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Sample records for adsorbed phase nmr

  1. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  2. NMR study of stable radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obynochny, A. A.; Maryasov, A. G.; Shakirov, M. M.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    1993-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the NMR spectrum of methyl-substituted nitroxyl radical of the imidazoline series has been studied. The NMR signal induced by radicals in the gas phase has been observed. A shift of the lines of the NMR spectrum in the gas phase according to the Curie law is observed which allows one to determine the value of the hfi constant of the protons of different racial groups. The hfi constant for methyl-substituted radical within experimental accuracy coincides with those measured by other methods in the liquid phase. In the absorbed phase of the samples under study, a substantial contribution is made by the volumetric susceptibility of the liquid film. The diamagnetic contribution to the magnetic susceptibility of the radical in the liquid state has been measured (in the film of 2 × 10 -6). When the thickness of the adsorbed film is small, the molecular exchange between the liquid and gas phases becomes noticeable, causing a corresponding additional shift of the lines. The gas-kinetic cross section for the radical (120 Å 2) has been estimated from the temperature dependence of the line width in the gas phase.

  3. Quantum Mechanical Calculations to Interpret Vibrational and NMR Spectra of Organic Compounds Adsorbed onto Mineral Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicki, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Vibrational (e.g., ATR FTIR and Raman) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies provide excellent information on the bonding and atomic environment of adsorbed organic compounds. However, interpretation of observed spectra collected for organic compounds adsorbed onto mineral surfaces can be complicated by the lack of comparable analogs of known structure and uncertainties about the mineral surface structure. Quantum mechanical calculations provide a method for testing interpretations of observed spectra because models can be built to mimic predicted structures, and the results are independent of experimental parameters (i.e., no fitting to data is necessary). In this talk, methodologies for modeling vibrational frequencies and NMR chemical shifts of adsorbed organic compounds are discussed. Examples included salicylic acid (as an analog for important binding functional groups in humic acids) adsorbed onto aluminum oxides, organic phosphoryl compounds that represent herbicides and bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and ofloxacin (a common agricultural antibiotic). The combination of the ability of quantum mechanical calculations to predict structures, spectroscopic parameters and energetics of adsorption with experimental data on these same properties allows for more definitive construction of surface complex models.

  4. Tethered or adsorbed supported lipid bilayers in nanotubes characterized by deuterium magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wattraint, Olivier; Warschawski, Dror E; Sarazin, Catherine

    2005-04-12

    2H solid-state NMR experiments were performed under magic angle spinning on lipid bilayers oriented into nanotubes arrays, as a new method to assess the geometrical arrangement of the lipids. Orientational information is obtained from the intensities of the spinning sidebands. The lipid bilayers are formed by fusion of small unilamellar vesicles of DMPC-d54 inside a nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide, either by direct adsorption on the support or by tethering through a streptavidin/biotin linker. The results support that the quality of the lipid bilayers alignment is clearly in favor of the tethering rather than an adsorbed strategy. PMID:15807556

  5. A [sup 13]C NMR study of ethylene adsorbed on reduced and oxygen-covered Ag surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plischke, J.K.; Benesi, A.J.; Vannice, M.A. )

    1992-11-01

    [sup 13]C-enriched ethylene was adsorbed on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag particles dispersed on [eta]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] on O-covered Ag exhibited an upfield shift of [minus]20 ppm relative to gas-phase C[sub 2]H[sub 4], whereas a narrower line and smaller shift of [minus]5 ppm occurred for C[sub 2]H[sub 4] reversibly adsorbed on reduced Ag. In addition to the resonance at 103 ppm for irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4], CP/MAS NMR spectra also gave resonances at 179, 170, 164, 159, and 19 ppm for the O-covered Ag sample. The CP/MAS spectrum for Ag acetate powder clearly identified the 179- and 19-ppm peaks as those associated with the carboxyl and methyl carbons of the acetate anion, and the peaks at 159, 164, and 170 ppm were assigned to oxalate, formate, and carbonate (or possibly acetic anhydride) species, respectively, based on previous studies. When heated to 473 K the adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] disappeared and only acetate and oxalate groups were observed, and continued heating to 573 K removed almost all resonances. No C[sub 2]H[sub 4]O was unambiguously detected, thus with this unpromoted Ag catalyst utilizing a high-surface-area alumina the observable surface species appeared to be those associated with complete combustion, with acetate and oxalate predominating during reaction. These results directly confirm the presence of an Ag acetate species which has been proposed previously to be an intermediate in complete combustion, and the presence of the other three species support earlier tentative assignments based on IR and TPR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts at 61, 28, and 13 ppm were indicative of alkoxy species formed on Bronsted-acid sites on the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] surface. 58 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Elucidation of meso- and microporosity in soil components with 129-Xe NMR spectroscopy of adsorbed xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, Svetlana; Nossov, Andrey; Knicker, Heike; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    Soil meso- and micropores (2-50 nm and <2 nm) are usually studied with the use of common adsorption methods. As a complementary technique, 129-Xe NMR spectroscopy of adsorbed xenon was only recently suggested for the use in soil science. In this present study, we applied both conventional, i.e. thermally polarised (TP), and hyperpolarised (HP) 129-Xe NMR for elucidating pore environments of a series of samples representing porous soil constituents. Aluminium (hydr)oxides, Al2O3 and AlOOH, both pure and subjected to the sorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were chosen as model mineral systems. Charcoals were used for understanding adsorption behaviour of xenon within organic polymeric structures formed by thermally altered bio-macromolecules. Natural soil particle size fractions were obtained from a non-allophanic Andosol and from Arenosol, i.e. soils containing charred residues and also characterised by a high content of Al oxides (case of the Andosol). DOM sorption on the studied Al oxides occurred inhomogeneously as it was inferred from the existence of the "empty" pores and the pores coated with OM. The latter were evidenced by the different Xe adsorption enthalpies estimated from the temperature dependences of the chemical shift. The increased sensitivity of the HP 129-Xe NMR allowed us detecting micropores in the charcoals, where the N2 adsorption method underestimated porosity due to the restricted diffusion of N2 at 77 K. The observed differences between the HP and TP 129-Xe patterns were explained by the slow diffusion of xenon within an interconnected but highly constricted pore system of the charcoals. The estimated width of those constricted pore openings was of the order of one or two diameters of the Xe atom. Similar "bottle neck" effects may also exist in the natural soil particle size fractions, as it was inferred from the increased pore access for Xe adsorption performed at elevated pressures (2-4 bar). The unusually large 129-Xe shifts (up to

  7. Allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent for removing endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-10-01

    In this study we present a simple and robust method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions by using crystals of the small-molecule compound 2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl urea (allantoin) as a solid phase adsorbent. Allantoin crystalline powder is added to a protein solution at supersaturated concentrations, endotoxins bind and undissolved allantoin crystals with bound endotoxins are removed by filtration or centrifugation. This method removes an average of 99.98% endotoxin for 20 test proteins. The average protein recovery is ∼80%. Endotoxin binding is largely independent of pH, conductivity, reducing agent and various organic solvents. This is consistent with a hydrogen-bond based binding mechanism. Allantoin does not affect protein activity and stability, and the use of allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent provides better endotoxin removal than anion exchange, polymixin affinity and biological affinity methods for endotoxin clearance.

  8. Deuterium Magic Angle Spinning NMR Used to Study the Dynamics of Peptides Adsorbed onto Polystyrene and Functionalized Polystyrene Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Nicholas F.; Li, Kun; Olsen, Gregory L.; Drobny, Gary P.

    2011-01-01

    LKα14 is a 14 amino acid peptide with a periodic sequence of leucine and lysine residues consistent with an amphipathic α-helix. This “hydrophobic periodicity” has been found to result in an α-helical secondary structure at air-water interfaces and on both polar and non-polar solid polymer surfaces. In this paper the dynamics of LKα14 peptides, selectively deuterated at a single leucine and adsorbed onto polystyrene and carboxylated polystyrene beads, are studied using 2H Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid state NMR over a 100 degree temperature range. We first demonstrate the sensitivity enhancement possible with 2H MAS techniques, which in turn enables us to obtain high quality 2H NMR spectra for selectively deuterated peptides adsorbed onto solid polymer surfaces. An extensive literature shows that the dynamics of leucine side chains are sensitive to the local structural environment of the protein. Therefore the degree to which the dynamics of leucine side chains and the backbone of the peptide LKα14 are influenced by surface proximity and surface chemistry is studied as a function of temperature with 2H MAS NMR. It is found that the dynamics of the leucine side chains in LKα14 depend strongly upon the orientation of the polymer on the surface, which in turn depends on whether the LKα14 peptide adsorbs onto a polar or non-polar surface. 2H MAS line shapes therefore permit probes of surface orientation over a wide temperature range. PMID:21650191

  9. NMR phase noise in bitter magnets.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, E E; Calder, E S; Thomas, G W; Mitrović, V F; Bachman, H N; Halperin, W P; Kuhns, P L; Reyes, A P

    2001-02-01

    We have studied the temporal instability of a high field resistive Bitter magnet through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This instability leads to transverse spin decoherence in repeated and accumulated NMR experiments as is normally performed during signal averaging. We demonstrate this effect via Hahn echo and Carr--Purcell--Meiboom--Gill (CPMG) transverse relaxation experiments in a 23-T resistive magnet. Quantitative analysis was found to be consistent with separate measurements of the magnetic field frequency fluctuation spectrum, as well as with independent NMR experiments performed in a magnetic field with a controlled instability. Finally, the CPMG sequence with short pulse delays is shown to be successful in recovering the intrinsic spin--spin relaxation even in the presence of magnetic field temporal instability.

  10. Phase Diagram for 3He Films on Boron Nitride: NMR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yibing; Sullivan, Neil

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies of the thermodynamic properties of 3He films on graphite have revealed the existence of a previously undetected self-bound liquid phase at low density coverages. We report the results of NMR relaxation time studies for 3He adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride designed to explore the dynamics of the adsorbed 3He atoms in order to identify the phase boundaries as a function of temperature. A steep thermally activated temperature dependence is observed at high temperatures (T > 2 . 6) K, followed by a linear dependence for 0 . 77 < T < 2 . 6 K. The linear dependence is consistent with that expected for thermal diffusion in the self-bound liquid state. The research was supported in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation, DMR-1303599.

  11. Acid properties of solid acid catalysts characterized by solid-state 31P NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Huang, Shing-Jong; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2011-09-01

    A brief review is presented on acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts by means of solid-state phosphor-31 magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P MAS NMR) spectroscopy using phosphor-containing molecules as probes. It is emphasized that such a simple approach using (31)P MAS NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules, namely trimethylphosphine (TMP) and trialkylphosphine oxides (R(3)PO), represents a unique technique in providing detailed qualitative and quantitative features, viz. type, strength, distribution, and concentration of acid sites in solid acid catalysts. In particular, it will be shown that when applied with a proper choice of probe molecules with varied sizes and results obtained from elemental analysis, the amounts and locations (intracrystalline vs. extracrystalline) of different types (Brønsted vs. Lewis) of acid sites may be determined. In addition, by incorporating the NMR results with that obtained from theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, correlations between the (31)P chemical shifts (δ(31)P) and acidic strengths of Brønsted and Lewis acid sites may also be derived, facilitating a suitable acidity scale for solid acid catalysts.

  12. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  13. Analytical phase diagrams for colloids and non-adsorbing polymer.

    PubMed

    Fleer, Gerard J; Tuinier, Remco

    2008-11-01

    We review the free-volume theory (FVT) of Lekkerkerker et al. [Europhys. Lett. 20 (1992) 559] for the phase behavior of colloids in the presence of non-adsorbing polymer and we extend this theory in several aspects: (i) We take the solvent into account as a separate component and show that the natural thermodynamic parameter for the polymer properties is the insertion work Pi(v), where Pi is the osmotic pressure of the (external) polymer solution and v the volume of a colloid particle. (ii) Curvature effects are included along the lines of Aarts et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matt. 14 (2002) 7551] but we find accurate simple power laws which simplify the mathematical procedure considerably. (iii) We find analytical forms for the first, second, and third derivatives of the grand potential, needed for the calculation of the colloid chemical potential, the pressure, gas-liquid critical points and the critical endpoint (cep), where the (stable) critical line ends and then coincides with the triple point. This cep determines the boundary condition for a stable liquid. We first apply these modifications to the so-called colloid limit, where the size ratio q(R)=R/a between the radius of gyration R of the polymer and the particle radius a is small. In this limit the binodal polymer concentrations are below overlap: the depletion thickness delta is nearly equal to R, and Pi can be approximated by the ideal (van't Hoff) law Pi=Pi(0)=phi/N, where phi is the polymer volume fraction and N the number of segments per chain. The results are close to those of the original Lekkerkerker theory. However, our analysis enables very simple analytical expressions for the polymer and colloid concentrations in the critical and triple points and along the binodals as a function of q(R). Also the position of the cep is found analytically. In order to make the model applicable to higher size ratio's q(R) (including the so-called protein limit where q(R)>1) further extensions are needed. We

  14. NMR study of ferroelastic phase transition of tetramethylammonium tetrabromocobaltate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Sun Ha

    2016-09-01

    Static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were carried out on 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in order to understand the structural changes of the N(CH3)4 groups in [N(CH3)4]2CoBr4 near the ferroelastic phase transition temperature TC. The two chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 groups were distinguished using 13C cross-polarization/(CP)MAS and 14N static NMR. The changes in chemical shifts, line intensities, and the spin-lattice relaxation time near TC can be correlated with the changing structural geometry, which underlies the phase transition. The 14N NMR spectra indicated a crystal symmetry change at TC, which is related to the ferroelastic domain with different orientations of the N(CH3)4 groups. The ferroelastic domain walls were confirmed by optical polarizing microscopy, and the wall orientations were described by the Sapriel theory. The transition to the ferroelastic phase was found to be related to the orientational ordering of the N(CH3)4 groups.

  15. NMR Studies of the Dynamics of HD Adsorbed on MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Chao; Hamida, Jaha; Sullivan, Neil

    We report the results of measurements of the nuclear spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times of a monolayer of HD molecules adsorbed on MCM-41 for temperatures 1 . 5 < T < 20 K. Two distinct characteristic relaxation times are observed. A slow diffusion process for 5 < T < 8 . 8 K and a faster rate with a distinctly different activation energy for 8 . 9 < T < 12 K. The behavior is fluid-like above 12 K. We discuss the results in terms of an expected cluster formation at low temperatures followed by the diffusion of single molecules at high temperatures. Work suported by the National Science Foundation - DMR-1303599 and DMR-1157490 (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory).

  16. Adsorbed solution model for prediction of normal-phase chromatography process with varying composition of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Wojciech; Petrushka, Igor; Antos, Dorota

    2005-10-21

    The adsorbed solution model has been used to predict competitive adsorption equilibria of the solute and the active component of mobile phase in a normal-phase liquid chromatography system. The inputs to the calculations were the single adsorption isotherms accounting for energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent surface and non-ideality of the mobile phase solution. The competitive adsorption model has been coupled with a model of the column dynamics and used for simulating of chromatography process at different mobile phase composition. The predictions have been verified by comparing the simulated and experimental chromatograms. The model allowed quantitative prediction of chromatography process on the basis of the pure-species adsorption isotherms.

  17. Two Phase Flow Measurements by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, Stephen A; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2006-08-14

    In concentrated suspensions, there is a tendency for the solid phase to migrate from regions of high shear rate to regions of low shear (Leighton & Acrivos, 1987). In the early years that our effort was funded by the DOE Division of Basic Energy Science, quantitative measurement of this process in neutrally buoyant suspensions was a major focus (Abbott, et al., 1991; Altobelli, et al., 1991). Much of this work was used to improve multi-phase numerical models at Sandia National Laboratories. Later, our collaborators at Sandia and the University of New Mexico incorporated body forces into their numerical models of suspension flow (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al., 2002). We developed experiments that allow us to study flows driven by buoyancy, to characterize these flows in well-known and useful engineering terms (Altobelli and Mondy, 2002) and to begin to explore the less well-understood area of flows with multiple solid phases (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003). We also studied flows that combine the effects of shear and buoyancy, and flows of suspensions made from non-Newtonian liquids (Rao, Mondy, Baer, et al, 2002). We were able to demonstrate the usefulness of proton NMR imaging of liquid phase concentration and velocity and produced quantitative data not obtainable by other methods. Fluids flowing through porous solids are important in geophysics and in chemical processing. NMR techniques have been widely used to study liquid flow in porous media. We pioneered the extension of these studies to gas flows (Koptyug, et al, 2000, 2000, 2001, 2002). This extension allows us to investigate a wider range of Peclet numbers, and to gather data on problems of interest in catalysis. We devised two kinds of NMR experiments for three-phase systems. Both experiments employ two NMR visible phases and one phase that gives no NMR signal. The earlier method depends on the two visible phases differing in a NMR relaxation property. The second method (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003) uses two

  18. Gas-phase NMR studies of alcohols. Intrinsic acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; True, Nancy S.

    1985-05-01

    Gas-phase (≈100 Torr) 1H NMR spectra of eighteen simple aliphatic and unsaturated alcohols, four fluorinated alcohols, and two thiols were obtained at 148.6°C where hydrogen bonding has little effect on chemical shifts. For the methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, t-butanol, i- butanol, neopentanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and benzyl alcohol, the observed hydroxylic proton chemical shifts correlate with previously obtained relative gas-phase acidities from thermochemical analysis which employed equilibrium constants of proton transfer reactions measured via mass spectroscopic and ion cyclotron resonance techniques. The correlational dependence is 10.3(0.5) kcal/mol ppm with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. These results demonstrate that the trend of increasing acidity with increasing size of the alkyl substituent is also reflected in the neutral forms of the alcohols, indicating that the polarizability of the ionic forms is not the only determining factor in relative gas-phase acidities of alcohols. Although factors affecting the hydroxylic proton chemical shifts of the larger substituted and unsaturated alcohols are more complex, their observed 1H NMR spectra also reflect this trend. For methanol and ethanol observed gas-phase 1H chemical shifts are also compared with recent theoritical calculations. 3JHH coupling constants across CO bonds are ≈ 5.5 Hz, significantly smaller than typical 3JHH coupling across sp 3 hybrid C C bonds.

  19. Characterization of a Mixture of CO2 Adsorption Products in Hyperbranched Aminosilica Adsorbents by (13)C Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Mehta, Anil K; Conradi, Mark S; Jones, Christopher W; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-11-17

    Hyperbranched amine polymers (HAS) grown from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 (hereafter "SBA-15-HAS") exhibit large capacities for CO2 adsorption. We have used static in situ and magic-angle spinning (MAS) ex situ (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the adsorption of CO2 by SBA-15-HAS. (13)C NMR distinguishes the signal of gas-phase (13)CO2 from that of the chemisorbed species. HAS polymers possess primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, leading to multiple chemisorption reaction outcomes, including carbamate (RnNCOO(-)), carbamic acid (RnNCOOH), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) moieties. Carbamates and bicarbonate fall within a small (13)C chemical shift range (162-166 ppm), and a mixture was observed including carbamic acid and carbamate, the former disappearing upon evacuation of the sample. By examining the (13)C-(14)N dipolar coupling through low-field (B0 = 3 T) (13)C{(1)H} cross-polarization MAS NMR, carbamate is confirmed through splitting of the (13)C resonance. A third species that is either bicarbonate or a second carbamate is evident from bimodal T2 decay times of the ∼163 ppm peak, indicating the presence of two species comprising that single resonance. The mixture of products suggests that (1) the presence of amines and water leads to bicarbonate being present and/or (2) the multiple types of amine sites in HAS permit formation of chemically distinct carbamates.

  20. Extraction of quadrature phase information from multiple pulse NMR signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Burum, D. P.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A multiple pulse sequence (8-pulse sequence) used for high-resolution solid state NMR is analyzed with regard to the information available from each of the four wide sampling windows. It is demonstrated that full quadrature phase information can be obtained using only a single phase detector and that, for the commonly encountered situation where the spectral width is much less than the folding frequency, the signals from the various windows can be combined easily using standard complex Fourier transform software. An improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio equal to the square root of 3 is obtained over either standard single or quadrature phase detection schemes. Procedures for correcting spectral distortions are presented.

  1. Communication: Phase incremented echo train acquisition in NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltisberger, Jay H.; Walder, Brennan J.; Keeler, Eric G.; Kaseman, Derrick C.; Sanders, Kevin J.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2012-06-01

    We present an improved and general approach for implementing echo train acquisition (ETA) in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, particularly where the conventional approach of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) acquisition would produce numerous artifacts. Generally, adding ETA to any N-dimensional experiment creates an N + 1 dimensional experiment, with an additional dimension associated with the echo count, n, or an evolution time that is an integer multiple of the spacing between echo maxima. Here we present a modified approach, called phase incremented echo train acquisition (PIETA), where the phase of the mixing pulse and every other refocusing pulse, ϕP, is incremented as a single variable, creating an additional phase dimension in what becomes an N + 2 dimensional experiment. A Fourier transform with respect to the PIETA phase, ϕP, converts the ϕP dimension into a Δp dimension where desired signals can be easily separated from undesired coherence transfer pathway signals, thereby avoiding cumbersome or intractable phase cycling schemes where the receiver phase must follow a master equation. This simple modification eliminates numerous artifacts present in NMR experiments employing CPMG acquisition and allows "single-scan" measurements of transverse relaxation and J-couplings. Additionally, unlike CPMG, we show how PIETA can be appended to experiments with phase modulated signals after the mixing pulse.

  2. Incommensurate phase of Te adsorbed on (001) GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibert, J.; Saminadayar, K.; Tatarenko, S.; Gobil, Y.

    1989-06-01

    Occurrence of commensurate and incommensurate phases is reported for adsorption of Te on Ga-rich (001) GaAs surfaces. The Te coverage is measured directly through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the incommensurate phase is studied in detail as a function of Te coverage; two regimes are demonstrated, one at low coverage where Te is mainly bound to Ga, and another one at high coverage where Te mainly bound to As is also present.

  3. Mechanism of formation of humus coatings on mineral surfaces 3. Composition of adsorbed organic acids from compost leachate on alumina by solid-state 13C NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Llaguno, E.C.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of compost leachate DOC on alumina is used as a model for elucidation of the mechanism of formation of natural organic coatings on hydrous metal oxide surfaces in soils and sediments. Compost leachate DOC is composed mainly of organic acid molecules. The solid-state 13C NMR spectra of these organic acids indicate that they are very similar in composition to aquatic humic substances. Changes in the solid-state 13C NMR spectra of compost leachate DOC fractions adsorbed on alumina indicate that the DOC molecules are most likely adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces through a combination of polar and hydrophobic interaction mechanisms. This combination of polar and hydrophobic mechanism leads to the formation of bilayer coatings of the leachate molecules on the oxide surfaces.

  4. NMR of molecules partially oriented in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijl, Peter C. M.; MacLean, C.; Skoglund, Cynthia; Bothner-By, Aksel A.

    The vapor phase 2H NMR spectra of monodeuterobenzene and pentadeuterofluorobenzene were recorded at 14.1 T. Reduction of the collision time, and thus of the linewidth, was accomplished by compressing the gas to 10.8 atm with ethane. The molecules are aligned by the field of the spectrometer and, as a consequence, quadrupolar couplings are recorded. Differences from the liquid-phase spectra arise in some of the quadrupolar splittings as well as in the scalar D-F couplings. It is rationalized that the deviating quadrupolar interaction cannot be caused by interactions resulting from incomplete quenching of the rotation, but originates from environmental effects on the quadrupolar coupling in the liquid. The results agree with recent microwave experiments.

  5. Interlocking order parameter fluctuations in structural transitions between adsorbed polymer phases.

    PubMed

    Martins, Paulo H L; Bachmann, Michael

    2016-01-21

    By means of contact-density chain-growth simulations of a simple coarse-grained lattice model for a polymer grafted at a solid homogeneous substrate, we investigate the complementary behavior of the numbers of surface-monomer and monomer-monomer contacts under various solvent and thermal conditions. This pair of contact numbers represents an appropriate set of order parameters that enables the distinct discrimination of significantly different compact phases of polymer adsorption. Depending on the transition scenario, these order parameters can interlock in perfect cooperation. The analysis helps understand the transitions from compact filmlike adsorbed polymer conformations into layered morphologies and dissolved adsorbed structures, respectively, in more detail.

  6. Molecular recognition using nanotube-adsorbed polymer phases: nanotube antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P.; Barone, Paul W.; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W.; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Heller, Daniel A.; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Hilmer, Andrew J.; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C.; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A.; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Sen, Fatih; Sen, Selda; Croy, Robert G.; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Essigmann, John M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is central to the design of therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensors. Motifs for doing so most commonly involve biological structures such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to such biological recognition consists of a folded and constrained heteropolymer that, via intra-molecular forces, forms a unique three dimensional structure that creates a binding pocket or an interface able to recognize a specific molecule. In this work, we demonstrate that synthetic heteropolymers can be alternatively constrained by adsorption around a nanoparticle, and specifically a single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), forming a corona phase and resulting in a new form of molecular recognition of specific molecules. The phenomenon is shown to be generic, with new heteropolymer recognition complexes demonstrated for three distinct examples: Riboflavin, l-thyroxine, and estradiol, each predicted using a 2D thermodynamic model of surface interactions. The dissociation constants are continuously tunable by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatial-temporal sensors based on modulation of SWNT photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages. PMID:24270641

  7. NMR Studies on the Aqueous Phase Photochemical Degradation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2008-04-06

    Aqueous phase photochemical degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is an important pathway in several environments, including washout lagoon soils, impact craters from partially detonated munitions that fill with rain or groundwater, and shallow marine environments containing unexploded munitions that have corroded. Knowledge of the degradation products is necessary for compliance issues on military firing ranges and formerly used defense sites. Previous laboratory studies have indicated that UV irradiation of aqueous TNT solutions results in a multicomponent product mixture, including polymerization compounds, that has been only partially resolved by mass spectrometric analyses. This study illustrates how a combination of solid and liquid state 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopy, including two dimensional analyses, provides complementary information on the total product mixture from aqueous photolysis of TNT, and the effect of reaction conditions. Among the degradation products detected were amine, amide, azoxy, azo, and carboxylic acid compounds.

  8. Ordered phases of ethylene adsorbed on charged fullerenes and their aggregates☆

    PubMed Central

    Zöttl, Samuel; Kaiser, Alexander; Daxner, Matthias; Goulart, Marcelo; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael; Hagelberg, Frank; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-01-01

    In spite of extensive investigations of ethylene adsorbed on graphite, bundles of nanotubes, and crystals of fullerenes, little is known about the existence of commensurate phases; they have escaped detection in almost all previous work. Here we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of ethylene adsorbed on free C60 and its aggregates. The ion yield of (C60)m(C2H4)n+ measured by mass spectrometry reveals a propensity to form a structurally ordered phase on monomers, dimers and trimers of C60 in which all sterically accessible hollow sites over carbon rings are occupied. Presumably the enhancement of the corrugation by the curvature of the fullerene surface favors this phase which is akin to a hypothetical 1 × 1 phase on graphite. Experimental data also reveal the number of molecules in groove sites of the C60 dimer through tetramer. The identity of the sites, adsorption energies and orientations of the adsorbed molecules are determined by molecular dynamics calculations based on quantum chemical potentials, as well as density functional theory. The decrease in orientational order with increasing temperature is also explored in the simulations whereas in the experiment it is impossible to vary the temperature. PMID:25843960

  9. On the interplay between chemical reactions and phase transitions for molecules adsorbed on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, M.; Metiu, H.

    1986-02-01

    There is a large body of experimental evidence suggesting that the rate of product formation in a reaction between adsorbed molecules is deeply modified when one of the reagents undergoes a phase transition or, more broadly speaking, an aggregation of some kind. Specific examples are: H2 and CO oxidation; methanol transformation into a methoxy radical on O/Cu; the water reaction with oxygen to form 2OH; the decomposition of N2O on Pt(111) which is affected by a phase transition in the outermost Pt layer; and the oxidation of Ni7. It is suspected that similar effects might operate on supported metal catalysts. We use Monte Carlo simulations to examine the manner in which reagent aggregation affects the reaction rate between molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. We discuss the temperature and concentration dependence of the rate of product formation.

  10. Inorganic-organic phase arrangement as a factor affecting gas-phase desulfurization on catalytic carbonaceous adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Adil; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2005-08-15

    Dried sewage sludge was physically mixed with waste paper (paper-to-sludge ratios from 25% to 75%). To increase the catalytic activity, from 1% to 6% calcium hydroxide was added to the mixtures. Then the precursors were carbonized at 950 degrees C. The performance of materials as H2S adsorbents was tested using a home-developed dynamic breakthrough test. The samples, before and after the adsorption process, were characterized by adsorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, thermal analysis, XRF, and SEM. Differences in the performance were linked to the surface properties. Itwas found that mixing paper with sludge increases the amount of H2S adsorbed/oxidized in comparison with that adsorbed/oxidized by the adsorbents obtained from pure precursors (sludge or waste paper) and the capacity is comparable to those of the best activated carbons existing on the market. Although both sewage sludge and waste paper provide the catalytic centers for hydrogen sulfide oxidation, the dispersion of the catalyst and its location within accessible pores is an important factor. The presence of cellulose in the precursor mixture leads to the formation of a light macroporous char whose particles physically separate the inorganic catalytic phase of the sewage sludge origin, decreasing the density of the adsorbent and thus providing more space for storage of oxidation products. This, along with calcium, contributes to a significant increase in the capacity of the materials as hydrogen sulfide adsorbents. On their surface about 30 wt % H2S can be adsorbed, mainly as elemental sulfur or sulfates. The results demonstrate the importance of the composition and arrangement of inorganic/ organic phases for the removal of hydrogen sulfide. The interesting finding is that although some microporosity is necessary to increase the storage area for oxidation products, the carbonaceous phase does not need to be highly microporous. It is important that it provides space for deposition of sulfur

  11. Phase transition and winding properties of a flexible polymer adsorbed to a rigid perioidic copolymer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Schubert, David; Chu, Min; Heermann, Dieter W

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by the noncovalent binding of polypeptides to DNA, the adsorption of a flexible polymer to a rigid periodic copolymer is studied in two dimensions and three dimensions. The fraction of adsorbed monomers, the specific heat, and the Binder cumulant are analyzed and compared with analytical results for an ideal chain. As the interaction strength ε increases, a second-order phase transition occurs from a nonadsorbed state to an adsorbed state, in two dimensions, and a higher-order transition occurs in three dimensions. The transition point is estimated as ε0∼2.2 for d=2 and ε0∼2.1 for d=3, where ε is given in units of kBT. The dependence of the number of adsorbed monomers Nads on the chain length L of the flexible polymer shows a power law scaling relation Nads∼Lϕ, with ϕ∼0.46,0.42 for d=2,3, respectively. We also find an optimal ε∼2.8 for the winding of the flexible polymer around the rigid one in three dimensions. Compared to the adsorbed monomers, the successive nonadsorbed monomers contribute more to the winding. When the interaction is strong, ε>3.5, the winding value or the number of winding turns of the flexible polymer becomes linearly dependent on the chain length. PMID:25871135

  12. Ionic liquid coated carbon nanospheres as a new adsorbent for fast solid phase extraction of trace copper and lead from sea water, wastewater, street dust and spice samples.

