised and morphologically classified by light microscopy, and some cysts were further examined by scanning electron microscopy or DNA amplification and sequencing at the small subunit (ssu) rRNA gene. In Norwegian moose, three sarcocyst types were recognized, yet five Sarcocystis species were found by sequence analysis. New names were proposed for three species which could be characterised by both morphological and molecular methods, i.e., Sarcocystis alces, Sarcocystis ovalis, and Sarcocystis scandinavica. S. alces was the most prevalent species, whereas S. scandinavica and the two unnamed species were rare and might either use another principal intermediate host or a rare definitive host. The five species in Norwegian moose were different from Sarcocystis alceslatrans isolated from a Canadian moose. Phylogenetic analyses based on complete ssu rRNA gene sequences revealed a close relationship between the six Sarcocystis species from moose and species from reindeer and Sika deer. We conclude that molecular methods are necessary for unequivocal species identification, as different cervid hosts harbour morphologically indistinguishable sarcocysts.

  10. Shark tales: a molecular species-level phylogeny of sharks (Selachimorpha, Chondrichthyes).

    PubMed

    Vélez-Zuazo, Ximena; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2011-02-01

    Sharks are a diverse and ecologically important group, including some of the ocean's largest predatory animals. Sharks are also commercially important, with many species suffering overexploitation and facing extinction. However, despite a long evolutionary history, commercial, and conservation importance, phylogenetic relationships within the sharks are poorly understood. To date, most studies have either focused on smaller clades within sharks, or sampled taxa sparsely across the group. A more detailed species-level phylogeny will offer further insights into shark taxonomy, provide a tool for comparative analyses, as well as facilitating phylogenetic estimates of conservation priorities. We used four mitochondrial and one nuclear gene to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of 229 species (all eight Orders and 31 families) of sharks, more than quadrupling the number of taxon sampled in any prior study. The resulting Bayesian phylogenetic hypothesis agrees with prior studies on the major relationships of the sharks phylogeny; however, on those relationships that have proven more controversial, it differs in several aspects from the most recent molecular studies. The phylogeny supports the division of sharks into two major groups, the Galeomorphii and Squalimorphii, rejecting the hypnosqualean hypothesis that places batoids within sharks. Within the squalimorphs the orders Hexanchiformes, Squatiniformes, Squaliformes, and Pristiophoriformes are broadly monophyletic, with minor exceptions apparently due to missing data. Similarly, within Galeomorphs, the orders Heterodontiformes, Lamniformes, Carcharhiniformes, and Orectolobiformes are broadly monophyletic, with a couple of species 'misplaced'. In contrast, many of the currently recognized shark families are not monophyletic according to our results. Our phylogeny offers some of the first clarification of the relationships among families of the order Squaliformes, a group that has thus far received relatively

  11. Molecular phylogeny of extant equids and effects of ancestral polymorphism in resolving species-level phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Cynthia C; Mitelberg, Anna; Tursi, Rosanna; Ryder, Oliver A

    2012-11-01

    Short divergence times and processes such as incomplete lineage sorting and species hybridization are known to hinder the inference of species-level phylogenies due to the lack of sufficient informative genetic variation or the presence of shared but incongruent polymorphism among taxa. Extant equids (horses, zebras, and asses) are an example of a recently evolved group of mammals with an unresolved phylogeny, despite a large number of molecular studies. Previous surveys have proposed trees with rather poorly supported nodes, and the bias caused by genetic introgression or ancestral polymorphism has not been assessed. Here we studied the phylogenetic relationships of all extant species of Equidae by analyzing 22 partial mitochondrial and nuclear genes using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inferences that account for heterogeneous gene histories. We also examined genetic signatures of lineage sorting and/or genetic introgression in zebras by evaluating patterns of intraspecific genetic variation. Our study improved the resolution and support of the Equus phylogeny and in particular the controversial positions of the African wild ass (E. asinus) and mountain zebra (E. zebra): the African wild ass is placed as a sister species of the Asiatic asses and the mountain zebra as the sister taxon of Grevy's and Burchell's zebras. A shared polymorphism (indel) detected among zebra species in the Estrogen receptor 1 gene was likely due to incomplete lineage sorting and not genetic introgression as also indicated by other mitochondrial (Cytochrome b) and nuclear (Y chromosome and microsatellites) markers. Ancestral polymorphism in equids might have contributed to the long-standing lack of clarity in the phylogeny of this highly threatened group of mammals.

  12. Decreased hepatic contents of coenzyme A molecular species in mice after subchronic mild social defeat stress.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshifumi; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Hagiya, Yuki; Chohnan, Shigeru; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Social stress may precipitate psychiatric disorders such as depression, which is related to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. We have evaluated the effects of social stress on central and peripheral metabolism using a model of depression in mice. In the present study, we focused on coenzyme A (CoA) molecular species [i.e. non-esterified CoA (CoASH), acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA] which play important roles in numerous metabolic pathways, and we analyzed changes in expression of these molecules in the hypothalamus and liver of adult male mice (C57BL/6J) subjected to 10 days of subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) with ICR mice as aggressors. Mice (n = 12) exposed to showed hyperphagia- and polydipsia-like symptoms and increased body weight gain compared with control mice which were not affected by exposure to ICR mice (n = 12). To elucidate the underlying metabolic features in the sCSDS model, acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and CoASH tissue levels were analyzed using the acyl-CoA cycling method. The levels of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, which decreases feeding behavior, were not influenced by sCSDS. However, sCSDS reduced levels of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and total CoA (sum of the three CoA molecular species) in the liver. Hence, hyperphagia-like symptoms in sCSDS mice evidently occurred independently of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, but might consequently lead to down-regulation of hepatic CoA via altered expression of nudix hydrolase 7. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the down-regulation of liver CoA pools in sCSDS mice.

  13. Molecular typing of environmental Cryptococcus neoformans/C. gattii species complex isolates from Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gleica Soyan Barbosa; Freire, Ana Karla Lima; Bentes, Amaury Dos Santos; Pinheiro, José Felipe de Souza; de Souza, João Vicente Braga; Wanke, Bodo; Matsuura, Takeshi; Jackisch-Matsuura, Ani Beatriz

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are the main causative agents of cryptococcosis, a systemic fungal disease that affects internal organs and skin, and which is acquired by inhalation of spores or encapsulated yeasts. It is currently known that the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex has a worldwide distribution, however, some molecular types seem to prevail in certain regions. Few environmental studies of Cryptococcus have been conducted in the Brazilian Amazon. This is the first ecological study of the pathogenic fungi C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex in the urban area of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. A total of 506 samples from pigeon droppings (n = 191), captive bird droppings (n = 60) and tree hollows (n = 255) were collected from June 2012 to January 2014 at schools and public buildings, squares, pet shops, households, the zoo and the bus station. Samples were plated on niger seed agar (NSA) medium supplemented with chloramphenicol and incubated at 25°C for 5 days. Dark-brown colonies were isolated and tested for thermotolerance at 37°C, cycloheximide resistance and growth on canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue agar. Molecular typing was done by PCR-RFLP. Susceptibility to the antifungal drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested using Etest(®) strips. In total, 13 positive samples were obtained: one tree hollow (C. gattiiVGII), nine pigeon droppings (C. neoformansVNI) and three captive bird droppings (C. neoformansVNI). The environmental cryptococcal isolates found in this study were of the same molecular types as those responsible for infections in Manaus.

  14. A simplified molecular method for distinguishing among species and ploidy levels in European water frogs (Pelophylax).

    PubMed

    Hauswaldt, J Susanne; Höer, Manuela; Ogielska, Maria; Christiansen, Ditte G; Dziewulska-Szwajkowska, Daria; Czernicka, Elżbieta; Vences, Miguel

    2012-09-01

    Western Palearctic water frogs in the genus Pelophylax are a set of morphologically similar anuran species that form hybridogenetic complexes. Fully reliable identification of species and especially of hybrid ploidy depends on karyological and molecular methods. In central Europe, native water frog populations consist of the Pelophylax esculentus complex, that is, P. lessonae (LL), P. ridibundus (RR) and the hybrid form P. esculentus that can have different karyotypes (RL, LLR and RRL). We developed existing molecular methods further and propose a simple PCR method based on size-differences in the length of the serum albumin intron-1 and the RanaCR1, a non-LTR retrotransposon of the chicken repeat (CR) family. This PCR yields taxon-specific banding patterns that can easily be screened by standard agarose gel electrophoresis and correctly identify species in all of the 160 samples that had been identified to karyotype with other methods. To distinguish ploidy levels in LR, LLR and RRL specimens, we used the ratio of the peak heights of the larger (ridibundus specific) to the smaller (lessonae specific) bands of fluorescently labelled PCR products resolved on a capillary DNA sequencer and obtained a correct assignment of the karyotype in 93% of cases. Our new method will cut down time and expenses drastically for a reliable identification of water frogs of the P. esculentus complex and potentially for identification of other hybridogenetic complexes and/or taxa, and it even serves as a good indicator of the ploidy status of hybrid individuals.

  15. Molecular Assortment of Lens Species with Different Adaptations to Drought Conditions Using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharmendra; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Tomar, Ram Sewak Singh; Taunk, Jyoti; Singh, Ranjeet; Maurya, Sadhana; Chaturvedi, Ashish Kumar; Pal, Madan; Singh, Rajendra; Dubey, Sarawan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The success of drought tolerance breeding programs can be enhanced through molecular assortment of germplasm. This study was designed to characterize molecular diversity within and between Lens species with different adaptations to drought stress conditions using SSR markers. Drought stress was applied at seedling stage to study the effects on morpho-physiological traits under controlled condition, where tolerant cultivars and wilds showed 12.8–27.6% and 9.5–23.2% reduction in seed yield per plant respectively. When juxtaposed to field conditions, the tolerant cultivars (PDL-1 and PDL-2) and wild (ILWL-314 and ILWL-436) accessions showed 10.5–26.5% and 7.5%–15.6% reduction in seed yield per plant, respectively under rain-fed conditions. The reductions in seed yield in the two tolerant cultivars and wilds under severe drought condition were 48–49% and 30.5–45.3% respectively. A set of 258 alleles were identified among 278 genotypes using 35 SSR markers. Genetic diversity and polymorphism information contents varied between 0.321–0.854 and 0.299–0.836, with mean value of 0.682 and 0.643, respectively. All the genotypes were clustered into 11 groups based on SSR markers. Tolerant genotypes were grouped in cluster 6 while sensitive ones were mainly grouped into cluster 7. Wild accessions were separated from cultivars on the basis of both population structure and cluster analysis. Cluster analysis has further grouped the wild accessions on the basis of species and sub-species into 5 clusters. Physiological and morphological characters under drought stress were significantly (P = 0.05) different among microsatellite clusters. These findings suggest that drought adaptation is variable among wild and cultivated genotypes. Also, genotypes from contrasting clusters can be selected for hybridization which could help in evolution of better segregants for improving drought tolerance in lentil. PMID:26808306

  16. Molecular Assortment of Lens Species with Different Adaptations to Drought Conditions Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Tomar, Ram Sewak Singh; Taunk, Jyoti; Singh, Ranjeet; Maurya, Sadhana; Chaturvedi, Ashish Kumar; Pal, Madan; Singh, Rajendra; Dubey, Sarawan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The success of drought tolerance breeding programs can be enhanced through molecular assortment of germplasm. This study was designed to characterize molecular diversity within and between Lens species with different adaptations to drought stress conditions using SSR markers. Drought stress was applied at seedling stage to study the effects on morpho-physiological traits under controlled condition, where tolerant cultivars and wilds showed 12.8-27.6% and 9.5-23.2% reduction in seed yield per plant respectively. When juxtaposed to field conditions, the tolerant cultivars (PDL-1 and PDL-2) and wild (ILWL-314 and ILWL-436) accessions showed 10.5-26.5% and 7.5%-15.6% reduction in seed yield per plant, respectively under rain-fed conditions. The reductions in seed yield in the two tolerant cultivars and wilds under severe drought condition were 48-49% and 30.5-45.3% respectively. A set of 258 alleles were identified among 278 genotypes using 35 SSR markers. Genetic diversity and polymorphism information contents varied between 0.321-0.854 and 0.299-0.836, with mean value of 0.682 and 0.643, respectively. All the genotypes were clustered into 11 groups based on SSR markers. Tolerant genotypes were grouped in cluster 6 while sensitive ones were mainly grouped into cluster 7. Wild accessions were separated from cultivars on the basis of both population structure and cluster analysis. Cluster analysis has further grouped the wild accessions on the basis of species and sub-species into 5 clusters. Physiological and morphological characters under drought stress were significantly (P = 0.05) different among microsatellite clusters. These findings suggest that drought adaptation is variable among wild and cultivated genotypes. Also, genotypes from contrasting clusters can be selected for hybridization which could help in evolution of better segregants for improving drought tolerance in lentil.

  17. Description and molecular diagnosis of a new species of Brunfelsia (Solanaceae) from the Bolivian and Argentinean Andes.

