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Sample records for adsorbed pdn clusters

  1. Thermal and adsorbate effects on the activity and morphology of size-selected Pdn/TiO2 model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, William E.; Kunkel, William A.; Roberts, F. Sloan; Kane, Matthew; Anderson, Scott L.

    2014-03-01

    Model catalysts containing size-selected Pdn (n = 1,2,4,7,10,16,20,25) deposited on rutile TiO2(110) deactivate during repeated CO oxidation temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) cycles, and the deactivation process has been probed using a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), low-energy ion scattering (ISS), temperature-dependent ion scattering (TD-ISS), annealing experiments, and temperature-programmed desorption following exposure to CO and O2 reactants. Results from such experiments suggest the cluster deactivation proceeds via an alloy-like, strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) effect that chemically modifies the clusters via electronic interactions between the supported metal atoms and Ti from the support. Threshold measurements show that this effect detrimentally affects CO-oxidation activity prior to the formation of an encapsulating overlayer by severely weakening the COPd bond strengths for binding configurations on top of the clusters. Oxidation appears to provide means of partially restoring the clusters to their initial state, but after sufficient exposure to reducing environments and elevated temperatures, all Pdn become covered by an overlayer and begin to electronically and chemically resemble freshly deposited atoms, which are completely inactive towards the probe reaction. In addition, we find evidence of oxygen spillover induced by co-adsorbed CO during TPRs for all active Pdn clusters.

  2. Influence of U doping on the growth behavior, electronic structure and magnetic properties of Pdn (n = 1-12) clusters: a first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattaraj, Debabrata; Parida, Suresh Chandra; Dash, Smruti; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2014-10-01

    The influence of U doping on the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Pdn clusters was investigated using the spin-polarized DFT including the spin-orbit coupling term. The results reveal significant alterations in the geometry of the Pdn clusters in presence of U. Unlike Pdn, where 3D structure onsets at n = 4, for UPdn-1 cluster, it is at n = 6. The energetics of Pdn and UPdn-1 clusters suggests that the incorporation of U in Pdn clusters not only improves the stability but also quenches the unusual magnetic moment of Pdn clusters. These features have been explained by the strong f-d orbitals interactions. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://http//dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2014-50080-0

  3. Molecular adsorption and metal-support interaction for transition-metal clusters in zeolites: NO adsorption on Pdn (n=1-6) clusters in mordenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grybos, Robert; Benco, Lubomir; Bučko, Tomas; Hafner, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of NO molecules on Pdn clusters of varying size (n =1-6) located in the main channel of mordenite and the interaction of the metallic clusters with the zeolitic framework were investigated using ab initio density-functional calculations under periodic boundary conditions. The supported clusters are created by binding Pdn2+ cations to the inner cavity of a deprotonated Al-exchanged zeolite with an Al/Si ratio of 1/11, such that a charge-neutral system is created. Compared to the highly symmetric structures of the gas-phase clusters, the clusters bound to the zeolitic framework undergo appreciable geometric distortions lowering their symmetry. The distortions are induced by strong interactions with "activated" framework oxygens located close to the charge-compensating Al/Si substitution sites, but the cluster forms also weaker bonds to "nonactivated" oxygen atoms. The interaction with the framework also affects the electronic and magnetic properties of the clusters. While in the gas phase all clusters (except the isolated Pd atom with a closed d10 ground state) have a paramagnetic moment of 2μB, in the zeolite clusters with two to four atoms have zero magnetic moment, while the Pd5 cluster has a magnetic moment of 2μB and for the Pd6 cluster, it is even enhanced to 4μB (but the magnetic energy differences relative to low-spin configurations are modest). Analysis of the magnetization densities shows that in all clusters with zero total moment (singlet ground state), there are sites with excess spin densities of opposite sign. The influence of the cluster-support interaction on the chemical properties of the clusters has been tested by the adsorption of NO molecules. The results demonstrate the interplay between the molecule-cluster and cluster-framework interactions, which can lead to an increase or decrease in the adsorption energy compared to NO on a gas-phase cluster. While on the gas-phase cluster adsorption in low-coordination sites (vertex or

  4. Molecular adsorption and metal-support interaction for transition-metal clusters in zeolites: NO adsorption on Pd(n) (n=1-6) clusters in mordenite.

    PubMed

    Grybos, Robert; Benco, Lubomir; Bucko, Tomas; Hafner, Jürgen

    2009-03-14

    The adsorption of NO molecules on Pd(n) clusters of varying size (n=1-6) located in the main channel of mordenite and the interaction of the metallic clusters with the zeolitic framework were investigated using ab initio density-functional calculations under periodic boundary conditions. The supported clusters are created by binding Pd(n) (2+) cations to the inner cavity of a deprotonated Al-exchanged zeolite with an Al/Si ratio of 1/11, such that a charge-neutral system is created. Compared to the highly symmetric structures of the gas-phase clusters, the clusters bound to the zeolitic framework undergo appreciable geometric distortions lowering their symmetry. The distortions are induced by strong interactions with "activated" framework oxygens located close to the charge-compensating Al/Si substitution sites, but the cluster forms also weaker bonds to "nonactivated" oxygen atoms. The interaction with the framework also affects the electronic and magnetic properties of the clusters. While in the gas phase all clusters (except the isolated Pd atom with a closed d(10) ground state) have a paramagnetic moment of 2mu(B), in the zeolite clusters with two to four atoms have zero magnetic moment, while the Pd(5) cluster has a magnetic moment of 2mu(B) and for the Pd(6) cluster, it is even enhanced to 4 mu(B) (but the magnetic energy differences relative to low-spin configurations are modest). Analysis of the magnetization densities shows that in all clusters with zero total moment (singlet ground state), there are sites with excess spin densities of opposite sign. The influence of the cluster-support interaction on the chemical properties of the clusters has been tested by the adsorption of NO molecules. The results demonstrate the interplay between the molecule-cluster and cluster-framework interactions, which can lead to an increase or decrease in the adsorption energy compared to NO on a gas-phase cluster. While on the gas-phase cluster adsorption in low

  5. A DFT Study of the Interaction of Monometallic Pdn/Ptn (n =1, 9) Clusters with γ-Al2O3(100) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Nalin; Johns, Tyne; Qi, Yue; Kim, Chang; Datye, Abhaya; Kiefer, Boris; New Mexico State University, Las Cruces Collaboration; University of New Mexico, Albuquerque Collaboration; Motors Global R&D, Warren, MI Collaboration, General

    2013-03-01

    The reduction of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions in advanced low temperature combustion engines has become more difficult for the advanced combustion systems in transportation sector. Exploration of effect of interface formation on the electronic properties of the existing platinum group materials may provide insight for the new material development that rivals platinum. In order to address the effects of the interface on the electronic properties of small Pdn and Ptn clusters (n =1-9) with a γ-Al2O3(100) support we have performed density-functional-theory (DFT) computations. The preliminary results suggest that the most favorable Pd9 binding geometry is characterized by four Pd atoms binding to both Al and O surface atoms. The average Pd-O bond length across the interface is ~ 2.2 Å, corroborating the formation of bonds. The preliminary analysis of the electronic density of states shows that the main electronic modifications occur at the Fermi energy, leading to an overall metallic behavior. We will discuss cluster size effects on the character of bonding across the interface, its stability, and electronic structure.

  6. Adsorption and Desorption of Hydrogen by Gas-Phase Palladium Clusters Revealed by In Situ Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, Masato; Kudoh, Satoshi; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen by gas-phase Pd clusters, Pdn(+), were investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The desorption processes were examined by heating the clusters that had adsorbed hydrogen at room temperature. The clusters remaining after heating were monitored by mass spectrometry as a function of temperature up to 1000 K, and the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) curve was obtained for each Pdn(+). It was found that hydrogen molecules were released from the clusters into the gas phase with increasing temperature until bare Pdn(+) was formed. The threshold energy for desorption, estimated from the TPD curve, was compared to the desorption energy calculated by using DFT, indicating that smaller Pdn(+) clusters (n ≤ 6) tended to have weakly adsorbed hydrogen molecules, whereas larger Pdn(+) clusters (n ≥ 7) had dissociatively adsorbed hydrogen atoms on the surface. Highly likely, the nonmetallic nature of the small Pd clusters prevents hydrogen molecule from adsorbing dissociatively on the surface. PMID:26043808

  7. From adsorption to condensation: the role of adsorbed molecular clusters.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubian, Sima; Zandavi, Seyed Hadi; Ward, C A

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of heptane vapour on a smooth silicon substrate with a lower temperature than the vapour is examined analytically and experimentally. An expression for the amount adsorbed under steady state conditions is derived from the molecular cluster model of the adsorbate that is similar to the one used to derive the equilibrium Zeta adsorption isotherm. The amount adsorbed in each of a series of steady experiments is measured using a UV-vis interferometer, and gives strong support to the amount predicted to be adsorbed. The cluster distribution is used to predict the subcooling temperature required for the adsorbed vapour to make a disorder-order phase transition to become an adsorbed liquid, and the subcooling temperature is found to be 2.7 ± 0.4 K. The continuum approach for predicting the thickness of the adsorbed liquid film originally developed by Nusselt is compared with that measured and is found to over-predict the thickness by three-orders of magnitude. PMID:27426944

  8. Solidification of 4He clusters adsorbed on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markić, L. Vranješ; Stipanović, P.; Bešlić, I.; Zillich, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    We determined the ground state of He4N clusters adsorbed on one side of graphene for selected cluster sizes in the range from N =20 to N =127 . For all investigated clusters variational and diffusion Monte Carlo simulations were performed at T =0 K, and in addition for a selected subset finite temperature path integral Monte Carlo. At T =0 K the liquid or solid character of each cluster was investigated by restricting the phase using corresponding importance sampling trial-wave functions. The 4He-graphene interaction was modeled as a sum of individual 4He-C interactions, where both isotropic and anisotropic models were tested; also the effect of the substrate-mediated McLachlan interaction was investigated. We have found homogeneous crystallization in models of anisotropic interactions, starting from clusters with N =26 atoms in simulations without the McLachlan interaction, and between N =37 and 61 when it is included. The atoms become increasingly delocalized as one moves from the center of the cluster to the perimeter, evidenced by the Lindemann parameter. On the other hand, in the case of the isotropic interaction model, a liquidlike structure is more favorable for all considered cluster sizes. We use a liquid-drop model to extrapolate the energy per particle to the N →∞ limit, and the results are compared with the values obtained in studies of bulk 4He on graphene. Low-temperature path integral Monte Carlo simulations are in agreement with ground-state results.

  9. Theoretical Study of Electron Scattering By Small Clusters and Adsorbates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Sheehy, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Current interest in clusters stems from their role as novel materials as well as a possible extension of cluster results to bulk systems. Experimental investigations on clusters have been carried out using laser spectroscopy, microwave spectroscopy, heavy-particle collisions, as well as electron collisions with earlier experimental work on electron attachment and ionization having been reviewed previously. Recently, Mark and coworkers studied the decay channels of cluster ions following electron impact ionization. Rauth et al. reported the formation of the superhalogen ion SF7(-) and other nonstoichiometric cluster ions in their study of electron attachment to SF6 clusters. Kresin et al. measured the absolute electron-impact depletion cross section of metal clusters Na8, Na(20), and Na(40). They found that the inelastic scattering cross section increased with cluster size and was considerably greater than the hard sphere collision cross sections. They hypothesized that electron attachment and collision-induced fragmentation were the dominant physical processes responsible for this effect. For the two smaller clusters, they also found a sharp increase in the cross section near threshold. Most theoretical studies of clusters have been devoted to their electronic structures, vibrational relaxation, and predissociation while investigations of electron scattering from clusters has been lacking. In view of this, we recently undertook an ab initio study of electron scattering from small Be clusters and BeCO. Beryllium was chosen because it is readily amenable to ab t'nitio calculations. Moreover, the electronic structure of Be clusters has been studied extensively, showing that the Be-Be bond is relatively weak in comparison with a normal chemical bond. Our investigation focuses on how the cross sections change with cluster size and geometry. The range of energy studied, 0.05 - 5.0 eV, is chosen because of the ubiquitous resonance in the low-energy scattering of Be. Hence

  10. Pressure-induced isostructural transition in PdN2

    SciTech Connect

    Aberg, D; Erhart, P; Crowhurst, J; Zaug, J M; Goncharov, A F; Sadigh, B

    2010-03-05

    We show that a synthesized Pd-N compound crystallize into the pyrite structure by comparison of experimental and calculated Raman intensities. The decreasing Raman intensities with decreasing pressure is explained by a closing of the fundamental band gap. We further discuss the experimental decomposition of this compound at 11 GPa in terms of an isostructural transition within the pyrite structure.

  11. A DFT study of arsine adsorption on palladium doped graphene: Effects of palladium cluster size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunaseth, Manaschai; Mudchimo, Tanabat; Namuangruk, Supawadee; Kungwan, Nawee; Promarak, Vinich; Jungsuttiwong, Siriporn

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have investigated the size effects of palladium (Pd) doped single-vacancy defective graphene (SDG) surface to the adsorption of AsH3 and its dehydrogenated products on Pd using density functional theory calculations. Here, Pd cluster binding study revealed that Pd6 nanocluster bound strongest to the SDG surface, while adsorption of AsHx (x = 0-3) on the most stable Pdn doped SDG showed that dehydrogenated arsine compounds adsorbed onto the surface stronger than the pristine AsH3 molecule. Charge analysis revealed that considerable amount of charge migration from Pd to dehydrogenated arsine molecules after adsorption may constitute strong adsorption for dehydrogenated arsine. In addition, study of thermodynamic pathways of AsH3 dehydrogenation on Pdn doped SDG adsorbents indicated that Pd cluster doping on SDG adsorbent tends to be thermodynamically favorable for AsH3 decomposition than the single-Pd atom doped SDG. Hence, our study has indicated that Pd6 clusters doped SDG is more advantageous as adsorbent material for AsH3 removal.

  12. 102Pd(n, {gamma}) Cross Section Measurement Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Alpizar-Vicente, A. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Greife, U.

    2006-03-13

    The neutron capture cross section of the proton rich nucleus 102Pd was measured with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The target was a 2 mg Pd foil with 78% enriched 102Pd. It was held by a 0.9 {mu}m thick Mylar bag which was selected after comparing different thicknesses of Kapton and Mylar for their scattering background. To identify the contribution of the other Pd isotopes the data of a natural Pd sample was compared to the data of the 102Pd enriched sample. A 12C sample was used to determine the scattering background. The 102Pd(n, {gamma}) rate is of importance for the p-process nucleosynthesis.

  13. Photoconductivities from band states and a dissipative electron dynamics: Si(111) without and with adsorbed Ag clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazhappilly, Tijo; Hembree, Robert H.; Micha, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A new general computational procedure is presented to obtain photoconductivities starting from atomic structures, combining ab initio electronic energy band states with populations from density matrix theory, and implemented for a specific set of materials based on Si crystalline slabs and their nanostructured surfaces without and with adsorbed Ag clusters. The procedure accounts for charge mobility in semiconductors in photoexcited states, and specifically electron and hole photomobilities at Si(111) surfaces with and without adsorbed Ag clusters using ab initio energy bands and orbitals generated from a generalized gradient functional, however with excited energy levels modified to provide correct bandgaps. Photoexcited state populations for each band and carrier type were generated using steady state solution of a reduced density matrix which includes dissipative medium effects. The present calculations provide photoexcited electronic populations and photoinduced mobilities resulting from applied electric fields and obtained from the change of driven electron energies with their electronic momentum. Extensive results for Si slabs with 8 layers, without and with adsorbed Ag clusters, show that the metal adsorbates lead to substantial increases in the photomobility and photoconductivity of electrons and holes.

  14. Photoconductivities from band states and a dissipative electron dynamics: Si(111) without and with adsorbed Ag clusters.

    PubMed

    Vazhappilly, Tijo; Hembree, Robert H; Micha, David A

    2016-01-14

    A new general computational procedure is presented to obtain photoconductivities starting from atomic structures, combining ab initio electronic energy band states with populations from density matrix theory, and implemented for a specific set of materials based on Si crystalline slabs and their nanostructured surfaces without and with adsorbed Ag clusters. The procedure accounts for charge mobility in semiconductors in photoexcited states, and specifically electron and hole photomobilities at Si(111) surfaces with and without adsorbed Ag clusters using ab initio energy bands and orbitals generated from a generalized gradient functional, however with excited energy levels modified to provide correct bandgaps. Photoexcited state populations for each band and carrier type were generated using steady state solution of a reduced density matrix which includes dissipative medium effects. The present calculations provide photoexcited electronic populations and photoinduced mobilities resulting from applied electric fields and obtained from the change of driven electron energies with their electronic momentum. Extensive results for Si slabs with 8 layers, without and with adsorbed Ag clusters, show that the metal adsorbates lead to substantial increases in the photomobility and photoconductivity of electrons and holes. PMID:26772554

  15. Density functional study of TaSi n ( n = 1-3, 12) clusters adsorbed to graphene surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ping; Zheng, Lin; Zheng, Ji Ming; Zhang, Ruizhi; Yang, Luna; Ren, Zhaoyu

    2011-11-01

    A plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to investigate structural and electronic properties of TaSin (n = 1-3, 12) clusters supported by graphene surface. The resulting adsorption structures are described and discussed in terms of stability, bonding, and electron transfer between the cluster and the graphene. The TaSin clusters on graphene surface favor their free-standing ground-state structures. Especially in the cases of the linear TaSi2 and the planar TaSi3, the graphene surface may catalyze the transition of the TaSin clusters from an isomer of lower dimensionality into the ground-state structure. The adsorption site and configuration of TaSin on graphene surface are dominated by the interaction between Ta atom and graphene. Ta atom prefers to adsorb on the hollow site of graphene, and Si atoms tend to locate on the bridge site. Further, the electron transfer is found to proceed from the cluster to the surface for n = 1 and 2, while its direction reverses as n > 2. For the case of TaSi, chemisorption is shown to prevail over physisorption as the dominant mode of surface-adsorbate interaction by charge density analysis.

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of water clusters co-adsorbed with hydrogen molecules on a sodium chloride film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen gas containing a trace of water vapor was dosed on a vacuum-evaporated sodium chloride film at 13 K, and water clusters formed on the substrate were investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Absorption bands due to (H2O)n clusters with n = 3-6 and an induced absorption band due to hydrogen were clearly observed. With increasing gas dosage, the intensities of the cluster bands increased linearly while the intensity of the hydrogen band was constant. This suggests that the water clusters were formed in two-dimensional matrices of hydrogen. We found that the water clusters did exist on the surface upon heating even after the hydrogen molecules had desorbed. A further rise of the substrate temperature up to 27 K yielded the formation of larger clusters, (H2O)n with n > 6 . We also discuss the origins of the two bands of the trimer in terms of pseudorotation and a metastable isomer.

  17. Photoionization dynamics of glycine adsorbed on a silicon cluster: ''On-the-fly'' simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Shemesh, Dorit; Baer, Roi; Seideman, Tamar; Gerber, R. Benny

    2005-05-08

    Dynamics of glycine chemisorbed on the surface of a silicon cluster is studied for a process that involves single-photon ionization, followed by recombination with the electron after a selected time delay. The process is studied by ''on-the-fly'' molecular dynamics simulations, using the semiempirical parametric method number 3 (PM3) potential energy surface. The system is taken to be in the ground state prior to photoionization, and time delays from 5 to 50 fs before the recombination are considered. The time evolution is computed over 10 ps. The main findings are (1) the positive charge after ionization is initially mostly distributed on the silicon cluster. (2) After ionization the major structural changes are on the silicon cluster. These include Si-Si bond breaking and formation and hydrogen transfer between different silicon atoms. (3) The transient ionization event gives rise to dynamical behavior that depends sensitively on the ion state lifetime. Subsequent to 45 fs evolution in the charged state, the glycine molecule starts to rotate on the silicon cluster. Implications of the results to various processes that are induced by transient transition to a charged state are discussed. These include inelastic tunneling in molecular devices, photochemistry on conducting surfaces, and electron-molecule scattering.

  18. Density functional studies of small Au clusters adsorbed on α-FeOOH: Structural and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, Leandro F.; Zubieta, Carolina E.; Fuente, Silvia A.; Belelli, Patricia G.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.

    2016-11-01

    We report a density functional theory (DFT) investigation on the interaction of tiny Aun (n = 1-5) clusters with the bare and hydroxylated (110) surfaces of goethite (α-FeOOH). Both adsorption and atom-by-atom nucleation processes were modeled. The adsorption is shown to be strong on the bare surface and takes place preferentially through the interaction of Au atoms with unsaturated surface oxygen anions, accompanied with an electronic charge transfer from the metal to the support. Au3, Au4 and Au5 planar structures resulted to be particularly stable due to polarization effects; indeed, Coulombic repulsion between basal Au atoms and surface oxygen anions promotes the displacement of the electronic density toward terminal Au atoms producing a Au+δ(basal)/Au-δ(terminal) polarization. On the hydroxylated surface, Au clusters adsorb more weakly with respect to the bare surface, mainly through monocoordinated surface hydroxyl groups and tricoordinated oxygen ions. Concerning the nucleation mechanism, while on the hydroxylated surface the nucleation energy is governed by the spin of the interacting systems, on the bare surface polarization effects seems to play a predominant role.

  19. Scanning tunneling microscopy study: From clean surface to surfaces adsorbed with atom/cluster or metallic island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xieqiu

    2007-12-01

    Nanostructures, namely materials in the nanometer or sub-nanometer scales, can possess completely diRTMerent properties from their bulk counterparts. Due to the potential applications in different disciplines, the study of nanostructures has attracted extensive attention worldwide in recent years. Metal nanostructures grown on semiconductor substrates are a special group of nanostructures. Since these nanostructures can be prepared in ultrahigh vacuum with high controllability, one can use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to obtain information in situ on both the structural and electronic properties of these nanostructures simultaneously. In this thesis, I will present the growth behavior of metal or semiconductor nanostructures at the initial stage and the novel electronic properties of some of these nanostructures. The study of single Ge atoms adsorbed on the Si(111)-7x7 surface shows that different deposition temperatures result in diRTMerent adsorption structures. We find Ge substitution for the Si adatoms during high temperature growth and simple Ge adsorption above the Si atoms during low temperature growth. Small Ag clusters, formed on the Si(111)-7x7 surface at controlled coverages, show a strong rectification effect, which is an indication of the initial stage of Schottky barrier formation and possibly the smallest Schottky diode. On the surfaces of heavily n-doped and p-doped Si substrates, although the 7x7 is metallic at room temperature, an energy gap opens at low temperatures. This energy gap is correlated well with the electronic localization induced by the doping impurities. For Pb nanoislands, a pseudogap was discovered at temperatures higher than the superconducting transition temperature. The strength of the pseudogap depends on the lateral size and temperature, which is speculated to originate from the weak electronic localization induced by structural disorder.

  20. {sup 129}Xe magic-angle spinning spectra of xenon in zeolite NaA direct observation of mixed clusters of co-adsorbed species.

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, A. K.; Jameson, C. J.; de Dios, A. C.; Oldfield, E.; Gerald, R. E., II; Turner, G. L.; Chemical Engineering; Loyola Univ.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Univ. of Illinois; Spectral Data Services, Inc.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first demonstration that the individual {sup 129}Xe resonances corresponding to Xe{sub n} (n = 1-8) clusters inside the {alpha}-cages of zeolite NaA can be narrowed under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Under these high-resolution conditions we also observe upon addition of Kr the individual peaks corresponding to mixed clusters, Xe{sub n}Kr{sub m}, inside the a-cages, which will allow the first direct determination of the distribution of co-adsorbates in a microporous solid. Under MAS the chemical shifts of the Xe{sub n} clusters are shown to be highly sensitive to 'disorder' in the zeolite and provides new, quantitative information about the presence of {alpha}-cages of several types.

  1. Ligand-free gold atom clusters adsorbed on graphene nano sheets generated by oxidative laser fragmentation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Marcus; Haxhiaj, Ina; Wagener, Philipp; Intartaglia, Romuald; Brandi, Fernando; Nakamura, Junji; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    Over three decades after the first synthesis of stabilized Au55-clusters many scientific questions about gold cluster properties are still unsolved and ligand-free colloidal clusters are difficult to fabricate. Here we present a novel route to produce ultra-small gold particles by using a green technique, the laser ablation and fragmentation in water, without using reductive or stabilizing agents at any step of the synthesis. For fabrication only a pulsed laser, a gold-target, pure water, sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide are deployed. The particles are exemplarily hybridized to graphene supports showing that these carbon-free colloidal clusters might serve as versatile building blocks.

  2. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  3. Adsorbate-induced absorption redshift in an organic-inorganic cluster conjugate: Electronic effects of surfactants and organic adsorbates on the lowest excited states of a methanethiol-CdSe conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Christopher; Chung, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Sungyul; Weiss, Shimon; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Bioconjugated CdSe quantum dots are promising reagents for bioimaging applications. Experimentally, the binding of a short peptide has been found to redshift the optical absorption of nanoclusters [J. Tsay et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 1669 (2005)]. This study examines this issue by performing density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent-DFT calculations to study the ground state and low-lying excited states of (CdSe)6[SCH3]-, a transition metal complex built by binding methanethiolate to a CdSe molecular cluster. Natural bond orbital results show that the redshift is caused by ligand-inorganic cluster orbital interaction. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of (CdSe)6 is dominated by selenium 4p orbitals; in contrast, the HOMO of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- is dominated by sulfur 3p orbitals. This difference shows that [SCH3]- binding effectively introduces filled sulfur orbitals above the selenium 4p orbitals of (CdSe)6. The resulting smaller HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- indeed leads to redshifts in its excitation energies compared to (CdSe)6. In contrast, binding of multiple NH3 destabilizes cadmium 5p orbitals, which contribute significantly to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of (CdSe)6, while leaving the selenium 4p orbitals near the HOMO relatively unaffected. This has the effect of widening the HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)6ṡ6NH3 compared to (CdSe)6. As expected, the excitation energies of the passivated (CdSe)6ṡ6NH3 are also blueshifted compared to (CdSe)6. As far as NH3 is a faithful representation of a surfactant, the results clearly illustrate the differences between the electronic effects of an alkylthiolate versus those of surfactant molecules. Surface passivation of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- is then simulated by coating it with multiple NH3 molecules. The results suggest that the [SCH3]- adsorption induces a redshift in the excitation energies in a surfactant environment.

  4. Palladium clusters on graphene support: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubeš, Miroslav; He, Junjie; Nachtigall, Petr; Bludský, Ota

    2016-02-01

    CCSD(T) calculations with an energy-consistent scalar relativistic pseudopotential have been performed on a series of Pd-PAH complexes. The CCSD(T)//CBS interaction energies for Pd-ethylene and Pd-PAH (PAH = benzene, naphthalene, pyrene, coronene and ovalene) are -32.3, -25.3, -21.0, -22.5, -23.1 and -24.0 kcal mol-1, respectively. A DFT/CC interaction model based on the Pd-PAH calculations has been proposed for a reliable and accurate description of Pd-cluster interaction with graphene support. PBE/CC and PBEh/CC calculations for Pdn-PAH and Pdn-graphene (n ≤ 4) are reported. The PBEh/CC value of -27.7 kcal mol-1 is our best estimate of the Pd-graphene interaction energy.

  5. Elementary steps of the catalytic NOx reduction with NH3: Cluster studies on adsorbate diffusion and dehydrogenation at vanadium oxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the details of important steps of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx at model V2O5(010) substrate. First, diffusion processes at the substrate surface are considered where hydrogen and ammonium, NH4, are used as examples. Hydrogen diffusion, a prerequisite for water formation involving substrate oxygen, is described by diffusion paths between adjacent surface oxygen sites. Corresponding energy barriers are determined mainly by the flexibility and the amount of distortion of the oxygen atoms which participate in the O-H-O bridge formation at the transition state. Further, diffusion of sub-surface oxygen to fill surface oxygen vacancies of the V2O5(010) substrate has been considered and results in reactive surface sites which have not been discussed so far. NH4 diffusion at the V2O5(010) surface can be described as a combined tumbling and rotation process characterized by quite low diffusion barriers which make the adsorbate rather mobile. Finally, hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of different NHx species at the V2O5(010) substrate surface are studied where special emphasis is given to the influence of surface reduction simulated locally by oxygen vacancies. The results confirm experimental findings of the presence of both NH2 and NH4 species after ammonia adsorption at the V2O5(010) surface.

  6. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  7. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  8. Insights into the geometries, electronic and magnetic properties of neutral and charged palladium clusters

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaodong; Hermann, Andreas; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Ju, Meng; Lu, Cheng; Jin, Yuanyuan; Xia, Xinxin; Maroulis, George

    2016-01-01

    We performed an unbiased structure search for low-lying energetic minima of neutral and charged palladium PdnQ (n = 2–20, Q = 0, + 1 and –1) clusters using CALYPSO method in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The main candidates for the lowest energy neutral, cationic and anionic clusters are identified, and several new candidate structures for the cationic and anionic ground states are obtained. It is found that the ground state structures of small palladium clusters are more sensitive to the charge states. For the medium size Pdn0/+/– (n = 16–20) clusters, a fcc-like growth behavior is found. The structural transition from bilayer-like structures to cage-like structures is likely to occur at n = 14 for the neutral and cationic clusters. In contrast, for the anionic counterparts, the structural transition occurs at Pd13–. The photoelectron spectra (PES) of palladium clusters are simulated based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method and compared with the experimental data. The good agreement between the experimental PES and simulated spectra provides us unequivocal structural information to fully solve the global minimum structures, allowing for new molecular insights into the chemical interactions in the Pd cages. PMID:26794267

  9. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  10. Chirality transfer from gold nanocluster to adsorbate evidenced by vibrational circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Dolamic, Igor; Varnholt, Birte; Bürgi, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of chirality from one set of molecules to another is fundamental for applications in chiral technology and has likely played a crucial role for establishing homochirality on earth. Here we show that an intrinsically chiral gold cluster can transfer its handedness to an achiral molecule adsorbed on its surface. Solutions of chiral Au38(2-PET)24 (2-PET=2-phenylethylthiolate) cluster enantiomers show strong vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) signals in vibrations of the achiral adsorbate. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that 2-PET molecules adopt a chiral conformation. Chirality transfer from the cluster to the achiral adsorbate is responsible for the preference of one of the two mirror images. Intermolecular interactions between the adsorbed molecules on the crowded cluster surface seem to play a dominant role for the phenomena. Such chirality transfer from metals to adsorbates likely plays an important role in heterogeneous enantioselective catalysis. PMID:25960309

  11. Physics and chemistry of small clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Jena, P.; Rao, B.K.; Khanna, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on physical and chemical phenomena of solid clusters. The papers cover the atomic and electronic structure, dynamics, stability, fragmentation, optical properties, interaction with adsorbates, astrochemistry and van der Waals forces of clusters. (LSP)

  12. Growth of sub-nanometric palladium clusters on boron nitride nanotubes: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Schimmenti, Roberto; Cortese, Remedios; Ferrante, Francesco; Prestianni, Antonio; Duca, Dario

    2016-01-21

    A QM/MM investigation is reported dealing with the nucleation and growth of small palladium clusters, up to Pd8, on the outer surface of a suitable model of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). It is shown that BNNTs could have a template effect on the cluster growth, which is due to the interplay between Pd-N and Pd-Pd interactions as well as due to the matching of the B3N3 ring and the Pd(111) face arrangement. The values for the cluster adsorption energies reveal a relatively strong physisorption, which suggests that under particular conditions the BNNTs could be used as supports for the preparation of shape-controlled metal clusters. PMID:26675305

  13. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh; R, Kamal Raj.; Kumar, T. J. Dhilip

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  15. Magnetism, structure and chemical order in small CoPd clusters: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2014-01-01

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of small ComPdn(N=m+n=8,m=0-N) nanoalloy clusters are studied in the framework of a generalized-gradient approximation to density-functional theory. The optimized cluster structures have a clear tendency to maximize the number of nearest-neighbor CoCo pairs. The magnetic order is found to be ferromagnetic-like (FM) for all the ground-state structures. Antiferromagnetic-like spin arrangements were found in some low-lying isomers. The average magnetic moment per atom μ increases approximately linearly with Co content. A remarkable enhancement of the local Co moments is observed as a result of Pd doping. This is a consequence of the increase in the number of Co d holes, due to CoPd charge transfer, combined with the reduced local coordination. The influence of spin-orbit interactions on the cluster properties is also discussed.

  16. Potential of ZrO clusters as replacement Pd catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Swayamprabha; King, Nicholas; Samanta, Devleena; Jena, Puru

    2014-07-01

    Atomic clusters with specific size and composition and mimicking the chemistry of elements in the periodic table are commonly known as superatoms. It has been suggested that superatoms could be used to replace elements that are either scarce or expensive. Based on a photoelectron spectroscopy experiment of negatively charged ions, Castleman and co-workers [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 975 (2010)] have recently shown that atoms of Ni, Pd, and Pt which are well known for their catalytic properties, have the same electronic structure as their counterpart isovalent diatomic species, TiO, ZrO, and WC, respectively. Based on this similarity they have suggested that ZrO, for example, could be a replacement catalyst for Pd. Since catalysts are seldom single isolated atoms, one has to demonstrate that clusters of ZrO also have the same electronic structure as same sized Pd clusters. To examine if this is indeed the case, we have calculated the geometries, electronic structure, electron affinity, ionization potential, and hardness of Pdn and (ZrO)n clusters (n = 1-5). We further studied the reaction of these clusters in neutral and charged forms with H2, O2, and CO and found it to be qualitatively different in most cases. These results obtained using density functional theory with hybrid B3LYP functional do not support the view that ZrO clusters can replace Pd as a catalyst.

  17. Potential of ZrO clusters as replacement Pd catalyst.

    PubMed

    Behera, Swayamprabha; King, Nicholas; Samanta, Devleena; Jena, Puru

    2014-07-21

    Atomic clusters with specific size and composition and mimicking the chemistry of elements in the periodic table are commonly known as superatoms. It has been suggested that superatoms could be used to replace elements that are either scarce or expensive. Based on a photoelectron spectroscopy experiment of negatively charged ions, Castleman and co-workers [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 975 (2010)] have recently shown that atoms of Ni, Pd, and Pt which are well known for their catalytic properties, have the same electronic structure as their counterpart isovalent diatomic species, TiO, ZrO, and WC, respectively. Based on this similarity they have suggested that ZrO, for example, could be a replacement catalyst for Pd. Since catalysts are seldom single isolated atoms, one has to demonstrate that clusters of ZrO also have the same electronic structure as same sized Pd clusters. To examine if this is indeed the case, we have calculated the geometries, electronic structure, electron affinity, ionization potential, and hardness of Pdn and (ZrO)n clusters (n = 1-5). We further studied the reaction of these clusters in neutral and charged forms with H2, O2, and CO and found it to be qualitatively different in most cases. These results obtained using density functional theory with hybrid B3LYP functional do not support the view that ZrO clusters can replace Pd as a catalyst. PMID:25053314

  18. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  19. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  20. Method And Apparatus For Regenerating Nox Adsorbers

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, J. Joshua; Endicott, Dennis L.; Faulkner, Stephen A.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-03-28

    Methods and apparatuses for regenerating a NOx adsorber coupled with an exhaust of an engine. An actuator drives a throttle valve to a first position when regeneration of the NOx adsorber is desired. The first position is a position that causes the regeneration of the NOx adsorber. An actuator drives the throttle valve to a second position while regeneration of the NOx adsorber is still desired. The second position being a position that is more open than the first position and operable to regenerate a NOx adsorber.

  1. Nanoalloy electrocatalysis: Simulating cyclic voltammetry from configurational thermodynamics with adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Tan, Teck L.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-02-27

    We simulate the adsorption isotherms for alloyed nanoparticles (nanoalloys) with adsorbates to determine cyclic voltammetry (CV) during electrocatalysis. The effect of alloying on nanoparticle adsorption isotherms is provided by a hybrid-ensemble Monte Carlo simulation that uses the cluster expansion method extended to non-exchangeable coupled lattices for nanoalloys with adsorbates. Exemplified here for the hydrogen evolution reaction, a 2-dimensional CV is mapped for Pd–Pt nanoalloys as a function of both electrochemical potential and the global Pt composition, and shows a highly non-linear alloying effect on CV. Detailed features in CV arise from the interplay among the H-adsorption in multiple sites that is closely correlated with alloy configurations, which are in turn affected by the H-coverage. The origins of specific features in CV curves are assigned. As a result, the method provides a more complete means to design nanoalloys for electrocatalysis.

  2. Nanoalloy electrocatalysis: Simulating cyclic voltammetry from configurational thermodynamics with adsorbates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Tan, Teck L.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-02-27

    We simulate the adsorption isotherms for alloyed nanoparticles (nanoalloys) with adsorbates to determine cyclic voltammetry (CV) during electrocatalysis. The effect of alloying on nanoparticle adsorption isotherms is provided by a hybrid-ensemble Monte Carlo simulation that uses the cluster expansion method extended to non-exchangeable coupled lattices for nanoalloys with adsorbates. Exemplified here for the hydrogen evolution reaction, a 2-dimensional CV is mapped for Pd–Pt nanoalloys as a function of both electrochemical potential and the global Pt composition, and shows a highly non-linear alloying effect on CV. Detailed features in CV arise from the interplay among the H-adsorption in multiple sites thatmore » is closely correlated with alloy configurations, which are in turn affected by the H-coverage. The origins of specific features in CV curves are assigned. As a result, the method provides a more complete means to design nanoalloys for electrocatalysis.« less

  3. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  4. Quasiparticle excitations of adsorbates on doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Dillon; Karrasch, Christoph; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jiong; Omrani, Arash A.; Brar, Victor; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wu, Qiong; Corsetti, Fabiano; Mostofi, Arash; Kawakami, Roland K.; Moore, Joel; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Mike

    Adsorbed atoms and molecules can modify the electronic structure of graphene, but in turn it is also possible to control the properties of adsorbates via the graphene substrate. In my talk, I will discuss the electronic structure of F4-TCNQ molecules on doped graphene and present a first-principles based theory of quasiparticle excitations that captures the interplay of doping-dependent image charge interactions between substrate and adsorbate and electron-electron interaction effects on the molecule. The resulting doping-dependent quasiparticle energies will be compared to experimental scanning tunnelling spectra. Finally, I will also discuss the effects of charged adsorbates on the electronic structure of doped graphene.

  5. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  6. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; et al

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  7. The Uranium from Seawater Program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T; Bonheyo, George; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana; Warner, Marvin G; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David; Mayes, Richard T; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas; Addleman, Shane R; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Dr. Ken; Breier, Crystalline; D'Alessandro, Dr. Evan

    2016-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory s (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing at Woods Hole

  8. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  9. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  10. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications. PMID:27124722

  11. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    SciTech Connect

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  12. Separation of the attractive and repulsive contributions to the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions of polar adsorbates on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Deng-Sung

    2015-11-01

    Dissociative adsorption of H2O, NH3, CH3OH and CH3NH2 polar molecules on the Si(100) surface results in a 1:1 mixture of two adsorbates (H and multi-atomic fragment A = OH, NH2, CH3O, CH3NH, respectively) on the surface. By using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption geometry, the total energies and the charge densities for various possible ordered structures of the mixed adsorbate layer have been found. Analyzing the systematic trends in the total energies unveils concurrently the nearest-neighbor interactions ENN and the next nearest-neighbor interactions ENNN between two polar adsorbates A. In going from small to large polar adsorbates, ENN's exhibit an attractive-to-repulsive crossover behavior, indicating that they include competing attractive and repulsive contributions. Exploration of the charge density distributions allows the estimation of the degree of charge overlapping between immediately neighboring A's, the resulting contribution of the steric repulsions, and that of the attractive interactions to the corresponding ENN's. The attractive contributions to nearest neighboring adsorbate-adsorbate interactions between the polar adsorbates under study are shown to result from hydrogen bonds or dipole-dipole interactions.

  13. Core-level binding-energy shifts due to ionic adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    1993-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the core-level binding-energy (BE) shifts due to alkali-metal and halogen adsorption on metal surfaces are identified and characterized through theoretical analyses of the surface electronic structure. By means of cluster model calculations of the adsorption of K and F atoms on the Cu(100) surface, we show that ionic adsorbates, both cationic and anionic, lead to small BE shifts, typically <200 meV, of the substrate metal atoms. These small shifts arise from the cancellation of two large initial-state effects, the electric field created by the ions at the surface and the consequent polarization of the metal conduction-band electrons. These two mechanisms induce rather large shifts of opposite sign and similar magnitude in the substrate core-level BE's, with resulting small final shifts. This is true for all electronic states, clusters, adsorption sites, and substrate-adsorbate distances. Thus, substrate BE shifts do not provide information about the bonding nature and the adsorption site. On the other hand, ionic and covalent bonding between the substrate and the adsorbate lead to significantly different shifts in the core-level BE's of the adsorbate. The BE shifts of alkali-metal atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces as functions of the coverage provide an indication of the transition from an ionic bond at low coverage to a covalent bond at high coverage.

  14. Analysis of Adsorbate-Adsorbate and Adsorbate-Adsorbent Interactions to Decode Isosteric Heats of Gas Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Madani, S Hadi; Sedghi, Saeid; Biggs, Mark J; Pendleton, Phillip

    2015-12-21

    A qualitative interpretation is proposed to interpret isosteric heats of adsorption by considering contributions from three general classes of interaction energy: fluid-fluid heat, fluid-solid heat, and fluid-high-energy site (HES) heat. Multiple temperature adsorption isotherms are defined for nitrogen, T=(75, 77, 79) K, argon at T=(85, 87, 89) K, and for water and methanol at T=(278, 288, 298) K on a well-characterized polymer-based, activated carbon. Nitrogen and argon are subjected to isosteric heat analyses; their zero filling isosteric heats of adsorption are consistent with slit-pore, adsorption energy enhancement modelling. Water adsorbs entirely via specific interactions, offering decreasing isosteric heat at low pore filling followed by a constant heat slightly in excess of water condensation enthalpy, demonstrating the effects of micropores. Methanol offers both specific adsorption via the alcohol group and non-specific interactions via its methyl group; the isosteric heat increases at low pore filling, indicating the predominance of non-specific interactions. PMID:26538339

  15. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  16. Excitation energy migration in yellow fluorescent protein (citrine) layers adsorbed on modified gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Hanis Mohd; Rzeźnicka, Izabela I.; Hoshi, Hirotaka; Kajimoto, Shinji; Horimoto, Noriko Nishizawa; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    The nature of functional proteins adsorbed on solid surfaces is interesting from the perspective of developing of bioelectronics and biomaterials. Here we present evidence that citrine (one of yellow fluorescent protein variants) adsorbed on modified gold surfaces would not undergo denaturation and energy transfer among the adsorbed citrine molecules would occur. Gold substrates were chemically modified with 3-mercaptopropionic acid and tert-butyl mercaptan for the preparation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, respectively. A pure solution of citrine was dropped and dried on the modified gold substrates and their surface morphology was studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The obtained STM images showed multilayers of citrine adsorbed on the modified surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, citrine was adsorbed more randomly, formed various non-uniform aggregates, while on hydrophilic surfaces, citrine appeared more aligned and isolated uniform protein clusters were observed. Fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay of these dried citrine layers were also measured using the time correlated single photon counting method. Fluorescence anisotropy of citrine on the hydrophobic surface decayed faster than citrine on the hydrophilic surface. From these results we concluded that fluorescence energy migration occurred faster among citrine molecules which were randomly adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface to compare with the hydrophilic surface.

  17. Structure, Stability, and Mobility of Small Pd Clusters on the Stoichiometric and Defective TiO2 (110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2011-11-07

    We report on the structure and adsorption properties of Pdn (n = 1–4) clusters supported on the rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces with the possible presence of a surface oxygen vacancy or a subsurface Ti-interstitial atom. As predicted by the density functional theory, small Pd clusters prefer to bind to the stoichiometric titania surface or at sites near subsurface Ti-interstitial atoms. The adsorption of Pd clusters changes the electronic structure of the underlying surface. For the surface with an oxygen vacancy, the charge localization and ferromagnetic spin states are found to be largely attenuated owing to the adsorption of Pd clusters. The potential energy surfaces of the Pd monomer on different types of surfaces are also reported. The process of sintering is then simulated via the Metropolis Monte Carlo method. The presence of oxygen vacancy likely leads to the dissociation of Pd clusters. On the stoichiometric surface or surface with Ti-interstitial atom, the Pd monomers tend to sinter into larger clusters, whereas the Pd dimer, trimer, and tetramer appear to be relatively stable below 600 K. This result agrees with the standard sintering model of transition metal clusters and experimental observations.

  18. Site blocking effects on adsorbed polyacrylamide conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherson, Brett A.

    The use of polymers as flocculating additives is a common practice in many manufacturing environments. However, exactly how these polymers interact with surfaces is relatively unknown. One specific topic which is thought to be very important to flocculation is an adsorbed polymer's conformation. Substantial amounts of previous work, mainly using simulations, have been performed to elucidate the theory surrounding adsorbed polymer conformations. Yet, there is little experimental work which directly verifies current theory. In order to optimize the use of polymer flocculants in industrial applications, a better understanding of an adsorbed polymer's conformation on a surface beyond theoretical simulations is necessary. This work looks specifically at site blocking, which has a broad impact on flocculation, adsorption, and surface modification, and investigated its effects on the resulting adsorbed polymer conformation. Experimental methods which would allow direct determination of adsorbed polymer conformational details and be comparable with previous experimental results were first determined or developed. Characterization of an adsorbed polymer's conformation was then evaluated using dynamic light scattering, a currently accepted experimental technique to examine this. This commonly used technique was performed to allow the comparison of this works results with past literature. Next, a new technique using atomic force microscopy was developed, building on previous experimental techniques, to allow the direct determination of an adsorbed polymer's loop lengths. This method also was able to quantify changes in the length of adsorbed polymer tails. Finally, mesoscopic simulation was attempted using dissipative particle dynamics. In order to determine more information about an adsorbed polymer's conformation, three different environmental factors were analyzed: an adsorbed polymer on a surface in water, an adsorbed polymer on a surface in aqueous solutions of varying

  19. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  20. States of water adsorbed on perindopril crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. A.; Khmelevskaya, V. S.; Bogdanov, N. Yu.; Gorchakov, K. A.

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between the structural state of adsorbed water, the crystal structure of the substances, and the solubility of the perindopril salt C19H32N2O5 · C4H11N in water was studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The high-frequency shift of the stretching vibrations of adsorbed water and the solubility depend on the crystal structure of the drug substance. A reversible chemical reaction occurred between the adsorbed water and the perindopril salt.

  1. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  2. IR investigations of surfaces and adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn Williams

    2001-12-10

    Synchrotron infrared reflection-absorption measurements on single crystal metal surfaces with adsorbates have led to the determination of many key parameters related to the bonding vibrational modes and the dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, energy couplings between electrons and adsorbate motion have been shown to be a dominant mechanism on metal surfaces. Excellent agreement has been obtained with calculations for many of the observations, and the synergy between theory and experiment has led to a deeper understanding of the roles of electrons and phonons in determining the properties of interfaces and their roles in phenomena as diverse as friction, lubrication, catalysis and adhesion. Nonetheless, as the experiments are pushed harder, to describe such effects as co-adsorbed systems, disagreements continue to challenge the theory and our comprehension also is still evolving.

  3. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  4. Examining Adsorbed Polymer Conformations with Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Maria; Chennaoui, Mourad; Wong, Janet; Tribology Group, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Team

    2011-03-01

    The conformation of adsorbed polymers can have significant impact on their properties such as dynamics and elasticity as well as their ability to take part in reactions with other molecules. Experimental research to determine adsorbed polymer conformation has relied mainly on atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. During an AFM scan, the contact between the scanning probe and the polymer could affect the polymer conformation, particularly where parts of the polymer might have formed projected loops and tails. In this work, conformations of model polymers are examined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The advantage of TIRFM over AFM is that TIRFM is a non contact technique. Lambda DNA labelled along its length with fluorescent probes was adsorbed in a projected 2D -- 3D state. With TIRFM, the relationship between intensity and depth was used as a basis to determine how the conformation of the adsorbed polymers evolved with time using our custom algorithm.

  5. Dispersed-phase adsorbents for biotechnology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of adsorbent material has been developed in which very small adsorbent particles are entrapped in a hydrocolloidal gel matrix that is formed into small, monodisperse spherical beads. Examples of applications of this type of material include dispersed, hydrous transition metal oxides that can be used for the retention of biocatalysts, such as enzymes, and certain microorganisms or microbial fragments that can be dispersed into the gel matrix to accumulate and isolate various dissolved metals. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  7. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  8. Mesoporous Silica: A Suitable Adsorbent for Amines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous silica with KIT-6 structure was investigated as a preconcentrating material in chromatographic systems for ammonia and trimethylamine. Its adsorption capacity was compared to that of existing commercial materials, showing its increased adsorption power. In addition, KIT-6 mesoporous silica efficiently adsorbs both gases, while none of the employed commercial adsorbents did. This means that KIT-6 Mesoporous silica may be a good choice for integrated chromatography/gas sensing micro-devices. PMID:20628459

  9. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  10. Thiophilic adsorbents for RIA and ELISA procedures.