    PubMed

    Tokalıoğlu, Şerife; Yavuz, Emre; Şahan, Halil; Çolak, Süleyman Gökhan; Ocakoğlu, Kasım; Kaçer, Mehmet; Patat, Şaban

    2016-10-01

    In this study a new adsorbent, ionic liquid (1,8-naphthalene monoimide bearing imidazolium salt) coated carbon nanospheres, was synthesized for the first time and it was used for the solid phase extraction of copper and lead from various samples prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The ionic liquid, carbon nanospheres and ionic liquid coated carbon nanospheres were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller surface area and zeta potential measurements. Various parameters for method optimization such as pH, adsorption and elution contact times, eluent volume, type and concentration, centrifuge time, sample volume, adsorption capacity and possible interfering ion effects were tested. The optimum pH was 6. The preconcentration factor, detection limits, adsorption capacity and precision (as RSD%) of the method were found to be 300-fold, 0.30µgL(-1), 60mgg(-1) and 1.1% for copper and 300-fold, 1.76µgL(-1); 50.3mgg(-1) and 2.2%, for lead, respectively. The effect of contact time results showed that copper and lead were adsorbed and desorbed from the adsorbent without vortexing. The equilibrium between analyte and adsorbent is reached very quickly. The method was rather selective for matrix ions in high concentrations. The accuracy of the developed method was confirmed by analyzing certified reference materials (LGC6016 Estuarine Water, Reference Material 8704 Buffalo River Sediment, and BCR-482 Lichen) and by spiking sea water, wastewater, street dust and spice samples. PMID:27474302

  13. Ionic liquid coated carbon nanospheres as a new adsorbent for fast solid phase extraction of trace copper and lead from sea water, wastewater, street dust and spice samples.

    PubMed

    Tokalıoğlu, Şerife; Yavuz, Emre; Şahan, Halil; Çolak, Süleyman Gökhan; Ocakoğlu, Kasım; Kaçer, Mehmet; Patat, Şaban

    2016-10-01

    In this study a new adsorbent, ionic liquid (1,8-naphthalene monoimide bearing imidazolium salt) coated carbon nanospheres, was synthesized for the first time and it was used for the solid phase extraction of copper and lead from various samples prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The ionic liquid, carbon nanospheres and ionic liquid coated carbon nanospheres were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller surface area and zeta potential measurements. Various parameters for method optimization such as pH, adsorption and elution contact times, eluent volume, type and concentration, centrifuge time, sample volume, adsorption capacity and possible interfering ion effects were tested. The optimum pH was 6. The preconcentration factor, detection limits, adsorption capacity and precision (as RSD%) of the method were found to be 300-fold, 0.30µgL(-1), 60mgg(-1) and 1.1% for copper and 300-fold, 1.76µgL(-1); 50.3mgg(-1) and 2.2%, for lead, respectively. The effect of contact time results showed that copper and lead were adsorbed and desorbed from the adsorbent without vortexing. The equilibrium between analyte and adsorbent is reached very quickly. The method was rather selective for matrix ions in high concentrations. The accuracy of the developed method was confirmed by analyzing certified reference materials (LGC6016 Estuarine Water, Reference Material 8704 Buffalo River Sediment, and BCR-482 Lichen) and by spiking sea water, wastewater, street dust and spice samples.

  14. Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-08-19

    To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.

  15. Aging assessment of nuclear air-treatment system HEPA filters and adsorbers. Volume 1, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winegardner, W.K.

    1993-08-01

    A Phase I aging assessment of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units (adsorbers) was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Information concerning design features; failure experience; aging mechanisms, effects, and stressors; and surveillance and monitoring methods for these key air-treatment system components was compiled. Over 1100 failures, or 12 percent of the filter installations, were reported as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) survey. Investigators from other national laboratories have suggested that aging effects could have contributed to over 80 percent of these failures. Tensile strength tests on aged filter media specimens indicated a decrease in strength. Filter aging mechanisms range from those associated with particle loading to reactions that alter properties of sealants and gaskets. Low radioiodine decontamination factors associated with the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident were attributed to the premature aging of the carbon in the adsorbers. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance include oxidation as well as the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the adsorption of pollutants. Stressors include heat, moisture, radiation, and airborne particles and contaminants.

  16. A study of phenylalanine side-chain dynamics in surface-adsorbed peptides using solid-state deuterium NMR and rotamer library statistics.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Emani, Prashant S; Ash, Jason; Groves, Michael; Drobny, Gary P

    2014-08-13

    Extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed onto mineral surfaces exist in a unique environment where the structure and dynamics of the protein can be altered profoundly. To further elucidate how the mineral surface impacts molecular properties, we perform a comparative study of the dynamics of nonpolar side chains within the mineral-recognition domain of the biomineralization protein salivary statherin adsorbed onto its native hydroxyapatite (HAP) mineral surface versus the dynamics displayed by the native protein in the hydrated solid state. Specifically, the dynamics of phenylalanine side chains (viz., F7 and F14) located in the surface-adsorbed 15-amino acid HAP-recognition fragment (SN15: DpSpSEEKFLRRIGRFG) are studied using deuterium magic angle spinning ((2)H MAS) line shape and spin-lattice relaxation measurements. (2)H NMR MAS spectra and T1 relaxation times obtained from the deuterated phenylalanine side chains in free and HAP-adsorbed SN15 are fitted to models where the side chains are assumed to exchange between rotameric states and where the exchange rates and a priori rotameric state populations are varied iteratively. In condensed proteins, phenylalanine side-chain dynamics are dominated by 180° flips of the phenyl ring, i.e., the "π flip". However, for both F7 and F14, the number of exchanging side-chain rotameric states increases in the HAP-bound complex relative to the unbound solid sample, indicating that increased dynamic freedom accompanies introduction of the protein into the biofilm state. The observed rotameric exchange dynamics in the HAP-bound complex are on the order of 5-6 × 10(6) s(-1), as determined from the deuterium MAS line shapes. The dynamics in the HAP-bound complex are also shown to have some solution-like behavioral characteristics, with some interesting deviations from rotameric library statistics.

  17. Low-density phases of 3He monolayers adsorbed on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Michele; Vitali, Ettore; Galli, Davide Emilio; Boninsegni, Massimo; Moroni, Saverio

    2016-03-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo simulations at zero temperature of a 3He monolayer adsorbed on graphite, either clean or preplated with 4He, unexpectedly point to a gas-liquid phase transition at a very low areal density of the order of 0.01 Å-2 . This result stems from an essentially unbiased calculation of the ground-state energy for an infinite, defect-free substrate, which interacts with He atoms via a realistic potential, whereas the interaction between two He atoms includes two- and three-body terms. The sensitivity of the gas-liquid coexistence region on the model Hamiltonian employed is discussed.

  18. Phase-field modeling of epitaxial growth in stochastic systems with interacting adsorbate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Kharchenko, Vasyl O.; Lysenko, Irina O.

    2011-04-01

    We study the epitaxial growth of pyramidal patterns in stochastic systems with interacting adsorbate within the framework of the phase-field approach based on the Burton-Cabrera-Frank model. Considering the statistical criteria of pattern formation, it is shown that the system dynamics is governed by the interaction strength of adatoms and the noise intensity of the total flux fluctuations. We have shown that the noise action can crucially change the processes of pyramidal pattern formation. The scaling behavior of the height-height correlation function is discussed.

  19. Spectrofluorimetric determination of glutathione in human plasma by solid-phase extraction using graphene as adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Jing, Qiang-Shan; Wei, Cai-Yun; Wu, Ying-Ying

    2011-09-01

    An efficient solid phase extraction-spectrofluorimetric method using graphene as adsorbent was developed to sensitively determine glutathione (GSH) in biological samples. Fluorescent probe N-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-yl)methyl)iodoacetamide (BODIPY Fl-C 1-IA) was applied for the derivatization of GSH. The procedure was based on BODIPY Fl-C 1-IA selective reaction with GSH to form highly fluorescent product BODIPY Fl-C 1-IA-GSH, its extraction to the graphene-packed SPE cartridge and spectrofluorimetric determination. Some factors affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the type of the eluent and its volume, sample pH, extraction time, and sample volume were optimized. Comparative studies were also performed between graphene and other adsorbents including C 18 silica, graphitic carbon, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the extraction of analyte. The calibration graph using the pretreatment system for GSH was linear over the range of 0.5-200 nM. The limit of detection was 0.01 nM (signal-to-noise ratio = 3). Relative standard deviation for six replicate determinations of GSH at 80 nM concentration level was lower than 5.0%. The developed method was applied to the determination of GSH in human plasma with recoveries of 92-108%. This work revealed the great potentials of graphene as an excellent sorbent material in the analysis of biological samples.

  20. Spectrofluorimetric determination of glutathione in human plasma by solid-phase extraction using graphene as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Jing, Qiang-Shan; Wei, Cai-Yun; Wu, Ying-Ying

    2011-09-01

    An efficient solid phase extraction-spectrofluorimetric method using graphene as adsorbent was developed to sensitively determine glutathione (GSH) in biological samples. Fluorescent probe N-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-yl)methyl)iodoacetamide (BODIPY Fl-C1-IA) was applied for the derivatization of GSH. The procedure was based on BODIPY Fl-C1-IA selective reaction with GSH to form highly fluorescent product BODIPY Fl-C1-IA-GSH, its extraction to the graphene-packed SPE cartridge and spectrofluorimetric determination. Some factors affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the type of the eluent and its volume, sample pH, extraction time, and sample volume were optimized. Comparative studies were also performed between graphene and other adsorbents including C18 silica, graphitic carbon, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the extraction of analyte. The calibration graph using the pretreatment system for GSH was linear over the range of 0.5-200 nM. The limit of detection was 0.01 nM (signal-to-noise ratio=3). Relative standard deviation for six replicate determinations of GSH at 80 nM concentration level was lower than 5.0%. The developed method was applied to the determination of GSH in human plasma with recoveries of 92-108%. This work revealed the great potentials of graphene as an excellent sorbent material in the analysis of biological samples.

  1. Measurement of the lateral diffusion of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine adsorbed on silica beads in the absence and presence of melittin: a 31P two-dimensional exchange solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, F; Paquet, M J; Dufourc, E J; Auger, M

    1998-01-01

    31P two-dimensional exchange solid-state NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the lateral diffusion, D(L), in the fluid phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the presence and absence of melittin. The use of a spherical solid support with a radius of 320 +/- 20 nm, on which lipids and peptides are adsorbed together, and a novel way of analyzing the two-dimensional exchange patterns afforded a narrow distribution of D(L) centered at a value of (8.8 +/- 0.5) x 10(-8) cm2/s for the pure lipid system and a large distribution of D(L) spanning 1 x 10(-8) to 10 x 10(-8) cm2/s for the lipids in the presence of melittin. In addition, the determination of D(L) for nonsupported DPPC multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) suggests that the support does not slow down the lipid diffusion and that the radii of the bilayers vary from 300 to 800 nm. Finally, the DPPC-melittin complex is stabilized at the surface of the silica beads in the gel phase, opening the way to further study of the interaction between melittin and DPPC. PMID:9533697

  2. An NMR study of the coexistence of nematic and "induced" smectic phases in mixtures of nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, P.; Wasser, H. R.; Gowda, G. A. Nagana; Suryaprakash, N.; Khetrapal, C. L.

    1989-07-01

    Deuteron NMR studies of mixtures of nematic liquid crystals such as N-( p-ethoxybenzylidene)- p-n-butylaniline and trans-4-pentyl-4-(4-cyanophenyl)cyclohexane and the molecules dissolved therein show the coexistence of up to three different spectra at certain concentrations and temperatures. This is attributed to the coexistence of nematic and "induced" smectic phases.

  3. Solid-State NMR Identification and Quantification of Newly Formed Aluminosilicate Phases in Weathered Kaolinite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crosson, Garry S.; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary K.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3 -, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH ~13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10-3, 10-4, and 10-5 molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10-5 m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10-3 m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and the quantitative

  4. NMR Studies of Texture in the B-like Phase of 3He in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, V. V.; Zavjalov, V. V.; Zmeev, D. E.; Mulders, N.

    2006-09-07

    Continuous wave NMR experiments have been performed in the B-like phase of 3He in a 98% open aerogel. The results allow us to get information about the texture of the 3He order parameter inside the aerogel. We conclude that in the B-like phase the boundary between the bulk 3He and the aerogel orients the vector of orbital anisotropy (L) parallel to it. Two stable textures and textural transition between them were observed in our sample.

  5. Remote detection NMR imaging of gas phase hydrogenation in microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Leppäniemi, Jarmo; Scotti, Gianmario; Franssila, Sami; Koptyug, Igor V

    2013-04-21

    The heterogeneous hydrogenation reaction of propene into propane in microreactors is studied by remote detection (RD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The reactors consist of 36 parallel microchannels (50 × 50 μm(2) cross sections) coated with a platinum catalyst. We show that RD NMR is capable of monitoring reactions with sub-millimeter spatial resolution over a field-of-view of 30 × 8 mm(2) with a steady-state time-of-flight time resolution in the tens of milliseconds range. The method enables the visualization of active zones in the reactors, and time-of-flight is used to image the flow velocity variations inside the reactor. The overall reaction yields determined by NMR varied from 10% to 50%, depending on the flow rate, temperature and length of the reaction channels. The reaction yield was highest for the channels with the lowest flow velocity. Propane T1 relaxation time in the channels, estimated by means of RD NMR images, was 270 ± 18 ms. No parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) was observed in experiments carried out using parahydrogen-enriched H2, indicating fast spreading of the hydrogen atoms on the sputtered Pt surface. In spite of the low concentration of gases, RD NMR made imaging of gas phase hydrogenation of propene in microreactors feasible, and it is a highly versatile method for characterizing on-chip chemical reactions.

  6. Behavior of adsorbed and fluid phases versus retention properties of amino acids on the teicoplanin chiral selector.

    PubMed

    Poplewska, Izabela; Kramarz, Renata; Piatkowski, Wojciech; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Antos, Dorota

    2008-05-23

    The relationship between adsorption equilibria of two amino acids, i.e., l,d-threonine and l,d-methionine on the teicoplanin chiral selector and their phase behavior has been analyzed. The experimental and numerical methods have been proposed to determine activity coefficients of amino acids in different solvent systems. The procedure was based on the analysis of solubility properties of the amino acids in aqueous solutions of methanol, ethanol and propanol-2-ol used as the mobile phases in chromatographic elution. The solubility measured in mixed alcohol-water solutions was correlated with the non-random-two-liquid (NRTL) model for the activity coefficients. The values of activity coefficients were incorporated into the adsorption isotherm equation, which allowed the analysis of retention properties of the amino acids versus their fluid phase behavior. For the investigation the experimental data of adsorption equilibria of amino acids as well as of the mobile phase constituents acquired in a previous work were exploited. The composition of both the mobile and the adsorbed phases was found to affect the retention properties of the amino acids. For water-rich mobile phases the activity in the adsorbed phase determined the retention mechanism, while for the alcohol-rich systems activity in the mobile phase was predominant.

  7. (129) Xe and (131) Xe nuclear magnetic dipole moments from gas phase NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2015-04-01

    (3) He, (129) Xe and (131) Xe NMR measurements of resonance frequencies in the magnetic field B0=11.7586 T in different gas phase mixtures have been reported. Precise radiofrequency values were extrapolated to the zero gas pressure limit. These results combined with new quantum chemical values of helium and xenon nuclear magnetic shielding constants were used to determine new accurate nuclear magnetic moments of (129) Xe and (131) Xe in terms of that of the (3) He nucleus. They are as follows: μ((129) Xe) = -0.7779607(158)μN and μ((131) Xe) = +0.6918451(70)μN . By this means, the new 'helium method' for estimations of nuclear dipole moments was successfully tested. Gas phase NMR spectra demonstrate the weak intermolecular interactions observed on the (3) He and (129) Xe and (131) Xe shielding in the gaseous mixtures with Xe, CO2 and SF6 .

  8. NMR detection of an equilibrium phase consisting of monomers and clusters in concentrated lysozyme solutions.

    PubMed

    Barhoum, Suliman; Yethiraj, Anand

    2010-12-30

    Protein aggregation is an important biophysical phenomenon, and it is technically challenging to quantify. Scattering studies in concentrated protein solutions are not in complete agreement over the existence of an equilibrium cluster phase. We use pulsed-field-gradient NMR spectroscopy to characterize diffusion in the long-time limit in concentrated lysozyme solutions and find strong evidence for the existence of an equilibrium phase that consists of both lysozyme monomers and clusters (aggregates). They indicate too that there is rapid exchange between monomer and aggregate on the NMR time scale, and that macroscopic measurables (e.g., the relaxation rate and the observed diffusion coefficient) reflect a weighted average of the two fractions. Our results are quantitatively compared, with no fit parameters, to simple theories of macromolecular crowding.

  9. The polymorphic phases of the hexaalkanoyloxytriphenylene liquid crystals, as studied by deuterium NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, D.; Lifshitz, E.; Zimmermann, H.; Luz, Z.

    1985-06-01

    Deuterium NMR spectra are reported for several specifically deuterated hexaalkanoyloxytriphenylenes in their corresponding liquid crystalline phases. The higher homologs of this series are polymorphic and exhibit a variety of discotic mesophases, including both biaxial (D0 and D1) and uniaxial (D2) columnar phases. The ordering characteristics of these phases are studied using the quadrupolar splittings of the aromatic and aliphatic deuterons. The results show that during the transition from the biaxial D1 to the axial D2 phase the major susceptibility tensor switch orientation, apparently due to strong tilting of the molecules with respect to the columnar axis in the biaxial phase. Characteristic features which appear in the spectra of these phases are interpreted in terms of intercolumnar jumps of mesogen molecules.

  10. Gas phase NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine. Environmental effects on kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; Leung, Doris Y.; True, Nancy S.

    1984-04-01

    Gas phase 1H NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine are consistent with first order chemical exchange rate constants which are ca. 25 times faster than those observed in neat liquids at corresponding temperatures. The associated kinetic parameters: Eact(∞), 20.5(1.1) kcal mol -1, Δ H‡, 19.7(1.0) kcal mol -1 and Δ G‡, 21.1(0.4) kcal mol -1 are approximately 2.5 kcal mol -1 lower than the most recently reported values for the neat liquid. The observed phase dependence is consistent with a process proceeding via a freely rotating transition state.

  11. Preparation of cold ions in strong magnetic field and its application to gas-phase NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuke, K.; Ohshima, Y.; Tona, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technique is widely used as a powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, this technique is limited to the materials in condensed phases. To extend this technique to the gas-phase molecular ions, we are developing a gas-phase NMR apparatus. In this note, we describe the basic principle of the NMR detection for molecular ions in the gas phase based on a Stern-Gerlach type experiment in a Penning trap and outline the apparatus under development. We also present the experimental procedures and the results on the formation and the manipulation of cold ions under a strong magnetic field, which are the key techniques to detect the NMR by the present method.

  12. Pulsed field gradient MAS-NMR studies of the mobility of carboplatin in cubic liquid-crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampel, André; Michel, Dieter; Reszka, Regina

    2002-05-01

    A drug delivery system with cubic liquid-crystalline phase structure (cubic phase) containing the anti-cancer drug Carboplatin is studied. It is demonstrated that the combination of pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR and MAS-NMR is a useful tool to study the biophysical properties of a cubic phase. The linewidth in 1H-NMR spectra is narrowed by MAS, which can be exploited to perform PFG diffusion NMR experiments under high-resolution conditions. Measurement of self-diffusion coefficients of all components of the cubic phase becomes possible. The influence of polyethylene glycol chains on the drug mobility is discussed. It is shown that polyethylene glycol chains interact with Carboplatin.

  13. Halloysite Nanotubes as a New Adsorbent for Solid Phase Extraction and Spectrophotometric Determination of Iron in Water and Food Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, A.; Amjadi, M.

    2016-07-01

    Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) have been introduced as a new solid phase extraction adsorbent for preconcentration of iron(II) as a complex with 2,2-bipyridine. The cationic complex is effectively adsorbed on the sorbent in the pH range of 3.5-6.0 and efficiently desorbed by trichloroacetic acid. The eluted complex has a strong absorption around 520 nm, which was used for determination of Fe(II). After optimizing extraction conditions, the linear range of the calibration graph was 5.0-500 μg/L with a detection limit of 1.3 μg/L. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace iron in various water and food samples, and the accuracy was assessed through the recovery experiments and analysis of a certified reference material (NIST 1643e).

  14. Characterization of mitotane (o,p'-DDD)--cyclodextrin inclusion complexes: phase-solubility method and NMR.

    PubMed

    Alfonsi, R; Attivi, D; Astier, A; Socha, M; Morice, S; Gibaud, S

    2013-05-01

    Mitotane (o,p'-dichlorodimethyl dichloroethane [o,p'-DDD]) is used for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer and occasionally Cushing's syndrome. This drug is very poorly soluble in water, and following oral administration, approximately 60% of the dose is recovered in the feces unaltered. The preparation of a soluble formulation (i.e. by complexation with cyclodextrins) with improved bioavailability is the aim of this work. The inclusion of mitotane in methyl-ß-cyclodextrins was studied using both phase-solubility methods and NMR experiments. To elucidate the inclusion mechanism, o,p'-DDD was compared to its regioisomer (i.e. p,p'-DDD). It was demonstrated that two dimethyl-ß-cyclodextrins (DMßCD) can complex with the aromatic rings. From the phase-solubility diagrams, we observe that both cases are very different: K(1:1) is between 37 000 and 85 000 mol.l(-1), whereas K(1:2) is between 5.3 and 32 mol.l(-1). The NMR experiments confirmed the inclusion but it also gave an insight into the kinetics of the dissociation: the ortho-chloro moiety is in slow exchange on the NMR time scale, whereas the para-chloro moiety is in fast exchange rate.

  15. Effect of the endcapping of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography adsorbents on the adsorption isotherm

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-09-01

    The retention mechanisms of n-propylbenzoate, 4-t ert-butylphenol, and caffeine on the endcapped Symmetry-C{sub 18} and the non-endcapped Resolve-C{sub 18} are compared. The adsorption isotherms were measured by frontal analysis (FA), using as the mobile phase mixtures of methanol or acetonitrile and water of various compositions. The isotherm data were modeled and the adsorption energy distributions calculated. The surface heterogeneity increases faster with decreasing methanol concentration on the non-endcapped than on the endcapped adsorbent. For instance, for methanol concentrations exceeding 30% (v/v), the adsorption of caffeine is accounted for by assuming three and two different types of adsorption sites on Resolve-C{sub 18} and Symmetry-C{sub 18}, respectively. This is explained by the effect of the mobile phase composition on the structure of the C{sub 18}-bonded layer. The bare surface of bonded silica appears more accessible to solute molecules at high water contents in the mobile phase. On the other hand, replacing methanol by a stronger organic modifier like acetonitrile dampens the differences between non-endcapped and endcapped stationary phase and decreases the degree of surface heterogeneity of the adsorbent. For instance, at acetonitrile concentrations exceeding 20%, the surface appears nearly homogeneous for the adsorption of caffeine.

  16. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  17. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  18. NMR signal analysis to characterize solid, aqueous, and lipid phases in baked cakes.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, F; Cambert, M; Mariette, F

    2007-12-26

    Proton mobility was studied in molecular fractions of some model systems and of cake using a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation technique. For cake, five spin-spin relaxation times (T2) were obtained from transverse relaxation curves: T2 (1) approximately 20 micros, T2 (2) approximately 0.2 ms, T2 (3) approximately 3 ms, T2 (4) approximately 50 ms, and T2 (2) approximately 165 ms. The faster component was attributed to the solid phase, components 2 and 3 were associated with the aqueous phase, and the two slowest components were linked to the lipid phase. After cooking, the crust contained more fat but less water than the center part of the cake. The amount of gelatinized starch was lower in the crust, and water was more mobile due to less interaction with macromolecules. This preliminary study revealed different effects of storage on the center and crust.

  19. Distinguishing bicontinuous lipid cubic phases from isotropic membrane morphologies using (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Yao, Hongwei; Hong, Mei

    2015-04-16

    Nonlamellar lipid membranes are frequently induced by proteins that fuse, bend, and cut membranes. Understanding the mechanism of action of these proteins requires the elucidation of the membrane morphologies that they induce. While hexagonal phases and lamellar phases are readily identified by their characteristic solid-state NMR line shapes, bicontinuous lipid cubic phases are more difficult to discern, since the static NMR spectra of cubic-phase lipids consist of an isotropic (31)P or (2)H peak, indistinguishable from the spectra of isotropic membrane morphologies such as micelles and small vesicles. To date, small-angle X-ray scattering is the only method to identify bicontinuous lipid cubic phases. To explore unique NMR signatures of lipid cubic phases, we first describe the orientation distribution of lipid molecules in cubic phases and simulate the static (31)P chemical shift line shapes of oriented cubic-phase membranes in the limit of slow lateral diffusion. We then show that (31)P T2 relaxation times differ significantly between isotropic micelles and cubic-phase membranes: the latter exhibit 2 orders of magnitude shorter T2 relaxation times. These differences are explained by the different time scales of lipid lateral diffusion on the cubic-phase surface versus the time scales of micelle tumbling. Using this relaxation NMR approach, we investigated a DOPE membrane containing the transmembrane domain (TMD) of a viral fusion protein. The static (31)P spectrum of DOPE shows an isotropic peak, whose T2 relaxation times correspond to that of a cubic phase. Thus, the viral fusion protein TMD induces negative Gaussian curvature, which is an intrinsic characteristic of cubic phases, to the DOPE membrane. This curvature induction has important implications to the mechanism of virus-cell fusion. This study establishes a simple NMR diagnostic probe of lipid cubic phases, which is expected to be useful for studying many protein-induced membrane remodeling phenomena

  20. NMR Properties of the Polar Phase of Superfluid ^3He in Anisotropic Aerogel Under Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineev, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    The polar phase of superfluid ^3He is stable in "nematically ordered" densed aerogel. A rotating vessel with the polar superfluid can be filled either by an array of the single quantum vortices or by an array of the half-quantum vortices. It is shown that the inhomogeneous distribution of the spin part of the order parameter arising in an array of half-quantum vortices in strong enough magnetic field tilted to the average direction of aerogel strands leads to the appearance of a satellite in the NMR signal shifted in the negative direction with respect to the Larmor frequency. The satellite is absent in the case of an array of single quantum vortices which allows to distinguish these two configurations. The polar state in the anisotropic aerogel with lower density transforms at lower temperatures to the axipolar state. The array of half-quantum vortices created in the polar phase keeps its structure under transition to the axipolar state. The temperature dependence of the vortex-satellite NMR frequency is found to be slower below the transition temperature to the axipolar state.

  1. Gas-phase NMR technique for studying the thermolysis of materials: thermal decomposition of ammonium perfluorooctanoate.

    PubMed

    Krusic, Paul J; Roe, D Christopher

    2004-07-01

    The kinetics of the thermal decomposition of ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) has been studied by high-temperature gas-phase nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy over the temperature range 196-234 degrees C. We find that APFO cleanly decomposes by first-order kinetics to give the hydrofluorocarbon 1-H-perfluoroheptane and is completely decomposed (>99%) in a matter of minutes at the upper limit of this temperature range. Based on the temperature dependence of the measured rate constants, we find that the enthalpy and entropy of activation are DeltaH++ = 150 +/- 11 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS++ = 3 +/- 23 J mol(-)(1) deg(-1). These activation parameters may be used to calculate the rate of APFO decomposition at the elevated temperatures (350-400 degrees C) at which fluoropolymers are processed; for example, at 350 degrees C the half-life for APFO is estimated to be less than 0.2 s. Our studies provide the fundamental parameters involved in the decomposition of the ammonium salt of perfluorooctanoic acid and indicate the utility of gas-phase NMR for thermolysis studies of a variety of materials that release compounds that are volatile at the temperature of decomposition and that contain an NMR-active nucleus.

  2. Second order rate constants for intramolecular conversions: Application to gas-phase NMR relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Lazaar, K. I.