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Natalia; Nee, Michael H; Renner, Susanne S

    2012-01-01

    Brunfelsia plowmaniana N.Filipowicz & M.Nee sp. nov., a species from humid and cloud forests of the Bolivian and Argentinean Andes, is described and provided with a molecular diagnosis, using provisions available in the recently approved International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants. Specimens belonging to the new species were previously placed in the polymorphic Brunfelsia uniflora (Pohl) D.Don, which a molecular phylogeny revealed as polyphyletic. Revision of numerous collections revealed clear morphological differences between the new species and Brunfelsia uniflora, the type locality of which is in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

  18. Description and molecular diagnosis of a new species of Brunfelsia (Solanaceae) from the Bolivian and Argentinean Andes

    PubMed Central

    Filipowicz, Natalia; Nee, Michael H.; Renner, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Brunfelsia plowmaniana N.Filipowicz & M.Nee sp. nov., a species from humid and cloud forests of the Bolivian and Argentinean Andes, is described and provided with a molecular diagnosis, using provisions available in the recently approved International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants. Specimens belonging to the new species were previously placed in the polymorphic Brunfelsia uniflora (Pohl) D.Don, which a molecular phylogeny revealed as polyphyletic. Revision of numerous collections revealed clear morphological differences between the new species and Brunfelsia uniflora, the type locality of which is in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. PMID:22461731

  19. Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (Esi-Ms/Ms) Analysis of the Lipid Molecular Species Composition of Yeast Subcellular Membranes Reveals Acyl Chain-Based Sorting/Remodeling of Distinct Molecular Species En Route to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Schneiter, Roger; Brügger, Britta; Sandhoff, Roger; Zellnig, Günther; Leber, Andrea; Lampl, Manfred; Athenstaedt, Karin; Hrastnik, Claudia; Eder, Sandra; Daum, Günther; Paltauf, Fritz; Wieland, Felix T.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.

    1999-01-01

    Nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nano-ESI-MS/MS) was employed to determine qualitative differences in the lipid molecular species composition of a comprehensive set of organellar membranes, isolated from a single culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Remarkable differences in the acyl chain composition of biosynthetically related phospholipid classes were observed. Acyl chain saturation was lowest in phosphatidylcholine (15.4%) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE; 16.2%), followed by phosphatidylserine (PS; 29.4%), and highest in phosphatidylinositol (53.1%). The lipid molecular species profiles of the various membranes were generally similar, with a deviation from a calculated average profile of ∼± 20%. Nevertheless, clear distinctions between the molecular species profiles of different membranes were observed, suggesting that lipid sorting mechanisms are operating at the level of individual molecular species to maintain the specific lipid composition of a given membrane. Most notably, the plasma membrane is enriched in saturated species of PS and PE. The nature of the sorting mechanism that determines the lipid composition of the plasma membrane was investigated further. The accumulation of monounsaturated species of PS at the expense of diunsaturated species in the plasma membrane of wild-type cells was reversed in elo3Δ mutant cells, which synthesize C24 fatty acid-substituted sphingolipids instead of the normal C26 fatty acid-substituted species. This observation suggests that acyl chain-based sorting and/or remodeling mechanisms are operating to maintain the specific lipid molecular species composition of the yeast plasma membrane. PMID:10459010

  20. Molecular characterization of patulin producing and non-producing Penicillium species in apples from Morocco.

    PubMed

    Rharmitt, Sanae; Hafidi, Majida; Hajjaj, Hassan; Scordino, Fabio; Giosa, Domenico; Giuffrè, Letterio; Barreca, Davide; Criseo, Giuseppe; Romeo, Orazio

    2016-01-18

    The isolation of patulin-producing Penicillia in apples collected in different markets in four localities in Morocco is reported. Fungi were identified by β-tubulin sequencing and further characterized using a specific PCR-based method targeting the isoepoxydon dehydrogenase (IDH) gene to discriminate between patulin-producing and non-producing strains. Production of patulin was also evaluated using standard cultural and biochemical methods. Results showed that 79.5% of contaminant fungi belonged to the genus Penicillium and that Penicillium expansum was the most isolated species (83.9%) followed by Penicillium chrysogenum (~9.7%) and Penicillium crustosum (~6.4%). Molecular analysis revealed that 64.5% of the Penicillium species produced the expected IDH-amplicon denoting patulin production in these strains. However, patulin production was not chemically confirmed in all P. expansum strains. The isolation of IDH(-)/patulin(+) strains poses the hypothesis that gentisylaldehyde is not a direct patulin precursor, supporting previous observations that highlighted the importance of the gentisyl alcohol in the production of this mycotoxin. Total agreement between IDH-gene detection and cultural/chemical methods employed was observed in 58% of P. expansum strains and for 100% of the other species isolated. Overall the data reported here showed a substantial genetic variability within P. expansum population from Morocco.

  1. Molecular characterization and physical localization of highly repetitive DNA sequences from Brazilian Alstroemeria species.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, A G J; Kamstra, S A; de Jeu, M J; Visser, R G F

    2002-01-01

    Highly repetitive DNA sequences were isolated from genomic DNA libraries of Alstroemeria psittacina and A. inodora. Among the repetitive sequences that were isolated, tandem repeats as well as dispersed repeats could be discerned. The tandem repeats belonged to a family of interlinked Sau3A subfragments with sizes varying from 68-127 bp, and constituted a larger HinfI repeat of approximately 400 bp. Southern hybridization showed a similar molecular organization of the tandem repeats in each of the Brazilian Alstroemeria species tested. None of the repeats hybridized with DNA from Chilean Alstroemeria species, which indicates that they are specific for the Brazilian species. In-situ localization studies revealed the tandem repeats to be localized in clusters on the chromosomes of A. inodora and A. psittacina: distal hybridization sites were found on chromosome arms 2PS, 6PL, 7PS, 7PL and 8PL, interstitial sites on chromosome arms 2PL, 3PL, 4PL and 5PL. The applicability of the tandem repeats for cytogenetic analysis of interspecific hybrids and their role in heterochromatin organization are discussed.

  2. Morphological and Molecular Discrimination of Fasciola Species Isolated From Domestic Ruminants of Urmia City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    YAKHCHALI, Mohammad; MALEKZADEH-VIAYEH, Reza; IMANI-BARAN, Abbas; MARDANI, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Background: The trematodes of the genus Fasciola (the liver flukes) are among the well-known instances of food-borne parasites worldwide. Differentiation of Fasciola species is important because of their different transmission and epidemiological characteristics. The current study was undertaken to discriminate Fasciola species in the domestic ruminants of Urmia city, Iran. Methods: Adult flukes were isolated from the naturally infected livers of the slaughtered water buffaloes and sheep. The flukes were initially identified based on morphological and morphometric parameters. A 618-bp-long fragment of the 28SrRNA gene of Fasciola was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified fragment was digested by DraII or AvaII enzymes for a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and sequenced for the phylogenetic tree construction. Results: Based on the morphometric examination, the flukes belonged to F. hepatica, F. gigantica and an intermediate Fasciola form. The PCR-RFLP analysis was able to differentiate F. hepatica from F. gigantica. While the phylogenetic reconstruction justified, to some extent, the morphological diagnosis, it failed to segregate F. hepatica from F. gigantica identified in this and the previous studies. Conclusion: To resolve fully the problem of taxonomy and evolution in Fasciola species, employing a broad range of molecular and morphological approaches is necessary. This is crucial for epidemiological surveys and successful clinical management of their infection. PMID:25904945

  3. Molecular detection of Rickettsia species in Amblyomma ticks collected from snakes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sumrandee, Chalao; Hirunkanokpun, Supanee; Doornbos, Kathryn; Kitthawee, Sangvorn; Baimai, Visut; Grubhoffer, Libor; Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Ahantarig, Arunee

    2014-10-01

    Some reptile ticks are potential vectors of pathogens such as spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae. Here, we report for the first time in detail the molecular evidence, DNA sequences and phylogenetic studies, for the presence of Rickettsia spp. in Amblyomma ticks (Amblyomma helvolum and Amblyomma varanense) from snakes in Thailand. A total of 24 tick samples was collected from 4 snake species and identified. A phylogenetic analysis inferred from the partial sequences of the gltA gene indicated that the Rickettsia spp. from 2 Amblyomma helvolum and 1 Amblyomma varanense belong to the same group as the SFG rickettsiae, which are closely related to Rickettsia raoultii strains. In contrast, there was 1 Rickettsia sp. from Amblyomma helvolum grouped into the same clade with other SFG rickettsiae (Rickettsia tamurae, Rickettsia monacensis, and a Rickettsia endosymbiont of Amblyomma dubitatum from Brazil). However, another Rickettsia sp. from Amblyomma varanense was closely related to Rickettsia bellii and Rickettsia sp. strain RDa420 from Thailand. In addition, from phylogenetic results based on the 16S rRNA gene and a concatenated tree of the 3 genes (gltA, ompA, and ompB), we found what may be a novel SFG rickettsia species closely related to Rickettsia raoultii (from both Amblyomma varanense and Amblyomma helvolum). In conclusion, our findings are the first report on the presence of novel SFG rickettsiae in 2 snake tick species, Amblyomma varanense and Amblyomma helvolum in Thailand and in south-eastern Asia.

  4. Morphological and molecular characterization of Endophyllum species on perennial asteraceous plants in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Wood, Alan R; Crous, Pedro W

    2005-04-01

    Endophyllum osteospermi is an autoecious, endocyclic rust fungus, which has only been recorded on Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. monilifera (Asteraceae, Calendulae), a perennial woody shrub. Both organisms are indigenous to South Africa. Because E. osteospermi is being considered for release in Australia as a biocontrol agent against C. monilifera ssp. monilifera, it was necessary to determine its host range and natural distribution in South Africa. To address this, natural stands of Chrysanthemoides species, as well as other South African asteraceous plants, were monitored for E. osteospermi between 1992 and 2003. A morphological and molecular comparison of specimens referable to Endophyllum was undertaken. Based on these results, E. osteospermi was recorded on C. monilifera sspp. monilifera, pisifera, rotundata, canescens, and subcanescens, C. incana, and an undescribed taxon. E. osteospermi was also recorded on Osteospermum ciliatum, O. pollgaloides, and O. potbergense. Furthermore, a closely related but previously undescribed species, E. dimorphothecae sp. nov. is described on Dimorphotheca cuneata. Aecidium elytropappi is transferred to Endophyllum as E. elytropappi comb. nov., being recorded on Elytropappus rhinocerostis and Stoebe plumosa. This study shows that in South Africa E. osteospermi is restricted to a small group of related plant species in the Calenduleae. This rust is therefore considered suitable as a candidate agent for the biocontrol of C. monilifera ssp. monilifera, and pending the results of host specificity testing, would most likely be safe to introduce into Australia.

  5. In Silico identification of SNP diversity in cultivated and wild tomato species: insight from molecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Archana; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Bag, Sumit K

    2016-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), an important source of genetic variations, are often used in crop improvement programme. The present study represented comprehensive In silico analysis of nucleotide polymorphisms in wild (Solanum habrochaites) and cultivated (Solanum lycopersicum) species of tomato to explore the consequence of substitutions both at sequence and structure level. A total of 8978 SNPs having Ts/Tv (Transition/Transversion) ratio 1.75 were identified from the Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) and Next Generation Sequence (NGS) data of both the species available in public databases. Out of these, 1838 SNPs were non-synonymous and distributed in 988 protein coding genes. Among these, 23 genes containing 96 SNPs were involved in traits markedly different between the two species. Furthermore, there were 28 deleterious SNPs distributed in 27 genes and a few of these genes were involved in plant pathogen interaction and plant hormone pathways. Molecular docking and simulations of several selected proteins showed the effect of SNPs in terms of compactness, conformation and interaction ability. Observed SNPs exhibited various types of motif binding effects due to nucleotide changes. SNPs that provide the evidence of differential motif binding and interaction behaviour could be effectively used for the crop improvement program. PMID:27929054

  6. Development of New Candidate Gene and EST-Based Molecular Markers for Gossypium Species.

    PubMed

    Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kantety, Ramesh V; Yu, John Z; Saha, Sukumar; Sharma, Govind C

    2011-01-01

    New source of molecular markers accelerate the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum EST sequences that were used for polymorphism detection followed by genetic and physical mapping. Nineteen gene-based markers were surveyed for polymorphism detection in 26 Gossypium species. Cluster analysis generated a phylogenetic tree with four major sub-clusters for 23 species while three species branched out individually. CAP method enhanced the rate of polymorphism of candidate gene-based markers between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. Two hundred A-genome based SSR markers were designed after datamining of G. arboreum EST sequences (Mississippi Gossypium arboreum  EST-SSR: MGAES). Over 70% of MGAES markers successfully produced amplicons while 65 of them demonstrated polymorphism between the parents of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense RIL population and formed 14 linkage groups. Chromosomal localization of both candidate gene-based and MGAES markers was assisted by euploid and hypoaneuploid CS-B analysis. Gene-based and MGAES markers were highly informative as they were designed from candidate genes and fiber transcriptome with a potential to be integrated into the existing cotton genetic and physical maps.

  7. Species identification of Mycobacterium avium complex isolates by a variety of molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Beggs, M L; Stevanova, R; Eisenach, K D

    2000-02-01

    Organisms in the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC; M. avium, M. intracellulare, and "nonspecific or X" MAC) are emerging pathogens among individual organisms of which significant genetic variability is displayed. The objective of the present study was to evaluate various molecular methods for the rapid and definitive identification of MAC species. Isolates were obtained from both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and HIV-negative patients with and without known predisposing conditions. The isolates were initially hybridized with nucleic acid probes complementary to the rRNA of the respective mycobacterial species (AccuProbe Culture Confirmation kits for M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MAC species; Gen-Probe). Isolates were also examined by PCR and in some cases by Southern blot hybridization for the insertion element IS1245. Two other techniques included a PCR assay that amplifies the mig gene, a putative virulence factor for MAC, and hsp65 gene amplification and sequencing. This study led to the following observations. Eighty-five percent of the isolates from HIV-positive patients were M. avium and 86% of the isolates from HIV-negative patients were M. intracellulare. Fifteen of the M. avium isolates did not contain IS1245 and 7% of the M. intracellulare isolates were found to carry IS1245. All of the M. avium strains were mig positive, and all of the M. intracellulare strains were mig negative.