    PubMed

    Oscarsson, S; Chaga, G; Porath, J

    1991-10-25

    Three types of agarose derivatives have been prepared and investigated as adsorbents for radioimmunoassay and ELISA analysis. The analytical systems were evaluated using beta 2 microglobulin as a model. After a competitive reaction between the immunocomponents in solution, the formed immune complexes were adsorbed onto the adsorbent in the presence of 0.5 M potassium sulfate in 0.1 M Tris, pH 7.5. The binding constant between the interaction site on human IgG and the adsorbent 3-(2-pyridylthio)-2-hydroxypropylagarose (Py-S-gel) was determined to be 1.5 x 10(7) M-1 and the binding capacity was 20 mg/ml gel. The immune complex was desorbed by deleting potassium sulfate from the buffer, and only 0.5% of the total applied protein remained after washing the adsorbent with 0.5 M NaOH. The same adsorbent can be used repetitively with different systems. PMID:1940385

  11. Photochemistry of Nitrate Adsorbed on Mineral Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gankanda, A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust particles in the atmosphere are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides including HNO3 and NO2. Although nitrate ion is a well-studied chromophore in natural waters, the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on mineral dust particles is yet to be fully explored. In this study, wavelength dependence of the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on different model components of mineral dust aerosol has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Al2O3, TiO2 and NaY zeolite were used as model systems to represent non-photoactive oxides, photoactive semiconductor oxides and porous materials respectively, present in mineral dust aerosol. In this study, adsorbed nitrate is irradiated with 254 nm, 310 nm and 350 nm narrow band light. In the irradiation with narrow band light, NO2 is the only detectable gas-phase product formed from nitrate adsorbed on Al2O3 and TiO2. The NO2 yield is highest at 310 nm for both Al2O3 and TiO2. Unlike Al2O3 and TiO2, in zeolite, adsorbed nitrate photolysis to nitrite is observed only at 310 nm during narrow band irradiation. Moreover gas phase products were not detected during nitrate photolysis in zeolite at all three wavelengths. The significance of these differences as related to nitrate photochemistry on different mineral dust components will be highlighted.

  12. Scalable properties of metal clusters: A comparative study of modern exchange-correlation functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koitz, Ralph; Soini, Thomas M.; Genest, Alexander; Trickey, S. B.; Rösch, Notker

    2012-07-01

    The performance of eight generalized gradient approximation exchange-correlation (xc) functionals is assessed by a series of scalar relativistic all-electron calculations on octahedral palladium model clusters Pdn with n = 13, 19, 38, 55, 79, 147 and the analogous clusters Aun (for n up through 79). For these model systems, we determined the cohesive energies and average bond lengths of the optimized octahedral structures. We extrapolate these values to the bulk limits and compare with the corresponding experimental values. While the well-established functionals BP, PBE, and PW91 are the most accurate at predicting energies, the more recent forms PBEsol, VMTsol, and VT{84}sol significantly improve the accuracy of geometries. The observed trends are largely similar for both Pd and Au. In the same spirit, we also studied the scalability of the ionization potentials and electron affinities of the Pd clusters, and extrapolated those quantities to estimates of the work function. Overall, the xc functionals can be classified into four distinct groups according to the accuracy of the computed parameters. These results allow a judicious selection of xc approximations for treating transition metal clusters.

  13. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications. PMID:27131811

  14. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of adsorbates on bimetallic surfaces. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, W.K.

    1992-12-01

    In this work, well-defined bimetallic surfaces have been studied using carbon monoxide adsorption in conjunction with infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). These studies have indicated that for CO adsorbed on Cu overlayers, the bond between the CO and the Cu adatoms is comprised of both pi-back-donation and polarization interaction components. The sum of the contributions from these effects determines the observed bond strength with the observed CO stretching frequency being determined by the relative contributions of the components. In addition, it was determined that IR spectra of adsorbed CO show a remarkable sensitivity to surface structure. Three-dimensional Cu clusters, well-ordered two dimensional Cu islands and isolated Cu atoms are distinctively characterized by their CO IR peaks. In addition, both disorder-order and order-order transitions are observed for the metal overlayers on the single crystal metal substrates. It was also observed that localized segregation and ordering of mixed Co and S overlayers on a Mo(110) substrate occurs upon annealing.

  15. Mobility of adsorbed proteins: a Brownian dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, S; Talbot, J

    2000-01-01

    We simulate the adsorption of lysozyme on a solid surface, using Brownian dynamics simulations. A protein molecule is represented as a uniformly charged sphere and interacts with other molecules through screened Coulombic and double-layer forces. The simulation starts from an empty surface and attempts are made to introduce additional proteins at a fixed time interval that is inversely proportional to the bulk protein concentration. We examine the effect of ionic strength and bulk protein concentration on the adsorption kinetics over a range of surface coverages. The structure of the adsorbed layer is examined through snapshots of the configurations and quantitatively with the radial distribution function. We extract the surface diffusion coefficient from the mean square displacement. At high ionic strengths the Coulombic interaction is effectively shielded, leading to increased surface coverage. This effect is quantified with an effective particle radius. Clustering of the adsorbed molecules is promoted by high ionic strength and low bulk concentrations. We find that lateral protein mobility decreases with increasing surface coverage. The observed trends are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental studies. PMID:10620278

  16. Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    N, Rekha T.; Rajkumar, Beulah J. M.

    2015-06-24

    Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver is investigated using DFT methods. Optimized geometry of pentacene after adsorption on silver indicates distortion in hexagonal structure of the ring close to the silver cluster and deviations in co-planarity of carbon atoms due to the variations in bond angles and dihedral angles. Theoretically simulated absorption spectrum has a symmetric surface plasmon resonance peak around 486nm corresponding to the transfer of charge from HOMO-2 to LUMO. Theoretical SERS confirms the process of adsorption, tilted orientation of pentacene on silver surface and the charge transfers reported. Localization of electron density arising from redistribution of electrostatic potential together with a reduced bandgap of pentacene after adsorption on silver suggests its utility in the design of electro active organic semiconducting devices.

  17. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  18. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  19. Method for modifying trigger level for adsorber regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.

    2010-05-25

    A method for modifying a NO.sub.x adsorber regeneration triggering variable. Engine operating conditions are monitored until the regeneration triggering variable is met. The adsorber is regenerated and the adsorbtion efficiency of the adsorber is subsequently determined. The regeneration triggering variable is modified to correspond with the decline in adsorber efficiency. The adsorber efficiency may be determined using an empirically predetermined set of values or by using a pair of oxygen sensors to determine the oxygen response delay across the sensors.

  20. Dimensionally Frustrated Diffusion towards Fractal Adsorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2007-12-01

    Diffusion towards a fractal adsorber is a well-researched problem with many applications. While the steady-state flux towards such adsorbers is known to be characterized by the fractal dimension (DF) of the surface, the more general problem of time-dependent adsorption kinetics of fractal surfaces remains poorly understood. In this Letter, we show that the time-dependent flux to fractal adsorbers (1

  1. Standoff Spectroscopy of Surface Adsorbed Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Despite its immediate applications, selective detection of trace quantities of surface adsorbed chemicals, such as explosives, without physically collecting the sample molecules is a challenging task. Standoff spectroscopic techniques offer an ideal method of detecting chemicals without using a sample collection step. Though standoff spectroscopic techniques are capable of providing high selectivity, their demonstrated sensitivities are poor. Here we describe standoff detection of trace quantities of surface adsorbed chemicals using two quantum cascade lasers operated simultaneously, with tunable wavelength windows that match with absorption peaks of the analytes. This standoff method is a variation of photoacoustic spectroscopy, where scattered light from the sample surface is used for exciting acoustic resonance of the detector. We demonstrate a sensitivity of 100 ng/cm{sup 2} and a standoff detection distance of 20 m for surface adsorbed analytes such as explosives and tributyl phosphate.

  2. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  3. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  4. Unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertel, E.

    1991-11-01

    Experimental work on unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems on metallic substrates is reviewed with emphasis on recent developments. The first part is devoted to molecular adsorbates. Weakly chemisorbed hydrocarbons are briefly discussed. An exhaustive inverse photoemission (IPE) study of the CO bond to the transition metals Ni, Pb, and Pt is presented. Adsorbed NO is taken as an example to demonstrate the persisting discrepancies in the interpretation of IPE spectra. Atomic adsorbates are discussed in the second part. The quantum well state model is applied to interpret the surface states in reconstructing and non-reconstructing adsorption systems of alkali metals and hydrogen. A recent controversy on the unoccupied electronic states of the Cu(110)/O p(2×1) surface is critically reviewed. The quantum well state model is then compared to tight binding and local-density-functional calculations of the unoccupied bands and the deficiencies of the various approaches are pointed out. Finally, the relation between the surface state model and more chemically oriented models of surface bonding is briefly discussed.

  5. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  6. Adsorption and reactions of O2 and D2 on small free palladium clusters in a cluster-molecule scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Mats; Rosén, Arne

    2010-08-01

    The adsorption of oxygen and hydrogen (deuterium) on small neutral palladium clusters was investigated in a cluster beam experiment. The beam passes through two low-pressure reaction cells, and the clusters, with and without adsorbed molecules, are detected using laser ionization and mass spectrometry. Both H2 and O2 adsorb efficiently on the palladium clusters with only moderate variations with cluster size in the investigated range, i.e. between 8 and 28 atoms. The co-adsorption of H2 and O2 results in the formation of H2O, detected as a decrease in the number of adsorbed oxygen atoms with an increasing number of collisions with H2 molecules. A comparison is done with an earlier similar study of clusters of Pt. Furthermore a comparison is done with what is known for sticking and reactivity of surfaces.

  7. Natural Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii by Adsorbed Chromosomal DNA: Role of Adsorbed DNA Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, N.; Zilles, J.; Nguyen, H.

    2008-12-01

    Recent increases in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms and the accompanying public health concerns result both from the widespread use of antibiotics and from the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among microorganisms. To understand the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and identify efficient measures to minimize these transfers, an interdisciplinary approach was used to identify physical and chemical factors that control the fate and biological availability of extracellular DNA. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to study extracellular DNA adsorption and the conformation of the adsorbed DNA on silica and natural organic matter (NOM) surfaces. Solution chemistry was varied systematically to investigate the role of adsorbed DNA conformation on transformation. Gene transfer was assessed under the same conditions using natural transformation of chromosomal DNA into the soil bacteria Azotobacter vinelandii. DNA adsorbed to both silica and NOM surfaces has a more compact and rigid conformation in the presence of Ca2+ compared to Na+. Extracellular DNA adsorbed on silica and NOM surfaces transformed A. vinelandii. The transformation efficiency of adsorbed DNA was up to 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of dissolved DNA. Preliminary results suggest that the presence of Ca2+ in groundwater (e.g. hardness) reduces the availability of adsorbed DNA for transformation.

  8. Experimental studies of the chemistry of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, E.K.; Riley, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The procedures for studying chemical reactions of metal clusters in a continuous-flow reactor are described, and examples of such studies are given. Experiments to be discussed include kinetics and thermodynamics measurements, and determination of the composition of clusters saturated with various adsorbate reagents. Specific systems to be covered include the reaction of iron clusters with ammonia and with hydrogen, the reaction of nickel clusters with hydrogen and with ammonia, and the reaction of platinum clusters with ethylene. The last two reactions are characterized by complex, multi-step processes that lead to adsorbate decomposition and hydrogen desorption from the clusters. Methods for probing these processes will be discussed. 26 refs., 8 figs.

  9. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  10. Kinetic Assembly of Near-IR Active Gold Nanoclusters using Weakly Adsorbing Polymers to Control Size

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Jasmine M.; Murthy, Avinash K.; Ingram, Davis R.; Nguyen, Robin; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2013-01-01

    Clusters of metal nanoparticles with an overall size less than 100 nm and high metal loadings for strong optical functionality, are of interest in various fields including microelectronics, sensors, optoelectronics and biomedical imaging and therapeutics. Herein we assemble ~5 nm gold particles into clusters with controlled size, as small as 30 nm and up to 100 nm, which contain only small amounts of polymeric stabilizers. The assembly is kinetically controlled with weakly adsorbing polymers, PLA(2K)-b-PEG(10K)-b-PLA(2K) or PEG (MW = 3350), by manipulating electrostatic, van der Waals (VDW), steric, and depletion forces. The cluster size and optical properties are tuned as a function of particle volume fractions and polymer/gold ratios to modulate the interparticle interactions. The close spacing between the constituent gold nanoparticles and high gold loadings (80–85% w/w gold) produce a strong absorbance cross section of ~9×10−15 m2 in the NIR at 700 nm. This morphology results from VDW and depletion attractive interactions that exclude the weakly adsorbed polymeric stabilizer from the cluster interior. The generality of this kinetic assembly platform is demonstrated for gold nanoparticles with a range of surface charges from highly negative to neutral, with the two different polymers. PMID:20361735

  11. Charging and hybridization in the finite cluster model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Bagus, P. S.; Nelin, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Cluster wavefunctions which have appropriate hybridization and polarization lead to reasonable properties for the interaction of an adsorbate with a solid surface. However, for Al clusters, it was found that the atomic change distribution is not uniform. The finite cluster size leads to changes not representative for an extended system. This effect appears to be dependent on the particular materials being studied; it does not occur in all cases.

  12. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  13. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.

  14. Computer simulations of adsorbed liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Greg D.; Cleaver, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    The structures adopted by adsorbed thin films of Gay-Berne particles in the presence of a coexisting vapour phase are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The films are adsorbed at a flat substrate which favours planar anchoring, whereas the nematic-vapour interface favours normal alignment. On cooling, a system with a high molecule-substrate interaction strength exhibits substrate-induced planar orientational ordering and considerable stratification is observed in the density profiles. In contrast, a system with weak molecule-substrate coupling adopts a director orientation orthogonal to the substrate plane, owing to the increased influence of the nematic-vapour interface. There are significant differences between the structures adopted at the two interfaces, in contrast with the predictions of density functional treatments of such systems.

  15. Simulations of noble gases adsorbed on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiga, Sidi; Gatica, Silvina

    2014-03-01

    We present results of Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of adsorption of Kr, Ar and Xe on a suspended graphene sheet. We compute the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction by a Lennard-Jones potential. We adopt a hybrid model for the graphene-adsorbate force; in the hybrid model, the potential interaction with the nearest carbon atoms (within a distance rnn) is computed with an atomistic pair potential Ua; for the atoms at r>rnn, we compute the interaction energy as a continuous integration over a carbon uniform sheet with the density of graphene. For the atomistic potential Ua, we assume the anisotropic LJ potential adapted from the graphite-He interaction proposed by Cole et.al. This interaction includes the anisotropy of the C atoms on graphene, which originates in the anisotropic π-bonds. The adsorption isotherms, energy and structure of the layer are obtained and compared with experimental results. We also compare with the adsorption on graphite and carbon nanotubes. This research was supported by NSF/PRDM (Howard University) and NSF (DMR 1006010).

  16. Orbital tomography for highly symmetric adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtmüller, B.; Willenbockel, M.; Reinisch, E. M.; Ules, T.; Bocquet, F. C.; Soubatch, S.; Puschnig, P.; Koller, G.; Ramsey, M. G.; Tautz, F. S.; Kumpf, C.

    2012-10-01

    Orbital tomography is a new and very powerful tool to analyze the angular distribution of a photoemission spectroscopy experiment. It was successfully used for organic adsorbate systems to identify (and consequently deconvolute) the contributions of specific molecular orbitals to the photoemission data. The technique was so far limited to surfaces with low symmetry like fcc(110) oriented surfaces, owing to the small number of rotational domains that occur on such surfaces. In this letter we overcome this limitation and present an orbital tomography study of a 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetra-carboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer film adsorbed on Ag(111). Although this system exhibits twelve differently oriented molecules, the angular resolved photoemission data still allow a meaningful analysis of the different local density of states and reveal different electronic structures for symmetrically inequivalent molecules. We also discuss the precision of the orbital tomography technique in terms of counting statistics and linear regression fitting algorithm. Our results demonstrate that orbital tomography is not limited to low-symmetry surfaces, a finding which makes a broad field of complex adsorbate systems accessible to this powerful technique.

  17. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy Of Metal Cluster-Adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. M.; Kaldor, A.; Zakin, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    Recent development of the laser vaporization technique combined with mass-selective detection has made possible new studies of the fundamental chemical and physical properties of unsupported transition metal clusters as a function of the number of constituent atoms. A variety of experimental techniques have been developed in our laboratory to measure ionization threshold energies, magnetic moments, and gas phase reactivity of clusters. However, studies have so far been unable to determine the cluster structure or the chemical state of chemisorbed species on gas phase clusters. The application of infrared multiple photon dissociation IRMPD to obtain the IR absorption properties of metal cluster-adsorbate species in a molecular beam is described here. Specifically using a high power, pulsed CO2 laser as the infrared source, the IRMPD spectrum for methanol chemisorbed on small iron clusters is measured as a function of the number of both iron atoms and methanols in the complex for different methanol isotopes. Both the feasibility and potential utility of IRMPD for characterizing metal cluster-adsorbate interactions are demonstrated. The method is generally applicable to any cluster or cluster-adsorbate system dependent only upon the availability of appropriate high power infrared sources.

  18. XPS Chemical Shifts for CO Adsorbed on Ni(100):. a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedocchi, L.; Rovida, G.; Russo, N.

    Starting from the observed chemical shift of C-1s and O-1s ionization potentials (IP), reported in the literature for the adsorption of CO on Ni(100), and correlated to the different CO adsorption sites at different coverages, we have carried out a theoretical investigation, using a first-principle density-functional method, to calculate ionization energies for adsorbed CO in the atop and bridge sites. In our approach, the Ni(100) surface was simulated with clusters of up to nine metal atoms of different geometry, in order to test the two adsorption sites. For each cluster, the CO adsorption geometry was optimized and the O-1s and C-1s ionizations were calculated. The main result was that the (O-1s-C-1s) difference was very well reproduced even with clusters of modest size, thus confirming the possibility to use this value as a structure-sensitive parameter.

  19. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  20. Dipolar capillary interactions between tilted ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gary B; Botto, Lorenzo

    2015-10-28

    Capillary interactions have emerged as a tool for the directed assembly of particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces, and play a role in controlling the mechanical properties of emulsions and foams. In this paper, following Davies et al. [Adv. Mater., 2014, 26, 6715] investigation into the assembly of ellipsoidal particles at interfaces interacting via dipolar capillary interactions, we numerically investigate the interaction between tilted ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface as their aspect ratio, tilt angle, bond angle, and separation vary. High-resolution Surface Evolver simulations of ellipsoidal particle pairs in contact reveal an energy barrier between a metastable tip-tip configuration and a stable side-side configuration. The side-side configuration is the global energy minimum for all parameters we investigated. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of clusters of up to 12 ellipsoidal particles show novel highly symmetric flower-like and ring-like arrangements. PMID:26323324

  1. Conformational properties of an adsorbed charged polymer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Ho; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2005-06-01

    The behavior of a strongly charged polymer adsorbed on an oppositely charged surface of a low-dielectric constant is formulated by the functional integral method. By separating the translational, conformational, and fluctuational degrees of freedom, the scaling behaviors for both the height of the polymer and the thickness of the diffusion layer are determined. Unlike the results predicted by scaling theory, we identified the continuous crossover from the weak compression to the compression regime. All the analytical results are found to be consistent with Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, an alternative (operational) definition of a charged polymer adsorption is proposed. PMID:16089715

  2. Recovery of Technetium Adsorbed on Charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Mark D.; Metz, Lori A.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2006-05-01

    Two methods capable of near complete recovery of technetium adsorbed on charcoal are presented. The first involves liquid extraction of the technetium from the charcoal by hot 4M nitric acid. An average recovery of 98% (n=3) is obtained after three rounds of extraction. The second method involves dry ashing with air in a quartz combustion tube at 400-450 C. This method yields an average recovery of 96% (n=5). Other thermal methods were attempted, but resulted in reduced recovery and incomplete material balance

  3. Lead removal with adsorbing colloid flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Thackston, E.L.; Wilson, D.J.; Hanson, J.S.; Miller, D.L. Jr.

    1980-02-01

    A process that removes lead from industrial waste by adsorbing colloid foam flotation has been designed and demonstrated. A system of ferric chloride and sodium lauryl sulfate, both relatively inexpensive chemicals, gave good performance with optimum dosages of sodium lauryl sulfate at 40 mg/l and trivalent iron at 150 mg/l. With optimum chemical and hydraulic conditions, the pilot plant was able to produce effluents with lead concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/l. The process may be especially attractive where space for heavy metals removal equipment is extremely limited.

  4. Raman fingerprint of doping due to metal adsorbates on graphene.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M W; Singh, Arun Kumar; Iqbal, M Z; Eom, Jonghwa

    2012-08-22

    The properties of single-layer graphene are strongly affected by metal adsorbates and clusters on graphene. Here, we study the effect of a thin layer of chromium (Cr) and titanium (Ti) metals on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene by using Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements. The Raman spectra and transport measurements show that both Cr and Ti metals affect the structure as well as the electronic properties of the CVD-grown graphene. The shift of peak frequencies, intensities and widths of the Raman bands are analyzed after the deposition of metal films of different thickness on CVD-grown graphene. The shifts in G and 2D peak positions indicate the doping effect of graphene by Cr and Ti metals. While p-type doping was observed for Cr-coated graphene, n-type doping was observed for Ti-coated graphene. The doping effect is also confirmed by measuring the gate voltage dependent resistivity of graphene. We have also found that annealing in Ar atmosphere induces a p-type doping effect on Cr- or Ti-coated CVD-grown graphene. PMID:22814217

  5. Raman fingerprint of doping due to metal adsorbates on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. W.; Singh, Arun Kumar; Iqbal, M. Z.; Eom, Jonghwa

    2012-08-01

    The properties of single-layer graphene are strongly affected by metal adsorbates and clusters on graphene. Here, we study the effect of a thin layer of chromium (Cr) and titanium (Ti) metals on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene by using Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements. The Raman spectra and transport measurements show that both Cr and Ti metals affect the structure as well as the electronic properties of the CVD-grown graphene. The shift of peak frequencies, intensities and widths of the Raman bands are analyzed after the deposition of metal films of different thickness on CVD-grown graphene. The shifts in G and 2D peak positions indicate the doping effect of graphene by Cr and Ti metals. While p-type doping was observed for Cr-coated graphene, n-type doping was observed for Ti-coated graphene. The doping effect is also confirmed by measuring the gate voltage dependent resistivity of graphene. We have also found that annealing in Ar atmosphere induces a p-type doping effect on Cr- or Ti-coated CVD-grown graphene.

  6. Density functional study of gold and iron clusters on perfect and defected graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Manoj K.; Wang, Yan; Kemper, A. F.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2012-04-01

    Metal clusters adsorbed on graphene can give rise to interesting physical properties. Using density-functional theory calculations, we investigate Aun and Fen (n=1-5) clusters adsorbed on perfect and defected graphene with a single vacancy. With the exception of Fe clusters on defected graphene, clusters are bonded to graphene through an anchor atom. Geometries of clusters on graphene are similar to their free-standing structures except for the Fe5 cluster on perfect graphene. Compared to Au, Fe clusters are more strongly bonded to graphene. We find that it is important to include long-range van der Waals interactions for Au clusters adsorbed on perfect graphene. An Au5 cluster becomes parallel to the graphene only when the van der Waals interactions are taken into account. Charge transfer between clusters and graphene shows strong size dependency, and the amount is larger in the presence of the single vacancy on the graphene than a pristine sheet. Perfect graphene is found to be doped for Au clusters with an odd number of atoms and undoped with an even number of atoms. Magnetic moments are also calculated as a function of cluster size and an odd-even oscillation is observed in Aun-perfect as well as defected graphene system. While Fen clusters remain to be magnetic for all n, the spin of a single Fe atom on a defect site is very small due to a covalent bonding to C atoms.

  7. Structure stability and magnetic properties of WnH2 (n =7-12) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Xiu-Rong; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Hu, Gao-Kang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the structure and magnetic properties of WnH2 (n = 7-12) clusters have been systematically investigated using density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The result indicates that the ground state structures of WnH2 clusters are generated when H2 dissociative adsorbed on the atop site of Wn clusters. W8H2 and W10H2 clusters are found to be more stable than other clusters. The adsorption abilities of Wn clusters are related to W-H bond length, adsorption energy and the charge transfer between H and W clusters as well as the electronic density of state.

  8. Optimizing heterosurface adsorbent synthesis for liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovskii, S. Yu.; Serdan, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural and geometric parameters of a silica matrix (SM) for the synthesis of heterosurface adsorbents (HAs) are optimized. Modification is performed by shielding the external surfaces of alkyl-modified silica (AS) using human serum albumin and its subsequent crosslinking. The structural and geometric characteristics of the SM, AS, and HA are measured via low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. It is found that the structural characteristics of AS pores with diameters D < 6 nm do not change during HA synthesis, while the volume of pores with diameters of 6 nm < D < 9 nm shrinks slightly due to the adsorption of albumin in the pore orifices. It is established that the volume of pores with diameters D > 9 nm reduces significantly due to adsorption of albumin. It is concluded that silica gel with a maximum pore size distribution close to 5 nm and a minimal proportion of pores with D > 9 nm is optimal for HA synthesis; this allows us to achieve the greatest similarity between the chromatographic retention parameters for HA and AS. The suitability of the synthesized adsorbents for analyzing drugs in biological fluids through direct sample injection is confirmed by chromatography. It was found that the percentage of the protein fraction detected at the outlet of the chromatographic column is 98%.

  9. Nitric oxide releasing material adsorbs more fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Lantvit, Sarah M; Barrett, Brittany J; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-11-01

    One mechanism of the failure of blood-contacting devices is clotting. Nitric oxide (NO) releasing materials are seen as a viable solution to the mediation of surface clotting by preventing platelet activation; however, NO's involvement in preventing clot formation extends beyond controlling platelet function. In this study, we evaluate NO's effect on factor XII (fibrinogen) adsorption and activation, which causes the initiation of the intrinsic arm of the coagulation cascade. This is done by utilizing a model plasticized poly(vinyl) chloride (PVC), N-diazeniumdiolate system and looking at the adsorption of fibrinogen, an important clotting protein, to these surfaces. The materials have been prepared in such a way to eliminate changes in surface properties between the control (plasticized PVC) and composite (NO-releasing) materials. This allows us to isolate NO release and determine the effect on the adsorption of fibrinogen, to the material surface. Surprisingly, it was found that an NO releasing material with a surface flux of 17.4 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) showed a significant increase in the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed to the material surface compared to one with a flux of 13.0 ± 1.6 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) and the control (2334 ± 496, 226 ± 99, and 103 ±31% fibrinogen adsorbed of control, respectively). This study suggests that NO's role in controlling clotting is extended beyond platelet activation. PMID:23554300

  10. Adsorbents as antiendotoxin agents in experimental colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, K R; Anderson, N H; McCaigue, M D; Erwin, P J; Halliday, M I; Rowlands, B J

    1993-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa protects the body from a large reservoir of intraluminal pathogenic bacteria and endotoxins. This mucosal barrier is disrupted by the inflammation and ulceration of inflammatory bowel disease and may permit the absorption of toxic bacterial products. Systemic endotoxaemia has been demonstrated in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and correlates with the extent and activity of disease. In this study the efficacy of absorbents as antiendotoxin agents in a hapten induced rat model of colitis is investigated. Induction of colitis was associated with systemic endotoxaemia. Enteral administration of terra fullonica and kaolin, but not of charcoal, significantly reduced systemic endotoxaemia (terra fullonica 4.2 (1.40) pg/ml; kaolin 5.29 (1.86) pg/ml; charcoal 32.7 (16.6) pg/ml; water 39.8 (12.6) pg/ml). Data expressed as mean (SE). With increasing severity of colitis, there was a decreasing ability of adsorbent therapy (terra fullonica) to control systemic endotoxaemia. Enteral administration of adsorbents controls gut derived systemic endotoxaemia in experimental colitis in animals and may be a useful antiendotoxin treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:8432452

  11. Block copolymer adsorbed layers on solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Mani; Jiang, Naisheng; Gowd, Bhoje; Endoh, Maya; Koga, Tadanori

    Block copolymer thin films offer a simple and effective route to fabricate highly ordered periodic microdomain structures. The fundamental, yet unsolved question is whether these highly oriented microdomain structures persist even near an impenetrable solid wall. We here report the adsorbed structures of polystyrene-block-poly (4-vinylpyridine) (PS-block-P4VP, Mw = 41,000, PS (weight fraction =0.81) formed on planar silicon substrates. Perpendicularly aligned cylindrical microdomains were created by solvent vapor annealing (Gowd et al., Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 7753), and the adsorbed layer was derived by solvent leaching with chloroform, a good solvent for the polymers and thereafter characterized by using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray reflectivity. The results showed that both PS and P4VP chains lie flat on the substrate, forming a microphase-separated structure (MSS) without long-range order. Moreover, a spin-coated PS-block-P4VP thin film annealed under vacuum at 190 °C showed similar MSS on the substrate, indicating the generality of the interfacial polymer structure. Details will be discussed in the presentation. NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  12. Mimetite Formation from Goethite-Adsorbed Ions.

    PubMed

    Kleszczewska-Zębala, Anna; Manecki, Maciej; Bajda, Tomasz; Rakovan, John; Borkiewicz, Olaf J

    2016-06-01

    Bioavailability of arsenic in contaminated soils and wastes can be reduced to insignificant levels by precipitation of mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl. The objective of this study is to elucidate mechanisms of the reaction between solution containing lead ions and arsenates adsorbed on synthetic goethite (AsO4-goethite), or arsenate ions in the solution and goethite saturated with adsorbed Pb (Pb-goethite). These reactions, in the presence of Cl, result in rapid crystallization of mimetite. Formation of mimetite is faster than desorption of AsO4 but slower than desorption of Pb from the goethite surface. Slow desorption of arsenates from AsO4-goethite results in heterogeneous precipitation and formation of mimetite incrustation on goethite crystals. Desorption of lead from Pb-goethite is at least as fast as diffusion and advection of AsO4 and Cl in suspension allowing for homogeneous crystallization of mimetite in intergranular solution. Therefore, the mechanism of nucleation is primarily driven by the kinetics of constituent supply to the saturation front, rather than by the thermodynamics of nucleation. The products of the reactions are well documented using microscopy methods such as scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PMID:27329315

  13. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers.

    PubMed

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-21

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role. PMID:27353115

  14. Photodecomposition of chloromethanes adsorbed on silica surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausloos, P.; Rebbert, R. E.; Glasgow, L.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation of CCl4, CFCl3, and CF2Cl2 in the presence of C2H6 in vessels containing silica sand or fused quartz tubing results in the formation of chlorine-containing products. The formation of these compounds occurs at wavelengths extending up to approximately 400 nm, that is, at wavelengths well beyond the absorption threshold of the chloromethanes in the gas phase. It is suggested that CCl4 adsorbed on silica surfaces photodissociates to yield CCl3 and CCl2 species. The poor material balance obtained in these experiments indicates that several of the chlorine-containing fragments are strongly adsorbed on the surface. At a CCl4 pressure of 13 Pa (0.1 torr), photolysis with 366 nm light in the presence of sand results in the decomposition of one molecule for every 10,000 photons striking the surface. Under otherwise identical conditions, the photon-induced breadkdown of CFCl3 and CF2Cl2 is respectively only 10% or 3% as efficient.

  15. Investigation of drug-porous adsorbent interactions in drug mixtures with selected porous adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Madieh, Shadi; Simone, Michael; Wilson, Wendy; Mehra, Dev; Augsburger, Larry

    2007-04-01

    The adsorption of drugs onto porous substrates may prove to be a convenient method by which to enhance the dissolution rate of certain poorly water-soluble drugs in body fluids. The purpose of this research is to provide a better understanding of the type of interactions occurring between drugs and certain pharmaceutically acceptable porous adsorbents that leads to enhanced drug dissolution rates. The interactions between ibuprofen (acidic drug), acetaminophen (acidic drug), dipyridamole (basic drug), and the porous adsorbents used (calcium silicate and silica gel) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). DSC and PXRD results indicated a significant loss of crystallinity of both ibuprofen and acetaminophen but not dipyridamole. In the case of ibuprofen, FTIR results indicated the ionization of the carboxylic group based on the shift in the FTIR carboxylic band. Dissolution of ibuprofen from its mixtures with porous adsorbents was found to be significantly higher compared to the neat drug, whereas dipyridamole dissolution from its mixtures with porous adsorbents was not significantly different from that of the neat drug. PMID:17221849

  16. Equilibrium molecular theory of two-dimensional adsorbate drops on surfaces of heterogeneous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2016-08-01

    A molecular statistical theory for calculating the linear tension of small multicomponent droplets in two-dimensional adsorption systems is developed. The theory describes discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a scale comparable to molecular size) and continuous distributions of molecules (at short distances inside cells) in their translational and vibrational motions. Pair intermolecular interaction potentials (the Mie type potential) in several coordination spheres are considered. For simplicity, it is assumed that distinctions in the sizes of mixture components are slight and comparable to the sizes of adsorbent adsorption centers. Expressions for the pressure tensor components inside small droplets on the heterogeneous surface of an adsorbent are obtained, allowing calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of a vapor-fluid interface, including linear tension. Problems in refining the molecular theory are discussed: describing the properties of small droplets using a coordination model of their structure, considering the effect an adsorbate has on the state of a near-surface adsorbent region, and the surface heterogeneity factor in the conditions for the formation of droplets.

  17. Mechanisms of laser interaction with metal carbonyls adsorbed on Si(111)7 × 7: Thermal vs photoelectronic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, N. S.; Ying, Z.; Bartosch, C. E.; Ho, W.

    1987-05-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum studies of the interaction of 514 nm radiation from a cw Ar ion laser and its second harmonic at 257 nm with mono- and multilayer coverages of Mo(CO)6, W(CO)6, and Fe(CO)5 adsorbed on Si(111)7×7 at 90 K using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), laser induced desorption spectroscopy, high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), and Auger electron spectroscopy were performed. A model for the temperature rise of the sample due to cw laser heating is developed. By directly measuring the substrate temperature, these experiments were able to distinguish between photoelectronic and thermal effects active in the decomposition and desorption mechanisms of the adsorbed carbonyls. Results from TDS and HREELS show that Mo(CO)6 and W(CO)6 are molecularly adsorbed, while Fe(CO)5 partially dissociates upon adsorption. The decomposition of adsorbed Mo(CO)6 is caused by electronic excitation due to direct absorption of the 257 nm radiation. Irradiation with 514 nm radiation results in no photochemistry. The same mechanism is dominant for adsorbed W(CO)6 and Fe(CO)5; however, new excitation mechanisms are available to these molecules that lead to bonding changes in W(CO)6 and Fe(CO)5 with 514 nm irradiation. The photodecomposition products of the adsorbed carbonyls are found to be different from the gas-phase decomposition products. The surface stabilizes the adsorbed carbonyls, preventing complete removal of all the CO ligands. Desorption of CO due to photoelectronic excitation is found to occur via sequential single photon absorption and extraction of CO ligands. Evidence of clustering of carbonyl fragments was observed after 257 nm irradiation.

  18. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W. -P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  19. Fundamental characteristics of synthetic adsorbents intended for industrial chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tadashi; Isobe, Eiji

    2004-05-14

    With the aim of obtaining comprehensive information on the selection of synthetic adsorbents for industrial applications, effect of pore and chemical structure of industrial-grade synthetic adsorbents on adsorption capacity of several pharmaceutical compounds was investigated. For relatively low molecular mass compounds, such as cephalexin, berberine chloride and tetracycline hydrochloride, surface area per unit volume of polystyrenic adsorbents dominated the equilibrium adsorption capacity. On the contrary, effect of pore size of the polystyrenic adsorbents on the equilibrium adsorption capacity was observed for relatively high molecular mass compounds, such as rifampicin, Vitamin B12 and insulin. Polystyrenic adsorbent with high surface area and small pore size showed small adsorption capacity for relatively high molecular mass compounds, whereas polystyrenic adsorbent with relatively small surface area but with large pore size showed large adsorption capacity. Effect of chemical structure on the equilibrium adsorption capacity of several pharmaceutical compounds was also studied among polystyrenic, modified polystyrenic and polymethacrylic adsorbents. The modified polystyrenic adsorbent showed larger adsorption capacity for all compounds tested in this study due to enhanced hydrophobicity. The polymethacrylic adsorbent possessed high adsorption capacity for rifampicin and insulin, but it showed lower adsorption capacity for the other compounds studied. This result may be attributed to hydrogen bonding playing major role for the adsorption of compounds on polymethacrylic adsorbent. Furthermore, column adsorption experiments were operated to estimate the effect of pore characteristics of the polystyrenic adsorbents on dynamic adsorption behavior, and it is found that both surface area and pore size of the polystyrenic adsorbents significantly affect the dynamic adsorption capacity as well as flow rate. PMID:15139411

  20. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1994-04-05

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

  1. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, Gunnar I.; Dietz, Russell N.

    1994-01-01

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

  2. Video STM Studies of Adsorbate Diffusion at Electrochemical Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansel, T.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2006-01-01

    Direct in situ studies of the surface diffusion of isolated adsorbates at an electrochemical interface by high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (video STM) are presented for sulfide adsorbates on Cu(100) in HCl solution. As revealed by a quantitative statistical analysis, the adsorbate motion can be described by thermally activated hopping between neighboring adsorption sites with an activation energy that increases linearly with electrode potential by 0.50 eV per V. This can be explained by changes in the adsorbate dipole moment during the hopping process and contributions from coadsorbates.

  3. Linear transport models for adsorbing solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.; Jury, W. A.

    1993-04-01

    A unified linear theory for the transport of adsorbing solutes through soils is presented and applied to analyze movement of napropamide through undisturbed soil columns. The transport characteristics of the soil are expressed in terms of the travel time distribution of the mobile phase which is then used to incorporate local interaction processes. This approach permits the analysis of all linear transport processes, not only the small subset for which a differential description is known. From a practical point of view, it allows the direct use of measured concentrations or fluxes of conservative solutes to characterize the mobile phase without first subjecting them to any model. For complicated flow regimes, this may vastly improve the identification of models and estimation of their parameters for the local adsorption processes.

  4. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A. Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-01

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role.The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth

  5. Structure analysis and photochemistry of adsorbates on platinum and palladium surfaces. [1,2-dichloroethene

    SciTech Connect

    Grassian, V.H.

    1987-05-01

    The vibrational spectra of benzene and toluene adsorbed on Pd(111) indicates at 180K these molecules weakly bond to the surface. The adsorption of benzene and toluene on Pt(111) is much stronger as indicated by large frequency shifts from gas phase values. Pyridine adsorption on both Pt(111) and Pd(111) was studied as a function of temperature. At room temperature pyridine decomposes on the surface to form an ..cap alpha..-pyridyl fragment (NC/sub 5/H/sub 4/) on Pt(111), whereas the molecule remains intact on Pd(111). The electron energy loss spectra of pyridine adsorbed on these surfaces is compared to the ir spectra of two osmium cluster compounds: Os/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/(NC/sub 5/H/sub 5/), a pyridine complex, and HOs/sub 3/(CO)/sub 10/(NC/sub 5/H/sub 4/), a pyridyl complex. The stronger interaction of these molecules to the platinum surface is a consequence of the stronger bonding of the 5d orbitals as compared to the 4d orbitals. The uv photochemistry of 2-butene and 1,2-dichloroethene when adsorbed on Pt and Pd surfaces was also studied.

  6. Theoretical study of AuCu nanoalloys adsorbed on MgO(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbelaud, M.; Barcaro, G.; Fortunelli, A.; Ferrando, R.

    2012-06-01

    The structures of AuCu clusters adsorbed on the (001) face of MgO are searched for by a two-step methodology. In a first step, the relevant structural motifs are singled out by global optimization searches within an atomistic model. In a second step, the lowest energy structures of each motif are relaxed by density-functional calculations. Three different sizes (30, 40 and 50 atoms) are considered. For each size, three compositions are analyzed. For size 30, a competition between fcc pyramids and a new motif (the daisy structure) is found. For 40 and 50 atoms, icosahedral fragments prevail. The results are discussed in connection with experimental data related to clusters of larger sizes.

  7. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  8. SORPTION PROPERTIES OF MODEL COMPOUNDS ON C18 ADSORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bonded silica adsorbent Bondapak-C18 was evaluated for removing organic matter from secondary sewage effluents and from solutions of pure organic compounds. The adsorbent is hydrophobic and its behavior with water samples may be erratic unless first wet with a solvent. Howeve...

  9. Development of a Desulfurization Strategy for a NOx Adsorber Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Tomazic, Dean

    2000-08-20

    Improve NOx regeneration calibration developed in DECSE Phase I project to understand full potential of NOx adsorber catalyst over a range of operating temperatures. Develop and demonstrate a desulfurization process to restore NOx conversion efficiency lost to sulfur contamination. Investigate effect of desulfurization process on long-term performance of the NOx adsorber catalyst.

  10. Facile and template-free preparation of {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanostructures and their enhanced adsorbability

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hongwei; Shen, Jianfeng; Shi, Min; Yan, Bo; Li, Na; Ye, Mingxin

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: . The as-obtained ({alpha}-MnO{sub 2}) nanomaterials could act as an adsorbent to remove Conge red. More significantly, the nanomaterials are nontoxic and environmentally friendly though a biological MTT assay experiment. Plots of the capacity to remove Conge red with time by the commercial and new-prepared {alpha}-MnO{sub 2}. Inset shows absorption of Congo Red with time by new-prepared rod-clusters {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} (0, 10, 20, 40 and 60 min, respectively). Highlights: {yields} Nanostructured {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} was prepared through a template-free hydrothermal method. {yields} The obtained {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} could act as effective adsorbents to remove organic dyes. {yields} The obtained adsorbents are environmentally friendly. -- Abstract: In this paper, nanostructured MnO{sub 2} materials were successfully prepared through a simple and template-free hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction pattern indicates that the as-prepared nanomaterials are {alpha}-MnO{sub 2}. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy images demonstrate that nanostructured rod-clusters {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} could be evolved from the nanorods. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement was employed to characterize the surface property. Moreover, the as-obtained ({alpha}-MnO{sub 2}) nanomaterials could act as an efficient adsorbent to remove Congo Red and Methlylene Blue. More significantly, the nanomaterials are nontoxic and environmentally friendly via biological methylthiazolyldiphenyltetrazoliumbromide assay experiments. Its nontoxic and enhanced adsorbability properties guarantee their safe applications in environmental protection and industrial aspects.

  11. Theoretical study of the dynamics of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on graphene multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaied, Mohammed; Moreno, J. A.; Caturla, M. J.; Ynduráin, Félix; Palacios, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dynamics of H atoms adsorbed on graphene bilayers with Bernal stacking. First, through extensive density functional theory calculations, including van der Waals interactions, we obtain the activation barriers involved in the desorption and migration processes of a single H atom. These barriers, along with attempt rates and the energetics of H pairs, are used as input parameters in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to study the time evolution of an initial random distribution of adsorbed H atoms. The simulations reveal that, at room temperature, H atoms occupy only one sublattice before they completely desorb or form clusters. This sublattice selectivity in the distribution of H atoms may last for sufficiently long periods of time upon lowering the temperature down to 0 ∘C . The final fate of the H atoms, namely, desorption or cluster formation, depends on the actual relative values of the activation barriers which can be tuned by doping. In some cases, a sublattice selectivity can be obtained for periods of time experimentally relevant even at room temperature. This result shows the possibility for observation and applications of the ferromagnetic state associated with such distribution.

  12. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  13. Kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, H.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M.G. Rao and A.K. Gupta was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for both the cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 2}/s were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively.

  14. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-01

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  15. Kinetic Study of Lead Adsorption to Composite Biopolymer Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Seki; Suzuki

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M. G. Rao and A. K. Gupta (Chem. Eng. J. 24, 181, 1982) was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for the both cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 x 10(-6) and 7 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049553

  16. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  17. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  18. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  19. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  20. Imaging the wave functions of adsorbed molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F. Stefan; Ramsey, Michael G.; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The basis for a quantum-mechanical description of matter is electron wave functions. For atoms and molecules, their spatial distributions and phases are known as orbitals. Although orbitals are very powerful concepts, experimentally only the electron densities and -energy levels are directly observable. Regardless whether orbitals are observed in real space with scanning probe experiments, or in reciprocal space by photoemission, the phase information of the orbital is lost. Here, we show that the experimental momentum maps of angle-resolved photoemission from molecular orbitals can be transformed to real-space orbitals via an iterative procedure which also retrieves the lost phase information. This is demonstrated with images obtained of a number of orbitals of the molecules pentacene (C22H14) and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (C24H8O6), adsorbed on silver, which are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. The procedure requires no a priori knowledge of the orbitals and is shown to be simple and robust. PMID:24344291

  1. Mesoporous carbon nanomaterials as environmental adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pranav K; Gan, Lihua; Liu, Mingxian; Rao, Nageswara N

    2014-02-01

    The transportation and diffusion of the guest objects or molecules in the porous carbon nanomaterials can be facilitated by reducing the pathway and resistance. The reduced pathway depends on the porous nature of carbon nanomaterials. Classification of porous carbon materials by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has given a new opportunity to design the pores as per their applicability and to understand the mobility of ions, atoms, and molecules in the porous network of carbon materials and also advanced their countless applicability. However, synthesis of carbon nanomaterials with a desired porous network is still a great challenge. Although, remarkable developments have taken place in the recent years, control over the pores size and/or hierarchical porous architectures, especially in the synthesis of carbon nanospheres (CNSs) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMCs) is still intriguing. The micro and mesoporous CNSs and OMCs have been prepared by a variety of procedures and over a wide range of compositions using various different surfactant templates and carbon precursors etc. The mechanisms of formation of micromesopore in the CNSs and OMCs are still evolving. On the other hand, the urge for adsorbents with very high adsorption capacities for removing contaminants from water is growing steadily. In this review, we address the state-of-the-art synthesis of micro and mesoporous CNSs and OMCs, giving examples of their applications for adsorptive removals of contaminants including our own research studies. PMID:24749459

  2. NASA Applications of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a new, innovative technology that was developed to reduce the risk of molecular contamination on spaceflight applications. Outgassing from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, and potting compounds, pose a significant threat to the spacecraft and the lifetime of missions. As a coating made of highly porous inorganic materials, MAC offers impressive adsorptive capabilities that help capture and trap contaminants. Past research efforts have demonstrated the coating's promising adhesion performance, optical properties, acoustic durability, and thermal stability. These results advocate its use near or on surfaces that are targeted by outgassed materials, such as internal optics, electronics, detectors, baffles, sensitive instruments, thermal control coatings, and vacuum chamber test environments. The MAC technology has significantly progressed in development over the recent years. This presentation summarizes the many NASA spaceflight applications of MAC and how the coatings technology has been integrated as a mitigation tool for outgassed contaminants. For example, this sprayable paint technology has been beneficial for use in various vacuum chambers for contamination control and hardware bake-outs. The coating has also been used in small instrument cavities within spaceflight instrument for NASA missions.

  3. Morphological characterization of furfuraldehyde resins adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Monteiro, S.N.; D`Almeida, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Sugar cane is one of the most traditional plantation cultivated crops in large areas in Brazil. The State University of the North of Rio de Janeiro, UENF, is currently engaged in a program aimed to exploit the potentialities of sugar cane industry as a self sustained non-polluting enterprise. One of the projects being carried out at the UENF is the transformation of sugar cane bagasse in precursor materials for the industry of furan derivatives such as the furfuraldehyde resins obtained by acid catalysis. The possibility of employing acid catalyzed furfuraldehyde resins as selective adsorbents has arisen during a comprehensive study of physical-chemical adsorption properties of these materials. The morphology of these resins depend on the synthesis method. Scanning Electron Microscopic studies of these materials which were synthesized, in bulk (FH-M) and solution (FH-D), showed differences in surface density and particle size. Using mercury porosimeter techniques and BET adsorption methods, it was found different pore size distributions and a decrement in surface area when solvent was employed in the synthesis process. By thermogravimetric analysis it was found similar weight losses (6%) of water adsorption and a small differences in thermal stabilities.