    1983-09-01

    The usually quoted expression for the second order rate constant, for a unimolecular reaction at the low pressure limit, is valid only for strictly irreversible processes. Its application to isomerization reactions (which are to some extent reversible) is demonstrably in error; corrected expressions have been published. Attention is directed to intramolecular conversions over low barriers, for which the inappropriateness of the unidirectional expression becomes obvious. For such isomerizations we propose a model which incorporates only operationally observable states, so that an essential conceptual ambiguity is avoided. Use of this model is illustrated for the syn⇄anti conversions of methyl nitrite, derived from a gas phase NMR coalescence curve (Mc:Tc). The present data suggest that during isomerization the alkyl nitrites may not be completely ergodic on a time scale of 10-9 s. A regional phase-space model is proposed which has the appropriate formalism to account for this behavior.

  3. Magnetic nano graphene oxide as solid phase extraction adsorbent coupled with liquid chromatography to determine pseudoephedrine in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Taghvimi, Arezou; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-15

    This paper reports on a method based on magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) for the determination of pseudoephedrine. Magnetic nanographene oxide (MNGO) was applied as a new adsorbent for the extraction of pseudoephedrine from urine samples. Synthesis of MNGO was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The main factors influencing extraction efficiency, including the amounts of sample volume, amount of adsorbent, type and amount of extraction organic solvent, time of extraction and desorption, pH, ionic strength of extraction medium, and agitation rate, were investigated and optimized. Under optimized extraction conditions, a good linearity was observed in the range of 100-2000ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9908 (r(2)). Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 25 and 82.7ng/mL, respectively. Inter-day and intra-day precision and accuracy were 6.01 and 0.34 (%), and 8.70 and 0.29 (%), respectively. The method was applied for the determination of pseudoephedrine in urine samples of volunteers receiving pseudoephedrine with the recovery of 96.42. It was concluded that the proposed method can be applied in diagnostic clinics.

  4. NMR properties of hydrogen-bonded glycine cluster in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Jorge R.; da Silva, Arnaldo Machado; Ghosh, Angsula; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    2016-11-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the effect of the hydrogen bond formation on the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) parameters of hydrogen-bonded clusters of glycine molecules in gas-phase. DFT predicted isotropic chemical shifts of H, C, N and O of the isolated glycine with respect to standard reference materials are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The variations of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts for all atoms constituting these clusters containing up to four glycine molecules have been investigated systematically employing gradient corrected hybrid B3LYP functional with three different types of extended basis sets. The clusters are mainly stabilized by a network of strong hydrogen bonds among the carboxylic (COOH) groups of glycine monomers. The formation of hydrogen bond influences the molecular structure of the clusters significantly which, on the other hand, gets reflected in the variations of NMR properties. The carbon (C) atom of the sbnd COOH group, the bridging hydrogen (H) and the proton-donor oxygen (O) atom of the Osbnd H bond suffer downfield shift due to the formation of hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bond lengths and the structural complexity of the clusters are found to vary with the number of participating monomers. A direct correlation between the hydrogen bond length and isotropic chemical shift of the bridging hydrogen is observed in all cases. The individual variations of the principal axis elements in chemical shift tensor provide additional insight about the different nature of the monomers within the cluster.

  5. Two confined phases of argon adsorbed inside open single walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Zygmunt J; Simard, Benoit

    2004-07-01

    Isothermal adsorption of Ar on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been studied at 77 and 87 K. The SWNTs have been grown by laser vaporization of a graphite pellet containing 0.6% (atomic) Ni/Co catalyst. The nanotubes have been prepared for argon adsorption measurements by prolonged outgassing of as-grown material in a vacuum at room temperature (295 K), at elevated temperatures of up to 475 K, and by oxidization for 2 h in dry air at 470 K. Formation of two condensed phases of Ar in the interior of SWNTs has been observed at 77 K. The low-density phase is formed at 155(5) microTorr, while the high-density phase, at 120(5) microTorr. At 87 K, only a single phase has been observed at 185(5) microTorr. Condensation at both 77 and 87 K appears to be the first-order phase transition. Onset of the quasi-one-dimensional linear (one-channel) phase and the quasi-two-dimensional monolayer (six-channel) phase formation on the external surface of bundles has been observed at 77 K near 0.0017 and 0.8 Torr, respectively, and at 87 K near 0.018 and 5 Torr, respectively. Isosteric heats of adsorption for the one-channel phase, the first external layer, and the second external layer have been determined to be equal to 137, 107, and 70 meV, respectively. PMID:16459613

  6. NMR studies of granular media and two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyu

    This dissertation describes two experimental studies of a vibrofluidized granular medium and a preliminary study of two-phase fluid flow in a porous medium using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The first study of granular medium is to test a scaling law of the rise in center of mass in a three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular system. Our granular system consisted of mustard seeds vibrated vertically at 40 Hz from 0g to 14g. We used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to measure density profile in vibrated direction. We observed that the rise in center of mass scaled as nu 0alpha/Nlbeta with alpha = 1.0 +/- 0.2 and beta = 0.5 +/- 0.1, where nu 0 is the vibration velocity and Nl is the number of layers of grains in the container. A simple theory was proposed to explain the scaling exponents. In the second study we measured both density and velocity information in the same setup of the first study. Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG)-NMR combined with MRI was used to do this measurement. The granular system was fully fluidized at 14.85g 50 Hz with Nl ≤ 4. The velocity distributions at horizontal and vertical direction at different height were measured. The distributions were nearly-Gaussian far from sample bottom and non-Gaussian near sample bottom. Granular temperature profiles were calculated from the velocity distributions. The density and temperature profile were fit to a hydrodynamic theory. The theory agreed with experiments very well. A temperature inversion near top was also observed and explained by additional transport coefficient from granular hydrodynamics. The third study was the preliminary density measurement of invading phase profile in a two-phase flow in porous media. The purpose of this study was to test an invasion percolation with gradient (IPG) theory in two-phase flow of porous media. Two phases are dodecane and water doped with CuSO4. The porous medium was packed glass beads. The front tail width sigma and front width of invading phase were

  7. Different methods in TiO2 photodegradation mechanism studies: gaseous and TiO2-adsorbed phases.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Pierre-Alexandre; Arsac, Fabrice; Thivel, Pierre-Xavier; Ferronato, Corinne; Delpech, Françoise; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Kaluzny, Pascal; Monnet, Christine

    2007-06-18

    The development of photocatalysis processes offers a significant number of perspectives especially in gaseous phase depollution. It is proved that the photo-oxidizing properties of photocatalyst (TiO(2)) activated by UV plays an important role in the degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Heterogeneous photocatalysis is based on the absorption of UV radiations by TiO(2). This phenomenon leads to the degradation and the oxidation of the compounds, according to a mechanism that associates the pollutant's adsorption on the photocatalyst and radical degradation reactions. The main objective of the study is the understanding of the TiO(2)-photocatalysis phenomenon including gaseous and adsorbed phase mechanisms. Results obtained with three different apparatus are compared; gaseous phases are analysed and mechanisms at the gaseous phase/photocatalyst interface are identified. This study leads to improve understanding of various mechanisms during pollutant photodegradation: adsorption of pollutants on TiO(2) first takes place, then desorption and/or photodegradation, and finally, desorption of degradation products on TiO(2). The association of analytical methods and different processes makes the determination of all parameters that affect the photocatalytic process possible. Mastering these parameters is fundamental for the design and construction of industrial size reactors that aim to purify the atmosphere.

  8. Gas-Phase Infrared and NMR Investigation of the Conformers of Diacetone Diperoxide (DADP).

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunlei; Persons, John; Woodford, Jeffrey N; Harbison, Gerard S

    2015-10-01

    Gas-phase infrared measurements of diacetone diperoxide (DADP) indicate a chair conformation with less than 5% of the predicted twist conformer. Vibrational frequencies are very similar to those previously measured in the solid state. Solution NMR measurements using 2D exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) also set a very low maximum limit on the equilibrium population of the twist conformer, with a room-temperature free-energy difference in excess of 14.5 kJ/mol. These experimental results are in accord with high-level quantum calculations incorporating full thermochemistry and solvation effects, which indicate a free-energy difference in the range of 14.7-17.5 kJ/mol in polar solvents. PMID:26387762

  9. Evaluation of the separation performance of polyvinylpyrrolidone as a virtual stationary phase for chromatographic NMR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaohua; Wu, Rui; Bai, Zhengwu; Yang, Ying; Li, Suying; Dou, Xiaowei

    2014-09-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was used as a virtual stationary phase to separate p-xylene, benzyl alcohol, and p-methylphenol by the chromatographic NMR technique. The effects of concentration and weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of PVP, solvent viscosity, solvent polarity, and sample temperature on the resolution of these components were investigated. It was found that both higher PVP concentration and higher PVP Mw caused the increase of diffusion resolution for the three components. Moreover, the diffusion resolution did not change at viscosity-higher solvents. Moreover, the three components showed different resolution at different solvents. As temperature increased, the diffusion resolution between p-xylene and benzyl alcohol gradually increased, and the one between p-xylene and p-methylphenol slightly increased from 278 to 298 K and then decreased above 298 K. It was also found that the polarity of the analytes played an important role for the separation by affecting the diffusion coefficient.

  10. Phase diagram of oxygen adsorbed on Ni(111) and thermodynamic properties from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazo, C.; Keil, F. J.

    2009-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties and the surface phase diagram of O/Ni(111) have been calculated from Metropolis and Wang-Landau Monte Carlo simulations based on lateral interactions derived from density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The DFT energies were mapped onto an Ising-like Hamiltonian according to the cluster expansion technique formalism. Both fcc and hcp adsorption sites were included in the Hamiltonian. Different criteria were used to evaluate competing parameter sets: cross-validation score CV, Mallow’s Cp statistics, and adjusted R2 statistics. The parameter space was searched using genetic algorithms in order to find optimum parameter sets. The different parameter sets obtained from different criteria lead essentially to the same transition temperatures. Excellent agreement is found when comparing the shape and the stability regions of the theoretical and the experimental (from the literature) phase diagrams. We investigate the nature of the p(2×2) and (3×3)R30° phase transitions at Θ=1/4 and 1/3 ML, respectively. Differences arise when comparing the values of the calculated and the experimental transition temperatures owing to imprecision in present-day DFT calculations.

  11. Phase transfer of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles using nonspecifically adsorbed polymers.

    PubMed

    Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Caravana, Aidan C; Hamaly, Majd A; Lerner, Kevin T; Thompson, Lucas B

    2016-01-01

    Many synthetic approaches for gold nanoparticles rely on an aqueous media, resulting in water-soluble nanoparticles, which limits the ability to incorporate gold nanoparticles into other organic solvents or hydrophobic polymeric composites. Surface functionalization and phase transfer approaches using alkylthiols or alkylamines, which strongly bind the gold surface, are common routes to overcome this limitation, however they are typically challenging methods. In this paper we report an approach to transport citrate capped gold nanoparticles into a variety of solvents, including ones that are hydrophobic and not miscible with water without the need for phase transfer agents. We suspend gold nanoparticles in a water-miscible polar organic solvent that also is a solvent for a hydrophobic polymer. After drying, polymer-stabilized gold nanoparticles were found to be dispersible in various hydrophobic solvents with maintained colloidal stability. This work investigates two hydrophobic polymers, namely (polymethylmethacrylate and polyvinylacetate), which share common chemical motifs but have significantly different physiochemical properties. Interestingly, a significant difference in their ability to stabilize the transferred gold nanoparticles is observed and discussed. PMID:26397907

  12. Phase transfer of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles using nonspecifically adsorbed polymers.

    PubMed

    Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Caravana, Aidan C; Hamaly, Majd A; Lerner, Kevin T; Thompson, Lucas B

    2016-01-01

    Many synthetic approaches for gold nanoparticles rely on an aqueous media, resulting in water-soluble nanoparticles, which limits the ability to incorporate gold nanoparticles into other organic solvents or hydrophobic polymeric composites. Surface functionalization and phase transfer approaches using alkylthiols or alkylamines, which strongly bind the gold surface, are common routes to overcome this limitation, however they are typically challenging methods. In this paper we report an approach to transport citrate capped gold nanoparticles into a variety of solvents, including ones that are hydrophobic and not miscible with water without the need for phase transfer agents. We suspend gold nanoparticles in a water-miscible polar organic solvent that also is a solvent for a hydrophobic polymer. After drying, polymer-stabilized gold nanoparticles were found to be dispersible in various hydrophobic solvents with maintained colloidal stability. This work investigates two hydrophobic polymers, namely (polymethylmethacrylate and polyvinylacetate), which share common chemical motifs but have significantly different physiochemical properties. Interestingly, a significant difference in their ability to stabilize the transferred gold nanoparticles is observed and discussed.

  13. Commensurate Phases of Kr Adsorbed on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Mamadou T.; Maiga, Sidi M.; Gatica, Silvina M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we show that Krypton atoms form a commensurate solid (CS) phase with a fractional coverage of one krypton atom per every four carbons on zigzag carbon nanotubes. This is a unique phase, different from the √{3} × √{3}R30° CS monolayer formed on graphite, which has a lower coverage of one krypton atom per every six carbons. Our prediction disagrees with experiments that observe in nanotubes the same solid structure found on graphite. In order to address this discrepancy, we simulated adsorption of Kr on zigzag and armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes with radii ranging from 4.7 to 28.83 Å. Our simulations confirm that the CS of coverage 1/4 forms on medium-sized zigzag nanotubes. We also found the 1/6-coverage solid on graphene, which represents the infinite-radius limit of a nanotube. Our findings are key to experiments of adsorption on nanotubes where the interpretation and justification of the results are based on the monolayer coverage, such as mass or conductance isotherms measurements.

  14. Automatic phase correction of fourier transform NMR spectra based on the dispersion versus absorption (DISPA) lineshape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotak, Christopher H.; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Newsham, Mark D.

    A method for automatic phase correction of Fourier transform NMR spectra bused on the dispersion versus absorption (DISPA) lineshape analysis is described. The DISPA display of a single misphased Lorentzian line gives a unit circle which has been rotated about the origin (relative to its "reference circle") by a number of degrees equal to the phase misadjustment. This rotation, Φ, is a combination of the zero- and first-order phase angles at the frequency of the resonance. Calculation of Φ for two or more resonances allows the spectral phasing parameters to be determined and applied to correct the spectrum. This approach has been implemented in both automatic and "semi-automatic" modes.

  15. NMR, symmetry elements, structure and phase transitions in the argyrodite family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, E.; Taulelle, F.; Boucher, F.; Evain, M.

    1998-02-01

    Cu7PSe6 belongs to a family of structures known as the argyrodites. It undergoes two phases transitions. The high temperature phase has been determined by X-ray diffraction. It has a Foverline{4}3m space group. Medium temperature phases have been refined using a non-harmonic technique and the space group proposed is P213. The low temperature phase had an apparent space group of Foverline{4}3m also. Use of X-ray diffraction and NMR together has allowed to determine the space groups of all phases as being respectively Foverline{4}3m, P213 and Pmn21. Positioning of disordered coppers in the structure is therefore possible and the structure can be described by connex polyhedra of PSe3-4 and SeCux-2_x. The phase transitions can be understood by an ordered motion of SeCux-2x polyhedra. If these polyhedra set in motion independently two transitions are to be observed, if they are coupled only one is observed. Cu7PSe6 appartient à une famille de composés connus sous le nom d'argyrodites. Cu7PSe6 possède deux transitions de phase. La structure de haute température a été déterminée par diffraction des rayons X. Elle se décrit par le groupe d'espace Foverline{4}3m. La phase de moyenne température a été raffinée en utilisant une technique non-harmonique et le groupe d'espace proposé est P213. La phase de basse température possède également un groupe d'espace apparent Foverline{4}3m. En utilisant ensemble la diffraction des rayons X et la RMN, il a été possible de déterminer les groupes d'espace de toutes les phases comme étant respectivement Foverline{4}3m, P213 et Pmn21. Placer les atomes de cuivre, désordonnés, dans la structure devient alors possible et la structure peut se décrire comme un ensemble de polyèdres connexes de PSe3-4 et SeCux-2_x. Les transitions de phases se décrivent alors comme des mouvements ordonnés des polyèdres SeCux-2_x. Si ces polyèdres se mettent en mouvement indépendamment, deux transitions de phases sont attendues, si

  16. (51)V NMR parameters of VOCl(3): static and dynamic density functional study from the gas phase to the bulk.

    PubMed

    Bjornsson, Ragnar; Früchtl, Herbert; Bühl, Michael

    2011-01-14

    (51)V NMR parameters have been calculated for VOCl(3), the reference compound in (51)V NMR spectroscopy, in order to capture environmental effects in both the neat liquid and the solid state. Using a combination of periodic geometry optimizations and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations with embedded cluster NMR calculations, we are able to test the ability of current computational approaches to reproduce (51)V NMR properties (isotropic shifts, anisotropic shifts and quadrupole coupling constants) in the gas, liquid and solid states, for direct comparison with liquid and solid-state experimental data. The results suggest that environmental effects in the condensed phases can be well captured by an embedded cluster approach and that the remaining discrepancy with experiment may be due to the approximate density functionals in current use. The predicted gas-to-liquid shift on the isotropic shielding constant is small, validating the common practice to use a single VOCl(3), molecule as reference in (51)V NMR computations.

  17. Molecular recognition using corona phase complexes made of synthetic polymers adsorbed on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P; Barone, Paul W; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Boghossian, Ardemis A; Hilmer, Andrew J; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Şen, Fatih; Şen, Selda; Croy, Robert G; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Heller, Daniel A; Essigmann, John M; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Understanding molecular recognition is of fundamental importance in applications such as therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensor design. The most common recognition motifs involve biological macromolecules such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to biorecognition consists of a unique three-dimensional structure formed by a folded and constrained bioheteropolymer that creates a binding pocket, or an interface, able to recognize a specific molecule. Here, we show that synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymer-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and oestradiol. In each case, the recognition was predicted using a two-dimensional thermodynamic model of surface interactions in which the dissociation constants can be tuned by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatiotemporal sensors based on modulation of the carbon nanotube photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages.

  18. Molecular recognition using corona phase complexes made of synthetic polymers adsorbed on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P.; Barone, Paul W.; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W.; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Hilmer, Andrew J.; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C.; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A.; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Şen, Fatih; Şen, Selda; Croy, Robert G.; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Heller, Daniel A.; Essigmann, John M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding molecular recognition is of fundamental importance in applications such as therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensor design. The most common recognition motifs involve biological macromolecules such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to biorecognition consists of a unique three-dimensional structure formed by a folded and constrained bioheteropolymer that creates a binding pocket, or an interface, able to recognize a specific molecule. Here, we show that synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymer-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and oestradiol. In each case, the recognition was predicted using a two-dimensional thermodynamic model of surface interactions in which the dissociation constants can be tuned by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatiotemporal sensors based on modulation of the carbon nanotube photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages.

  19. Selective solid-phase extraction of alpha-tocopherol by functionalized ionic liquid-modified mesoporous SBA-15 adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Pham, Patrisha J; Pittman, Charles U; Li, Tingyu

    2008-10-01

    Ordered mesoporous adsorbents were prepared by physically grafting functionalized ionic liquids onto SBA-15 (a mesoporous siliceous substrate) using incipient wetness immersion method. These adsorbents were successfully applied to the selective extraction and separation of alpha-tocopherol (an isomer of vitamin E) from a model mixture of soybean oil deodorizer distillate. Various parameters affecting adsorption process such as adsorption time, the structures and loadings of ionic liquids, the adsorption isotherm, and the reusability of adsorbent were investigated using liquid-solid extraction. As high as 211 mg/g adsorbent of the adsorption capacity for alpha-tocopherol was obtained through the adsorption isotherm tests using [emim][Gly]/SBA-15 (functionalized ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium glycine which was physically coated on SBA-15) as the adsorbent, in which the functionalized ionic liquids contained the amino acid glycine as the anion. The adsorbent [emim][Gly]/SBA-15 also exhibited a very high adsorption selectivity for alpha-tocopherol. The extraction selectivity or the ratio of distribution coefficients between alpha-tocopherol and the major interference component glyceryl triundecanoate (K(d(alpha-tocopherol))/K(d(triglyceride))) was 10.5. The concentration of alpha-tocopherol was significantly increased from 15.6% in original feedstock solution that contained fatty acid methyl ester, triglyceride and alpha-tocopherol to 73.0% after stripping by diethyl ether. Five adsorbent recycle tests showed good reusability of the functionalized ionic liquid-modified mesoporous adsorbent. PMID:18845881

  20. Theoretical Analysis of Electrochemical Formation and Phase Transition of Oxygenated Adsorbates on Pt(111).

    PubMed

    Chen, Junxiang; Luo, Siwei; Liu, Yuwen; Chen, Shengli

    2016-08-10

    The electrochemical oxygenation processes of Pt(111) surface are investigated by combining density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Monto Carlo (MC) simulations. DFT calculations are performed to construct force-field parameters for computing the energy of (√3 × √3)R30°-structured OH*-H2O* hydrogen-bonding networks (differently dissociated water bilayer) on the Pt(111) surface, with which MC simulations are conducted to probe the reversible H2O* ↔ OH* conversion in OH*-H2O* networks. The simulated isotherm (relation between electrode potential and OH* coverage) agrees well with that predicted by the experimental cyclic voltammetry (CV) in the potential region of 0.55-0.85 V (vs RHE). It is suggested that the butterfly shape of CV in this region is due to different variation trends of Pt-H2O* distance in low and high OH* coverages. DFT calculation results indicate that the oxidative voltammetry in the potential region from 0.85 V to ca. 1.07 V is associated with the dissociation of OH* to O*, which yields surface structures consisting of OH*-H2O* networks and (√3 × √3)-structured O* clusters. The high stability of the half-dissociated water bilayer (OH*-H2O* hydrogen-bonding network with equal OH* and H2O* coverages) formed in the butterfly region makes OH* dissociation initially very difficult in energetics, but become facile once starts due to the destabilization of OH* by the formed O* nearby. This explains the experimentally observed nucleation and growth behavior of O* phase formation and the high asymmetry of oxidation-reduction voltammetry in this potential region. PMID:27377100

  1. Nanogold-Decorated Silica Monoliths as Highly Efficient Solid-Phase Adsorbent for Ultratrace Mercury Analysis in Natural Waters.

    PubMed

    Huber, Jessica; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Sonke, Jeroen E; Ziller, Sebastian; Lindén, Mika; Leopold, Kerstin

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel analytical method for mercury (Hg) trace determination based on direct Hg preconcentration from aqueous solution onto a gold nanoparticle-decorated silica monolith (AuNP@SiO2). Detection of Hg is performed after thermal desorption by means of atomic fluorescence spectrometry. This new methodology benefits from reagent-free, time- and cost-saving procedure, due to most efficient solid-phase adsorbent and results in high sensitive quantification. The excellent analytical performance of the whole procedure is demonstrated by a limit of detection as low as 1.31 ng L(-1) for only one-min accumulation duration. A good reproducibility with standard deviations ≤5.4% is given. The feasibility of the approach in natural waters was confirmed by a recovery experiment in spiked seawater with a recovery rate of 101%. Moreover, the presented method was validated through reference analysis of a submarine groundwater discharge sample by cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry resulting in a very good agreement of the found values. Hence the novel method is a very promising new tool for low-level Hg monitoring in natural waters providing easy-handling on-site preconcentration, reagent-free stabilization as well as reagent-free, highly sensitive detection.

  2. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. PMID:20851447

  3. Structural features of polymer adsorbent LiChrolut EN and interfacial behavior of water and water/organic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gun'ko, V M; Turov, V V; Zarko, V I; Nychiporuk, Y M; Goncharuk, E V; Pakhlov, E M; Yurchenko, G R; Kulik, T V; Palyanytsya, B B; Borodavka, T V; Krupskaya, T V; Leboda, R; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J; Osovskii, V D; Ptushinskii, Y G; Turov, A V

    2008-07-01

    The structural and adsorption characteristics of polymer adsorbent LiChrolut EN and the behavior of adsorbed water and water/organic mixtures were studied using adsorption, microcalorimetry, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy with layer-by-layer freezing-out of liquids (190-273 K), and thermally stimulated depolarization current method (90-265 K). This adsorbent is characterized by large specific surface area (approximately 1500 m2/g) and pore volume (0.83 cm3/g) with a major contribution of narrow pores (R<10 nm) of a complicated shape (long hysteresis loop is in nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm). The adsorbent includes aromatic and aliphatic structures and oxygen-containing functionalities and can effectively adsorb organics and water/organic mixtures. On co-adsorption of water and organics (dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, methane), there is a weak influence of one on another adsorbate due to their poor mixing in pores. Weakly polar chloroform displaces a fraction of water from narrow pores. These effects can explain high efficiency of the adsorbent in solid-phase extraction of organics from aqueous solutions. The influence of structural features of several carbon and polymer adsorbents on adsorbed nitrogen, water and water/organics is compared on the basis of the adsorption and 1H NMR data. PMID:18440015

  4. 1H and 19F NMR studies on molecular motions and phase transitions in solid triethylammonium tetrafluoroborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Seki, Riki; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    1995-02-01

    Measurements by differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry and of the spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1), the spin-spin relaxation time ( T2), and the second moment ( M2) of 1H and 19F NMR were carried out in the three solid phases of (CH 3CH 2) 3NHBF 4. X-ray powder patterns were taken in the highest-temperature phase (Phase I) existing above 367 K and the room-temperature phase (Phase II) stable between 220 and 367 K. Phase I formed a NaCl-type cubic structure with a = 11.65(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1581(13) Å3, and Dx = 0.794 g cm -3, and was expected to be an ionic plastic phase. In this phase, the self-diffusion of anions and the isotropic reorientation of cations were observed. Phase II formed a tetragonal structure with a = 12.47(1) and c = 9.47(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1473(6) Å3, and Dx = 0.852 g cm -3. From the present DSC and NMR results in this phase, the cations and/or anions were considered to be dynamically disordered states. The C3 reorientation of the cation about the NH bond axis was detected and, in addition, the onset of nutation of the cations and local diffusion of the anions was suggested. In the low-temperature phase (Phase III) stable below 219 K, the C3 reorientations of the three methyl groups of cations and the isotropic reorientation of anions were observed. The motional parameters for these modes were evaluated.

  5. Solid-phase microextraction of phthalate esters in water sample using different activated carbon-polymer monoliths as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Lirio, Stephen; Fu, Chung-Wei; Lin, Jhih-Yun; Hsu, Meng-Ju; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-07-13

    In this study, the application of different activated carbon-polymer (AC-polymer) monoliths as adsorbents for the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of phthalate esters (PAEs) in water sample were investigated. The activated carbon (AC) was embedded in organic polymers, poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (poly(BMA-EDMA)) or poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (poly(STY-DVB)), via a 5-min microwave-assisted or a 15-min water bath heating polymerization. Preliminary investigation on the performance of the native poly(BMA-EDMA) and poly(STY-DVB) demonstrated remarkable adsorption efficiencies for PAEs. However, due to the strong hydrophobic, π-π, and hydrogen bonding interactions between the analytes and polymers, low extraction recoveries were achieved. In contrast, the presence of AC in native polymers not only enhanced the adsorption efficiencies but also assisted the PAE desorption, especially for AC-poly(STY-DVB) with extraction recovery ranged of 76.2-99.3%. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction recoveries for intra-, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 76.5-100.8% (<3.7% RSDs), 77.2-97.6% (<5.6% RSDs) and 75.5-99.7% (<6.2% RSDs), respectively. The developed AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column showed good mechanical stability, which can be reused for more than 30 extraction times without any significant loss in the extraction recoveries of PAEs. The AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column was successfully applied in SPME of PAEs in water sample with extraction recovery ranged of 78.8%-104.6% (<5.5% RSDs). PMID:27237837

  6. Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets as adsorbents for solid-phase extraction of polychlorinated biphenyls from water samples.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shiliang; Wang, Zhenhua; Ding, Ning; Elaine Wong, Y-L; Chen, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Guangyu; Dominic Chan, T-W

    2016-09-14

    The adsorptive potential of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNSs) for solid-phase extraction (SPE) of pollutants was investigated for the first time. Seven indicators of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were selected as target analytes. The adsorption of PCBs on the surface of the h-BNNSs in water was simulated by the density functional theory and molecular dynamics. The simulation results indicated that the PCBs are adsorbed on the surface by π-π, hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions. The PCBs were extracted with an h-BNNS-packed SPE cartridge, and eluted by dichloromethane. Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry working in the multiple reaction monitor mode was used for the sample quantification. The effect of extraction parameters, including the flow rate, pH value, breakthrough volume, and the ionic strength, were investigated. Under the optimal working conditions, the developed method showed low limits of detection (0.24-0.50 ng L(-1); signal-to-noise ratio = 3:1), low limits of quantification (0.79-1.56 ng L(-1); signal-to-noise ratio = 10:1), satisfactory linearity (r > 0.99) within the concentration range of 2-1000 ng L(-1), and good precision (relative standard deviation < 12%). The PCBs concentration in environmental water samples was determined by the developed method. This results demonstrate that h-BNNSs have high analytical potential in the enrichment of pollutants. PMID:27566347

  7. New insights into phase distribution, phase composition and disorder in Y2(Zr,Sn)2O7 ceramics from NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Mitchell, Martin R; Sneddon, Scott; Moran, Robert F; de los Reyes, Massey; Lumpkin, Gregory R; Whittle, Karl R

    2015-04-14

    A combination of (89)Y and (119)Sn NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations are used to investigate phase evolution, local structure and disorder in Y2Zr2-xSnxO7 ceramics, where a phase change is predicted, from pyrochlore to defect fluorite, with increasing Zr content. The ability of NMR to effectively probe materials that exhibit positional and compositional disorder provides insight into the atomic-scale structure in both ordered and disordered phases and, by exploiting the quantitative nature of the technique, we are able to determine detailed information on the composition of the phase(s) present and the average coordination number (and next-nearest neighbour environment) of the cations. In contrast to previous studies, a more complex picture of the phase variation with composition emerges, with single-phase pyrochlore found only for the Sn end member, and a single defect fluorite phase only for x = 0 to 0.6. A broad two-phase region is observed, from x = 1.8 to 0.8, but the two phases present have very different composition, with a maximum of 13% Zr incorporated into the pyrochlore phase, whereas the composition of the defect fluorite phase varies throughout. Preferential ordering of the anion vacancies in the defect fluorite phase is observed, with Sn only ever found in a six-coordinate environment, while remaining vacancies are shown to be more likely to be associated with Zr than Y. Our findings are then discussed in the light of those from previous studies, many of which utilize diffraction-based approaches, where, in most cases, a single phase of fixed composition has been assumed for the refinement procedure. The significant and surprising differences encountered demonstrate the need for complementary approaches to be considered for a detailed and accurate picture of both the long- and short-range structure of a solid to be achieved.