  8. Morphological and molecular characterisation of Diaporthe species associated with grapevine trunk disease in China.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Asha J; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Udayanga, Dhanushka; Chukeatirote, Ekachai; Li, XingHong; Yan, JiYe; Hyde, Kevin D

    2015-05-01

    Trunk diseases in grapevine (Vitis spp.) are major problems in the wine and table-grape industries reducing the productivity, quality and longevity of vineyards. Species of Diaporthe are important fungal pathogens of grapevine trunk disease worldwide. A survey of 14 grape vineyards located in different provinces of China was yielded Diaporthe isolates associated with symptomatic grapevine wood. These isolates were identified based on morphology and a combined data matrix of rDNA ITS, partial sequences of translation elongation factor 1-α (EF 1-α), β-tubulin (TUB) and calmodulin (CAL) gene regions. Four species of Diaporthe were identified, which included Diaporthe eres, Diaporthe hongkongensis, Diaporthe phaseolorum and Diaporthe sojae. All isolates of Diaporthe caused disease on detached grape shoots in pathogenicity experiments but differed in virulence. The incidence in local vineyards and the pathogenicity results indicate that D. eres is an important pathogen of grapevine in Chinese vineyards, where it may significantly limit grape production. This is the first detailed report of Diaporthe species associated with grapevine trunk diseases in China with morphology, pathogenicity and molecular data.

  9. Lactational changes in concentration and distribution of ganglioside molecular species in human breast milk from Chinese mothers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Liu, Xihong; MacGibbon, Alastair K H; Rowan, Angela; McJarrow, Paul; Fong, Bertram Y

    2015-11-01

    Gangliosides play a critical role in human brain development and function. Human breast milk (HBM) is an important dietary source of gangliosides for the growing infant. In this study, ganglioside concentrations were measured in the breast milk from a cross-sectional sample of Chinese mothers over an 8-month lactation period. The average total ganglioside concentration increased from 13.1 mg/l during the first month to 20.9 mg/l by 8 months of lactation. The average concentration during the typically solely breast-feeding period of 1‒6 months was 18.9 mg/l. This is the first study to report the relative distribution of the individual ganglioside molecular species through lactation for any population group. The ganglioside molecular species are made up of different fatty acid moieties that influence the physical properties of these gangliosides, and hence affect their function. The GM(3) molecular species containing long-chain acyl fatty acids had the most prominent changes, increasing in both concentration and relative distribution. The equivalent long-chain acyl fatty acid GD(3) molecular species typically decreased in concentration and relative distribution. The lactational trends for both concentration and relative distribution for the very long-chain acyl fatty acid molecular species were more varied. The major GM(3) and GD(3) molecular species during lactation were d40:1 and d42:1, respectively. An understanding of ganglioside molecular species distribution in HBM is essential for accurate application of mass spectrometry methods for ganglioside quantification.

  10. Investigation of the local structure of mixtures of an ionic liquid with polar molecular species through molecular dynamics: cluster formation and angular distributions.

    PubMed

    Carrete, Jesús; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Cabeza, Óscar; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2012-05-24

    In this work, we used molecular dynamics simulations to analyze in detail the spatial distributions of the different constituents in mixtures of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate with three polar molecular species: water and two alcohols of different chain lengths (methanol and ethanol). In particular, we report results regarding the influence of the chosen species and its concentration on the formation of ionic and molecular clusters over the whole miscibility range, as well as on the angular distribution of polar molecules around the anion and the cation in these systems. Both analyses showed that addition of a molecular species breaks down the polar network of the pure ionic liquid in clusters whose mean size decreases progressively as more molecules are added. At very high concentrations of the molecular species, the ions are found to be isolated in mixtures with water and methanol, but they tend to form pairs in ethanol. In mixtures with water we identified large clusters that form a water network at very high water concentrations, while at low water concentrations polar molecules tend to form smaller aggregates. In contrast, in mixtures with alkanols there is no evidence of the formation of large alcohol clusters at any concentration. Spatial order in alcohol was also studied by means of the Kirkwood G factor, reaching the conclusion that the angular correlations which appear in pure alcohols due to dipole interactions are destroyed by the ionic liquid, even when present only in tiny amounts.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium Species and Giardia duodenalis from Symptomatic Cambodian Children

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Catrin E.; Elwin, Kristin; Phot, Nget; Seng, Chanthou; Mao, Saroeun; Suy, Kuong; Kumar, Varun; Nader, Johanna; Bousfield, Rachel; Perera, Sanuki; Bailey, J. Wendi; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Parry, Christopher M.; Chalmers, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In a prospective study, 498 single faecal samples from children aged under 16 years attending an outpatient clinic in the Angkor Hospital for Children, northwest Cambodia, were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts using microscopy and molecular assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 2.2% (11/498) of samples using microscopy and in 7.7% (38/498) with molecular tests. Giardia duodenalis cysts were detected in 18.9% (94/498) by microscopy and 27.7% (138/498) by molecular tests; 82% of the positive samples (by either method) were from children aged 1–10 years. Cryptosporidium hominis was the most common species of Cryptosporidium, detected in 13 (34.2%) samples, followed by Cryptosporidium meleagridis in 9 (23.7%), Cryptosporidium parvum in 8 (21.1%), Cryptosporidium canis in 5 (13.2%), and Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium ubiquitum in one sample each. Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum positive samples were subtyped by sequencing the GP60 gene: C. hominis IaA16R6 and C. parvum IIeA7G1 were the most abundant subtypes. Giardia duodenalis was typed using a multiplex real-time PCR targeting assemblages A and B. Assemblage B (106; 76.8% of all Giardia positive samples) was most common followed by A (12.3%) and mixed infections (5.1%). Risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium were malnutrition (AOR 9.63, 95% CI 1.67–55.46), chronic medical diagnoses (AOR 4.51, 95% CI 1.79–11.34) and the presence of birds in the household (AOR 2.99, 95% CI 1.16–7.73); specifically C. hominis (p = 0.03) and C. meleagridis (p<0.001) were associated with the presence of birds. The use of soap was protective against Giardia infection (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58–0.95). Conclusions/Significance This is the first report to describe the different Cryptosporidium species and subtypes and Giardia duodenalis assemblages in Cambodian children. The variety of Cryptosporidium species detected indicates both

  12. Molecular Simulation of the Diffusion of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2010-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous uranyl carbonate species were carried out with two different potential models to gain molecular-level insight into the hydration properties of these species and evaluate the ability of the two models to reproduce published ab initio and experimental data. The simulation results were used to estimate the self-diffusion coefficients of uranyl carbonate species that often dominate uranyl speciation in groundwater systems. The first potential model was based on a series of shell models developed by Parker and co-workers (including (DE LEEUW and PARKER, 1998; KERISIT and PARKER, 2004; PAVESE et al., 1996). The second potential model was a rigid-ion model based on the flexible SPC water model (TELEMAN et al., 1987), the uranyl model of Guilbaud and Wipff (GUILBAUD and WIPFF, 1996), and the parameters for the carbonate ion given by Greathouse and co-workers (GREATHOUSE and CYGAN, 2005; GREATHOUSE et al., 2002). Analysis of structural (mean interatomic distances and coordination numbers) and dynamical (water residence times in hydration shell and self-diffusion coefficients) properties showed that, overall, the first potential model performed best when compared to published data, although the only major discrepancy with the second model was a misrepresentation of the configuration adopted by the alkaline-earth uranyl carbonate ions. The diffusion coefficients obtained for the alkaline-earth cations and the uranyl ion were compared with three variants of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation and it was found that none of the three SE models were able to reproduce both the absolute values and the overall trend determined from the molecular dynamics simulations. However, as would be expected based on the SE equation, a plot of the diffusion coefficients of the uranyl carbonate complexes as a function of the inverse of the equivalent spherical radius showed a general linear dependence with the two models yielding almost identical gradients

  13. Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Clinical Isolates of the Candida rugosa Species Complex and Proposal of the New Species Candida neorugosa

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Katihuska; Sutton, Deanna A.; Cano, Josep; Fothergill, Annette W.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Zhang, Sean; Watkins, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Candida rugosa is a poorly known fungal species occasionally involved in human infections. A molecular analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal genes of 24 clinical isolates phenotypically identified as C. rugosa demonstrated that only 10 (41.6%) isolates belonged to that species. The other isolates were identified as Candida pararugosa (41.6%) and Candida pseudorugosa (8.3%). The remaining two isolates, from human and equine infections, respectively, were clearly different from the others and represent a new species proposed here as Candida neorugosa. The closest species by D1/D2 sequences was the type strain of C. rugosa, with only 92.3% similarity. C. neorugosa can also be differentiated from all other species of the C. rugosa complex by phenotypic features. The eight antifungal drugs tested showed high in vitro activity against the 24 isolates included in the study. PMID:22553236

  14. Molecular Analysis of the In Situ Growth Rates of Subsurface Geobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Giloteaux, Ludovic; Barlett, Melissa; Chavan, Milind A.; Smith, Jessica A.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael; Long, Philip; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular tools that can provide an estimate of the in situ growth rate of Geobacter species could improve understanding of dissimilatory metal reduction in a diversity of environments. Whole-genome microarray analyses of a subsurface isolate of Geobacter uraniireducens, grown under a variety of conditions, identified a number of genes that are differentially expressed at different specific growth rates. Expression of two genes encoding ribosomal proteins, rpsC and rplL, was further evaluated with quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) in cells with doubling times ranging from 6.56 h to 89.28 h. Transcript abundance of rpsC correlated best (r2 = 0.90) with specific growth rates. Therefore, expression patterns of rpsC were used to estimate specific growth rates of Geobacter species during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment in which acetate was added to the groundwater to promote dissimilatory metal reduction. Initially, increased availability of acetate in the groundwater resulted in higher expression of Geobacter rpsC, and the increase in the number of Geobacter cells estimated with fluorescent in situ hybridization compared well with specific growth rates estimated from levels of in situ rpsC expression. However, in later phases, cell number increases were substantially lower than predicted from rpsC transcript abundance. This change coincided with a bloom of protozoa and increased attachment of Geobacter species to solid phases. These results suggest that monitoring rpsC expression may better reflect the actual rate that Geobacter species are metabolizing and growing during in situ uranium bioremediation than changes in cell abundance. PMID:23275510

  15. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma species isolated from the genital tract of Dorper sheep in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kalshingi, Habu A; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Gouws, Johan; van Vuuren, Moritz

    2015-06-08

    Biochemical and molecular analysis were conducted on 34 strains of Mycoplasma species isolated between 2003 and 2009 from the genital tract of clinically healthy Dorper sheep and sheep with ulcerative vulvitis and balanitis. Earlier publications identified the causative agent as Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides large colony (MmmLC) and Arcanobacterium pyogenes. The aims of the study were to characterise Mycoplasma species isolated from the genital tract of Dorper sheep with polymerase chain reaction assay, cloning and gene sequencing. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) results revealed six predominant Mycoplasma species: Mycoplasma arginini, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, Arcanobacterium laidlawii, MmmLC, Mycoplasma sp. ovine/caprine serogroup II and M. canadense. Sequencing of the 34 isolates were analysed using phylogenetic methods, and 18 (50%) were identified as M. arginini with 99% - 100% similarity to M. arginini from England and Sweden. Six isolates showed 99% similarity to M. bovigenitalium strains from Turkey and Germany. Two isolates had 99% similarity to an M. sp. ovine/caprine sero group II from the United Kingdom. BLAST for two isolates revealed 99% similarity to Acholeplasma laidlawii from India, another two were 99% similar to MmmLC strain from Sweden, two showed 98% similarity to Mycoplasma sp. Usp 120 from Brazil, and two isolates have a 97% - 99% similarity to M. mm. Jcv1 strain from the United States of America. Finally, one isolate showed similarity of 99% to Mycoplasma canadense strain from Italy. The findings support the hypothesis that ulcerative vulvitis and balanitis of Dorper sheep in South Africa (SA) is a multifactorial disease with involvement of different Mycoplasma species.

  16. Morphological and molecular analyses of larval taeniid species in small mammals from contrasting habitats in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabi, M N S; Jensen, P M; Christensen, M U; Kapel, C M O

    2015-01-01

    Taeniid infections in intermediate hosts manifest themselves as extraintestinal larval stages which, in early development, lack species-specific characteristics. The inability to distinguish infections of zoonotic importance such as Echinococcus multilocularis from other taeniid infections that have mainly veterinary significance stimulated the development of species-specific molecular diagnostics. In this study, the prevalence of taeniid infections in potential intermediate hosts was evaluated using both morphological diagnosis and a newly described multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for species determination. Small mammals (N= 719) were trapped in three different types of habitats in north-east Zealand, Denmark. The sensitivity of the multiplex PCR (90.5%) exceeded that of morphological examination (57.9%) for identifying 95 taeniid infections. The use of the multiplex PCR resulted in higher prevalence rates due to improved detection of immature liver infections with Hydatigera taeniaeformis and Versteria mustelae, but did not affect the observed prevalence rates of peritoneal metacestodes of Taenia polyacantha. The prevalence of taeniid infections showed a significant difference according to habitat type, potentially identifying a 'sylvatic' transmission and an 'urban' transmission, with marked variation among different taeniid species. Versteria mustelae and T. polyacantha were more prevalent in rural forests, while infections with H. taeniaeformis were dominant in urban parks/forests and in residential and farm gardens. The multiplex PCR facilitated a better utilization of wildlife samples by yielding a higher number of definitive diagnoses of ambiguous taeniid infections in liver lesions, allowing for more accurate epidemiological data and, hence, a more accurate risk assessment.