  4. Cluster analysis of molecular simulation trajectories for systems where both conformation and orientation of the sampled states are important.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, Tigran M; Snyder, James A; Thyparambil, Aby A; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Clustering methods have been widely used to group together similar conformational states from molecular simulations of biomolecules in solution. For applications such as the interaction of a protein with a surface, the orientation of the protein relative to the surface is also an important clustering parameter because of its potential effect on adsorbed-state bioactivity. This study presents cluster analysis methods that are specifically designed for systems where both molecular orientation and conformation are important, and the methods are demonstrated using test cases of adsorbed proteins for validation. Additionally, because cluster analysis can be a very subjective process, an objective procedure for identifying both the optimal number of clusters and the best clustering algorithm to be applied to analyze a given dataset is presented. The method is demonstrated for several agglomerative hierarchical clustering algorithms used in conjunction with three cluster validation techniques. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27292100

  5. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  6. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  7. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  8. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  9. Nitrogen Molecule Adsorption on Cationic Tantalum Clusters and Rhodium Clusters and Desorption from Their Nitride Clusters Studied by Thermal Desorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-06-23

    Adsorption and desorption of N2 molecules onto cationic Ta and Rh clusters in the gas phase were investigated in the temperature range of 300-1000 K by using thermal desorption spectrometry in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For Ta6(+), the first N2 molecule was found to adsorb dissociatively, and it remained adsorbed when Ta6(+)N2 was heated to 1000 K. In contrast, the second and the subsequent N2 molecules adsorbed weakly as a molecular form and were released into the gas phase when heated to 600 K. The difference can be explained in terms of the activation barrier between the molecular and dissociative forms. On the other hand, when Ta clusters were generated in the presence of N2 gas by the laser ablation of a Ta rod, isomeric clusters, TanNm(+), having heat resistivity were formed. For Rh6(+), N2 adsorbed molecularly at 300 K and desorbed totally at 450 K. These results were consistent with the DFT calculations, indicating that the dissociative adsorption of N2 is endothermic. PMID:27276438

  10. Novel adhesive properties of poly(ethylene-oxide) adsorbed nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wenduo

    Solid-polymer interfaces play crucial roles in the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology and are the confluence of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. There is now growing evidence that polymer chains irreversibly adsorb even onto weakly attractive solid surfaces, forming a nanometer-thick adsorbed polymer layer ("adsorbed polymer nanolayers"). It has also been reported that the adsorbed layers greatly impact on local structures and properties of supported polymer thin films. In this thesis, I aim to clarify adhesive and tribological properties of adsorbed poly(ethylene-oxide) (PEO) nanolayers onto silicon (Si) substrates, which remain unsolved so far. The adsorbed nanolayers were prepared by the established protocol: one has to equilibrate the melt or dense solution against a solid surface; the unadsorbed chains can be then removed by a good solvent, while the adsorbed chains are assumed to maintain the same conformation due to the irreversible freezing through many physical solid-segment contacts. I firstly characterized the formation process and the surface/film structures of the adsorbed nanolayers by using X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Secondly, to compare the surface energy of the adsorbed layers with the bulk, static contact angle measurements with two liquids (water and glycerol) were carried out using a optical contact angle meter equipped with a video camera. Thirdly, I designed and constructed a custom-built adhesion-testing device to quantify the adhesive property. The experimental results provide new insight into the microscopic structure - macroscopic property relationship at the solid-polymer interface.

  11. Alkylammonium montmorillonites as adsorbents for organic vapors from air

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, M.; Purnell, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Montmorillonite clays may be modified by the exchange of the inorganic interlayer cations with alkylammonium ions, resulting in a fixed internal porosity. The pore size and shape depend on the nature of the alkylammonium ion. A number of different ions were used to prepare adsorbents with varying properties, and these were examined for their potential application to sampling organic vapors in air. Characterization involved determination of nitrogen and water contents, surface area, interlayer spacing, thermal stability, and breakthrough volumes of organic vapors. The adsorbent that showed the most promise (tetramethylammonium montmorillonite (TMA)) was further evaluated for use as an adsorbent in both thermal- and solvent-desorable sampling systems.

  12. Controlling adsorbate interactions for advanced chemical patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra Garcia, Hector M.

    -situ esterification results in the creation of subtle chemical and structural defects that promote molecular exchange reactions to go to completion. The complementary hydrolysis reaction can be employed to quench the reacted monolayer, significantly hindering further displacement. The generality of reversible lability was tested by applying the in-situ esterification reaction to the structurally distinct carboxyl-functionalized molecule 3-mercapto-1-adamantane-carboxylic acid. In addition to the studies of manipulating the interactions in self-assembled monolayers, materials with tunable optical and electronic properties were fabricated using atomic clusters as building blocks. It was shown that materials assembled from the same cluster motif, in this case As3-7 , can result in materials with band gaps that vary predictably between 1.09 to 2.08 eV. The size and highest occupied molecular orbital of the alkali metal counter-cation used in the assembly was shown to affect the band gap of the cluster-assembled solids. Furthermore, the dimensionality of the cluster-cluster interactions played a crucial role in determining the resulting properties. These results demonstrate how complex surface assemblies, or novel solid materials, can be fabricated by manipulating the interactions between the individual components within the assemblies, paving the way for the fabrication of next-generation devices and materials.

  13. Pulsed EPR for studying silver clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalik, J.; Wasowicz, T.; Sadlo, J.; Reijerse, E. J.; Kevan, L.

    1996-01-01

    The cationic silver clusters of different nuclearity have been produced by radiolysis of zeolite A and SAPO molecular sieves containing Ag + as exchangeable cations. The pulsed EPR spectroscopy has been applied for studying the local environment of silver cluster in order to understand the mechanism of cluster formation and stabilization. The electron spin echo modulation (ESEM) results on Ag 6n+ cluster in dehydration zeolite A indicate that the hexameric silver is stabilized only in sodalite cages which are surrounded by α-cages containing no water molecules. Trimeric silver clusters formed in hydrated A zeolites strongly interact with water, thus the paramagnetic center can be considered as a cluster-water adduct. In SAPO-molecular sieves, silver clusters are formed only in the presence of adsorbed alcohol molecules. From ESEM it is determined that Ag 4n+ in SAPO-42 is stabilized in α-cages, where it is directly coordinated by two methanol molecules. Dimeric silver, Ag 2+ in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 is located in 6-ring channels and interacts with three CH 3OH molecules, each in different 10-ring or 12-ring channels. The differences of Ag 2+ stability in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 are also discussed.

  14. Oscillatory behavior in the size dependence of cluster mobility on metal surfaces: Rh on Rh(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Kellogg, G.L. )

    1994-09-26

    The mobility of Rh clusters containing two to twelve atoms adsorbed on the Rh(100) plane is examined by field ion microscopy. The activation energy of surface diffusion exhibits an interesting, oscillatory behavior as a function of cluster size. Compact geometric structures (squares and rectangles) have a consistently higher activation energy than structures with extra atoms at the periphery. The atomic-level mechanism involved in cluster diffusion is inferred from a comparison of the measured activation energies to previous theoretical calculations.

  15. Radiation grafted adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Nasef, Mohamed; Ting, T. M.; Abbasi, Ali; Layeghi-moghaddam, Alireza; Sara Alinezhad, S.; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation induced grafting (RIG) is acquired to prepare a number of adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications using a single route involving RIG of glycidymethacrylate (GMA) onto polyethylene-polypropylene (PE-PP) non-woven fabric. The grafted fabric was subjected to one of three functionalization reactions to impart desired ionic characters. This included treatment with (1) N-dimethyl-D-glucamine, (2) triethylamine and (3) triethylamine and alkalisation with KOH. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to study the changes in chemical and physical structures of the obtained fibrous adsorbents. The potential applications of the three adsorbents for removal of boron from solutions, capturing CO2 from CO2/N2 mixtures and catalysing transesterification of triacetin/methanol to methyl acetate (biodiesel) were explored. The obtained fibrous adsorbents provide potential alternatives to granular resins for the investigated applications and require further development.

  16. SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION OF PARTICULATE AND ADSORBENT MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a summary of work performed by PNL on the extraction of semivolatile organic materials (SVOCs), for example, polynuclear aromatic compounds, from various adsorbents and environmental matrices, using supercritical fluids (SCFs) as extractants. The results of the work...

  17. Anomalous thermal denaturing of proteins adsorbed to nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichroeb, J. H.; Forrest, J. A.; Ngai, V.; Jones, L. W.

    2006-09-01

    We have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) to monitor the structural changes that accompany thermal denaturing of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed onto gold nanospheres of size 5nm-60nm. The effect of the protein on the LSPR was monitored by visible extinction spectroscopy. The position of the resonance is affected by the conformation of the adsorbed protein layer, and as such can be used as a very sensitive probe of thermal denaturing that is specific to the adsorbed protein. The results are compared to detailed calculations and show that full calculations can lead to significant increases in knowledge where gold nanospheres are used as biosensors. Thermal denaturing on spheres with diameter > 20 nm show strong similarity to bulk calorimetric studies of BSA in solution. BSA adsorbed on nanospheres with d ⩽ 15nm shows a qualitative difference in behavior, suggesting a sensitivity of denaturing characteristics on local surface curvature. This may have important implications for other protein-nanoparticle interactions.

  18. Removal of adsorbed gases with CO2 snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    1991-09-01

    During the outgassing of orbiting astronomical observatories, the condensation of molecular species on optical surfaces can create difficulties for astronomers. The problem is particularly severe in ultraviolet astronomy where the adsorption of only a few atomic layers of some substances can be very damaging. In this paper the removal of adsorbed atomic layers using carbon dioxide snow is discussed. The rate of removal of adsorbed layers of isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF, and deionized distilled water on Teflon substrates was experimentally determined. The removal of fingerprints (containing fatty acids such as stearic acid) from optical surfaces is also demonstrated. The presence and rate of removal of the multilayers was monitored by detecting the molecular dipole field of adsorbed molecular species. For isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF (trichlorotrifluoroethane), and water adsorbed multilayers were removed in under 1.5 seconds. Fingerprint removal was much more difficult and required 20 seconds of spraying with a mixture of carbon dioxide snow flakes and atomized microdroplets of isopropyl alcohol.

  19. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  20. Trace contaminant studies of HSC adsorbent. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yieh, D. T. N.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of fifteen trace contaminants on HSC (polyethylenimine coated acrylic ester) adsorbent were experimentally investigated with the following two objectives: to test the removal potential and the adsorption reversibility of the selected trace contaminants, and to test the effect a preadsorbed trace contaminant has on the CO2 adsorption capacity. The experimental method for acquiring the adsorption equilibrium data used is based on the volumetric (or displacement) concept of vacuum adsorption. From the experimental results, it was found that the HSC adsorbent has good adsorption potential for contaminants of alcohol compounds, esters, and benzene compounds; whereas, adsorption of ketone compounds, oxidizing and reducing agents are detrimental to the adsorbent. In addition, all liquid contaminants reduce the CO2 capacity of HSC adsorbent.

  1. New insights into perfluorinated adsorbents for analytical and bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Nicola; Guzzinati, Roberta; Catani, Martina; Massi, Alessandro; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorinated (F-) adsorbents are generally prepared by bonding perfluoro-functionalized silanes to silica gels. They have been employed for a long time essentially as media for solid-phase extraction of F-molecules or F-tagged molecules in organic chemistry and heterogeneous catalysis. More recently, this approach has been extended to proteomics and metabolomics. Owing to their unique physicochemical properties, namely fluorophilicity and proteinophilicity, and a better understanding of some fundamental aspects of their behavior, new applications of F-adsorbents in the field of environmental science and bio-affinity studies can be envisaged. In this article, we revisit the most important features of F-adsorbents by focusing, in particular, on some basic information that has been recently obtained through (nonlinear) chromatographic studies. Finally, we try to envisage new applications and possibilities that F-adsorbents will allow in the near future. PMID:25358910

  2. Adsorption of β-galactosidase on silica and aluminosilicate adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Dobryakova, I. V.; Pilipenko, O. S.

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that adsorption of β-galactosidase of Aspergillus oryzae fungi on mesoporous and biporous silica and aluminosilicate adsorbents and the rate of the process grow along with the diameter of the pores of the adsorbent. It is found that the shape of the adsorption isotherms changes as well, depending on the texture of the adsorbent: the Michaelis constant rises from 0.3 mM for the enzyme in solution to 0.4-0.5 mM for the enzyme on a surface in the hydrolysis of o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside. It is concluded that β-galactosidase displays its maximum activity on the surface of biporous adsorbents.

  3. Oil palm biomass as an adsorbent for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Many industries discharge untreated wastewater into the environment. Heavy metals from many industrial processes end up as hazardous pollutants of wastewaters.Heavy metal pollution has increased in recent decades and there is a growing concern for the public health risk they may pose. To remove heavy metal ions from polluted waste streams, adsorption processes are among the most common and effective treatment methods. The adsorbents that are used to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media have both advantages and disadvantages. Cost and effectiveness are two of the most prominent criteria for choosing adsorbents. Because cost is so important, great effort has been extended to study and find effective lower cost adsorbents.One class of adsorbents that is gaining considerable attention is agricultural wastes. Among many alternatives, palm oil biomasses have shown promise as effective adsorbents for removing heavy metals from wastewater. The palm oil industry has rapidly expanded in recent years, and a large amount of palm oil biomass is available. This biomass is a low-cost agricultural waste that exhibits, either in its raw form or after being processed, the potential for eliminating heavy metal ions from wastewater. In this article, we provide background information on oil palm biomass and describe studies that indicate its potential as an alternative adsorbent for removing heavy metal ions from wastewater. From having reviewed the cogent literature on this topic we are encouraged that low-cost oil-palm-related adsorbents have already demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants.Because cost is so important to those who choose to clean waste streams by using adsorbents, the use of cheap sources of unconventional adsorbents is increasingly being investigated. An adsorbent is considered to be inexpensive when it is readily available, is environmentally friendly, is cost-effective and be effectively used in economical processes. The

  4. Modeling visibility in the Paso del Norte (PDN) Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina Calderon, Richard

    Poor visibility is a subject of growing public concern throughout the U.S, and an active area of research. Its societal impacts on air quality, aviation transport and traffic are significant. Aerosols play a fundamental role in the attenuation of solar radiation, and also affect visibility. The scattering and extinction coefficients of aerosol particles in the Paso del Norte Region have been calculated using the T- matrix model in conjunction with a laser particle counter. Inter-comparison of the model's results of the scattering and absorption coefficients against the corresponding data from a Photoacustic extinctiometer instrument (which measures in-situ absorption and scattering coefficients of aerosol particles) shows excellent agreement. In addition, the volume-weighted method is used to determine the composite index of refraction which is representative of the aerosols for the Paso del Norte Region to obtain information of the type of aerosol particles present in the Region. The Single Scattering Albedo has also been retrieved using this methodology to obtain further insight into the type of aerosols present on a given day. Finally, the Koschmieder equation has been used to calculate the visual range or visibility, and was correlated with the PM2.5 and PM10 particle concentration present in the Region. Our methodology will allow a better understanding of the size and type of aerosol particles that are most detrimental to the visibility for the Paso Del Norte Region.

  5. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  6. Ultra-small rhenium clusters supported on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Miramontes, Orlando; Bonafé, Franco; Santiago, Ulises; Larios-Rodriguez, Eduardo; Velázquez-Salazar, Jesús J.; Mariscal, Marcelo M.; Yacaman, Miguel José

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of very small rhenium clusters (2 – 13 atoms) supported on graphene was studied with high annular dark field - scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The atomic structure of the clusters was fully resolved with the aid of density functional calculations and STEM simulations. It was found that octahedral and tetrahedral structures work as seeds to obtain more complex morphologies. Finally, a detailed analysis of the electronic structure suggested that a higher catalytic effect can be expected in Re clusters when adsorbed on graphene than in isolated ones. PMID:25721176

  7. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun

    2013-08-28

    This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as sorbents for gaseous iodine. Work was conducted in fiscal year 2012 to demonstrate the feasibility of converting Sn2S3 chalcogel without iodine into a glass. This current document summarizes the work conducted in fiscal year 2013 to assess the consolidation potential of non-oxide aerogels with adsorbed iodine. The Sn2S3 and Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels were selected for study. The first step in the process for these experiments was to load them with iodine (I2). The I2 uptake was ~68 mass% for Sn2S3 and ~50 mass% for Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of both sets of sorbents showed that metal-iodide complexes were formed during adsorption, i.e., SnI4 for Sn2S3 and SbI3 for Sb13.5Sn5S20. Additionally, metal-sulfide-iodide complexes were formed, i.e., SnSI for Sn2S3 and SbSI for Sb13.5Sn5S20. No XRD evidence for unreacted iodine was found in any of these samples. Once the chalcogels had reached maximum adsorption, the consolidation potential was assessed. Here, the sorbents were heated for consolidation in vacuum-sealed quartz vessels. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogel was heated both (1) in a glassy carbon crucible within a fused quartz tube and (2) in a single-containment fused quartz tube. The Sn2S3 chalcogel was only heated in a single-containment fused quartz tube. In both cases with the single-containment fused quartz experiments, the material consolidated nicely. However, in both cases, there were small fractions of metal iodides not incorporated into the final product as well as fused quartz particles within the melt due to the sample attacking the quartz wall during the heat treatment. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 did not appear to attack the glassy carbon crucible so, for future experiments, it would be ideal to apply a coating, such as pyrolytic graphite, to the inner walls of the fused quartz vessel to prevent

  8. SVM clustering

    PubMed Central

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen; Merat, Sam

    2007-01-01

    Background Support Vector Machines (SVMs) provide a powerful method for classification (supervised learning). Use of SVMs for clustering (unsupervised learning) is now being considered in a number of different ways. Results An SVM-based clustering algorithm is introduced that clusters data with no a priori knowledge of input classes. The algorithm initializes by first running a binary SVM classifier against a data set with each vector in the set randomly labelled, this is repeated until an initial convergence occurs. Once this initialization step is complete, the SVM confidence parameters for classification on each of the training instances can be accessed. The lowest confidence data (e.g., the worst of the mislabelled data) then has its' labels switched to the other class label. The SVM is then re-run on the data set (with partly re-labelled data) and is guaranteed to converge in this situation since it converged previously, and now it has fewer data points to carry with mislabelling penalties. This approach appears to limit exposure to the local minima traps that can occur with other approaches. Thus, the algorithm then improves on its weakly convergent result by SVM re-training after each re-labeling on the worst of the misclassified vectors – i.e., those feature vectors with confidence factor values beyond some threshold. The repetition of the above process improves the accuracy, here a measure of separability, until there are no misclassifications. Variations on this type of clustering approach are shown. Conclusion Non-parametric SVM-based clustering methods may allow for much improved performance over parametric approaches, particularly if they can be designed to inherit the strengths of their supervised SVM counterparts. PMID:18047717

  9. Evaluation of a cesium adsorbent grafted with ammonium 12-molybdophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuya; Seko, Noriaki; Amada, Haruyo; Kasai, Noboru; Saiki, Seiichi; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Ueki, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    A fibrous cesium (Cs) adsorbent was developed using radiation-induced graft polymerization with a cross-linked structure containing a highly stable adsorption ligand. The ligand, ammonium 12-molybdophosphate (AMP), was successfully introduced onto the fibrous polyethylene trunk material. The resulting Cs adsorbent contained 36% nonwoven fabric polyethylene (NFPE), 1% AMP, 2% triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and 61% glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The adsorbent's Cs adsorption capacity was evaluated using batch and column tests. It was determined that the adsorbent could be used in a wide pH range. The amount of desorbed molybdenum, which can be used as an estimate for AMP stability on the Cs adsorbent, was minimized at the standard drinking water pH range of 5.8-8.6. Based from the inspection on the adherence of these results to the requirements set forth by the Food Sanitation Act by a third party organization, it can be concluded that the developed Cs adsorbent can be safely utilized for drinking water.

  10. Application of Silver Impregnated Iodine Adsorbent to Nuclear Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Tomotaka; Kondo, Yoshikazu; Funabashi, Kiyomi

    Radioactive iodine is one of the most important nuclides to be prevented for release from nuclear facilities and many facilities have off-gas treatment systems to minimize the volatile nuclides dispersion to the environment. Silver impregnated inorganic adsorbents were known as inflammable and stable fixing materials for iodine and the authors started to develop 25 years ago a kind of inorganic adsorbent that has better capability compared with conventional ones. Aluminum oxide (Alumina) was selected as a carrier material and silver nitrate as an impregnated one. Pore diameters were optimized to avoid the influence of impurities such as humidity in the off-gas stream at lower temperatures. Experiments and improvements were alternately conducted for the new adsorbent. The tests were carried out in various conditions to confirm the performance of the developed adsorbent, which clarified its good ability to remove iodine. Silver nitrate impregnated alumina adsorbent (AgA) has about twice the capacity for iodine adsorption and higher iodine removal efficiency at relatively high humidity than conventional ones. The AgA chemically and stably fixes radioactive iodine and fits the storage and disposal of used adsorbent. AgA is now and will be applied to nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants, and research facilities.

  11. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  12. Control of acid gases using a fluidized bed adsorber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Bo-Chin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Yeh, Chia-Lin

    2003-08-01

    During incineration, secondary pollutants such as acid gases, organic compounds, heavy metals and particulates are generated. Among these pollutants, the acid gases, including sulfur oxides (SO(x)) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), can cause corrosion of the incinerator piping and can generate acid rain after being emitted to the atmosphere. To address this problem, the present study used a novel combination of air pollution control devices (APCDs), composed of a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter. The major objective of the work is to demonstrate the performance of a fluidized bed adsorber for removal of acid gases from flue gas of an incinerator. The adsorbents added in the fluidized bed adsorber were mainly granular activated carbon (AC; with or without chemical treatment) and with calcium oxide used as an additive. The advantages of a fluidized bed reactor for high mass transfer and high gas-solid contact can enhance the removal of acid gases when using a dry method. On the other hand, because the fluidized bed can filter particles, fine particles prior to and after passing through the fluidized bed adsorber were investigated. The competing adsorption on activated carbon between different characteristics of pollutants was also given preliminary discussion. The results indicate that the removal efficiencies of the investigated acid gases, SO(2) and HCl, are higher than 94 and 87%, respectively. Thus, a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter has the potential to replace conventional APCDs, even when there are other pollutants at the same time. PMID:12935758

  13. Gold recovery from low concentrations using nanoporous silica adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aledresse, Adil

    The development of high capacity adsorbents with uniform porosity denoted 5%MP-HMS (5% Mercaptopropyl-Hexagonal Mesoporous Structure) to extract gold from noncyanide solutions is presented. The preliminary studies from laboratory simulated noncyanide gold solutions show that the adsorption capacities of these materials are among the highest reported. The high adsorption saturation level of these materials, up to 1.9 mmol/g (37% of the adsorbent weight) from gold chloride solutions (potassium tetrachloroaurate) and 2.9 mmol/g (57% of the adsorbent weight) from gold bromide solutions (potassium tetrabromoaurate) at pH = 2, is a noteworthy feature of these materials. This gold loading from [AuC4]- and [AuBr4 ]- solutions corresponds to a relative Au:S molar ratio of 2.5:1 and 3.8:1, respectively. These rates are significantly higher than the usual 1:1 (Au:S) ratio expected for metal ion binding with the material. The additional gold ions loaded have been spontaneously reduced to metallic gold in the mesoporous material. Experimental studies indicated high maximum adsorptions of gold as high as 99.9% recovery. Another promising attribute of these materials is their favourable adsorption kinetics. The MP-HMS reaches equilibrium (saturation) in less than 1 minute of exposure in gold bromide and less than 10 minutes in gold chloride. The MP-HMS materials adsorption is significantly improved by agitation and the adsorption capacity of Au (III) ions increases with the decrease in pH. The recovery of adsorbed gold and the regeneration of spent adsorbent were investigated for MP-HMS adsorbent. The regenerated adsorbent (MP-HMS) maintained its adsorption capacity even after repeated use and all the gold was successfully recovered from the spent adsorbent. For the fist time, a promising adsorbent system has been found that is capable of effectively concentrating gold thiosulphate complexes, whereas conventional carbon-inpulp (CIP) and carbon-in-leach (CIL) systems fail. The

  14. Soluble hydrocarbons uptake by porous carbonaceous adsorbents at different water ionic strength and temperature: something to consider in oil spills.

    PubMed

    Flores-Chaparro, Carlos E; Ruiz, Luis Felipe Chazaro; Alfaro-De la Torre, Ma Catalina; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, petrochemical operations involve risks to the environment and one of the biggest is oil spills. Low molecular aromatics like benzene, toluene, and naphthalene dissolve in water, and because of their toxicological characteristics, these produce severe consequences to the environment. The oil spill cleanup strategies are mainly designed to deal with the heavy fractions accumulated on the water surface. Unfortunately, very limited information is available regarding the treatment of dissolved fractions.A commercial (Filtrasorb 400) and modified activated carbons were evaluated to remove benzene, toluene, and naphthalene from water, which are the most soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, at different ionic strengths (I) and temperatures (0-0.76 M and 4-25 °C, respectively). This allowed simulating the conditions of fresh and saline waters when assessing the performance of these adsorbents. It was found that the hydrocarbons adsorption affinity increased 12 % at a I of 0.5 M, due to the less negative charge of the adsorbent, while at a high I (≃0.76 M) in a synthetic seawater, the adsorption capacity decreased 21 % that was attributed to the adsorbent's pores occlusion by water clusters. Approximately, 40 h were needed to reach equilibrium; however, the maximum adsorption rate occurred within the first hour in all the cases. Moreover, the hydrocarbons adsorption and desorption capacities increased when the temperature augmented from 4 to 25 °C. On the other hand, thermally and chemically modified materials showed that the interactions between adsorbent-contaminant increased with the basification degree of the adsorbent surface. PMID:26903130

  15. Utility of adsorbents in the purification of drinking water: a review of characterization, efficiency and safety evaluation of various adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Shashi Prabha; Gopal, Krishna; Bersillon, J L

    2009-05-01

    Clean drinking water is one of the implicit requisites fora healthy human population. However the growing industrialization and extensive use of chemicals for various concerns, has increased the burden of unwanted pollutants in the drinking water of developing countries like India. The entry of potentially hazardous substances into the biota has been magnifying day by day. In the absence of a possible stoppage of these, otherwise, useful chemicals, the only way to maintain safer water bodies is to develop efficient purifying technologies. One such immensely beneficial procedure that has been in use is that of purification of water using 'adsorbents'. Indigenous minerals and natural plants products have potential for removing many pollutants viz. fluoride, arsenic, nitrate, heavy metals, pesticides as well as trihalomethanes. Adsorbents which are derived from carbon, alumina, zeolite, clay minerals, iron ores, industrial by products, and natural products viz. parts of the plants, herbs and algal biomass offer promising potential of removal. In the recent years attention has been paid to develop process involving screening/pretreatment/activation/impregnation using alkalies, acids, alum, lime, manganese dioxide, ferric chloride and other chemicals which are found to enhance their adsorbing efficiency. Chemical characterization of these adsorbents recapitulates the mechanism of the process. It is imperative to observe that capacities of the adsorbents may vary depending on the characteristics, chemical modifications and concentration of the individual adsorbent. Removal kinetics is found to be based on the experimental conditions viz. pH, concentration of the adsorbate, quantity of the adsorbent and temperature. It is suggested that isotherm model is suitable tool to assess the adsorption capacities in batch and column modes. Safety evaluation and risk assessment of the process/products may be useful to provide guidelines for its sustainable disposal. PMID:20120453

  16. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Stewart R.; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10 MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000 CV/h (2 s and 0.3 s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12 mg BSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21 mg lysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1 MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20 mg BSA/mL and 27 mg lysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1 MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000 CV/h. For compression loads of 5 MPa and 10 MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1 MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an

  17. Electron energy loss and thermal desorption spectroscopy of pyridine adsorbed on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Grassian, V.H.; Muetterties, E.L.

    1986-10-23

    The chemisorption behavior of pyridine (NC/sub 5/H/sub 5/) on a Pt(111) surface has been examined by using thermal desorption and electron energy loss spectroscopy as a function of adsorption temperature. The vibrational spectrum of pyridine adsorbed to room temperature on this surface shows intense loss peaks in the specular direction from vibrational modes which can be characterized as in-plane stretching and bending modes. This vibrational spectrum has been interpreted as the formation of an ..cap alpha..-pyridyl species (NC/sub 5/H/sub 4/) on the surface. The pyridyl moiety is bonded to the platinum surface through the nitrogen and one of the ..cap alpha..-carbon atoms with the pyridyl plane perpendicular to the metal surface. When pyridine is adsorbed at low temperature (120 K), it bonds to the surface through both the nitrogen atom and the ..pi.. and ..pi../sup */ orbitals of the pyridine ring. As the crystal is warmed to 260 K, at saturation coverage, approximately 50% of the molecules desorb as molecular pyridine. The remaining pyridine molecules partially decompose on the surface to form an ..cap alpha..-pyridyl fragment. The electron energy loss spectra of pyridine adsorbed at both low and room temperature is compared to the infrared spectra of two osmium cluster compounds: Os/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/(NC/sub 5/H/sub 5/), a pyridine complex, and HOs/sub 3/(CO)/sup 18/NC/sub 5/H/sub 4/), a pyridyl complex.

  18. Elution by Le Chatelier's principle for maximum recyclability of adsorbents: applied to polyacrylamidoxime adsorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater.

    PubMed

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Vukovic, Sinisa; Dai, Sheng

    2016-05-28

    Amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents have attracted interest within the last decade due to their high adsorption capacities for uranium and other rare earth metals from seawater. The ocean contains an approximated 4-5 billion tons of uranium and even though amidoxime-based adsorbents have demonstrated the highest uranium adsorption capacities to date, they are still economically impractical because of their limited recyclability. Typically, the adsorbed metals are eluted with a dilute acid solution that not only damages the amidoxime groups (metal adsorption sites), but is also not strong enough to remove the strongly bound vanadium, which decreases the adsorption capacity with each cycle. We resolved this challenge by incorporating Le Chatelier's principle to recycle adsorbents indefinitely. We used a solution with a high concentration of amidoxime-like chelating agents, such as hydroxylamine, to desorb nearly a 100% of adsorbed metals, including vanadium, without damaging the metal adsorption sites and preserving the high adsorption capacity. The method takes advantage of knowing the binding mode between the amidoxime ligand and the metal and mimics it with chelating agents that then in a Le Chatelier's manner removes metals by shifting to a new chemical equilibrium. For this reason the method is applicable to any ligand-metal adsorbent and it will make an impact on other extraction technologies. PMID:27117598

  19. NMR Studies of the Dynamics of HD Adsorbed on MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Chao; Hamida, Jaha; Sullivan, Neil

    We report the results of measurements of the nuclear spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times of a monolayer of HD molecules adsorbed on MCM-41 for temperatures 1 . 5 < T < 20 K. Two distinct characteristic relaxation times are observed. A slow diffusion process for 5 < T < 8 . 8 K and a faster rate with a distinctly different activation energy for 8 . 9 < T < 12 K. The behavior is fluid-like above 12 K. We discuss the results in terms of an expected cluster formation at low temperatures followed by the diffusion of single molecules at high temperatures. Work suported by the National Science Foundation - DMR-1303599 and DMR-1157490 (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory).

  20. Vibrational Studies of Adsorbate-Induced Reconstruction on Molybdenum Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopinski, Gregory Peter

    Adsorbate-induced rearrangement of the substrate structure strongly modifies the adsorbate-substrate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, leading to the complex behavior observed in many chemisorption systems. In this thesis the H/Mo(211), O/Mo(211) and Na/Mo(100) systems have been studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) to observe vibrations of the adsorbed atoms. The vibrational data is correlated with observations of the long-range order probed by LEED as well as the work function changes induced by adsorption. Adsorbate -induced substrate reconstruction plays an important role in all three of these systems. Studies of the coadsorption systems O+H/Mo(211) and Na+O/Mo(100) indicate how these effects can influence interactions between adsorbates. For H/Mo(211), above 1ML a (1 x 1) to (1 x 2) transition is observed and attributed to modification of the substrate periodicity. Below 1ML, H atoms are bridge bonded and induce local distortions of the substrate. The transition to the (1 x 2) phase involves the ordering of these displacements and occupation of three-fold sites partially populated by conversion of the bridge bonded species. This conversion accounts for the sawtooth-like coverage dependence of the work function. The structural model proposed for this system is also supported by the desorption parameters and partial molar entropy extracted from adsorption isobars. Oxygen adsorption on Mo(211) involves the occupation of multiple binding sites, with both the long-range order and the local geometry of the adsorbate phases strongly temperature dependent. Coadsorption of low coverages of oxygen and hydrogen leads to segregation of the two adsorbates which can be understood in terms of a substrate-mediated repulsive interaction between O and H. For Na/Mo(100), the frequency of the Na-Mo symmetric stretch mode does not shift with coverage although the mode intensity is strongly coverage dependent. The absence of a frequency shift

  1. Photodissociation of methyl iodide adsorbed on low-temperature amorphous ice surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    DeSimone, Alice J.; Olanrewaju, Babajide O.; Grieves, Gregory A.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2013-02-28

    Photodissociation dynamics of methyl iodide (CH{sub 3}I) adsorbed on both amorphous solid water (ASW) and porous amorphous solid water (PASW) has been investigated. The ejected ground-state I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and excited-state I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) photofragments produced by 260- and 290-nm photons were detected using laser resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. In contrast to gas-phase photodissociation, (i) the I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) photofragment is favored compared to I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) at both wavelengths, (ii) I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) have velocity distributions that depend upon ice morphology, and (iii) I{sub 2} is produced on ASW. The total iodine [I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})+I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})+I{sub 2}] yield varies with substrate morphology, with greater yield from ASW than PASW using both 260- and 290-nm photons. Temperature-programmed desorption studies demonstrate that ice porosity enhances the trapping of adsorbed CH{sub 3}I, while pore-free ice likely allows monomer adsorption and the formation of two-dimensional CH{sub 3}I clusters. Reactions or collisions involving these clusters, I atomic fragments, or I-containing molecular fragments at the vacuum-surface interface can result in I{sub 2} formation.

  2. [DSC and FTIR study of adsorbed lysozyme on hydrophobic surface].

    PubMed

    Lei, Zu-meng; Geng, Xin-peng; Dai, Li; Geng, Xin-du

    2008-09-01

    During a process of hen egg white lysozyme adsorption and folding on a moderately hydrophobic surface (PEG-600), the effects of salt((NH4)2SO4) concentrations, surface coverage and denaturant (guanidine hydrochloride, GuHCl) concentrations on thermal stability and the changes in the molecular conformation of adsorbed native and denatured lysozyme without aqueous solution were studied with a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) with FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that temperature due to endothermic peaks was reduced and the disturbance increased at higher temperature with the increase in salt concentration and surface coverage of adsorbed protein. beta-Sheet and beta-Turn stucture increased while alpha-Helix structure decreased after the adsorption. The peaks corresponding to both C-C stretching frequency in 1400-1425 cm(-1) and amide I band frequency in 1650-1670 cm(-1) of adsorbed denatured lysozyme can be detected in FTIR spectra while that due to amide I band frequency of adsorbed native lysozyme almost can't be observed. Adsorption resulted in structural loss of adsorbed native lysozyme, whose performance was less stable. PMID:19093560

  3. Synthesis of arsenic graft adsorbents in pilot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Kasai, Noboru; Shibata, Takuya; Aketagawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Makikatsu; Yoshii, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Yasuhiko; Seko, Noriaki

    2012-08-01

    Synthesis of arsenic (As) adsorbents in pilot scale was carried out with a synthesizing apparatus by radiation-induced graft polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate phosphoric acid monomer (PA), which consists of phosphoric acid mono- (50%) and di- (50%) ethyl methacrylate esters onto a nonwoven cotton fabric (NCF), and following chemical modification by contact with a zirconium (Zr) solution. The apparatus which was equipped with reaction tanks, a washing tank and a pump can produce up to 0.3 m×14 m size of the As(V) adsorbent in one reaction. A degree of grafting of 150% was obtained at an irradiation dose of 20 kGy with 5% of PA solution mixed with deionized water for 1 h at 40 °C. Finally, after Zr(IV) was loaded onto a NCF with 5 mmol/L of Zr(IV) solution, the graft adsorbent for the removal of As(V) was achieved in pilot-scale. The adsorbent which was synthesized in pilot scale was evaluated in batch mode adsorption with 1 ppm (mg/l) of As(V) solution for 2 h at room temperature. As a result, the adsorption capacity for As(V) was 0.02 mmol/g-adsorbent.

  4. High capacity cryogel-type adsorbents for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naveen Kumar; Dsouza, Roy N; Grasselli, Mariano; Fernández-Lahore, Marcelo

    2014-08-15

    Cryogel bodies were modified to obtain epoxy groups by graft-copolymerization using both chemical and gamma irradiation initiation techniques. The free epoxy adsorbents were reacted further to introduce diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) functionalities. The resulting weak anion-exchange cryogel adsorbents showed dynamic binding capacities of ca. 27±3mg/mL, which was significantly higher than previously reported for this type of adsorbent material. Gamma irradiated grafting initiation showed a 4-fold higher capacity for proteins than chemical grafting initiation procedures. The phosphate capacity for these DEAE cryogels was 119mmol/L and also showed similar column efficiency as compared to commercial adsorbents. The large pores in the cryogel structure ensure convective transport of the molecules to active binding sites located on the polymer-grafted surface of cryogels. However, as cryogels have relatively large pores (10-100μm), the BET area available for surface activation is low, and consequently, the capacity of the cryogels is relatively low for biomolecules, especially when compared to commercial beaded adsorbents. Nevertheless, we have shown that gamma ray mediated surface grafting of cryogel matrices greatly enhance their functional and adsorptive properties. PMID:24980092

  5. Interactions of small platinum clusters with the TiC(001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Jianjun; Li, Shasha; Chu, Xingli; Yang, Zongxian

    2015-11-14

    Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the interactions of small platinum clusters (Pt{sub n}, n = 1–5) with the TiC(001) surface. The results are analyzed in terms of geometric, energetic, and electronic properties. It is found that a single Pt atom prefers to be adsorbed at the C-top site, while a Pt{sub 2} cluster prefers dimerization and a Pt{sub 3} cluster forms a linear structure on the TiC(001). As for the Pt{sub 4} cluster, the three-dimensional distorted tetrahedral structure and the two-dimensional square structure almost have equal stability. In contrast with the two-dimensional isolated Pt{sub 5} cluster, the adsorbed Pt{sub 5} cluster prefers a three-dimensional structure on TiC(001). Substantial charge transfer takes place from TiC(001) surface to the adsorbed Pt{sub n} clusters, resulting in the negatively charged Pt{sub n} clusters. At last, the d-band centers of the absorbed Pt atoms and their implications in the catalytic activity are discussed.

  6. Interactions of small platinum clusters with the TiC(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jianjun; Li, Shasha; Chu, Xingli; Yang, Zongxian

    2015-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the interactions of small platinum clusters (Ptn, n = 1-5) with the TiC(001) surface. The results are analyzed in terms of geometric, energetic, and electronic properties. It is found that a single Pt atom prefers to be adsorbed at the C-top site, while a Pt2 cluster prefers dimerization and a Pt3 cluster forms a linear structure on the TiC(001). As for the Pt4 cluster, the three-dimensional distorted tetrahedral structure and the two-dimensional square structure almost have equal stability. In contrast with the two-dimensional isolated Pt5 cluster, the adsorbed Pt5 cluster prefers a three-dimensional structure on TiC(001). Substantial charge transfer takes place from TiC(001) surface to the adsorbed Ptn clusters, resulting in the negatively charged Ptn clusters. At last, the d-band centers of the absorbed Pt atoms and their implications in the catalytic activity are discussed.

  7. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    PubMed

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters. PMID:26799470

  8. Adsorption of lead ions on composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1996-04-01

    A fundamental study about the application of biopolymers to the recovery of lead from dilute solution was carried out. A membranous composite biopolymer adsorbent containing two kind of biopolymers, alginic acid (AA) and humic acid (HA), was prepared. HA, which has high solubility in water, was almost completely immobilized in the adsorbent by a combination of calcium alginate gel and activated carbon powder. A general model for complexation between divalent metal ions and acidic sites on biopolymers was applied to explain the adsorption mechanism of lead on the adsorbent (HA-M). The results showed that the complexation constants and the complexation capacities of lead-AA and lead-HA systems were scarcely influenced by immobilization.

  9. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, Harvey R.; Fanslow, Glenn E.

    1983-01-01

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed.

  10. SERS effect of isonicotinic acid adsorbed on a copper electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Lucia K.; Sala, O.

    1987-11-01

    The surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of isonicotinic acid adsorbed on a copper electrode were obtained in order to verify their dependence on the type of electrolyte solution, pH and applied potential. The results are discussed considering the most characteristic bands of the species (protonated or nonprotonated) in the ring nitrogen and in the carboxylic group. In specifically adsorbed electrolytes (Cl - and mainly I -) the completely protonated species is more stabilized on the electrode surface than it is in non-specifically adsorbed anions (ClO -4), because of the formation of ion pairs with the coadsorbed halide ions. For more negative potentials, even at low pH values, the spectra are characteristic of the nonprotonated species.

  11. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, H.R.; Fanslow, G.E.

    1983-12-20

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed. 8 figs.

  12. Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating and Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Kenneth M.; Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed two unique coating formulations that will keep surfaces clean and sanitary and contain contaminants.The Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating, modeled after the self-cleaning, water-repellant lotus leaf, disallows buildup of dust, dirt, water, and more on surfaces. This coating, has been successfully tested on painted, aluminum, glass, silica, and some composite surfaces, could aid in keeping medical assets clean.The Molecular Adsorber Coating is a zeolite-based, sprayable molecular adsorber coating, designed to prevent outgassing in materials in vacuums. The coating works well to adsorb volatiles and contaminates in manufacturing and processing, such as in pharmaceutical production. The addition of a biocide would also aid in controlling bacteria levels.

  13. High-performances carbonaceous adsorbents for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weigang; Fierro, Vanessa; Aylon, E.; Izquierdo, M. T.; Celzard, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) with controlled microporosity have been prepared and their H2 storage performances have been tested in a gravimetric device. Such adsorbents are natural Chinese anthracites chemically activated with alkaline hydroxides, NaOH or KOH. Outstanding total storage capacities of hydrogen, as high as 6.6wt.% equivalent to excess capacity of 6.2 wt.%, have been obtained at 4MPa for some of these adsorbents. These values of hydrogen adsorption are among the best, if not the highest, ever published so far in the open literature. They are well above those of some commercial materials, e.g. Maxsorb-3, considered as a reference of high-performance adsorbent for hydrogen adsorption. Such exceptional storage capacities may be ascribed to a higher volume of micropores (< 2nm).

  14. A high-capacity hydrophobic adsorbent for human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Belew, M; Peterson, E A; Porath, J

    1985-12-01

    A simple method, based on salting out hydrophobic interaction chromatography, for the efficient removal of trace amounts of serum albumin from partially purified protein preparations is described. The method is also successfully applied for the purification of albumin from Cohn fraction IV, a by-product obtained from the commercial fractionation of human serum proteins by the ethanol precipitation procedure. About 70% of the adsorbed albumin can be eluted by buffer of low ionic strength and can thus be lyophilized directly, if required. The adsorbent can be used for several cycles of adsorption and desorption without affecting its selectivity or capacity. Its adsorption properties and capacity for serum albumin are compared with those of the commercially available adsorbent Blue Sepharose CL-6B. PMID:3879424

  15. Adsorbent selection for endosulfan removal from water environment.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Y; Dikshit, A K

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to select a low cost adsorbing material for the removal of endosulfan [C,C'-(1,4,5,6,7,7-hexachloro-8,9,10- trinorborn-5-en-2,3-ylene)(dimethylsulphite)] from water. Various low cost adsorbents like wood charcoal, kimberlite tailings, silica, macro fungi sojar caju were tried with activated charcoal as reference material. The above materials were selected from various sources encompassing organic, inorganic, clayey, and biological sources. For the selection of suitable adsorbent for endosulfan uptake, maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax) was chosen as the parameter. Kinetic profiles of removal were generated for all the materials to assess the equilibrium time. Equilibrium studies were carried out for all materials to assess the adsorption equilibrium model that they followed. The model that gave the best correlation coefficient by linear regression analysis, was adopted for the calculation of Qmax of the corresponding adsorbent material. Using linearised forms of equilibrium models like Langmuir, BET, and Freundlich, maximum adsorptive capacities were determined. Activated charcoal showed the best adsorptive capacity with Qmax of 2.145 mg/g followed by wood charcoal 1.773 mg/g, sojar caju 1.575 mg/g, kimberlite tailings 0.8821 mg/g, and silica 0.3231 mg/g. Albeit activated charcoal gave better performance, it was not considered as a candidate material because of its high cost. Wood charcoal was the next best adsorbent with Qmax 1.773 mg/g. Therefore, wood charcoal was chosen as the best material for endosulfan removal. The study of physical and chemical characteristics of wood charcoal revealed that it is a potential adsorbent and can even be improved further. PMID:10048207

  16. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure-function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  17. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure–function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  18. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.

  19. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8more » ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.« less

  20. Surface characterization of adsorbed asphaltene on a stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, W. A.; Taylor, S. D.

    2007-05-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize a single layer of adsorbed asphaltene on a metallic surface. The deposits were created by immersing a stainless steel disc into a dilute asphaltene solution with either toluene or dichloromethane as the solvent, although the toluene solution allowed for better control of the adsorbed asphaltene layer and less atmospheric oxygen contamination. The analyses for C 1s, S 2p3/2, N 1s and O 1s photoemission peaks indicated that different functional groups are present in the asphaltene layer including carboxylic, pyrrolic, pyridininc, thiophenic and sulfite, with slight differences in their binding energies.

  1. AQUATIC PHOTOLYSIS OF OXY-ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON GOETHITE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.

    1985-01-01

    Organic materials that will not absorb light at wavelengths longer than 295 nanometers (the solar wavelength cutoff) may nevertheless, undergo electron transfer reactions initiated by light. These reactions occur when the organic materials are adsorbed as ligand complexes to the surface of iron oxy-hydroxide (goethite). The adsorbed materials can be either inner or outer coordination sphere complexes. Goethite was chosen as the iron oxyhydroxide surface because it has the highest thermodynamic stability of any of the oxyhydroxides in water and it can be synthesized easily, with high purity.

  2. Adsorbed liposome deformation studied with quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reviakine, Ilya; Gallego, Marta; Johannsmann, Diethelm; Tellechea, Edurne

    2012-02-01

    Deformation of surface-adsorbed liposomes is an important parameter that governs the kinetics of their transformations, but one that is very difficult to measure in the case of nm-size liposomes. We investigate the deformation of dimyristoyl phosphatidyl choline liposomes by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as a function of temperature and show that it follows the dependence of this lipid's bending modulus on temperature, as expected from theoretical considerations. To corroborate our approach, we model QCM response from adsorbed liposomes by explicitly considering their shape and mechanical properties.

  3. Carbon adsorbents from products of solid fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pokonova, Yu.V.; Grabovskii, A.I.

    1995-01-10

    Total shale phenols (mixture of alkylresorcinols) or their solution in commercial-grade furfural can be used for forming carbon adsorbents with high mechanical strength (up to 97%), high microporosity (up to 0.41 cm{sup 3}{center_dot}cm{sup -3}), and higher sorption capacity. Samples with medium burnout exhibit higher selectivity (than those molded from conventional wood tar) in the recovery of noble metals from multicomponent metal salt solutions. In these parameters they surpass commercial adsorbents as well. Samples with low burnout exhibit high selectivity and separation ability with respect to gas mixtures.

  4. Adsorbed water and CO on Pt electrode modified with Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futamata, Masayuki; Luo, Liqiang

    Highly sensitive ATR-SEIRA spectroscopy was exploited to elucidate water, CO and electrolyte anions adsorbed on the Ru modified Pt film electrode. CO on Ru domains was oxidized below ca. +0.3 V, followed by pronounced water adsorption. Since the oxidation potential of CO on Pt domain was significantly reduced compared to bare Pt, these water molecules on Ru obviously prompt CO oxidation on adjacent Pt surface as consistent with the bifunctional mechanism. Diffusion of adsorbate from Ru to Pt surfaces was indicated in dilute CH 3OH solution by spectral changes with potential.

  5. Structural characterization of adsorbed helical and beta-sheet peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Newton Thangadurai

    Adsorbed peptides on surfaces have potential applications in the fields of biomaterials, tissue engineering, peptide microarrays and nanobiotechnology. The surface region, the "biomolecular interface" between a material and the biological environment, plays a crucial role in these applications. As a result, characterization of adsorbed peptide structure, especially with respect to identity, concentration, spatial distribution, conformation and orientation, is important. The present research employs NEXAFS (near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy) and SFG (sum frequency generation spectroscopy) to provide information about the adsorbed peptide structure. Soft X-ray NEXAFS is a synchrotron-based technique which typically utilizes polarized X-rays to interrogate surfaces under ultra-high vacuum conditions. SFG is a non-linear optical technique which utilizes a combination of a fixed visible and a tunable infrared laser beams to generate a surface-vibrational spectrum of surface species. SFG has the added advantage of being able to directly analyze the surface-structure at the solid-liquid interface. The main goals of the present research were twofold: characterize the structure of adsorbed peptides (1) ex situ using soft X-ray NEXAFS, and (2) in situ using non-linear laser spectroscopy (SFG). Achieving the former goal involved first developing a comprehensive characterization of the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen k-edge NEXAFS spectra for amino acids, and then using a series of helical and beta-sheet peptides to demonstrate the sensitivity of polarization-dependent NEXAFS to secondary structure of adsorbed peptides. Characterizing the structure of adsorbed peptides in situ using SFG involved developing a model system to probe the solid-liquid interface in situ; demonstrating the ability to probe the molecular interactions and adsorbed secondary structure; following the time-dependent ordering of the adsorbed peptides; and establishing the ability to obtain

  6. Affinity Adsorbents Based on Carriers Activated by Epoxy-compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyashchitskii, B. A.; Kuznetsov, P. V.