  8. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  9. Effect of Polarity of Activated Carbon Surface, Solvent and Adsorbate on Adsorption of Aromatic Compounds from Liquid Phase.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsuru; Amano, Yoshimasa; Machida, Motoi; Imazeki, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, introduction of acidic functional groups onto a carbon surface and their removal were carried out through two oxidation methods and outgassing to investigate the adsorption mechanism of aromatic compounds which have different polarity (benzene and nitrobenzene). Adsorption experiments for these aromatics in aqueous solution and n-hexane solution were conducted in order to obtain the adsorption isotherms for commercial activated carbon (BAC) as a starting material, its two types of oxidized BAC samples (OXs), and their outgassed samples at 900 °C (OGs). Adsorption and desorption kinetics of nitrobenzene for the BAC, OXs and OGs in aqueous solution were also examined. The results showed that the adsorption of benzene molecules was significantly hindered by abundant acidic functional groups in aqueous solution, whereas the adsorbed amount of nitrobenzene on OXs gradually increased as the solution concentration increased, indicating that nitrobenzene can adsorb favourably on a hydrophilic surface due to its high dipole moment, in contrast to benzene. In n-hexane solution, it was difficult for benzene to adsorb on any sample owing to the high affinity between benzene and n-hexane solvent. On the other hand, adsorbed amounts of nitrobenzene on OXs were larger than those of OGs in n-hexane solution, implying that nitrobenzene can adsorb two adsorption sites, graphene layers and surface acidic functional groups. The observed adsorption and desorption rate constants of nitrobenzene on the OXs were lower than those on the BAC due to disturbance of diffusion by the acidic functional groups.

  10. Phase Composition and Disorder in La2(Sn,Ti)2O7 Ceramics: New Insights from NMR Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An NMR crystallographic approach, involving the combination of 119Sn NMR spectroscopy, XRD, and DFT calculations, is demonstrated for the characterization of La2Sn2–xTixO7 ceramics. A phase change from pyrochlore (La2Sn2O7) to a layered perovskite phase (La2Ti2O7) is predicted (by radius ratio rules) to occur when x ≈ 0.95. However, the sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy to the local environment is able to reveal a significant two-phase region is present, extending from x = 1.8 to ∼0.2, with limited solid solution at the two extremes, in broad agreement with powder XRD measurements. DFT calculations reveal that there is preferential site substitution of Sn in La2Ti2O7, with calculated shifts for Sn substitution onto Ti1 and Ti2 sites (in the “bulk” perovskite layers) in better agreement with experiment than those for Ti3 and Ti4 (“edge” sites). Substitution onto these two sites also produces structural models with lower relative enthalpy. As the Sn content decreases, there is a further preference for substitution onto Sn2. In contrast, the relative intensities of the spectral resonances suggest that Ti substitution into the pyrochlore phase is random, although only a limited solid solution is observed (up to ∼7% Ti). DFT calculations predict very similar 119Sn shifts for Sn substitution into the two proposed models of La2Ti2O7 (monoclinic (P21) and orthorhombic (Pna21)), indicating it is not possible to distinguish between them. However, the relative energy of the Sn-substituted orthorhombic phase was higher than that of substituted monoclinic cells, suggesting that the latter is the more likely structure. PMID:27721909

  11. Estimation of atmospheric lifetimes of hydrofluorocarbons, hydrofluoroethers, and olefins by chlorine photolysis using gas-phase NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marchione, Alexander A; Fagan, Paul J; Till, Eric J; Waterland, Robert L; LaMarca, Concetta

    2008-08-15

    An empirical correlation has been derived between accepted atmospheric lifetimes of a set of hydrofluorocarbons and hydrofluoroethers and relative rates of reaction with photolyzed chlorine in excess at ambient temperature. These kinetic systems were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the gas phase, marking the first application of NMR spectroscopy to this field. The square of the Pearson coefficient R for the linear correlation between observed reaction rates and accepted atmospheric lifetimes was 0.87 for compounds of lifetime less than 20 years. The method was extended to the study of ethene and propene; the rate of reaction of propene was found to be 1.25 times that of ethene at 23 degrees C. The chief advantage of this method is its simplicity and reliance only on common tools and techniques of an industrial chemical laboratory.

  12. High-pressure low-field 1H NMR relaxometry in nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Horch, Carsten; Schlayer, Stefan; Stallmach, Frank

    2014-03-01

    A low-field NMR sensor with NdFeB permanent magnets (B0=118 mT) and a pressure cell made of PEEK (4 cm outer diameter) were designed for (1)H relaxation time studies of adsorbed molecules at pressures of up to 300 bar. The system was used to investigate methane uptake of microporous metal-organic frameworks and nanoporous activated carbon. T2 relaxation time distribution of pure methane and of methane under co-adsorption of carbon dioxide show that the host-guest interaction lead to a relaxation time contrasts, which may be used to distinguish between the gas phase and the different adsorbed phases of methane. Adsorption isotherms, exchange of methane between adsorbent particles and the surrounding gas phase, successive displacement of methane from adsorption sites by co-adsorption of carbon dioxide and CO2/CH4 adsorption separation factors were determined from the observed NMR relaxation time distributions.

  13. Vibrational spectra of CO adsorbed on oxide thin films: A tool to probe the surface defects and phase changes of oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Savara, Aditya

    2014-03-15

    Thin films of iron oxide were grown on Pt(111) single crystals using cycles of physical vapor deposition of iron followed by oxidative annealing in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus. Two procedures were utilized for film growth of ∼15–30 ML thick films, where both procedures involved sequential deposition+oxidation cycles. In procedure 1, the iron oxide film was fully grown via sequential deposition+oxidation cycles, and then the fully grown film was exposed to a CO flux equivalent to 8 × 10{sup −7} millibars, and a vibrational spectrum of adsorbed CO was obtained using infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy. The vibrational spectra of adsorbed CO from multiple preparations using procedure 1 show changes in the film termination structure and/or chemical nature of the surface defects—some of which are correlated with another phase that forms (“phase B”), even before enough of phase B has formed to be easily detected using low energy electron diffraction (LEED). During procedure 2, CO vibrational spectra were obtained between deposition+oxidation cycles, and these spectra show that the film termination structure and/or chemical nature of the surface defects changed as a function of sequential deposition+oxidation cycles. The authors conclude that measurement of vibrational spectra of adsorbed CO on oxide thin films provides a sensitive tool to probe chemical changes of defects on the surface and can thus complement LEED techniques by probing changes not visible by LEED. Increased use of vibrational spectra of adsorbed CO on thin films would enable better comparisons between films grown with different procedures and by different groups.

  14. Final Report: DoE SBIR Phase 2 Low-Cost Small Diameter NMR Technologies for In-Situ Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, David Oliver

    2010-09-03

    In this Phase 2 SBIR program, Vista Clara successfully developed and field-tested small diameter NNR logging tools for subsurface characterization and monitoring. This effort involved the design and development surface electronics, a winch with 470ft cable, and three interchangeable downhole probes: a 3.5â diameter borehole NMR probe, a 1.67â diameter borehole NMR probe, and a 2.5â diameter NMR probe that can be deployed using a Geoprobe direct push machine. The 3.5â probe was tested extensively over a 6 week period including 4â to 8â boreholes in Washington, Idaho, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Connecticut and Massachusetts. The field test campaign was highly successful. The 1.67â probe was assembled, tested and calibrated in the laboratory. The 2.5â Geoprobe probe is in final assembly and testing at the time of this report. The completed Phase 2 R&D program has resulted in the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes of 4â diameter, the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes on 2â diameter, and the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed by a direct push machine. These small diameter tools make NMR logging technically and economically feasible, for the first time. Previously available NMR logging tools were developed for oilfield applications and are prohibitively large and expensive for the majority of near surface groundwater characterization problems.

  15. Phase behavior and 13C NMR spectroscopic analysis of the mixed methane + ethane + propane hydrates in mesoporous silica gels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungmin; Cha, Inuk; Seo, Yongwon

    2010-11-25

    In this study, the phase behavior and quantitative determination of hydrate composition and cage occupancy for the mixed CH(4) + C(2)H(6) + C(3)H(8) hydrates were closely investigated through the experimental measurement of three-phase hydrate (H)-water-rich liquid (L(W))-vapor (V) equilibria and (13)C NMR spectra. To examine the effect of pore size and salinity, we measured hydrate phase equilibria for the quaternary CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) + water mixtures in silica gel pores of nominal diameters of 6.0, 15.0, and 30.0 nm and for the quinary CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) + NaCl + water mixtures of two different NaCl concentrations (3 and 10 wt %) in silica gel pores of a nominal 30.0 nm diameter. The value of hydrate-water interfacial tension for the CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) hydrate was found to be 47 ± 4 mJ/m(2) from the relation of the dissociation temperature depression with the pore size of silica gels at a given pressure. At a specified temperature, three-phase H-L(W)-V equilibrium curves of pore hydrates were shifted to higher pressure regions depending on pore sizes and NaCl concentrations. From the cage-dependent (13)C NMR chemical shifts of enclathrated guest molecules, the mixed CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) gas hydrate was confirmed to be structure II. The cage occupancies of each guest molecule and the hydration number of the mixed gas hydrates were also estimated from the (13)C NMR spectra.

  16. Fabrication of a novel hydrophobic/ion-exchange mixed-mode adsorbent for the dispersive solid-phase extraction of chlorophenols from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Wei, Yinmao

    2016-08-01

    A novel mixed-mode adsorbent was prepared by functionalizing silica with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde as the main mixed-mode scaffold due to the presence of the plentiful amino groups and benzene rings in their molecules. The adsorption mechanism was probed with acidic, natural and basic compounds, and the mixed hydrophobic and ion-exchange interactions were found to be responsible for the adsorption of analytes. The suitability of dispersive solid-phase extraction was demonstrated in the determination of chlorophenols in environmental water. Several parameters, including sample pH, desorption solvent, ionic strength, adsorbent dose, and extraction time were optimized. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the proposed dispersive solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography showed good linearity range and acceptable limits of detection (0.22∽0.54 ng/mL) for five chlorophenols. Notably, the higher extraction recoveries (88.7∽109.7%) for five chlorophenols were obtained with smaller adsorbent dose (10 mg) and shorter extraction time (15 min) compared with the reported methods. The proposed method might be potentially applied in the determination of trace chlorophenols in real water samples.

  17. Interpretation of the excess adsorption isotherms of organic eluent components on the surface of reversed-phase adsorbents. Effect on the analyte retention.

    PubMed

    Kazakevich, Y V; LoBrutto, R; Chan, F; Patel, T

    2001-04-13

    The excess adsorption isotherms of acetonitrile, methanol and tetrahydrofuran from water on reversed-phase packings were studied, using 10 different columns packed with C1-C6, C8, C10, C12, and C18 monomeric phases, bonded on the same type of silica. The interpretation of isotherms on the basis of the theory of excess adsorption shows significant accumulation of the organic eluent component on the adsorbent surface on the top of "collapsed" bonded layer. The accumulated amount was shown to be practically independent of the length of alkyl chains bonded to the silica surface. A model that describes analyte retention on a reversed-phase column from a binary mobile phase is developed. The retention mechanism involves a combination of analyte distribution between the eluent and organic adsorbed layer, followed by analyte adsorption on the surface of the bonded phase. A general retention equation for the model is derived and methods for independent measurements of the involved parameters are suggested. The theory was tested by direct measurement of analyte retention from the eluents of varied composition and comparison of the values obtained with those theoretically calculated values. Experimental and theoretically calculated values are in good agreement.

  18. Differential scanning calorimetry and /sup 2/H NMR studies of the phase behavior of gramicidin-phosphatidylcholine mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, M.R.; Davis, J.H.

    1988-03-22

    The extents of two-phase coexistence in the phase diagrams of mixtures of gramicidin with 1,2-bis(perdeuteriopalmitoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC-d62) and with 1,2-bis(perdeuteriomyristoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC-d54) mixtures have been explored with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 2/H NMR). For both systems, increased gramicidin content causes a decrease in transition enthalpy and a broadening of the peak in excess heat capacity at the transition. In DMPC-d54-based mixtures, the broadening is roughly symmetric about the pure lipid transition temperature. Addition of gramicidin to DPPC-d62 extends the excess heat capacity peak on the low-temperature side, resulting in a slightly asymmetric scan. Deuterium NMR spectra showing a superposition of gel and liquid-crystalline components, observed for both mixtures, indicate the presence of two-phase coexistence. For the DPPC-d62-based mixtures, two-phase coexistence is restricted to an approximately 2 degrees C temperature range below the pure transition temperature. For DMPC-d54-based mixtures, the region of two-phase coexistence is even narrower. For both mixtures, beyond a gramicidin mole fraction of 2%, distinct gel and liquid-crystal contributions to the spectra cannot be distinguished. Along with the broad featureless nature of the DSC scan in this region, this is taken to indicate that the transition has been replaced by a continuous phase change. These results are consistent with the existence of a closed two-phase region having a critical concentration of gramicidin below 2 mol%.

  19. Angular and temperature-dependent 77Se NMR in the metallic, SDW, and field-induced spin density wave phases of (TMTSF)2X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumata, L. L.; Brooks, J. S.; Kuhns, P. L.; Reyes, A. P.; Brown, S. E.; Cui, H. B.; Haddon, R. C.; Yamada, J.-I.

    2008-10-01

    We report angular dependent 77Se NMR measurements on the partially quenched, metallic, and magnetic field-induced spin density wave (FISDW) states of (TMTSF)2CIO4. To correlate the NMR data with the FISDW phase diagram, electrical transport was also measured concurrently in some cases. Similar measurements on (TMTSF)2PF6 allow comparison of the behavior of the NMR signal of the spin density wave (SDW) transition with that of the FISDW transition. We present details of the experimental findings including the enhancement behavior, and correlations of the angular dependence of the NMR spectra with the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1. A possible model to describe the behavior of the NMR signal intensity and 1/T1 in terms of a Hebel-Slichter mechanism upon crossing the metal-FISDW transition is presented.

  20. NMR studies of phase transition form a metallic state to a Dirac-electron state in the organic system, θ-(BEDT-TTF)2I3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Kazuya; Hirata, Michihiro; Ishikawa, Kyohei; Taniguchi, Tomotaka; Tamura, Masafumi; Kanoda, Kazushi

    2014-03-01

    The Dirac electron phase is realized in the bulk organic systems, θ and α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3. The bulky nature of the system allows one to study the Dirac electrons in the spin degrees of freedom by means of NMR (K. Miyagawa et al. JPSJ 79, 063703 (2010)). Moreover, in θ-(BEDT-TTF)2I3, the Dirac electron phase neighbors a metallic (superconducting) phase in a pressure-temperature phase diagram. To clarify how the Dirac phase emerges from the metallic state, we performed 13C NMR measurements for this material at ambient and under pressures. The angular dependence of NMR spectra demonstrates that all the molecules are equivalent (Hirata et al. PRB 85, 195146, (2012)). The temperature dependences of Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, hold the Korringa relation, which signifies metallicity under pressures before the transition to the Dirac phase. However, after the system undergoes a transition to the Dirac electron state, the NMR spectral shape becomes complicated indicating a structural phase transition. The analysis of the angular dependence of the NMR spectra shows the molecular arrangement changes from theta to alpha type. Supported in part by JSPS KAKENHI under Grant Nos. 20110002, 25220709 and 24654101.

  1. Changes in porosity and organic matter phase distribution monitored by NMR relaxometry following hydrous pyrolysis under uniaxial confinement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Lewan, Michael D.; Miller, Michael; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Artificial maturation methods are used to induce changes in source rock thermal maturity without the uncertainties that arise when comparing natural samples from a particular basin that often represent different levels of maturation and different lithofacies. A novel uniaxial confinement clamp was used on Woodford Shale cores in hydrous pyrolysis experiments to limit sample expansion by simulating the effect of overburden present during thermal maturation in natural systems. These samples were then subjected to X-ray computed tomography (X-CT) imaging and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry measurements. LF-NMR relaxometry is a noninvasive technique commonly used to measure porosity and pore-size distributions in fluid-filled porous media, but may also measure hydrogen present in hydrogen-bearing organic solids. Standard T1 and T2 relaxation distributions were determined and two dimensional T1-T2 correlation measurements were performed on the Woodford Shale cores. The T1-T2 correlations facilitate resolution of organic phases in the system. The changes observed in NMR-relaxation times correspond to bitumen and lighter hydrocarbon production that occur as source rock organic matter matures. The LF-NMR porosities of the core samples at maximum oil generation are significantly higher than porosities measured by other methods. This discrepancy likely arises from the measurement of highly viscous organic constituents in addition to fluid-filled porosity. An unconfined sample showed shorter relaxation times and lower porosity. This difference is attributed to the lack of fractures observed in the unconfined sample by X-CT.

  2. Gas-phase NMR measurements, absolute shielding scales, and magnetic dipole moments of 29Si and 73Ge nuclei.

    PubMed

    Makulski, W; Jackowski, K; Antusek, A; Jaszuński, M

    2006-10-12

    New gas-phase NMR measurements of the shielding constants of 29Si, 73Ge, and 1H nuclei in SiH4 and GeH4 are reported. The results, extrapolated to zero density, provide accurate isolated molecule values, best suited for comparison with theoretical calculations. Using the recent ab initio results for these molecules and the measured chemical shifts, we determine the absolute shielding scales for 29Si and 73Ge. This allows us to provide new values of the nuclear magnetic dipole moments for these two nuclei; in addition, we examine the dipole moments of 13C and 119Sn.

  3. Resilience of gas-phase anharmonicity in the vibrational response of adsorbed carbon monoxide and breakdown under electrical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabo, Ismaila

    2012-07-01

    In surface catalysis, the adsorption of carbon monoxide on transition-metal electrodes represents the prototype of strong chemisorption. Notwithstanding significant changes in the molecular orbitals of adsorbed CO, spectroscopic experiments highlight a close correlation between the adsorbate stretching frequency and equilibrium bond length for a wide range of adsorption geometries and substrate compositions. In this work, we study the origins of this correlation, commonly known as Badger's rule, by deconvoluting and examining the contributions from the adsorption environment to the intramolecular potential using first-principles calculations. Noting that intramolecular anharmonicity is preserved upon CO chemisorption, we show that Badger's rule for adsorbed CO can be expressed solely in terms of the tabulated Herzberg spectroscopic constants of isolated CO. Moreover, although it had been previously established using finite-cluster models that Badger's rule is not affected by electrical conditions, we find here that Badger's rule breaks down when the electrified surface is represented as a periodic slab. Examination of this breakdown in terms of anharmonic contributions from the effective surface charge reveals limitations of conventional finite-cluster models in describing electrical conditions at metal electrodes.

  4. Liquid phase adsorptions of Rhodamine B dye onto raw and chitosan supported mesoporous adsorbents: isotherms and kinetics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inyinbor, A. A.; Adekola, F. A.; Olatunji, G. A.

    2016-04-01

    Irvingia gabonensis endocarp waste was charred (DNc) and subsequently coated with chitosan (CCDNc). Physicochemical characteristics of the two adsorbents were established, while Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area methods were further employed for characterization. Efficiencies of the prepared adsorbents in the uptake of Rhodamine B (RhB) from aqueous effluent were investigated and adsorption data were tested using four isotherms and four kinetics models. The BET surface areas of the prepared adsorbent were 0.0092 and 4.99 m2/g for DNc and CCDNc, respectively, and maximum adsorption was recorded at pH between 3 and 4, respectively. While monolayer adsorption dominates the uptake of RhB onto DNc, uptake of RhB onto CCDNc was onto heterogeneous surface. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities (q max) obtained from the Langmuir equation are 52.90 and 217.39 mg/g for DNc and CCDNc, respectively. Pseudo second order and Elovich kinetic models well described the kinetics of the two adsorption processes. The mean sorption energy (E) calculated from the D-R model and desorption efficiencies suggests that while the uptake of RhB onto DNc was physical in nature, for RhB-CCDNc system chemisorption dominates.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as solid-phase microextraction adsorbent for the determination of low-level concentrations of butyltin compounds in seawater.

    PubMed

    Rastkari, Noushin; Ahmadkhaniha, Reza; Samadi, Nasrin; Shafiee, Abbas; Yunesian, Masud

    2010-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a kind of new carbon-based nanomaterials, which have drawn great attention in many application fields. The potential of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) adsorbent for the preconcentration of environmental pollutants has been investigated in recent years. In the present study, the feasibility of SWCNTs as SPME adsorbent for the determination of monobutyltin, dibutyltin and tributyltin in seawater samples was studied. To achieve this aim, the potential factors affecting the SPME efficiency, including extraction time, extraction temperature, desorption time, desorption temperature, and salinity were optimized. The developed method showed good performance according to the ICH (International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Analytical Methods) criteria. The acquired calibration curves were linear (r > or = 0.992) over the concentration range from < or = 12 to 2000 ng L(-1). For all of the analytes, the limit of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was below 5 ng L(-1). Furthermore, in comparison with the commercial carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber, the developed SWCNT fiber showed better thermal stability (over 350 degrees C) and longer life span (over 150 times). The application of the proposed method in environmental analyses was shown by analyzing seawater samples from the harbors on the Persian Gulf for butyltin residues. Some of the butyltins were detected in the analyzed samples. Results of the present study demonstrate the feasibility of the SWCNTs as SPME adsorbent for the determination of butyltins in seawater samples. PMID:20152270

  6. Optically polarized {sup 129}Xe NMR investigation of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Clewett, Catherine F. M.; Morgan, Steven W.; Saam, Brian; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-12-15

    We demonstrate the utility of optically polarized {sup 129}Xe NMR in a convection cell for measuring the surface properties of materials. In particular, we show adsorption of xenon gas on oxidatively purified single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The interaction between xenon and multiwalled nanotubes produced by chemical vapor deposition was stronger than that of single- or multiwalled nanotubes produced by carbon arc discharge. Xenon was observed in gas, liquid, and adsorbed phases. The large polarization and moderate pressures of xenon ({approx}0.2 MPa) allowed resolution of multiple lines in both the gas and condensed phases of xenon in contact with carbon nanotubes. Xe gas exchanges with physisorbed xenon in two different environments. Xe adsorbs preferentially on defects, but if the number of defects is not sufficient, it will also adsorb on surface and interstitial sites. Penetration of Xe in the tube interior was not observed.

  7. A solid-state NMR study of phase structure, molecular interactions, and mobility in blends of citric acid and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Schantz, S; Hoppu, P; Juppo, A M

    2009-05-01

    Citric acid anhydrate (CAA) and paracetamol (PARA), prepared as crystalline physical mixtures and as amorphous blends, were studied using (13)C solid-state cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR. Amorphous blends showed significant line broadening from the conformational distribution as compared to the crystalline samples. Also, chemical shift variations were observed between crystalline and amorphous blends, which were attributed to differences in intermolecular interactions. Averaging of proton rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1rho)) probed via different (13)C sites in the amorphous blends confirmed molecular level mixing. For some, initially amorphous, sample compositions the onset of crystallization was evident directly from spectra and from the significantly longer T(1rho) relaxations. Thus, crystallization caused phase separation with properties of the two phases resembling those of pure CAA and PARA, respectively. (13)C spectra of amorphous 50/50 (w/w, %) CAA/PARA recorded from above the glass transition temperature broadened as the temperature increased to a maximum at T approximately T(g) + 33 K. This was the result of a dynamic interference between the line narrowing techniques being applied and the time scale of molecular reorientation in the miscible melt. The derived average correlation time was found to correspond well with previous results from melt rheology. We conclude that the underlying reasons for physical instability (i.e., crystallization from the miscible melt, including molecular interactions and dynamics) of this class of amorphous binary mixtures can be effectively evaluated using NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Short-Range Order of Mesomorphic Phase of a Semi-crystalline Polymer by Solid-State NMR: Isotactic Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shichen; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Mesophase is intermediate phase between crystalline and melt state. Characterization of short-range structures of disordered mesomorphic phase without long-range order is challenging issue in polymer characterization. The short range order was considered same as α or β i PP, or neither. In this work, a new strategy using 13C-13C through space interactions as well as molecular dynamics based on chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) re-orientation is proposed for evaluating short-range order of mesophase of isotactic-polypropylene (iPP). 13C-13C double quantum (DQ) build up curves of 13C 15 percent CH3 selectively labeled iPP and spin dynamics simulations elucidate that local packing structures in mesophase is very close to that in β phase. Moreover, exchange NMR proves that the crystalline chains perform large amplitude motions in all α, β, and mesophase. The correlation time of overall dynamics of stems in mesophase follows the same Arrhenius line with that of β phase but is largely deviated from the Arrhenius line of the α phase. Through the obtained results, it is concluded that short-range order in mesophase is exceedingly close or same to those in β phase. This work was financially supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-1105829) and by UA startup funds.

  9. Microwave distillation-solid phase adsorbent trapping device for the determination of off-flavors, geosmin and methylisoborneol, in catfish tissue below their rejection levels

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, E.D.; Shen, C.Y.; Miller, D.W.; Perschbacher, P.W.

    1996-08-01

    Described is a rapid microwave-mediated steam distillation device for determining two predominant off-flavor compounds, geosmin and methylisoborneol, in catfish tissue. A microwave on-time of 10 min is needed to efficiently remove these off-flavor compounds from the sample matrix and trap them on a solid phase adsorbent. A minimal amount of organic solvent is used to elute the trapped compounds. The extract is then analyzed by gas chromatography with ion trap detection in the selective ion storage mode. Detection limits in the sub-parts-per-billion range are obtained with this method. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The (1) H NMR spectrum of pyrazole in a nematic phase.

    PubMed

    Provasi, Patricio; Jimeno, María Luisa; Alkorta, Ibon; Reviriego, Felipe; Elguero, José; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2016-08-01

    The experimental (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of 1H-pyrazole was recorded in thermotropic nematic liquid crystal N-(p-ethoxybenzylidene)-p-butylaniline (EBBA) within the temperature range of 299-308 K. Two of three observable dipolar DHH -couplings appeared to be equal at each temperature because of fast prototropic tautomerism. Analysis of the Saupe orientational order parameters using fixed geometry determined by computations and experimental dipolar couplings results in a situation in which the molecular orientation relative to the magnetic field (and the liquid crystal director) can be described exceptionally by a single parameter. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Schiff base - Chitosan grafted L-monoguluronic acid as a novel solid-phase adsorbent for removal of congo red.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Qiu, Li-Gan; Su, Hong-Zhen; Cao, Cheng-Liang; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    A novel modified chitosan adsorbent (GL-SBCS) was synthesized by covalently grafting a Schiff base-chitosan (SBCS) onto the surface of l-monoguluronic acid. Physico-chemical investigation on the adsorption of congo red, an anionic azo dye by GL-SBCS has been carried out. The effect of different weight contents of chitosan in GL-SBCS composite, adsorbent dosage, initial pH and contract time were studied in detail using batch adsorption. Results showed that GL-SBCS exhibited better than normal CS and l-monoguluronic acid. Further investigation demonstrated that the adsorption pattern fitted well with the Langmuir model (R(2)>0.99) but less-satisfied the Freundlich model. Both ionic interaction as well as physical forces is responsible for binding of congo red with GL-SBCS as determined by zeta potential measurement Both sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate significantly influenced the adsorption process. SBCS would be a good method and resource to increase absorption efficiency for the removal of anionic dyes in a wastewater treatment process.

  12. TiO2 nanotubes as solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Kefi, Bochra Bejaoui; El Atrache, Latifa Latrous; Kochkar, Hafedh; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method based on TiO2 nanotubes solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with gas chromatography (GC) was established for the analysis of seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): acenaphtylene, acenaphthene, anthracene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene. Factors affecting the extraction efficiency including the eluent type and its volume, adsorbent amount, sample volume, sample pH and sample flow rate were optimized. The characteristic data of analytical performance were determined to investigate the sensitivity and precision of the method. Under the optimized extraction conditions, the method showed good linearity in the range of 0.01-0.8 microg/mL, repeatability of the extraction (RSD were between 6.7% and 13.5%, n = 5) and satisfactory detection limits (0.017-0.059 ng/mL). The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of surface water (tap, river and dam) samples. The recoveries of PAHs spiked in environmental water samples ranged from 90% to 100%. All the results indicated the potential application of titanate nanotubes as solid-phase extraction adsorbents to pre-treat water samples.