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Isolates Recovered from Wild Animal Species

    PubMed Central

    Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Strother, Megan; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Kapur, Vivek; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterial isolates were obtained by radiometric culture from 33 different species of captive or free-ranging animals (n = 106) and environmental sources (n = 3) from six geographic zones within the United States. The identities of all 109 isolates were confirmed by using mycobactin J dependence and characterization of five well-defined molecular markers, including two integration loci of IS900 (loci L1 and L9), one Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis)-specific sequence (locus 251), and one M. avium subsp. avium-specific marker (IS1245), as well as hsp65 and IS1311 restriction endonuclease analyses. Seventy-six acid-fast isolates were identified as M. paratuberculosis, 15 were identified as belonging to the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex (but not M. paratuberculosis), and the remaining 18 were identified as mycobacteria outside the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex. Fingerprinting by multiplex PCR for IS900 integration loci clustered 67 of the 76 M. paratuberculosis strains into a single clade (designated clade A18) and had a Simpson's diversity index (D) of 0.53. In contrast, sequence-based characterization of a recently identified M. paratuberculosis short sequence repeat (SSR) region enabled the differentiation of the M. paratuberculosis isolates in clade A18 into seven distinct alleles (D = 0.75). The analysis revealed eight subtypes among the 33 species of animals, suggesting the interspecies transmission of specific strains. Taken together, the results of our analyses demonstrate that SSR analysis enables the genetic characterization of M. paratuberculosis isolates from different host species and provide evidence for the host specificity of some M. paratuberculosis strains as well as sharing of strains between wild and domesticated animal species. PMID:15071028

  18. Molecular analysis of the in situ growth rates of subsurface Geobacter species.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dawn E; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Barlett, Melissa; Chavan, Milind A; Smith, Jessica A; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael; Long, Philip; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-03-01

    Molecular tools that can provide an estimate of the in situ growth rate of Geobacter species could improve understanding of dissimilatory metal reduction in a diversity of environments. Whole-genome microarray analyses of a subsurface isolate of Geobacter uraniireducens, grown under a variety of conditions, identified a number of genes that are differentially expressed at different specific growth rates. Expression of two genes encoding ribosomal proteins, rpsC and rplL, was further evaluated with quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) in cells with doubling times ranging from 6.56 h to 89.28 h. Transcript abundance of rpsC correlated best (r(2) = 0.90) with specific growth rates. Therefore, expression patterns of rpsC were used to estimate specific growth rates of Geobacter species during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment in which acetate was added to the groundwater to promote dissimilatory metal reduction. Initially, increased availability of acetate in the groundwater resulted in higher expression of Geobacter rpsC, and the increase in the number of Geobacter cells estimated with fluorescent in situ hybridization compared well with specific growth rates estimated from levels of in situ rpsC expression. However, in later phases, cell number increases were substantially lower than predicted from rpsC transcript abundance. This change coincided with a bloom of protozoa and increased attachment of Geobacter species to solid phases. These results suggest that monitoring rpsC expression may better reflect the actual rate that Geobacter species are metabolizing and growing during in situ uranium bioremediation than changes in cell abundance.

  19. Molecular Tools for the Selective Detection of Nine Diatom Species Biomarkers of Various Water Quality Levels

    PubMed Central

    Cimarelli, Lucia; Singh, Kumar Saurabh; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Dhar, Bidhan Chandra; Brandi, Anna; Brandi, Letizia; Spurio, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the composition of diatom communities and their response to environmental changes is currently limited by laborious taxonomic identification procedures. Advances in molecular technologies are expected to contribute more efficient, robust and sensitive tools for the detection of these ecologically relevant microorganisms. There is a need to explore and test phylogenetic markers as an alternative to the use of rRNA genes, whose limited sequence divergence does not allow the accurate discrimination of diatoms at the species level. In this work, nine diatom species belonging to eight genera, isolated from epylithic environmental samples collected in central Italy, were chosen to implement a panel of diatoms covering the full range of ecological status of freshwaters. The procedure described in this work relies on the PCR amplification of specific regions in two conserved diatom genes, elongation factor 1-a (eEF1-a) and silicic acid transporter (SIT), as a first step to narrow down the complexity of the targets, followed by microarray hybridization experiments. Oligonucleotide probes with the potential to discriminate closely related species were designed taking into account the genetic polymorphisms found in target genes. These probes were tested, refined and validated on a small-scale prototype DNA chip. Overall, we obtained 17 highly specific probes targeting eEF1-a and SIT, along with 19 probes having lower discriminatory power recognizing at the same time two or three species. This basic array was validated in a laboratory setting and is ready for tests with crude environmental samples eventually to be scaled-up to include a larger panel of diatoms. Its possible use for the simultaneous detection of diatoms selected from the classes of water quality identified by the European Water Framework Directive is discussed. PMID:26006124

  20. Assessing the viability of bacterial species in drinking water by combined cellular and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Kahlisch, Leila; Henne, Karsten; Gröbe, Lothar; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-02-01

    The question which bacterial species are present in water and if they are viable is essential for drinking water safety but also of general relevance in aquatic ecology. To approach this question we combined propidium iodide/SYTO9 staining ("live/dead staining" indicating membrane integrity), fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and community fingerprinting for the analysis of a set of tap water samples. Live/dead staining revealed that about half of the bacteria in the tap water had intact membranes. Molecular analysis using 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprints and sequencing of drinking water bacteria before and after FACS sorting revealed: (1) the DNA- and RNA-based overall community structure differed substantially, (2) the community retrieved from RNA and DNA reflected different bacterial species, classified as 53 phylotypes (with only two common phylotypes), (3) the percentage of phylotypes with intact membranes or damaged cells were comparable for RNA- and DNA-based analyses, and (4) the retrieved species were primarily of aquatic origin. The pronounced difference between phylotypes obtained from DNA extracts (dominated by Betaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria) and from RNA extracts (dominated by Alpha-, Beta-, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Cyanobacteria) demonstrate the relevance of concomitant RNA and DNA analyses for drinking water studies. Unexpected was that a comparable fraction (about 21%) of phylotypes with membrane-injured cells was observed for DNA- and RNA-based analyses, contradicting the current understanding that RNA-based analyses represent the actively growing fraction of the bacterial community. Overall, we think that this combined approach provides an interesting tool for a concomitant phylogenetic and viability analysis of bacterial species of drinking water.

  1. De novo Transcriptome Analysis and Molecular Marker Development of Two Hemarthria Species

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiu; Yan, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Xin-Quan; Zhang, Jian; Frazier, Taylor P.; Huang, De-Jun; Lu, Lu; Huang, Lin-Kai; Liu, Wei; Peng, Yan; Ma, Xiao; Yan, Yan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hemarthria R. Br. is an important genus of perennial forage grasses that is widely used in subtropical and tropical regions. Hemarthria grasses have made remarkable contributions to the development of animal husbandry and agro-ecosystem maintenance; however, there is currently a lack of comprehensive genomic data available for these species. In this study, we used Illumina high-throughput deep sequencing to characterize of two agriculturally important Hemarthria materials, H. compressa “Yaan” and H. altissima “1110.” Sequencing runs that used each of four normalized RNA samples from the leaves or roots of the two materials yielded more than 24 million high-quality reads. After de novo assembly, 137,142 and 77,150 unigenes were obtained for “Yaan” and “1110,” respectively. In addition, a total of 86,731 “Yaan” and 48,645 “1110” unigenes were successfully annotated. After consolidating the unigenes for both materials, 42,646 high-quality SNPs were identified in 10,880 unigenes and 10,888 SSRs were identified in 8330 unigenes. To validate the identified markers, high quality PCR primers were designed for both SNPs and SSRs. We randomly tested 16 of the SNP primers and 54 of the SSR primers and found that the majority of these primers successfully amplified the desired PCR product. In addition, high cross-species transferability (61.11–87.04%) of SSR markers was achieved for four other Poaceae species. The amount of RNA sequencing data that was generated for these two Hemarthria species greatly increases the amount of genomic information available for Hemarthria and the SSR and SNP markers identified in this study will facilitate further advancements in genetic and molecular studies of the Hemarthria genus. PMID:27148320

  2. Molecular tools for the selective detection of nine diatom species biomarkers of various water quality levels.

    PubMed

    Cimarelli, Lucia; Singh, Kumar Saurabh; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Dhar, Bidhan Chandra; Brandi, Anna; Brandi, Letizia; Spurio, Roberto

    2015-05-22

    Our understanding of the composition of diatom communities and their response to environmental changes is currently limited by laborious taxonomic identification procedures. Advances in molecular technologies are expected to contribute more efficient, robust and sensitive tools for the detection of these ecologically relevant microorganisms. There is a need to explore and test phylogenetic markers as an alternative to the use of rRNA genes, whose limited sequence divergence does not allow the accurate discrimination of diatoms at the species level. In this work, nine diatom species belonging to eight genera, isolated from epylithic environmental samples collected in central Italy, were chosen to implement a panel of diatoms covering the full range of ecological status of freshwaters. The procedure described in this work relies on the PCR amplification of specific regions in two conserved diatom genes, elongation factor 1-a (eEF1-a) and silicic acid transporter (SIT), as a first step to narrow down the complexity of the targets, followed by microarray hybridization experiments. Oligonucleotide probes with the potential to discriminate closely related species were designed taking into account the genetic polymorphisms found in target genes. These probes were tested, refined and validated on a small-scale prototype DNA chip. Overall, we obtained 17 highly specific probes targeting eEF1-a and SIT, along with 19 probes having lower discriminatory power recognizing at the same time two or three species. This basic array was validated in a laboratory setting and is ready for tests with crude environmental samples eventually to be scaled-up to include a larger panel of diatoms. Its possible use for the simultaneous detection of diatoms selected from the classes of water quality identified by the European Water Framework Directive is discussed.

  3. Energy loss in gas-surface dynamics: Electron-hole pair and phonon excitation upon adsorbate relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of electron and phonon degrees of freedom on the relaxation dynamics of adsorption processes in gas-surface systems by using ab initio molecular dynamics that incorporates an electronic friction force (AIMDEF). As representative cases we have chosen three systems with different adsorption energies and adsorbate-to-surface atom mass ratios: H on Pd(1 0 0), N on Ag(1 1 1), and N2 on Fe(1 1 0). We show, through inspection of the total energies and trajectories of the hot adsorbates on the surface, that electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations dominate relaxation of the light gas species, while the phonon channel is dominant for the heavy species. In the latter case e-h pairs become more important at the final thermalization stages.

  4. A molecular method to identify species of fine roots and to predict the proportion of a species in mixed samples in subtropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Weixian; Zhou, Bo; Lei, Pifeng; Zeng, Yeling; Liu, Yan; Liu, Cong; Xiang, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of belowground interactions among tree species and the fine root (≤2 mm in diameter) contribution of a species to forest ecosystem production are mostly restricted by experimental difficulties in the quantification of the species composition. The available approaches have various defects. By contrast, DNA-based methods can avoid these drawbacks. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an advanced molecular technology, but it is difficult to develop specific primer sets. The method of next-generation sequencing has several limitations, such as inaccurate sequencing of homopolymer regions, as well as being time-consuming, and requiring special knowledge for data analysis. This study evaluated the potential of the DNA-sequence-based method to identify tree species and to quantify the relative proportion of each species in mixed fine root samples. We discriminated the species by isolating DNA from individual fine roots and amplifying the plastid trnL(UAA; i.e., tRNA-Leu-UAA) intron using the PCR. To estimate relative proportions, we extracted DNA from fine root mixtures. After the plastid trnL(UAA) intron amplification and TA-cloning, we sequenced the positive clones from each mixture. Our results indicated that the plastid trnL(UAA) intron spacer successfully distinguished tree species of fine roots in subtropical forests. In addition, the DNA-sequence-based approach could reliably estimate the relative proportion of each species in mixed fine root samples. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the DNA-sequence-based method has been used to quantify tree species proportions in mixed fine root samples in Chinese subtropical forests. As the cost of DNA-sequencing declines and DNA-sequence-based methods improve, the molecular method will be more widely used to determine fine root species and abundance. PMID:25999977

  5. Molecular Species of Phosphatidylinositol-Cycle Intermediates in the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Plasma Membrane†

    PubMed Central

    Shulga, Yulia V.; Myers, David S.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Brown, H. Alex; Topham, Matthew K.; Epand, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover is a process requiring both the plasma and ER membranes. We have determined the distribution of phosphatidic acid (PA) and PI and their acyl chain compositions in these two subcellular membranes using mass spectrometry. We assessed the role of PI cycling in determining the molecular species and quantity of these lipids by comparing the compositions of the two membranes isolated from embryonic fibroblasts obtained from diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DGKε) knock out (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. In the KO cells the conversion of arachidonoyl-rich DAG to PA is blocked by the absence of DGKε, resulting in reducing the rate of PI-cycling. The acyl chain composition is very similar for PI or PA in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) vs. plasma membrane (PM) and for WT vs. KO. However, the acyl chain profile for PI is very different from that for PA. This indicates that DGKε is not facilitating the direct transfer of a specific species of PA between the PM and the ER. About 20% of the PA in the ER membrane has one short acyl chain of 14 carbons or less. These species of PA are not converted into PI but may play a role in stabilizing regions of high positive curvature in the ER. There are also PI species in both the ER and PM for which there is no detectable PA precursor, indicating that these species of PI are unlikely to arise via the PI-cycle. We find that in the PM of KO cells the levels of PI and of PA are decreased about three-fold in comparison with either the PM of WT cells or in comparison with the ER of KO cells. The PI-cycle is slowed in the KO cells, hence the lipid intermediates of the PI-cycle can no longer be interconverted and are depleted from the PI-cycle by conversion to other species. There is less of an effect of the depletion in the ER where de novo synthesis of PA occurs in comparison with the PM. PMID:20000336

  6. A new tool for the molecular identification of Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group: the glass slide microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Deblauwe, I; de Witte, J C; de Deken, G; de Deken, R; Madder, M; van Erk, S; Hoza, F A; Lathouwers, D; Geysen, D

    2012-03-01

    Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are potential vectors of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV 8), which was introduced into central Western Europe in 2006. Correct morphological species identification of Obsoletus group females is especially difficult and molecular identification is the method of choice. In this study we present a new molecular tool based on probe hybridization using a DNA microarray format to identify Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group. The internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) gene sequences of 55 Culicoides belonging to 13 different species were determined and used, together with 19 Culicoides ITS1 sequences sourced from GenBank, to design species-specific probes for the microarray test. This test was evaluated using the amplified ITS1 sequences of another 85 Culicoides specimens, belonging to 11 species. The microarray test successfully identified all samples (100%) of the Obsoletus group, identifying each specimen to species level within the group. This test has several advantages over existing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular tools, including possible capability for parallel analysis of many species, high sensitivity and specificity, and low background signal noise. Hand-spotting of the microarray slide and the use of detection chemistry make this alternative technique affordable and feasible for any diagnostic laboratory with PCR facilities.