    1984-10-01

    The review is devoted to the synthesis and applications of affinity adsorbents based on carriers activated by epoxy-compounds. The methods for the introduction of epoxy-groups into carriers of different chemical types are discussed and conditions for the immobilisation of three-dimensional spacers and low-molecular-weight and polymeric ligands on carriers containing epoxy-groups are considered. Data are presented on the properties and applications of adsorbents of this type in affinity chromatography. The bibliography includes 144 references.

  7. Hydrogen molecule on lithium adsorbed graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Gaganpreet, Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structure calculations for the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on lithium (Li) decorated and pristine graphene have been studied systematically using SIESTA code [1] within the framework of the first-principle DFT under the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)[2], including spin polarization. The energy of adsorption of hydrogen molecule on graphene is always enhanced by the presence of co-adsorbed lithium. The most efficient adsorption configuration is when H2 is lying parallel to lithium adsorbed graphene which is in contrast to its adsorption on pristine graphene (PG) where it prefers perpendicular orientation.

  8. CARTILAGE CELL CLUSTERS

    PubMed Central

    Lotz, Martin K.; Otsuki, Shuhei; Grogan, Shawn P.; Sah, Robert; Terkeltaub, Robert; D’Lima, Darryl

    2010-01-01

    The formation of new cell clusters is a histological hallmark of arthritic cartilage but the biology of clusters and their role in disease are poorly understood. This is the first comprehensive review of clinical and experimental conditions associated with cluster formation. Genes and proteins that are expressed in cluster cells, the cellular origin of the clusters, mechanisms that lead to cluster formation and the role of cluster cells in pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:20506158

  9. RADIOLYSIS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE ADSORBED STATE

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, J.W.; Allen, A.O.

    1961-10-01

    >A method of forming branch chained hydrocarbons by means of energetic penetrating radiation is described. A solid zeolite substrate is admixed with a cobalt ion and is irradiated with a hydrocarbon adsorbed therein. Upon irradiation with gamma rays, there is an increased yield of branched and lower molecular straight chain compounds. (AEC)

  10. Ozonation of isoproturon adsorbed on silica particles under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflieger, Maryline; Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran

    2012-12-01

    The results on heterogeneous ozonation of a phenylurea pesticide, isoproturon, under atmospheric conditions are presented for the first time in the present study. The study was carried out using an experimental device previously adopted and validated for the heterogeneous reactivity of organics toward ozone (Pflieger et al., 2011). Isoproturon was adsorbed on silica particles via a liquid-to-solid equilibrium with a load far below a monolayer (0.02% by weight/surface coverage of 0.5%). The rate constants were estimated by measuring the consumption of the organic (dark, T = 26 °C, RH < 1%). The experimental data were fitted by both the modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood and the Eley-Rideal patterns, resulting in atmospheric lifetimes of heterogeneous ozonation of 4 and 6 days, respectively (for 40 ppb of O3). Parameters, such as the number and the quantity of pesticides adsorbed on the solid support, which can significantly influence the heterogeneous kinetics, were investigated as well. The results obtained suggest that the organic compound is adsorbed in multilayer aggregates on the aerosol even though submonolayer coverage is assumed. The presence of a second herbicide, trifluralin, together with isoproturon on the aerosol surface does not affect the kinetics of ozonation, indicating that both compounds are adsorbed on different surface sites of silica particles.

  11. Chitosan membrane adsorber for low concentration copper ion removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Li, Yanxiang; Li, Haigang; Yang, Chuanfang

    2016-08-01

    Thin chitosan membranes with symmetric and interconnected pore structure were prepared using silica as porogen, and their physical properties including pore structure, pore size distribution, porosity and water affinity were analyzed. The membrane showed a maximum Cu(II) adsorption capacity of 87.5mg/g in static adsorption, and the adsorption fitted pseudo-second order kinetics and Toth adsorption isotherm. The membranes were then stacked in layers as an adsorber to remove small concentration Cu(II) from water dynamically. At feed concentration of 5mg/L, the adsorber could retain Cu(II) effectively when its thickness reached over 200μm, and the performance was further improved by using more membranes layers. Within a certain limit, the adsorber showed a 'flow-independent' loading behavior, an indication of fast mass transfer inside the membrane. The adsorption process was correlated well with bed depth service time (BDST) model, Thomas model and Yoon and Nelson model, and the adsorber was also found to be regenerable and re-usable. PMID:27112875

  12. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AI series adsorbents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-10

    A series of adsorbent (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole/mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with higher degree of grafting which ranges from 110 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 10 wt% hydroxylamine at 80 C for 72 hours. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged frommore » 171-187 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. The performance of the adsorbents for uranium adsorption in natural seawater was also carried out using flow-through-column at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The three hours KOH conditioning was better for higher uranium uptake than one hour. The adsorbent AI11 containing AN and VPA at the mole ration of 3.52, emerged as the potential candidate for higher uranium adsorption (3.35 g-U/Kg-ads.) after 56 days of exposure in the seawater in the flow-through-column. The rate vanadium adsorption over uranium was linearly increased throughout the 56 days exposure. The total vanadium uptake was ~5 times over uranium after 56 days.« less

  13. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AI series adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-10

    A series of adsorbent (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole/mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with higher degree of grafting which ranges from 110 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 10 wt% hydroxylamine at 80 C for 72 hours. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 171-187 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. The performance of the adsorbents for uranium adsorption in natural seawater was also carried out using flow-through-column at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The three hours KOH conditioning was better for higher uranium uptake than one hour. The adsorbent AI11 containing AN and VPA at the mole ration of 3.52, emerged as the potential candidate for higher uranium adsorption (3.35 g-U/Kg-ads.) after 56 days of exposure in the seawater in the flow-through-column. The rate vanadium adsorption over uranium was linearly increased throughout the 56 days exposure. The total vanadium uptake was ~5 times over uranium after 56 days.

  14. Probing atomic positions of adsorbed ammonia molecules in zeolite.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Lo, Benedict T W; Qu, Jin; Wilkinson, Ian; Hughes, Tim; Murray, Claire A; Tang, Chiu C; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2016-02-25

    Atomic positions and interactions between adsorbed guest molecules, such as ammonia in H-ZSM-5 microporous solids, are for the first time revealed by making use of the change in the periodical scattering parameter using in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction combined with refinement within experimental errors. PMID:26833032

  15. The density and refractive index of adsorbing protein layers.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Janos

    2004-07-01

    The structure of the adsorbing layers of native and denatured proteins (fibrinogen, gamma-immunoglobulin, albumin, and lysozyme) was studied on hydrophilic TiO(2) and hydrophobic Teflon-AF surfaces using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy techniques. The density and the refractive index of the adsorbing protein layers could be determined from the complementary information provided by the two in situ instruments. The observed density and refractive index changes during the protein-adsorption process indicated the presence of conformational changes (e.g., partial unfolding) in general, especially upon contact with the hydrophobic surface. The structure of the formed layers was found to depend on the size of the proteins and on the experimental conditions. On the TiO(2) surface smaller proteins formed a denser layer than larger ones and the layer of unfolded proteins was less dense than that adsorbed from the native conformation. The hydrophobic surface induced denaturation and resulted in the formation of thin compact protein films of albumin and lysozyme. A linear correlation was found between the quartz crystal microbalance measured dissipation factor and the total water content of the layer, suggesting the existence of a dissipative process that is related to the solvent molecules present inside the adsorbed protein layer. Our measurements indicated that water and solvent molecules not only influence the 3D structure of proteins in solution but also play a crucial role in their adsorption onto surfaces. PMID:15240488

  16. Agricultural Waste as Sources for Mercury Adsorbents in Gas Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plants have resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream where it adsorbs the mer...

  17. Agricultural By-products as Mercury Adsorbents in Gas Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plans have resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream where is adsorbs the merc...

  18. Complexation of trace metals by adsorbed natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and solution speciation of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were studied in model systems containing colloidal alumina particles and dissolved natural organic matter. At equilibrium a significant fraction of the alumina surface was covered by adsorbed organic matter. Cu(II) was partitioned primarily between the surface-bound organic matter and dissolved Cu-organic complexes in the aqueous phase. Complexation of Cu2+ with the functional groups of adsorbed organic matter was stronger than complexation with uncovered alumina surface hydroxyls. It is shown that the complexation of Cu(II) by adsorbed organic matter can be described by an apparent stability constant approximately equal to the value found for solution phase equilibria. In contrast, Cd(II) adsorption was not significantly affected by the presence of organic matter at the surface, due to weak complex formation with the organic ligands. The results demonstrate that general models of trace element partitioning in natural waters must consider the presence of adsorbed organic matter. ?? 1984.

  19. Gd uptake experiments for preliminary set of functionalized adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Noack

    2015-03-16

    These data summarize adsorption experiments conducted with Gd in 0.5 M NaCl. Results represent preliminary, proof-of-concept data utilizing fine-powder silica gel as the adsorbent support. Future testing will focus on larger, application-appropriate beads.

  20. DESIGNING FIXED-BED ADSORBERS TO REMOVE MIXTURES OF ORGANICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A liquid-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) pilot plant and a full-scale GAC adsorber were designed, built, and operated in order to evaluate their performance for treating a groundwater contaminated with several volatile and synthetic organic chemicals. Several empty bed con...

  1. Spectroscopic studies of pyrene adsorbed to titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xing; Kusumoto, Yoshihumi

    2003-08-01

    Pyrene was adsorbed to a TiO 2 surface from water-alcohol mixture solutions at 25 °C and pyrene-TiO 2 particles were recovered by filtration. We found that the surface of TiO 2 thus recovered is relatively hydrophobic and pyrene is not decomposed but keep its fluorescence characteristics on the spectral measurement under ultraviolet excitation.

  2. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  3. EVALUATING VARIOUS ADSORBENTS AND MEMBRANES FOR REMOVING RADIUM FROM GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted in Lemont, Ill., to evaluate specific adsorbents and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes for removing radium from groundwater. A radium-selective complexer and barium-sulfate-loaded alumina appeared to have the best potential for low-cost adsorption of ra...

  4. Enhanced encapsulation of metoprolol tartrate with carbon nanotubes as adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garala, Kevin; Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-12-01

    A highly water-soluble antihypertensive drug, metoprolol tartrate (MT), was selected as a model drug for preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-impregnated ethyl cellulose (EC) microspheres. The present investigation was aimed to increase encapsulation efficiency of MT with excellent adsorbent properties of MWCNTs. The unique surface area, stiffness, strength and resilience of MWCNTs have drawn much anticipation as carrier for highly water-soluble drugs. Carbon nanotubes drug adsorbate (MWCNTs:MT)-loaded EC microspheres were further optimized by the central composite design of the experiment. The effects of independent variables (MWCNTs:MT and EC:adsorbate) were evaluated on responses like entrapment efficiency (EE) and t 50 (time required for 50% drug release). The optimized batch was compared with drug alone EC microspheres. The results revealed high degree of improvement in encapsulation efficiency for MWCNTs:MT-loaded EC microspheres. In vitro drug release study exhibited complete release form drug alone microspheres within 15 h, while by the same time only 50-60% drug was released for MWCNTs-impregnated EC microspheres. The optimized batch was further characterized by various instrumental analyses such as scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results endorse encapsulation of MWCNTs:MT adsorbate inside the matrix of EC microspheres, which might have resulted in enhanced encapsulation and sustained effect of MT. Hence, MWCNTs can be utilized as novel carriers for extended drug release and enhanced encapsulation of highly water-soluble drug, MT.

  5. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2009-03-01

    Adsorbed water films strongly influence residual water saturations and hydraulic conductivities in porous media at low saturations. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media were investigated through combining Langmuir's film model with scaling analysis, without use of any adjustable parameters. Diffuse double layer influences are predicted to be important through the strong dependence of adsorbed water film thickness (f) on matric potential ({Psi}) and ion charge (z). Film thickness, film velocity, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are predicted to vary with z{sup -1}, z{sup -2}, and z{sup -3}, respectively. In monodisperse granular media, the characteristic grain size ({lambda}) controls film hydraulics through {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of (1) the perimeter length per unit cross sectional area over which films occur, (2) the critical matric potential ({Psi}{sub c}) below which films control flow, and (3) the magnitude of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity when {Psi} < {Psi}{sub c}. While it is recognized that finer textured sediments have higher unsaturated hydraulic conductivities than coarser sands at intermediate {Psi}, the {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of hydraulic conductivity predicted here extends this understanding to very low saturations where all pores are drained. Extremely low unsaturated hydraulic conductivities are predicted under adsorbed film-controlled conditions (generally < 0.1 mm y{sup -1}). On flat surfaces, the film hydraulic diffusivity is shown to be constant (invariant with respect to {Psi}).

  6. Pulling adsorbed self-avoiding walks from a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.; Jensen, I.; Whittington, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a self-avoiding walk model of polymer adsorption where the adsorbed polymer can be desorbed by the application of a force, concentrating on the case of the square lattice. Using series analysis methods we investigate the behaviour of the free energy of the system when there is an attractive potential ɛ with the surface and a force f applied at the last vertex, normal to the surface, and extract the phase boundary between the ballistic and adsorbed phases. We believe this to be exact to graphical accuracy. We give precise estimates of the location of the transition from the free phase to the ballistic phase, which we find to be at yc = exp (f/kBTc) = 1, and from the free phase to the adsorbed phase, which we estimate to be at ac = exp ( - ɛ/kBTc) = 1.775 615 ± 0.000 005. In addition we prove that the phase transition from the ballistic to the adsorbed phase is first order.

  7. Photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on aluminum oxide particle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2009-07-01

    Nitrogen oxides, including nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid, react with mineral dust particles in the atmosphere to yield adsorbed nitrate. Although nitrate ion is a well-known chromophore in natural waters, little is known about the surface photochemistry of nitrate adsorbed on mineral particles. In this study, nitrate adsorbed on aluminum oxide, a model system for mineral dust aerosol, is irradiated with broadband light (lambda > 300 nm) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in the presence of molecular oxygen. Upon irradiation, the nitrate ion readily undergoes photolysis to yield nitrogen-containing gas-phase products including NO(2), NO, and N(2)O, with NO being the major product. The relative ratio and product yields of these gas-phase products change with RH, with N(2)O production being highest at the higher relative humidities. Furthermore, an efficient dark reaction readily converts the major NO product into NO(2) during post-irradiation. Photochemical processes on mineral dust aerosol surfaces have the potential to impact the chemical balance of the atmosphere, yet little is known about these processes. In this study, the impact that adsorbed nitrate photochemistry may have on the renoxification of the atmosphere is discussed. PMID:19534452

  8. Self-healing and adsorbate-induced removal of defects on graphene and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsetseris, Leonidas; Pantelides, Sokrates

    2009-03-01

    The presence of point defects is known to induce significant changes in the electronic, chemical, transport, and mechanical properties of graphitic systems. Here, we use first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory to describe several adatom-related processes that alter key physical traits of graphene and carbon nanotubes. We find that, while pairs of C adatoms and clusters of four or more self-interstitials stay idle unless the system is heated to very high temperatures, clustering of three C adatoms leads to removal of hillock-like features and creates mobile species, resulting in self-healing of defective structures. We also demonstrate the reactivity of defect pairs using hydrogen and oxygen as prototype adsorbates, and we show that interaction with extrinsic species is an alternative healing mechanism for adatom structures in the above systems. The results relate to the evolution of defects either during growth of carbon nanotubes or during post-growth treatment and operation of related devices. This work was supported in part by DOE Grant DEFG0203ER46096.

  9. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  10. Nanopore reactive adsorbents for the high-efficiency removal of waste species

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2005-01-04

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g., metal, enzyme, etc., particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as ions, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  11. Effect of adsorbent addition on floc formation and clarification.

    PubMed

    Younker, Jessica M; Walsh, Margaret E

    2016-07-01

    Adding adsorbent into the coagulation process is an emerging treatment solution for targeting hard-to-remove dissolved organic compounds from both drinking water and industrial wastewater. The impact of adding powdered activated carbon (PAC) or organoclay (OC) adsorbents with ferric chloride (FeCl3) coagulant was investigated in terms of potential changes to the coagulated flocs formed with respect to size, structure, and breakage and regrowth properties. The ability of dissolved air flotation (DAF) and sedimentation (SED) clarification processes to remove hybrid adsorbent-coagulant flocs was also evaluated through clarified water quality analysis of samples collected in bench-scale jar test experiments. The jar tests were conducted using both a synthetic fresh water and oily wastewater test water spiked with dissolved aromatic compounds phenol and naphthalene. Results of the study demonstrated that addition of adsorbent reduced the median coagulated floc size by up to 50% but did not affect floc strength or regrowth potential after application of high shear. Experimental results in fresh water demonstrated that sedimentation was more effective than DAF for clarification of both FeCl3-PAC and FeCl3-OC floc aggregates. However, experimental tests performed on the synthetic oily wastewater showed that coagulant-adsorbent floc aggregates were effectively removed with both DAF and sedimentation treatment, with lower residual turbidity achieved in clarified water samples than with coagulation treatment alone. Addition of OC or PAC into the coagulation process resulted in removals of over half, or nearly all of the dissolved aromatics, respectively. PMID:27064206

  12. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. )

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. CO dissociation on magnetic Fe(n) clusters.

    PubMed

    Jedidi, Abdesslem; Markovits, Alexis; Minot, Christian; Abderrabba, Manef; Van Hove, Michel A

    2014-10-14

    This work theoretically investigates the CO dissociation on Fen nanoparticles, for n in the range of 1-65, focusing on size dependence in the context of the initial step of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. CO adsorbs molecularly through its C-end on a triangular facet of the nanoparticle. Dissociation becomes easier when the cluster size increases. Then, the C atom is bonded to a square facet that is generated as a result of the adsorption if it does not yet exist in the bare cluster, while the O atom is adsorbed on a triangular facet. In the most stable situation, the two adsorbed atoms remain close together, both having in common one shared first-neighbor iron atom. There is a partial spin quenching of the neighboring Fe atoms, which become more positively charged than the other Fe atoms. The shared surface iron atom resembles a metal-cation from a complex. Despite the small size of the iron cluster considered, fluctuations due to specific configurations do not influence properties for n > 25 and global trends seem significant. PMID:25162295

  14. Comparison of cluster expansion fitting algorithms for interactions at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herder, Laura M.; Bray, Jason M.; Schneider, William F.

    2015-10-01

    Cluster expansions (CEs) are Ising-type interaction models that are increasingly used to model interaction and ordering phenomena at surfaces, such as the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions that control coverage-dependent adsorption or surface-vacancy interactions that control surface reconstructions. CEs are typically fit to a limited set of data derived from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The CE fitting process involves iterative selection of DFT data points to include in a fit set and selection of interaction clusters to include in the CE. Here we compare the performance of three CE fitting algorithms-the MIT Ab-initio Phase Stability code (MAPS, the default in ATAT software), a genetic algorithm (GA), and a steepest descent (SD) algorithm-against synthetic data. The synthetic data is encoded in model Hamiltonians of varying complexity motivated by the observed behavior of atomic adsorbates on a face-centered-cubic transition metal close-packed (111) surface. We compare the performance of the leave-one-out cross-validation score against the true fitting error available from knowledge of the hidden CEs. For these systems, SD achieves lowest overall fitting and prediction error independent of the underlying system complexity. SD also most accurately predicts cluster interaction energies without ignoring or introducing extra interactions into the CE. MAPS achieves good results in fewer iterations, while the GA performs least well for these particular problems.

  15. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  16. Parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulation framework incorporating accurate models of adsorbate lateral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jens; D’Avezac, Mayeul; Hetherington, James; Stamatakis, Michail

    2013-12-14

    Ab initio kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations have been successfully applied for over two decades to elucidate the underlying physico-chemical phenomena on the surfaces of heterogeneous catalysts. These simulations necessitate detailed knowledge of the kinetics of elementary reactions constituting the reaction mechanism, and the energetics of the species participating in the chemistry. The information about the energetics is encoded in the formation energies of gas and surface-bound species, and the lateral interactions between adsorbates on the catalytic surface, which can be modeled at different levels of detail. The majority of previous works accounted for only pairwise-additive first nearest-neighbor interactions. More recently, cluster-expansion Hamiltonians incorporating long-range interactions and many-body terms have been used for detailed estimations of catalytic rate [C. Wu, D. J. Schmidt, C. Wolverton, and W. F. Schneider, J. Catal. 286, 88 (2012)]. In view of the increasing interest in accurate predictions of catalytic performance, there is a need for general-purpose KMC approaches incorporating detailed cluster expansion models for the adlayer energetics. We have addressed this need by building on the previously introduced graph-theoretical KMC framework, and we have developed Zacros, a FORTRAN2003 KMC package for simulating catalytic chemistries. To tackle the high computational cost in the presence of long-range interactions we introduce parallelization with OpenMP. We further benchmark our framework by simulating a KMC analogue of the NO oxidation system established by Schneider and co-workers [J. Catal. 286, 88 (2012)]. We show that taking into account only first nearest-neighbor interactions may lead to large errors in the prediction of the catalytic rate, whereas for accurate estimates thereof, one needs to include long-range terms in the cluster expansion.

  17. Novel adsorbent applicability for decontamination of printing wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiurski, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Ranogajec, Jonjaua; Kecic, Vesna

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption capacity of clayey minerals can be enhanced by replacing the natural exchangeable cations with organic cations, which makes the clay surface more hydrophobic. Different solids such as activated carbon, clay minerals, zeolites, metal oxides and organic polymers have been tested as effective adsorbents. On a global scale, clays have a large applicability for decontamination, purification of urban and industrial residual waters, protection of waste disposal areas, and purification of industrial gases and so on. Clay derivative materials with high adsorption capacities are very attractive from an economical point of view. Due to the economic constraints, a development of cost effective and clean processes is desired. Adsorption processes has proved to be the most effective, especially for effluents with moderate and low heavy metal concentrations, as like as in printing wastewaters. Among several removal technologies, the adsorption of Zn(II) ion onto NZ, B, pure C and C with PEG 600 addition could be of great importance for the printing wastewaters purification. However, the newly designed adsorbent of the defined pore size distribution and phase structure considered as the most suitable material for Zn(II) ion removal. The values of distribution coefficient (Kd) increased with decreasing of the adsorbent amount. The Kd values depend also on the type of used adsorbent, the following increased order is obtained: NZ < B = pure C < C with PEG 600 addition. The adsorption equilibrium data of Zn(II) ion on NZ, B, pure C and C with PEG 600 were analyzed in terms of the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR) isotherm models. The characteristic parameters for each isotherms and related correlation coefficients were determined. The values of correlation coefficient (R2) indicated the following order of the isotherm models: Freundlich > Langmuir > DKR. The study also showed that the fired clay modified with PEG 600 addition has great potential

  18. Hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation by pressure-swing adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Pan, C.Y.; McMinis, C.W.; Ivory, J.; Ghosh, D.

    1998-07-01

    Hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation by pressure-swing adsorption (PSA) was studied experimentally. The high efficiency of hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation was illustrated by hydrogen separation using fine-powder-activated carbon and molecular sieve as adsorbents. The adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of the hollow-fiber adsorbers were determined. The pressure drop of the gas flowing through the adsorbers was also examined. The adsorbers were tested for hydrogen separation from nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and a multicomponent gas mixture simulating ammonia synthesis purge gas. The PSA systems using the hollow-fiber adsorbers were very effective for hydrogen purification. The high separation efficiency is derived from the fast mass-transfer rate and low pressure drop, two key features of hollow-fiber-based adsorbers.

  19. Removal of acutely hazardous pharmaceuticals from water using multi-template imprinted polymer adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Avinash; Chopra, Nikita; Krupadam, Reddithota J

    2014-05-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer adsorbent has been prepared to remove a group of recalcitrant and acutely hazardous (p-type) chemicals from water and wastewaters. The polymer adsorbent exhibited twofold higher adsorption capacity than the commercially used polystyrene divinylbenzene resin (XAD) and powdered activated carbon adsorbents. Higher adsorption capacity of the polymer adsorbent was explained on the basis of high specific surface area formed during molecular imprinting process. Freundlich isotherms drawn showed that the adsorption of p-type chemicals onto polymer adsorbent was kinetically faster than the other reference adsorbents. Matrix effect on adsorption of p-type chemicals was minimal, and also polymer adsorbent was amenable to regeneration by washing with water/methanol (3:1, v/v) solution. The polymer adsorbent was unaltered in its adsorption capacity up to 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption, which will be more desirable in cost reduction of treatment compared with single-time-use activated carbon. PMID:24499987

  20. Detecting the mass and position of an adsorbate on a drum resonator

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y. P.

    2014-01-01

    The resonant frequency shifts of a circular membrane caused by an adsorbate are the sensing mechanism for a drum resonator. The adsorbate mass and position are the two major (unknown) parameters determining the resonant frequency shifts. There are infinite combinations of mass and position which can cause the same shift of one resonant frequency. Finding the mass and position of an adsorbate from the experimentally measured resonant frequencies forms an inverse problem. This study presents a straightforward method to determine the adsorbate mass and position by using the changes of two resonant frequencies. Because detecting the position of an adsorbate can be extremely difficult, especially when the adsorbate is as small as an atom or a molecule, this new inverse problem-solving method should be of some help to the mass resonator sensor application of detecting a single adsorbate. How to apply this method to the case of multiple adsorbates is also discussed. PMID:25294971

  1. Reflectivity studies on adsorbed block copolymers under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.S.; Wages, S.; Baker, S.M.; Toprakcioglu, C.; Hadziioannou, G.

    1994-12-01

    The authors report neutron reflectivity data on (poly)styrene-(poly)ethylene oxide (PS-PEO) diblock copolymers adsorbed onto quartz from the selective solvent cyclohexane (a non-solvent for PEO and a poor solvent for PS). The PEO ``anchor block`` adsorbs strongly to form a thin layer on the quartz substrate, while the deuterated PS chains dangle into the solvent. They find that under static conditions the density profile of the PS block in a poor solvent can be well described by a Schultz function which is indicative of a polymer ``mushroom.`` Furthermore, they have studied the same system under shear at shear rates from 0--400s{sup {minus}1}. They find that there is a dramatic increase in the thickness of the PS layer under shear in cyclohexane and that the relaxation time from the shear-on profile back to the static profile is on the order of several days.

  2. Adsorbed molecules in external fields: Effect of confining potential.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Ashish; Silotia, Poonam; Maan, Anjali; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational excitation of a molecule adsorbed on a surface. As is well known the interaction potential between the surface and the molecule can be modeled in number of ways, depending on the molecular structure and the geometry under which the molecule is being adsorbed by the surface. We explore the effect of change of confining potential on the excitation, which is largely controlled by the static electric fields and continuous wave laser fields. We focus on dipolar molecules and hence we restrict ourselves to the first order interaction in field-molecule interaction potential either through permanent dipole moment or/and the molecular polarizability parameter. It is shown that confining potential shapes, strength of the confinement, strongly affect the excitation. We compare our results for different confining potentials. PMID:27387127

  3. Adsorbate-induced curvature and stiffening of graphene.

    PubMed

    Svatek, Simon A; Scott, Oliver R; Rivett, Jasmine P H; Wright, Katherine; Baldoni, Matteo; Bichoutskaia, Elena; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Marsden, Alexander J; Wilson, Neil R; Beton, Peter H

    2015-01-14

    The adsorption of the alkane tetratetracontane (TTC, C44H90) on graphene induces the formation of a curved surface stabilized by a gain in adsorption energy. This effect arises from a curvature-dependent variation of a moiré pattern due to the mismatch of the carbon-carbon separation in the adsorbed molecule and the period of graphene. The effect is observed when graphene is transferred onto a deformable substrate, which in our case is the interface between water layers adsorbed on mica and an organic solvent, but is not observed on more rigid substrates such as boron nitride. Our results show that molecular adsorption can be influenced by substrate curvature, provide an example of two-dimensional molecular self-assembly on a soft, responsive interface, and demonstrate that the mechanical properties of graphene may be modified by molecular adsorption, which is of relevance to nanomechanical systems, electronics, and membrane technology. PMID:25469625

  4. Hydrogen adsorption of ruthenium: Isosteres of solubility of adsorbed hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zaginaichenko, S.Y.; Matysina, Z.A.; Schur, D.V.; Pishuk, V.K.

    1998-12-31

    The theoretical investigation of solubility isosteres of adsorbed hydrogen has been performed for free face (0001) of crystals with hexagonal close-packed lattice A3 of Mg type. The face free energy has been calculated and its dependence on temperature, pressure, hydrogen concentration and character of hydrogen atoms distribution over surface interstitial sites of different type has been defined. The equations of thermodynamic equilibrium and solubility of adsorbed hydrogen have been defined. The plots of isosteres in the region of phase transition from isotropic to anisotropic state have been constructed and it has been established that in anisotropic state the order in distribution of hydrogen atoms over interstitial sites of different type must become apparent. Comparison of the theoretical isosteres with experimental for ruthenium has been carried out, the isotropic-anisotropic state transition can stipulate a stepwise and break-like change in isosteres.

  5. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  6. Monte Carlo lattice models for adsorbed polymer conformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, B. S.

    1985-01-01

    The adhesion between a polymer film and a metal surface is of great technological interest. However, the prediction of adhesion and wear properties of polymer coated metals is quite difficult because a fundamental understanding of the polymer surface interaction does not yet exist. A computer model for the conformation of a polymer molecule adsorbed on a surface is discussed. The chain conformation is assumed to be described by a partially directed random walk on a three dimensional simple cubic lattice. An attractive surface potential is incorporated into the model through the use of a random walk step probability distribution that is anisotropic in the direction normal to the attractive surface. The effects of variations in potential characteristics are qualitatively included by varying both the degree of anisotropy of the step distribution and the range of the anisotropy. Polymer conformation is characterized by the average end to end distance, average radius of gyration, and average number of chain segments adsorbed on the surface.

  7. Photocurrent response of bacteriorhodopsin adsorbed on bimolecular lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Seta, P; Ormos, P; d'Epenoux, B; Gavach, C

    1980-06-10

    The photo response of bacteriorhodopsin adsorbed on a bimolecular lipid membrane has been investigated using short-circuit current measurements. The results revealed a biphasic current vs. time curve for the photocurrent at pH values of approx. 7. This phenomenon could be modified by altering either the value of the external applied electrical field or the proton concentration differences. The observed effects of the external applied voltage, pH gradient and lipophilic proton carriers enabled us to conclude that the bacteriorhodopsin can be adsorbed in two different states, which give rise to a pumping effect and a flux of protons in opposite directions. A theoretical analysis of the photocycle in relation to the electrical field which acts on the proton uptake and release is proposed. The main effect of this field is to diminish the pumping rate due to the proton motive force resulting from the creation of space-charge in the vicinity of purple membrane fragments. PMID:7388016

  8. Heavy metals and adsorbents effects on activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ong, S A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E

    2004-01-01

    The sorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from synthetic solution by powdered activated carbon (PAC), biomass, rice husk (RH) and activated rice husk (ARH) were investigate under batch conditions. After activated by concentrated nitric acid for 15 hours at 60-65 degrees C, the adsorption capacity for RH was increased. The adsorbents arranged in the increasing order of adsorption capacities to the Langmuir Q degree parameter were biomass > PAC > ARH > RH. The addition of adsorbents in base mix solution had increased the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) activated sludge microorganisms with and without the presence of metals. The increased of SOUR were due to the ability of PAC and RH in reducing the inhibitory effect of metals on microorganisms and provide a reaction site between activated sludge microorganisms and substrates. PMID:15141467

  9. In vitro binding of zearalenone to different adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Dante J; Di Marco, Liliana; Oliver, Guillermo; Bardón, Alicia

    2005-03-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a potent estrogenic metabolite produced by some Fusarium species. No treatment has been successfully employed to get rid of the ZEA contained in foods. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability (adsorptive power) of five adsorbents--activated carbon, bentonite, talc, sandstone, and calcium sulfate--to trap ZEA in vitro. Activated carbon was the best adsorbent, binding 100% ZEA (pH 3 and 7.3) at 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1% dose levels. Bentonite, talc,and calcium sulfate were less efficient than activated carbon but still could bind ZEA to some extent. On the other hand, sandstone was inactive in the experimental conditions employed. Our results indicate that activated carbon could be a good candidate for detoxification of ZEA present in foods. PMID:15771192

  10. Topological features of engineered arrays of adsorbates in honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Arraga, Luis A.; Lado, J. L.; Guinea, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen adatoms are one of the most the promising proposals for the functionalization of graphene. The adatoms induce narrow resonances near the Dirac energy, which lead to the formation of magnetic moments. Furthermore, they also create local lattice distortions which enhance the spin-orbit coupling. The combination of magnetism and spin-orbit coupling allows for a rich variety of phases, some of which have non-trivial topological features. We analyze the interplay between magnetism and spin-orbit coupling in ordered arrays of adsorbates on honeycomb lattice monolayers, and classify the different phases that may arise. We extend our model to consider arrays of adsorbates in graphene-like crystals with stronger intrinsic spin-orbit couplings. We also consider a regime away from half-filling in which the Fermi level is at the bottom of the conduction band, we find a Berry curvature distribution corresponding to a Valley-Hall effect.

  11. Candidate Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs: Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Chuntai; Hu, Jun; Han, Sungho; Yu, Clare C; Wu, R Q

    2015-08-14

    A major obstacle to using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as qubits is flux noise. We propose that the heretofore mysterious spins producing flux noise could be O_{2} molecules adsorbed on the surface. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that an O_{2} molecule adsorbed on an α-alumina surface has a magnetic moment of ~1.8 μ_{B}. The spin is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the O-O bond, the barrier to spin rotations is about 10 mK. Monte Carlo simulations of ferromagnetically coupled, anisotropic XY spins on a square lattice find 1/f magnetization noise, consistent with flux noise in Al SQUIDs. PMID:26317742

  12. Surface Adsorbate Fluctuations and Noise in Nanoelectromechanical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y. T.; Callegari, C.; Feng, X. L.; Roukes, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Physisorption on solid surfaces is important in both fundamental studies and technology. Adsorbates can also be critical for the performance of miniature electromechanical resonators and sensors. Advances in resonant nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), particularly mass sensitivity attaining the single-molecule level, make it possible to probe surface physics in a new regime, where a small number of adatoms cause a detectable frequency shift in a high quality factor (Q) NEMS resonator, and adsorbate fluctuations result in resonance frequency noise. Here we report measurements and analysis of the kinetics and fluctuations of physisorbed xenon (Xe) atoms on a high-Q NEMS resonator vibrating at 190.5 MHz. The measured adsorption spectrum and frequency noise, combined with analytic modeling of surface diffusion and adsorption–desorption processes, suggest that diffusion dominates the observed excess noise. This study also reveals new power laws of frequency noise induced by diffusion, which could be important in other low-dimensional nanoscale systems. PMID:21388120

  13. Enhanced Photovoltaic Properties of Potassium-Adsorbed Titania Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.; Jaye, C; Fischer, D; Lewis, L; Willey, R; Menon, L

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that vertically-aligned titania nanotube planar arrays fabricated by electrochemical anodization using standard potassium-containing electrolytes invariably contain a significant amount of surface-adsorbed potassium ions, hitherto undetected, that affect the titania photoelectrochemical or PEC performance. Synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy reveals the strong ionic nature of surface potassium-titania bonds that alters the PEC performance over that of pure titania nanotubes through reduction of the external electrical bias needed to produce hydrogen at maximum efficiency. This result implies that the external electrical energy input required per liter of solar hydrogen produced with potassium-adsorbed titania nanotubes may be reduced. Tailoring the potassium content may thus be an alternative means to fine-tune the photoelectrochemical response of TiO2 nanotube-based PEC electrodes.

  14. pyIAST: Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) Python package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Cory M.; Smit, Berend; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) is a widely-used thermodynamic framework to readily predict mixed-gas adsorption isotherms from a set of pure-component adsorption isotherms. We present an open-source, user-friendly Python package, pyIAST, to perform IAST calculations for an arbitrary number of components. pyIAST supports several common analytical models to characterize the pure-component isotherms from experimental or simulated data. Alternatively, pyIAST can use numerical quadrature to compute the spreading pressure for IAST calculations by interpolating the pure-component isotherm data. pyIAST can also perform reverse IAST calculations, where one seeks the required gas phase composition to yield a desired adsorbed phase composition.

  15. Forces and pressures in adsorbing partially directed walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.; Prellberg, T.

    2016-05-01

    Polymers in confined spaces lose conformational entropy. This induces a net repulsive entropic force on the walls of the confining space. A model for this phenomenon is a lattice walk between confining walls, and in this paper a model of an adsorbing partially directed walk is used. The walk is placed in a half square lattice {{{L}}}+2 with boundary \\partial {{{L}}}+2, and confined between two vertical parallel walls, which are vertical lines in the lattice, a distance w apart. The free energy of the walk is determined, as a function of w, for walks with endpoints in the confining walls and adsorbing in \\partial {{{L}}}+2. This gives the entropic force on the confining walls as a function of w. It is shown that there are zero force points in this model and the locations of these points are determined, in some cases exactly, and in other cases asymptotically.

  16. Allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent for removing endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-10-01

    In this study we present a simple and robust method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions by using crystals of the small-molecule compound 2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl urea (allantoin) as a solid phase adsorbent. Allantoin crystalline powder is added to a protein solution at supersaturated concentrations, endotoxins bind and undissolved allantoin crystals with bound endotoxins are removed by filtration or centrifugation. This method removes an average of 99.98% endotoxin for 20 test proteins. The average protein recovery is ∼80%. Endotoxin binding is largely independent of pH, conductivity, reducing agent and various organic solvents. This is consistent with a hydrogen-bond based binding mechanism. Allantoin does not affect protein activity and stability, and the use of allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent provides better endotoxin removal than anion exchange, polymixin affinity and biological affinity methods for endotoxin clearance. PMID:24001944

  17. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  18. Theory of optical excitation of adsorbed rare gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Masaru; Brenig, Wilhelm

    1985-03-01

    Optical absorption spectra of rare-gas atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces exhibit a bimodal behavior, which, according to Cunningham, Greenlaw and Flynn, can be correlated with the difference I' - φ (where I' is the ionization energy of the excited (gas phase) state of the rare gas atom and φ the work function of the metal) controlling the energetics of charge transfer from the excited atom to the metal. In this paper we propose a model which allows to treat this charge transfer and some accompanying many-body effects in detail. Strong Coulomb attraction between the core hole and the excited electron on the adatom is taken into account as well as the interaction with surface plasmons. An improved charge transfer criterion is obtained which, besides the important parameter I∗ - φ, involves additional parameters such as the adsorbate-metal coupling strength and the plasmon frequency.

  19. Candida albicans binds to saliva proteins selectively adsorbed to silicone.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; van der Wielen, Pauline; Cannon, Richard D; Ruske, Dean; Dawes, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Explanted voice prostheses obtained from 5 patients at the time of prosthesis replacement were consistently colonized by yeast, in particular Candida albicans. A simple, reproducible, in vitro model of C. albicans adherence to saliva-coated voice prosthesis silicone was developed. Whole saliva promoted adherence of C. albicans to silicone in a dose-dependent manner. Saliva rinses from voice prosthesis patients also promoted binding of C. albicans to silicone in vitro (mean adherence 14.9% +/- 2.8% of input C. albicans cells). This was significantly higher than C. albicans adherence to silicone in the absence of saliva (P < .001) or adherence promoted by saliva rinses from healthy volunteers (P < .005). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and a blot overlay adherence assay revealed that certain salivary proteins were selectively adsorbed to silicone and that C. albicans yeast cells adhered specifically to the adsorbed salivary proteins. PMID:16997116

  20. Adsorbed self-avoiding walks subject to a force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.; Whittington, S. G.

    2013-11-01

    We consider a self-avoiding walk model of polymer adsorption where the adsorbed polymer can be desorbed by the application of a force. In this paper the force is applied normal to the surface at the last vertex of the walk. We prove that the appropriate limiting free energy exists where there is an applied force and a surface potential term, and prove that this free energy is convex in appropriate variables. We then derive an expression for the limiting free energy in terms of the free energy without a force and the free energy with no surface interaction. Finally we show that there is a phase boundary between the adsorbed phase and the desorbed phase in the presence of a force, prove some qualitative properties of this boundary and derive bounds on the location of the boundary.

  1. Subnanometer-sized Pt/Sn alloy cluster catalysts for the dehydrogenation of linear alkanes.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Andreas W; Gomes, Joseph; Bajdich, Michal; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T

    2013-12-21

    The reaction pathways for the dehydrogenation of ethane, propane, and butane, over Pt are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT). Pt nanoparticles are represented by a tetrahedral Pt4 cluster. The objectives of this work were to establish which step is rate limiting and which one controls the selectivity for forming alkenes as opposed to causing further dehydrogenation of adsorbed alkenes to produce precursors responsible for catalyst deactivation due to coking. Further objectives of this work are to identify the role of adsorbed hydrogen, derived from H2 fed together with the alkane, on the reaction pathway, and the role of replacing one of the four Pt atoms by a Sn atom. A comparison of Gibbs free energies shows that in all cases the rate-determining step is cleavage of a C-H bond upon alkane adsorption. The selectivity to alkene formation versus precursors to coking is dictated by the relative magnitudes of the activation energies for alkene desorption and dehydrogenation of the adsorbed alkene. The presence of an adsorbed H atom on the cluster facilitates alkene desorption relative to dehydrogenation of the adsorbed alkene. Substitution of a Sn atom in the cluster to produce a Pt3Sn cluster leads to a downward shift of the potential energy surface for the reaction and causes an increase of the activity of the catalyst as suggested by recent experiments due to the lower net activation barrier for the rate limiting step. However, the introduction of Sn does not alter the relative activation barriers for gas-phase alkene formation versus loss of hydrogen from the adsorbed alkene, the process leading to the formation of coke precursors. PMID:24196250

  2. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2•6H2O functionalization of zeolite. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents at 21...

  3. Development of the Molecular Adsorber Coating for Spacecraft and Instrument Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin

    2011-01-01

    On-orbit Molecular Contamination occurs when materials outgas and deposit onto very sensitive interior surfaces of the spacecraft and instruments. The current solution, Molecular Adsorber Pucks, has disadvantages, which are reviewed. A new innovative solution, Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC), is currently being formulated, optimized, and tested. It is a sprayable alternative composed of Zeolite-based coating with adsorbing properties.

  4. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2•6H2O functionalization of zeolite. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents ...

  5. Nuclear spin heat capacity of 3He adsorbed on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greywall, Dennis S.

    1989-10-01

    The heat capacity of 3He adsorbed on graphite has been measured for films between one and five atomic layers and for temperatures between 2 and 200 mK. These results are compared with recent magnetization data which also show several anomalies in this coverage regime. Prior to third layer promotion the second layer is found to solidify into a registered structure with unusual propertis. This contradicts the model proposed to explain the NMR measurements.

  6. Removing 3,5-Dichlorophenol from Wastewater by Alternative Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobetičová, Hana; Galbičková, Blanka; Ševčíková, Janka; Soldán, Maroš

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of this paper is to evaluate an efficiency of 3,5 - dichlorophenol removal from wastewater by using alternative adsorbents. Chlorophenols are organic compounds consisting of a benzene ring, OH groups and also atoms of chlorine. Chlorophenols may have a huge isomere variety that means there are differences in their chemical and physical properties. Due to their toxicity it is necessary to remove them from waste water and in this paper an alternative way of such process is described.

  7. MOFs as adsorbents for low temperature heating and cooling applications.

    PubMed

    Henninger, Stefan K; Habib, Hesham A; Janiak, Christoph

    2009-03-01

    The 3D metal-organic framework (MOF) (3)(infinity){[Ni(3)(mu(3)-btc)(2)(mu(4)-btre)(2)(mu-H(2)O)(2)]. approximately 22H(2)O} is found to be a reversibly dehydratable-hydratable water-stable MOF material with a large loading spread of 210 g/kg as a candidate for solid adsorbents in heat transformation cycles for refrigeration, heat pumping, and heat storage. PMID:19206233

  8. Inhomogeneous distribution of organic molecules adsorbed in sol gel glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Sánchez-Villicaña, V.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J. J.; King, T. A.

    1999-09-01

    The effects of the porous matrix upon the radiative characteristics of quinine sulphate doped sol-gel glasses are investigated. The broadenings of the absorption and fluorescence spectra are explained by the attachment of the molecules on distorted sites or in a non-planar fashion, creating an inhomogeneous distribution of adsorbed molecules. For this reason, each emitting center relaxes with its own characteristics. This inhomogeneous distribution is also supported by the non-exponential and the wavelength dependence of the fluorescence decay.

  9. Silver diffusion over silicon surfaces with adsorbed tin atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Olshanetskii, B. Z.

    2015-02-15

    Silver diffusion over the (111), (100), and (110) surfaces of silicon with preliminarily adsorbed tin atoms is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Diffusion is observed only on the surface of Si(111)-2√3 × 2√3-Sn. The diffusion mechanism is established. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends on the concentration of diffusing atoms. The diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing silver concentration, while the activation energy and the preexponential factor increase.

  10. Carbonaceous adsorbents in cryosorption pump applications; Future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. Vijai; Kasthurirengan, S.; Udgata, S. S.; Gangradey, R.; Krishnamoorthy, V.; Surendra, Bhati

    2013-06-01

    Use of granular activated carbon in commercial cryosorption pumps is now, more or less well established. The development of advanced polymeric precursor based activated carbon adsorbents in various forms has opened a flood gate of possibilities vis-a-vis improvements in performance of cryosorption pumps, both in rate of adsorption and their ultimate capacity. This paper gives a summary of indigenous efforts towards this direction.

  11. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  12. Heat capacity of xenon adsorbed on nanobundle grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishko, K. A.; Sokolova, E. S.

    2016-02-01

    A model of a one-dimensional nonideal gas in an external transverse force field is used to interpret the experimentally observed thermodynamic properties of xenon deposited in grooves on the surface of carbon nanobundles. A nonideal gas model with pairwise interactions is not entirely adequate for describing dense adsorbates (at low temperatures), but makes it easy to account for the exchange of particles between the 1D adsorbate and the 3D atmosphere, which is an important factor at intermediate (on the order of 35 K for xenon) and, especially, high (˜100 K) temperatures. In this paper, we examine a 1D real gas taking only the one-dimensional Lennard-Jones interaction into account, but under exact equilibrium with respect to the number of particles between the 1D adsorbate and the 3D atmosphere of the measurement cell. The low-temperature branch of the specific heat is fitted independently by an elastic chain model so as to obtain the best agreement between theory and experiment over the widest possible region, beginning at zero temperature. The gas approximation sets in after temperatures for which the phonon specific heat of the chain essentially transforms to a one-dimensional equipartition law. Here the basic parameters of both models can be chosen so that the heat capacity C(T) of the chain transforms essentially continuously into the corresponding curve for the gas approximation. Thus, it can be expected that an adequate interpretation of the real temperature dependences of the specific heat of low-dimensionality atomic adsorbates can be obtained through a reasonable combination of the phonon and gas approximations. The main parameters of the gas approximation (such as the desorption energy) obtained by fitting the theory to experiments on the specific heat of xenon correlate well with published data.

  13. Non-linear optical studies of adsorbates: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiangdong.

    1989-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we have established a systematic procedure to apply the surface optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique to study surface dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, we have developed a novel technique for studies of molecular surface diffusions. In this technique, the laser-induced desorption with two interfering laser beams is used to produce a monolayer grating of adsorbates. The monolayer grating is detected with diffractions of optical SHG. By monitoring the first-order second-harmonic diffraction, we can follow the time evolution of the grating modulation from which we are able to deduce the diffusion constant of the adsorbates on the surface. We have successfully applied this technique to investigate the surface diffusion of CO on Ni(111). The unique advantages of this novel technique will enable us to readily study anisotropy of a surface diffusion with variable grating orientation, and to investigate diffusion processes of a large dynamic range with variable grating spacings. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that optical infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) from surfaces can be used as a viable surface vibrational spectroscopic technique. We have successfully recorded the first vibrational spectrum of a monolayer of adsorbates using optical infrared-visible SFG. The qualitative and quantitative correlation of optical SFG with infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies are examined and experimentally demonstrated. We have further investigated the possibility to use transient infrared-visible SFG to probe vibrational transients and ultrafast relaxations on surfaces. 146 refs.