  13. Oleic and docosahexaenoic acid differentially phase separate from lipid raft molecules: a comparative NMR, DSC, AFM, and detergent extraction study.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Dumaual, Alfred C; Castillo, Alicia; LoCascio, Daniel; Siddiqui, Rafat A; Stillwell, William; Wassall, Stephen R

    2004-09-01

    We have previously suggested that the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may in part function by enhancing membrane lipid phase separation into lipid rafts. Here we further tested for differences in the molecular interactions of an oleic (OA) versus DHA-containing phospholipid with sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (CHOL) utilizing (2)H NMR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, and detergent extractions in model bilayer membranes. (2)H NMR and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) established the phase behavior of the OA-containing 1-[(2)H(31)]palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (16:0-18:1PE-d(31))/SM (1:1) and the DHA-containing 1-[(2)H(31)]palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (16:0-22:6PE-d(31))/SM (1:1) in the absence and presence of equimolar CHOL. CHOL was observed to affect the OA-containing phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) more than the DHA-containing PE, as exemplified by >2 x greater increase in order measured for the perdeuterated palmitic chain in 16:0-18:1PE-d(31)/SM (1:1) compared to 16:0-22:6PE-d(31)/SM (1:1) bilayers in the liquid crystalline phase. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments showed less lateral phase separation between 16:0-18:1PE-rich and SM/CHOL-rich raft domains in 16:0-18:1PE/SM/CHOL (1:1:1) bilayers than was observed when 16:0-22:6PE replaced 16:0-18:1PE. Differences in the molecular interaction of 16:0-18:1PE and 16:0-22:6PE with SM/CHOL were also found using biochemical detergent extractions. In the presence of equimolar SM/CHOL, 16:0-18:1PE showed decreased solubilization in comparison to 16:0-22:6PE, indicating greater phase separation with the DHA-PE. Detergent experiments were also conducted with cardiomyocytes fed radiolabeled OA or DHA. Although both OA and DHA were found to be largely detergent solubilized, the amount of OA that was found to be associated with raft-rich detergent-resistant membranes exceeded DHA by

  14. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear coherence transfer using phase and amplitude modulated rf irradiation at the Hartmann Hahn sideband conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2003-12-01

    An improved variant of the popular double cross-polarization (DCP) experiment for heteronuclear dipolar recoupling in solid-state NMR spectroscopy under magic-angle-spinning is introduced. By simple phase and amplitude modulation of the rf irradiation at the Hartman-Hahn sideband conditions, the new pulse sequence, dubbed iDCP, enables broadband excitation with the high efficiency of γ-encoded coherence transfer. The efficiency and robustness of iDCP toward isotropic chemical shift variations and chemical shift anisotropies, in the order typically applying for the backbone atoms in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled proteins, is demonstrated numerically and experimentally by 15N to 13C coherence transfer for 15N-labeled N-Ac- L-valyl- L-leucine and 13C, 15N-labeled- L-threonine.

  15. 17O and 29Si NMR parameters of MgSiO3 phases from high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy and first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Berry, Andrew J; Frost, Daniel J; Gregorovic, Alan; Pickard, Chris J; Readman, Jennifer E; Wimperis, Stephen

    2007-10-31

    The 29Si and 17O NMR parameters of six polymorphs of MgSiO3 were determined through a combination of high-resolution solid-state NMR and first-principles gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) formalism calculations using periodic boundary conditions. MgSiO3 is an important component of the Earth's mantle that undergoes structural changes as a function of pressure and temperature. For the lower pressure polymorphs (ortho-, clino-, and protoenstatite), all oxygen species in the 17O high-resolution triple-quantum magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra were resolved and assigned. These assignments differ from those tentatively suggested in previous work on the basis of empirical experimental correlations. The higher pressure polymorphs of MgSiO3 (majorite, akimotoite, and perovskite) are stabilized at pressures corresponding to the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle, with perovskite being the major constituent at depths >660 km. We present the first 17O NMR data for these materials and confirm previous 29Si work in the literature. The use of high-resolution multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) and satellite-transition MAS (STMAS) experiments allows us to resolve distinct oxygen species, and full assignments are suggested. The six polymorphs exhibit a wide variety of structure types, providing an ideal opportunity to consider the variation of NMR parameters (both shielding and quadrupolar) with local structure, including changes in coordination number, local geometry (bond distances and angles), and bonding. For example, we find that, although there is a general correlation of increasing 17O chemical shift with increasing Si-O bond length, the shift observed also depends upon the exact coordination environment.

  16. Magnetic metal-organic framework-titanium dioxide nanocomposite as adsorbent in the magnetic solid-phase extraction of fungicides from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao; Lin, Yunliang; Wang, Zhenhua; Wong, Y-L Elaine; Chen, Xiangfeng; Chan, T-W Dominic

    2016-09-30

    In this work, a core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2@MOF/TiO2 nanocomposite was synthesized and used to as adsorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of triazole fungicides from environmental water samples. Five triazole fungicides, namely, triadimenol, hexaconazole, diniconazole, myclobutanil, and tebuconazole, were selected as target analytes for MSPE. These analytes were quantitatively adsorbed on microspheres, and the sorbents were separated from the solution by using a magnet. The analytes were desorbed by methanol and determined through liquid-chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The extraction parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were optimized through response surface methodology. The limits of detection and limits of quantification for the selected fungicides were 0.19-1.20ngL(-1) and 0.61-3.62ngL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was applied to determine the concentration of fungicides in actual environmental water samples. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by measuring the recovery of the spiked samples. The satisfying recoveries of the four water samples ranged from 90.2% to 104.2%. Therefore, the magnetic metal-organic framework/TiO2 nanocomposite based MSPE is a potential approach to analyze fungicides in actual water samples. PMID:27592609

  17. Graphene-modified TiO2 nanotube arrays as an adsorbent in micro-solid phase extraction for determination of carbamate pesticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Fang, Zhi

    2015-04-15

    Graphene is a good adsorbent for organic pollutants, especially for compounds containing benzene rings. When used in TiO2 nanotube arrays for micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE), the combination of graphene's strong adsorptive properties with its good separation capabilities results in excellent sample preconcentration performance. In the present study, graphene-modified TiO2 nanotube arrays were prepared by electrodeposition using a cyclic voltammetric reduction method. Four carbamate pesticides, including metolcarb, carbaryl, isoprocarb, and diethofencarb, were used as model analytes to validate the enrichment properties of the prepared adsorbent in μ-SPE. Factors affecting the enrichment efficiency of the μ-SPE procedure were optimized and included sample pH, elution solvents, salting-out effect, adsorption time and desorption time. Under optimal conditions, graphene-modified TiO2 nanotube arrays exhibited excellent enrichment efficiency for carbamate pesticides. The detection limits of these carbamate pesticides ranged from 2.27 to 3.26 μg L(-1). The proposed method was validated using four environmental water samples, and yields of pesticides recovered from spiked test samples of the four analytes were in the range of 83.9-108.8%. These results indicate that graphene-modified TiO2 nanotube arrays exhibit good adsorption to the target pollutants, and the method described in this work could be used as a faster and easier alternative procedure for routine analysis of carbamate pesticides in real water samples. PMID:25818138

  18. Graphene-modified TiO2 nanotube arrays as an adsorbent in micro-solid phase extraction for determination of carbamate pesticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Fang, Zhi

    2015-04-15

    Graphene is a good adsorbent for organic pollutants, especially for compounds containing benzene rings. When used in TiO2 nanotube arrays for micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE), the combination of graphene's strong adsorptive properties with its good separation capabilities results in excellent sample preconcentration performance. In the present study, graphene-modified TiO2 nanotube arrays were prepared by electrodeposition using a cyclic voltammetric reduction method. Four carbamate pesticides, including metolcarb, carbaryl, isoprocarb, and diethofencarb, were used as model analytes to validate the enrichment properties of the prepared adsorbent in μ-SPE. Factors affecting the enrichment efficiency of the μ-SPE procedure were optimized and included sample pH, elution solvents, salting-out effect, adsorption time and desorption time. Under optimal conditions, graphene-modified TiO2 nanotube arrays exhibited excellent enrichment efficiency for carbamate pesticides. The detection limits of these carbamate pesticides ranged from 2.27 to 3.26 μg L(-1). The proposed method was validated using four environmental water samples, and yields of pesticides recovered from spiked test samples of the four analytes were in the range of 83.9-108.8%. These results indicate that graphene-modified TiO2 nanotube arrays exhibit good adsorption to the target pollutants, and the method described in this work could be used as a faster and easier alternative procedure for routine analysis of carbamate pesticides in real water samples.

  19. [Analysis of organochlorine pesticides and pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables by gas chromatography-electron capture detection coupled with solid-phase extraction using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haixiang; Jia, Yanxia; Ding, Mingyu; Sun, Dajiang; Zhao, Mengbin

    2011-05-01

    A multi-residue analytical method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbent was developed. The determination of 6 organochlorine pesticides and 7 pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables (including cucumber, cherry tomato, cabbage, lettuce, purple cabbage, leek, shallot and onion) was carried out by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). The GC-ECD method used two columns (HP-50 and HP-1) and two ECD detectors. The HP-50 column was used for the analysis and the HP-1 column for validation. The clean-up conditions were optimized. The analytes were extracted by acetonitrile, and the extract was cleaned up by the MWCNTs SPE cartridge. The extract was re-dissolved by hexane, eluted with acetone-hexane (7:3, v/v) from the columns. The recoveries were over 70% for the 11 pesticides in the 13 pesticides. The results indicated that the MWCNTs SPE cartridge was efficient for 8 vegetable samples, because it reduced the contamination of the coloring materials to GC-ECD. The experimental results showed the MWCNTs SPE cartridge can adsorb the coloring materials and the eluant was nearly colorless.

  20. Glyoxal-Urea-Formaldehyde Molecularly Imprinted Resin as Pipette Tip Solid-Phase Extraction Adsorbent for Selective Screening of Organochlorine Pesticides in Spinach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Lv, Tianwei; Yan, Hongyuan; Wu, Gaochan; Li, Haonan

    2015-11-01

    A new kind of glyoxal-urea-formaldehyde molecularly imprinted resin (GUF-MIR) was synthesized by a glyoxal-urea-formaldehyde (GUF) gel imprinting method with 4,4'-dichlorobenzhydrol as a dummy template. The obtained GUF-MIR was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and applied as a selective adsorbent of miniaturized pipet tip solid-phase extraction (PT-SPE) for the separation and extraction of three organochlorine pesticides (dicofol (DCF), dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane (DDD), and tetradifon) in spinach samples. The proposed pretreatment procedures of spinach samples involved only 5.0 mg of GUF-MIR, 0.7 mL of MeOH-H2O (1:1, v/v) (washing solvent), and 0.6 mL of cyclohexane-ethyl acetate (9:1, v/v) (elution solvent). In comparison with other adsorbents (such as silica gel, C18, NH2-silica gel, and neutral alumina (Al2O3-N)), GUF-MIR showed higher adsorption and purification capacity for DCF, DDD, and tetradifon in aqueous solution. The average recoveries at three spiked levels ranged from 89.1% to 101.9% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ≤ 7.1% (n = 3). The presented GUF-MIR-PT-SPE method combines the advantages of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), GUF, and PT-SPE and can be used in polar solutions with high affinity and selectivity to the analytes in complex samples.

  1. [Analysis of organochlorine pesticides and pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables by gas chromatography-electron capture detection coupled with solid-phase extraction using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haixiang; Jia, Yanxia; Ding, Mingyu; Sun, Dajiang; Zhao, Mengbin

    2011-05-01

    A multi-residue analytical method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbent was developed. The determination of 6 organochlorine pesticides and 7 pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables (including cucumber, cherry tomato, cabbage, lettuce, purple cabbage, leek, shallot and onion) was carried out by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). The GC-ECD method used two columns (HP-50 and HP-1) and two ECD detectors. The HP-50 column was used for the analysis and the HP-1 column for validation. The clean-up conditions were optimized. The analytes were extracted by acetonitrile, and the extract was cleaned up by the MWCNTs SPE cartridge. The extract was re-dissolved by hexane, eluted with acetone-hexane (7:3, v/v) from the columns. The recoveries were over 70% for the 11 pesticides in the 13 pesticides. The results indicated that the MWCNTs SPE cartridge was efficient for 8 vegetable samples, because it reduced the contamination of the coloring materials to GC-ECD. The experimental results showed the MWCNTs SPE cartridge can adsorb the coloring materials and the eluant was nearly colorless. PMID:21847981

  2. Effect of phase symmetry on the NMR spectrum of acetonitrile oriented in a uniaxial-biaxial-uniaxial phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, H. S. Vinay; Yelamaggad, C. V.; Khetrapal, C. L.; Ramanathan, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    We report here the measurement of the Csbnd H and the Hsbnd H dipolar couplings of the methyl group of acetonitrile oriented in the biaxial liquid crystal potassium laurate/1-decanol/water system. These parameters show large variations when measured as a function of temperature. The variations follow the symmetry of the phase as the liquid crystal goes through the sequence of uniaxial - biaxial - uniaxial phases and show a close correspondence to the phase changes that occur in the liquid crystalline solvent coinciding with the onset of biaxiality. The Hsbnd Csbnd H bond angle calculated after incorporating vibrational corrections to the dipolar couplings is discussed in terms of contributions in the case of the biaxial liquid crystal arising from vibration-rotation interaction effects.

  3. Phase Cycling Schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS Solid State NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY414, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D 1H/1H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY412, XY413, XY414, and XY814 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T10T2,±2, T1,±1T2,±1, etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field in homogeneity effects revealed that XY414 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp-RFDR are also analyzed

  4. Phase cycling schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS solid state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-03-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY4(1)4, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D (1)H/(1)H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY4(1)2, XY4(1)3, XY4(1)4, and XY8(1)4 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T(10)T(2,±2), T(1,±1)T(2,±1), etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field inhomogeneity effects revealed that XY4(1)4 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp

  5. Dicationic polymeric ionic-liquid-based magnetic material as an adsorbent for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of organophosphate pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiong; Liu, Qin; Chen, Qiliang; Zhao, Wenjie; Xiang, Guoqiang; He, Lijun; Jiang, Xiuming; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particles modified with a dicationic polymeric ionic liquid are described as a new adsorbent in magnetic solid-phase extraction. They were obtained through the copolymerization of a 1,8-di(3-vinylimidazolium)octane-based ionic liquid with vinyl-modified SiO2 @Fe3 O4 , and were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The modified magnetic particles are effective in the extraction of organophosphate pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Also, they can provide different extraction performance for the selected analytes including fenitrothion, parathion, fenthion, phoxim, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene, where the extraction efficiency is found to be in agreement with the hydrophobicity of analytes. Various factors influencing the extraction efficiency, such as, the amount of adsorbent, extraction, and desorption time, and type and volume of the desorption solvent, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, a good linearity ranging from 1-100 μg/L is obtained for all analytes, except for parathion (2-200 μg/L), where the correlation coefficients varied from 0.9960 to 0.9998. The limits of detection are 0.2-0.8 μg/L, and intraday and interday relative standard deviations are 1.7-7.4% (n = 5) and 3.8-8.0% (n = 3), respectively. The magnetic solid-phase extraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography can be applied for the detection of trace targets in real water samples with satisfactory relative recoveries and relative standard deviations. PMID:27357486

  6. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  7. Multinuclear NMR microscopy of two-phase fluid systems in porous rock.

    PubMed

    Doughty, D A; Tomutsa, L

    1996-01-01

    The high-field magnetic resonance (MR) characteristics of fluids in porous reservoir rock exhibit short T2 relaxation times and broad natural line widths. These characteristics severely restrict which MR imaging (MRI) methodology can be used to obtain high-resolution porescale images of fluids in porous rock. An MR microscopy protocol based on 3D backprojection using strong imaging gradients was developed to overcome many of these constraints. To improve the image quality of two-phase systems, multinuclear MRI using proton MR to image the brine phase and 19F MR of a fluorinated hydrocarbon to image the oil phase was used. Resolution as high as 25 microns per pixel has been obtained for fluid systems in Bentheim and Fontainebleau sandstones. Separate proton and 19F images of brine and oil phases show good agreement with total saturation images. Software has been developed to perform 3D erosion/dilations and to extract the pore size distribution from binarized 3D images of fluid filled porosity. Results from pore size measurements show significant differences in the nature of the pore network in Fontainebleau and Bentheim sandstones. PMID:8970097

  8. 2H NMR study of phase transition and hydrogen dynamics in hydrogen bonded organic antiferroelectric 55DMBP-H2ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, Tetsuo; Hara, Masamichi; Fujimori, Hiroki; Hagiwara, Shoko

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen dynamics in one-dimensional hydrogen bonded organic antiferroelectric, co-crystal of 5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (55DMBP) and chloranilic acid (H2ca), was investigated by use of 2H high resolution solid-state NMR. The two types of hydrogen bonds O-H …N and N+-H … O - in the antiferroelectric phase were clearly observed as the splitting of the side band of the 2H MAS NMR spectra of the acid-proton deuterated compound 55DMBP-D 2ca. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time was measured of the N+-H and O-H deuterons, respectively. It was suggested that the motion of the O-H deuteron is already in the antiferroelectric phase in the fast-motion regime in the NMR time scale, while that of the N+-H deuteron is a slow motion. In the high-temperature paraelectric phase, the both deuterons become equivalent and the fast motion of the deuterons in the NMR time scale is taking place with the activation energy of 7.9 kJ mol-1.

  9. HPLC-NMR revisited: using time-slice high-performance liquid chromatography-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance with database-assisted dereplication.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Kenneth T; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Nyberg, Nils T

    2013-03-19

    Time-based trapping of chromatographically separated compounds onto solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges and subsequent elution to NMR tubes was done to emulate the function of HPLC-NMR for dereplication purposes. Sufficient mass sensitivity was obtained by use of a state-of-the-art HPLC-SPE-NMR system with a cryogenically cooled probe head, designed for 1.7 mm NMR tubes. The resulting (1)H NMR spectra (600 MHz) were evaluated against a database of previously acquired and prepared spectra. The in-house-developed matching algorithm, based on partitioning of the spectra and allowing for changes in the chemical shifts, is described. Two mixtures of natural products were used to test the approach: an extract of Carthamus oxyacantha (wild safflower), containing an array of spiro compounds, and an extract of the endophytic fungus Penicillum namyslowski, containing griseofulvin and analogues. The database matching of the resulting spectra positively identified expected compounds, while the number of false positives was few and easily recognized.

  10. Gas-phase NMR. Part I. Conformational energies of 1,2-disubstituted propanes and a comparison with MM2 and MNDO calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Takashi; Hirano, Tsuneo; Sato, Hisaya

    1984-11-01

    Gas-phase 1H NMR spectra of 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-DCP) and 1,2-di(methoxy- d3)-propane (1,2-DMP) have been measured. The conformational energies of these molecules in the gas phase were determined from the observed coupling constants under a three rotational isomeric state model and are compared with the theoretical values from MM2 molecular mechanics and MNDO molecular orbital calculations. The results indicate that gas-phase NMR is useful method for the determination of conformational energies of relatively complex molecules, and that the MNDO results are more reasonable than the MM2 results for molecules containing electronegative atoms such as oxygen.

  11. Humic acids as both matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and adsorbent for magnetic solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Xu, Jing; Yin, Jia; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-08-19

    In the present study, humic acids (HAs) were applied as both a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and an adsorbent of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) for the first time. As natural macromolecule compounds, HAs are inherently highly functionalized and contain laser energy absorbing-transferring aromatic structures. This special molecular structure made HAs a good candidate for use as a MALDI matrix in small molecule analysis. At the same time, due to its good adsorption ability, HAs was prepared as MSPE adsorbent via a simple co-mixing method, in which the commercially available HAs were directly mixed with Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in a mortar and grinded evenly and completely. In this process, MNPs were physically wrapped and adhered to tiny HAs leading to the formation of magnetic HAs (MHAs). To verify the bi-function of the MHAs, Rhodamine B (RdB) was chosen as model compound. Our results show that the combination of MHAs-based MSPE and MALDI-TOF-MS can provide a rapid and sensitive method for the determination of RdB in chili oil. The whole analytical procedure could be completed within 30 min for simultaneous determination of more than 20 samples, and the limit of quantitation for RdB was found to be 0.02 μg/g. The recoveries in chili oil were in the range 73.8-81.5% with the RSDs less than 21.3% (intraday) and 20.3% (interday). The proposed strategy has potential applications for high-throughput analysis of small molecules in complex samples. PMID:26343436

  12. Humic acids as both matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and adsorbent for magnetic solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Xu, Jing; Yin, Jia; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-08-19

    In the present study, humic acids (HAs) were applied as both a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and an adsorbent of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) for the first time. As natural macromolecule compounds, HAs are inherently highly functionalized and contain laser energy absorbing-transferring aromatic structures. This special molecular structure made HAs a good candidate for use as a MALDI matrix in small molecule analysis. At the same time, due to its good adsorption ability, HAs was prepared as MSPE adsorbent via a simple co-mixing method, in which the commercially available HAs were directly mixed with Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in a mortar and grinded evenly and completely. In this process, MNPs were physically wrapped and adhered to tiny HAs leading to the formation of magnetic HAs (MHAs). To verify the bi-function of the MHAs, Rhodamine B (RdB) was chosen as model compound. Our results show that the combination of MHAs-based MSPE and MALDI-TOF-MS can provide a rapid and sensitive method for the determination of RdB in chili oil. The whole analytical procedure could be completed within 30 min for simultaneous determination of more than 20 samples, and the limit of quantitation for RdB was found to be 0.02 μg/g. The recoveries in chili oil were in the range 73.8-81.5% with the RSDs less than 21.3% (intraday) and 20.3% (interday). The proposed strategy has potential applications for high-throughput analysis of small molecules in complex samples.

  13. Determination of imidazole derivatives by micellar electrokinetic chromatography combined with solid-phase microextraction using activated carbon-polymer monolith as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yung-Han; Lirio, Stephen; Li, Chih-Keng; Liu, Wan-Ling; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an effective method for the separation of imidazole derivatives 2-methylimidazole (2-MEI), 4- methylimidazole (4-MEI) and 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI) in caramel colors using cation-selective exhaustive injection and sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CSEI-sweeping-MEKC) was developed. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for the CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method were in the range of 4.3-80μgL(-1) and 14-270μgL(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, a rapid fabrication activated carbon-polymer (AC-polymer) monolithic column as adsorbent for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of imidazole colors was developed. Under the optimized SPME condition, the extraction recoveries for intra-day, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 84.5-95.1% (<6.3% RSDs), 85.6-96.1% (<4.9% RSDs), and 81.3-96.1% (<7.1% RSDs), respectively. The LODs and LOQs of AC-polymer monolithic column combined with CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method were in the range of 33.4-60.4μgL(-1) and 111.7-201.2μgL(-1), respectively. The use of AC-polymer as SPME adsorbent demonstrated the reduction of matrix effect in food samples such as soft drink and alcoholic beverage thereby benefiting successful determination of trace-level caramel colors residues using CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method. The developed AC-polymer monolithic column can be reused for more than 30 times without any significant loss in the extraction recovery for imidazole derivatives.

  14. Volatile garlic odor components: gas phases and adsorbed exhaled air analysed by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Laakso, I; Seppänen-Laakso, T; Hiltunen, R; Müller, B; Jansen, H; Knobloch, K

    1989-06-01

    Combined headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HSGC-MS) was used in the analysis of garlic volatile compounds. Twenty major components were identified in the gas phases enriched by fresh, sliced garlic cloves ( ALLIUM SATIVUM L, Allioceae, Liliidae). Suspended dry garlic powder and crushed garlic, incubated in vegetable oil, revealed a different pattern since mainly the amounts of di- and trisulfides were decreased. The considerable compositional differences found in the analyses for the gas phase of garlic cloves, kept in oil, are likely associated with the poor stability of allicin in a lipophilic environment; a marked increase in the amounts of 2-propene-1-thiol, acetic acid, and ethanol was observed in the gas phase, whereas trisulfides were present in traces only. The occurrence of 2-propene-1-thiol and diallyl disulfide, the two principal sulfur components in exhaled air, also may indicate a rapid degradation of most garlic volatile components probably caused by the enzymatically active human salivary or digestive system. PMID:17262412

  15. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique for Structural and Dynamic Analysis of Solid-Phase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Polenova, Tatyana; Gupta, Rupal; Goldbourt, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analysis of a broad range of systems, including inorganic materials, pharmaceuticals, and biomacromolecules. The recent developments in MAS NMR instrumentation and methodologies opened new vistas to atomic-level characterization of a plethora of chemical environments previously inaccessible to analysis, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. PMID:25794311

  16. Cigarette filters as adsorbents of solid-phase extraction for determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics in environmental water samples coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Wang, Weidong; Huang, Yuming

    2012-01-15

    The potential use of cigarette filters (CFs) as solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbents for the preconcentration of six fluoroquinolones (FQs) antibacterial agents prior to liquid chromatography was examined in this paper. In order to find a suitable procedure for extraction of the target FQs in one single step, various parameters probably affecting the extraction efficiency including the eluent kind and volume, sample flow rate, pH, ion strength and sample volume were systematically optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the target FQs could be easily extracted by the proposed SPE cartridge. Combination of SPE with HPLC/UV provided detection limits for different FQs of 2-5 ng L(-1) when 500 mL of water sample was processed. The precision of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation, ranged from 4.1 to 6.3% for 2.5 μg L(-1) FQs. The recoveries of FQs spiked in environmental water samples ranged from 76 to 112%. The results obtained from the proposed method demonstrated that CFs-based solid-phase extraction combined with HPLC/UV was suitable for analyzing fluoroquinolones in water samples at ng L(-1) concentration level.

  17. Thermodynamics of the adsorption of organic compounds from the gas phase over a monolayer of liquid crystal formed on the surface of a carbon adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytin, K. A.; Bykov, E. S.; Onuchak, L. A.; Kudryashov, S. Yu.; Kuvshinova, S. A.; Burmistrov, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Inverse gas-solid chromatography is used to study the adsorption of vapors of organic compounds with different structures and polarities on a carbon adsorbent modified with a monolayer of 4-(3-hydroxypropyloxy)-4'-formylazobenzene (HPOFAB) polar LIQUID crystal. The resulting thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption on the original and modified adsorbents are compared. The effect the nature and structure of adsorbate molecules and the liquid crystal modifier have on the thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption is considered.

  18. The microwave heating mechanism of N-(4-methoxybenzyliden)-4-butylaniline in liquid crystalline and isotropic phases as determined using in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tasei, Yugo; Tanigawa, Fumikazu; Kawamura, Izuru; Fujito, Teruaki; Sato, Motoyasu; Naito, Akira

    2015-04-14

    Microwave heating effects are widely used in the acceleration of organic, polymerization and enzymatic reactions. These effects are primarily caused by the local heating induced by microwave irradiation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms associated with microwave heating effects on the chemical reactions are not yet well understood. This study investigated the microwave heating effect of N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline (MBBA) in liquid crystalline and isotropic phases using in situ microwave irradiation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, by obtaining (1)H NMR spectra of MBBA under microwave irradiation. When heated simply using the temperature control unit of the NMR instrument, the liquid crystalline MBBA was converted to the isotropic phase exactly at its phase transition temperature (Tc) of 41 °C. The application of microwave irradiation at 130 W for 90 s while maintaining the instrument temperature at 20 °C generated a small amount of isotropic phase within the bulk liquid crystal. The sample temperature of the liquid crystalline state obtained during microwave irradiation was estimated to be 35 °C by assessing the linewidths of the (1)H NMR spectrum. This partial transition to the isotropic phase can be attributed to a non-equilibrium local heating state induced by the microwave irradiation. The application of microwave at 195 W for 5 min to isotropic MBBA while maintaining an instrument temperature of 50 °C raised the sample temperature to 160 °C. In this study, the MBBA temperature during microwave irradiation was estimated by measuring the temperature dependent chemical shifts of individual protons in the sample, and the different protons were found to indicate significantly different temperatures in the molecule. These results suggest that microwave heating polarizes bonds in polar functional groups, and this effect may partly explain the attendant acceleration of organic reactions.

  19. A High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR Study of the Enantiodiscrimination of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) by an Immobilized Polysaccharide-Based Chiral Phase

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Márcio W.; Lourenço, Tiago C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the investigation of the chiral interaction between 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) enantiomers and an immobilized polysaccharide-based chiral phase. For that, suspended-state high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H HR-MAS NMR) was used. 1H HR-MAS longitudinal relaxation time and Saturation Transfer Difference (STD NMR) titration experiments were carried out yielding information at the molecular level of the transient diastereoisomeric complexes of MDMA enantiomers and the chiral stationary phase. The interaction of the enantiomers takes place through the aromatic moiety of MDMA and the aromatic group of the chiral selector by π-π stacking for both enantiomers; however, a stronger interaction was observed for the (R)-enantiomer, which is the second one to elute at the chromatographic conditions. PMID:27668862

  20. Analyte induced water adsorbability in gas phase biosensors: the influence of ethinylestradiol on the water binding protein capacity.