  7. Molecular phylogenetics, systematics and host-plant associations of the Bruchidius albosparsus (Fåhraeus) species group (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) with the description of four new species.

    PubMed

    Delobel, Alex; Le Ru, Bruno; Genson, Gwenaëlle; Musyoka, Boaz K; Kergoat, Gael J

    2015-03-16

    Bruchidius Schilsky is a large paraphyletic genus of seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) which consists of multiple lineages that are usually associated with narrow sets of host-plants. In this study we focus on a group that mostly develops on wattle trees (acacias) belonging to the genus Vachellia Wight & Arn. This group originally included nine species and was designated as the Bruchidius centromaculatus (Allard) species group, but recent phylogenetic analyses revealed that these species belong to a much wider group of species with similar morphologies. For reasons of anteriority we call this enlarged group Bruchidius albosparsus (Fåhraeus). Here we review the morphology of species in this group and provide new diagnoses and ecological data for 10 species. The following combinations and synonymies are proposed: Bruchidius tanaensis (Pic, 1921) (= Bruchus tanaensis Pic, 1921) comb. nov. and Bruchidius albosparsus (Fåhraeus, 1839) (= Bruchus spadiceus Fåhraeus, 1839) syn. nov. Four new species are also described: B. eminingensis sp. nov., B. gerrardiicola sp. nov., B. glomeratus sp. nov. and B. haladai sp. nov. Finally we carried out molecular phylogenetic analyses on a multi-marker dataset of 59 specimens and 35 species, including 14 species from the group. The resulting trees allow us to confirm the monophyly of the group of interest and provide a more detailed picture of their evolutionary relationships.

  8. Vibrational Frequencies of Fractionally Charged Molecular Species: Benchmarking DFT Results against ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Bâldea, Ioan

    2017-03-23

    Recent advances in nano/molecular electronics and electrochemistry made it possible to continuously tune the fractional charge q of single molecules and to use vibrational spectroscopic methods to monitor such changes. Approaches to compute vibrational frequencies ω(q) of fractionally charged species based on the density functional theory (DFT) are faced with an important issue: the basic quantity used in these calculations, the total energy, should exhibit piecewise linearity with respect to the fractional charge, but approximate, commonly utilized exchange correlation functionals do not obey this condition. In this paper, with the aid of a simple and representative example, we benchmark results for ω(q) obtained within the DFT against ab initio methods, namely, coupled cluster singles and doubles and also second- and third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation) expansions. These results indicate that, in spite of missing the aforementioned piecewise linearity, DFT-based values ω(q) can reasonably be trusted.

  9. Molecular identification of novel intermediate host species of Angiostrongylus vasorum in Greater London.

    PubMed

    Patel, Zainab; Gill, A Christina; Fox, Mark T; Hermosilla, Carlos; Backeljau, Thierry; Breugelmans, Karin; Keevash, Esther; McEwan, Claudia; Aghazadeh, Mahdis; Elson-Riggins, Jocelyn G

    2014-12-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum is a parasitic nematode that can cause serious and potentially fatal disease in dogs and other canids. The aim of this study was to determine the intermediate slug species infected in nature by sampling sites in Greater London and Hertfordshire located within a known hyperendemic region. Overall, A. vasorum larvae were recovered from 6/381 slugs (1.6%) by tissue digestion, and their identity was confirmed by PCR. Infected slugs originated from three different sites in the Greater London area: one in Waltham Forest and two in Bromley. Slugs parasitised by A. vasorum were identified by a combination of external morphological characteristics and molecular techniques and belonged to three different families: the Arionidae, the Milacidae and the Limacidae. This includes two new host records for the parasite: Arion distinctus and Tandonia sowerbyi. This is the first record of A. vasorum in the family Milacidae, indicating that the parasite has a broader intermediate host range than previously recognised.

  10. Phylogenetic relationships among some Ateles species: the use of chromosomic and molecular characters.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Mariela; Ascunce, Marina Sofía; Rahn, Mónica Inés; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2005-07-01

    As with most platyrrhines, the systematics of Ateles is under discussion. In order to help clarify its systematic, we employed chromosomic and molecular characters to analyze the phylogenetic relationship among some species of the genus Ateles. Chromosomic studies were conducted on 14 atelid specimens: eight Ateles from A. paniscus, A. chamek, A. belzebuth and A. geoffroyi, and six Alouatta caraya. Ateles paniscus showed 2N=32, whereas A. chamek, A. belzebuth and A. geoffroyi presented 2N=34, XX/XY (with a submetacentric X and a variable Y) corroborated by male meiosis. Nucleotide sequence variation at the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II gene (COII) was analyzed in ten New World monkey specimens. Parsimony trees showed consistent phylogenetic relationships using both chromosomic forms and mitochondrial COII gene sequences as characters. Particularly, chromosomic phylogenies showed A. hybridus as a divergent taxon from the remaining group, whereas A. chamek, A. belzebuth and A. marginatus form an unresolved clade with A. geoffroyi as sister group.

  11. A SEARCH FOR CO-EVOLVING ION AND NEUTRAL GAS SPECIES IN PRESTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Hezareh, Talayeh; Willacy, Karen

    2012-11-20

    A comparison between the widths of ion and neutral molecule spectral lines has been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO{sup +}) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density, and thus, may not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO{sup +} and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral line width differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations, because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO{sup +}/NO, HCO{sup +}/CO, and NO{sup +}/NO.

  12. Cryptic Caribbean species of Scorpaena (Actinopterygii: Scorpaeniformes) suggested by cytogenetic and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Nirchio, M; Oliveira, C; Siccha-Ramirez, Z R; Sene, V F; Sánchez-Romero, O R; Ehemann, N R; Milana, V; Rossi, A R; Sola, L

    2016-10-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular analyses enabled identification of two cytotypes among individuals of the spotted scorpion fish Scorpaena plumieri from Margarita Island, Venezuela. Cytotype 1 was characterized by 48 subtelo-acrocentric chromosomes and fundamental number (number of chromosome arms; FN) equalled 48, while cytotype 2 was characterized by two metacentric and 46 subtelo-acrocentric chromosomes and FN was 50. These cytotypes also differed in the location of the ribosomal gene clusters and in the distribution of the constitutive heterochromatin. Moreover, fish from the cytotypes 1 and 2 were found to belong to distinct mitochondrial lineages. The presence of two S. plumieri cytotypes from two lineages separated by high genetic distance suggests that they correspond to sympatric cryptic species.

  13. Substrate Specificity of Equine and Human Influenza A Virus Sialidase to Molecular Species of Sialic Acid.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Unuma, Saori; Kawagishi, Sawako; Kurebayashi, Yuuki; Takano, Maiko; Yoshino, Hiroki; Minami, Akira; Yamanaka, Takashi; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Most equine influenza A viruses (IAVs) show strong binding to glycoconjugates containing N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) as well as N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Therefore, the progeny of equine IAV is thought to be released from the infected cell surface through removal of sialic acids by the viral sialidase. In the present study, equine IAV sialidases showed significantly lower substrate affinity than that of human IAV sialidases to artificial and natural Neu5Gc-conjugated substrates. The substrate specificity of equine IAV sialidases is in disagreement with their binding specificity to molecular species of sialic acid. The results suggest that substrate specificity of equine IAV sialidase for Neu5Ac, rather than for Neu5Gc, is important for an advantage at the early infection stage and the process of progeny virus release from the surface of infected cells.

  14. Molecular Properties of the Anti-Aromatic Species Cyclopentadienone, C5H5=0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormond, Thomas; Ellison, Barney; Daily, John W.; Stanton, John F.; Ahmed, Musahid; Zwier, Timothy S.; Hemberger, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    A common intermediate in the high temperature combustion of benzene is cyclopentadienone, C5H4=O. Cyclopentadienone is considered to be an "anti-aromatic" molecule. It is certainly a metastable species; samples persist at LN2 temperatures but dimerize upon warming to -80°C. It is of great interest to physically characterize this "anti-aromatic" species. The microwave spectrum, the infrared spectrum, the ionization energy, and the electron affinity of cyclopentadienone have been measured. Flash pyrolysis of o-phenylene sulfite (C6H4O2SO) provides molecular beams of C5H4=O entrained in a rare gas carrier. The beams are interrogated with time-of-flight photoionization mass spectrometry, confirming the clean, intense production of C5H4=O. a) Chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and CCSD(T) electronic structure calculations have combined to determine the re molecular structure of C5H4=O. b) Guided by CCSD(T) electronic structure calculations, the matrix infrared absorbance spectrum of C5H4=O isolated in a 4 K neon matrix has been used to assign 20 of the 24 fundamental vibrational frequencies. c) Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence (iPEPICO) spectra of cyclopentadienone establishes the ionization energy, IE(C5H4=O), to be 9.41 ± 0.01 eV. d) Prof. A. Sanov's group has reported the electron affinity, EA(C5H4=O), to be 1.06 ± 0.01 eV. Kidwell et al. J. Phys. Chem. Letts. 2201 (2014) Ormond et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 708 (2014) Ormond et al. Mol. Phys. in press (2015) Khuseynov et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 6965 (2014)

  15. Studies for the Loss of Atomic and Molecular Species from IO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    The general objective of this project has been to advance our theoretical understanding of lo's atmosphere and how various atomic and molecular species are lost from this atmosphere and are distributed in the circumplanetary environment of Jupiter. This grant has provided support for the activities of Dr. Michael Combi at the University of Michigan to serve as a small part in collaboration with a larger project awarded to Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc., with primary principal investigator Dr. William H. Smyth. Dr. Combi is the Principal Investigator and Project Manager for the Michigan grant NAG5-6187. This Michigan grant has provided for a continuation of a collaboration between Drs. Smyth and Combi in related efforts beginning in 1981, and with the object to develop and apply sophisticated theoretical models to interpret and to relate a number of new and exciting observations for the atmospheric gases of the satellite. The ability to interpret and then to relate through the theoretical fabric a number of these otherwise independent observations are a central strength of this program. This comprehensive approach provides a collective power, extracting more from the sum of the parts and seeing beyond various limitations that are inherent in any one observation. Although the approach is designed to unify, the program is divided into well-defined studies for the likely dominant atmospheric gases involving species of the SO2 family (SO2, SO, O2, S and O) and for the trace atmospheric gas atomic sodium and a likely escaping molecular ion NaX(+) (where Na(X) is the atmospheric molecule and X represents one or more atoms).Attachments: IO's sodium corona and spatially cloud: a consistent flux speed distribution. and Io's plasma environment during the Galileo flyby: global three-dimensional MHD modeling with adaptive mesh refinement.

  16. Molecular analysis of phylogeographic subspecies in three Ponto-Caspian sturgeon species

    PubMed Central

    Dudu, Andreea; Georgescu, Sergiu Emil; Costache, Marieta

    2014-01-01

    Sturgeons (Order Acipenseriformes) represent an extremely valuable natural resource that is now facing depletion. In the current study we evaluate if the traditional classification in subspecies of Acipenser gueldenstaedtii, Acipenser stellatus and Huso huso, endemic to Ponto-Caspian region is sustained by molecular analysis and if these represent Evolutionary Significant Units (ESUs) that should be managed separately in conservation programs. To examine the classification of taxonomic entities we sequenced a fragment of the mitochondrial control region in case of three sturgeon species that inhabit the North-western of Black Sea and migrate for reproduction in the Lower Danube. Beside these sequences, we used previously published sequences from sturgeon individuals sampled in the Black Sea, Azov Sea and Caspian Sea. We determined the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation, conducted a Population Aggregation Analysis (PAA) and inferred an intraspecific molecular phylogeny and haplotype network. The results indicated a low level of genetic differentiation between the geographically designated subspecies and did not support a significant divergence or reciprocal monophyly between them. Our results confirm previous genetic studies with smaller samples sizes, but additional analyses including nuclear markers should be conducted for proper recommendations aiming at the development of conservation programs. PMID:25249783

  17. Experimental Investigation of Molecular Species Formation in Metal Plasmas During Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radousky, H.; Crowhurst, J.; Rose, T.; Armstrong, M.; Stavrou, E.; Zaug, J.; Weisz, D.; Azer, M.; Finko, M.; Curreli, D.