  14. Development Trends in Porous Adsorbents for Carbon Capture.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, Bolisetty; Sreedhar, Inkollu; Suresh, Pathi; Raghavan, Kondapuram Vijaya

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of greenhouse gases especially CO2 in the atmosphere leading to global warming with undesirable climate changes has been a serious global concern. Major power generation in the world is from coal based power plants. Carbon capture through pre- and post- combustion technologies with various technical options like adsorption, absorption, membrane separations, and chemical looping combustion with and without oxygen uncoupling have received considerable attention of researchers, environmentalists and the stake holders. Carbon capture from flue gases can be achieved with micro and meso porous adsorbents. This review covers carbonaceous (organic and metal organic frameworks) and noncarbonaceous (inorganic) porous adsorbents for CO2 adsorption at different process conditions and pore sizes. Focus is also given to noncarbonaceous micro and meso porous adsorbents in chemical looping combustion involving insitu CO2 capture at high temperature (>400 °C). Adsorption mechanisms, material characteristics, and synthesis methods are discussed. Attention is given to isosteric heats and characterization techniques. The options to enhance the techno-economic viability of carbon capture techniques by integrating with CO2 utilization to produce industrially important chemicals like ammonia and urea are analyzed. From the reader's perspective, for different classes of materials, each section has been summarized in the form of tables or figures to get a quick glance of the developments. PMID:26422294

  15. Theory of raman scattering from molecules adsorbed at semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueba, H.

    1983-09-01

    A theory is presented to calculate the Raman polarizability of an adsorbed molecule at a semiconductor surface, where the electronic excitation in the molecular site interacts with excitons (elementary excitations in the semiconductor) through non-radiative energy transfer between them, in an intermediate state in the Raman scattering process. The Raman polarizability thus calculated is found to exhibit a peak at the energy corresponding to a resonant excitation of excitons, thereby suggesting the possibility of surface enhanced Raman scattering on semiconductor surfaces. The mechanism studied here can also give an explanation of a recent observation of the Raman excitation profiles of p-NDMA and p-DMAAB adsorbed on ZnO or TiO 2, where those profiles were best described by assuming a resonant intermediate state of the exciton transition in the semiconductors. It is also demonstrated that in addition to vibrational Raman scattering, excitonic Raman scattering of adsorbed molecules will occur in the coupled molecule-semiconductor system, where the molecular returns to its ground electronic state by leaving an exciton in the semiconductor. A spectrum of the excitonic Raman scattering is expected to appear in the background of the vibrational Raman band and to be characterized by the electronic structure of excitons. A desirable experiment is suggested for an examination of the theory.

  16. Adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic solution onto porous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, A.; Ramlan, N. A.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Chu, C. M.; Farm, Y. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Adsorption isotherm is essential component in the understanding of the adsorption process. Several methods of the measurements, analysis and interpretation of adsorption from solution have been reported in the literature. Most of the measurements of adsorption isotherm from solution were involved the measurement of excess isotherm conducted at low region of sorbates concentration. Direct interpretation of excess adsorption isotherm as adsorption isotherm is always been practice. Therefore, in this work a study on the measurement of the adsorption isotherm from solution of non-azeotropic organic solvent mixture onto porous adsorbents for whole range of liquid concentration was conducted. The study included the measurement of excess adsorption isotherm using conventional technique. Theoretical analysis and interpretation of adsorption isotherm from the excess isotherm were conducted using Pseudo Ideal Adsorption, Gibbs Dividing Plane Model and Langmuir-Fruendlich binary isotherm model. For organic solvents, acetone and propanol were chosen as the adsorbates due to the non-azeotropic properties in the mixture. Activated carbon and silicalite were chosen as adsorbents due to the different in their porosity such as macro porous and micro porous structure. The result of the study has revealed that the adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic mixture onto activated carbon and silicalite can be interpreted as monolayer type of adsorption.

  17. Photoinduced surface dynamics of CO adsorbed on a platinum electrode.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hidenori; Okada, Tsubasa; Uosaki, Kohei

    2006-08-10

    The surface dynamics of adsorbed CO molecules formed by dissociative adsorption of HCHO at a polycrystalline Pt electrode/electrolyte solution interface was studied by picosecond time-resolved sum-frequency generation (TR-SFG) spectroscopy. A SFG peak at 2050-2060 cm(-1) was observed at the Pt electrode in HClO(4) solution containing HCHO at 0-300 mV (vs Ag/AgCl), indicating the formation of adsorbed CO at an atop site of the Pt surface as a result of dissociative adsorption of HCHO. The peak position varied with potential by approximately 33 cm(-1)/V, as previously found in an infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) study. Irradiation of an intense picosecond visible pulse (25 ps, 532 nm) caused an instant intensity decrease and broadening of the CO peak accompanied by the emergence of a new broad peak at approximately 1980 cm(-1) within the time resolution of the system. These results suggest a decrease and increase in the populations of CO adsorbed on atop and bridge sites, respectively, upon visible pump pulse irradiation. PMID:16884215

  18. Energetics of adsorbed CH3 on Pt(111) by calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Karp, Eric M; Silbaugh, Trent L; Campbell, Charles T

    2013-04-01

    The enthalpy and sticking probability for the dissociative adsorption of methyl iodide were measured on Pt(111) at 320 K and at low coverages (up to 0.04 ML, where 1 ML is equal to one adsorbate molecule for every surface Pt atom) using single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC). At this temperature and in this coverage range, methyl iodide produces adsorbed methyl (CH(3,ad)) plus an iodine adatom (I(ad)). Combining the heat of this reaction with reported energetics for Iad gives the standard heat of formation of adsorbed methyl, ΔH(f)(0)(CH3,ad), to be −53 kJ/mol and a Pt(111)–CH3 bond energy of 197 kJ/mol. (The error bar of ±20 kJ/mol for both values is limited by the reported heat of formation of I(ad).) This is the first direct measurement of these values for any alkyl fragment on any surface. PMID:23461481

  19. SPR-MS: from identifying adsorbed molecules to image tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Jean-François; Breault-Turcot, Julien; Forest, Simon; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have become valuable analytical sensors for biomolecule detection. While SPR is heralded with high sensitivity, label-free and real-time detection, nonspecific adsorption and detection of ultralow concentrations remain issues. Nonspecific adsorption can be minimized using adequate surface chemistry. For example, we have employed peptide monolayers to reduce nonspecific adsorption of crude serum or cell lysate. It is important to uncover the nature of molecules nonspecifically adsorbing to surfaces in these biofluids, to further improve understanding of the nonspecific adsorption processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) provides a complementary tool to SPR to identify biomolecule adsorbed to surface. Trypsic digestion of the proteins adsorbed to surfaces led to identification of characteristic peptides from the proteins involved in nonspecific adsorption. Nonspecific adsorption in crude cell lysate results mainly from lipids, as confirmed with SPR and MS but proteins were observed on some surfaces. In another application of SPR and MS, imaging SPR can be used in combination to imaging MS to image tissue sections. Thin sections of mouse liver were inserted in the fluidic chamber of a SPRi instrument and proteins were transferred to the SPRi chip. The SPR chip was then imaged using MALDI imaging MS to identify the biomolecules that were transferred to the SPRi chip.

  20. Heterogeneous Ozonolysis of Surface Adsorbed Lignin Pyrolysis Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass combustion releases semi-volatile organic compounds into the troposphere, including many phenols and methoxyphenols as the result of lignin pyrolysis. Given their relatively low vapor pressures, these compounds readily adsorb on inorganic and organic aerosol substrates where they may alter aerosol properties and undergo heterogeneous chemistry. We use infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS and ATR-FTIR) to monitor the adsorption and subsequent heterogeneous ozonolysis of model lignin pyrolysis products, including catechol, eugenol, and 4-propylguaiacol. Ozonolysis reaction kinetics were compared on various inorganic substrates - such as Al2O3 and NaCl, which serve as mineral and sea salt aerosol substrates, respectively - and as a function of ozone concentration and relative humidity. Following in situ FTIR analysis, the adsorbed organics were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy to identify reaction products and quantify product branching ratios. Ozonolysis of catechol and 4-propylguaiacol readily resulted in ring cleavage forming dicarboxylic acids (e.g., muconic acid). Eugenol ozonolysis proceeded rapidly at the alkene side chain producing homovanillic acid and homovanillin in an approximate 2:1 branching ratio at 0% RH; ring cleavage was also observed. For all lignin pyrolysis products, heterogeneous ozonolysis was faster on NaCl versus Al2O3. Implications for the atmospheric chemistry of semi-volatile methoxylphenols adsorbed on aerosol substrates will be discussed.

  1. Regeneration of thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica adsorbents of mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arencibia, Amaya; Aguado, José; Arsuaga, Jesús M.

    2010-06-01

    The regeneration of thiol-functionalized SBA-15 adsorbents of mercury is presented in this article. The influence of temperature and pH on the adsorption process was studied. The effect due to the presence of complexing agents in aqueous solution on the desorption step was also evaluated. Hg(II) maximum adsorption capacities at different temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 60 °C were obtained and it was found that temperature does not affect the adsorption process. Mercury adsorption capacity was also determined in the presence of HNO 3 and HCl up to 3 M concentration. The comparison of the results showed that whereas hydrochloric acid exhibits an appreciable capacity to regenerate the thiol-functionalized SBA-15 adsorbent, the nitric acid results inefficient. The difference was attributed to the mercury complexing ability of chloride anion. Four complexing compounds, KBr, KSCN, (NH 2) 2CS, and HBr were tested for desorbing mercury in regeneration experiments. All agents were able to remove significant amounts of adsorbed mercury, being hydrobromic acid the complexing compound that yields the best results.

  2. Foodservice Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist vocational teachers in developing and implementing a cluster program in food service occupations, this guide contains sections on cluster organization and implementation and instructional emphasis areas. The cluster organization and implementation section covers goal-based planning and includes a proposed cluster curriculum, a…

  3. Cluster-impact fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Echenique, P.M.; Manson, J.R.; Ritchie, R.H. )

    1990-03-19

    We present a model for the cluster-impact-fusion experiments of Buehler, Friedlander, and Friedman, Calculated fusion rates as a function of bombarding energy for constant cluster size agree well with experiment. The dependence of the fusion rate on cluster size at fixed bombarding energy is explained qualitatively. The role of correlated, coherent collisions in enhanced energy loss by clusters is emphasized.

  4. Electric Field Cancellation on Quartz by Rb Adsorbate-Induced Negative Electron Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, J. A.; Kim, E.; Rittenhouse, S. T.; Weck, P. F.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Shaffer, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the (0001) surface of single crystal quartz with a submonolayer of Rb adsorbates. Using Rydberg atom electromagnetically induced transparency, we investigate the electric fields resulting from Rb adsorbed on the quartz surface, and measure the activation energy of the Rb adsorbates. We show that the adsorbed Rb induces negative electron affinity (NEA) on the quartz surface. The NEA surface allows low energy electrons to bind to the surface and cancel the electric field from the Rb adsorbates. Our results will be important for integrating Rydberg atoms into hybrid quantum systems, as fundamental probes of atom-surface interactions, and for studies of 2D electron gases bound to surfaces.

  5. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  6. Electric Field Cancellation on Quartz by Rb Adsorbate-Induced Negative Electron Affinity.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, J A; Kim, E; Rittenhouse, S T; Weck, P F; Sadeghpour, H R; Shaffer, J P

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the (0001) surface of single crystal quartz with a submonolayer of Rb adsorbates. Using Rydberg atom electromagnetically induced transparency, we investigate the electric fields resulting from Rb adsorbed on the quartz surface, and measure the activation energy of the Rb adsorbates. We show that the adsorbed Rb induces negative electron affinity (NEA) on the quartz surface. The NEA surface allows low energy electrons to bind to the surface and cancel the electric field from the Rb adsorbates. Our results will be important for integrating Rydberg atoms into hybrid quantum systems, as fundamental probes of atom-surface interactions, and for studies of 2D electron gases bound to surfaces. PMID:27081976

  7. Powder-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2016-05-03

    A powder-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The powder-based adsorbent includes polymer powder with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the powder-based adsorbent includes irradiating polymer powder, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Powder-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  8. Structural, energetic, and electronic properties of hydrogenated titanium clusters.

    PubMed

    Dhilip Kumar, T J; Tarakeshwar, P; Balakrishnan, N

    2008-05-21

    Hydrogen undergoes dissociative chemisorption on small titanium clusters. How the electronic structure of the cluster changes as a function of the number of adsorbed hydrogen atoms is an important issue in nanocatalysis and hydrogen storage. In this paper, a detailed theoretical investigation of the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of the icosahedral Ti13 cluster is presented as a function of the number of adsorbed hydrogen atoms. The results show that hydrogen loaded Ti13H20 and Ti13H30 clusters are exceptionally stable and are characterized by hydrogen multicenter bonds. In Ti13H20, the dissociated hydrogen atoms are bound to each of the 20 triangular faces of Ti13, while in Ti13H30, they are bound to the 30 Ti-Ti edges of Ti13. Consequently, the chemisorption and desorption energies of the Ti13H20 (1.93 eV, 3.10 eV) are higher than that of Ti13H30 (1.13 eV, 1.95 eV). While increased hydrogen adsorption leads to an elongation of the Ti-Ti bonds, there is a concomitant increase in the electrostatic interaction between the dissociated hydrogen atoms and the Ti13 cluster. This enhanced interaction results from the participation of the subsurface titanium atom at higher hydrogen concentrations. Illustrative results of hydrogen saturation on the larger icosahedral Ti55 cluster are also discussed. The importance of these results on hydrogen saturated titanium clusters in elucidating the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption in titanium doped complex metal hydrides is discussed. PMID:18500893

  9. Application of quantum descriptors for predicting adsorption performance of starch and cyclodextrin adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Okoli, Chukwunonso Peter; Guo, Qing Jun; Adewuyi, Gregory Olufemi

    2014-01-30

    Adsorption trend of aromatic compounds on epichlorohydrin (EPI), 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), and 4,4-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) cross-linked starch and cyclodextrin adsorbents were comparatively studied by density functional theorem (DFT) based interaction descriptors and batch adsorption studies. The DFT quantum chemical descriptors predicted adsorption trend of MDI adsorbents>HDI adsorbents>EPI adsorbents. The values of the fractional number of electrons transferred (ΔN) for all the studied adsorbent-adsorbate pair were negative, indicating that the adsorbents were electron donors in the studied adsorption interaction. The batch adsorption performance for the studied cross-linked adsorbents was in agreement with the DFT predictions. Energy gap, chemical hardness, and softness showed good linear correlation (R(2)=0.8,073 ± 0.2259) to the batch adsorption performance for most of the studied adsorbent-adsorbate pairs. The present study demonstrated that DFT quantum chemical parameters are suitable adsorption descriptors for predicting adsorption performance of cross-linked adsorbents. PMID:24299747

  10. Survey on granularity clustering.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shifei; Du, Mingjing; Zhu, Hong

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of uncertain artificial intelligent and the arrival of big data era, conventional clustering analysis and granular computing fail to satisfy the requirements of intelligent information processing in this new case. There is the essential relationship between granular computing and clustering analysis, so some researchers try to combine granular computing with clustering analysis. In the idea of granularity, the researchers expand the researches in clustering analysis and look for the best clustering results with the help of the basic theories and methods of granular computing. Granularity clustering method which is proposed and studied has attracted more and more attention. This paper firstly summarizes the background of granularity clustering and the intrinsic connection between granular computing and clustering analysis, and then mainly reviews the research status and various methods of granularity clustering. Finally, we analyze existing problem and propose further research. PMID:26557926

  11. Formation of Large Ag Clusters with Shells of Methane, Ethylene, and Acetylene in He Droplets.

    PubMed

    Loginov, Evgeny; Gomez, Luis F; Sartakov, Boris G; Vilesov, Andrey F

    2016-09-01

    Helium droplets were used to assemble composite metal-molecular clusters. Produced clusters have several hundreds of silver atoms in the core, immersed in a shell consisting of methane, ethylene, or acetylene molecules. The structure of the clusters was studied via infrared spectra of the C-H stretches of the hydrocarbon molecules. The spectra of the clusters containing methane and acetylene show two distinct features due to molecules on the interface with silver core and those in the volume of the neat molecular part of the clusters. The relative intensities of the peaks are in good agreement with the estimates based on the number of the captured particles. Experiments also suggest that selection rules for infrared transitions for molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces are also valid for silver clusters as small as 300 atoms. PMID:27500443

  12. Amine-pillared Nanosheet Adsorbents for CO2 Capture Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui

    Amine-functionalized solid adsorbents have gained attention within the last decade for their application in carbon dioxide capture, due to their many advantages such as low energy cost for regeneration, tunable structure, elimination of corrosion problems, and additional advantages. However, one of the challenges facing this technology is to accomplish both high CO 2 capture capacity along with high CO2 diffusion rates concurrently. Current amine-based solid sorbents such as porous materials similar to SBA-15 have large pores diffusion entering molecules; however, the pores become clogged upon amine inclusion. To meet this challenge, our group's solution involves the creation of a new type of material which we are calling-amino-pillared nanosheet (APN) adsorbents which are generated from layered nanosheet precursors. These materials are being proposed because of their unique lamellar structure which exhibits ability to be modified by organic or inorganic pillars through consecutive swelling and pillaring steps to form large mesoporous interlayer spaces. After the expansion of the layer space through swelling and pillaring, the large pore space can be functionalized with amine groups. This selective functionalization is possible by the choice of amine group introduced. Our choice, large amine molecules, do not access the micropore within each layer; however, either physically or chemically immobilized onto the surface of the mesoporous interlayer space between each layer. The final goal of the research is to investigate the ability to prepare APN adsorbents from a model nanoporous layered materials including nanosheets precursor material MCM-22(P) and nanoporous layered silicate material AMH-3. MCM-22(P) contains 2-dimensional porous channels, 6 membered rings (MB) openings perpendicular to the layers and 10 MB channels in the plane of the layers. However, the transport limiting openings (6 MB) to the layers is smaller than CO2 gas molecules. In contrast, AMH-3 has

  13. A DFT study on the adsorption of CO and CO{sub 2} molecules on Pt{sub 4} and Ir{sub 4} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Munieswaran, P.; Seenithurai, S.; Pandyan, R. Kodi; Kumar, S. Vinodh; Saranya, C.; Mahendran, M.

    2015-06-24

    We analyze the electronic structure and adsorption binding energy of CO and CO{sub 2} molecules adsorbed on Ir{sub 4} and Pt{sub 4} clusters by using Density functional theory (DFT). It is found that the Ir{sub 4} cluster has more adsorption binding energy than Pt{sub 4} cluster. We show that the Ir and Ir - supported materials are good catalytic materials and could be useful for gas sensor applications.

  14. Quantum Chemical Study of Raman Spectroscopy of Substituted Benzene Derivatives Adsorbed on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, De-Yin; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2011-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can be applied to obtain the information of molecules at the noble metal surfaces. But there are a number of difficulties to clearly correlate Raman spectra with microscopic molecular structures on metal surfaces. The main reason is that it is difficult to characterize unambiguously the metal surface structures and the influence of the binding interaction on SERS signals of the probe molecules. According to the surface selection rule of SERS, the electromagnetic enhancement will not change relative Raman intensities of vibrational modes with the same irreducible representation. Therefore, the change of the relative Raman intensities of the total symmetric modes may only originate from the chemical enhancement. In order to understand how the chemical interaction modulates the Raman intensity of individual modes, it is necessary to systematically investigate the Raman spectra of probe molecules themselves and the dependence of SERS signals on the binding interaction, adsorption sites, excitation wavelengths and metal property. Some probe molecules, including aniline, 1,4-benzenediamine, p-aminothiophenol, benzyl chlorine, and 4,4^'-bipyridine are investigated based on quantum chemical calculations. Raman spectra of these molecules and their adsorbed species were predicted and compared with experimentally measured spectra. The metal surfaces were mimicked using the metallic cluster model, where the silver or gold surfaces were replaced by silver or gold clusters, respectively. The density functional theory approach was employed to obtain the optimized structures and vibrational spectra by combining all-electron basis sets of 6-311+G** for atoms in the molecules and the poseudopotential basis set of LANL2DZ for metal atoms. The vibrational frequency shift and the relative Raman intensity are related to the adsorption configuration of the probe molecules. For all these molecules, the ring breathing mode and the C-C stretching

  15. Defluoridation of groundwater using brick powder as an adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Asheesh Kumar; Kaushik, C P; Haritash, Anil Kumar; Kansal, Ankur; Rani, Neetu

    2006-02-01

    Defluoridation of groundwater using brick powder as an adsorbent was studied in batch process. Different parameters of adsorption, viz. effect of pH, effect of dose and contact time were selected and optimized for the study. Feasible optimum conditions were applied to two groundwater samples of high fluoride concentration to study the suitability of adsorbent in field conditions. Comparison of adsorption by brick powder was made with adsorption by commercially available activated charcoal. In the optimum condition of pH and dose of adsorbents, the percentage defluoridation from synthetic sample, increased from 29.8 to 54.4% for brick powder and from 47.6 to 80.4% for commercially available activated charcoal with increasing the contact time starting from 15 to 120 min. Fluoride removal was found to be 48.73 and 56.4% from groundwater samples having 3.14 and 1.21 mg l(-1) fluoride, respectively, under the optimized conditions. Presence of other ions in samples did not significantly affect the deflouridation efficiency of brick powder. The optimum pH range for brick powder was found to be 6.0-8.0 and adsorption equilibrium was found to be 60 min. These conditions make it very suitable for use in drinking water treatment. Deflouridation capacity of brick powder can be explained on the basis of the chemical interaction of fluoride with the metal oxides under suitable pH conditions. The adsorption process was found to follow first order rate mechanism as well as Freundlich isotherm. PMID:16233952

  16. Cluster Morphology Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Most disease clustering methods assume specific shapes and do not evaluate statistical power using the applicable geography, at-risk population, and covariates. Cluster Morphology Analysis (CMA) conducts power analyses of alternative techniques assuming clusters of different relative risks and shapes. Results are ranked by statistical power and false positives, under the rationale that surveillance should (1) find true clusters while (2) avoiding false clusters. CMA then synthesizes results of the most powerful methods. CMA was evaluated in simulation studies and applied to pancreatic cancer mortality in Michigan, and finds clusters of flexible shape while routinely evaluating statistical power. PMID:20234799

  17. Activation and adsorption of CO{sub 2} on copper surfaces and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, Seema; Dharmvir, Keya; Goel, Neetu

    2014-04-24

    The activation and adsorption of CO{sub 2} over Cu{sub n} clusters have been investigated by first principle calculations. Results of these calculations are compared with the previous studies of adsorption of CO{sub 2} on Cu (hkl) surfaces [Wang et al. Surface Science 570 (2004) 205–217]. We find that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed over the clusters in comparison with Cu (hkl) surfaces. The Cu13 cluster in particular dissociates the CO{sub 2} molecule adsorbed on the one of the caps of the icosahedron into CO and atomic oxygen. This activated configuration can act as a precursor to reactions leading to hydrocarbon fuels from CO{sub 2}.

  18. A simple model for electronic properties of surface adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Rajesh; Schwalm, William

    We adapt a minimal approximation to one electron quantum theory of molecules referred as Fast Accurate Kinetic Energy method. This in principle handles large complex molecular structures with less computational effort to compute electronic properties of adsorbed molecules. Kinetic energy integrals are calculated accurately but multi-electron potential energy integrals are approximated. The neighboring atom interactions are included also. For layers of isopthalic acids formed on pyrolytic graphite the configuration changes as a function of length of hydrocarbon tails. We study properties of this system as a function of tail length.

  19. 3,5-Dichlorophenol Removal From Wastewater Using Alternative Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobetičová, Hana; Lipovský, Marek; Wachter, Igor; Soldán, Maroš

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the efficiency of 3,5-dichlorophenol removal from wastewater by using alternative low cost adsorbents. Waste from the production and processing of metals (black nickel mud, red mud) and a biosorbent (Lemna minor) were used for this research. Initial concentration of the contaminant was 4 mmol L-1, the contact time of sorbent and waste water was 0 - 48 hrs and the temperature during experiment was 25 ± 0.2 °C. The results show that the highest removal efficiency of 3,5 - dichlorophenol (58.18 %) was reached by the red mud in 48 hours.

  20. The effective thermal conductivity of an adsorbent - Praseodymium cerium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secary, J. J.; Tong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the effective thermal conductivity of praseodymium cerium oxide are reported. Praseodymium cerium oxide is an adsorbent used in the development of adsorption compressors for spaceborne refrigeration systems. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus was built for this study. Measurements were carried out for mean temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 C under a vacuum of 10 exp -5 torr. For the temperature range studied, the effective thermal conductivity increased from 0.14 to 0.76 W/m per C with increasing temperature, while displaying a cubic temperature dependency.

  1. Decomposition of trichloroethene on ozone-adsorbed high silica zeolites.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirotaka; Izumi, Jun; Sagehashi, Masaki; Fujii, Takao; Sakoda, Akiyoshi

    2004-01-01

    We developed a novel ozonation process for water treatment using high silica zeolites as an adsorptive concentrator of water-dissolved ozone and organic pollutants, resulting in a significant increase in reaction rate. In experiments involving trichloroethene (TCE) decomposition using a tubular flow reactor, TCE decomposition was much greater in the presence of ZSM-5 (SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratio=3000) than in its absence, possibly due to the high concentrations of ozone and TCE inside the adsorbent. The TCE conversion obtained in our experiments was found to reach its theoretically maximum limit. PMID:14630114

  2. Cesium adsorption on composite ferrocyanide-aluminosilicate adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Panasyugin, A.S.; Rat`ko, A.I.; Trofimenko, N.E.

    1995-11-01

    The formation of composite ferrocyanide adsorbents prepared on the basis of clinoptilolite is studied by potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction analysis, and IR spectroscopy, and the nature of ion-exchanging complex is established. Exchange capacity, selectivity, and hydrolytic stability of the sorbents are characterized. Distribution coefficients with modified samples can be as large as 10000 for {sup 137}Cs; however, with increase of the background salt concentration above 0.17 g l{sup -1}, competing ions have noticeable effect on the adsorption properties of the aluminosilicates.

  3. Electrically heated particulate filter regeneration using hydrocarbon adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-02-01

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material selectively heats exhaust passing through the upstream end to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A hydrocarbon adsorbent coating applied to the PF releases hydrocarbons into the exhaust to increase a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

  4. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  5. Behavior of adsorbed Poly-A onto sodium montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomino-Aquino, Nayeli; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2015-07-01

    The adsorption of Poly-A (a polynucleotide consisting of adenine, ribose and a phosphate group), onto a clay mineral, was studied to investigate the extent of adsorption, the site of binding, and the capacity of the clay to protect Poly-A, while it is adsorbed onto the clay, from external sources of energy. The results showed that Poly-A presented a high percentage of adsorption at the edges of the clay and that the survival of the polynucleotide was superior to irradiating the polymer in the absence of the clay.

  6. Titanate-based adsorbents for radioactive ions entrapment from water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjiang; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2013-03-21

    This feature article reviews some titanate-based adsorbents for the removal of radioactive wastes (cations and anions) from water. At the beginning, we discuss the development of the conventional ion-exchangeable titanate powders for the entrapment of radioactive cations, such as crystalline silicotitanate (CST), monosodium titanate (MST), peroxotitanate (PT). Then, we specially emphasize the recent progress in the uptake of radioactive ions by one-dimensional (1D) sodium titanate nanofibers and nanotubes, which includes the synthesis and phase transformation of the 1D nanomaterials, adsorption ability (capacity, selectivity, kinetics, etc.) of radioactive cations and anions, and the structural evolution during the adsorption process. PMID:23412572

  7. Do Methanethiol Adsorbates on the Au(111) Surface Dissociate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank

    2006-07-01

    The interaction of methanethiol molecules CH3SH with the Au(111) surface is investigated, and it is found for the first time that the S-H bond remains intact when the methanethiol molecules are adsorbed on the regular Au(111) surface. However, it breaks if defects are present in the Au(111) surface. At low coverage, the fcc region is favored for S atom adsorption, but at saturated coverage the adsorption energies at various sites are almost isoenergetic. The presented calculations show that a methanethiol layer on the regular Au(111) surface does not dimerize.

  8. Molecular switches from benzene derivatives adsorbed on metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Filimonov, Sergey N.; Carrasco, Javier; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Transient precursor states are often experimentally observed for molecules adsorbing on surfaces. However, such precursor states are typically rather short-lived, quickly yielding to more stable adsorption configurations. Here we employ first-principles calculations to systematically explore the interaction mechanism for benzene derivatives on metal surfaces, enabling us to selectively tune the stability and the barrier between two metastable adsorption states. In particular, in the case of the tetrachloropyrazine molecule, two equally stable adsorption states are identified with a moderate and conceivably reversible barrier between them. We address the feasibility of experimentally detecting the predicted bistable behaviour and discuss its potential usefulness in a molecular switch. PMID:24157660

  9. Mobilization of arsenite by dissimilatory reduction of adsorbed arsenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zobrist, J.; Dowdle, P.R.; Davis, J.A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum barnesii is capable of anaerobic growth using ferric iron or arsenate as electron acceptors. Cell suspensions of S. barnesii were able to reduce arsenate to arsenite when the former oxyanion was dissolved in solution, or when it was adsorbed onto the surface of ferrihydrite, a common soil mineral, by a variety of mechanisms (e.g., coprecipitation, presorption). Reduction of Fe(III) in ferrihydrite to soluble Fe(II) also occurred, but dissolution of ferrihydrite was not required in order for adsorbed arsenate reduction to be achieved. This was illustrated by bacterial reduction of arsenate coprecipitated with aluminum hydroxide, a mineral that does not undergo reductive dissolution. The rate of arsenate reduction was influenced by the method in which arsenate became associated with the mineral phases and may have been strongly coupled with arsenate desorption rates. The extent of release of arsenite into solution was governed by adsorption of arsenite onto the ferrihydrite or alumina phases. The results of these experiments have interpretive significance to the mobilization of arsenic in large alluvial aquifers, such as those of the Ganges in India and Bangladesh, and in the hyporheic zones of contaminated streams.Sulfurospirillum barnesii is capable of anaerobic growth using ferric iron or arsenate as electron acceptors. Cell suspensions of S. barnesii were able to reduce arsenate to arsenite when the former oxyanion was dissolved in solution, or when it was adsorbed onto the surface of ferrihydrite a common soil mineral, by a variety of mechanisms (e.g., coprecipitation, presorption). Reduction of Fe(III) in ferrihydrite to soluble Fe(II) also occurred, but dissolution of ferrihydrite was not required in order for adsorbed arsenate reduction to be achieved. This was illustrated by bacterial reduction of arsenate coprecipitated with aluminum hydroxide, a mineral that does not undergo reductive dissolution. The rate of arsenate reduction was

  10. Behavior of adsorbed Poly-A onto sodium montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Palomino-Aquino, Nayeli; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2015-07-23

    The adsorption of Poly-A (a polynucleotide consisting of adenine, ribose and a phosphate group), onto a clay mineral, was studied to investigate the extent of adsorption, the site of binding, and the capacity of the clay to protect Poly-A, while it is adsorbed onto the clay, from external sources of energy. The results showed that Poly-A presented a high percentage of adsorption at the edges of the clay and that the survival of the polynucleotide was superior to irradiating the polymer in the absence of the clay.

  11. Detection of adsorbed water and hydroxyl on the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Data from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIAAS) on Cassini during its flyby of the AAoon in 1999 show a broad absorption at 3 micrometers due to adsorbed water and near 2.8 micrometers attributed to hydroxyl in the sunlit surface on the AAoon. The amounts of water indicated in the spectra depend on the type of mixing and the grain sizes in the rocks and soils but could be 10 to 1000 parts per million and locally higher. Water in the polar regions may be water that has migrated to the colder environments there. Trace hydroxyl is observed in the anorthositic highlands at lower latitudes.

  12. Contaminant removal from enclosed atmospheres by regenerable adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, R. L.; Mcnulty, K. J.; Freedland, G. M.; Turk, A.; Nwankwo, J.

    1974-01-01

    A system for removing contaminants from spacecraft atmospheres was studied, which utilizes catalyst-impregnated activated carbon followed by in-situ regeneration by low-temperature catalytic oxidation of the adsorbed contaminants. Platinum was deposited on activated carbon by liquid phase impregnation with chloroplatinic acid, followed by drying and high-temperature reduction. Results were obtained for the seven selected spacecraft contaminants by means of three experimental test systems. The results indicate that the contaminants could be removed by oxidation with very little loss in adsorptive capacity. The advantages of a catalyst-impregnated carbon for oxidative regeneration are found to be significant enough to warrent its use.

  13. Temperature programmed desorption of weakly bound adsorbates on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Meling, Artur; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2016-08-01

    We have performed temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to analyze the desorption kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, C2H2, SF6, N2, NO and CO on Au(111). We report desorption activation energies (Edes), which are an excellent proxy for the binding energies. The derived binding energies scale with the polarizability of the molecules, consistent with the conclusion that the surface-adsorbate bonds arise due to dispersion forces. The reported results serve as a benchmark for theories of dispersion force interactions of molecules at metal surfaces.

  14. Hydrogen spillover on DV (555-777) graphene – vanadium cluster system: First principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, E. Mathan E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com; Thapa, Ranjit E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com; P, Sabarikirishwaran

    2015-06-24

    Using dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT+D), the interaction of Vanadium adatom and cluster with divacancy (555-777) defective graphene sheet has been studied elaborately. We explore the prospect of hydrogen storage on V{sub 4} cluster adsorbed divacancy graphene system. It has been observed that V{sub 4} cluster (acting as a catalyst) can dissociate the H{sub 2} molecule into H atoms with very low barrier energy. We introduce the spillover of the atomic hydrogen throughout the surface via external mediator gallane (GaH{sub 3}) to form a hydrogenated system.

  15. Hydrogen spillover on DV (555-777) graphene - vanadium cluster system: First principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, E. Mathan; P, Sabarikirishwaran; Thapa, Ranjit

    2015-06-01

    Using dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT+D), the interaction of Vanadium adatom and cluster with divacancy (555-777) defective graphene sheet has been studied elaborately. We explore the prospect of hydrogen storage on V4 cluster adsorbed divacancy graphene system. It has been observed that V4 cluster (acting as a catalyst) can dissociate the H2 molecule into H atoms with very low barrier energy. We introduce the spillover of the atomic hydrogen throughout the surface via external mediator gallane (GaH3) to form a hydrogenated system.

  16. Universal Cluster Deposition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, You; Sun, Zhiguang; Sellmyer, David J.

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a universal cluster deposition system (UCDS), which combines a new kind of sputtering-gas-aggregation (SGA) cluster beam source with two atom beams from magnetron sputtering. A highly intense, very stable beam of nanoclusters (like Co, Fe, Ni, Si, CoSm or CoPt) are produced. A quadrupole and/or a new high transmission infinite range mass selector have been designed for the cluster beam. The size distribution (Δd/d) is between 0.05+/-0.10, measured in situ by TOF. A range of mean cluster size is 2 to 10 nm. Usually the deposition rate is about 5 deg/s. The cluster concentration in the film is adjusted through the ratio of cluster and atomic beam deposition rates, as measured in situ with a rotatable quartz microbalance. The UCDS can be used to prepare coated clusters. After exiting from the cluster source, the clusters can be coated first with an atomic or molecular species in an evaporation chamber, and deposited alone or co-deposited with another material. This system is used to deposit simultaneously or alternately mesoscopic thin films or multilayers, and offers the possibility to control independently the incident cluster size and concentration, and thereby the interaction between clusters and cluster-matrix material which is of interest for fundamental research and industry applications. Magnetic properties of Co cluster-assembled materials will be discussed. * Research supported by NSF, DARPA through ARO, and CMRA

  17. Adsorption energy and spin state of first-row transition metals adsorbed on MgO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovits, A.; Paniagua, J. C.; López, N.; Minot, C.; Illas, F.

    2003-03-01

    Slab and cluster model spin-polarized calculations have been carried out to study various properties of isolated first-row transition metal atoms adsorbed on the anionic sites of the regular MgO(100) surface. The calculated adsorption energies follow the trend of the metal cohesive energies, indicating that the changes in the metal-support and metal-metal interactions along the series are dominated by atomic properties. In all cases, except for Ni at the generalized gradient approximation level, the number of unpaired electron is maintained as in the isolated metal atom. The energy required to change the atomic state from high to low spin has been computed using the PW91 and B3LYP density-functional-theory-based methods. PW91 fails to predict the proper ground state of V and Ni, but the results for the isolated and adsorbed atom are consistent within the method. B3LYP properly predicts the ground state of all first-row transition atom the high- to low-spin transition considered is comparable to experiment. In all cases, the interaction with the surface results in a reduced high- to low-spin transition energy.

  18. Can the state of platinum species be unambiguously determined by the stretching frequency of an adsorbed CO probe molecule?

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Neyman, Konstantin M; Hadjiivanov, Konstantin I; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2016-08-10

    The paper addresses possible ambiguities in the determination of the state of platinum species by the stretching frequency of a CO probe, which is a common technique for characterization of platinum-containing catalytic systems. We present a comprehensive comparison of the available experimental data with our theoretical modeling (density functional) results of pertinent systems - platinum surfaces, nanoparticles and clusters as well as reduced or oxidized platinum moieties on a ceria support. Our results for CO adsorbed on-top on metallic Pt(0), with C-O vibrational frequencies in the region 2018-2077 cm(-1), suggest that a decrease of the coordination number of the platinum atom, to which CO is bound, by one lowers the CO frequency by about 7 cm(-1). This trend corroborates the Kappers-van der Maas correlation derived from the analysis of the experimental stretching frequency of CO adsorbed on platinum-containing samples on different supports. We also analyzed the effect of the charge of platinum species on the CO frequency. Based on the calculated vibrational frequencies of CO in various model systems, we concluded that the actual state of the platinum species may be mistaken based only on the measured value of the C-O vibrational frequency due to overlapping regions of frequencies corresponding to different types of species. In order to identify the actual state of platinum species one has to combine this powerful technique with other approaches. PMID:27444400

  19. Rhodium Oxide Cluster Ions Studied by Thermal Desorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Takenouchi, Masato; Miyajima, Ken; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-01-28

    Gas-phase rhodium oxide clusters, RhnOm(+), were investigated by measuring the rate constants of oxidation and thermal desorption spectrometry. RhnOm(+) was suggested to be categorized into different states as m/n ≤ 1, 1 < m/n ≤ 1.5, and 1.5 < m/n in terms of energy and kinetics. For m/n ≤ 1, the O atoms readily adsorbed on the cluster with a large binding energy until RhO was formed. Under the O2-rich environment, oxidation proceeded until Rh2O3 was formed with a moderate binding energy. In addition, O2 molecules attached weakly to the cluster, and Rh2O3 formed RhnOm(+) (1.5 < m/n). The energetics and geometries of Rh6Om(+) (m = 6-12) were obtained using density functional theory calculations and were found to be consistent with the experimental results. PMID:26730616

  20. EINSTEIN Cluster Alignments Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, S. W.; Melott, A. L.; Miller, C. J.

    2000-12-01

    We have examined whether the major axes of rich galaxy clusters tend to point (in projection) toward their nearest neighboring cluster. We used the data of Ulmer, McMillan and Kowalski, who used x-ray morphology to define position angles. Our cluster samples, with well measured redshifts and updated positions, were taken from the MX Northern Abell Cluster Survey. The usual Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows no significant alignment signal for nonrandom angles for all separations less than 100 Mpc/h. Refining the null hypothesis, however, with the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, reveals a high confidence signal for alignment. This confidence is highest when we restrict our sample to small nearest neighbor separations. We conclude that we have identified a more powerful tool for testing cluster-cluster alignments. Moreover, there is a strong signal in the data for alignment, consistent with a picture of hierarchical cluster formation in which matter falls into clusters along large scale filamentary structures.

  1. Matlab Cluster Ensemble Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Sapio, Vincent De; Kegelmeyer, Philip

    2009-04-27

    This is a Matlab toolbox for investigating the application of cluster ensembles to data classification, with the objective of improving the accuracy and/or speed of clustering. The toolbox divides the cluster ensemble problem into four areas, providing functionality for each. These include, (1) synthetic data generation, (2) clustering to generate individual data partitions and similarity matrices, (3) consensus function generation and final clustering to generate ensemble data partitioning, and (4) implementation of accuracy metrics. With regard to data generation, Gaussian data of arbitrary dimension can be generated. The kcenters algorithm can then be used to generate individual data partitions by either, (a) subsampling the data and clustering each subsample, or by (b) randomly initializing the algorithm and generating a clustering for each initialization. In either case an overall similarity matrix can be computed using a consensus function operating on the individual similarity matrices. A final clustering can be performed and performance metrics are provided for evaluation purposes.

  2. Interaction of plasma-generated water cluster ions with chemically-modified Si surfaces investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Matsumura, Ryosuke; Ma, Teng; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio; Nishikawa, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the interaction of water cluster ions generated by discharge plasma, with chemically modified Si surfaces using infrared absorption spectroscopy in the multiple internal reflection geometry. We observe that water cluster ions readily adsorb on SiO2-covered Si surfaces to form water droplets. We demonstrate that positively- and negatively-charged cluster ions adsorb on the SiO2-covered Si surface in different manners, indicating ionic interaction of the water droplets with the negatively-charged SiO2 surface. Water droplets formed on the protein-coated surface rupture the amide bond of the proteins, suggesting the function of protein decomposition of water cluster ions.

  3. Contact and friction of nanoasperities: effects of adsorbed monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Luan, Binquan; Robbins, Mark O

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study contact between a rigid, nonadhesive, and spherical tip with radius of order 30 nm and a flat elastic substrate covered with a fluid monolayer of adsorbed chain molecules. Previous studies of bare surfaces showed that the atomic scale deviations from a sphere that are present on any tip constructed from discrete atoms lead to significant deviations from continuum theory and dramatic variability in friction forces. Introducing an adsorbed monolayer leads to larger deviations from continuum theory but decreases the variations between tips with different atomic structure. Although the film is fluid, it remains in the contact and behaves qualitatively like a thin elastic coating except for certain tips at high loads. Measures of the contact area based on the moments or outer limits of the pressure distribution and on counting contacting atoms are compared. The number of tip atoms making contact during a time interval Deltat grows as a power of Deltat when the film is present and as the logarithm of Deltat for bare surfaces. Friction is measured by displacing the tip at a constant velocity or pulling the tip with a spring. Both static and kinetic friction rise linearly with load at small loads. Transitions in the state of the film lead to nonlinear behavior at large loads. The friction is less clearly correlated with contact area than load. PMID:20365427

  4. Membrane adsorbers comprising grafted glycopolymers for targeted lectin binding

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Husson, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    This work details the design and testing of affinity membrane adsorbers for lectin purifications that incorporate glucose-containing glycopolymers. It is the selective interaction between the sugar residues of the glycopolymer and the complementary carbohydrate-binding domain of the lectin that provides the basis for the isolation and purification of lectins from complex biological media. The design approach used in these studies was to graft glycopolymer ‘tentacles’ from macroporous regenerated cellulose membranes by atom transfer radical polymerization. As shown in earlier studies, this design approach can be used to prepare high-productivity membrane adsorbers. The model lectin, concanavalin A (conA), was used to evaluate membrane performance in bind-and-elute purification, using a low molecular weight sugar for elution. The membrane capacity for binding conA was measured at equilibrium and under dynamic conditions using flow rates of 0.1 and 1.0 mL/min. The first Damkohler number was estimated to relate the adsorption rate to the convective mass transport rate through the membrane bed. It was used to assess whether adsorption kinetics or mass transport contributed the primary limitation to conA binding. Analyses indicate that this system is not limited by the accessibility of the binding sites, but by the inherent rate of adsorption of conA onto the glycopolymer. PMID:25866416

  5. Fly ash adsorbents for multi-cation wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visa, Maria; Isac, Luminita; Duta, Anca

    2012-06-01

    Class "F" fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO2/Al2O3 over 2.4 proved good adsorbent properties, and was further used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for heavy metals from multi-cation wastewater treatment. Firstly, the new adsorbent was characterized by AFM, XRD, DSC, FTIR and the surface energy was evaluated by contact angle measurements. The experimental data suggested that the new type of substrate is predominant crystalline with highly polar surface. The substrate was used for removing the Pb2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+ cations from mixed solutions. The results show high efficiency and selective adsorption the Pb2+ and Zn2+ cations. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe the processes. The pseudo-second order kinetics could well model all the processes, indicating a surface concentration of the adsorption sites with the same order of magnitude as the cation concentrations.

  6. Palladium dimers adsorbed on graphene: A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-05-15

    The 2D structure of graphene shows a great promise for enhanced catalytic activity when adsorbed with palladium. We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Pd{sub 2}-graphene system are calculated. Both horizontal and vertical orientations of Pd{sub 2} on graphene are studied. Our calculations revealed that the minimum energy configuration for Pd dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms occupying centre of adjacent hexagonal rings of graphene sheet. Magnetic moment is induced for Pd dimer adsorbed on graphene in vertical orientation while horizontal orientation of Pd dimer on graphene do not exhibit magnetism. Insignificant energy differences among adsorption sites means that dimer mobility on the graphene sheet is high. There is imperceptible distortion of graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane. However, some lateral displacements are seen.

  7. Confocal Raman microscopy of protein adsorbed in chromatographic particles.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuewu; Stone, Thomas; Bell, David; Gillespie, Christopher; Portoles, Marta

    2012-09-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy is a nondestructive analytical technique that combines the chemical information from vibrational spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of confocal microscopy. It was applied, for the first time, to measure conformation and distribution of protein adsorbed in wetted chromatographic particles. Monoclonal antibody was loaded into the Fractogel EMD SO(3) (M) cation exchanger at 2 mS/cm or 10 mS/cm. Amide I and III frequencies in the Raman spectrum of the adsorbed protein suggest that there are no detectable changes of the original β-sheet conformation in the chromatographic particles. Protein depth profile measurements indicate that, when the conductivity is increased from 2 mS/cm to 10 mS/cm, there is a change in mass transport mechanism for protein adsorption, from the shrinking-core model to the homogeneous-diffusion model. In this study, the use of confocal Raman microscopy to measure protein distribution in chromatographic particles fundamentally agrees with previous confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations, but confocal Raman spectroscopy enjoys additional advantages: use of unlabeled protein to eliminate fluorescent labeling, ability for characterization of protein secondary structure, and ability for spectral normalization to provide a nondestructive experimental approach to correct light attenuation effects caused by refractive index (RI) mismatching in semiopaque chromatographic particles. PMID:22803776

  8. Graphene protected surface state on Ir(111) with adsorbed lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazic, Predrag; Pervan, Petar; Petrovic, Marin; Srut-Rakic, Iva; Pletikosic, Ivo; Kralj, Marko; Milun, Milorad; Valla, Tonica

    It is well known that electronic surface states (SS) get strongly perturbed upon the chemical adsorption of very small amount of adsorbates. Adsorption of lithium atoms on Ir(111) is no exception to that rule. Iridium SS gets strongly perturbed and is practically eradicated - it can not be seen as a sharp peak in the ARPES measurement. However, if the system is prepared with graphene on top of Ir/Li system, the iridium SS reappears. We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the described system. Using the density functional theory calculations for large unit cells with disordered lithium atoms geometries on the (111) surface of iridium we were able to reproduce the results of the ARPES measurements - showing clearly that the SS signal is strongly suppressed when lithium is adsorbed, while it is almost unchanged when lithium is intercalated (i.e. with graphene on top of it). Looking at the projected density of states we constructed a rather simple model explaining this behavior which seems to be general.

  9. Activated carbon adsorbents from waste tires for air quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C.M.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.; Hsi, H.C.

    1999-07-01

    This study evaluates methodologies for utilizing waste tire rubber to produce carbonaceous adsorbents for use in air quality control operations. Such an approach provides a two-fold environmental and economic benefit. A recycling path is developed for waste tire rubber and new adsorbents are produced from a low cost feedstock for use in environmentally-related operations. Bench-scale and pilot-scale quantities of tire-derived activated carbon (TDAC) were produced from waste tire rubber. Raw tire rubber samples and devolatilized tire char were obtained from several US vendors. The raw samples were analyzed using proximate, ultimate, and elemental analyses. Batches of activated carbon samples were prepared using a bench-scale fixed-tubular reactor to prepare {approximately}10 g samples and a fluidized-bed reactor to prepare {approximately}100 g quantities. About 25 kg of activated carbon was also produced at a pilot-scale commercial facility. The resulting TDACs were then characterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77K. The sample surface areas were determined by the BET method, and the pore size distribution (PSD) was evaluated using the BJH model, and a 3-D PSD model. Performance of the TDACs was evaluated in their ability to remove gaseous mercury species from simulated power-plant flue-gas streams, and for the removal of organic compounds (e.g., acetone and 1,1,1-trichloroethane) from flowing gas streams.