    PubMed

    Snopok, Borys; Kruglenko, Ivanna

    2015-05-01

    An ultra-sensitive gas phase biosensor/tracer/bio-sniffer is an emerging technology platform designed to provide real-time information on air-borne analytes, or those in liquids, through classical headspace analysis. The desired bio-sniffer measures gaseous 17α- ethinylestradiol (ETED) as frequency changes on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), which is a result of the interactions of liquid sample components in the headspace (ETED and water) with a biorecognition layer. The latter was constructed by immobilization of polyclonal antiserum against a phenolic A-ring of estrogenic receptors through protein A. The QCM response exhibited stretched exponential kinetics of negative frequency shifts with reversible and "irreversible" components of mass uptake onto the sensor surface in static headspace conditions when exposed to water solutions of ETED over the sensor working range, from 10(-10) to 10(-17) g L(-1). It was shown that the variations in the QCM response characteristics are due to the change of the water-binding capacity of the sensing layer induced by protein transformations initiated by the binding of ETED molecules. This result is well correlated with the natural physiological function of estrogens in controlling the homeostasis of body fluids in living beings. PMID:25763411

  1. Detection of conserved N-linked glycans and phase-variable lipooligosaccharides and capsules from campylobacter cells by mass spectrometry and high resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Christine M; Michael, Frank St; Jarrell, Harold C; Li, Jianjun; Gilbert, Michel; Larocque, Suzon; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Brisson, Jean-Robert

    2003-07-01

    Glycomics, the study of microbial polysaccharides and genes responsible for their formation, requires the continuous development of rapid and sensitive methods for the identification of glycan structures. In this study, methods for the direct analysis of sugars from 108 to 1010 cells are outlined using the human gastrointestinal pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni. Using capillary-electrophoresis coupled with sensitive electrospray mass spectrometry, we demonstrate variability in the lipid A component of C. jejuni lipooligosaccharides (LOSs). In addition, these sensitive methods have permitted the detection of phase-variable LOS core structures that were not observed previously. High resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR was used to examine capsular polysaccharides directly from campylobacter cells and showed profiles similar to those observed for purified polysaccharides analyzed by solution NMR. This method also exhibited the feasibility of campylobacter serotyping, mutant verification, and preliminary sugar analysis. HR-MAS NMR examination of growth from individual colonies of C. jejuni NCTC11168 indicated that the capsular glycan modifications are also phase-variable. These variants show different staining patterns on deoxycholate-PAGE and reactivity with immune sera. One of the identified modifications was a novel -OP=O(NH2)OMe phosphoramide, not observed previously in nature. In addition, HR-MAS NMR detected the N-linked glycan, GalNAc-alpha1,4-GalNAc-alpha1,4-[Glc-beta1,3-]GalNAc-alpha1,4-GalNAc-alpha1,4-GalNAc-alpha1,3-Bac, where Bac is 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-d-glucopyranose, in C. jejuni and Campylobacter coli. The presence of this common heptasaccharide in multiple campylobacter isolates demonstrates the conservation of the N-linked protein glycosylation pathway in this organism and describes the first report of HR-MAS NMR detection of N-linked glycans on glycoproteins from intact bacterial cells.

  2. The entropies of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Charles T; Sellers, Jason R V

    2012-10-31

    Adsorbed molecules are involved in many reactions on solid surface that are of great technological importance. As such, there has been tremendous effort worldwide to learn how to predict reaction rates and equilibrium constants for reactions involving adsorbed molecules. Theoretical calculation of both the rate and equilibrium constants for such reactions requires knowing the entropy and enthalpy of the adsorbed molecule. While much effort has been devoted to measuring and calculating the enthalpies of well-defined adsorbates, few measurements of the entropies of adsorbates have been reported. We present here a new way to determine the standard entropies of adsorbed molecules (S(ad)(0)) on single crystal surfaces from temperature programmed desorption data, prove its accuracy by comparison to entropies measured by equilibrium methods, and apply it to published data to extract new entropies. Most importantly, when combined with reported entropies, we find that at high coverage, they linearly track the entropy of the gas-phase molecule at the same temperature (T), such that S(ad)(0)(T) = 0.70 S(gas)(0)(T) - 3.3R (R = the gas constant), with a standard deviation of only 2R over a range of 50R. These entropies, which are ~2/3 of the gas, are huge compared to most theoretical predictions. This result can be extended to reliably predict prefactors in the Arrhenius rate constant for surface reactions involving such species, as proven here for desorption. PMID:23033909

  3. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  4. Carbon nanotube sponges as a solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the enrichment and determination of polychlorinated biphenyls at trace levels in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Jia-Bin; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2016-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) sponges has recently attracted considerable attention in numerous fields because of its excellent properties, such as high porosity, light weight, and large surface area. The potential of CNT sponges for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of organic pollutants at trace levels was investigated in this study for the first time. Seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were selected as analytes, and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was employed for the detection. We optimized important parameters that may influence the efficiency of SPE, including the kind and volume of elution solvent, sample pH, and sample flow rate and volume. Under optimized conditions, low limits of detection (0.72-1.98ngL(-1)), wide range of linearity (10-1000ngL(-1)) and good repeatability (2.69-6.85%, n=5) were obtained. CNT sponges exhibited higher extraction performance than other adsorbent materials under the optimized conditions. Real environmental water samples were analyzed, and satisfactory recoveries (81.1-119.1%) were achieved. All these results demonstrated that CNT sponges are suitable SPE material for the enrichment and sensitive determination of PCBs at trace levels.

  5. A novel dispersive solid-phase extraction method using metal-organic framework MIL-101 as the adsorbent for the analysis of benzophenones in toner.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhu, Quanfei; Yang, Yang; Huang, Jianlin; Dang, Xueping; Chen, Huaixia

    2015-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been paid widespread attention in the field of adsorption and separation materials due to its porosity, large specific surface area, unsaturated metal-ligand sites and structural diversity. In this study, the green powder MIL-101 was synthesized and used for the extraction of benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone from toner samples for the first time. The synthesized MIL-101 was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry and nitrogen adsorption porosimetry. The MIL-101 was applied as the dispersive solid phase extraction (DSPE) adsorbent for the extraction and preconcentration of benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone from toner samples. The extraction conditions were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a DSPE-HPLC method for the determination of benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone was developed. The method yielded a linear calibration curve in the concentration ranges from 4.0 to 3500 μg L(-1) for the three analytes in toner samples with regression coefficients (r(2)) of 0.9992, 0.9999 and 0.9990, respectively. Limits of detection were 1.2, 1.2 and 0.9 μg L(-1), respectively. Both the intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSDs) were <10%. PMID:25476369

  6. Carbon nanotube sponges as a solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the enrichment and determination of polychlorinated biphenyls at trace levels in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Jia-Bin; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2016-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) sponges has recently attracted considerable attention in numerous fields because of its excellent properties, such as high porosity, light weight, and large surface area. The potential of CNT sponges for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of organic pollutants at trace levels was investigated in this study for the first time. Seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were selected as analytes, and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was employed for the detection. We optimized important parameters that may influence the efficiency of SPE, including the kind and volume of elution solvent, sample pH, and sample flow rate and volume. Under optimized conditions, low limits of detection (0.72-1.98ngL(-1)), wide range of linearity (10-1000ngL(-1)) and good repeatability (2.69-6.85%, n=5) were obtained. CNT sponges exhibited higher extraction performance than other adsorbent materials under the optimized conditions. Real environmental water samples were analyzed, and satisfactory recoveries (81.1-119.1%) were achieved. All these results demonstrated that CNT sponges are suitable SPE material for the enrichment and sensitive determination of PCBs at trace levels. PMID:27591590

  7. MQ NMR and SPME analysis of nonlinearity in the degradation of a filled silicone elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Alviso, C T; Berman, E S; Harvey, C A; Maxwell, R S; Wilson, T S; Cohenour, R; Saalwachter, K; Chasse, W

    2008-10-10

    Radiation induced degradation of polymeric materials occurs via numerous, simultaneous, competing chemical reactions. Though degradation is typically found to be linear in adsorbed dose, some silicone materials exhibit non-linear dose dependence due to dose dependent dominant degradation pathways. We have characterized the effects of radiative and thermal degradation on a model filled-PDMS system, Sylgard 184 (commonly used as an electronic encapsulant and in biomedical applications), using traditional mechanical testing, NMR spectroscopy, and sample headspace analysis using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) followed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). The mechanical data and {sup 1}H spin-echo NMR indicated that radiation exposure leads to predominantly crosslinking over the cumulative dose range studies (0 to 250 kGray) with a rate roughly linear with dose. {sup 1}H Multiple Quantum NMR detected a bimodal distribution in the network structure, as expected by the proposed structure of Sylgard 184. The MQ-NMR further indicated that the radiation induced structural changes were not linear in adsorbed dose and competing chain scission mechanisms contribute more largely to the overall degradation process in the range of 50 -100 kGray (though crosslinking still dominates). The SPME-GC/MS data were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which identified subtle changes in the distributions of degradation products (the cyclic siloxanes and other components of the material) as a function of age that provide insight into the dominant degradation pathways at low and high adsorbed dose.

  8. NMR Studies of 3He Films on Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of NMR studies of the dynamics of 3He adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride. These studies can identify the phase transitions of the 2D films as a function of temperature. A thermally activated temperature dependence is observed for 2.6 < T < 8 K compared to a linear temperature dependence for 0.7 < T < 2.6 K. This linear dependence is consistent with that expected for thermal diffusion in a fluid for coverages of 0.4 - 0.6 of a monolayer.

  9. Study of the ferroelastic phase transition in the tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 by magic-angle spinning and static NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-03-01

    The ferroelastic phase transition of tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 at the phase transition temperature (TC) = 283 K was characterized by magic-angle spinning (MAS) and static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and confirmed by optical polarizing spectroscopy. The structural geometry near TC was studied in terms of the chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups were distinguishable in the 13C NMR spectrum, and the T1ρ results indicate that they undergo tumbling motion above TC in a coupled manner. From the 14N NMR results, the two nitrogen nuclei in the N(C2H5)4+ ions were distinguishable above TC, and the splitting in the spectra below TC was related to the ferroelastic domains with different orientations.

  10. Hyphenation of solid-phase extraction with liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance: application of HPLC-DAD-SPE-NMR to identification of constituents of Kanahia laniflora.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Cailean; Staerk, Dan; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2005-06-01

    The introduction of on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) in HPLC-NMR has dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of this technique by concentration of the analytes in a small-volume NMR flow cell and by increasing the amount of the analyte by multiple peak trapping. In this study, the potential of HPLC-DAD-SPE-NMR hyphenation was demonstrated by structure determination of complex constituents of flower, leaf, root, and stem extracts of an African medicinal plant Kanahia laniflora. The technique was shown to allow acquisition of high-quality homo- and heteronuclear 2D NMR data following analytical-scale HPLC separation of extract constituents. Four flavonol glycosides [kaempferol 3-O-(6-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-d-glucopyranoside; kaempferol 3-O-(2,6-di-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-d-glucopyranoside; quercetin 3-O-(2,6-di-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-d-glucopyranoside (rutin); and isorhamnetin, 3-O-(6-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-d-glucopyranoside] and three 5alpha-cardenolides [coroglaucigenin 3-O-6-deoxy-beta-d-allopyranoside; coroglaucigenin 3-O-(4-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl)-6-deoxy-beta-d-glucopyranoside; 3'-O-acetyl-3'-epiafroside] were identified, with complete assignments of 1H and 13C resonances based on HSQC and HMBC spectra whenever required. Confirmation of the structures was provided by HPLC-MS data. The HPLC-DAD-SPE-NMR technique therefore speeds up the dereplication of complex mixtures of natural origin significantly, by characterization of individual extract components prior to preparative isolation work. PMID:15924388

  11. NMR study of the AF-SC-SC-AF phased transition in a pnictide superconductor LaFeAsO1-xHx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoki; Sakurai, Ryosuke; Iimura, Soushi; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo; Yamakawa, Youichi; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    We have performed 75As and 1H NMR measurements in LaFeAsO1xHx, an isomorphic compound of LaFeAsO1xFx. LaFeAsO1xHx is an electron doped system, and O2- can be replaced with H- up to x = 0.5. LaFeAsO1xHx is known for having double superconducting (SC) domes on H doping. Recently, we discovered that a new antiferromagnetic (AF) phase follows the double SC domes on further H doping, forming a symmetric AF-SC-SC-AF phase alignment in the electronic phase diagram Unlike the AF ordering in the lightly H-doped regime, the AF ordering in the highly H-doped regime is attributed to the nesting between electron pockets. In the conference, we will show the data of both NMR spectra and the relaxation rate 1/T1 in the whole doping region. We will discuss the difference of electronic states between the lightly H-doped AF-SC phases and highly H-doped SC-AF phases. This work is supported by a Grant-in-Aid (Grant No. KAKENHI 23340101) from the Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture, Japan.

  12. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    DOEpatents

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  13. An investigation of catalytic active phase-support interactions by IR, NMR and x-ray absorption spectroscopies. Progress report, January 15, 1991--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.L.

    1993-07-01

    Active catalytic phases (metal, mixed metals, oxide or mixed oxides) interacting with oxide support can affect percentage exposed, the morphology of supported particles, the degree of reducibility of cations, etc., in a variety of ways. Solid state {sup 29}Si NMR was used to obtain a new correlation between partial charge on the Si which comprises a part of the SiOHAl Br{o}nsted acid structure in amorphous silica-aluminas. We also describe two potential improvements in solid state NMR applied to catalysts and catalysts supports. One is experimental, dynamic angle spinning NMR, a new technique for obtaining high resolution spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, e.g., {sup 27}Al. The second approach is an alternative to the standard fast Fourier transform of the free induction decay to convert from the time to spectral domain, the maximum entropy method. Effect of different methods of preparation of Pd/L-zeolites is described. By comparison to analogous Pt systems, it is the inherent chemistry of the L-zeolite which results in better dispersion when impregnation preparation is used relative to ion exchange preparation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to compare the effect of support (SiO{sub 2} and L-zeolite) on the degree and kind of Pt-Ni interaction. When supported in L-zeolite and promoted with Ni, Pt has improved stability both with regard to self-poisoning and sulfur catalyzed agglomeration.

  14. Gas phase NMR and ab initio molecular orbital calculations of 5-methoxy-1,3-dioxanes: a critical survey of the Gauche effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Akihiro; Furuya, Hidemine; Ichimura, Noriko; Kawauchi, Susumu

    1997-02-01

    The gas-phase NMR analysis of 5-methoxy-1,3-dioxanes was carried out. The conformational energies estimated from the observed coupling constant data were compared with the results of ab initio MO calculations using d95 + (2df,p) basis set at the MP2 level. While the energy difference between the axial-out and equatorial-out forms was in a reasonable agreement, the 1,5 interaction energy between the methoxy methyl and the ring oxygens was not in accord.

  15. Quality assurance in the pre-analytical phase of human urine samples by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Budde, Kathrin; Gök, Ömer-Necmi; Pietzner, Maik; Meisinger, Christine; Leitzmann, Michael; Nauck, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Friedrich, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches investigate changes in metabolite profiles, which may reflect changes in metabolic pathways and provide information correlated with a specific biological process or pathophysiology. High-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy is used to identify metabolites in biofluids and tissue samples qualitatively and quantitatively. This pre-analytical study evaluated the effects of storage time and temperature on (1)H NMR spectra from human urine in two settings. Firstly, to evaluate short time effects probably due to acute delay in sample handling and secondly, the effect of prolonged storage up to one month to find markers of sample miss-handling. A number of statistical procedures were used to assess the differences between samples stored under different conditions, including Projection to Latent Structure Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), non-parametric testing as well as mixed effect linear regression analysis. The results indicate that human urine samples can be stored at 10 °C for 24 h or at -80 °C for 1 month, as no relevant changes in (1)H NMR fingerprints were observed during these time periods and temperature conditions. However, some metabolites most likely of microbial origin showed alterations during prolonged storage but without facilitating classification. In conclusion, the presented protocol for urine sample handling and semi-automatic metabolite quantification is suitable for large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:26264917

  16. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  17. Tracking Sodium-Antimonide Phase Transformations in Sodium-Ion Anodes: Insights from Operando Pair Distribution Function Analysis and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allan, Phoebe K; Griffin, John M; Darwiche, Ali; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Wiaderek, Kamila M; Chapman, Karena W; Morris, Andrew J; Chupas, Peter J; Monconduit, Laure; Grey, Clare P

    2016-02-24

    Operando pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and ex situ (23)Na magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS ssNMR) spectroscopy are used to gain insight into the alloying mechanism of high-capacity antimony anodes for sodium-ion batteries. Subtraction of the PDF of crystalline NaxSb phases from the total PDF, an approach constrained by chemical phase information gained from (23)Na ssNMR in reference to relevant model compounds, identifies two previously uncharacterized intermediate species formed electrochemically; a-Na(3-x)Sb (x ≈ 0.4-0.5), a structure locally similar to crystalline Na3Sb (c-Na3Sb) but with significant numbers of sodium vacancies and a limited correlation length, and a-Na(1.7)Sb, a highly amorphous structure featuring some Sb-Sb bonding. The first sodiation breaks down the crystalline antimony to form first a-Na(3-x)Sb and, finally, crystalline Na3Sb. Desodiation results in the formation of an electrode formed of a composite of crystalline and amorphous antimony networks. We link the different reactivity of these networks to a series of sequential sodiation reactions manifesting as a cascade of processes observed in the electrochemical profile of subsequent cycles. The amorphous network reacts at higher voltages reforming a-Na(1.7)Sb, then a-Na(3-x)Sb, whereas lower potentials are required for the sodiation of crystalline antimony, which reacts to form a-Na(3-x)Sb without the formation of a-Na(1.7)Sb. a-Na(3-x)Sb is converted to crystalline Na3Sb at the end of the second discharge. We find no evidence of formation of NaSb. Variable temperature (23)Na NMR experiments reveal significant sodium mobility within c-Na3Sb; this is a possible contributing factor to the excellent rate performance of Sb anodes.

  18. ¹J(CH) couplings in Group 14/IVA tetramethyls from the gas-phase NMR and DFT structural study: a search for the best computational protocol.

    PubMed

    Nazarski, Ryszard B; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2014-08-01

    Four tetramethyl compounds EMe4 (E = C, Si, Ge, and Pb) were studied by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy in gaseous and liquid states at 300 K. Extrapolation of experimental vapor-phase C-H J-couplings to a zero-pressure limit permitted determining the (1)J(0,CH)s in methyl groups of their nearly isolated molecules. Theoretical predictions of the latter NMR parameters were also performed in a locally dense basis sets/pseudopotential (Sn, Pb) approach, by applying a few DFT methods pre-selected in calculations of other gas-phase molecular properties of all these species and SnMe4 (bond lengths, C-H stretching IR vibrations). A very good agreement theory vs. experiment was achieved with some computational protocols for all five systems. The trends observed in their geometry and associated coupling constants ((1)J(CH)s, (2)J(HH)s) are discussed and rationalized in terms of the substituent-induced rehybridization of the methyl group (treated as a ligand) carbon, by using Bent's rule and the newly proposed, theoretically derived values of the Mulliken electronegativity (χ) of related atoms and groups. All these χ data for the Group-14/IVA entities were under a lot of controversy for a very long time. As a result, the recommended χ values are semi-experimentally confirmed for the first time and only a small correction is suggested for χ(Ge) and χ(GeMe3).

  19. Asymmetric simultaneous phase-inversion cross-polarization in solid-state MAS NMR: Relaxing selective polarization transfer condition between two dilute spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jianping; Yang, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Double cross polarization (DCP) has been widely used for heteronuclear polarization transfer between 13C and 15N in solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. However, DCP is such sensitive to experimental settings that small variations or deviations in RF fields would deteriorate its efficiency. Here, we report on asymmetric simultaneous phase-inversion cross polarization (referred as aSPICP) for selective polarization transfer between low-γ 13C and 15N spins. We have demonstrated through simulations and experiments using biological solids that the asymmetric duration in the simultaneous phase-inversion cross polarization scheme leads to efficient polarization transfer between 13C and 15N even with large chemical shift anisotropies in the presence of B1 field variations or mismatch of the Hartmann-Hahn conditions. This could be very useful in the aspect of long-duration experiments for membrane protein studies at high fields.

  20. Phase solubility, 1H NMR and molecular modelling studies of bupivacaine hydrochloride complexation with different cyclodextrin derivates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jug, Mario; Mennini, Natascia; Melani, Fabrizio; Maestrelli, Francesca; Mura, Paola

    2010-11-01

    A novel method, which simultaneously exploits experimental (NMR) and theoretically calculated data obtained by a molecular modelling technique, was proposed, to obtain deeper insight into inclusion geometry and possible stereoselective binding of bupivacaine hydrochloride with selected cyclodextrin derivatives. Sulphobuthylether-β-cyclodextrin and water soluble polymeric β-cyclodextrin demonstrated to be the best complexing agents for the drug, resulting in formation of the most stable inclusion complexes with the highest increase in aqueous drug solubility. The drug-carrier binding modes with these cyclodextrins and phenomena which may be directly related to the higher stability and better aqueous solubility of complexes formed were discussed in details.

  1. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, L. B.

    1985-04-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by magic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable engine sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. The NMR techniques that will be emphasized are the measurement and analysis of the (17)O NMR properties, (27)Al NMR intensity quantitation, and (27)Al and (29)Si NMR relaxation rates. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of (17)O enriched Na-Y faujasties.

  2. Using Zn/Al layered double hydroxide as a novel solid-phase extraction adsorbent to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at trace levels in water samples prior to the determination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Long; Zhou, Jia-Bin; Zhao, Ru-Song; Chen, Xiang-Feng

    2012-09-01

    This paper demonstrates, for the first time, the great potential of using Zn/Al layered double hydroxide intercalated sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (Zn/Al-SDBS-LDH) as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) material in the extraction of persistent organic pollutants prior to the determination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in environmental water samples. Zn/Al-SDBS-LDH, a relatively inexpensive and simply prepared material, was synthesized and used as a SPE adsorbent to quantitatively determine the concentration of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environmental water samples. Factors affecting extraction efficiency, such as, eluent type, eluent volume, flow rate of sample, sample volume, and amount of adsorbent, were investigated and optimized in detail. Experimental results indicate that there is an excellent linear relationship between peak area and the concentration of PAHs over the range of 5-500 ng L(-1), and the precisions (relative standard deviation (RSD)) were 2.5-6.3% under the optimum conditions. Based on the ratio of chromatographic signal-to-base line noise (S/N = 3), the limits of detection could reach 1.2-3.2 ng L(-1). This novel method was successfully applied to the analysis of PAHs in environmental water samples. As such, we show here that the use of Zn/Al-SDBS-LDH as SPE adsorbent materials, coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, is an excellent improvement in the routine analysis of PAHs at trace levels in the environment.

  3. Trace determination of chromium(VI) in environmental water samples using innovative thermally reduced graphene (TRG) modified SiO₂ adsorbent for solid phase extraction and UV-vis spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Sereshti, Hassan; Farahani, Mina Vasheghani; Baghdadi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    An innovative thermally reduced graphene (TRG) modified silica-supported 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (SiO2-APTES) composite was synthesized and characterized using Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy SEM techniques. The adsorbent was then used in the solid phase extraction (SPE) of Cr (VI) as the Cr (VI)-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) complex with the subsequent measurement by UV-vis spectrophotometry. The adsorbent surface was activated by adding sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the sample solution. The effect of the main experimental parameters such as type and volume of the extraction solvent, pH, dosage of DPC, SDS, the adsorbent, time of the extraction, and salt concentration on the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. A linear dynamic range of 1.3-40 ng mL(-1) with a satisfactory determination coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9930 was obtained. A detection limit of 0.4 ng mL(-1) Cr (VI) was attained when a sample volume of 25 mL was used. Intraday and inter-day precisions were obtained equal to 2.3% and 7.9%, respectively. The enrichment factor (EF) was calculated to be equal to 167. The technique was applied successfully to the determination of Cr (VI) at trace levels in tap, river, sewage and ground water samples and the relative recoveries of the added chromium were in the range of 92.6-109.9%.

  4. Solid-state 13C NMR study of banana liquid crystals - 3: Alkyl-tail-group packing environments of an acute-angle bent-core molecule in the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Hiromichi; Endo, Yumi; Kimura, Saori; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Harada, Motoi; Lee, Eun-Woo; Sone, Masato; Watanabe, Junji; Kang, Sungmin

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were performed on the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases of an acute-angle banana-shaped molecule, N(1,7)-S30. In the hexagonal columnar phase, three peaks appear at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that the two alkyl tails have different packing structures, and one of the tails has two different conformations within a single molecule. Combined cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning and pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurements show that one of the alkyl chains is located inside and the other is located outside the columnar structure. In the cubic phase, pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurement shows that only one peak appears at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that both of the alkyl chains are located outside the cubic structure.

  5. Monitoring and understanding the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition in the metal-organic framework [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Lucier, Bryan E G; Sinelnikov, Regina; Terskikh, Victor V; Staroverov, Viktor N; Huang, Yining

    2015-10-01

    The paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition in two isostructural metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] (M=Mg, Zn) was investigated by in situ variable-temperature (25) Mg, (67) Zn, (14) N, and (13) C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy. With decreasing temperature, a disorder-order transition of NH4 (+) cations causes a change in dielectric properties. It is thought that [NH4 ][Mg(HCOO)3 ] exhibits a higher transition temperature than [NH4 ][Zn(HCOO)3 ] due to stronger hydrogen-bonding interactions between NH4 (+) ions and framework oxygen atoms. (25) Mg and (67) Zn NMR parameters are very sensitive to temperature-induced changes in structure, dynamics, and dielectric behavior; stark spectral differences across the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition are intimately related to subtle changes in the local environment of the metal center. Although (25) Mg and (67) Zn are challenging nuclei for SSNMR experiments, the highly spherically symmetric metal-atom environments in [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] give rise to relatively narrow spectra that can be acquired in 30-60 min at a low magnetic field of 9.4 T. Complementary (14) N and (13) C SSNMR experiments were performed to probe the role of NH4 (+) -framework hydrogen bonding in the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition. This multinuclear SSNMR approach yields new physical insights into the [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] system and shows great potential for molecular-level studies on electric phenomena in a wide variety of MOFs.

  6. Preparation of magnetic graphene/mesoporous silica composites with phenyl-functionalized pore-walls as the restricted access matrix solid phase extraction adsorbent for the rapid extraction of parabens from water-based skin toners.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianan; He, Xinying; Liu, Xiaodan; Sun, Xueni; Li, Yan

    2016-09-23

    In this work, phenyl-functionalized magnetic graphene/mesoporous silica composites (MG-mSiO2-Ph) were prepared and applied as restricted access matrix solid phase extraction (RAM-SPE) adsorbents to determine the parabens in commercially available retail cosmetics. MG-mSiO2-Ph composites were synthesized by a surfactant-mediated co-condensation reaction in which mesoporous silica with phenyl-functionalized pore-walls was coated on a magnetic graphene sheet. The obtained nano-composites were proven to be of sufficient quality for an ideal RAM-SPE adsorbent with a large specific surface area of 369m(2)g(-1), uniform mesopores of 2.8nm, and special phenyl-functionalized pore-walls. Parabens, such as methyl paraben, ethyl paraben and propyl paraben, were extracted from water-based skin toners using one step of the RAM-SPE and were then analysed by a HPLC-DAD system. The SPE conditions were optimized by studying the parameters, such as the adsorbent amount, elution solvent type, adsorption time and desorption time, that influence the extraction efficiency. For each analyte, there were good linearities of approximately 0.10-120μgmL(-1) with determination coefficients (R(2))>0.995. The sensitivity was as low as 0.01-0.025μgmL(-1) for the LOD, and the percent recoveries were 98.37-105.84%. The intra-day and inter-day RSDs were 1.44-6.11% (n=6) and 3.12-11.70% (n=6), respectively. The results indicated that this method with novel RAM-SPE adsorbents is sensitive and convenient. The results also offered an attractive alternative for the extraction and determination of paraben preservatives in a complex matrix, such as cosmetics. PMID:27575922

  7. Facile preparation of surface-exchangeable core@shell iron oxide@gold nanoparticles for magnetic solid-phase extraction: use of gold shell as the intermediate platform for versatile adsorbents with varying self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaping; Qi, Li; Shen, Ying; Ma, Huimin

    2014-02-01

    The core@shell Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with exchangeable self-assembled monolayers have been developed for mode switching magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) using high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The adsorbents were synthesized by chemical coprecipitation to prepare magnetic cores followed by sonolysis to produce gold shells. Functionalization of Fe3O4@Au NPs surface was realized through self-assembly of commercially available low molecular weight thiol-containing ligands using gold shells as intermediate platform and the dynamic nature of Au-S chemistry allowed substituent of one thiol-containing ligand with another simply by thiol exchange process. The resultant adsorbents were characterized by transmission electronic microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, contact angle measurement, and vibrating sample magnetometry. To evaluate the versatile performance of the developed MSPE adsorbents, they were applied for normal-phase SPE followed by reversed-phase SPE. A few kinds of diphenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were employed as model analytes, respectively. The predominant parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, wide dynamic linear range (6.25-1600 μg L(-1) for diphenols and 1.56-100 μg L(-1) for PAHs) with good linearity (r(2)≥0.989) and low detection limits (0.34-16.67 μg L(-1) for diphenols and 0.26-0.52 μg L(-1) for PAHs) were achieved. The advantage of the developed method is that the Fe3O4@Au NPs could be reutilized for preconcentrating diverse target analytes in different SPE modes sequentially simply through treatment with desired thiol-containing ligands.

  8. Joint NMR and Solid-Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatography Chemometric Approach for Very Complex Mixtures: Grape and Zone Identification in Wines.

    PubMed

    Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Guitian, Esteban; Riguera, Ricardo

    2016-06-21

    In very complex mixtures, classification by chemometric methods may be limited by the difficulties to extract from the NMR or gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) experimental data information useful for a reliable classification. The joint analysis of both data has showed its superiority in the biomedical field but is scarcely used in foodstuffs and never in wine in spite of the complexity of their spectra and classification. In this article we show that univariate and multivariate principal component analysis-discriminant analysis (PCA-DA) statistics applied to the combined (1)H NMR and solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography (SPME-GC) data of a collection of 270 wines from Galicia (northwest Spain) allows a discrimination and classification not attainable from the separate data, distinguishing wines from autochthonous and nonautochthonous grapes, mono- from the plurivarietals, and identifying, in part, the geographical subzone of origin of the albariño wines. A general and automatable protocol, based on the signal integration of selected ROIs (regions of interest), is proposed that allows the fast and reliable identification of the grape in Galician wines. PMID:27247992

  9. NMR study of the vortex slush phase in organic superconductor κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu(NCS)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urano, M.; Tonishi, J.; Inoue, H.; Saito, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Chiku, H.; Oosawa, A.; Goto, T.; Suzuki, T.; Sasaki, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K.