    2016-10-01

    Atomic and molecular spectra on metal plasmas generated by laser ablation have been measured using single, nominally 6-7 ns pulses at 1064 nm, and with energies less than 50 mJ. The primary goal for these studies is to constrain the physical and chemical mechanisms that control the distribution of radionuclides in fallout after a nuclear detonation. In this work, laser emission spectroscopy was used to obtain in situdata for vapor phase molecular species as they form in a controlled oxygen atmosphere for a variety of metals such as Fe, Al, as well as preliminary results for U. In particular, the ablation plumes created from these metals have been imaged with a resolution of 10 ns, and it is possible to observe the expansion of the plume out to 0.5 us. These data serve as one set of inputs for a semi-empirical model to describe the chemical fractionation of uranium during fallout formation. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This project was sponsored by the Department of the Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, under Grant Number HDTRA1-16-1-0020.

  18. Studies for the loss of atomic and molecular species from Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    The general objective of this project is to advance theoretical understanding of Io's atmosphere and how various atomic and molecular species are lost from this atmosphere and are distributed in the circumplanetary environment of Jupiter. The major task for the University of Michigan portion of this work is the generalization of the Io sodium cloud model to simulate the ion-precursor of sodium that is the apparent source of the fast sodium jet observed by Schneider et al. (1991). The goal is a quantitative test of the molecular ion hypothesis with a model that is comparable to a general sodium cloud model published previously. A detailed comparison of observations with such a model will help to probe the feasibility of such a source and to examine the rates and scale lengths associated with the decay of the ion precursor so as to possibly uncover the identity of the parent ion. Another important task to be performed at Michigan is more support of AER in the general area of modeling the Na and SO2-family clouds.

  19. Capturing the transient species at the electrode–electrolyte interface by in situ dynamic molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jiachao; Zhou, Yufan; Hua, Xin; Liu, Songqin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical interface between the solid electrode and liquid electrolyte has long been studied because of its importance in electrical energy storage, material synthesis, catalysis, and energy conversions.1 However, such interfaces are complex and extremely difficult to observe directly and are poorly under-stood due to lack of true in situ tools.2 Although electrochemical techniques have been widely used to investigate such interfaces, they are based on macroscopic models or current changes that could not provide direct ionic and molecular information of the interfacial structure. Many in situ and ex situ spectroscopy and microscopy techniques have been used to study the solid–liquid (s–l) interface.3,4 In situ TEM in sealed liquid cells has notably become a popular choice to provide structural information of s–l at the atomic level.5,6 However, real-time spatial mapping of the ionic and molecular intermediate species at the dynamic inter-face still remains a key challenge.

  20. Enhanced understanding of predator-prey relationships using molecular methods to identify predator species, individual and sex.

    PubMed

    Mumma, Matthew A; Soulliere, Colleen E; Mahoney, Shane P; Waits, Lisette P

    2014-01-01

    Predator species identification is an important step in understanding predator-prey interactions, but predator identifications using kill site observations are often unreliable. We used molecular tools to analyse predator saliva, scat and hair from caribou calf kills in Newfoundland, Canada to identify the predator species, individual and sex. We sampled DNA from 32 carcasses using cotton swabs to collect predator saliva. We used fragment length analysis and sequencing of mitochondrial DNA to distinguish between coyote, black bear, Canada lynx and red fox and used nuclear DNA microsatellite analysis to identify individuals. We compared predator species detected using molecular tools to those assigned via field observations at each kill. We identified a predator species at 94% of carcasses using molecular methods, while observational methods assigned a predator species to 62.5% of kills. Molecular methods attributed 66.7% of kills to coyote and 33.3% to black bear, while observations assigned 40%, 45%, 10% and 5% to coyote, bear, lynx and fox, respectively. Individual identification was successful at 70% of kills where a predator species was identified. Only one individual was identified at each kill, but some individuals were found at multiple kills. Predator sex was predominantly male. We demonstrate the first large-scale evaluation of predator species, individual and sex identification using molecular techniques to extract DNA from swabs of wild prey carcasses. Our results indicate that kill site swabs (i) can be highly successful in identifying the predator species and individual responsible; and (ii) serve to inform and complement traditional methods.

  1. Docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species of glycerophospholipids from frog retinal rod outer segments show different rates of biosynthesis and turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, K.; Wiegand, R.D.; Anderson, R.E.

    1988-12-13

    The authors have studied the de novo synthesis and subsequent turnover of major docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species in frog rod outer segment (ROS) phospholipids following intravitreal injection of (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol. On selected days after injection, ROS were prepared and phospholipids extracted. Phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylserine (PS) were isolated and converted to diradylglycerols with phospholipase C. Diradylglycerols were derivatized with benzoic anhydride and resolve into diacylglycerobenzoates and ether-linked glycerobenzoates. The diacylglycerobenzoates were fractionated into molecular species by HPLC, quantitated, and counted for radioactivity. Label was incorporated into ROS phospholipids by day 1 and was followed up through the eighth day. The dipolyenoic species 22:6-22:6 from PC showed 1 3-5 times higher radiospecific activity than the same species from either PE or PS. The rate of decline was determined by calculating the half-life of each molecular species, which was used as a measure of the turnover of the species. The percent distribution of radioactivity in the molecular species of PC and PE was quite different from the relative mass distribution at day 1. However, percent dpm approached the mole percent by 31 days. In PS, percent dpm and mole percent were the same at all time points. These results indicate that the molecular species composition of PC and PE in frog retinal ROS is determined by a combination of factors, which include rate of synthesis, rate of degradation, and selective interconversions. In contrast, PS composition appears to be determined at the time of synthesis.

  2. Trace species detection: Spectroscopy and molecular energy transfer at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    Monitoring the concentration of trace species such as atomic and molecular free radicals is essential in forming predictive models of combustion processes. LIF-based techniques have the necessary sensitivity for concentration and temperature measurements but have limited accuracy due to collisional quenching in combustion applications. The goal of this program is to use spectroscopic and kinetic measurements to quantify nonradiative and collisional effects on LIF signals and to develop new background-free alternatives to LIF. The authors have measured the natural linewidth of several OH A-X (3,0) rotational transitions to determine predissociation lifetimes in the upper state, which were presumed to be short compared to quenching lifetimes, and as a result, quantitative predictions about the applicability of predissociation fluorescence methods at high pressures are made. The authors are investigating collisional energy transfer in the A-state of NO. Quenching rates which enable direct corrections to NO LIF quantum yields at high temperature were calculations. These quenching rates are now being used in studies of turbulence/chemistry interactions. The authors have measured the electric dipole moment {mu} of excited-state NO using Stark quantum-beat spectroscopy. {mu} is an essential input to a harpoon model which predicts quenching efficiencies for NO (A) by a variety of combustion-related species. The authors are developing new coherent multiphoton techniques for measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration in laboratory flames to avoid the quenching problems associated with previous multiphoton LIF schemes.

  3. Studies for the Loss of Atomic and Molecular Species from Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.

    1997-01-01

    The general objective of this project is to advance our theoretical understanding of Io's atmosphere by studying how various atomic and molecular species are lost from this atmosphere and are distributed near the satellite and in the circumplanetary environment of Jupiter. The project is divided into well-defined studies described for the likely dominant atmospheric gases involving species of the SO2 family (SO2, SO, 02, 0, S) and for the trace atmospheric gas atomic sodium. The relative abundance of the members of the S02 family and Na (and its parent Na(x)) at the satellite exobase and their relative spatial densities beyond in the extended corona of lo are not well known but will depend upon a number of factors including the upward transport rate of gases from below, the velocity distribution and corresponding escape rate of gases at the exobase, and the operative magnetospheric/solar-photon driven chemistry for the different gases. This question of relative abundance will be studied in this project.

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of ligand- and species-specificity of amphibian estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Taniguchi, Ena; Urushitani, Hiroshi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Takase, Minoru; Kubokawa, Kaoru; Tooi, Osamu; Oka, Tomohiro; Santo, Noriaki; Myburgh, Jan; Matsuno, Akira; Iguchi, Taisen

    2010-09-01

    Estrogens are essential for normal reproductive activity in both males and females as well as for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage in most vertebrates. To understand the molecular mechanisms of estrogen action and to evaluate estrogen receptor ligand interactions in amphibians, we isolated cDNAs encoding the estrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) from the Japanese firebelly newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster), Tokyo salamander (Hynobius tokyoensis), axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), and Raucous toad (Bufo rangeri). Full-length amphibian ER cDNAs were obtained using 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The predicted amino acid sequences of these amphibian ERs showed a high degree of amino acid sequence identity (over 70%) to each other. We analyzed the relationships of these amphibian ER sequences to other vertebrate ER sequences by constructing a phylogenetic tree. We verified that these were bona fide estrogen receptors using receptor dependent reporter gene assays. We analyzed the effects of natural estrogens, ethinylestradiol, and DDT and its metabolites on the transactivation of the four amphibian species listed above, and Xenopus tropicalis ERs and found that there were species-specific differences in the sensitivity of these ERs to hormones and environmental chemicals. These findings will expand our knowledge of endocrine-disrupting events in amphibians.

  5. Molecular phylogeny of the genus Lepidophthalmus (Decapoda, Callianassidae), with re-examination of its species composition.

    PubMed

    Robles, Rafael; Felder, Darryl L

    2015-09-23

    Ghost shrimps (Decapoda: Callianassidae) are common estuarine and marine burrowing organisms of tropical to temperate waters, typically found in intertidal to shallow subtidal habitats. Except for an abbreviated planktonic larval phase, most callianassids live as obligate burrowers and appear to depend on the burrow for shelter, reproduction, and feeding. Recent studies have shown the genus Lepidophthalmus, a group largely restricted to estuaries and river mouths, to be surprisingly speciose, but relationships among these taxa and driving forces for their separation remain poorly understood. We include fifteen described species of Lepidophthalmus in a molecular phylogenetic analysis based upon sequence analyses of the 16S and 12S mitochondrial genes. Our findings clarify the monophyletic membership of the genus and confirm postulated species separations. We reconfirm validity of Lepidophthalmus eiseni, reject two recently proposed new genera for selected members of Lepidophthalmus, and define ecologically and morphologically informative clades among congeners. Limited capability for larval dispersal and regional biogeographic history could well account for high diversity and regional endemism observed within the genus. Biogeographic scenarios, including continental drift, closure of the Panamanian Isthmus, and post-glacial dispersals, are invoked to account for proposed reconstructions of historical relationships.

  6. Molecular Characterization of Leishmania Species Isolated from Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M.; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Bin Shuaib, Naemah O. M.; Azazy, Ahmed A.; Mahmud, Rohela

    2010-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected tropical disease endemic in the tropics and subtropics with a global yearly incidence of 1.5 million. Although CL is the most common form of leishmaniasis, which is responsible for 60% of DALYs lost due to tropical-cluster diseases prevalent in Yemen, available information is very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted to determine the molecular characterization of Leishmania species isolated from human cutaneous lesions in Yemen. Dermal scrapes were collected and examined for Leishmania amastigotes using the Giemsa staining technique. Amplification of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1(ITS-1) gene was carried out using nested PCR and subsequent sequencing. The sequences from Leishmania isolates were subjected to phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods. The trees identified Leishmania tropica from 16 isolates which were represented by two sequence types. Conclusions/Significance The predominance of the anthroponotic species (i.e. L. tropica) indicates the probability of anthroponotic transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Yemen. These findings will help public health authorities to build an effective control strategy taking into consideration person–to-person transmission as the main dynamic of transmission of CL. PMID:20862227

  7. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Papionina using concatenation and species tree methods.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Elaine E; Steiper, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    The Papionina is a geographically widespread subtribe of African cercopithecid monkeys whose evolutionary history is of particular interest to anthropologists. The phylogenetic relationships among arboreal mangabeys (Lophocebus), baboons (Papio), and geladas (Theropithecus) remain unresolved. Molecular phylogenetic analyses have revealed marked gene tree incongruence for these taxa, and several recent concatenated phylogenetic analyses of multilocus datasets have supported different phylogenetic hypotheses. To address this issue, we investigated the phylogeny of the Lophocebus + Papio + Theropithecus group using concatenation methods, as well as alternative methods that incorporate gene tree heterogeneity to estimate a 'species tree.' Our compiled DNA sequence dataset was ∼56 kb pairs long and included 57 independent partitions. All analyses of concatenated alignments strongly supported a Lophocebus + Papio clade and a basal position for Theropithecus. The Bayesian concordance analysis supported the same phylogeny. A coalescent-based Bayesian method resulted in a very poorly resolved species tree. The topological agreement between concatenation and the Bayesian concordance analysis offers considerable support for a Lophocebus + Papio clade as the dominant relationship across the genome. However, the results of the Bayesian concordance analysis indicate that almost half the genome has an alternative history. As such, our results offer a well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis for the Papio/Lophocebus/Theropithecus trichotomy, while at the same time providing evidence for a complex evolutionary history that likely includes hybridization among lineages.

  8. First flowering hybrid between autotrophic and mycoheterotrophic plant species: breakthrough in molecular biology of mycoheterotrophy.

    PubMed

    Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Miyoshi, Kazumitsu; Tsutsumi, Chie; Yukawa, Tomohisa

    2014-03-01

    Among land plants, which generally exhibit autotrophy through photosynthesis, about 880 species are mycoheterotrophs, dependent on mycorrhizal fungi for their carbon supply. Shifts in nutritional mode from autotrophy to mycoheterotrophy are usually accompanied by evolution of various combinations of characters related to structure and physiology, e.g., loss of foliage leaves and roots, reduction in seed size, degradation of plastid genome, and changes in mycorrhizal association and pollination strategy. However, the patterns and processes involved in such alterations are generally unknown. Hybrids between autotrophic and mycoheterotrophic plants may provide a breakthrough in molecular studies on the evolution of mycoheterotrophy. We have produced the first hybrid between autotrophic and mycoheterotrophic plant species using the orchid group Cymbidium. The autotrophic Cymbidium ensifolium subsp. haematodes and mycoheterotrophic C. macrorhizon were artificially pollinated, and aseptic germination of the hybrid seeds obtained was promoted by sonication. In vitro flowering was observed five years after seed sowing. Development of foliage leaves, an important character for photosynthesis, segregated in the first generation; that is, some individuals only developed scale leaves on the rhizome and flowering stems. However, all of the flowering plants formed roots, which is identical to the maternal parent.