  10. Cellulose: A review as natural, modified and activated carbon adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Suhas; Gupta, V K; Carrott, P J M; Singh, Randhir; Chaudhary, Monika; Kushwaha, Sarita

    2016-09-01

    Cellulose is a biodegradable, renewable, non-meltable polymer which is insoluble in most solvents due to hydrogen bonding and crystallinity. Natural cellulose shows lower adsorption capacity as compared to modified cellulose and its capacity can be enhanced by modification usually by chemicals. This review focuses on the utilization of cellulose as an adsorbent in natural/modified form or as a precursor for activated carbon (AC) for adsorbing substances from water. The literature revealed that cellulose can be a promising precursor for production of activated carbon with appreciable surface area (∼1300m(2)g(-1)) and total pore volume (∼0.6cm(3)g(-1)) and the surface area and pore volume varies with the cellulose content. Finally, the purpose of review is to report a few controversies and unresolved questions concerning the preparation/properties of ACs from cellulose and to make aware to readers that there is still considerable scope for future development, characterization and utilization of ACs from cellulose. PMID:27265088

  11. Chemical and structural characterization of copper adsorbed on mosses (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    González, Aridane G; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Adamo, Paola; Pokrovsky, Oleg S

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of copper on passive biomonitors (devitalized mosses Hypnum sp., Sphagnum denticulatum, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachythecium rutabulum) was studied under different experimental conditions such as a function of pH and Cu concentration in solution. Cu assimilation by living Physcomitrella patents was also investigated. Molecular structure of surface adsorbed and incorporated Cu was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Devitalized mosses exhibited the universal adsorption pattern of Cu as a function of pH, with a total binding sites number 0.05-0.06 mmolg(dry)(-1) and a maximal adsorption capacity of 0.93-1.25 mmolg(dry)(-1) for these devitalized species. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) fit of the first neighbor demonstrated that for all studied mosses there are ∼4.5 O/N atoms around Cu at ∼1.95 Å likely in a pseudo-square geometry. The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis demonstrated that Cu(II)-cellulose (representing carboxylate groups) and Cu(II)-phosphate are the main moss surface binding moieties, and the percentage of these sites varies as a function of solution pH. P. patens exposed during one month to Cu(2+) yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu-S(CN) complexes, suggesting metabolically-controlled reduction of adsorbed and assimilated Cu(2+). PMID:26852210

  12. CO2 electrochemical reduction via adsorbed halide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Kotaro; Salazar-Villalpando, Maria D.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of CO2 was studied utilizing halide ions as electrolytes, specifically, aqueous solutions of KCl, KBr, KI. Electrochemical experiments were carried out in a laboratory-made, divided H-type cell. The working electrode was a copper mesh, while the counter and reference electrodes were a Pt wire and an Ag/AgCl electrode, respectively. The results of our work suggest a reaction mechanism for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 where the presence of Cu-X as the catalytic layer facilitates the electron transfer from the electrode to CO2. Electron-transfer to CO2 may occur via the X- ad(Br-, Cl-, I-)-C bond, which is formed by the electron flow from the specifically adsorbed halide anion to the vacant orbital of CO2. The stronger the adsorption of the halide anion to the electrode, the more strongly CO2 is restrained, resulting in higher CO2 reduction current. Furthermore, it is suggested that specifically adsorbed halide anions could suppress the adsorption of protons; leading to a higher hydrogen overvoltage. These effects may synergistically mitigate the over potential necessary for CO2 reduction, and thus increase the rate of electrochemical CO2 reduction.

  13. Structure of Inert Gases Adsorbed in MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Dylan; Sokol, Paul

    One-dimensional quantum liquids of 3He or 4He have generated recent interest for investigation in the Luttinger liquid model. Unfortunately, current studies lack a clear demonstration of definitively one-dimensional behavior. We propose using the templated, porous material, MCM-41, as a host for an atomic Luttinger liquid. In general, the pores of MCM-41 are too wide to provide a strictly one-dimensional environment, so we investigate preplating these pores with inert gases to effectively reduce their diameter. We present the results of studies of the structure of inert gases in MCM-41. Nitrogen sorption isotherms were used to characterize the sample. Then, using inert gases as adsorbates, we determined the minimum effective pore diameter that can be achieved in our sample before capillary condensation takes over. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed on the ideally preplated sample to investigate the structure of the adsorbates in the nanopores. The XRD measurements are compared to simulations of core-shell cylinder model scattering, and the validity of the model is assessed. The prospects for creating a definitively one-dimensional channel for the application of studying the structure and dynamics of helium confined in one dimension are discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DGE-1069091.

  14. Fibrous adsorbent for removal of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Jun; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Yamada, Toshiro; Takagi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Bundles of a strongly hydrophobic fibrous material (p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole; PBO; Zylon) were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of aqueous aromatic compounds, because the PBO fibers are too rigid to be woven and did not entrap suspended solids. The removal performance for nine kinds of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was evaluated. PAHs and DEHP at initial concentrations of 50 microg L(-1) were removed at 72.5-99.9% and ca. 95%, respectively, although the removal efficiencies were affected by the phase ratio (fiber weight/solution volume). The logarithm of the partition coefficient (log K) for planar PAHs was linearly correlated with the logarithm of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P), but nonplanar PAHs, such as cis-stilbene, p-terphenyl, and o-terphenyl, showed significantly lower adsorption performance. The adsorbed PAHs were not desorbed effectively with CH3CN, CH2Cl2, and toluene. On the other hand, DEHP was effectively desorbed with methanol. PMID:17585293

  15. Adsorbate electric fields on a cryogenic atom chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, K S; Siercke, M; Hufnagel, C; Dumke, R

    2014-01-17

    We investigate the behavior of electric fields originating from adsorbates deposited on a cryogenic atom chip as it is cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Using Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, we measure the field strength versus distance from a 1 mm square of yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) patterned onto a yttria stabilized zirconia chip substrate. We find a localized and stable dipole field at room temperature and attribute it to a saturated layer of chemically adsorbed rubidium atoms on the YBCO. As the chip is cooled towards 83 K we observe a change in sign of the electric field as well as a transition from a localized to a delocalized dipole density. We relate these changes to the onset of physisorption on the chip surface when the van der Waals attraction overcomes the thermal desorption mechanisms. Our findings suggest that through careful selection of substrate materials, it may be possible to reduce the electric fields caused by atomic adsorption on chips, opening up experiments to controlled Rydberg-surface coupling schemes. PMID:24484028

  16. Enhanced photodegradation of organic dyes adsorbed on a clay.

    PubMed

    Tani, Seiji; Yamaki, Hiroshi; Sumiyoshi, Azumi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yamazaki, Suzuko; Kawamata, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of three photoactive organic dyes, Rhodamine B, Rhodamine 6G and a stilbazolium derivative 4'-dimethylamino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium with synthetic sodium-saponite has been examined by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. In all cases, bathochromic shifts and the reduction of peak absorbance for the dyes were observed in the absorption spectra at a low dye concentration (25% adsorption of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay), although the shape and the width of their absorption bands were similar to those in aqueous solution. This absorption behavior indicates that the organic dye molecules adsorbed onto the surface of the negatively charged clay particles and the adsorbed molecules were well dispersed. The photodegradation of the organic dyes in aqueous solution and in the clay suspension has been also examined by the irradiation of a laser beam at a wavelength of 532 nm. We have found that the hybridization of the organic dyes with the exfoliated clay particles largely enhanced a photodegradation. The clay particles acted as a catalyst even at a high concentration such as approximately 300% of CEC. PMID:19441365

  17. Microcanonical simulations of adsorbing self-avoiding walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    Linear polymers adsorbing on a wall can be modelled by half-space self-avoiding walks adsorbing on a line in the square lattice, or on a surface in the cubic lattice. In this paper a numerical approach based on the GAS algorithm is used to approximately enumerate states in the partition function of this model. The data are used to approximate the free energy in the model, from which estimates of the location of the critical point and crossover exponents are made. The critical point is found to be located at \\begin{equation} a_c^+ = \\cases{ 1.779 \\pm 0.003, & \\hbox{in the square lattice}; \\\\ 1.306 \\pm 0.007, & \\hbox{in the cubic lattice}. } \\end{equation} These results are then used to estimate the crossover exponent $\\phi$ associated with the adsorption transition, giving \\begin{equation} \\phi = \\cases{ 0.496 \\pm 0.009, & \\hbox{in two dimensions}; \\\\ 0.505 \\pm 0.006, & \\hbox{in three dimensions}. } \\end{equation} In addition, the scaling of these thermodynamic quantities is examined using the numerical data, including the scaling of metric quantities, and the partition and generating functions. In all cases results and numerical values of exponents were obtained which are consistent with estimates in the literature.

  18. [Pathophysiology of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Donnet, Anne

    2015-11-01

    The aetiology of cluster headache is partially unknown. Three areas are involved in the pathogenesis of cluster headache: the trigeminal nociceptive pathways, the autonomic system and the hypothalamus. The cluster headache attack involves activation of the trigeminal autonomic reflex. A dysfunction located in posterior hypothalamic gray matter is probably pivotal in the process. There is a probable association between smoke exposure, a possible genetic predisposition and the development of cluster headache. PMID:26470883

  19. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesús Pelayo, José; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by G. Delgado Barrio, A. Solov'Yov, P. Villarreal, R. Prosmiti.

  20. CLUSTERING OF RARE EVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clustering of cases of a rare disease is considered. The number of events observed for each unit is assumed to have a Poisson distribution, the mean of which depends upon the population size and the cluster membership of that unit. Here a cluster consists of those units that ...

  1. Clustering and photochemistry of freon CF2Cl2 on argon and ice nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Poterya, Viktoriya; Kočišek, Jaroslav; Lengyel, Jozef; Svrčková, Pavla; Pysanenko, Andriy; Hollas, Daniel; Slavíček, Petr; Fárník, Michal

    2014-07-01

    The photochemistry of CF2Cl2 molecules deposited on argon and ice nanoparticles was investigated. The clusters were characterized via electron ionization mass spectrometry, and the photochemistry was revealed by the Cl fragment velocity map imaging after the CF2Cl2 photodissociation at 193 nm. The complex molecular beam experiment was complemented by ab initio calculations. The (CF2Cl2)n clusters were generated in a coexpansion with Ar buffer gas. The photodissociation of molecules in the (CF2Cl2)n clusters yields predominantly Cl fragments with zero kinetic energy: caging. The CF2Cl2 molecules deposited on large argon clusters in a pickup experiment are highly mobile and coagulate to form the (CF2Cl2)n clusters on ArN. The photodissociation of the CF2Cl2 molecules and clusters on ArN leads to the caging of the Cl fragment. On the other hand, the CF2Cl2 molecules adsorbed on the (H2O)N ice nanoparticles do not form clusters, and no Cl fragments are observed from their photodissociation. Since the CF2Cl2 molecule was clearly adsorbed on (H2O)N, the missing Cl signal is interpreted in terms of surface orientation, possibly via the so-called halogen bond and/or embedding of the CF2Cl2 molecule on the disordered surface of the ice nanoparticles. PMID:24911048

  2. Vibrational analysis of water adsorbed on Pd(100): sensitivity of the isotope shifts of bending modes to the bonding site. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, K.G.; Banse, B.A.; Hemminger, J.C.

    1986-02-15

    A harmonic picture of the vibrations of water adsorbed on Pd(100) is presented. The shift of the water-bending mode (against the surface plane) upon deuteration is well described by this purely harmonic picture. Normal-mode calculations in which the Pd(100) substrate is described by a finite cluster of 66 atoms were used to study the sensitivity of the isotope shift of the bending-mode frequency to the bonding site. The on-top and two-fold bridge sites are consistent with experimental results whereas the four-fold hollow site is not.

  3. The changes in small metal cluster size with adsorption Be13Xn, X = H, O, S, Cl and F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Be-Be and Be-adsorbate distances are optimized for small Be13Xn clusters,s assuming only two independent degrees of freedom. Results for chemisorption into the three-fold hollows are quite similar to those found for small metal clusters on supports. It is predicted that Cl and F will have the same effect on the metal-metal bond lengths, and so will O and S.

  4. Preparation and characterization of novel carbon dioxide adsorbents based on polyethylenimine-modified Halloysite nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Haohao; Bao, Feng; Gao, Jie; Chen, Tao; Wang, Si; Ma, Rui

    2015-01-01

    New nano-sized carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbents based on Halloysite nanotubes impregnated with polyethylenimine (PEI) were designed and synthesized, which were excellent adsorbents for the capture of CO2 at room temperature and had relatively high CO2 adsorption capacity. The prepared adsorbents were characterized by various techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, gel permeation chromatography, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetry, thermogravimetry-Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption characteristics and capacity were studied at room temperature, the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 156.6 mg/g-PEI was obtained and the optimal adsorption capacity can reach a maximum value of 54.8 mg/g-adsorbent. The experiment indicated that this kind of adsorbent has a high stability at 80°C and PEI-impregnated adsorbents showed good reversibility and stability during cyclic adsorption-regeneration tests. PMID:25381878

  5. Oil palm biomass-based adsorbents for the removal of water pollutants--a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanweer; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ghazali, Arniza; Sulaiman, Othman; Hashim, Rokiah

    2011-07-01

    This article presents a review on the role of oil palm biomass (trunks, fronds, leaves, empty fruit bunches, shells, etc.) as adsorbents in the removal of water pollutants such as acid and basic dyes, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, various gaseous pollutants, and so on. Numerous studies on adsorption properties of various low-cost adsorbents, such as agricultural wastes and its based activated carbons, have been reported in recent years. Studies have shown that oil palm-based adsorbent, among the low-cost adsorbents mentioned, is the most promising adsorbent for removing water pollutants. Further, these bioadsorbents can be chemically modified for better efficiency and can undergo multiple reuses to enhance their applicability at an industrial scale. It is evident from a literature survey of more than 100 recent papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants. The conclusion is been drawn from the reviewed literature, and suggestions for future research are proposed. PMID:21929380

  6. Synthesis of 4-vinylpyridine-divinylbenzene copolymer adsorbents for microwave-assisted desorption of benzene.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing Bo; Yang, Go-Su; Lee, Youn-Sik

    2012-02-29

    Reports on the development of polymer adsorbents for microwave-assisted desorption of nonpolar volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are rare. In this study, we synthesized macroporous polymeric adsorbents with hydrophilic methyl pyridinium units for microwave-assisted desorption of nonpolar VOCs. The benzene adsorption and desorption properties of the adsorbents were investigated under both dry and humid conditions. Under humid conditions, as the content of the hydrophilic methyl pyridinium units in the adsorbents increased from 0 to 20%, the adsorption capacity of benzene decreased from about 21 to 7 mg/g, while the desorption efficiency of benzene increased significantly from 48 to 87%. The maximum concentration of desorbate also increased significantly as the content of the hydrophilic units was increased under humid conditions. We attributed the enhanced desorption efficiency mainly to more adsorbed moisture, which indirectly allowed heating of the polymer adsorbents to higher temperatures upon irradiation with 600 W microwaves. PMID:22236950

  7. A new clustering strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-xin; Tang, Jia-fu; Wang, Guang-xing

    2007-04-01

    On the basis of the analysis of clustering algorithm that had been proposed for MANET, a novel clustering strategy was proposed in this paper. With the trust defined by statistical hypothesis in probability theory and the cluster head selected by node trust and node mobility, this strategy can realize the function of the malicious nodes detection which was neglected by other clustering algorithms and overcome the deficiency of being incapable of implementing the relative mobility metric of corresponding nodes in the MOBIC algorithm caused by the fact that the receiving power of two consecutive HELLO packet cannot be measured. It's an effective solution to cluster MANET securely.

  8. Selective adsorption and efficient regeneration via smart adsorbents possessing thermo-controlled molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yao; Tan, Peng; Cheng, Lei; Shan, Shu-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Bing

    2016-04-21

    Adsorption and desorption are equally important in an adsorptive separation process, while conventional adsorbents with fixed pores benefit only one of them rather than both. Here, a new generation of adsorbents was fabricated by incorporating thermo-responsive polymers (TRPs) into pores. The TRPs act as molecular switches, making pore spaces and active sites responsive to adsorption/desorption conditions. The adsorbents can thus realize both selective adsorption and efficient desorption, which are extremely desirable for adsorptive separation. PMID:26883022

  9. Unconventional methods for clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Cluster analysis or clustering is a task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense or another) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). It is the main task of exploratory data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. The topic of this paper is one of the modern methods of clustering namely SOM (Self Organising Map). The paper describes the theory needed to understand the principle of clustering and descriptions of algorithm used with clustering in our experiments.

  10. Uranium Recovery from Seawater: Development of Fiber Adsorbents Prepared via Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Chatterjee, Sabornie; Kim, Jungseung; Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Oyola, Yatsandra; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel adsorbent preparation method using atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) combined with radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP) was developed to synthesize an adsorbent for uranium recovery from seawater. The ATRP method allowed a much higher degree of grafting on the adsorbent fibers (595 2818%) than that allowed by RIGP alone. The adsorbents were prepared with varied composition of amidoxime groups and hydrophilic acrylate groups. The successful preparation revealed that both ligand density and hydrophilicity were critical for optimal performance of the adsorbents. Adsorbents synthesized in this study showed a relatively high performance (141 179 mg/g at 49 62 % adsorption) in laboratory screening tests using a uranium concentration of ~6 ppm. This performance is much higher than that of known commercial adsorbents. However, actual seawater experiment showed impeded performance compared to the recently reported high-surface-area-fiber adsorbents, due to slow adsorption kinetics. The impeded performance motivated an investigation of the effect of hydrophilic block addition on the graft chain terminus. The addition of hydrophilic block on the graft chain terminus nearly doubled the uranium adsorption capacity in seawater, from 1.56 mg/g to 3.02 mg/g. The investigation revealed the importance of polymer chain conformation, in addition to ligand and hydrophilic group ratio, for advanced adsorbent synthesis for uranium recovery from seawater.

  11. Biodegradable metal adsorbent synthesized by graft polymerization onto nonwoven cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Ayako; Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    A fibrous adsorbent for Hg ions was synthesized by radiation-induced emulsion graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto a nonwoven cotton fabric and subsequent chemical modification. The optimal pre-irradiation dose for initiation of the graft polymerization of GMA, which minimized the effects of radiation damage on the mechanical strength of the nonwoven cotton fabric, was found to be 10 kGy. The GMA-grafted nonwoven cotton fabric was subsequently modified with ethylenediamine (EDA) or diethylenetriamine (DETA) to obtain a Hg adsorbent. The resulting amine-type adsorbents were evaluated for batch and continuous adsorption of Hg. In batch adsorption, the distribution coefficients of Hg reached 1.9×10 5 and 1.0×10 5 for EDA- and DETA-type adsorbents, respectively. A column packed with EDA-type adsorbent removed Hg from 1.8 ppm Hg solution at a space velocity of 100 h -1, which corresponds to 16,000 times the volume of the packed adsorbent. The adsorbed Hg on the EDA-type adsorbent could be completely eluted by 1 M HCl solution. A microbial oxidative degradation test revealed that the EDA-type adsorbent is biodegradable.

  12. Investigations into Alternative Desorption Agents for Amidoxime-Based Polymeric Uranium Adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Wood, Jordana R.; Wai, Chien; Pan, Horng-Bin

    2015-06-15

    Amidoxime-based polymeric braid adsorbents that can extract uranium (U) from seawater are being developed to provide a sustainable supply of fuel for nuclear reactors. A critical step in the development of the technology is to develop elution procedures to selectively remove U from the adsorbents and to do so in a manner that allows the adsorbent material to be reused. This study investigates use of high concentrations of bicarbonate along with targeted chelating agents as an alternative means to the mild acid elution procedures currently in use for selectively eluting uranium from amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents.

  13. Modeling Clustered Data with Very Few Clusters.

    PubMed

    McNeish, Daniel; Stapleton, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    Small-sample inference with clustered data has received increased attention recently in the methodological literature, with several simulation studies being presented on the small-sample behavior of many methods. However, nearly all previous studies focus on a single class of methods (e.g., only multilevel models, only corrections to sandwich estimators), and the differential performance of various methods that can be implemented to accommodate clustered data with very few clusters is largely unknown, potentially due to the rigid disciplinary preferences. Furthermore, a majority of these studies focus on scenarios with 15 or more clusters and feature unrealistically simple data-generation models with very few predictors. This article, motivated by an applied educational psychology cluster randomized trial, presents a simulation study that simultaneously addresses the extreme small sample and differential performance (estimation bias, Type I error rates, and relative power) of 12 methods to account for clustered data with a model that features a more realistic number of predictors. The motivating data are then modeled with each method, and results are compared. Results show that generalized estimating equations perform poorly; the choice of Bayesian prior distributions affects performance; and fixed effect models perform quite well. Limitations and implications for applications are also discussed. PMID:27269278

  14. Pillared Interlayered Clays as Adsorbents of Gases and Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, J.; Pinto, M. L.

    This chapter reviews recent works where porous materials prepared from clays, particularly pillared interlayered clays (PILCs), were studied as gas phase adsorbents. It also includes the cases which used the adsorption of gases and vapors for the nanotextural characterization of the materials, other than the usual low temperature nitrogen adsorption. This is, for instance, the case of the adsorption of molecules of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with various dimensions and shapes, which can be used as probe molecules for the characterization of the porosity or concerning the topic of the VOCs abatement. A similar situation occurs with water adsorption, whose results can be informative not only on the desiccant properties of the materials but also on their surface chemistry. A more recent line of studies of adsorption by materials prepared from clays, namely, the hydrocarbon purification from natural gas or biogas, was also addressed.

  15. Carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan; Zhou, Tie-ge; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu; Feng, Min

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, we study the magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene and its dependence on carrier accumulation. We show that carrier accumulation not only impacts the magnitude of magnetic anisotropy but also switches its sign. Hole accumulation enhances the perpendicular anisotropy up to ˜16 meV per Gd atom, while electron accumulation switches the anisotropy from perpendicular to in-plane direction. Moreover, we find that the first order perturbation of spin-orbit coupling interaction induces a pseudo-gap at Γ for the perpendicular magnetization, which leads to the the anomalous magnetic anisotropy for the neutral composite. Our findings pave the way for magneto-electric materials based on rare-earth-decorated graphene for voltage-controlled spintronics.

  16. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2015-12-02

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. We prepared gold surfaces modified by pits, starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface; we then used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Finally, pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with definedmore » defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.« less

  17. Adsorbent comparisons for anesthetic gas capture in hospital air emissions.

    PubMed

    Mehrata, Mina; Moralejo, Carol; Anderson, William A

    2016-08-23

    For the development of emission control strategies, activated carbon, zeolite, molecular sieves, and a silica gel were tested for adsorption of the newer anesthetic gases isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane from air. The activated carbon Norit GCA 48 was selected for the best performance, and adsorption isotherms at room temperature were developed for the three anesthetics. Equilibrium capacities for this carbon were in the range of 500 to 1,000 mg g(-1) for these anesthetics at partial pressures ranging from 5 to 45 Torr, with the most volatile compound (desflurane) showing the least favorable adsorption. Activated carbons are therefore suggested for use as effective adsorbents in emission control of these anesthetic gases from hospitals. PMID:27222158

  18. Application of Henry's Law for Binding Energies of Adsorbed Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Andrew; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Sweany, Mark; Pfeifer, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The method of isosteres is the simplest method used to calculate the differential enthalpy of adsorption. However, it is incredibly sensitive to the choice of model and respective fitting parameters. For a set of isotherms measured on a specific sample, most models converge upon a similar value at high coverage, but are inconsistent in the low pressure regime. In this talk, we investigate the application of various models for localized and mobile adsorption at low pressures in order to obtain binding energy of hydrogen to the adsorbent surface. Henry's Law analysis of the Langmuir Model of adsorption yield binding energies in excellent agreement with those obtained from the Clausius Clapeyron relation. Work supported by DOE-EERE, Award No. DE-FG36-08GO18142.

  19. Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for color removal from textile wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.; Xu, X.

    1997-03-01

    Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for two basic dyes (Methylene Blue and Basic Red 9) and two direct dyes (Congo Red and Direct Blue 71) in aqueous solutions were studied with equilibrium isotherms and kinetic adsorptions. The maximum adsorptions of two basic dyes on sunflower stalks are very high, i.e., 205 and 317 mg/g for Methylene Blue and Basic Red 9, respectively. The two direct dyes have relatively lower adsorption on sunflower stalks. The adsorptive behaviors of sunflower stalk components are different. The pith, which is the soft and porous material in the center of stalks, has twice the adsorptive capacity of the skin. Particle sizes of sunflower stalks also affect the adsorption of dyes. The adsorption rates of two basic dyestuffs are much higher than that of the direct dyes. Within 30 min about 80% basic dyes were removed from the solutions.

  20. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. Starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface we prepared by ion sputtering gold surfaces modified by pits, used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

  1. Water adsorbate influence on the Cu(110) surface optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghbanpourasl, Amirreza; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Denk, Mariella; Cobet, Christoph; Hohage, Michael; Zeppenfeld, Peter; Hingerl, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Surface reflectance anisotropy may be utilized for characterizing surfaces, interfaces, and adsorption structures. Here, the reflectance anisotropy and surface dielectric functions of the thermodynamically most favored water adsorbate structures on the Cu(110) surface (i.e. hexagonal bilayers, pentagonal chains, and partially dissociated water structures) are calculated from density-functional theory and compared with recent experimental data. It is shown that the water overlayer structures modify in a geometry-specific way the optical anisotropy of the bare surface which can be exploited for in situ determination of the adsorption structures. For hexagonal bilayer overlayer geometries, strong features in the vacuum ultraviolet region are predicted. The theoretical analysis shows a noticeable influence of intraband transitions also for higher photon energies and rather slight influences of the van der Waals interaction on the spectral signatures. Water induced strain effects on the surface optical response are found to be negligible.

  2. Controlling spins in adsorbed molecules by a chemical switch

    PubMed Central

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Chylarecka, Dorota; Kleibert, Armin; Müller, Kathrin; Iacovita, Cristian; Nolting, Frithjof; Jung, Thomas A.; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2010-01-01

    The development of chemical systems with switchable molecular spins could lead to the architecture of materials with controllable magnetic or spintronic properties. Here, we present conclusive evidence that the spin of an organometallic molecule coupled to a ferromagnetic substrate can be switched between magnetic off and on states by a chemical stimulus. This is achieved by nitric oxide (NO) functioning as an axial ligand of cobalt(II)tetraphenylporphyrin (CoTPP) ferromagnetically coupled to nickel thin-film (Ni(001)). On NO addition, the coordination sphere of Co2+ is modified and a NO–CoTPP nitrosyl complex is formed, which corresponds to an off state of the Co spin. Thermal dissociation of NO from the nitrosyl complex restores the on state of the Co spin. The NO-induced reversible off–on switching of surface-adsorbed molecular spins observed here is attributed to a spin trans effect. PMID:20975713

  3. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2015-12-02

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. We prepared gold surfaces modified by pits, starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface; we then used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Finally, pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

  4. Photoluminescence Enhancement of Adsorbed Species on Si Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Taketoshi; Maeda, Masanori; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2016-12-01

    We have fabricated Si nanoparticles from Si swarf using the beads milling method. The mode diameter of produced Si nanoparticles was between 4.8 and 5.2 nm. Si nanoparticles in hexane show photoluminescence (PL) spectra with peaks at 2.56, 2.73, 2.91, and 3.09 eV. The peaked PL spectra are attributed to the vibronic structure of adsorbed dimethylanthracene (DMA) impurity in hexane. The PL intensity of hexane with DMA increases by ~3000 times by adsorption on Si nanoparticles. The PL enhancement results from an increase in absorption probability of incident light by DMA caused by adsorption on the surface of Si nanoparticles. PMID:26744147

  5. The adsorbed state of a thiol on palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Scott M; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Jones, Wilm; Bowker, Michael; Kanaras, Antonios G; Wells, Peter P; Catlow, C Richard A; Parker, Stewart F

    2016-06-29

    In the present work, a combination of imaging, spectroscopic and computational methods shows that 1-dodecanethiol undergoes S-deprotonation to form 1-dodecanethiolate on the surface of palladium nanoparticles, which then self-assembles into a structure that shows a high degree of order. The alkyl chain is largely in the all-trans conformation, which occurs despite the small size of the nanoparticle, (mean diameter = 3.9 nm). Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy is readily able to characterise organic surface layers on nanoparticles; the nature of the material is irrelevant: whether the nanoparticle core is an oxide, a metal or a semiconductor makes no difference. Comparison to DFT calculations allows insights into the nature and conformation of the adsorbed layer. PMID:27087637

  6. SERS and in situ SERS spectroscopy of riboflavin adsorbed on silver, gold and copper substrates. Elucidation of variability of surface orientation based on both experimental and theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendisová-Vyškovská, Marcela; Kokaislová, Alžběta; Ončák, Milan; Matějka, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering and in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra have been collected to study influences of (i) used metal and (ii) applied electrode potential on orientation of adsorbed riboflavin molecules. Special in situ SERS spectroelectrochemical cell was used to obtain in situ SERS spectra of riboflavin adsorbed on silver, gold and copper nanostructured surfaces. Varying electrode potential was applied in discrete steps forming a cycle from positive values to negative and backward. Observed spectral features in in situ SERS spectra, measured at alternate potentials, have been changing very significantly and the spectra have been compared with SERS spectra of riboflavin measured ex situ. Raman spectra of single riboflavin molecule in the vicinity to metal (Ag, Au and Cu) clusters have been calculated for different mutual positions. The results demonstrate significant changes of bands intensities which can be correlated with experimental spectra measured at different potentials. Thus, the orientation of riboflavin molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces can be elucidated. It is influenced definitely by the value of applied potential. Furthermore, the riboflavin adsorption orientation on the surface depends on the used metal. Adsorption geometries on the copper substrates are more diverse in comparison with the orientations on silver and gold substrates.

  7. Molecular Factors in Dendritic Cell Responses to Adsorbed Glycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Hotaling, Nathan A.; Cummings, Richard D.; Ratner, Daniel M.; Babensee, Julia E.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates and glycoconjugates have been shown to exert pro-inflammatory effects on the dendritic cell (DC), supporting pathogen-induced innate immunity and antigen processing, as well as immunosuppressive effects in the tolerance to self-proteins. Additionally, the innate inflammatory response to implanted biomaterials has been hypothesized to be mediated by inflammatory cells interacting with adsorbed proteins, many of which are glycosylated. However, the molecular factors relevant for surface displayed glycoconjugate modulation of DC phenotype are unknown. Thus, in this study, a model system was developed to establish the role of glycan composition, density, and carrier cationization state on DC response. Thiol modified glycans were covalently bound to a model protein carrier, maleimide functionalized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the number of glycans per BSA modulated. Additionally, the carrier isoelectric point was scaled from a pI of ~4.0 to ~10.0 using ethylenediamine (EDA). The DC response to the neoglycoconjugates adsorbed to wells of a 384 well plate was determined via a high throughput assay. The underlying trends in DC phenotype in relation to conjugate properties were elucidated via multivariate general linear models. It was found that glycoconjugates with more than 20 glycans per carrier had the greatest impact on the pro-inflammatory response from DCs, followed by conjugates having an isoelectric point above 9.5. Surfaces displaying terminal α1–2 linked mannose structures were able to increase the inflammatory DC response to a greater extent than did any other terminal glycan structure. The results herein can be applied to inform the design of the next generation of combination products and biomaterials for use in future vaccines and implanted materials. PMID:24746228

  8. Thermal behaviour of arsenic trioxide adsorbed on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Frederic; De Dobbelaere, Christopher; Hardy, An; Van Bael, Marlies K; Helsen, Lieve

    2009-07-30

    The thermal stability and desorption of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) adsorbed on activated carbon (AC) was investigated as this phenomenon is expected to influence the arsenic release during low temperature pyrolysis of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood waste. Firstly, a thermogravimetric (TG) experiment with arsenolite, an allotropic form of As(2)O(3), was performed. The sample starts to sublime at temperatures lower than 200 degrees C with a sublimation peak temperature of 271 degrees C. Subsequently, TG experiments with samples of As(2)O(3) adsorbed on AC revealed that only very little (max. 6+/-3 wt%) As(2)O(3) was volatilized at temperatures below 280 degrees C, while still 41.6 (+/-5)wt% of the original arsenic concentration was retained at 440 degrees C and 28.5 (+/-3)wt% at 600 degrees C. The major arsenic volatilization occurred between 300 degrees C and 500 degrees C. The kinetic parameters of desorption, activation energy of desorption (E(d)) and pre-exponential factor (A), were determined by fitting an Arrhenius model to the experimental data, resulting in E(d)=69 kJ/mol, A=1.21 x 10(4)s(-1). It can be concluded that the adsorption of As(2)O(3) on AC can contribute to the thermal stabilisation of As(2)O(3). Consequently, during low temperature pyrolysis of CCA wood arsenic release may be prevented by adsorption of As(2)O(3) on the coal-type product formed during the thermal decomposition of the wood. PMID:19136209

  9. Theoretical investigations on decomposition of HCOOH catalyzed by Pd7 cluster.

    PubMed

    Li, Song Ju; Zhou, Xin; Tian, Wei Quan

    2012-11-29

    Density functional theory based calculations have been performed to investigate decomposition of HCOOH on a Pd(7) cluster in vacuum and solution. The adsorption of HCOOH on Pd(7) cluster occurs on a layer-by-layer quasi-planar conformation of Pd(7) with 4 atoms on top and 3 atoms below. Possible reaction pathways for the decomposition of HCOOH adsorbed on Pd(7) cluster in vacuum and solution are located and compared in terms of the reaction enengies and barriers. Formic acid prefers to decompose through dehydrogenation rather than dehydrate under the significant effect of solvent. The toxic species, CO generated on Pt surface, could not possibly appear in the catalytic decomposition of formic acid on Pd(7) cluster due to high reaction barrier, thus no poisoning of catalyst would occur on Pd surface. The Pd(7) cluster model rationalizes experimental observation, and the predictions are in good agreement with the ones based on the surface model. PMID:23102058

  10. [Clustering of simple obesity].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Matsuda, H; Kurita, M; Umetada, Y

    1988-05-01

    An attempt was made to classify persons with simple obesity from the viewpoint of health education. Subjects of the study were 1,278 male workers in a financing company who underwent health examination. At the time of health examinations, questionnaire survey concerning their life styles was carried out on all the subjects. The obese group consisted of 127 subjects whose obesity indices were over 15% and the control group consisted of 342 subjects whose obesity indices ranged from -5 to 5%. Subjects in the obese group were classified into four clusters based on cluster analysis using five life-style parameters; that is, frequency of taking breakfast, frequency of taking staple food, drinking habits, smoking habits, and frequency of exercise. The first cluster (N = 10) included inactive persons, the second cluster (N = 46) non smokers, the third cluster (N = 39) smokers and heavy drinkers, and the fourth cluster (N = 32) smokers and non-drinkers. Comparison of the four clusters of obese persons with the control group revealed the following findings: 1) All the four clusters had significantly high frequencies of abnormal values of triglyceride (TG) and fasting blood sugar (FBS). 2) The first cluster had significantly high frequencies of abnormal values of glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT). 3) The second cluster had significantly high frequencies of abnormal values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, TG, FBS, uric acid, GOT, GPT and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3172544

  11. Competition between Displacement and Dissociation of a Strong Acid Compared to a Weak Acid Adsorbed on Silica Particle Surfaces: The Role of Adsorbed Water.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Tang, Mingjin; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-16

    The adsorption of nitric (HNO3) and formic (HCOOH) acids on silica particle surfaces and the effect of adsorbed water have been investigated at 296 K using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Under dry conditions, both nitric and formic acids adsorb reversibly on silica. Additionally, the FTIR spectra show that both of these molecules remain in the protonated form. At elevated relative humidities (RH), adsorbed water competes both for surface adsorption sites with these acids as well as promotes their dissociation to hydronium ions and the corresponding anions. Compared to HNO3, the extent of dissociation is much smaller for HCOOH, very likely because it is a weaker acid. This study provides valuable insights into the interaction of HNO3 and HCOOH with silica surface on the molecular level and further reveals the complex roles of surface-adsorbed water in atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust particles-many of these containing silica. PMID:27220375

  12. Adsorption of high ammonium nitrogen from wastewater using a novel ceramic adsorbent and the evaluation of the ammonium-adsorbed-ceramic as fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingxin; Yang, Yingnan; Yang, Shengjiong; Wang, Qinghong; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Zhenya

    2013-03-01

    A novel ceramic adsorbent was developed to adsorb ammonium from high concentration ammonium contaminated wastewater. Typical gardening cultivation mediums in Japan-Kanuma clay and Akadama clay were used to synthesize the ceramic adsorbent. Static batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various parameters such as contact time, initial ammonium concentration, adsorbent dosage, and competing cations during the ammonium adsorption process. The results revealed that the Freundlich isotherm model fitted better with the adsorption process than the Langmuir model, and the adsorption process was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The maximum nitrogen adsorption capacity of the ceramic adsorbent was 75.5 mg g(-1) at an initial NH(4)(+)-N concentration of 10,000 mg L(-1), dosage of 20 g L(-1), and contact time of 480 min. Results demonstrated that the low-cost ceramic adsorbent directly used as nitrogen fertilizer was feasible for its high ammonium nitrogen content, nontoxic effect on the environment and excellent soil properties. PMID:23153680

  13. Electron: Cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidemann, A.A.; Kresin, V.V.; Knight, W.D.

    1994-02-01

    Beam depletion spectroscopy has been used to measure absolute total inelastic electron-sodium cluster collision cross sections in the energy range from E {approximately} 0.1 to E {approximately} 6 eV. The investigation focused on the closed shell clusters Na{sub 8}, Na{sub 20}, Na{sub 40}. The measured cross sections show an increase for the lowest collision energies where electron attachment is the primary scattering channel. The electron attachment cross section can be understood in terms of Langevin scattering, connecting this measurement with the polarizability of the cluster. For energies above the dissociation energy the measured electron-cluster cross section is energy independent, thus defining an electron-cluster interaction range. This interaction range increases with the cluster size.

  14. Information-based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Slonim, Noam; Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2005-01-01

    In an age of increasingly large data sets, investigators in many different disciplines have turned to clustering as a tool for data analysis and exploration. Existing clustering methods, however, typically depend on several nontrivial assumptions about the structure of data. Here, we reformulate the clustering problem from an information theoretic perspective that avoids many of these assumptions. In particular, our formulation obviates the need for defining a cluster “prototype,” does not require an a priori similarity metric, is invariant to changes in the representation of the data, and naturally captures nonlinear relations. We apply this approach to different domains and find that it consistently produces clusters that are more coherent than those extracted by existing algorithms. Finally, our approach provides a way of clustering based on collective notions of similarity rather than the traditional pairwise measures. PMID:16352721

  15. Infrared-induced reactivity of N2O on small gas-phase rhodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Suzanne M; Hopkins, W Scott; Harding, Dan J; Walsh, Tiffany R; Haertelt, Marko; Kerpal, Christian; Gruene, Philipp; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2011-03-31

    Far- and mid-infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy has been employed to study both the structure and surface reactivity of isolated cationic rhodium clusters with surface-adsorbed nitrous oxide, Rh(n)N(2)O(+) (n = 4-8). Comparison of experimental spectra recorded using the argon atom tagging method with those calculated using density functional theory (DFT) reveals that the nitrous oxide is molecularly bound on the rhodium cluster via the terminal N-atom. Binding is thought to occur exclusively on atop sites with the rhodium clusters adopting close-packed structures. In related, but conceptually different experiments, infrared pumping of the vibrational modes corresponding with the normal modes of the adsorbed N(2)O has been observed to result in the decomposition of the N(2)O moiety and the production of oxide clusters. This cluster surface chemistry is observed for all cluster sizes studied except for n = 5. Plausible N(2)O decomposition mechanisms are given based on DFT calculations using exchange-correlation functionals. Similar experiments pumping the Rh-O stretch in Rh(n)ON(2)O(+) complexes, on which the same chemistry is observed, confirm the thermal nature of this reaction. PMID:21391545

  16. Robust Maleimide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces and Nanoparticles Generated Using Custom-Designed Bidentate Adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul Soon; Lee, Han Ju; Jamison, Andrew C; Lee, T Randall

    2016-07-26

    A series of custom-designed alkanethioacetate ligands were synthesized to provide a facile method of attaching maleimide-terminated adsorbates to gold nanostructures via thiolate bonds. Monolayers on flat gold substrates derived from both mono- and dithioacetates, with and without oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) moieties in their alkyl spacers, were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle goniometry. For all adsorbates, the resulting monolayers revealed that a higher packing density and more homogeneous surface were generated when the film was formed in EtOH, but a higher percentage of bound thiolate was obtained in THF. A series of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) capped with each adsorbate were prepared to explore how adsorbate structure influences aqueous colloidal stability under extreme conditions, as examined visually and spectroscopically. The AuNPs coated with adsorbates that include OEG moieties exhibited enhanced stability under high salt concentration, and AuNPs capped with dithioacetate adsorbates exhibited improved stability against ligand exchange in competition with dithiothreitol (DTT). Overall, the best results were obtained with a chelating dithioacetate adsorbate that included OEG moieties in its alkyl spacer, imparting improved stability via enhanced solubility in water and superior adsorbate attachment owing to the chelate effect. PMID:27385466

  17. Low-cost adsorbents for heavy metals uptake from contaminated water: a review.

    PubMed

    Babel, Sandhya; Kurniawan, Tonni Agustiono

    2003-02-28

    In this article, the technical feasibility of various low-cost adsorbents for heavy metal removal from contaminated water has been reviewed. Instead of using commercial activated carbon, researchers have worked on inexpensive materials, such as chitosan, zeolites, and other adsorbents, which have high adsorption capacity and are locally available. The results of their removal performance are compared to that of activated carbon and are presented in this study. It is evident from our literature survey of about 100 papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for certain metal ions as compared to activated carbon. Adsorbents that stand out for high adsorption capacities are chitosan (815, 273, 250 mg/g of Hg(2+), Cr(6+), and Cd(2+), respectively), zeolites (175 and 137 mg/g of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+), respectively), waste slurry (1030, 560, 540 mg/g of Pb(2+), Hg(2+), and Cr(6+), respectively), and lignin (1865 mg/g of Pb(2+)). These adsorbents are suitable for inorganic effluent treatment containing the metal ions mentioned previously. It is important to note that the adsorption capacities of the adsorbents presented in this paper vary, depending on the characteristics of the individual adsorbent, the extent of chemical modifications, and the concentration of adsorbate. PMID:12573840

  18. Sorption of methylene blue on treated agricultural adsorbents: equilibrium and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, D. P.; Singh, S. K.; Sharma, Neetu

    2015-03-01

    Agricultural adsorbents are reported to have a remarkable performance for adsorption of dyes. In the present study, formaldehyde and sulphuric acid treated two agricultural adsorbents; potato peel and neem bark are used to adsorb methylene blue. On the whole, the acid-treated adsorbents are investigated to have high sorption efficiency compared to HCHO treated adsorbents. The percentage removal efficiency of H2SO4 treated potato peel (APP) increases considerably high from 75 to 100 % with increase in adsorbent dose, whereas the removal efficiency of H2SO4 treated neem bark (ANB) is found to be 98 % after adding the first dose only. The monolayer sorption behaviour of HCHO treated potato peel (PP) and APP is well defined by Langmuir, whereas the chemisorptions behaviour of HCHO treated neem bark (NB) and ANB is suggested by Temkin's isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity measured is highest in ANB followed by NB, PP and APP with the values of 1000, 90, 47.62 and 40.0 mg/g, respectively. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted well with the observed data of all the four adsorbents. The results obtained reveal that NB and ANB both are good adsorbents compared to PP and APP.

  19. NONPHOTOCHEMICAL DECOMPOSITION OF FLUORENE VAPOR-ADSORBED ON COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluorene is representative of a group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that have been shown to exhibit oxidation in the absence of light when adsorbed on fly ash. The present study examines this process for fluorene in detail. Fluorene has been adsorbed on several different fl...

  20. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Han, Changseok; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-08-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2·6H2O functionalization of zeolite 4A. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The synthesized materials were characterized by porosimetry analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction analysis, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbents at 21±1°C was about 60mgCg(-1). The results showed that the positive charge density of ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents was proportional to the amount of ZnO coated on zeolite and thus, ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents exhibited a greater affinity for negatively charged ions. Furthermore, the adsorption capacity of ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents increased markedly after acid modification. Adsorption experiments demonstrated ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents possessed high adsorption capacity to remove HA from aqueous solutions mainly due to strong electrostatic interactions between negative functional groups of HA and the positive charges of ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents. PMID:27135170

  1. Uptake of uranium from seawater by amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbent marine testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, C.; Kim, J.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, R.; Hexel, C.; Sostre Gonzalez, F.; Janke, C.; Dai, S.; Gill, G.; Kuo, L.J.; Wood, J.; Choe, K.Y.; Pourmand, A.; D'Alessandro, E.; Buesseler, K.; Pike, S.

    2013-07-01

    Amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents in the form of functionalized fibers were prepared at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and screened in laboratory experiments, in terms of uranium uptake capacity, using spiked uranium solution and seawater samples. Batch laboratory experiments conducted with 5-gallon seawater tanks provided equilibrium information. Based on results from 5-gallon experiments, the best adsorbent was selected for field-testing of uranium adsorption from seawater. Flow-through column tests have been performed at different marine sites to investigate the uranium uptake rate and equilibrium capacity under diverse biogeochemistry. The maximum amount of uranium uptake from seawater tests at Sequim, WA, was 3.3 mg U/g adsorbent after eight weeks of contact of the adsorbent with seawater. This amount was three times higher than the maximum adsorption capacity achieved in this study by a leading adsorbent developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), which was 1.1 mg U/g adsorbent at equilibrium. The initial uranium uptake rate of the ORNL adsorbent was 2.6 times higher than that of the JAEA adsorbent under similar conditions. A mathematical model derived from the mass balance of uranium was employed to describe the data. (authors)

  2. Copper loaded on sol-gel-derived alumina adsorbents for phosphine removal.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jung-Nan; Bai, Hsunling; Li, Shou-Nan; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2010-05-01

    The hydride gas of phosphine (PH3) is commonly used for semiconductor and optoelectronic industries. The local scrubbers must immediately abate it because of its high toxicity. In this study, copper (Cu) loaded on the sol-gel-derived gamma-alumina (Al2O3) adsorbents are prepared and tested to investigate the possibility of PH3 removal and sorbent regeneration. Test results showed that during the breakthrough time of over 99% PH3 removal efficiency, the maximum adsorption capacity of Cu loaded on the sol-gel-derived gamma-Al2O3 adsorbent is 18 mg-PH3/g-adsorbent. This is much higher than that of Cu loaded on the commercial gamma-Al2O3 adsorbent--8.6 mg-PH3/g-adsorbent. The high specific surface area, narrow pore size distribution, and well dispersion of Cu loaded on the sol-gel-derived gamma-Al2O3 could be the reasons for its high PH3 adsorption capacity. The regeneration test shows that Cu loaded on the sol-gel-derived gamma-Al2O3 adsorbent can be regenerated after a simple air purging procedure. The cumulative adsorption capacity for five regeneration cycles is 65 mg-PH3/g-adsorbent, which is approximately double that of the Cu/zeolite adsorbent demonstrated in the literature. PMID:20480862

  3. Towards understanding KOH conditioning of amidoxime-based oolymer adsorbents for sequestering uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary A.; Janke, Christopher James; Wai, Chien M.

    2015-11-17

    Conditioning of polymer fiber adsorbents grafted with amidoxime and carboxylic acid groups is necessary to make the materials hydrophilic for sequestering uranium from seawater. In this paper, spectroscopic techniques were employed to study the effectiveness of the traditional KOH conditioning method (2.5% KOH at 80⁰C) on recently developed high-surface-area amidoxime-based polymer fiber adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. FTIR spectra reveal that the KOH conditioning process removes the proton from the carboxylic acids and also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. With prolonged KOH treatment (>1 hr) at 80⁰C, physical damage to the adsorbent material occurs which can lead to a significant reduction in the adsorbent's uranium adsorption capability in real seawater during extended exposure times (>21 days). The physical damage to the adsorbent can be minimized by lowering KOH conditioning temperature. For the high-surface-area amidoxime-based adsorbents, 20 min of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 80⁰C or 1 hr of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 60⁰C appears sufficient to achieve de-protonation of the carboxylic acid with minimal harmful effects to the adsorbent material. Lastly, the use of NaOH instead of KOH can also reduce the cost of the base treatment process required for conditioning the amidoxime-based sorbents with minimal loss of adsorption capacity (≤7%).