    2007-07-01

    The vortex state in a single crystal of the layered organic superconductor κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu(NCS)2 , where BEDT-TTF (or ET) is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene, was studied by H-NMR1 . Under a low field region around 0.75T , the vortex-glass-liquid transition was demonstrated by a diverging of the longitudinal nuclear spin relaxation rate and peak broadening in spectra. Under a high field region near the upper critical field Hc2(0)≃7T , the curvature of nuclear spin relaxation curves showed a drastic change at the temperature where the emergence of the quantum vortex slush state was reported. The mechanism in this curvature change was discussed in terms of the fluctuating field produced by fragments of vortex glass.

  10. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination. Part II: Pulse NMR and NMR Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Uses simple pulse NMR experiments to discuss Fourier transforms. Studies the generation of spin echoes used in the imaging procedure. Shows that pulse NMR experiments give signals that are additions of sinusoids of differing amplitudes, frequencies, and phases. (MVL)

  11. Investigation of Phase Mixing in Amorphous Solid Dispersions of AMG 517 in HPMC-AS Using DSC, Solid-State NMR, and Solution Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Calahan, Julie L; Azali, Stephanie C; Munson, Eric J; Nagapudi, Karthik

    2015-11-01

    Intimate phase mixing between the drug and the polymer is considered a prerequisite to achieve good physical stability for amorphous solid dispersions. In this article, spray dried amorphous dispersions (ASDs) of AMG 517 and HPMC-as were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), solid-state NMR (SSNMR), and solution calorimetry. DSC analysis showed a weakly asymmetric (ΔTg ≈ 13.5) system with a single glass transition for blends of different compositions indicating phase mixing. The Tg-composition data was modeled using the BKCV equation to accommodate the observed negative deviation from ideality. Proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory and rotating frames ((1)H T1 and T1ρ), as measured by SSNMR, were consistent with the observation that the components of the dispersion were in intimate contact over a 10-20 nm length scale. Based on the heat of mixing calculated from solution calorimetry and the entropy of mixing calculated from the Flory-Huggins theory, the free energy of mixing was calculated. The free energy of mixing was found to be positive for all ASDs, indicating that the drug and polymer are thermodynamically predisposed to phase separation at 25 °C. This suggests that miscibility measured by DSC and SSNMR is achieved kinetically as the result of intimate mixing between drug and polymer during the spray drying process. This kinetic phase mixing is responsible for the physical stability of the ASD.

  12. High resolution magic angle spinning NMR as a tool for unveiling the molecular enantiorecognition of omeprazole by amylose-based chiral phase.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Juliana Cristina; de Campos Lourenço, Tiago; Silva, Lorena Mara A; Venâncio, Tiago; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2014-03-21

    Polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phases (CSP) demonstrate great versatility and higher chiral selectivity for a variety of chiral compounds in multimodal elution modes (normal, reverse and polar organic). The main role of CSP phenyl carbamate based derivatives as chiral selectors is the formation of diastereoisomeric complexes by means of π-π interaction, dipole-dipole, hydrogen bonding and/or inclusion complex mechanisms. Nevertheless, the mechanism behind their enantioselectivity requires clarification. High resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H HR/MAS NMR) has provided key information on the recognition process at the binding sites of the CSP surface. Herein we report the results obtained using omeprazole as a probe for these investigations.

  13. Deuteron and proton NMR study of D2, p-dichlorobenzene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene in bimesogenic liquid crystals with two nematic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnell, E. E.; Ahmed, Z.; Welch, C.; Mehl, G. H.; Dong, R. Y.

    2016-08-01

    The solutes dideuterium, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene and p-dichlorobenzene (pdcb) are co-dissolved in a 61/39 wt% mixture of CBC9CB/5CB, a bimesogenic liquid crystal with two nematic phases. NMR spectra are collected for each solute. The local electric field gradient (FZZ) is obtained from the dideuterium spectrum. A double Maier-Saupe potential (MSMS) is used to rationalize the order parameters of pdcb. The liquid-crystal fields G1 and G2 are taken to be due to size and shape interactions and interactions between the solute molecular quadrupole and the mean FZZ of the medium. The FZZ 's obtained from D2 and G2 (from pdcb) are compared and discussed.

  14. Tracking Sodium-Antimonide Phase Transformations in Sodium-Ion Anodes: Insights from Operando Pair Distribution Function Analysis and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allan, Phoebe K; Griffin, John M; Darwiche, Ali; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Wiaderek, Kamila M; Chapman, Karena W; Morris, Andrew J; Chupas, Peter J; Monconduit, Laure; Grey, Clare P

    2016-02-24

    Operando pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and ex situ (23)Na magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS ssNMR) spectroscopy are used to gain insight into the alloying mechanism of high-capacity antimony anodes for sodium-ion batteries. Subtraction of the PDF of crystalline NaxSb phases from the total PDF, an approach constrained by chemical phase information gained from (23)Na ssNMR in reference to relevant model compounds, identifies two previously uncharacterized intermediate species formed electrochemically; a-Na(3-x)Sb (x ≈ 0.4-0.5), a structure locally similar to crystalline Na3Sb (c-Na3Sb) but with significant numbers of sodium vacancies and a limited correlation length, and a-Na(1.7)Sb, a highly amorphous structure featuring some Sb-Sb bonding. The first sodiation breaks down the crystalline antimony to form first a-Na(3-x)Sb and, finally, crystalline Na3Sb. Desodiation results in the formation of an electrode formed of a composite of crystalline and amorphous antimony networks. We link the different reactivity of these networks to a series of sequential sodiation reactions manifesting as a cascade of processes observed in the electrochemical profile of subsequent cycles. The amorphous network reacts at higher voltages reforming a-Na(1.7)Sb, then a-Na(3-x)Sb, whereas lower potentials are required for the sodiation of crystalline antimony, which reacts to form a-Na(3-x)Sb without the formation of a-Na(1.7)Sb. a-Na(3-x)Sb is converted to crystalline Na3Sb at the end of the second discharge. We find no evidence of formation of NaSb. Variable temperature (23)Na NMR experiments reveal significant sodium mobility within c-Na3Sb; this is a possible contributing factor to the excellent rate performance of Sb anodes. PMID:26824406

  15. Tracking Sodium-Antimonide Phase Transformations in Sodium-Ion Anodes: Insights from Operando Pair Distribution Function Analysis and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Operando pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and ex situ 23Na magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS ssNMR) spectroscopy are used to gain insight into the alloying mechanism of high-capacity antimony anodes for sodium-ion batteries. Subtraction of the PDF of crystalline NaxSb phases from the total PDF, an approach constrained by chemical phase information gained from 23Na ssNMR in reference to relevant model compounds, identifies two previously uncharacterized intermediate species formed electrochemically; a-Na3–xSb (x ≈ 0.4–0.5), a structure locally similar to crystalline Na3Sb (c-Na3Sb) but with significant numbers of sodium vacancies and a limited correlation length, and a-Na1.7Sb, a highly amorphous structure featuring some Sb–Sb bonding. The first sodiation breaks down the crystalline antimony to form first a-Na3–xSb and, finally, crystalline Na3Sb. Desodiation results in the formation of an electrode formed of a composite of crystalline and amorphous antimony networks. We link the different reactivity of these networks to a series of sequential sodiation reactions manifesting as a cascade of processes observed in the electrochemical profile of subsequent cycles. The amorphous network reacts at higher voltages reforming a-Na1.7Sb, then a-Na3–xSb, whereas lower potentials are required for the sodiation of crystalline antimony, which reacts to form a-Na3–xSb without the formation of a-Na1.7Sb. a-Na3–xSb is converted to crystalline Na3Sb at the end of the second discharge. We find no evidence of formation of NaSb. Variable temperature 23Na NMR experiments reveal significant sodium mobility within c-Na3Sb; this is a possible contributing factor to the excellent rate performance of Sb anodes. PMID:26824406

  16. Phase states of methane in fossil coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, A. D.; Vasylenko, T. A.; Ul'yanova, E. V.

    2004-06-01

    NMR measurements have revealed that methane can exist in coal samples in the state of solid solution rather than only adsorbed gas, opening new ways to prevention of gas dynamic accidents in underground coal mines and true estimation of coalbed methane resources. Understanding molecular structure of coal constituents and forms of methane occurrence in coal is the only way of extracting safely either coal or methane. We had studied nuclear magnetic resonance lines in various coals at room or low temperatures and have found that there exist three species of methane molecules differing in molecular mobility. Based on estimated diffusion parameters, these species were attributed to free methane, adsorbed methane, and solid solution of methane in crystalline coal substance. While first two phases are well known and can be analyzed by many different techniques, the last one hardly can be studied by methods other than NMR, resulting in inadequate estimations of methane resources.

  17. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  18. A Comparison of NMR Spectra Obtained for Solid-Phase-Synthesis Resins Using Conventional High-Resolution, Magic-Angle-Spinning, and High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keifer, Paul A.; Baltusis, Laima; Rice, David M.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Shoolery, James N.

    It has recently been shown that high-resolution 1H NMR spectra can be obtained for samples covalently bound to polystyrene-based (Tentagel) solid-phase-synthesis resins by the use of magic-angle spinning (MAS) combined with high-resolution-probe technology. The attainable spectral resolution in the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of these resins is affected by molecular mobility and magnetic-susceptibility mismatches, both within the sample and in the probe itself. Using new high-resolution MAS probes called Nano·nmr probes, the importance of magnetic-susceptibility matching in the construction of these probes is demonstrated, and the limitations of using MAS alone to generate line narrowing in both 1H and 13C NMR are explored using a solvent-swollen functionalized Wang resin. The effects of presaturation, temperature, spin rate, and different solvents upon spectral quality have also been investigated, and advanced 1D- and 2D-experimental capability is demonstrated. This ability to generate high-resolution NMR spectra of samples still bound to the resins is expected to be of extreme interest in not only solid-phase synthesis, but also in the rapidly growing field of combinatorial chemistry.

  19. MQ NMR and SPME analysis of nonlinearity in the degradation of a filled silicone elastomer.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Sarah C; Alviso, Cynthia T; Berman, Elena S F; Harvey, Christopher A; Maxwell, Robert S; Wilson, Thomas S; Cohenour, Rebecca; Saalwächter, Kay; Chassé, Walter

    2010-08-01

    Radiation-induced degradation of polymeric materials occurs through numerous, simultaneous, competing chemical reactions. Although degradation is typically found to be linear in adsorbed dose, some silicone materials exhibit nonlinear dose dependence due to dose-dependent dominant degradation pathways. We have characterized the effects of radiative and thermal degradation on a model filled-PDMS system, Sylgard 184 (commonly used in electronic encapsulation and in biomedical applications), using traditional mechanical testing, NMR spectroscopy, and sample headspace analysis using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The mechanical data and (1)H spin-echo NMR spectra indicated that radiation exposure leads to predominantly cross-linking over the cumulative dose range studied (0-250 kGy) with a rate roughly linear with dose. (1)H multiple-quantum NMR spectroscopy detected a bimodal distribution in the network structure, as expected from the proposed structure of Sylgard 184. The MQ NMR spectra further indicated that the radiation-induced structural changes were not linear in adsorbed dose and that competing chain scission mechanisms made a greater contribution to the overall degradation process in the range of 50-100 kGy (although cross-linking still dominated). The SPME-GC/MS data were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA), which identified subtle changes in the distributions of degradation products (the cyclic siloxanes and other components of the material) as a function of age that provide insight into the dominant degradation pathways at low and high adsorbed dose.

  20. Synthesis of mimic molecularly imprinted ordered mesoporous silica adsorbent by thermally reversible semicovalent approach for pipette-tip solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography fluorescence determination of estradiol in milk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yan, Hongyuan; Yang, Chunliu; Li, Zan; Qiao, Fengxia

    2016-07-22

    A mimic molecularly imprinted ordered mesoporous silica (MIOMS) adsorbent was prepared utilizing a thermally reversible semicovalent approach. The thermally reversible covalent template-monomer complex was firstly synthesized by employing 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol (BPS) and (3-isocyanatopropyl) triethoxysilane (ICPTES) as template and monomer, respectively. The template-monomer complex was incorporated into ordered mesoporous silica via a simple self-assembly process. The adsorption experiment illustrated that the imprint-removed silica (MIOMS-ir) had higher special recognition ability (250μgg(-1)) for estradiol (E2) than the non-imprinted silica (NIOMS-ir) (25μgg(-1)). MIOMS-ir was applied as an adsorbent in pipette-tip solid-phase extraction (PT-SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector (LC-FLD) for determination of E2 in milk samples. Under the optimized conditions, only 3mg of the adsorbent, 0.3mL of water as washing solvent, and 0.5mL of acetonitrile-acetic acid (96:4, v/v) as elution solvent were used in the pretreatment procedure of milk samples. Good calibration linearity was obtained in a range of 25ngL(-1) to 1000ngL(-1), and the recoveries at three spiked levels were ranged from 95.4% to 107.0% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ≤3.1% (n=3). The proposed MIOMS-ir-PT-SPE-LC-FLD method combined the advantages of PT-SPE and ordered mesoporous material such as ease assembly, low cost, high extraction efficiency and large specific surface area, so it is a potential pretreatment strategy for the extraction and determination of E2 in complex milk samples. PMID:27328886

  1. Ferroelastic phase transitions by 14N NMR spectra in [N(CH3)4]2CoCl4 and [N(CH3)4]2ZnCl4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-09-01

    Changes in the structural geometry of [N(CH3)4]2BCl4 (B=Co and Zn) crystals near the phase transition temperatures were studied by analyzing the 14N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Two physically inequivalent a-N(1)(CH3)4 and b-N(2)(CH3)4 groups were observed in these spectra. Abrupt changes in the resonance frequency and splitting of 14N NMR signals near the phase transition temperatures were attributed to structural phase transitions, and the primary mechanism of these phase transitions exhibited ferroelastic characteristics. In addition, ferroelasticity of [N(CH3)4]2BCl4 was identified at low temperatures using optical polarizing microscopy.

  2. Novel Phase Transitions in the Breathing Pyrochlore Lattice: Li7-NMR on LiInCr4O8 and LiGaCr4O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yu; Yoshida, Makoto; Takigawa, Masashi; Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Hiroi, Zenji

    2014-11-01

    We report Li7-NMR studies on LiInCr4O8 and LiGaCr4O8, in which Cr3 + ions with spin 3 /2 form a breathing pyrochlore lattice, a network of tetrahedra with alternating sizes. In LiInCr4O8 with large alternation, the nuclear relaxation rate 1 /T1 shows an activated temperature (T ) dependence down to 18 K, indicating a singlet ground state with a spin gap. This behavior, however, is disrupted by an antiferromagnetic transition at 13 K, which is preceded by another, most likely structural, transition at 16 K. In contrast, LiGaCr4O8 with a small alternation shows no spin gap but exhibits a first-order antiferromagnetic transition over a distributed T range 13-20 K. Nevertheless, 1 /T1 of the paramagnetic phase diverges toward 13 K, indicating proximity to a second-order transition. The results indicate that LiGaCr4O8 is located in the vicinity of a tricritical point in the phase diagram.

  3. Detection of Significant Aprotic Solvent Effects on the Conformational Distribution of Methyl 4-Nitrophenyl Sulfoxide: From Gas-Phase Rotational to Liquid-Crystal NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Celebre, Giorgio; De Luca, Giuseppina; Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; Giuliano, Barbara Michela; Melandri, Sonia; Cinacchi, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    The conformational equilibrium of methyl 4-nitrophenyl sulfoxide (MNPSO) was experimentally investigated in the gas phase by using microwave spectroscopy and in isotropic and nematic liquid-crystal solutions, in which the solvents are nonaqueous and aprotic, by using NMR spectroscopy; moreover, it was theoretically studied in vacuo and in solution at different levels of theory. The overall set of results indicates a significant dependence of the solute conformational distribution on the solvent dielectric permittivity constant: when dissolved in low-polarity media, the most stable conformation of MNPSO proved to be strongly twisted with respect to that in more polar solvents, in which the conformational distribution maximum essentially coincides with that obtained in the gas phase. We discuss a possible explanation of this behavior, which rests on electrostatic solute-solvent interactions and is supported by calculations of the solute electric dipole moment as a function of the torsional angle. This function shows that the least polar conformation of MNPSO is located at a twist angle close to that of the conformational distribution maximum found in less-polar solvents. This fact, associated with a relatively flat torsional potential, can justify the stabilization of the twisted conformation by the less-polar solvents.

  4. Using specialized adsorbents for remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, D.P.; Grant, A.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes two remediation case studies in which specialized adsorbents were used. In one case, the adsorbents were used to treat effluent from a soil vapor extraction system. In the other case, the adsorbents were used to treat air from a groundwater air stripper. The specialized adsorbents effectively removed volatile organic compounds from each air stream.

  5. Determination of pyrazole and pyrrole pesticides in environmental water samples by solid-phase extraction using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiping; Lu, Xi; Xia, Yan; Yan, Fengli

    2015-02-01

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) method using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was developed for the determination of four pyrazole and pyrrole pesticides (fenpyroximate, chlorfenapyr, fipronil and flusilazole) in environmental water samples. Several parameters, such as extraction adsorbent, elution solvent and volume and sample loading flow rate were optimized to obtain high SPE recoveries and extraction efficiency. The calibration curves for the pesticides extracted were linear in the range of 0.05-10 μg L(-1) for chlorfenapyr and fenpyroximate and 0.05-20 μg L(-1) for fipronil and flusilazole, with the correlation coefficients (r(2)) between 0.9966 and 0.9990. The method gave good precisions (relative standard deviation %) from 2.9 to 10.1% for real spiked samples from reservoir water and seawater; method recoveries ranged 92.2-105.9 and 98.5-103.9% for real spiked samples from reservoir water and seawater, respectively. Limits of detection (S/N = 3) for the method were determined to be 8-19 ng L(-1). The optimized method was successfully applied to the determination of four pesticides of pyrazoles and pyrroles in real environmental water samples.

  6. Bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers: An effective adsorbent for solid phase extraction and slurry sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of cadmium and lead in water, hair, food and cigarette samples.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Ocsoy, Ismail; Ozdemir, Nalan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Herein, the synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers (BSA-NFs) through the building blocks of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and copper(II) ions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and their use as adsorbent for cadmium and lead ions are reported. The BSA-NFs, for the first time, were efficiently utilized as novel adsorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of cadmium and lead ions in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. The method is based on the separation and pre-concentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by BSA-NFs prior to determination by slurry analysis via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The analytes were adsorbed on BSA-NFs under the vortex mixing and then the ion-loaded slurry was separated and directly introduced into the flame AAS nebulizer by using a hand-made micro sample introduction system to eliminate a number of drawbacks. The effects of analytical key parameters, such as pH, amount of BSA-NFs, vortexing time, sample volume, and matrix effect of foreign ions on adsorbing of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were systematically investigated and optimized. The limits of detection (LODs) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were calculated as 0.37 μg L(-)(1) and 8.8 μg L(-)(1), respectively. The relative standard deviation percentages (RSDs) (N = 5) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 7.2%, and 5.0%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified Water, TMDA-70 Fortified Water, SPS-WW2 Waste Water, NCSDC-73349 Bush Branches and Leaves) and by addition/recovery analysis. The quantitative recoveries were obtained for the analysis of certified reference materials and addition/recovery tests. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of cadmium and lead in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. PMID:26772130

  7. Bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers: An effective adsorbent for solid phase extraction and slurry sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of cadmium and lead in water, hair, food and cigarette samples.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Ocsoy, Ismail; Ozdemir, Nalan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Herein, the synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers (BSA-NFs) through the building blocks of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and copper(II) ions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and their use as adsorbent for cadmium and lead ions are reported. The BSA-NFs, for the first time, were efficiently utilized as novel adsorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of cadmium and lead ions in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. The method is based on the separation and pre-concentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by BSA-NFs prior to determination by slurry analysis via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The analytes were adsorbed on BSA-NFs under the vortex mixing and then the ion-loaded slurry was separated and directly introduced into the flame AAS nebulizer by using a hand-made micro sample introduction system to eliminate a number of drawbacks. The effects of analytical key parameters, such as pH, amount of BSA-NFs, vortexing time, sample volume, and matrix effect of foreign ions on adsorbing of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were systematically investigated and optimized. The limits of detection (LODs) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were calculated as 0.37 μg L(-)(1) and 8.8 μg L(-)(1), respectively. The relative standard deviation percentages (RSDs) (N = 5) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 7.2%, and 5.0%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified Water, TMDA-70 Fortified Water, SPS-WW2 Waste Water, NCSDC-73349 Bush Branches and Leaves) and by addition/recovery analysis. The quantitative recoveries were obtained for the analysis of certified reference materials and addition/recovery tests. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of cadmium and lead in water, food, cigarette and hair samples.

  8. High-level ab-initio calculation of gas-phase NMR chemical shifts and secondary isotope effects of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution high-level ab-initio calculations of the chemical shifts of methanol including zero-point vibrational and temperature corrections are presented. For the first time, secondary isotope effects have been calculated via second order vibrational perturbation theory. In comparison with recent experimental gas-phase data and in contrast to other quantum-chemical methods the results are consistent and in very good agreement with the experimental 13C, 17O and 1H chemical shifts reported by Makulski [W. Makulski, J. Mol. Struct. 872 (2008) 81]. Secondary isotope effects can be calculated with remarkable accuracy of a few hundredths of a ppm in comparison to experiment.

  9. Nanosized spongelike Mn3O4 as an adsorbent for preconcentration by vortex assisted solid phase extraction of copper and lead in various food and herb samples.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Emre; Tokalıoğlu, Şerife; Şahan, Halil; Patat, Şaban

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a nanosized spongelike Mn3O4 was synthesized and used for the first time as an effective adsorbent for vortex-assisted separation and preconcentration of lead and copper from various food samples. Copper and lead were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The characterization of the nanosized spongelike Mn3O4 was performed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller surface area and zeta potential measurement. The contact times for both adsorption and elution were only 3min. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits for copper and lead were found to be 2.6μgL(-1) and 3.0μgL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations were found to be ⩽3.2%. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analyzing the standard reference materials (BCR-482 Licken and SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves) and spiked real food and herb samples.

  10. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  11. [Determination of six phthalate acid esters in camellia oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with solid-phase extraction using single-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Zhonghai; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaosong

    2014-07-01

    An analytical method based on solid-phase extraction with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as adsorbent was developed for the simultaneous determination of six phthalate acid esters (PAEs) in camellia oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The samples were diluted by hexane and then cleaned up with a glass SWCNTs solid phase extraction (SPE) column. The PAEs were measured by GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, using external standard method for quantitative analysis. The important factors affecting extraction efficiency, such as the dilution volume of hexane, the type of adsorbent material, the dosage of SWCNTs, the volume of wash solution, the type and volume of elution solution were optimized. The optimal conditions were as follows: the dilution volume of hexane was 5 mL, the dosage of SWCNTs was 0.6 g, the wash solution was 20 mL hexane, and the elution solution was 5 mL toluene. The six PAEs had a good linear range from 0.05 mg/L to 1.0 mg/L, with the correlation coefficients (r) all above 0.999 9. The average recoveries of the six targets in spiked camellia oil (from 0.05 mg/kg to 1.0 mg/kg) ranged from 86.4% to 111.7% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) from 4.2% to 10.4%. The developed method is accurate, quick and suitable for the determination of the six PAEs in camellia oil.

  12. Determination of phthalate esters at trace level from environmental water samples by magnetic solid-phase extraction with Fe@SiO2@polyethyleneimine magnetic nanoparticles as adsorbent prior to high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Zheng, Zhenwen; Xiao, Junping; Fan, Huili; Yan, Xiuyi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, polyethyleneimine grafted silica-coated nanoscale zero valent iron (Fe@SiO2@PEI) has been successfully synthesized and was investigated to be an effective adsorbent for efficient enrichment of five phthalate esters such as diphenyl phthalate, dibenzyl phthalate, butyl benzyl phthalate, diphenyl isophthalate, and dicyclohexyl phthalate (DPP, DBP, BBP, DPIP, and DCHP) from environmental water samples. The structure and morphology of the materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction(XRD). The parameters that influenced the enrichment performance such as amount of sorbent, sample pH, type of eluent, volume of eluent, salting-out effect, adsorption time, and desorption time were investigated. Under optimal conditions, excellent linear relationships were found in the concentration range from 0.5 to 100 μg L(-1), the limits of detection (S/N = 3) were in the range of 0.26-0.45 μg L(-1), and the intra-day and inter-day precisions (n = 6) were in the range of 3.7-4.8 and 3.2-4.3 %, respectively. The developed method was evaluated with real water samples, and satisfied spiked recoveries in the range of 99-104 % were achieved. The experimental results proved that Fe@SiO2@PEI had good adsorption for phthalate esters, and would be a good adsorbent for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of important pollutants from environmental water samples.ᅟ Graphical abstract A flowchart of the synthesis of polyethyleneimine grafted silica coated nanoscale zero valent iron (Fe@SiO2@PEI) and the process of the developed magnetic solid phase extraction of phthalate esters before the analysis by high performance liquid chromatography. PMID:27178558

  13. Nanopore reactive adsorbents for the high-efficiency removal of waste species

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2005-01-04

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g., metal, enzyme, etc., particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as ions, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  14. Indirect spin-spin coupling constants in CH 4, SiH 4 and GeH 4 - Gas-phase NMR experiment and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antušek, Andrej; Keḑziera, Dariusz; Jackowski, Karol; Jaszuński, Michał; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2008-09-01

    New values of the indirect spin-spin coupling constants in CH 4, SiH 4 and GeH 4, derived from experiment and ab initio calculations, are reported. The new experimental values of 1J(CH), 1J(SiH) and 1J(GeH) are obtained from gas-phase NMR spectra. The dependence of the measured one-bond coupling constants on the density is analysed and the results are extrapolated to zero-density point to eliminate the effects due to intermolecular forces. In the calculation of the coupling constants, at the nonrelativistic level coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) perturbation theory is used and the basis set convergence of the results is discussed. The relativistic corrections are estimated from Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) calculations. The final theoretical values are obtained adding available estimates of the vibrational and temperature corrections. The agreement of the calculated and experimental 1J(XH), X = C, Si, Ge, constants is very satisfying, the differences are approximately 1-3%.

  15. Application of (13)C ramp CPMAS NMR with phase-adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) for the quantitative estimation of carbon functional groups in natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Kosuke; Watanabe, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The composition of carbon (C) functional groups in natural organic matter (NOM), such as dissolved organic matter, soil organic matter, and humic substances, is frequently estimated using solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. A problem associated with quantitative analysis using general cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CPMAS) spectra is the appearance of spinning side bands (SSBs) split from the original center peaks of sp (2) hybridized C species (i.e., aromatic and carbonyl C). Ramp CP/phase-adjusted side band suppressing (PASS) is a pulse sequence that integrates SSBs separately and quantitatively recovers them into their inherent center peaks. In the present study, the applicability of ramp CP/PASS to NOM analysis was compared with direct polarization (DPMAS), another quantitative method but one that requires a long operation time, and/or a ramp CP/total suppression side band (ramp CP/TOSS) technique, a popular but non-quantitative method for deleting SSBs. The test materials were six soil humic acid samples with various known degrees of aromaticity and two fulvic acids. There were no significant differences in the relative abundance of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, and aromatic C between the ramp CP/PASS and DPMAS methods, while the signal intensities corresponding to aromatic C in the ramp CP/TOSS spectra were consistently less than the values obtained in the ramp CP/PASS spectra. These results indicate that ramp CP/PASS can be used to accurately estimate the C composition of NOM samples.

  16. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Guangjin E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu; Lu, Xingyu E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Vega, Alexander J. E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Polenova, Tatyana E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu

    2014-09-14

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear {sup 1}H-X (X = {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, {sup 31}P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the {sup 1}H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the {sup 1}H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from {sup 1}H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the {sup 1}H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [{sup 15}N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  17. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Lu, Xingyu; Vega, Alexander J.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-09-01

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear 1H-X (X = 13C, 15N, 31P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the 1H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the 1H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from 1H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the 1H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [15N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-13C,15N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate 1H-15N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-13C,15N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  18. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  19. NMR relaxation study of the phase transitions and relaxation mechanisms of the alums MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb and Cs) single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Ae Ran; Paik, Younkee; Lim, Kye-Young

    2011-06-15

    The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb and Cs) single crystals have been investigated. The phase transition temperatures, NMR spectra, and the spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} of the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs nuclei in the two crystals were determined using DSC and FT NMR spectroscopy. The resonance lines and relaxation times of the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs nuclei undergo significant changes at the phase transition temperatures. The sudden changes in the splitting of the Rb and Cs resonance lines are attributed to changes in the local symmetry of their sites, and the changes in the temperature dependences of T{sub 1} are related to variations in the symmetry of the octahedra of water molecules surrounding Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +}. We also compared these {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs NMR results with those obtained for the trivalent cations Cr and Al in MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O and MAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O crystals. - Graphical Abstract: The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb, Cs, and NH{sub 4}) single crystals have been investigated. Highlights: > The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb and Cs) crystals {yields} The NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} of the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs nuclei in the two crystals {yields} The variations in the symmetry of the octahedra of water molecules surrounding Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +}.

  20. Dynamics of the Chiral Liquid Crystal 4'-Butyl-4-(S)-(2-methylbutoxy)azoxybenzene in the Isotropic, Cholesteric, and Solid Phases: A Fast Field-Cycling NMR Relaxometry Study.

    PubMed

    Carignani, Elisa; Calucci, Lucia; Juszyńska-Gałązka, Ewa; Gałązka, Mirosław; Massalska-Arodź, Maria; Forte, Claudia; Geppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    (1)H NMR relaxometry was applied to investigate dynamic processes in the isotropic liquid, cholesteric, and crystalline phases of the chiral mesogen 4'-butyl-4-(S)-(2-methylbutoxy)azoxybenzene (4ABO5*). To this aim, (1)H longitudinal relaxation rates were measured as a function of temperature (between 257 and 319 K) and Larmor frequency (from 10 kHz to 35 MHz by a fast field-cycling relaxometer and at 400 MHz by an NMR spectrometer). The NMR relaxation dispersion (NMRD) curves so obtained were analyzed in terms of models suitable for the description of dynamic processes in the different phases, thus quantitatively determining values of characteristic motional parameters. In particular, internal and overall rotations/reorientations, molecular translational diffusion, and collective motions contribute to relaxation in the isotropic and cholesteric phases, whereas, in the crystalline phase, relaxation is mainly determined by internal motions and molecular reorientations. The results were discussed and compared with those previously obtained on the same compound by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy.