  9. Molecular species delimitation methods and population genetics data reveal extensive lineage diversity and cryptic species in Aglaopheniidae (Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Postaire, Bautisse; Magalon, Hélène; Bourmaud, Chloé A-F; Bruggemann, J Henrich

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive inventory of global biodiversity would be greatly improved by automating methods for species delimitation. The Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery method, the Poisson tree processes algorithm and the Generalized mixed Yule-coalescent model have been proposed as means of increasing the rate of biodiversity description using single locus data. We applied these methods to explore the diversity within the Aglaopheniidae, a hydrozoan family with many species widely distributed across tropical and temperate oceans. Our analyses revealed widespread cryptic diversity in this family, almost half of the morpho-species presenting several independent evolutionary lineages, as well as support for cases of synonymy. For two common species of this family, Lytocarpia brevirostris and Macrorhynchia phoenicea, we compared the outputs to clustering analyses based on microsatellite data and to nuclear gene phylogenies. For L. brevirostris, microsatellite data were congruent with results of the species delimitation methods, revealing the existence of two cryptic species with Indo-Pacific distribution. For M. phoenicea, all analyses confirmed the presence of two cryptic species within the South-Western Indian Ocean. Our study suggests that the diversity of Aglaopheniidae might be much higher than assumed, likely related to low dispersal capacities. Sequence-based species delimitation methods seem highly valuable to reveal cryptic diversity in hydrozoans; their application in an integrative framework will be very useful in describing the phyletic diversity of these organisms.

  10. Molecular detection and species identification of Enterocytozoon bieneusi isolated from immunocompetent Orang Asli in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ashikin, Azah; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Moktar, Norhayati; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul

    2017-04-01

    Most studies of opportunistic infections focus on immunocompromised patients. However, there is a lack of information on microsporidiosis in healthy people (immunocompetent) worldwide. This study aimed to detect and identify microsporidia species in immunocompetent Orang Asli living in Pahang, Malaysia. Orang Asli is a collective term for a group of indigenous people that usually reside in the interior regions of Peninsular Malaysia. They comprise about 0.7% of the total population in Malaysia and 76% of them lived below the poverty line i.e., poor housing conditions with the lack of access to safe drinking water and adequate sanitation, contaminated environment, high illiteracy rate and unhygienic practices by these people. Stool samples were collected from 209 Orang Asli and analyzed for detecting the presence of Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis by polymerase chain reaction assay targeting small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. E. bieneusi was detected in 8 individuals (3.83%). This infection was commonly found in males than females (5.2% vs. 2.7%). All infected Orang Asli were adults, with a mean age of 44years. Diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms were reported in one case (12.5%) among individuals infected with this species. These findings clearly show that exposure to E. bieneusi may actually be common than reported. The accurate detection and identification of microsporidian species by molecular technique will improve therapy, clinical manifestations and prognosis of this infection, as no antiparasitic therapy has been approved for E. bieneusi. It is hoped that these findings will allow the formulation of better health management and disease prevention advisories, and improvement in the standards of health in similar communities.

  11. Molecular cloning of doublesex genes of four cladocera (water flea) species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The gene doublesex (dsx) is known as a key factor regulating genetic sex determination in many organisms. We previously identified two dsx genes (DapmaDsx1 and DapmaDsx2) from a freshwater branchiopod crustacean, Daphnia magna, which are expressed in males but not in females. D. magna produces males by parthenogenesis in response to environmental cues (environmental sex determination) and we showed that DapmaDsx1 expression during embryonic stages is responsible for the male trait development. The D. magna dsx genes are thought to have arisen by a cladoceran-specific duplication; therefore, to investigate evolutionary conservation of sex specific expression of dsx genes and to further assess their functions in the environmental sex determination, we searched for dsx homologs in four closely related cladoceran species. Results We identified homologs of both dsx genes from, D. pulex, D. galeata, and Ceriodaphnia dubia, yet only a single dsx gene was found from Moina macrocopa. The deduced amino acid sequences of all 9 dsx homologs contained the DM and oligomerization domains, which are characteristic for all arthropod DSX family members. Molecular phylogenetic analysis suggested that the dsx gene duplication likely occurred prior to the divergence of these cladoceran species, because that of the giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon is rooted ancestrally to both DSX1 and DSX2 of cladocerans. Therefore, this result also suggested that M. macrocopa lost dsx2 gene secondarily. Furthermore, all dsx genes identified in this study showed male-biased expression levels, yet only half of the putative 5’ upstream regulatory elements are preserved in D. magna and D. pulex. Conclusions The all dsx genes of five cladoceran species examined had similar amino acid structure containing highly conserved DM and oligomerization domains, and exhibited sexually dimorphic expression patterns, suggesting that these genes may have similar functions for environmental sex

  12. Molecular diagnostic for boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) based on amplification of three species-specific microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Seok; Szendrei, Zsofia; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Mulder, Phillip G; Sappington, Thomas W

    2009-04-01

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of cultivated cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., in the Americas, and reinfestation of zones from which they have been eradicated is of perpetual concern. Extensive arrays of pheromone traps monitor for reintroductions, but occasionally the traps collect nontarget weevils that can be misidentified by scouts. For example, the congeneric pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano, and other superficially similar weevils are attracted to components of the boll weevil lure or trap color. Although morphologically distinguishable by trained personnel, the potential for misidentification is compounded when captured weevils are dismembered or partially consumed by ants or ground beetles that sometimes feed on them in the traps. Because misidentification can have expensive consequences, a molecular diagnostic tool would be of great value to eradication managers. We demonstrate that a cocktail of three primer pairs in a single polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplify species-specific microsatellites that unambiguously distinguish the boll weevil from three other weevil species tested, including pepper weevil; cranberry weevil, Anthonomus eugenii musculus Say; and pecan weevil, Curculio caryae Horn. However, it does not distinguish the boll weevil from the subspecific "thurberia" weevil. A universal internal transcribed spacer primer pair included in the cocktail cross-amplifies DNA from all species, serving as a positive control. Furthermore, the diagnostic primers amplified the target microsatellites from various boll weevil adult body parts, indicating that the PCR technology using the primer cocktail is sensitive enough to positively identify a boll weevil even when the body is partly degraded.

  13. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of several Heliconia species in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Isaza, L; Marulanda, M L; López, A M

    2012-12-19

    Researchers have classified the Heliconia genus as a group of highly variable and diverse plants. Species and cultivars are visually differentiated primarily on the basis of the color and size of inflorescence bracts. At taxonomic level, flower type (parabolic, sigmoid, or erect) and size are taken into account. The vast morphological diversity of heliconias at intra-specific, intra-population, and varietal levels in central-west Colombia prompted the present study. We characterized the genetic variability of 67 genotypes of cultivated heliconias belonging to Heliconia caribaea Lamarck, H. bihai (L.) L., H. orthotricha L. Andersson, H. stricta Huber, H. wagneriana Petersen, and H. psittacorum L. f., as well as that of several interspecific hybrids such as H. psittacorum L. f. x H. spathocircinata Aristeguieta and H. caribaea Lamarck x H. bihai (L.) L. We also created an approximation to their phylogenetic analysis. Molecular analysis using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers revealed a total of 170 bands. Two large, well-defined groups resulted: the first grouped cultivars of the very closely related H. caribaea and H. bihai species with those of H. orthotricha and H. psittacorum, and the second grouped H. stricta and H. wagneriana cultivars. The lowest percentage of polymorphism was found in H. psittacorum (17.65%) and the highest was in H. stricta (55.88%). Using AFLP, phylogenetic analysis of the species studied revealed the monophyletic origin of the Heliconiaceae family, and identified the Heliconia subgenus as monophyletic while providing evidence of the polyphyletic origin of several representatives of the Stenochlamys subgenus.

  14. Molecular determinants of the species selectivity of neurokinin type 1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pradier, L; Habert-Ortoli, E; Emile, L; Le Guern, J; Loquet, I; Bock, M D; Clot, J; Mercken, L; Fardin, V; Garret, C

    1995-02-01

    Most nonpeptide neurokinin (NK)1 antagonists display a marked difference in affinity for rat versus human NK1 receptors. The molecular basis for the species selectivity of RP67580 and CP96,345 has been previously addressed [J. Biol. Chem. 267:25668-25671 (1992); J. Biol. Chem. 268:2319-2323 (1993)]. We are extending these previous results to additional NK1 antagonists, which are members of different chemical families. Included is a new perhydroisoindolol, RPR100893, which unlike its parent compound (RP67580) is human receptor selective. Chimeric rat/human NK1 receptors, as well as rat and human mutant NK1 receptors, were constructed and expressed in COS-1 cells, and affinities for substance P and the various antagonists were determined in binding studies. With human receptor-selective antagonists, the rat R290(S-->I) mutation was the most effective in increasing antagonist affinity (from 7- to 23-fold). Combination with the R116(L-->V) mutation led to an additional increase in affinity for trans-4-hydroxy-1-(1H-indol-3-ylcarbonyl)-L-prolyl-N- methyl-N-(phenylmethyl)-L-tyrosineamide (a derivative of FK888) and to nearly full human receptor affinity for RPR100893 and (+/-)-CP99,994. Based on the gains in affinities, these results confirm and extend the role of residues 116 and 290 of the NK1 receptor in the species selectivity of these three new human receptor-selective NK1 antagonists. In comparison, the affinity of RP67580, the least selective molecule, was most affected by changes at position 116, and combination with mutations at either position 97 (V-->E) or position 290 led to the human receptor phenotype. For the heterosteroid KAN610857, modifications of the rat receptor at positions 97 and 290, and to a lesser degree position 116, were the most effective in reducing affinity. Two double-mutants [R(97,290) and R(116,290)], although different from those identified for RP67580, also displayed human receptor-like affinity. Therefore, the molecular determinants of

  15. Molecular systematics of Serrasalmidae: Deciphering the identities of piranha species and unraveling their evolutionary histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, B.; Nico, L.G.; Osentoski, M.; Jelks, H.L.; Collins, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Piranhas and their relatives have proven to be a challenging group from a systematic perspective, with difficulties in identification of species, linking of juveniles to adults, diagnosis of genera, and recognition of higher-level clades. In this study we add new molecular data consisting of three mitochondrial regions for museum vouchered and photo-documented representatives of the Serrasalmidae. These are combined with existing serrasalmid sequences in GenBank to address species and higher-level questions within the piranhas using parsimony and Bayesian methods. We found robust support for the monophyly of Serrasalmus manueli, but not for Serrasalmus gouldingi when GenBank specimens identified as S. gouldingi were included in the analysis. "Serrasalmus gouldingi" sequences in GenBank may, however, be misidentified. Linking of juveniles to adults of the same species was greatly facilitated by the addition of sequence data. Based on our sampling and identifications, our data robustly reject the monophyly of the genera Serrasalmus and Pristobrycon. We found evidence for a well-supported clade comprised of Serrasalmus, Pygocentrus, and Pristobrycon (in part). This clade was robustly supported in separate and combined analyses of gene regions, and was also supported by a unique molecular character, the loss of a tandem repeat in the control region. Analysis of specimens and a literature review suggest this clade is also characterized by the presence of a pre-anal spine and ectopterygoid teeth. A persistent polytomy at the base of this clade was dated using an independent calibration as 1.8 million years old, corresponding to the beginning of the Pleistocene Epoch, and suggesting an origin for this clade more recent than dates cited in the recent literature. The sister group to this clade is also robustly supported, and consists of Catoprion, Pygopristis, and Pristobrycon striolatus. If the term piranha is to refer to a monophyletic clade, it should be restricted to

  16. Quantification of triacylglycerol molecular species in cocoa butter using high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with nano quantity analyte detector.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Fumiaki; Nagai, Toshiharu; Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Mizobe, Hoyo; Kojima, Koichi; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) molecular species were quantified through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a nano quantity analyte detector (NQAD). TAG standard compounds, i.e., 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoylglycerol (β-POP), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-stearoyl-rac-glycerol (β-POS), and 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoylglycerol (β-SOS), and natural cocoa butter were used for analyses. NQAD gave the first order equation passing through the origin for all TAG standard compounds. TAG molecular species in cocoa butter were quantified using the calibration curves and the obtained values were almost the same as the reported ones of conventional cocoa butter. Furthermore, a recovery test was also carried out and the values were almost 100. Therefore, HPLC-NQAD can be successfully used for the quantification of TAG molecular species in natural fats and oils.