  4. Scandium-Triflate/Metal-Organic Frameworks: Remarkable Adsorbents for Desulfurization and Denitrogenation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2015-12-01

    Scandium-triflate (Sc(OTf)3) was introduced for the first time on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), to utilize acidic Sc(OTf)3 for adsorptive desulfurization and denitrogenation of fuel containing benzothiophene (BT), dibenzothiophene (DBT), quinoline (QUI), and indole (IND). A remarkable improvement in the adsorption capacity (about 65% based on the weight of adsorbents; 90% based on the surface area of the adsorbents) was observed with the Sc(OTf)3/MOFs as compared to the virgin MOFs for the adsorption of BT from liquid fuel. The basic QUI was also adsorbed preferentially onto the acidic Sc(OTf)3/MOFs. However, nonsupported Sc(OTf)3 showed negligible adsorption capacities. The improved adsorptive performance for BT, DBT, and QUI might be derived from acid-base interactions between the acidic Sc(OTf)3 and basic adsorbates. On the other hand, the Sc(OTf)3, loaded on MOFs, reduced the adsorption capacity for neutral IND due to lack of interaction between the neutral adsorbate and acidic adsorbent and the reduced porosities of the modified adsorbents. The reusability of the adsorbents was found satisfactory up to the fourth run. On the basis of the result, it is suggested that metal-triflates, such as Sc(OTf)3, can be prospective materials for adsorptive desulfurization/denitrogenation of fuels when supported on porous materials such as MOFs. PMID:26575418

  5. Towards understanding KOH conditioning of amidoxime-based oolymer adsorbents for sequestering uranium from seawater

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary A.; Janke, Christopher James; Wai, Chien M.

    2015-11-17

    Conditioning of polymer fiber adsorbents grafted with amidoxime and carboxylic acid groups is necessary to make the materials hydrophilic for sequestering uranium from seawater. In this paper, spectroscopic techniques were employed to study the effectiveness of the traditional KOH conditioning method (2.5% KOH at 80⁰C) on recently developed high-surface-area amidoxime-based polymer fiber adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. FTIR spectra reveal that the KOH conditioning process removes the proton from the carboxylic acids and also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. With prolonged KOH treatment (>1 hr) at 80⁰C, physical damage to the adsorbent materialmore » occurs which can lead to a significant reduction in the adsorbent's uranium adsorption capability in real seawater during extended exposure times (>21 days). The physical damage to the adsorbent can be minimized by lowering KOH conditioning temperature. For the high-surface-area amidoxime-based adsorbents, 20 min of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 80⁰C or 1 hr of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 60⁰C appears sufficient to achieve de-protonation of the carboxylic acid with minimal harmful effects to the adsorbent material. Lastly, the use of NaOH instead of KOH can also reduce the cost of the base treatment process required for conditioning the amidoxime-based sorbents with minimal loss of adsorption capacity (≤7%).« less

  6. REGENERATION AND REACTIVATION OF CARBON ADSORBENTS BY RADIO FREQUENCY INDUCTION HEATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Electrical Properties of Adsorbents: We measured the electric permittivity of four commercially available carbon adsorbents (supplied by Wesvaco Inc) over the radio frequency range (1 to 40 MHz). Westvaco is by far the largest volume supplier of activated carbon...

  7. Adsorbate-metal bond effect on empirical determination of surface plasmon penetration depth.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Laurel L; Menegazzo, Nicola; Booksh, Karl S

    2013-05-21

    The penetration depth of surface plasmons is commonly determined empirically from the observed response for adsorbate loading on gold surface plasmon resonance (SPR) substrates. However, changes in the SPR spectrum may originate from both changes in the effective refractive index near the metal surface and changes in the metal permittivity following covalent binding of the adsorbate layer. Herein, the significance of incorporating an additional adsorbate-metal bonding effect in the calculation is demonstrated in theory and in practice. The bonding effect is determined from the nonzero intercept of a SPR shift versus adsorbate thickness calibration and incorporated into the calculation of penetration depth at various excitation wavelengths. Determinations of plasmon penetration depth with and without the bonding response for alkanethiolate-gold are compared and are shown to be significantly different for a thiol monolayer adsorbate system. Additionally, plasmon penetration depth evaluated with bonding effect compensation shows greater consistency over different adsorbate thicknesses and better agreement with theory derived from Maxwell's equation, particularly for adsorbate thicknesses that are much smaller (<5%) than the plasmon penetration depth. The method is also extended to a more practically applicable polyelectrolyte multilayer adsorbate system. PMID:23566015

  8. Carbonaceous adsorbents from caking coals for the extraction of noble metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kostomarova, M.A.; Surinova, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    The authors examine the sorption and mechanical properties of spherical adsorbents obtained from Kuzbass caking coal using an IGI method. An investigation has also been made of the sorption kinetics of gold and silver. It was found that spherical adsorbent pellets of this kind are capable of extracting noble metals from ore pulps. (1 ref.)

  9. Mini-clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinellato, J. A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Bellandifilho, J.; Lattes, C. M. G.; Menon, M. J.; Navia, C. E.; Pamilaju, A.; Sawayanagi, K.; Shibuya, E. H.; Turtelli, A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of mini-clusters observed in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber no.19 are summarized. The study was made on 54 single core shower upper and 91 shower clusters of E(gamma) 10 TeV from 30 families which are visible energy greater than 80 TeV and penetrate through both upper and lower detectors of the two-story chamber. The association of hadrons in mini-cluster is made clear from their penetrative nature and microscopic observation of shower continuation in lower chamber. Small P sub t (gamma) of hadrons in mini-clusters remained in puzzle.

  10. Management of cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment and prophylactic treatment. In ECH and CCH the attacks can be treated with oxygen (12 L/min) or subcutaneous sumatriptan 6 mg. For both oxygen and sumatriptan there are two randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating efficacy. In both ECH and CCH, verapamil is the prophylactic drug of choice. Verapamil 360 mg/day was found to be superior to placebo in one clinical trial. In clinical practice, daily doses of 480-720 mg are mostly used. Thus, the dose of verapamil used in cluster headache treatment may be double the dose used in cardiology, and with the higher doses the PR interval should be checked with an ECG. At the start of a cluster, transitional preventive treatment such as corticosteroids or greater occipital nerve blockade can be given. In CCH and in long-standing clusters of ECH, lithium, methysergide, topiramate, valproic acid and ergotamine tartrate can be used as add-on prophylactic treatment. In drug-resistant CCH, neuromodulation with either occipital nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation of the hypothalamus is an alternative treatment strategy

  11. The youngest globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara

    2015-11-01

    It is likely that all stars are born in clusters, but most clusters are not bound and disperse. None of the many protoclusters in our Galaxy are likely to develop into long-lived bound clusters. The super star clusters (SSCs) seen in starburst galaxies are more massive and compact and have better chances of survival. The birth and early development of SSCs takes place deep in molecular clouds, and during this crucial stage the embedded clusters are invisible to optical or UV observations but are studied via the radio-infrared supernebulae (RISN) they excite. We review observations of embedded clusters and identify RISN within 10 Mpc whose exciting clusters have ≈ 106 M⊙ or more in volumes of a few pc3 and which are likely to not only survive as bound clusters, but to evolve into objects as massive and compact as Galactic globulars. These clusters are distinguished by very high star formation efficiency η, at least a factor of 10 higher than the few percent seen in the Galaxy, probably due to the violent disturbances their host galaxies have undergone. We review recent observations of the kinematics of the ionized gas in RISN showing outflows through low-density channels in the ambient molecular cloud; this may protect the cloud from feedback by the embedded H II region.

  12. Cluster size and composition dependent water deprotonation by free manganese oxide clusters.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sandra M; Bernhardt, Thorsten M; Kiawi, Denis M; Bakker, Joost M; Barnett, Robert N; Landman, Uzi

    2016-06-21

    In the quest for cheap and earth abundant but highly effective and energy efficient water splitting catalysts, manganese oxide represents one of the materials of choice. In the framework of a new hierarchical modeling strategy we employ free non-ligated manganese oxide clusters MnxOx+y(+) (x = 2-5, y = -1, 0, 1, 2) as simplified molecular models to probe the interaction of water with nano-scale manganese oxide materials. Infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IR-MPD) spectroscopy in conjunction with first-principles spin density functional theory calculations is applied to study several series of MnxOx+y(H2O)n(+) complexes and reveal that the reaction of water with MnxOx+y(+) leads to the deprotonation of the water molecules via hydroxylation of the cluster oxo-bridges. This process is independent of the formal Mn oxidation state and occurs already for the first adsorbed water molecule and it proceeds until all oxo-bridges are hydroxylated. Additional water molecules are bound intact and favorably form H3O2 units with the hydroxylated oxo-bridges. Water adsorption and deprotonation is also found to induce structural transformations of the cluster core, including dimensionality crossover. Furthermore, the IR-MPD measurements reveal that clusters with one oxygen atom in excess MnxOx+1(+) contain a terminal O atom while clusters with two oxygen atoms in excess MnxOx+2(+) contain an intact O2 molecule which, however, dissociates upon adsorption of a minimum number of water molecules. These basic concepts could aid the future design of artificial water-splitting molecular catalysts. PMID:27226138

  13. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and density-functional studies of Si atoms adsorbed on a C60 film.

    PubMed

    Onoe, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Hara, Toshiki

    2004-12-01

    The interaction between C(60) and Si atoms has been investigated for Si atoms adsorbed on a C(60) film using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density-functional (DFT) calculations. Analysis of the Si 2p core peak identified three kinds of Si atoms adsorbed on the film: silicon suboxides (SiO(x)), bulk Si crystal, and silicon atoms bound to C(60). Based on the atomic percent ratio of silicon to carbon, we estimated that there was approximately one Si atom bound to each C(60) molecule. The Si 2p peak due to the Si-C(60) interaction demonstrated that a charge transfer from the Si atom to the C(60) molecule takes place at room temperature, which is much lower than the temperature of 670 K at which the charge transfer was observed for C(60) adsorbed on Si(001) and (111) clean surfaces [Sakamoto et al., Phys. Rev. B 60, 2579 (1999)]. The number of electrons transferred between the C(60) molecule and Si atom was estimated to be 0.59 based on XPS results, which is in good agreement with the DFT result of 0.63 for a C(60)Si with C(2v) symmetry used as a model cluster. Furthermore, the shift in binding energy of both the Si 2p and C 1s core peaks before and after Si-atom deposition was experimentally obtained to be +2.0 and -0.4 eV, respectively. The C(60)Si model cluster provides the shift of +2.13 eV for the Si 2p core peak and of -0.28 eV for the C 1s core peak, which are well corresponding to those experimental results. The covalency of the Si-C(60) interaction was also discussed in terms of Mulliken overlap population between them. PMID:15634092

  14. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-01

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems. PMID:24697366

  15. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-15

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems.

  16. Energetics of a Li Atom adsorbed on B/N doped graphene with monovacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Babita; Jindal, V. K.; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-08-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to study the adsorption properties and diffusion of Li atom across B/N-pyridinic graphene. Regardless of the dopant type, B atoms of B-pyridinic graphene lose electron density. On the other hand, N atoms (p-type dopants) have tendency to gain electron density in N-pyridinic graphene. Higher chemical reactivity and electronic conductivity of B/N-pyridinic graphene are responsible for stronger binding of Li with the substrates as compared to pristine graphene. The binding energy of Li with B/N-pyridinic graphene exceeds the cohesive energy of bulk Li, making it energetically unfavourable for Li to form clusters on these substrates. Li atom gets better adsorbed on N-pyridinic graphene due to an additional p-p hybridization of the orbitals while Li on B-pyridinic prefers the ionic bonding. Also, significant distortion of N-pyridinic graphene upon Li adsorption is a consequence of the change in bonding mechanism between Li atom and the substrate. Our results show that bonding character and hence binding energies between Li and graphene can be tuned with the help of B/N doping of monovacancy defects. Further, the sites for most stable adsorption are different for the two types of doped and defective graphene, leading to greater Li uptake capacity of B-pyridinic graphene near the defect. In addition, B-pyridinic graphene offering lower diffusion barrier, ensures better Li kinetics. Thus, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for LIBs as compared to N-pyridinic graphene.

  17. Thermodynamic formalism of water uptakes on solid porous adsorbents for adsorption cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Baichuan; Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2014-05-19

    This Letter presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the amount of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and silica gel for the development of an advanced adsorption chiller. This formalism is developed from the rigor of the partition distribution function of each water vapor adsorptive site on adsorbents and the condensation approximation of adsorptive water molecules and is validated with experimental data. An interesting and useful finding has been established that the proposed model is thermodynamically connected with the pore structures of adsorbent materials, and the water vapor uptake highly depends on the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero surface coverage and the adsorptive sites of the adsorbent materials. Employing the proposed model, the thermodynamic trends of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents can be estimated.

  18. Polydopamine meets porous membrane: A versatile platform for facile preparation of membrane adsorbers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinxin; Luo, Jianquan; Chen, Xiangrong; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-05-27

    Polydopamine, as an intermediate layer coated on PES membrane, was applied to fabricate various membrane adsorbers. Anion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and affinity membrane adsorbers prepared by this facile method exhibited a high selectivity in fractionation of IgG (immunoglobulin)/HSA (human serum albumin) mixture. The anion-exchange membrane adsorber containing polyethylenimine (PEI) improved the HSA purity from 17.7% to 96.7%; The hydrophobic interaction membrane adsorber with Dodecyl mercaptan (DDM) as ligand obtained an IgG purity of 94.6%; Histidine attached affinity membrane chromatography achieved nearly a 100% purity of IgG. The present work indicated that the polydopamine layer not only activated membrane surface to attach various adsorptive ligands under the mild condition, but also reduced non-specific adsorption. Due to the versatile conjunction function, this facile mussel-inspired coating is also promising for the preparation of diverse membrane adsorbers. PMID:27131962

  19. A fragment method for systematic improvement of anharmonic adsorbate vibrational frequencies: Acetylene on Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Chulkov, Sergey K. Benoit, David M.

    2013-12-07

    We suggest a novel method for systematic improvement of anharmonic adsorbate frequencies based on a fragment approach. The calculations are carried out by considering the adsorbed molecule separately and computing an energy correction using high-level ab initio method in addition to a standard calculation of the whole adsorbed system using quantum mechanical techniques with periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate its reliability for a C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecule chemisorbed on a Cu(001) surface. We also show that the accuracy of the presented approach with a suitable description of the periodic surface depends mainly on the accuracy of the high-level ab initio method used to describe the adsorbate molecule. Moreover, our technique potentially allows to predict adsorbate vibrational spectra with spectroscopic accuracy.

  20. Removal of chromium from tannery industry effluents with (activated carbon and fly ash) adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Rao, S; Lade, H S; Kadam, T A; Ramana, T V; Krishnamacharyulu, S K G; Deshmukh, S; Gyananath, G

    2007-10-01

    Adsorption is a strong choice for removal operations as it is very simple to recover a high quality product from waste sludge. The efficiency of adsorbents like fly ash and activated carbon are tested based on their performance to remove chrome at various pH values, bed heights, and concentration of adsorbents. The removal efficiency was also tested for wastewater characteristics in a pilot plant in addition to the use of adsorbents. The concentration of chromium was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer). The results depicted that the efficiency of removal increased with increasing pH and bed height and decreased with increasing concentration. The removal efficiency with fly ash as an adsorbent was comparatively better than activatedcarbon. Thus, adsorbents can be used for chromium removal from tannery industry effluent. PMID:18476371

  1. Electric field cancellation on quartz by Rb adsorbate-induced negative electron affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, James

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the (0001) surface of single crystal quartz with a submonolayer of Rb adsorbates. Using Rydberg atom electromagnetically induced transparency, we investigate the electric fields resulting from Rb adsorbed on the quartz surface, and measure the activation energy of the Rb adsorbates. We show that the adsorbed Rb induces a negative electron affinity (NEA) on the quartz surface. The NEA surface allows low energy electrons to bind to the surface and cancel the electric field from the Rb adsorbates. Our results are important for integrating Rydberg atoms into hybrid quantum systems and the fundamental study of atom-surface interactions, as well as applications for electrons bound to a 2D surface. This work was supported by the DARPA Quasar program by a Grant through ARO (60181-PH-DRP) and the AFOSR (FA9550-12-1-0282),.

  2. Poly(ethylene oxide) Mushrooms Adsorbed at Silica-Ionic Liquid Interfaces Reduce Friction.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, James; Webber, Grant B; Atkin, Rob

    2016-03-01

    The adsorbed layer conformation and lubricity of 35, 100, and 300 kDa PEO adsorbed to ionic liquid (IL)-silica interfaces from 0.01 wt % solutions have been investigated using colloid probe atomic force microscopy. The ILs used were propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]), which are protic and aprotic ILs, respectively. Normal force curves reveal steric interactions consistent with adsorbed polymer layers which are best fit using the mushroom model. Friction measurements show that the adsorbed polymer layer markedly reduces friction compared to surfaces sliding in the pure ILs and that lubricity increases with polymer length. When polymer is adsorbed to the sliding surfaces, friction is controlled by the creation and disruption of intermolecular interactions between entangled chains and the dragging of polymer chains through the interpenetration region. These experiments show that added polymer can reduce friction while maintaining the useful properties of ILs as lubricants. PMID:26844589

  3. Preparation of ferric-activated sludge-based adsorbent from biological sludge for tetracycline removal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Xu, Guoren; Yu, Huarong; Zhang, Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Ferric activation was novelly used to produce sludge-based adsorbent (SBA) from biological sludge through pyrolysis, and the adsorbents were applied to remove tetracycline from aqueous solution. The pyrolysis temperature and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) greatly influenced the surface area and pore characteristics of SBA. Ferric activation could promote the porous structure development of adsorbents, and the optimum preparation conditions were pyrolysis temperature 750°C and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) 0.5. In batch experiments, ferric-activated SBA showed a higher adsorption capacity for tetracycline than non-activated SBA, because the enhanced mesoporous structure favored the diffusion of tetracycline into the pores, the iron oxides and oxygen-containing functional groups in the adsorbents captured tetracycline by surface complexation. The results indicate that ferric activation is an effective approach for preparing adsorbents from biological sludge to remove tetracycline, providing a potential option for waste resource recovery. PMID:27038265

  4. Desorption of uranium recovered with fibrous amidoxime adsorbent shaped into balls

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Katsuki; Isumi, Noriaki; Morooka, Shigeharu )

    1994-07-01

    Amidoxime fiber synthesized with a commercial PAN fiber was packed in 2 cm-diameter spherical shells made of plastic net. The adsorbent balls were then packed in a cage through which seawater passed. This shape of adsorbent increased the contact efficiency between adsorbent and seawater but might decrease the desorption rate of uranium adsorbed in the balls. The rate of desorption from 2 cm-diameter adsorbent balls packed in a column was nearly equal to the value obtained with completely dispersed amidoxime fiber, however, when the eluent velocity through the balls was higher than 2-4 cm[center dot]s[sup [minus]1] and the void fraction in the balls was higher than 0.8. Most of the liquid held in the balls was removed with a light centrifugation. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Solid-state conversion of fly ash to effective adsorbents for Cu removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Li, Lin; Zhu, Z H

    2007-01-10

    Solid-state conversion of fly ash to an amorphous aluminosilicate adsorbent (geopolymer) has been investigated under different conditions and the synthesised material has been tested for Cu2+ removal from aqueous solution. It has been found that higher reaction temperature and Na:FA ratio will make the adsorbents achieving higher removal efficiency. The adsorbent loading and Cu2+ initial concentration will also affect the removal efficiency while the adsorption capacity exhibits similarly at 30-40 degrees C. The adsorption capacity of the synthesised adsorbent shows much higher value than fly ash and natural zeolite. The capacity is 0.1, 3.5 and 92 mg/g, for fly ash, natural zeolite, and FA derived adsorbent, respectively. The kinetic studies indicate that the adsorption can be fitted by the second-order kinetic model. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms also can fit to the adsorption isotherm. PMID:16839666

  6. Comparison of physico-chemical characteristics among three pharmaceutical spherical carbon adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Makoto

    2012-12-01

    In this study, various physicochemical characteristics were evaluated for three pharmaceutical spherical carbon adsorbents, Kremezin as a brand product and its generics; Merckmezin and Spherical Carbon Adsorbent "Mylan". Scanning electron microscopic observations, measurements of specific surface area, particle sizes, and pore volume distributions by mercury intrusion porosimetry, and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) analysis were conducted. Compared to Kremezin, Merckmezin is dented with a small pore-rich structure; pores of less than 10nm make up 43% (Kremezin) and 68% (Merckmezin) of total pore volume. On the other hand, Spherical Carbon Adsorbent "Mylan" is porous with macropores. The results of fractal dimension analysis of micropores suggested that the complexity of the internal pore structure is Merckmezin>Kremezin>Spherical Carbon Adsorbent "Mylan". The three spherical carbon adsorbents are physico-chemically different, but clinical studies should be conducted to prove that they are therapeutically equivalent. PMID:22766286

  7. Preparation and characterization of a novel adsorbent from Moringa oleifera leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Olugbenga Solomon; Adegoke, Kayode Adesina; Akinyunni, Opeyemi Omowumi

    2015-10-01

    A new and novel adsorbent was obtained by impregnation of Moringa oleifera leaf in H2SO4 and NaOH, respectively. Prepared adsorbents were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR, SEM, TGA and EDX analyses, respectively. The effects of operational parameters, such as pH, moisture content, ash content, porosity and iodine number on these adsorbents were investigated and compared with those of commercial activated carbon (CAC). EDX results of acid activated M. oleifera leaf have the highest percentage of carbon by weight (69.40 %) and (76.11 %) by atom, respectively. Proximate analysis showed that the fixed carbon content of acid activated M. oleifera leaf (69.14 ± 0.01) was the highest of all adsorbents studied. Conclusively, the present investigation shows that acid activated M. oleifera leaf is a good alternative adsorbent that could be used in lieu of CAC for recovery of dyes and heavy metal from aqueous solutions and other separation techniques.

  8. A nonparametric clustering technique which estimates the number of clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    In applications of cluster analysis, one usually needs to determine the number of clusters, K, and the assignment of observations to each cluster. A clustering technique based on recursive application of a multivariate test of bimodality which automatically estimates both K and the cluster assignments is presented.

  9. Reactive accelerated cluster erosion (RACE) by ionized cluster beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gspann, Jürgen

    1996-05-01

    Beams of ionized clusters accelerated up to about 120 keV kinetic energy per cluster are used for cluster impact lithography. Chemical reactions of clusters of CO 2, or of SF 6, respectively, are found to assist the physical erosion by hypervelocity cluster impacts in yielding volatile products. Natural diamond, silicon and Pyrex glass have been microstructured showing very smooth eroded surfaces.

  10. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand. PMID:25988294

  11. Development of carbon dioxide adsorbent from rice husk char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abang, S.; Janaun, J.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Ikhwan, F. S.

    2016-06-01

    This study was mainly concerned about the development of carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbent from rice husk (RH). Several chemical treatments were used to produce activated rice husk char (RHAC) from RH. Initially the RH was refluxed with 3M of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, activation followed by using 0.5M of zinc chloride (ZnCl2) solution and finally acidic treatment by using 0.1M of hydrochloric acid (HCl). Then, the RHAC was functionalized by using 3-chloropropylamine hydrochloride (3-CPA) and noted as RHN. RHN samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Based on the SEM, the RHN sample had a large pore diameter compared to RH sample after being treated. Based on MIP data, the average pore diameter between RH and RHAC samples were increased significantly from 0.928 microns to 1.017 microns. The RHN sample also had higher total porosity (%) compared to RHAC and RH (58.45%, 47.82% and 45.57% respectively). The total specific surface area of the sample was much increasing from RHO to RHAC (29.17 m2/g and 62.94 m2/g respectively) and slightly being decreasing from RHAC to RHN (58.88 m2/g). FTIR result showed the present of weak band at 1587 cm-1 which demonstrating of the amine group present on the sample. The CO2 capture result showed that the decreasing of operating temperature can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. On the contrary decreasing of CO2 gas flow rate can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. The highest total amount of CO2 adsorbed was 25338.57 mg of CO2/g of RHN sample by using 100 mL/min of gas flow rate at 30oC. Based on adsorption isotherm analysis, the Freundlich isotherm was the best isotherm to describe the CO2 adsorption on the sample.

  12. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V.; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M.; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of ‘extra adsorption domains’—that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically.

  13. Reconstruction of adsorption potential in Polanyi-based models and application to various adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bingjun; Zhang, Huichun

    2014-06-17

    The equilibrium Polanyi adsorption potential was reconstructed as ε = -RT ln(Ca(or H)/δ) to correlate the characteristic energy (E) of Polanyi-based models (qe = f[ε/E]) with the properties or structures of absorbates, where qe is the equilibriumn adsorption capacity, Ca(or H) is the converted concentration from the equilibrium aqueous concentration at the same activity and corresponds to the adsorption from the gas or n-hexadecane (HD) phase by the water-wet adsorbent, and "δ" is an arbitrary divisor to converge the model fitting. Subsequently, the modified Dubinin-Astakhov model based on the reconstructed ε was applied to aqueous adsorption on activated carbon, black carbon, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and polymeric resin. The fitting results yielded intrinsic characteristic energies Ea, derived from aqueous-to-gas phase conversion, or EH, derived from aqueous-to-HD phase conversion, which reflect the contributions of the overall or specific adsorbate-adsorbent interactions to the adsorption. Effects of the adsorbate and adsorbent properties on Ea or EH then emerge that are unrevealed by the original characteristic energy (Eo), i.e., adsorbates with tendency to form stronger interactions with an adsorbent have larger Ea and EH. Additionally, comparison of Ea and EH allows quantitative analysis of the contributions of nonspecific interactions, that is, a significant relationship was established between the nonspecific interactions and Abraham's descriptors for the adsorption of all 32 solutes on the four different adsorbents: (Ea - EH) = 24.7 × V + 9.7 × S - 19.3 (R(2) = 0.97), where V is McGowan's characteristic volume for adsorbates, and S reflects the adsorbate's polarity/polarizability. PMID:24815932

  14. Destabilization of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) by adsorbed sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Russell, Selena M.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2011-10-17

    Sulfur accelerates coarsening of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) at 300 K, and this effect is enhanced with increasing sulfur coverage over a range spanning a few hundredths of a monolayer, to nearly 0.25 monolayers. We propose that acceleration of coarsening in this system is tied to the formation of AgS{sub 2} clusters primarily at step edges. These clusters can transport Ag more efficiently than can Ag adatoms (due to a lower diffusion barrier and comparable formation energy). The mobility of isolated sulfur on Ag(100) is very low so that formation of the complex is kinetically limited at low sulfur coverages, and thus enhancement is minimal. However, higher sulfur coverages force the population of sites adjacent to step edges, so that formation of the cluster is no longer limited by diffusion of sulfur across terraces. Sulfur exerts a much weaker effect on the rate of coarsening on Ag(100) than it does on Ag(111). This is consistent with theory, which shows that the difference between the total energy barrier for coarsening with and without sulfur is also much smaller on Ag(100) than on Ag(111).

  15. The LLNL Cluster Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S L

    2007-03-27

    {lg_bullet} The Cluster Tool -is a set of linked vacuum chambers -can deposit multiple layers of metal and metal oxides {lg_bullet} Each layer can be deposited without breaking vacuum {lg_bullet} Shadow masks can give each layer a different pattern {lg_bullet} The Cluster Tool will be operational in April

  16. Cluster Interest Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Douglas

    The Cluster Interest Inventory is designed to familiarize students with representative occupations in 13 career clusters: (1) agribusiness and natural resources, (2) business marketing, and office occupations, (3) communications and media, (4) consumer and homemaker, (5) fine arts and humanities, (6) health, (7) manufacturing and processing, (8)…

  17. Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  18. Probability and Cancer Clusters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton-Keene, Rachael; Lenard, Christoper T.; Mills, Terry M.

    2009-01-01

    Recently there have been several news items about possible cancer clusters in the Australian media. The term "cancer cluster" is used when an unusually large number of people in one geographic area, often a workplace, are diagnosed with cancer in a short space of time. In this paper the authors explore this important health issue using probability…

  19. Illinois' Career Cluster Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Kirby, Catherine L.; Bragg, Debra D.; Taylor, Jason L.; Oertle, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    This booklet provides information to multiple stakeholders on the implementation of career clusters in Illinois. The booklet is an extension of the previous edition titled "An Introduction to Illinois CTE Programs of Study" (2008), and provides a resource for partners to understand Illinois' Career Cluster Model as its own adaptation of the…

  20. Matlab Cluster Ensemble Toolbox

    2009-04-27

    This is a Matlab toolbox for investigating the application of cluster ensembles to data classification, with the objective of improving the accuracy and/or speed of clustering. The toolbox divides the cluster ensemble problem into four areas, providing functionality for each. These include, (1) synthetic data generation, (2) clustering to generate individual data partitions and similarity matrices, (3) consensus function generation and final clustering to generate ensemble data partitioning, and (4) implementation of accuracy metrics. Withmore » regard to data generation, Gaussian data of arbitrary dimension can be generated. The kcenters algorithm can then be used to generate individual data partitions by either, (a) subsampling the data and clustering each subsample, or by (b) randomly initializing the algorithm and generating a clustering for each initialization. In either case an overall similarity matrix can be computed using a consensus function operating on the individual similarity matrices. A final clustering can be performed and performance metrics are provided for evaluation purposes.« less

  1. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  2. Young Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portegies Zwart, Simon F.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Gieles, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Young massive clusters (YMCs) are dense aggregates of young stars that form the fundamental building blocks of galaxies. Several examples exist in the Milky Way Galaxy and the Local Group, but they are particularly abundant in starburst and interacting galaxies. The few YMCs that are close enough to resolve are of prime interest for studying the stellar mass function and the ecological interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics. The distant unresolved clusters may be effectively used to study the star-cluster mass function, and they provide excellent constraints on the formation mechanisms of young cluster populations. YMCs are expected to be the nurseries for many unusual objects, including a wide range of exotic stars and binaries. So far only a few such objects have been found in YMCs, although their older cousins, the globular clusters, are unusually rich in stellar exotica. In this review, we focus on star clusters younger than ˜100 Myr, more than a few current crossing times old, and more massive than ˜104M⊙; the size of the cluster and its environment are considered less relevant as distinguishing parameters. We describe the global properties of the currently known young massive star clusters in the Local Group and beyond, and discuss the state of the art in observations and dynamical modeling of these systems. In order to make this review readable by observers, theorists, and computational astrophysicists, we also review the cross-disciplinary terminology.

  3. Blue emitting undecaplatinum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indranath; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Bhat, Shridevi; Pradeep, T.

    2014-07-01

    A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents.A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures, instrumentation, chromatogram of the crude cluster; SEM/EDAX, DLS, PXRD, TEM, FT-IR, and XPS of the isolated Pt11 cluster; UV/Vis, MALDI MS and SEM/EDAX of isolated 2 and 3; and 195Pt NMR of the K2PtCl6 standard. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02778g

  4. Brightest Cluster Galaxy Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haarsma, D. B.; Sebald, D. A.; ACCEPT Team

    2011-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) play an important role in several fields of astronomical research. The literature includes many different methods and criteria for identifying the BCG in the cluster, such as choosing the brightest galaxy, the galaxy nearest the X-ray peak, or the galaxy with the most extended profile. Here we examine a sample of 75 clusters from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), measuring masked magnitudes and profiles for BCG candidates in each cluster. We first identified galaxies by hand; in 15% of clusters at least one team member selected a different galaxy than the others.We also applied 6 other identification methods to the ACCEPT sample; in 30% of clusters at least one of these methods selected a different galaxy than the other methods. We then developed an algorithm that weighs brightness, profile, and proximity to the X-ray peak and centroid. This algorithm incorporates the advantages of by-hand identification (weighing multiple properties) and automated selection (repeatable and consistent). The BCG population chosen by the algorithm is more uniform in its properties than populations selected by other methods, particularly in the relation between absolute magnitude (a proxy for galaxy mass) and average gas temperature (a proxy for cluster mass). This work supported by a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and a Sid Jansma Summer Research Fellowship.

  5. Marketing Occupations. Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This cluster guide, which is designed to show teachers what specific knowledge and skills qualify high school students for entry-level employment (or postsecondary training) in marketing occupations, is organized into three sections: (1) cluster organization and implementation, (2) instructional emphasis areas, and (3) assessment. The first…

  6. Muster: Massively Scalable Clustering

    2010-05-20

    Muster is a framework for scalable cluster analysis. It includes implementations of classic K-Medoids partitioning algorithms, as well as infrastructure for making these algorithms run scalably on very large systems. In particular, Muster contains algorithms such as CAPEK (described in reference 1) that are capable of clustering highly distributed data sets in-place on a hundred thousand or more processes.

  7. Tunable magnetism in metal adsorbed fluorinated nanoporous graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pankaj; Sharma, Vinit; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Yang, Li-Ming; Pushpa, Raghani

    2016-01-01

    Developing nanostructures with tunable magnetic states is crucial for designing novel data storage and quantum information devices. Using density functional theory, we investigate the thermodynamic stability and magnetic properties of tungsten adsorbed tri-vacancy fluorinated (TVF) graphene. We demonstrate a strong structure-property relationship and its response to external stimuli via defect engineering in graphene-based materials. Complex interplay between defect states and the chemisorbed atom results in a large magnetic moment of 7 μB along with high in-plane magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) of 17 meV. Under the influence of electric field, spin crossover effect accompanied by a change in the MAE is observed. The ascribed change in spin-configuration is caused by the modification of exchange coupling between defect states and a change in the occupation of d-orbitals of the metal complex. Our predictions open a promising way towards controlling the magnetic properties in graphene based spintronic and non-volatile memory devices. PMID:27554975

  8. Enhanced initial bone regeneration with inorganic polyphosphate-adsorbed hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Doi, K; Kubo, T; Takeshita, R; Kato, S; Shiba, T; Akagawa, Y

    2010-07-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (poly(P)) can promote binding between fibroblast growth factors and their receptors and enhance osteoblastic cell differentiation and calcification. This study evaluated the possibilities for poly(P) adsorbed onto interconnected porous calcium hydroxyapatite (IP-CHA) as a new bone regeneration material. Prepared 1%, 5%, 25% and 50% poly(P)/IP-CHA composites showed the elution peak of poly(P) between 15 and 20 min, respectively, with the highest value from 50% poly(P)/IP-CHA in vitro. Histologically, at 1 week of placement into the femur of rabbits, granulation tissue had penetrated into the pores in all composites and IP-CHA as a control. In contrast, at 2 weeks of placement, newly formed lamellar bone was found in all groups, although a higher amount of bone regeneration was obviously formed in the 25% and 50% poly(P)/IP-CHA with a significantly higher value of bone regeneration ratio of 50% poly(P)/IP-CHA. These results indicate that 25% and 50% poly(P)/IP-CHA composites may enhance initial bone regeneration. PMID:20056175

  9. Theory of colloid depletion stabilization by unattached and adsorbed polymers.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A N; Shvets, A A

    2015-12-01

    The polymer-induced forces between colloidal particles in a semidilute or concentrated polymer solution are considered theoretically. This study is focussed on the case of partially adsorbing colloidal surfaces involving some attractive centers able to trap polymer segments. In the presence of free polymers the particles are covered by self-assembled fluffy layers whose structure is elucidated. It is shown that the free-polymer-induced interaction between the particles is repulsive at distances exceeding the polymer correlation length, and that this depletion repulsion can be strongly enhanced due to the presence of fluffy layers. This enhanced depletion stabilization mechanism (which works in tandem with a more short-range steric repulsion of fluffy layers) can serve on its own to stabilize colloidal dispersions. More generally, we identify three main polymer-induced interaction mechanisms: depletion repulsion, depletion attraction, and steric repulsion. Their competition is analyzed both numerically and analytically based on an asymptotically rigorous mean-field theory. It is shown that colloid stabilization can be achieved by simply increasing the molecular weight of polymer additives, or by changing their concentration. PMID:26400677

  10. Surface geometry of tryptophan adsorbed on gold colloidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Shafqat; Pang, Yoonsoo

    2015-09-01

    Two distinct surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra of tryptophan depending on the surface adsorption geometry were obtained by using colloidal gold nanoparticles reduced by borohydride and citrate ions. According to the vibrational assignments based on DFT simulations, the SER spectra of tryptamine and 3-indolepropionic acid, and the pH dependence of tryptophan SER spectrum, we found that some indole ring vibrations are very sensitive to the surface adsorption geometry of the molecules. With citrate-reduced gold colloids, tryptophan and related molecules mainly adsorb via the protonated amine group while maintaining a perpendicular geometry of the indole ring to the surface. However, a flat geometry of the indole ring to the surface is preferred on the borohydride-reduced gold colloids where the surface adsorption occurs mainly through the indole ring π electrons. By comparing our results with previous reports on the SER spectra of tryptophan on various silver and gold surfaces, we propose a general adsorption model of tryptophan on metal nanosurfaces.

  11. Utilization of Rice Husk as Pb Adsorbent in Blood Cockles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohaeti, Eti; Permata Sari, Wenny; Batubara, Irmanida

    2016-01-01

    Water pollution by lead affects blood cockles, a potential source of food. The aim of this research is to compare rice husk (RH) and rice husk carbon (RHC) in reducing the concentration of lead in blood cockles. RH and RHC were activated with NaOH 1 M, and then the optimal conditions and maximum capacity were determined. This research showed that RH and RHC had maximum adsorbancy capacities of 28.7326 mg/g and 51.5464 mg/g at optimal condition. The optimal adsorption condition for RH in 100 ml Pb solution is 0.32 gram, pH 5, for 4 hours. The optimal adsorption condition for RHC in 100 ml Pb solution is 0.20 gram, pH 5, for 2 hours. Lead content in blood cockles from the north waters of Jakarta (1.9658 mg/kg) is beyond the threshold limit. Lead adsorption by RH and RHC could reduce lead content in blood cockles by about 40% and 31%, respectively.

  12. Adsorbed Methane Film Properties in Nanoporous Carbon Monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Chada, Nagaraju; Beckner, Matthew; Romanos, Jimmy; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase methane storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed natural gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize methane storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis temperature. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis temperature both have large influences on monolith uptakes. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high methane storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument. The saturated film density and the film thickness was determined using linear extrapolation on the high pressure excess adsorption isotherms. The saturated film density was also determined using the monolayer Ono-Kondo model. Film densities ranged from ca. 0.32 g/cm3 - 0.37 g/cm3.The Ono-Kondo model also determines the binding energy of methane. Binding energies were also determined from isosteric heats calculated from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and compared with the Ono-Kondo model method. Binding energies from Ono-Kondo were ca. 7.8 kJ/mol - 10 kJ/mol. Work funded by California Energy Commission Contract #500-08-022.

  13. Adsorbed water and thin liquid films on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxe, C. S.; Hand, K. P.; Nealson, K. H.; Yung, Y. L.; Yen, A. S.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2012-07-01

    At present, bulk liquid water on the surface and near-subsurface of Mars does not exist due to the scarcity of condensed- and gas-phase water, pressure and temperature constraints. Given that the nuclei of soil and ice, that is, the soil solid and ice lattice, respectively, are coated with adsorbed and/or thin liquid films of water well below 273 K and the availability of water limits biological activity, we quantify lower and upper limits for the thickness of such adsorbed/water films on the surface of the Martian regolith and for subsurface ice. These limits were calculated based on experimental and theoretical data for pure water ice and water ice containing impurities, where water ice containing impurities exhibit thin liquid film enhancements, ranging from 3 to 90. Close to the cold limit of water stability (i.e. 273 K), thin liquid film thicknesses at the surface of the Martian regolith is 0.06 nm (pure water ice) and ranges from 0.2 to 5 nm (water ice with impurities). An adsorbed water layer of 0.06 nm implies a dessicated surface as the thickness of one monolayer of water is 0.3 nm but represents 0.001-0.02% of the Martian atmospheric water vapour inventory. Taking into account the specific surface area (SSA) of surface-soil (i.e. top 1 mm of regolith and 0.06 nm adsorbed water layer), shows Martian surface-soil may contain interfacial water that represents 6-66% of the upper- and lower-limit atmospheric water vapour inventory and almost four times and 33%, the lower- and upper-limit Martian atmospheric water vapour inventory. Similarly, taking the SSA of Martian soil, the top 1 mm or regolith at 5 nm thin liquid water thickness, yields 1.10×1013 and 6.50×1013 litres of waters, respectively, 55-325 times larger than Mars' atmospheric water vapour inventory. Film thicknesses of 0.2 and 5 nm represent 2.3×104-1.5×106 litres of water, which is 6.0×10-7-4.0×10-4%, respectively, of a 10 pr μm water vapour column, and 3.0×10-6-4.0×10-4% and 6.0×10

  14. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  15. Tunable magnetism in metal adsorbed fluorinated nanoporous graphene.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Sharma, Vinit; Reboredo, Fernando A; Yang, Li-Ming; Pushpa, Raghani

    2016-01-01

    Developing nanostructures with tunable magnetic states is crucial for designing novel data storage and quantum information devices. Using density functional theory, we investigate the thermodynamic stability and magnetic properties of tungsten adsorbed tri-vacancy fluorinated (TVF) graphene. We demonstrate a strong structure-property relationship and its response to external stimuli via defect engineering in graphene-based materials. Complex interplay between defect states and the chemisorbed atom results in a large magnetic moment of 7 μB along with high in-plane magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) of 17 meV. Under the influence of electric field, spin crossover effect accompanied by a change in the MAE is observed. The ascribed change in spin-configuration is caused by the modification of exchange coupling between defect states and a change in the occupation of d-orbitals of the metal complex. Our predictions open a promising way towards controlling the magnetic properties in graphene based spintronic and non-volatile memory devices. PMID:27554975

  16. Dietary bioavailability of Cu adsorbed to colloidal hydrous ferric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The dietary bioavailability of copper (Cu) adsorbed to synthetic colloidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was evaluated from the assimilation of 65Cu by two benthic grazers, a gastropod and a larval mayfly. HFO was synthesized, labeled with 65Cu to achieve a Cu/Fe ratio comparable to that determined in naturally formed HFO, and then aged. The labeled colloids were mixed with a food source (the diatom Nitzschia palea) to yield dietary 65Cu concentrations ranging from 211 to 2204 nmol/g (dry weight). Animals were pulse fed the contaminated diet and assimilation of 65Cu from HFO was determined following 1–3 days of depuration. Mass transfer of 65Cu from HFO to the diatom was less than 1%, indicating that HFO was the source of 65Cu to the grazers. Estimates of assimilation efficiency indicated that the majority of Cu ingested as HFO was assimilated (values >70%), implying that colloidal HFO potentially represents a source of dietary Cu to benthic grazers, especially where there is active formation and infiltration of these particles into benthic substrates.

  17. Structure of Non-Equilibrium Adsorbed Polymer Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Ben; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2004-03-01

    Equilibrium polymer adsorption has been widely studied theoretically. Many experiments however implicate strong non-equilibrium effects for monomer sticking energies somewhat larger than kT, the most common case. The structure and slow dynamics in these layers is not understood. We analyze theoretically non-equilibrium layers from dilute solutions in the limit of irreversible monomer adsorption. We find the density profile ˜ z-4/3 and loop distribution ˜ s-11/5 of the resulting layer are no different to equilibrium. However, single chain statistics are radically different: the layer consists of a flat inner portion of fully collapsed chains plus an outer part whose chains make only fN surface contacts where N is chain length. The contact fractions f follow a broad distribution, P(f) ˜ f-4/5, consistent with experiment [H. M. Schneider et al, Langmuir 12, 994 (1996)], and the lateral size R of adsorbed chains is of order the bulk coil size, R ˜ N^3/5. For equilibrium layers, by contrast, P has a unique peak at a value of f of order unity, while R ˜ N^1/2 is significantly less. The relaxation of a non-equilibrium layer towards equilibrium thus entails chain shrinkage and tighter binding. We speculate that the observed decrease of bulk-layer chain exchange rates with increasing aging reflects these internal layer dynamics.

  18. Poliovirus concentration from tap water with electropositive adsorbent filters.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, M D; Glass, J S

    1980-08-01

    Simple, reliable, and efficient concentration of poliovirus from tap water was obtained with two types of electropositive filter media, one of which is available in the form of a pleated cartridge filter (Virozorb 1MDS). Virus adsorption from tap water between pH 3.5 and 7.5 was more efficient with electropositive filters than with Filterite filters. Elution of adsorbed viruses was more efficient with beef extract in glycine, pH 9.5, than with glycine-NaOH, pH 11.0. In paired comparative studies, electropositive filters, with adsorption at pH 7.5 and no added polyvalent cation salts, gave less variable virus concentration efficiencies than did Filterite filters with adsorption at pH 3.5 plus added MgCl2. Recovery of poliovirus from 1,000-liter tap water volumes was approximately 30% efficient with both Virozorb 1MDS and Filterite pleated cartridge filters, but the former were much simpler to use. The virus adsorption behavior of these filters appears to be related to their surface charge properties, with more electropositive filters giving more efficient virus adsorption from tap water at higher pH levels. PMID:6258472

  19. Modulation of the molecular spintronic properties of adsorbed copper corroles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Liu, Jie; Mishra, Puneet; Komeda, Tadahiro; Mack, John; Chang, Yi; Kobayashi, Nagao; Shen, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The ability to modulate the spin states of adsorbed molecules is in high demand for molecular spintronics applications. Here, we demonstrate that the spin state of a corrole complex can be tuned by expanding its fused ring as a result of the modification to the d–π interaction between the metal and ligand. A bicyclo[2.2.2]octadiene-fused copper corrole can readily be converted into a tetrabenzocorrole radical on an Au(111) substrate during the sublimation process. In the scanning tunnelling spectroscopy spectrum, a sharp Kondo resonance appears near the Fermi level on the corrole ligand of the tetrabenzocorrole molecule. In contrast, a non-fused-ring-expanded copper corrole molecule, copper 5,10,15-triphenylcorrole, shows no such Kondo feature. Mapping of the Kondo resonance demonstrates that the spin distribution of the tetrabenzocorrole molecule can be further modified by the rotation of the meso-aryl groups, in a manner that could lead to applications in molecular spintronics. PMID:26112968

  20. Cosmology with galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoris, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Clusters of galaxies are powerful probes to constrain parameters that describe the cosmological models and to distinguish among different models. Since, the evolution of the cluster mass function and large-scale clustering contain the informations about the linear growth rate of perturbations and the expansion history of the Universe, clusters have played an important role in establishing the current cosmological paradigm. It is crucial to know how to determine the cluster mass from observational quantities when using clusters as cosmological tools. For this, numerical simulations are helpful to define and study robust cluster mass proxies that have minimal and well understood scatter across the mass and redshift ranges of interest. Additionally, the bias in cluster mass determination can be constrained via observations of the strong and weak lensing effect, X-ray emission, the Sunyaev- Zel’dovic effect, and the dynamics of galaxies.A major advantage of X-ray surveys is that the observable-mass relation is tight. Moreover, clusters can be easily identified in X-ray as continuous, extended sources. As of today, interesting cosmological constraints have been obtained from relatively small cluster samples (~102), X-ray selected by the ROSAT satellite over a wide redshift range (0clusters, the ROSAT All-Sky Survey.The next generation of X-ray telescopes will enhance the statistics of detected clusters and enlarge their redshift coverage. In particular, eROSITA will produce a catalog of >105 clusters with photometric redshifts from multi-band optical surveys (e.g. PanSTARRS, DES, and LSST). This will vastly improve upon current cosmological constraints, especially by the synergy with other cluster surveys that

  1. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey Aleksandrovich Varganov

    2005-12-17

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms to

  2. Hybridization schemes for clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    The concept of an optimum hybridization scheme for cluster compounds is developed with particular reference to electron counting. The prediction of electron counts for clusters and the interpretation of the bonding is shown to depend critically upon the presumed hybridization pattern of the cluster vertex atoms. This fact has not been properly appreciated in previous work, particularly in applications of Stone's tensor surface harmonic (TSH) theory, but is found to be a useful tool when dealt with directly. A quantitative definition is suggested for the optimum cluster hybridization pattern based directly upon the ease of interpretation of the molecular orbitals, and results are given for a range of species. The relationship of this scheme to the detailed cluster geometry is described using Löwdin's partitioned perturbation theory, and the success and range of application of TSH theory are discussed.

  3. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Sanfilippo, Antonio; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  4. Towards Understanding KOH Conditioning of Amidoxime-based Polymer Adsorbents for Sequestering Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana R.; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary A.; Janke, C.; Wai, Chien M.