  17. Molecular evolution and phylogenetic analysis of genes related to cotton fibers development from wild and domesticated cotton species in Gossypium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huayu; Lv, Junhong; Zhao, Liang; Tong, Xiangchao; Zhou, Baoliang; Zhang, Tianzhen; Guo, Wangzhen

    2012-06-01

    The domestication of both diploid and tetraploid cotton species was carried out for fiber utilization. To understand the origin and domestication of fibers, 18 genes related to fiber development were individually cloned and sequenced from 22 different cotton species. Their structures, phylogenetic relationship and molecular evolution were further studied. In the orthologous and homeologous loci of the 18 genes, the sequence and structure of 72.22% were conserved and 27.78% were diverse. Tree topologies constructed based on the combined sequences showed that all 13 D-genome species were congruent with Fryxell's subsection taxonomy, the A- and D-subgenomes independently evolved in the allopolyploid after polyploid formation, and Gossypium raimondii had the closest relationship with all allotetraploids of D-subgenomes. The molecular evolutionary rates revealed approximately equivalent rates among different D-genome species, and purifying selection acted on all genes in the wild D-genome species. Among orthologs and homeologs, the D-subgenomes had higher evolutionary rates than the A-subgenomes in tetraploid cotton species, and the cultivars had higher evolutionary rates than either the semi-domesticated or wild species. Our study revealed that human domestication altered the molecular evolutionary pattern of genes related to fiber development, and Gossypium hirsutum endured greater selective pressures than Gossypium barbadense during the domestication process.

  18. Species Boundaries and Host Range of Tortoise Mites (Uropodoidea) Phoretic on Bark Beetles (Scolytinae), Using Morphometric and Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Knee, Wayne; Beaulieu, Frédéric; Skevington, Jeffrey H.; Kelso, Scott; Cognato, Anthony I.; Forbes, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the ecology and evolutionary history of symbionts and their hosts requires accurate taxonomic knowledge, including clear species boundaries and phylogenies. Tortoise mites (Mesostigmata: Uropodoidea) are among the most diverse arthropod associates of bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae), but their taxonomy and host associations are largely unstudied. We tested the hypotheses that (1) morphologically defined species are supported by molecular data, and that (2) bark beetle uropodoids with a broad host range comprise cryptic species. To do so, we assessed the species boundaries of uropodoid mites collected from 51 host species, across 11 countries and 103 sites, using morphometric data as well as partial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA (28S). Overall, morphologically defined species were confirmed by molecular datasets, with a few exceptions. Twenty-nine of the 36 uropodoid species (Trichouropoda, Nenteria and Uroobovella) collected in this study had narrow host ranges, while seven species had putative broad host ranges. In all but one species, U. orri, our data supported the existence of these host generalists, which contrasts with the typical finding that widespread generalists are actually complexes of cryptic specialists. PMID:23071768

  19. The genome as a life-history character: why rate of molecular evolution varies between mammal species

    PubMed Central

    Bromham, Lindell

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequences evolve at different rates in different species. This rate variation has been most closely examined in mammals, revealing a large number of characteristics that can shape the rate of molecular evolution. Many of these traits are part of the mammalian life-history continuum: species with small body size, rapid generation turnover, high fecundity and short lifespans tend to have faster rates of molecular evolution. In addition, rate of molecular evolution in mammals might be influenced by behaviour (such as mating system), ecological factors (such as range restriction) and evolutionary history (such as diversification rate). I discuss the evidence for these patterns of rate variation, and the possible explanations of these correlations. I also consider the impact of these systematic patterns of rate variation on the reliability of the molecular date estimates that have been used to suggest a Cretaceous radiation of modern mammals, before the final extinction of the dinosaurs. PMID:21807731

  20. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  1. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Less-Frequent Fusarium Species of Clinical Interest: Correlation between Morphological and Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility▿

    PubMed Central

    Azor, Mónica; Gené, Josepa; Cano, Josep; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Venkatapathy, Narendran; Guarro, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Forty-eight Fusarium isolates morphologically identified as belonging to seven species of clinical interest (i.e., Fusarium chlamydosporum, Fusarium dimerum, Fusarium incarnatum, Fusarium napiforme, Fusarium nygamai, Fusarium proliferatum, and Fusarium sacchari) were characterized molecularly by the analysis of the sequences of the TUB region of the β-tubulin gene. F. chlamydosporum and F. dimerum were the most genetically heterogeneous species. A high degree of correlation between the morphological and molecular identification was shown among the isolates studied. A table with the key morphological features for the identification of these Fusarium species is provided. The antifungal susceptibilities of the Fusarium isolates to 11 antifungal drugs were tested; terbinafine was the most active drug against all the species tested with the exception of F. incarnatum, for which amphotericin B was the most active. PMID:19321723

  3. THE TRANSITION OF THE 37-kDa LAMININ RECEPTOR (RPSA) TO HIGHER MOLECULAR WEIGHT SPECIES: SUMOylation OR ARTIFACT?

    PubMed Central

    DIGIACOMO, VINCENT; GANDO, IVAN A.; VENTICINQUE, LISA; HURTADO, ALICIA; MERUELO, DANIEL

    2017-01-01

    The 37-kDa laminin receptor (37LRP or RPSA) is a remarkable, multifaceted protein that functions in processes ranging from matrix adhesion to ribosome biogenesis. Its ability to engage extracellular laminin is further thought to contribute to cellular migration and invasion. Most commonly associated with metastatic cancer, RPSA is also increasingly found to be important in other pathologies, including microbial infection, neurodegenerative disease and developmental malformations. Importantly, it is thought to have higher molecular weight forms, including a 67-kDa species (67LR), the expression of which is linked to strong laminin binding and metastatic behavior. The composition of these larger forms has remained elusive and controversial. Homo- and heterodimerization have been proposed as events capable of building the larger species from the monomeric 37-kDa precursor, but solid evidence is lacking. Here, we present data suggesting that higher molecular weight species require SUMOylation to form. We also comment on the difficulty of isolating larger RPSA species for unambiguous identification and demonstrate that cell lines stably expressing tagged RPSA for long periods of time fail to produce tagged higher molecular weight RPSA. It is possible that higher molecular weight species like 67LR are not derived from RPSA. PMID:26146125

  4. Distribution of plasma phosphatidylcholine molecular species in rabbits fed fish oil is modulated by dietary n-6 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Koba, K; Horrobin, D F; DeMarco, A C; Ni, I H; Huang, Y S

    1995-12-01

    The present study examined the distribution of plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecular species in rabbits fed a chow diet supplemented with fish oil (FO) in combination with either hydrogenated coconut oil or the n-6 fatty acid-rich evening primrose oil (EPO) for 4 weeks. Significant proportions of plasma PC molecular species contained long-chain n-3 fatty acids. Addition of EPO to the FO supplemented diet increased the incorporation of n-6 fatty acids into plasma PC molecules; it also raised the proportions of 16:0-18:2, n-6, 18:1-18:2, n-6, 18:2, n-6-18:2, n-6, and 16:0-20:4, n-6. The increase of n-6 fatty acid-containing PC was at the expense of n-3 fatty acid containing PC species. However, feeding n-6 fatty acids did not affect the distribution of PC molecular species based on total carbon chain length. The most interesting observation was that dietary suplementation with EPO, raised the ratio of 22:6, n-3-containing to 20:5, n-3-containing molecular species, suggesting an enhanced conversion of 20:5, n-3 to 22:6, n-3.

  5. Molecular phylogeny and taxonomy of the Epictia goudotii Species complex (Serpentes: Leptotyphlopidae: Epictinae) in Middle America and northern South America

    PubMed Central

    McCranie, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Here we review the systematics of the threadsnakes of the Epictia goudotii Species complex in Middle and northern South America using external morphology and molecular data. Two species, Epictia goudotii and E. magnamaculata, are currently recognized from that region, but we provide evidence for recognizing, as species, three other nominal forms usually treated as subspecies of E. goudotii: E. ater, E. bakewelli, and E. phenops. Thus, together with E. columbi (Bahamas), we recognize six species in the Epictia goudotii Species complex. Because E. albifrons from northern South America has been confused with E. goudotii in the past, we also briefly discuss the taxonomic status of that species and its apparent close relative E. tenella, which are not members of the E. goudotii complex. PMID:26788430

  6. A new species of Alopoglossus lizard (Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae) from the tropical Andes, with a molecular phylogeny of the genus.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Lobos, Simón E

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new species of Alopoglossus from the Pacific slopes of the Andes in northern Ecuador based on morphological and molecular evidence. The new species differs most significantly from all other congeners in having a double longitudinal row of widened gular scales, lanceolate dorsal scales in transverse rows, 29-32 dorsal scales in a transverse row at midbody, and 4 longitudinal rows of ventrals at midbody. It is most similar in morphology to A. festae, the only species of Alopoglossus currently recognized in western Ecuador. We analyze the phylogenetic relationships among species of Alopoglossus based on the mitochondrial gene ND4. Cis-Andean [east of the Andes] and Trans-Andean [west of the Andes] species are nested in two separate clades, suggesting that the uplift of these mountains had an important effect in the diversification of Alopoglossus. In addition, we present an updated key to the species of Alopoglossus.

  7. Method of coating aluminum substrates with solid adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.R.; McKeon, M.J.; Cohen, A.P.; Behan, A.S.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a method of coating a surface of an aluminum substrate with a layer of solid adsorbent selected from the group consisting of crystalline molecular sieves, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof. It comprises heating the surface in an oxygen containing atmosphere to a temperature of at least about 200{degrees} C and sufficient to enable bonding of the solid adsorbent to the surface, contacting the heated surface with a slurry comprising the adsorbent and a binder selected from the group consisting of volclay, kaolin, sepiolite, attapulgite, silicates, aluminates, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof in a suspending liquid to form a slurry-coated surface, and removing sufficient liquid to form an adsorbent coating thereon.

  8. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  9. New molecular phylogeny of Lucinidae: increased taxon base with focus on tropical Western Atlantic species (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Taylor, John D; Glover, Emily A; Smith, Lisa; Ikebe, Chiho; Williams, Suzanne T

    2016-11-23

    A new molecular phylogeny of the Lucinidae using 18S and 28S rRNA and cytochrome b genes includes many species from the tropical Western Atlantic as well as additional taxa from the Indo-West Pacific. This study provides a phylogenetic framework for a new taxonomy of tropical Western Atlantic lucinids. The analysis confirmed five major clades-Pegophyseminae, Leucosphaerinae, Myrteinae, Codakiinae and Lucininae, with Monitilorinae and Fimbriinae represented by single species. The Leucosphaerinae are expanded and include Callucina winckworthi and the W. Atlantic Myrtina pristiphora that groups with several Indo-West Pacific Myrtina species. Within the Codakiinae two abundant species of Ctena from the Western Atlantic with similar shells are discriminated as C. orbiculata and C. imbricatula, while in the Indo-West Pacific Ctena bella is a probable species complex. The Lucininae is the most species rich and disparate subfamily with several subclades apparent. Three species of Lucina are recognized in the W. Atlantic L. aurantia, L. pensylvanica and L. roquesana. Pleurolucina groups near to Cavilinga and Lucina, while Lucinisca muricata is more closely related to the E. Pacific L. fenestrata than to the Atlantic L. nassula. A new species of Parvilucina is identified from molecular analyses having been confounded with Parvilucina pectinata but differs in ligament structure. Also, the former Parvilucina clenchi is more distant and assigned to Guyanella.

  10. Species and sex identification of the Korean goral (Nemorhaedus caudatus) by molecular analysis of non-invasive samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek Jun; Lee, Yun-Sun; An, Jung-hwa; Park, Han-Chan; Okumura, Hideo; Lee, Hang; Min, Mi-Sook

    2008-09-30

    Korean long-tailed goral (Nemorhaedus caudatus) is one of the most endangered species in South Korea. However, detailed species distribution and sex ratio data on the elusive goral are still lacking due to difficulty of identification of the species and sex in the field. The primary aim of this study was to develop an economical PCR-RFLP method to identify species using invasive or non-invasive samples from five Korean ungulates: goral (N. caudatus), roe deer (Capreolus pygargus), feral goat (Capra hircus), water deer (Hydropotes inermis) and musk deer (Moschus moschiferus). The secondary aim was to find more efficient molecular sexing techniques that may be applied to invasive or non-invasive samples of ungulate species. We successfully utilized PCR-RFLP of partial mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (376 bp) for species identification, and sex-specific amplification of ZFX/Y and AMELX/Y genes for sexing. Three species (goral, goat and water deer) showed distinctive band patterns by using three restriction enzymes (XbaI, StuI or SspI). Three different sexing primer sets (LGL331/335 for ZFX/Y gene; SE47/48 or SE47/53 for AMELX/Y gene) produced sex-specific band patterns in goral, goat and roe deer. Our results suggest that the molecular analyses of non-invasive samples might provide us with potential tools for the further genetic and ecological study of Korean goral and related species.

  11. Molecular based phylogenetic species recognition in the genus Pampus (Perciformes: Stromateidae) reveals hidden diversity in the Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Divya, P R; Mohitha, C; Rahul, G Kumar; Rajool Shanis, C P; Basheer, V S; Gopalakrishnan, A

    2017-04-01

    Pomfrets (Genus Pampus) are commercially important fishes in the Indo Pacific region. The systematics of this genus is complicated due to morphological similarities between species. The silver pomfret from Indian waters has long been considered to be Pampus argenteus. The objective of the study was to utilize the mitochondrial COI gene to establish the molecular identity of the silver pomfret distributed in Indian waters and to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among Pampus species in the world based on sequence data in the NCBI database. Seven valid Pampus species are identified in this study. The mean genetic divergence value calculated between clades representing these species was 7.9%. The mean genetic distance between the so-called Pampus argenteus from Indian waters and sequences attributed to P. argenteus from the South China Sea, where the neotype of this species was collected, was found to be greater than 12%, strongly supporting the likelihood of the Indian species being distinct. The Indian Pampus species show very close affinity to P. cinereus, with inter species differences less than 2%. The taxonomic identity of the silver pomfret in India is also discussed here, in light of molecular and morphological evidence.

  12. Chronology of the extant African elephant species and case study of the species identification of the small African elephant with the molecular phylogenetic method.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yumie; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Kihara, Ichiro; Kashiwamura, Toshihide; Sugihara, Yuj