    2015-11-16

    Conditioning of polymer fiber adsorbents grafted with amidoxime and carboxylic acid groups is necessary to make the materials hydrophilic for sequestering uranium from seawater. Spectroscopic techniques were employed to study the effectiveness of the traditional KOH conditioning method (2.5% KOH at 80 oC) on recently developed high-surface-area amidoxime-based polymer fiber adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. FTIR spectra reveal that the KOH conditioning process removes the proton from the carboxylic acids and also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. With prolonged KOH treatment (>1 hr) at 80 oC, physical damage to the adsorbent material occurs which can lead to a significant reduction in the adsorbent’s uranium adsorption capability in real seawater during extended exposure times (>21 days). The physical damage to the adsorbent can be minimized by lowering KOH conditioning temperature. For the high-surface-area amidoxime-based adsorbents, 20 min of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 80 oC or 1 hr of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 60 oC appears sufficient to achieve de-protonation of the carboxylic acid with minimal harmful effects to the adsorbent material. The use of NaOH instead of KOH can also reduce the cost of the base treatment process required for conditioning the amidoxime-based sorbents with minimal loss of adsorption capacity (≤ 7%).

  5. Cellulose based cationic adsorbent fabricated via radiation grafting process for treatment of dyes waste water.

    PubMed

    Goel, Narender Kumar; Kumar, Virendra; Misra, Nilanjal; Varshney, Lalit

    2015-11-01

    A cationized adsorbent was prepared from cellulosic cotton fabric waste via a single step-green-radiation grafting process using gamma radiation source, wherein poly[2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (PMAETC) was covalently attached to cotton cellulose substrate. Radiation grafted (PMAETC-g-cellulose) adsorbent was investigated for removal of acid dyes from aqueous solutions using two model dyes: Acid Blue 25 (AB25) and Acid Blue 74 (AB74). The equilibrium adsorption data was analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, whereas kinetic data was analyzed by pseudo first order, pseudo second order, intra particle diffusion and Boyd's models. The PMAETC-g-cellulose adsorbent with 25% grafting yield exhibited equilibrium adsorption capacities of ∼ 540.0mg/g and ∼ 340.0mg/g for AB25 and AB74, respectively. Linear and nonlinear fitting of adsorption data suggested that the equilibrium adsorption process followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, whereas, the kinetic adsorption process followed pseudo-second order model. The multi-linearities observed in the intra-particle kinetic plots suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling process in the adsorption of acid dyes on the adsorbent, which was further supported by Boyd's model. The adsorbent could be regenerated by eluting the adsorbed dye from the adsorbent and could be repeatedly used. PMID:26256369

  6. [Synthesis and application of the polyacrylamide beads acting as LDL adsorbent's matrices].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xixun; Li, Li; Yue, Yilun; Chen, Huaiqing

    2004-08-01

    This study in pursuit of the synthetic technologies and structure characterization of polyacrylamide-based matrices (PAM beads) for low density lipoprotein (LDL) adsorbent and their adsorbability for LDL was intended for an experimental evidence of developing advanced matrices for LDL adsorbent. PAM beads were synthesized by inverse suspension polymerization, and their structure characterization was characterized by SEM, image analyzer and small angle X-ray scattering. The tripeptide serine-aspartic-glutamic acid (SDE) was coupled on the PAM beads to prepare the LDL adsorbents whose adsorbability for LDL was determined in vitro. The results showed that the PAM beads with the average size diameter 142.1 microm and the average pore diameter 119.8 nm could act as the matrices in accordance with the requirement of adsorbent for LDL. When the amount of acrylamide and the crosslinking agent N,N'-methylene-bis(acrylamide) was fixed, the average pore diameter decreased with the increase of the crosslinking agent content. Although the nonspecific binding of PAM beads for LDL was low, they could selectively adsorb LDL after coupling the SDE on the PAM beads. PMID:15357437

  7. Adsorption characteristics of benzene on biosolid adsorbent and commercial activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-Lung Chiang; Kuo-Hsiung Lin; Chih-Yu Chen; Ching-Guan Choa; Ching-Shyung Hwu; Nina Lai

    2006-05-15

    This study selected biosolids from a petrochemical wastewater treatment plant as the raw material. The sludge was immersed in 0.5-5 M of zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}) solutions and pyrolyzed at different temperatures and times. Results indicated that the 1-M ZnCl{sub 2}-immersed biosolids pyrolyzed at 500{sup o}C for 30 min could be reused and were optimal biosolid adsorbents for benzene adsorption. Pore volume distribution analysis indicated that the mesopore contributed more than the macropore and micropore in the biosolid adsorbent. The benzene adsorption capacity of the biosolid adsorbent was 65 and 55% of the G206 (granular-activated carbon) and BPL (coal-based activated carbon; Calgon, Carbon Corp.) activated carbons, respectively. Data from the adsorption and desorption cycles indicated that the benzene adsorption capacity of the biosolid adsorbent was insignificantly reduced compared with the first-run capacity of the adsorbent; therefore, the biosolid adsorbent could be reused as a commercial adsorbent, although its production cost is high. 18 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Electronic and magnetic properties of nonmetal atoms adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoou; Li, Qingfang

    2015-08-14

    The stable configurations and electronic and magnetic properties of nonmetal atoms (H, N, P, O, S, F, and Cl) adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers have been investigated by first-principles calculations. It is found that H, O, S, F, and Cl prefer to occupy the peak sites of S atoms, while both N and P atoms favor the valley sites of S atoms. The ReS{sub 2} sheet exhibits a good adsorption capability to nonmetal atoms. The reconstruction of the surface is pronounced in N- and P-adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers. In H-adsorbed case, the Fermi level is pulled into the conduction band, which results in the semiconductor-metal transition. The same magnetic moment of 1μ{sub B} is found in the N-, P-, F-, and Cl-adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers, while the mechanisms of forming magnetic moment for N (P)- and F (Cl)-adsorbed cases are different. In addition, the spatial extensions of spin density in P-, F-, and Cl-adsorbed cases are larger than that in N-adsorbed case, which is more suitable to achieve long-range magnetic coupling interaction at low defect concentrations. Our results provide insight for achieving metal-free magnetism and a tunable band gap for various electronic and spintronic devices based on ReS{sub 2}.

  9. Selective Gas Capture Ability of Gas-Adsorbent-Incorporated Cellulose Nanofiber Films.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kinjal J; Imae, Toyoko

    2016-05-01

    The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCNF) were hybridized with cation and anion-exchange organoclays, where poly(amido amine) dendrimers were loaded to enhance the functionality of gas adsorption, since dendrimers have the high adsorbability and the enough selectivity on the gas adsorption. The thin films were prepared from the organoclay-TOCNF hybrids and supplied to the gas adsorption. The adsorption of CO2 and NH3 gases increased with an increasing amount of organoclays in TOCNF films, but the behavior of the increase depended on gases, clays, and dendrimers. The hydrotalcite organoclay-TOCNF films displayed the highest adsorption of both gases, but the desorption of CO2 gas from hydrotalcite organoclay-TOCNF films was drastically high in comparison with the other systems. While the CO2 gas is adsorbed and remained on cationic dendrimer sites in cation-exchange organoclay-TOCNF films, the CO2 gas is adsorbed on cationic clay sites in anion exchange organoclay-TOCNF films, and it is easily desorbed from the films. The NH3 adsorption is inversive to the CO2 adsorption. Then the CO2 molecules adsorbed on the cationic dendrimers and the NH3 molecules adsorbed on the anionic dendrimers are preferably captured in these adsorbents. The present research incorporated dendrimers will be contributing to the development of gas-specialized adsorbents, which are selectively storable only in particular gases. PMID:27035217

  10. Direct Measurement of the Adsorbed Film Volume for Estimating Heats of Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Andrew; Dohnke, Elmar; Rash, Tyler; Stalla, David; Knight, Ernest; Seydel, Florian; Sweany, Mark; Pfeifer, Peter

    Compressed hydrogen and methane require extremely high pressures or low temperatures in order to compete with the energy density of conventional fossil fuels. Adsorbent materials provide a means to increase the energy density of these gasses up to 6 times that of compressed gas at the same temperature and pressure. One major concern in engineering adsorbed gas systems is thermal management during charging and discharging. Adsorption is an exothermic process, releasing heat during charging and absorbing heat during discharging. To estimate the heat of adsorption, it is common to analyze excess adsorption isotherms by converting to absolute adsorption and employ the Clausius Clapeyron relation. However, this method requires an assumed volume of the adsorbed state. It is common for researchers to assume that the adsorbed film occupies the entire pore volume of the adsorbent material. However, the adsorbed film only occupies a fraction of the total pore volume. This yields heats of adsorption that are underestimated by as much as 10kJ/mol at high coverage. In this talk, we present a method to directly measure the adsorbed film volume as a function of temperature and present the resulting heats of adsorption for both methane and hydrogen.

  11. Reducing the Cost and Preserving the Reactivity in Noble-Metal-Based Catalysts: Oxidation of CO by Pt and Al-Pt Alloy Clusters Supported on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Boero, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation mechanisms of CO to CO2 on graphene-supported Pt and Pt-Al alloy clusters are elucidated by reactive dynamical simulations. The general mechanism evidenced is a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) pathway in which O2 is adsorbed on the cluster prior to the CO oxidation. The adsorbed O2 dissociates into two atomic oxygen atoms thus promoting the CO oxidation. Auxiliary simulations on alloy clusters in which other metals (Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni) replace a Pt atom have pointed to the aluminum doped cluster as a special case. In the nanoalloy, the reaction mechanism for CO oxidation is still a LH pathway with an activation barrier sufficiently low to be overcome at room temperature, thus preserving the catalyst efficiency. This provides a generalizable strategy for the design of efficient, yet sustainable, Pt-based catalysts at reduced cost. PMID:26878836

  12. NO adsorption and dissociation on palladium clusters: The importance of charged state and metal doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Zhang, Li Mei; Kong, Chun Cai; Yang, Zhi Mao; Chen, Yong Mei

    2016-08-01

    The NO adsorption and dissociation on neutral, charged and Ni-doped Pd13 clusters were studied by using density functional calculations. Our results revealed that NO always prefers to adsorb on the hollow site rather than the top or bridge sites. However, the charge state and Ni doping remarkably influence NO adsorption energy, dissociation barrier and reaction energy. The reaction on Pd13- has the lowest energy barrier and largest reaction energy. The Hirshfeld charge analysis discloses that the origin of the catalytic activity difference is the charge transfer from clusters to NO in the metastable NO adsorption state.

  13. Molecular cluster theory for chemisorption of first row atoms on nickel /100/ surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, D. E.; Adachi, H.; Averill, F. W.

    1976-01-01

    Self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Slater molecular cluster models for the chemisorption of first-row atoms on Ni(100) surfaces are presented. Energy levels and ground-state charge distributions are given for XNi5 clusters with the adatom X = H, C, N, O located in C4V symmetry at a fixed height of 2.0 au above the surface. The variation of properties with height was studied in detail for the case of oxygen. Theoretical results compare rather well with experimental photoelectron and energy-loss data. Local-densities-of-states diagrams are used to clarify the interaction between adsorbate levels and metal conduction bands.

  14. Control of optical response of a supported cluster on different dielectric substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Kenji Noda, Masashi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2015-06-07

    We develop a computational method for optical response of a supported cluster on a dielectric substrate. The substrate is approximated by a dielectric continuum with a frequency-dependent dielectric function. The computational approach is based on our recently developed first-principles simulation method for photoinduced electron dynamics in real-time and real-space. The approach allows us to treat optical response of an adsorbate explicitly taking account of interactions at an interface between an adsorbate and a substrate. We calculate optical absorption spectra of supported Ag{sub n} (n = 2, 54) clusters, changing the dielectric function of a substrate. By analyzing electron dynamics in real-time and real-space, we clarify the mechanisms for variations in absorption spectra, such as peak shifts and intensity changes, relating to various experimental results for optical absorption of supported clusters. Attractive and repulsive interactions between an adsorbate and a substrate result in red and blue shifts, respectively, and the intensity decreases by energy dissipation into a substrate. We demonstrate that optical properties can be controlled by varying the dielectric function of a substrate.

  15. Mesoporous carbon adsorbents from melamine-formaldehyde resin using nanocasting technique for CO2 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-06-01

    Mesoporous carbon adsorbents, having high nitrogen content, were synthesized via nanocasting technique with melamine-formaldehyde resin as precursor and mesoporous silica as template. A series of adsorbents were prepared by varying the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700°C. Adsorbents were characterized thoroughly by nitrogen sorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental (CHN) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Boehm titration. Carbonization temperature controlled the properties of the synthesized adsorbents ranging from surface area to their nitrogen content, which play major role in their application as adsorbents for CO2 capture. The nanostructure of these materials was confirmed by XRD and TEM. Their nitrogen content decreased with an increase in carbonization temperature while other properties like surface area, pore volume, thermal stability and surface basicity increased with the carbonization temperature. These materials were evaluated for CO2 adsorption by fixed-bed column adsorption experiments. Adsorbent synthesized at 700°C was found to have the highest surface area and surface basicity along with maximum CO2 adsorption capacity among the synthesized adsorbents. Breakthrough time and CO2 equilibrium adsorption capacity were investigated from the breakthrough curves and were found to decrease with increase in adsorption temperature. Adsorption process for carbon adsorbent-CO2 system was found to be reversible with stable adsorption capacity over four consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. From three isotherm models used to analyze the equilibrium data, Temkin isotherm model presented a nearly perfect fit implying the heterogeneous adsorbent surface. PMID:26040750

  16. Titanium-incorporated organic–inorganic hybrid adsorbent for improved CO{sub 2} adsorption performance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Qin, Hongyan; Zhang, Sisi; Wu, Wei

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Titanium-incorporated organic–inorganic hybrid adsorbent was prepared. • The incorporation of Ti to the adsorbent showed significant effect. • The sorbent shows high CO{sub 2} capture capacity both in pure and diluted CO{sub 2} at RT. • The sorbent exhibits a high recycling stability after 15 cycling runs. - Abstract: The CO{sub 2} adsorption performance of acrylonitrile (AN)–tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) adduct (hereafter referred to as TN) impregnated adsorbent was greatly enhanced by introduction of Titanium atom into the silica matrix. The adsorbents were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The adsorption experiments together with the physicochemical characterization demonstrated that these adsorbents containing an optimal amount of Titanium (Ti/Si ≈ 0.1) remarkably reinforced the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and recycling stability. The highest CO{sub 2} uptakes reached 4.65 and 1.80 mmol CO{sub 2}/g adsorbent at 25 °C under 90% CO{sub 2} (CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, 90:10 V/V) and 1% CO{sub 2} (CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, 1:99 V/V) conditions for sample Ti(0.1)-DMS-TN, respectively. Repeated adsorption/desorption cycles revealed that the Ti-incorporated adsorbent showed only a tiny decrease in adsorption capacity (1.778 mmol CO{sub 2}/g adsorbent after 15 cycles, decreased by 0.95%), significantly enhanced the adsorbent recycling stability.

  17. Poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite: A novel adsorbent for enhanced fulvic acid removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Yang, Lei; Zhong, Wenhui; Cui, Jing; Wei, Zhenggui

    2015-03-01

    In this study, poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) was developed as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fulvic acid (FA) from aqueous solution. Surface functionality, crystallinity, and morphology of the synthetic adsorbent were studied by Fourier-transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of various parameters such as crystallinity of adsorbent, contact time, adsorbent dosage, pH, initial adsorbate concentration, temperature, ionic strength and the presence of alkaline earth metal ions on FA adsorption were investigated. Results indicated that the nanosized HAP calcined at lower temperature was poorly crystalline (Xc = 0.23) and had better adsorption capacity for FA than those (Xc = 0.52, 0.86) calcined at higher temperature. FA removal was increased with increases of adsorbent dosage, temperature, ionic strength and the presence of alkali earth metal ions, but decreased as the pH increased. Kinetic studies showed that pseudo-second-order kinetic model better described the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were best described by Sips models, and the estimated maximum adsorption capacity of poorly crystalline HAP was 90.20 mg/g at 318 K, displaying higher efficiency for FA removal than previously reported adsorbents. FT-IR results revealed that FA adsorption over the adsorbent could be attributed to the surface complexation between the oxygen atom of functional groups of FA and calcium ions of HAP. Regeneration studies indicated that HAP could be recyclable for a long term. Findings of the present work highlight the potential for using poorly crystalline HAP nanoparticles as an effective and recyclable adsorbent for FA removal from aqueous solution.

  18. Neutralization of a proton at adsorbate-covered metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, M.; O'Connor, D. J.; Yamamoto, K.; Souda, R.

    1996-08-01

    Charge exchange between a proton and adatoms on the metal substrates has been studied theoretically. The neutral fraction may increase or decrease, depending on the electronic environments of the adatom. The neutral yield of a proton depends significantly on the interaction between the adatom and the substrate metal. One remarkable aspect is the creative or destructive interference between two charge-exchange processes: one is the neutralization between the proton and the adatom, and the other is the neutralization between the proton and the substrate metal. Using the parameter values derived from molecular orbital calculations for cluster atoms, the remarkable interference effect is demonstrated.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of adsorbed water on silica gel - Exergy losses in adiabatic sorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worek, W. M.; Zengh, W.; San, J.-Y.

    1991-09-01

    In order to perform exergy analyses to optimize the transient heat and mass transfer processes involving sorption by solid adsorbents, the thermodynamic properties of adsorbed water must be determined. In this paper, the integral enthalpy and entropy are determined directly from isotherm data of water adsorbed on silica gel particles and silica gel manufactured in the form of a felt with 25 percent cotton as a support and Teflon as a binder. These results are then used to evaluate the exergy losses, due to the sorption and the convective heat and mass transfer processes, that occur in each portion of an adiabatic desiccant dehumidificaton cycle.

  20. Experimental study of a three-adsorber sorption refrigerator for utilization of renewable sources of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitovich, A. P.

    2013-03-01

    A three-adsorber refrigerator has been created and experimentally tested, in which use is made of a composite sorbent consisting of activated carbon fiber and alkali salts. This sorbent has a high capacity of storage of refrigeration characteristic of chemical coolers and a high sorption rate characteristic of adsorption refrigerators. The sorbent structure makes it possible to effect a convective intrapore process of cooling of the sorbent through intense two-phase heat transfer. A three-adsorber refrigerator has a higher refrigeration efficiency and smaller mass and overall dimensions than a traditional two-stage four-adsorber refrigerator.

  1. Binding energies and electronic structures of adsorbed titanium chains on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chih-Kai; Zhao, Jijun; Lu, Jianping

    2002-03-01

    Our calculations based on first principles have shown that titanium is much favored energetically over gold and aluminum to form a continuous chain on a variety of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Results from two zigzag nanotubes, (10,0) and (14,0), and two armchairs, (6,6) and (8,8), indicate that binding energy for a Ti-adsorbed SWNT is generally six to seven eV per unit cell larger than a Au or Al-adsorbed SWNT. Furthermore, the adsorbed Ti chain generates additional states in the band gaps of the two semi-conducting zigzag nanotubes, transforming them into metals.

  2. Removal of pesticides from water and wastewater by different adsorbents: a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanweer; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ghazali, Arniza; Sulaiman, Othman; Hashim, Rokiah; Ahmad, Anees

    2010-10-01

    In this review article, the use of various low-cost adsorbents for the removal of pesticides from water and wastewater has been reviewed. Pesticides may appear as pollutants in water sources, having undesirable impacts to human health because of their toxicity, carcinogenicity, and mutagenicity or causing aesthetic problems such as taste and odors. These pesticides pollute the water stream and it can be removed very effectively using different low-cost adsorbents. It is evident from a literature survey of about 191 recently published papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for pesticides. PMID:21069614

  3. Extraction of palladium from acidic solutions with the use of carbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Kononova; N.G. Goryaeva; N.B. Dostovalova; S.V. Kachin; A.G. Kholmogorov

    2007-08-15

    We studied the sorption of palladium(II) on LKAU-4, LKAU-7, and BAU carbon adsorbents from model hydrochloric acid solutions and the solutions of spent palladium-containing catalysts. It was found that sorbents based on charcoal (BAU) and anthracite (LKAU-4) were characterized by high sorption capacities for palladium. The kinetics of the saturation of carbon adsorbents with palladium(II) ions was studied, and it was found that more than 60% of the initial amount of Pd(II) was recovered in a 1-h contact of an adsorbent with a model solution. This value for the solutions of spent catalysts was higher than 35%.

  4. Pyrolyzed feather fibers for adsorbent and high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoz, Erman

    Chicken feather fibers (CFF) are problematic and costly for the poultry industry in terms of managing maintenance and disposal. Considering their great availability, low cost, and unique protein structure, CFF can be an environmentally friendly and bio-renewable candidate to replace petroleum products. CFF's low degradation and melting temperature render them useless at high temperatures. Pyrolysis methods were developed for CFF by using two temperature steps to convert them into high temperature resistant and adsorbent fibers while retaining their original physical appearance and affine dimensions. An intermolecular crosslinking mechanism in the first step of pyrolysis at 215 ºC for 24 h provided an intact fibrous structure with no subsequent melting. The evidence obtained from the thermal, bulk, and surface analysis techniques was indication of the simultaneous side chain degradation, polypeptide backbone scission, disulfide bond cleavage, and isopeptide crosslinking. The variation in the reaction kinetics of disulfide bond cleavage and isopeptide crosslinking played an important role in the melting transition. Consequently, long-lasting heat treatments below the melting point provided sufficient crosslinks in the protein matrix to keep the fibrous structure intact. Water-insoluble and crosslinked CFF reinforced the triglyceride-fatty acid based composites by providing a 15 fold increase in storage and tensile modulus at room temperature. These thermally stable fibers can be used instead of CFF in composites which may require high temperature compounding and molding processes. The second step of pyrolysis at 400--450 ºC for 1 h resulted in microporous fibers with a micropore volume of ˜0.18 cm3/g STP and with a narrower pore size distribution than commercial activated carbons through thermal degradation. Nearly all accessible pores in the microporous pyrolyzed chicken feather fibers (PCFF) had diameters less than 1 nm and therefore, showed a potential to be

  5. Dynamics of photoinduced electron transfer from adsorbed molecules into solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, L.; Ernstorfer, R.; Willig, F.

    2007-08-01

    Ultrafast interfacial electron transfer from the donor orbital of organic chromophores into empty electronic acceptor states of a semiconductor and of a metal was investigated by two-photon photoemission spectroscopy (2PPE). Experimental tools and procedures have been developed for carrying out wet-chemistry preparation of the molecule/solid interface. The organic chromophore perylene was investigated with several different bridge/anchor groups on TiO2(110). One perylene compound was investigated for comparison on Ag(110). Angle and polarization dependent 2PPE measurements revealed the orientation of the perylene chromophore on the surface as controlled by the adsorption geometry of the respective anchor group on TiO2. UPS measurements gave the position of the HOMO level of the chromophore with respect to the Fermi level of the solid. The donor level of each molecule was found high enough to fulfill the “wide band limit” of heterogeneous electron transfer dynamics. Time constants for heterogeneous electron transfer were extracted from 2PPE transients. A difference by a factor of four was found, 13 fs against 47 fs, when a conjugated bond was exchanged for a saturated bond in the otherwise identical bridge group. The two different contributions to the 2PPE transients arising firstly from the excited state of the chromophore and secondly from the injected electrons were separated by measuring the latter contribution separately in the case of instantaneous interfacial electron transfer realized with catechol as adsorbate. The time scales measured for the electron transfer step and for the subsequent electron escape process from the surface into the bulk of TiO2 showed both good agreement with recent theoretical predictions of other groups for these systems.

  6. Supported polytertiary amines: highly efficient and selective SO2 adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Ritesh; Abboud, Mohamed; Sayari, Abdelhamid

    2014-01-01

    Tertiary amine containing poly(propyleneimine) second (G2) and third (G3) generation dendrimers as well as polyethyleneimine (PEI) were developed for the selective removal of SO2. N-Alkylation of primary and secondary amines into tertiary amines was confirmed by FTIR and NMR analysis. Such modified polyamines were impregnated on two nanoporous supports, namely, SBA-15PL silica with platelet morphology and ethanol-extracted pore-expanded MCM-41 (PME) composite. In the presence of 0.1% SO2/N2 at 23 °C, the uptake of modified PEI, G2, and G3 supported on SBA-15PL was 2.07, 2.35, and 1.71 mmol/g, respectively; corresponding to SO2/N ratios of 0.22, 0.4, and 0.3. Under the same conditions, the SO2 adsorption capacity of PME-supported modified PEI and G3 was significantly higher, reaching 4.68 and 4.34 mmol/g, corresponding to SO2/N ratios of 0.41 and 0.82, respectively. The working SO2 adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature, reflecting the exothermic nature of the process. The adsorption capacity of these materials was enhanced dramatically in the presence of humidity in the gas mixture. FTIR data before SO2 adsorption and after adsorption and regeneration did not indicate any change in the materials. Nonetheless, the SO2 working capacity decreased in consecutive adsorption/regeneration cycles due to evaporation of impregnated polyamines, rather than actual deactivation. FTIR and (13)C and (15)N CP-MAS NMR of fresh and SO2 adsorbed modified G3 on PME confirmed the formation of a complexation adduct. PMID:24437448

  7. Direct electrochemistry of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite.

    PubMed

    Dimcheva, Nina; Horozova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The voltammetric studies of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase (PcCAT) adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite, showed direct electron transfer (DET) between its active site and the electrode surface. Analogous tests performed with the commercially available bovine catalase revealed that mammalian enzyme is much less efficient in the DET process. Both catalases were found capable to catalyse the electrooxidation of phenol, but differed in the specifics of catalytic action. At an applied potential of 0.45V the non-linear regression showed the kinetics of the bioelectrochemical oxidation catalysed by the PcCAT obeyed the Hill equation with a binding constant K=0.034±0.002 M(2) (Hill's coefficient n=2.097±0.083, R(2)=0.997), whilst the catalytic action of the bovine catalase was described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with the following parameters: V(max,app)=7.780±0.509 μA, and K(M,app)=0.068±0.070 mol L(-1). The performance of the electrode reaction was affected by the electrode potential, the pH, and temperature. Based on the effect of pH and temperature on the electrode response in presence of phenol a tentative reaction pathway of its bioelectrocatalytic oxidation has been hypothesised. The possible application of these findings in biosensing phenol up to concentration 30 mM at pHs below 7 and in absence of oxidising agents (oxygen or H(2)O(2)) was considered. PMID:23103554

  8. STEM characterization of metal clusters in/on oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehraeen, Shareghe

    Dispersed metal clusters in or on a support matrix are key phenomenons in many technological fields. Two widely used examples of them which are investigated in this thesis are supported-metal clusters in heterogeneous catalysis and transition metal clusters in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) applied in spintronics. The catalytic activity and selectivity of catalysts often depend sensitively on structure parameters, such as particles size and shape. With the same analogy, the magnetic properties of DMS oxides are sensitively related to the crystal defects of the host material as a consequence of doping the transition metal. Therefore it is essential to develop and understand the correlation between nanostructure and function of these materials. STEM Z-contrast imaging is the best candidate for this type of study because of a high degree of resolution it provides and the unique ability it offers to detect and differentiate between the clusters and oxide matrix due to the large difference between their atomic numbers. Moreover the technique development in the STEM field fosters the conjugation of electron energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Z-contrast imaging and their widespread use for nearly atomic level chemical analysis at interface, second phases, and isolated defects. The advanced preparation method of supported clusters catalysts which is by carbonyl ligands offers a controlled cluster size and shape. MgO-supported Os clusters and SiO2-supported Ta clusters prepared by this method are adsorbed on oxide to convert into single-sized supported metal aggregates. The last step of preparation method is by removal of the ligands (decarbonylation) which is very important because it determines the final size distribution and shape of such clusters. Reaching carbonylated decaosmium clusters with the size of theoretically 0.295 nm and the tetrahedral-shape geometry are the aim of the preparation method. The size distribution measurements of sub-nanoclusters of

  9. Statistical properties of convex clustering

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kean Ming; Witten, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript, we study the statistical properties of convex clustering. We establish that convex clustering is closely related to single linkage hierarchical clustering and k-means clustering. In addition, we derive the range of the tuning parameter for convex clustering that yields a non-trivial solution. We also provide an unbiased estimator of the degrees of freedom, and provide a finite sample bound for the prediction error for convex clustering. We compare convex clustering to some traditional clustering methods in simulation studies.

  10. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  11. Dwarfs in Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This false-color mosaic of the central region of the Coma cluster combines infrared and visible-light images to reveal thousands of faint objects (green). Follow-up observations showed that many of these objects, which appear here as faint green smudges, are dwarf galaxies belonging to the cluster. Two large elliptical galaxies, NGC 4889 and NGC 4874, dominate the cluster's center. The mosaic combines visible-light data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (color coded blue) with long- and short-wavelength infrared views (red and green, respectively) from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

  12. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  13. Extending Beowulf Clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinwand, Daniel R.; Maddox, Brian; Beckmann, Tim; Hamer, George

    2003-01-01

    Beowulf clusters can provide a cost-effective way to compute numerical models and process large amounts of remote sensing image data. Usually a Beowulf cluster is designed to accomplish a specific set of processing goals, and processing is very efficient when the problem remains inside the constraints of the original design. There are cases, however, when one might wish to compute a problem that is beyond the capacity of the local Beowulf system. In these cases, spreading the problem to multiple clusters or to other machines on the network may provide a cost-effective solution.

  14. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Fabien; Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2016-08-01

    The abundance of clusters and the clustering of galaxies are two of the important cosmological probes for current and future large scale surveys of galaxies, such as the Dark Energy Survey. In order to combine them one has to account for the fact that they are not independent quantities, since they probe the same density field. It is important to develop a good understanding of their correlation in order to extract parameter constraints. We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. We employ the framework of the halo model complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD). We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions. Indeed, we show that the non-Gaussian covariance becomes dominant at small scales, low redshifts or high cluster masses. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias. We demonstrate that the SSC obeys mathematical inequalities and positivity. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeably better constraints, with improvements of order 20% on cosmological parameters compared to the best single probe, and even greater improvement on HOD parameters, with reduction of error bars by a factor 1.4-4.8. This happens in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales. We conclude that accounting for non-Gaussian effects is required for the joint analysis of these observables in galaxy surveys.

  15. All-electron scalar relativistic calculation of water molecule adsorption onto small gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Xin-Qiang; Liu, Gao-Bin

    2011-08-01

    An all-electron scalar relativistic calculation was performed on Au( n )H(2)O (n = 1-13) clusters using density functional theory (DFT) with the generalized gradient approximation at PW91 level. The calculation results reveal that, after adsorption, the small gold cluster would like to bond with oxygen and the H(2)O molecule prefers to occupy the single fold coordination site. Reflecting the strong scalar relativistic effect, Au( n ) geometries are distorted slightly but still maintain a planar structure. The Au-Au bond is strengthened and the H-O bond is weakened, as manifested by the shortening of the Au-Au bond-length and the lengthening of the H-O bond-length. The H-O-H bond angle becomes slightly larger. The enhancement of reactivity of the H(2)O molecule is obvious. The Au-O bond-lengths, adsorption energies, VIPs, HLGs, HOMO (LUMO) energy levels, charge transfers and the highest vibrational frequencies of the Au-O mode for Au( n )H(2)O clusters exhibit an obvious odd-even oscillation. The most favorable adsorption between small gold clusters and the H(2)O molecule takes place when the H(2)O molecule is adsorbed onto an even-numbered Au( n ) cluster and becomes an Au( n )H(2)O cluster with an even number of valence electrons. The odd-even alteration of magnetic moments is observed in Au( n )H(2)O clusters and may serve as material with a tunable code capacity of "0" and "1" by adsorbing a H(2)O molecule onto an odd or even-numbered small gold cluster. PMID:21140279

  16. Mantis BT Cluster Support

    2009-06-05

    The software is a modidication to the Mantis BT V1.5 open source application provided by the mantis BT group to support cluster web servers. It also provides various cosmetic modifications used a LLNL.

  17. Cyclostomes Lack Clustered Protocadherins.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Vydianathan; Yu, Wei-Ping; Pillai, Nisha E; Lian, Michelle M; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2016-02-01

    The brain, comprising billions of neurons and intricate neural networks, is arguably the most complex organ in vertebrates. The diversity of individual neurons is fundamental to the neuronal network complexity and the overall function of the vertebrate brain. In jawed vertebrates, clustered protocadherins provide the molecular basis for this neuronal diversity, through stochastic and combinatorial expression of their various isoforms in individual neurons. Based on analyses of transcriptomes from the Japanese lamprey brain and sea lamprey embryos, genome assemblies of the two lampreys, and brain expressed sequence tags of the inshore hagfish, we show that extant jawless vertebrates (cyclostomes) lack the clustered protocadherins. Our findings indicate that the clustered protocadherins originated from a nonclustered protocadherin in the jawed vertebrate ancestor, after the two rounds of whole-genome duplication. In the absence of clustered protocadherins, cyclostomes might have evolved novel molecules or mechanisms for generating neuronal diversity which remains to be discovered. PMID:26545918

  18. Dynamic Bayesian clustering.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Anna; Menon, Vilas; Heard, Nicholas A

    2013-10-01

    Clusters of time series data may change location and memberships over time; in gene expression data, this occurs as groups of genes or samples respond differently to stimuli or experimental conditions at different times. In order to uncover this underlying temporal structure, we consider dynamic clusters with time-dependent parameters which split and merge over time, enabling cluster memberships to change. These interesting time-dependent structures are useful in understanding the development of organisms or complex organs, and could not be identified using traditional clustering methods. In cell cycle data, these time-dependent structure may provide links between genes and stages of the cell cycle, whilst in developmental data sets they may highlight key developmental transitions. PMID:24131050

  19. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI. PMID:26549687

  20. Wild Duck Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On April 7, 2005, the Deep Impact spacecraft's Impactor Target Sensor camera recorded this image of M11, the Wild Duck cluster, a galactic open cluster located 6 thousand light years away. The camera is located on the impactor spacecraft, which will image comet Tempel 1 beginning 22 hours before impact until about 2 seconds before impact. Impact with comet Tempel 1 is planned for July 4, 2005.

  1. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) molecular adsorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Moore, Sonya; Soules, David; Voecks, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    A device has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, for the adsorption of contaminants inside a space instrument during flight. The molecular adsorber was developed for use on the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, and it has been shown to perform at its design specifications in the WFPC-2. The basic principle of the molecular adsorber is a zeolite-coated ceramic honeycomb. The arrangement is efficient for adsorption and also provides the needed rigidity to retain the special zeolite coating during the launch vibrational environment. The adsorber, on other forms, is expected to be useful for all flight instruments sensitive to internal sources of contamination. Typically, some internal contamination is unavoidable. A common design solution is to increase the venting to the exterior. However, for truly sensitive instruments, the external contamination environment is more severe. The molecular adsorber acts as a one-way vent to solve this problem. Continued development is planned for this device.

  2. Effect of adsorbed chlorine and oxygen on shear strength of iron and copper junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Static friction experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature on copper, iron, and steel contacts selectively contaminated with oxygen and chlorine in submonolayer amounts. The concentration of the adsorbates was determined with Auger electron spectroscopy and was measured relative to the saturation concentration of oxygen on iron (concentration 1.0). The coefficient of static friction decreased with increasing adsorbate concentration. It was independent of the metal and the adsorbate. The results compared satisfactorily with an extension of the junction growth theory to heterogeneous interfaces. The reduction in interfacial shear strength was measured by the ratio sub a/sub m where sub a is the shear strength of the interface with an adsorbate concentration of 1.0, and sub m is the strength of the clean metal interface. This ratio was 0.835 + or - 0.012 for all the systems tested.

  3. EVALUATION OF SOLID ADSORBENTS FOR THE COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micrometeorological flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) usually require that large volumes of air be collected (whole air samples) or focused during the sampling process (cryogenic trapping or gas-solid partitioning on adsorbents) in order to achiev...

  4. Performance of a membrane adsorber for trace impurity removal in biotechnology manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Michael; Cormier, Jason; Ferrence, Jennifer; Dowd, Chris; Kiss, Robert; Lutz, Herbert; Carter, Jeffrey

    2005-06-17

    Membrane adsorbers provide an attractive alternative to traditional bead-based chromatography columns used to remove trace impurities in downstream applications. A linearly scalable novel membrane adsorber family designed for the efficient removal of trace impurities from biotherapeutics, are capable of reproducibly achieving greater than 4 log removal of mammalian viruses, 3 log removal of endotoxin and DNA, and greater than 1 log removal of host cell protein. Single use, disposable membrane adsorbers eliminate the need for costly and time consuming column packing and cleaning validation associated with bead-based chromatography systems, and minimize the required number and volume of buffers. A membrane adsorber step reduces process time, floor space, buffer usage, labor cost, and improves manufacturing flexibility. This "process compression" effect is commonly associated with reducing the number of processing steps. The rigid microporous structure of the membrane layers allows for high process flux operation and uniform bed consistency at all processing scales. PMID:16007984

  5. Graphene oxide/chitin nanofibril composite foams as column adsorbents for aqueous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongshi; Liu, Dagang; Zhu, Yi; Li, Zehui; Li, Zhenxuan; Tian, Huafeng; Liu, Haiqing

    2016-06-25

    A novel graphene oxide/chitin nanofibrils (GO-CNF) composite foam as a column adsorbent was prepared for aqueous contaminant disposal. The structures, morphologies and properties of composite foams supported by nanofibrils were characterized. As a special case, the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on GO-CNF was investigated regarding the static adsorption and column adsorption-desorption tests. Results from equilibrium adsorption isotherms indicated that the adsorption behavior was well-fitted to Langmuir model. The composite foams reinforced by CNF were dimensionally stable during the column adsorption process and could be reused after elution. The removal efficiency of MB was still nearly 90% after 3 cycles. Furthermore, other inorganic or organic pollutants adsorbed by composite foams were also explored. Therefore, this novel composite foam with remarkable properties such as dimensional stability, universal adsorbent for cationic pollutants, high adsorption capacity, and ease of regeneration was a desirable adsorbent in the future practical application of water pollutant treatment. PMID:27083813

  6. Prussian blue caged in spongiform adsorbents using diatomite and carbon nanotubes for elimination of cesium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baiyang; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Yu, Hongwen; Abe, Yoshiteru

    2012-05-30

    We developed a spongiform adsorbent that contains Prussian blue, which showed a high capacity for eliminating cesium. An in situ synthesizing approach was used to synthesize Prussian blue inside diatomite cavities. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used to form CNT networks that coated the diatomite to seal in the Prussian blue particles. These ternary (CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue) composites were mixed with polyurethane (PU) prepolymers to produce a quaternary (PU/CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue), spongiform adsorbent with an in situ foaming procedure. Prussian blue was permanently immobilized in the cell walls of the spongiform matrix and preferentially adsorbed cesium with a theoretical capacity of 167 mg/g cesium. Cesium was absorbed primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism, and the absorption was accomplished by self-uptake of radioactive water by the quaternary spongiform adsorbent. PMID:22464752

  7. Individual Detection and Electrochemically Assisted Identification of Adsorbed Nanoparticles by Using Surface Plasmon Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nizamov, Shavkat; Kasian, Olga; Mirsky, Vladimir M

    2016-06-13

    The increasing production and application of nanoparticles necessitates a highly sensitive analytical method for the quantification and identification of these potentially hazardous materials. We describe here an application of surface plasmon microscopy for the individual detection of each adsorbed nanoparticle and for visualization of its electrochemical conversion. Whereas the adsorption rate characterizes the number concentration of nanoparticles, the potential at which the adsorbed nanoparticles disappear during an anodic potential sweep characterizes the type of material. All the adsorbed nanoparticles are subjected to the potential sweep simultaneously; nevertheless, each of the up to a million adsorbed nanoparticles is identified individually by its electrochemical dissolution potential. The technique has been tested with silver and copper nanoparticles, but can be extended to many other electrochemically active nanomaterials. PMID:27139913

  8. Effect of Adsorbed Nitrogen on the Thermionic Emission from Lanthanum Hexaboride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Wood, George P.

    1959-01-01

    The emission properties of lanthanum hexaboride in an atmosphere of nitrogen were investigated. The emitter was not poisoned by adsorbed nitrogen. This result should have application to magnetohydrodynamic devices in which electron flow from channel walls is required.

  9. Evaluation of activated carbon adsorbents for CO{sub 2} capture in gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor C. Drage; James M. Blackman; Cova Pevida; Colin E. Snape

    2009-05-15

    Activated carbon adsorbents have been evaluated at high pressure, up to 4 MPa, to determine their applicability for the removal of CO{sub 2} from syngas generated from gasification. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and diffusion mechanism were demonstrated to be dependent upon the adsorbent outgas conditions. Activated carbons have been demonstrated to have higher adsorption capacities than existing absorption systems up to 12 mmol g{sup -1} at 4 MPa, under strong outgas conditions. Adsorption capacities on a weight basis have been demonstrated to be correlated with the surface area and micropore volume of the materials. However, performance on a volumetric basis is less well-defined and is controlled by the form and bulk density of the adsorbent. Complete cyclic regeneration of the adsorbents has been demonstrated by pressure swing regeneration cycles. 37 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Effects of the Adsorbed Polymer Nanolayers on the Dewetting of Polystyrene Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Justin; Wang, Jiaxun; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya; Koga, Tadanori

    2015-03-01

    It was previously reported that irreversibly adsorbed polymer nanolayers can be produced on solid substrates by thermal annealing. This study sought to determine the impact of the adsorbed nanolayers on film stability of ultrathin polystyrene (PS) films. A series of bilayers composed of the bottom PS adsorbed nanolayers and PS overlayers with different molecular weights were prepared as model systems. The surface structures of the bilayer films annealed above the bulk glass transition temperature were analyzed by using optical and atomic force microscopes. We will discuss the unique roles of the adsorbed polymer chains in the stability of the liquid thin films. T. K. acknowledges the partial financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  11. Microwave assisted thermal treatment of defective coffee beans press cake for the production of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S; Nunes, Anne A; Alves, Cibele C O

    2010-02-01

    Defective coffee press cake, a residue from coffee oil biodiesel production, was evaluated as an adsorbent for removal of basic dyes (methylene blue--MB) from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was prepared by microwave treatment, providing a significant reduction in processing time coupled to an increase in adsorption capacity in comparison to conventional carbonization in a muffle furnace. Batch adsorption tests were performed at 25 degrees C and the effects of particle size, contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial solution pH were investigated. Adsorption kinetics was better described by a second-order model. The experimental adsorption equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin adsorption models, with Langmuir providing the best fit. The results presented in this study show that microwave activation presents great potential as an alternative method in the production of adsorbents. PMID:19767204

  12. Adsorption and Desorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Mixtures on Synthetic Hydrophobic Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Several synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents produced through pyrolysis of polymeric materials are available commercially. Some appear to have advantages over activated carbon for certain adsorption applications. In particular, they can have tailored hydrophobicities that are significantly greater than that of activated carbon, while moderately high surfaces areas are retained. These sorbents are being investigated for possible use in removing trace contaminants and excess carbon dioxide from air in closed habitats, plant growth chambers, and other applications involving purification of humid gas streams. We have analyzed the characteristics of a few of these adsorbents through adsorption and desorption experiments and standard characterization techniques. This paper presents pure and multicomponent adsorption data collected for carbon dioxide and water on two synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents having different hydrophobicities and capillary condensation characteristics. The observations are interpreted through consideration of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the solids and interactions between adsorbed carbon dioxide, water, and the solvent gas.

  13. Removal effects and mechanisms of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Wu, Cuirong; He, Yan; Zhang, Bingru; Li, Fengting

    2010-11-01

    The health of humans and other organisms is threatened by increasingly serious water contamination by algae in all the country's major lakes such as Taihu Lake. This experiment was conducted to investigate the removal effects and mechanism of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified adsorbent, with comparison of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) and poly ferric sulfate (PFS). Microcystic aeruginosa grown in the laboratory was used for this experiment. The results showed that the algae-removal efficiency of Chitosan-modified adsorbent presents a good performance. When the dosage of the adsorbent reached 20 ppm, the turbidity and the chlorophyll a of treated water dropped by 90% and 86%, respectively. Compared to conventional coagulation, the dosage was reduced. The adhesive bridge effect of Chitosan and adsorption of modified adsorbent provided an important complement to subsequent dehydrating treatment for algae.

  14. Size-dependent denaturing kinetics of bovine serum albumin adsorbed onto gold nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichroeb, J. H.; Forrest, J. A.; Jones, L. W.

    2008-08-01

    We have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) to monitor the kinetics of thermal denaturing of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed onto gold nanospheres of size 5nm-100nm. The effect of the protein on the LSPR was monitored by visible extinction spectroscopy. The wavelength of the peak extinction (resonance) is affected by the conformation of the adsorbed protein layer, and as such can be used as a very sensitive probe of thermal denaturing that is specific to the adsorbed (as opposed to free) protein. The time dependence of the denaturing is measured in the temperature range 60 °C - 70 °C , and the lifetimes are used to calculate an activation barrier for thermal denaturing. The results show that thermally activated denaturing of proteins adsorbed onto nanoparticles has a nanoparticle-size-dependent activation barrier, and this barrier increases for decreasing particle size. This may have important implications for other protein-nanoparticle interactions.

  15. Photostability enhancement of azoic dyes adsorbed and intercalated into Mg-Al-layered double hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengfei; Liu, Pei; Zhao, Kongcao; Li, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Two azoic dyes 4-aminoazobenzene-4-sulfonic (AS) and ethyl orange (EO) were adsorbed on or intercalated into Mg-Al-CO3 layered double hydroxide (LDH) for photostability enhancement. Fluorescence analysis results showed that the photostability of two dyes could be greatly improved after being adsorbed on the surface of Mg-Al-CO3-LDH matrix. Furthermore, photostability of adsorbed dyes was superior to that of intercalated dyes. It was suggested that AS or EO was adsorbed on LDHs surface through a strong chemisorption interaction, resulting in the enhancement of photostability. After the UV irradiation under N2 atmosphere, the absorbed dyes not only show great increase of fluorescence intensity but also exhibited high stability against UV irradiation. This work provides a feasible approach to enhance the photostability of azoic dye confined in an inorganic two-dimensional (2D) matrix via changing the microenvironment, which may be considered to be a promising method of improving photostability of solid fluorescent materials.

  16. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T.; Gelperin, Alan; Staii, Cristian

    2011-07-12

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  17. Removal and recycle of phosphate from treated water of sewage plants with zirconium ferrite adsorbent by high gradient magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, D.; Nishimura, K.; Miura, O.

    2009-03-01

    Zirconium ferrite particles are good adsorbent for phosphate ions. Magnetic separation characteristics for removal of phosphate from treated water of sewage plants with the adsorbent have been studied to prevent eutrophication of semi-enclosed bay, e.g. the bay of Tokyo. Based on the adsorption for the phosphate ions and ferromagnetic properties of the zirconium ferrite adsorbent, high gradient magnetic separation characteristics with using superconducting magnet was discussed. Very rapid magnetic filtration velocity, i.e. 1m/s, and regeneration properties of the adsorbent indicate that the zirconium ferrite is the excellent adsorbent for phosphorus removal and recycle from treated water of large scale sewage plants.

  18. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  19. Communication: The cluster vapor to cluster solid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweatman, Martin B.; Lue, Leo

    2016-05-01

    Until now, depletion induced transitions have been the hallmark of multicomponent systems only. Monte Carlo simulations reveal a depletion-induced phase transition from cluster vapor to cluster solid in a one-component fluid with competing short range and long range interactions. This confirms a prediction made by earlier theoretical work. Analysis of renormalized cluster-cluster and cluster-vapor interactions suggests that a cluster liquid is also expected within a very narrow range of model parameters. These insights could help identify the mechanisms of clustering in experiments and assist the design of colloidal structures through engineered self-assembly.

  20. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric solid-air interfaces, such as aerosol and ground level surfaces, thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed-catechol with nitrogen dioxide and, in separate preliminary experiments, ozone. Graphite, kaolinite, and sodium halide (NaF, NaCl, NaBr) powders served as carbonaceous, mineral and sea salt aerosol surrogates, respectively. Broad OH stretching bands for adsorbed catechol shifted to lower wavenumber with peak frequencies following the trend NaBr > NaCl > NaF ≈ kaolinite, consistent with the increasing basicity of the halide anions and basic Brønsted sites on kaolinite. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with NaCl-adsorbed catechol at relative humidity (RH) <2% promoted nitration forming 4-nitrocatechol and oxidation forming 1,2-benzoquinone and the ring cleavage product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4%, respectively. 4-Nitrocatechol was the dominant product for catechol adsorbed on NaF and kaolinite, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced less 4-nitrocatechol and more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. For all three sodium halides, the reactions of NO2 with adsorbed catechol were orders of magnitude faster than between NO2 and each NaX substrate. 4-Nitrocatechol rates and product yields were consistent with the relative ability of each substrate to enhance the deprotonated nature of adsorbed-catechol. Increasing the relative humidity caused the rate of each product channel to decrease and also altered the product branching ratios. Most notably, 1,2-benzoquinone formation decreased significantly even at 13% RH. The dramatic