  1. NMR study of the magnetization of superfluid helium-3-boron and NMR of superfluid helium-3 in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haard, Thomas Michael

    Pulsed NMR measurements of superfluid 3He confined in 98.2% porosity silica aerogel are reported. The aerogel suppressed the superfluid transition temperature TC and the order parameter magnitude from their bulk values in qualitative agreement with impurity scattering models. Magnetization measurements showed that the superfluid is an equal spin pairing state (ESP). The superfluid exhibited positive NMR frequency shifts with similar temperature dependence to those of the bulk A-phase, only smaller. TC was independent of the magnetic field for H < 1.8 kOe to within the experimental error. At 2.18 kOe an increased suppression of TC and the order parameter was observed. Two layers of solid 3He were adsorbed to the aerogel strands. When these were replaced with solid 4He a non-ESP superfluid state was observed. An experimental cell for measuring the heat capacity of 3He in aerogel was designed and fabricated. It was tested without aerogel by measuring the heat capacity of liquid 3He over a range of temperatures from 1 to 25 mK and at pressures of 7.0, 14.0, and 28.0 bar. The measurements in both the normal and superfluid phases were consistent with the data of Greywall. The discrepancy between static and dynamic measurements of the magnetization of superfluid 3He-B was characterized over a region of the phase diagram by comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data and recent SQUID data from other researchers. At the B- to A-phase transition, TAB, the discrepancy was absent at low pressure, but increased to 20% at 26.6 bar and 1.2 kOe. The NMR data were consistent with the weak-coupling-plus (wcp) theory at TAB for most pressures and fields. The Ginzburg-Landau strong-coupling parameter gz/( gz)wcp was determined from NMR results to equal 1.00 +/- 0.03 for all pressures. Combinations of the Ginzburg-Landau beta-parameters are reported that are consistent with this observation.

  2. Kinetics, mechanism, and dynamics of the gas-phase H(D) atom reaction with adsorbed D(H) atom on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Lee, Jihwa

    2000-08-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of the abstraction reaction H(D)+Dad(Had)/Pt(111) at 100 K and saturation coverage (θsat=0.95±0.06 ML) using an H(D) atom beam, in which the angle-integrated and angle-resolved product desorption rates were simultaneously monitored with two mass spectrometers. HD molecules are formed by the abstraction reaction as well as by the secondary hot atom (s-HA) reactions, Ds*(Hs*)+Had(Dad)→HD, where Ds*(Hs*) is a collisionally excited surface D(H) atom. The two reaction components of HD show quite distinct angular distributions; while the former component is sharply forward-peaked to be represented by cos12(θf-3°), the latter component preferentially desorbs at large desorption angles centered at θf˜45°. The two HD formation reactions also exhibit distinct kinetics, which could be separately identified by properly selecting the desorption angle. Concurrent desorption of D2(H2) formed by a homonuclear s-HA reaction was also observed with a relatively large yield amounting to 37%(31%) of the initially adsorbed D(H) atoms. The angular distribution of D2 is very similar to that of HD formed by the s-HA reactions. Varying the beam incidence angle has no effect on the reaction rate constants and the product branching ratio. From a kinetic analysis, we estimate a cross section σabst=1.30±0.07(1.49±0.11) Å2 for HD formation by abstraction in H(D)-on-Dad(Had) reaction. For D2(H2) formation, an effective cross section for generating reactive Ds*(Hs*) atom is estimated as σ*=1.87±0.08(1.61±0.24) Å2. These values can be translated into the probabilities Pabst=0.19(0.21), Pex=0.27(0.23), Pads=0.73(0.67), and Pscatt=0.08(0.12) for abstraction reaction, s-HA generation, adsorption, and scattering of an incident H(D) atom, respectively. The isotope effects are small and the corresponding cross sections differ at most by 15%. The mechanism-dependent product angular distributions are discussed in terms of the different reaction dynamics

  3. Three-dimensional graphene aerogel-supported iron oxide nanoparticles as an efficient adsorbent for magnetic solid phase extraction of organophosphorus pesticide residues in fruit juices followed by gas chromatographic determination.

    PubMed

    Mahpishanian, Shokouh; Sereshti, Hassan

    2016-04-22

    In this research, a magnetic three dimensional-graphene nanocomposite (3D-G-Fe3O4) was prepared, characterized and used as an effective nanoadsorbent in magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from juice samples prior to gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection (GC-NPD). The properties and morphology of 3D-G-Fe3O4 were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The main experimental parameters affecting extraction recoveries including extraction time, amount of adsorbent, pH of sample solution, salt concentration and desorption conditions were carefully studied and optimized. The results showed wide linear concentration ranges with determination coefficients between 0.9973 and 0.9999. The limits of detection (S/N=3) of the method and limits of quantification (S/N=10) were from 1.2 to 5.1 ng L(-1) and 3.4-17.0 ng L(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day RSDs were 2.6-5.1% and 3.5-6.9%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of OPPs in fruit juices (apple, orange, grape, sour-cherry and apricot) with recoveries in range of 86.6-107.5%. The GC-NPD results were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results demonstrated that with combination of highly interconnected 3D network structure and magnetism property of adsorbent, 3D-G-Fe3O4 aerogel exhibited exceptional extraction ability towards the OPPs. PMID:27018186

  4. Three-dimensional graphene aerogel-supported iron oxide nanoparticles as an efficient adsorbent for magnetic solid phase extraction of organophosphorus pesticide residues in fruit juices followed by gas chromatographic determination.

    PubMed

    Mahpishanian, Shokouh; Sereshti, Hassan

    2016-04-22

    In this research, a magnetic three dimensional-graphene nanocomposite (3D-G-Fe3O4) was prepared, characterized and used as an effective nanoadsorbent in magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from juice samples prior to gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection (GC-NPD). The properties and morphology of 3D-G-Fe3O4 were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The main experimental parameters affecting extraction recoveries including extraction time, amount of adsorbent, pH of sample solution, salt concentration and desorption conditions were carefully studied and optimized. The results showed wide linear concentration ranges with determination coefficients between 0.9973 and 0.9999. The limits of detection (S/N=3) of the method and limits of quantification (S/N=10) were from 1.2 to 5.1 ng L(-1) and 3.4-17.0 ng L(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day RSDs were 2.6-5.1% and 3.5-6.9%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of OPPs in fruit juices (apple, orange, grape, sour-cherry and apricot) with recoveries in range of 86.6-107.5%. The GC-NPD results were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results demonstrated that with combination of highly interconnected 3D network structure and magnetism property of adsorbent, 3D-G-Fe3O4 aerogel exhibited exceptional extraction ability towards the OPPs.

  5. Twist, tilt, and orientational order at the nematic to twist-bend nematic phase transition of 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane: A dielectric, 2H NMR, and calorimetric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Hernández, Beatriz; Sebastián, Nerea; de la Fuente, M. Rosario; López, David O.; Diez-Berart, Sergio; Salud, Josep; Ros, M. Blanca; Dunmur, David A.; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R.; Timimi, Bakir A.

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the nematic-nematic phase transition in the liquid crystal dimer 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane (CB9CB) has been investigated using techniques of calorimetry, dynamic dielectric response measurements, and 2H NMR spectroscopy. The experimental results for CB9CB show that, like the shorter homologue CB7CB, the studied material exhibits a normal nematic phase, which on cooling undergoes a transition to the twist-bend nematic phase (NTB), a uniaxial nematic phase, promoted by the average bent molecular shape, in which the director tilts and precesses describing a conical helix. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry has been used to analyze the nature of the NTB-N phase transition, which is found to be weakly first order, but close to tricritical. Additionally broadband dielectric spectroscopy and 2H magnetic resonance studies have revealed information on the structural characteristics of the recently discovered twist-bend nematic phase. Analysis of the dynamic dielectric response in both nematic phases has provided an estimate of the conical angle of the heliconical structure for the NTB phase. Capacitance measurements of the electric-field realignment of the director in initially planar aligned cells have yielded values for the splay and bend elastic constants in the high temperature nematic phase. The bend elastic constant is small and decreases with decreasing temperature as the twist-bend phase is approached. This behavior is expected theoretically and has been observed in materials that form the twist-bend nematic phase. 2H NMR measurements characterize the chiral helical twist identified in the twist-bend nematic phase and also allow the determination of the temperature dependence of the conical angle and the orientational order parameter with respect to the director.

  6. Twist, tilt, and orientational order at the nematic to twist-bend nematic phase transition of 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane: A dielectric, (2)H NMR, and calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Robles-Hernández, Beatriz; Sebastián, Nerea; de la Fuente, M Rosario; López, David O; Diez-Berart, Sergio; Salud, Josep; Ros, M Blanca; Dunmur, David A; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R; Timimi, Bakir A

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the nematic-nematic phase transition in the liquid crystal dimer 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane (CB9CB) has been investigated using techniques of calorimetry, dynamic dielectric response measurements, and (2)H NMR spectroscopy. The experimental results for CB9CB show that, like the shorter homologue CB7CB, the studied material exhibits a normal nematic phase, which on cooling undergoes a transition to the twist-bend nematic phase (N(TB)), a uniaxial nematic phase, promoted by the average bent molecular shape, in which the director tilts and precesses describing a conical helix. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry has been used to analyze the nature of the N(TB)-N phase transition, which is found to be weakly first order, but close to tricritical. Additionally broadband dielectric spectroscopy and (2)H magnetic resonance studies have revealed information on the structural characteristics of the recently discovered twist-bend nematic phase. Analysis of the dynamic dielectric response in both nematic phases has provided an estimate of the conical angle of the heliconical structure for the N(TB) phase. Capacitance measurements of the electric-field realignment of the director in initially planar aligned cells have yielded values for the splay and bend elastic constants in the high temperature nematic phase. The bend elastic constant is small and decreases with decreasing temperature as the twist-bend phase is approached. This behavior is expected theoretically and has been observed in materials that form the twist-bend nematic phase. (2)H NMR measurements characterize the chiral helical twist identified in the twist-bend nematic phase and also allow the determination of the temperature dependence of the conical angle and the orientational order parameter with respect to the director.

  7. Magnetic porous carbon derived from a metal-organic framework as a magnetic solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the extraction of sex hormones from water and human urine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruiyang; Hao, Lin; Wang, Junmin; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    An iron-embedded porous carbon material (MIL-53-C) was fabricated by the direct carbonization of MIL-53. The MIL-53-C possesses a high surface area and good magnetic behavior. The structure, morphology, magnetic property, and porosity of the MIL-53-C were studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and N2 adsorption. With the use of MIL-53-C as the magnetic solid-phase extraction adsorbent, a simple and efficient method was developed for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of three hormones from water and human urine samples before high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. The developed method exhibits a good linear response in the range of 0.02-100 ng/mL for water and 0.5-100 ng/mL for human urine samples, respectively. The limit of detection (S/N = 3) for the analytes was 0.005-0.01 ng/mL for water sample and 0.1-0.3 ng/mL for human urine sample. The limit of quantification (S/N = 10) of the analytes were in the range of 0.015-0.030 and 0.3-0.9 ng/mL, respectively. PMID:27470965

  8. Synthesis of metronidazole-imprinted molecularly imprinted polymers by distillation precipitation polymerization and their use as a solid-phase adsorbent and chromatographic filler.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Lu; Li Han Song, Le; Liu, Yuan; Tang, Hui; Li, Yingchun

    2015-04-01

    Metronidazole-imprinted polymers with superior recognition properties were prepared by a novel strategy called distillation-precipitation polymerization. The as-obtained polymers were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, laser particle size determination and scanning electron microscopy, and their binding performances were evaluated in detail by static, kinetic and dynamic rebinding tests, and Scatchard analysis. The results showed that when the fraction of the monomers was 5 vol% in the whole reaction system, the prepared polymers afforded good morphology, monodispersity, and high adsorption capacity and excellent selectivity to the target molecule, metronidazole. The optimal binding performance is 12.41 mg/g for metronidazole just before leakage occurred and 38.51 mg/g at saturation in dynamic rebinding tests. Metronidazole-imprinted polymers were further applied as packing agents in solid-phase extraction and as chromatographic filler, both of which served for the detection of metronidazole in fish tissue. The results illustrated the recoveries of spiked samples ranged from 82.97 to 87.83% by using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction combined with a C18 commercial column and 93.7 to 101.2% by directly using the polymer-packed chromatographic column. The relative standard deviation of both methods was less than 6%. PMID:25594306

  9. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  10. Silver nanoparticles attached to silica gel as a new solid phase adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of iron from biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Dastafkan, Kamran

    2012-11-01

    In this study, an easy and fast procedure based on solid phase extraction was developed that is intended to pre-concentrate, separate, and determine trace amounts of Fe(III) ions in biological samples using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Silver nanoparticles coated with silica gel were modified by morin and then used as a sorbent. It was synthesized by mixing slurried silica gel with silver nitrate and sodium citrate. The effects of experimental conditions, including pH, sample and eluent flow rates, and the type and least amount of an eluent to the elute iron from the sorbent were studied, and optimum values of these parameters have been found. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection of this procedure for Fe(III) was 67 ng/l. The relative standard deviation (RSD%) was 2.5 % (n = 10, C = 0.5 mg/l). The developed procedure was used to determine iron in biological samples.

  11. Orientational and Translational Properties of Hydrogen Films Adsorbed onto Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Morgan David

    thesis concerns the orientational ordering of H_2 in two-dimensions as investigated through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. While ordering in three-dimensional (bulk) systems involves a crystal phase change and a strong ortho-hydrogen concentration dependence, ordering of hydrogen on boron nitride is shown to be more subtle. Evidence of partial ordering below 1 Kelvin is uncovered. This ordering is shown to depend not only on the ortho-hydrogen concentration but also on the number of adsorbed layers.

  12. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  13. Simulations of the fluid phase of nitrogen molecules adsorbed on the basal planes of graphite: structural and dynamical effects of the corrugation in the holding potential.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, F. Y.; Bruch, L. W.; Taub, H.

    1997-03-01

    A discrepancy between calculated (F. Y. Hansen, L.W. Bruch and H. Taub, Phys. Rev. B. 52), 8515 (1995) and experimental melting temperatures of submonolayer films was traced to the intermolecular potentials. These have been tested by comparing molecular dynamics simulations of isosteric heats of adsorption in fluid films with experimental measurements (J. Piper, J. A. Morrison, C. Peters and Y. Ozaki, J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 1, 79), 2863 (1983). The effect of the corrugation in the holding potential on the fluid phases has also been evaluated in a series of simulations. For films on a model uncorrugated graphite surface the melting temperature is lowered by 7 K. Contrary to what is found for films on the corrugated surface, these simulations show that there is a region of liquid--gas coexistence, demonstrating that this is a normal triple point system. Diffusion constants in these fluids are larger than for the fluids on the corrugated graphite surface. At low coverages, a crossover from activated diffusion to nonactivated diffusion is seen. The damping of the hydrodynamic modes causing the long--time tails in the velocity correlation function seems to be a little stronger on a corrugated surface than on a smooth surface.

  14. In Situ Synthesis of Porous Carbons by Using Room-Temperature, Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma as High-Performance Adsorbents for Solid-Phase Microextraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yao; Wu, Li; Xu, Kailai; Tian, Yunfei; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2015-09-21

    A one-step, template-free method is described to synthesize porous carbons (PCs) in situ on a metal surface by using a room-temperature, atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. This method not only features high efficiency, environmentally friendliness, and low cost and simple equipment, but also can conveniently realize large-area synthesis of PCs by only changing the design of the DBD reactor. The synthesized PCs have a regulated nestlike morphology, and thus, provide a high specific surface area and high pore volume, which result in excellent adsorption properties. Its applicability was demonstrated by using a PC-coated stainless-steel fiber as a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber to preconcentrate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) prior to analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The results showed that the fiber exhibited excellent enrichment factors (4.1×10(4) to 3.1×10(5)) toward all tested PAHs. Thus, the PC-based SPME-GC-FID provides low limits of detection (2 to 20 ng L(-1)), good precision (<7.8%), and good recoveries (80-115%) for ultra-sensitive determination of PAHs in real water samples. In addition, the PC-coated fiber could be stable enough for more than 500 replicate extraction cycles. PMID:26267394

  15. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    Nanoscience is an emerging field that can provide potential routes towards addressing critical issues such as clean and sustainable energy, environmental remediation and human health. Specifically, porous nanomaterials, such as zeolites and mesoporous silica, are found in a wide range of applications including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, environmental protection, and sensing. The characterization of the physical and chemical properties of nanocrystalline materials is essential to the realization of these innovative applications. The great advantage of porous nanocrystals is their increased external surface area that can control their biological, chemical and catalytic activities. Specific functional groups synthesized on the surface of nanoparticles are able to absorb heavy metals from the solution or target disease cells, such as cancer cells. In these studies, three main issues related to functionalized nanomaterials will be addressed through the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques including: 1) surface composition and structure of functionalized nanocrystalline particles; 2) chemical properties of the guest molecules on the surface of nanomaterials, and 3) adsorption and reactivity of surface bound functional groups. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the major spectroscopic techniques available for the characterization of molecular structure and conformational dynamics with atomic level detail. This thesis deals with the application of 1H solution state NMR to porous nanomaterial in an aqueous environment. Understanding the aqueous phase behavior of functionalized nanomaterials is a key factor in the design and development of safe nanomaterials because their interactions with living systems are always mediated through the aqueous phase. This is often due to a lack of fundamental knowledge in interfacial chemical and physical phenomena that occur on the surface of nanoparticles. The use of solution NMR spectroscopy results

  16. Sol-gel approach for fabrication of coated anodized titanium wire for solid-phase microextraction: highly efficient adsorbents for enrichment of trace polar analytes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jing; Xu, Lili; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Licheng; Liu, Xia

    2014-05-01

    Nanotubular titania film was prepared in situ on titanium wire and was used as the fiber substrate for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) because of its high surface-to-volume ratio, easy preparation, and mechanical stability. Three different functional coatings, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), β-cyclodextrin-co-poly(ethylenepropylene glycol) (β-CD/PEG), and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based sorbents were chemically bonded to the nanostructured wire surface via sol-gel technology to further enhance the absorbing capability and extraction selectivity. Coupled to gas chromatography-flame ionic detection (GC-FID), the prepared SPME fibers were investigated using diverse compounds. The results indicated that the fibers showed good mechanical strength, excellent thermal stability, and wonderful capacity and selectivity to polar compounds, including polar aromatic compounds, alcohols, and ketones. Combining the superior hydrophilic property of a bonded functional molecule and the highly porous structure of a fiber coating, the prepared PEG-coated SPME fiber showed much higher adsorption affinity to ephedrine and methylephedrine than β-CD and β-CD/PEG fibers. The as-established PEG-coated SPME-GC analytical method provided excellent sensitivity (LODs, 0.004 and 0.001 ng mL(-1) for ephedrine and methylephedrine, respectively) and better linear range (0.01-2 000 μg L(-1)). In addition, it has surprising repeatability and reproducibility. Finally, the present approach was used to analyze ephedrine and methylephedrine from real urine samples, and reliable results were obtained. PMID:24682230

  17. NMR characterization of shocked quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Cygan, R.T.; Assink, R.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    We have characterized experimentally and naturally-shocked quartz (both synthetic and natural samples) by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Relaxation analysis of experimentally-shocked samples provides a means for quantitative characterization of the amorphous/disordered silica component NMR spectra demonstrate that magnetization in both the amorphous and crystalline components follows power-law behavior as a function of recycle time. This observation is consistent with the relaxation of nuclear spins by paramagnetic impurities. A fractal dimension can be extracted from the power-law exponent associated with each phase, and relative abundances can be extracted from integrated intensities of deconvolved peaks. NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona (USA) led to the discovery of a new amorphous hydroxylated silica phase. Solid state NMR spectra of both experimentally and naturally shocked quartz were unexpectedly rich in microstructural information, especially when combined with relaxation analysis and cross-polarization studies. We suggest solid state NMR as a potentially useful tool for examining shock-induced microstructural changes in other inorganic compounds, with possible implications for shock processing of structural ceramics.

  18. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal's structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties. A special NMR probe will be constructed which will allow the concurrent measurement of NMR properties and adsorption uptake at a variety of temperatures. All samples will be subjected to a suite of conventional'' pore structure analyses. These include nitrogen adsorption at 77 K with BET analysis, CO[sub 2] and CH[sub 4] adsorption at 273 K with D-R (Dubinin-Radushkevich) analysis, helium pycnometry, and small angle X-ray scattering as well as gas diffusion measurements.

  19. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of phenolic acid, flavonoid, and phenol contents in various natural Yemeni honeys using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a solid-phase extraction adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Badjah Hadj Ahmed, A Y; Obbed, Munir S; Wabaidur, Saikh M; AlOthman, Zeid A; Al-Shaalan, Nora H

    2014-06-18

    A simple method has been described for simultaneous determination of phenolic acid, flavonoid, and other phenol contents in various natural honey samples collected from various regions of Yemen. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used as a solid-phase adsorbent for extraction of the polyphenols from honey samples. The total contents of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and phenolic components of the 12 different samples were found in the range of 363-2658, 261-1646, and 224-1355 μg/100 g of honey samples, respectively. The major phenolic acid, flavonoid, and phenolic compound in these samples were found to be 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (1410 μg/100 g), chrysin (850 μg/100 g), and cinnamic acid (1336 μg/100 g), respectively. A total of 25 compounds (10 phenolic acids, 9 flavonoids, and 6 phenols) were analyzed, and a total of 24 were detected, while only 23 compounds were determined quantitatively in the honey samples. The developed method showed potential usefulness for the analysis of honey and was used for the determination of polyphenols in honey extracts.

  20. [Magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a solid phase extraction adsorbent for the determination of 13 phthalate acid esters in water samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Fu, Shanliang; Ding, Li; Zhu, Shaohua; Jiao, Yanna; Gong, Qiang; Chen, Jitao; Wang, Libing

    2011-08-01

    A method based on solid phase extraction (SPE) with magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbent was developed for the determination of 13 phthalate acid esters (PAEs) in water samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The factors affecting the extraction efficiency, such as extraction time, pH of water sample, desorption solvent, and desorption time, were carefully investigated. The optimized conditions were as follows: extraction time, 10 min; pH of water samples, 5 - 7; desorption solvent, 2 mL acetone; desorption time, 5 min. The extraction efficiencies were 89.7% - 100.5% under the optimized conditions. The method was sensitive with the detection limits (S/N = 3) between 0.08 -0.47 microg/L for the 13 PAEs. The developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of tap water, bottle drinking water and lake water, and none of the 13 PAEs was detected. The recoveries ranged from 84.5% to 107.5% for the 3 real spiked samples, and the relative standard deviations were between 1.9% and 12.8%. The developed method has proved convenient, time-saving, accurate, sensitive, and environmental-friendly, and can be used for the determination of PAEs in water samples.

  1. Determination of six sulfonylurea herbicides in environmental water samples by magnetic solid-phase extraction using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiping; Jiang, Lianhua; Wu, Gege; Xia, Yan; Lu, Wenhui; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-09-30

    Magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mag-MWCNTs) as adsorbents, coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detector (HPLC-DAD), was developed for the simultaneous separation and determination of six types of sulfonylurea herbicides (SUs) in environmental water samples. Several variables affecting MSPE efficiency were systematically investigated, including the type and volume of desorption solvent, sample solution pH, salt concentration, amount of mag-MWCNTs, and extraction and desorption time. Response surface was employed to assist in the MSPE optimization. Under optimized conditions, excellent linearity was achieved in the range of 0.05-5.0μg/L for all six SUs, with coefficients of correlation r>0.9994, and preconcentration factors ranging from 178 to 210. Limits of detection and quantification were 0.01-0.04μg/L and 0.03-0.13μg/L, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precision (relative standard deviations, n=6, %) at three spiked levels were 2.0-11.0% and 2.1-12.9% in terms of peak area, respectively. The method recoveries at three fortified concentrations were obtained within 76.7-106.9% for reservoir water samples and 78.2-105.4% for tap water samples. The developed MSPE-HPLC method demonstrated high sensitivity, repeatability, simplicity, rapidity, and excellent practical applicability. PMID:27590086

  2. Simultaneous determination of copper, cobalt, and mercury ions in water samples by solid-phase extraction using carbon nanotube sponges as adsorbent after chelating with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate prior to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jia-Bin; Wang, Xia; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2016-06-01

    Recently, a sponge-like material called carbon nanotube sponges (CNT sponges) has drawn considerable attention because it can remove large-area oil, nanoparticles, and organic dyes from water. In this paper, the feasibility of CNT sponges as a novel solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbent for the enrichment and determination of heavy metal ions (Co(2+), Cu(2+), and Hg(2+)) was investigated for the first time. Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) was used as the chelating agent and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the final analysis. Important factors which may influence extraction efficiency of SPE were optimized, such as the kind and volume of eluent, volume of DDTC, sample pH, flow rate, etc. Under the optimized conditions, wide range of linearity (0.5-400 μg L(-1)), low limits of detection (0.089~0.690 μg L(-1); 0.018~0.138 μg), and good repeatability (1.27~3.60 %, n = 5) were obtained. The developed method was applied for the analysis of the three metal ions in real water samples, and satisfactory results were achieved. All of these findings demonstrated that CNT sponges will be a good choice for the enrichment and determination of target ions at trace levels in the future. PMID:27108287

  3. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  4. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal's structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We now have two suites of well-characterized microporous materials including oxides (zeolites and silica gel) and activated carbons from our industrial partner, Air Products in Allentown, PA. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  5. Orientational and structural properties of ferroelectric liquid crystal with a broad temperature range in the SmC(*) phase by (13)C NMR, x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bubnov, Alexej; Domenici, Valentina; Hamplová, Věra; Kašpar, Miroslav; Veracini, Carlo Alberto; Glogarová, Milada

    2009-01-21

    Thermotropic liquid crystalline materials laterally substituted by a methyl group on the aromatic ring of the alkoxybenzoate unit far from the chiral centre exhibit a very broad temperature range in the ferroelectric smectic C* (SmC(*)) phase on cooling (including supercooling) with a very high spontaneous polarization (∼210 nC cm(-2)) and tilt angle (∼43°) at saturation. We are presenting a detailed study of the physical properties of a ferroelectric compound, representative of this category of liquid crystals, by means of solid state (13)C-NMR, small angle x-ray scattering, dielectric spectroscopy and optical methods of the tilted SmC(*). Values of the spontaneous tilt angle measured optically are compared to those determined from the x-ray data and discussed. In addition, the viscosity has been determined in the SmC(*) phase by different experimental methods. (13)C NMR data allowed us to get information about the degree of orientational order of the SmC(*) phase and revealed the complete unwinding of the helical axis at the magnetic field of 9.4 T. This result is discussed in the framework of recent publications on the effect of the magnetic field on the supra-molecular structure of the SmC(*) phase.

  6. Gas-phase NMR spectra of cyclohexene are consistent with a barrier to ring inversion of less than 30 kJ mol -1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Cristina; Tafazzoli, Mohsen; True, Nancy S.

    1992-08-01

    1H NMR spectra of gaseous cyclohexene at 7.05 T and 195 K do not show line broadening attributable to axial-equatorial proton exchange, indicating that the Gibbs energy of activation, Δ G‡, is less than 30 kJ mol -1, considerably lower than the 43 kJ mol -1 barrier recently determined from a vibrational analysis.

  7. Following Solid-Acid-Catalyzed Reactions by MAS NMR Spectroscopy in Liquid Phase -Zeolite-Catalyzed Conversion of Cyclohexanol in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Hu, Mary Y.; Feng, Ju; Camaioni, Donald M.; Mei, Donghai; Hu, Jian Z.; Zhao, Chen; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-01-07

    The catalytic conversion of cyclohexanol on zeolite HBEA in hot liquid water leads to dehydration as well as alkylation products. A novel micro autoclave suitable for application in MAS NMR at high temperatures and pressures is developed and successfully applied to obtain new insight into the mechanistic pathway leading to an understanding of the reactions under selected experimental conditions.

  8. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W. -P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-09-30

    -flow natural seawater at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and elemental analysis were used to characterize the adsorbent at different stages of adsorbent preparation and treatment. The study can be divided into two parts: (A) investigation of optimal parameters for KOH adsorbent conditioning and (B) investigation of other possible agents for alkali conditioning, including cost analysis on the basis of uranium production. In the first part of the study, tests with simulated seawater containing 8 ppm uranium showed that the uranium adsorption capacity increased with an increase in the KOH concentration and conditioning time and temperature at each of the KOH concentrations used. FTIR and solid state NMR studies indicated that KOH conditioning converts the amidoxime functional groups into more hydrophilic carboxylate. The longer the KOH conditioning time, up to three hours, the higher was the loading capacity from the simulated seawater solution which is composed of only uranyl, sodium, chloride, and carbonate ions. Marine testing with natural seawater, on the other hand, showed that the uranium adsorption capacity of the adsorbent increased with KOH conditioning temperature, and gradually decreased with increasing KOH conditioning time from one hour to three hours at 80 C. This behavior is due to the conversion of amidoxime to carboxylate. The carboxylate groups are needed to increase the hydrophilicity of the adsorbent; however, conversion of a significant amount of amidoxime to carboxylate leads to loss in selectivity toward uranyl ions. Thus, there is an optimum KOH conditioning time for each temperature at which an optimum ratio between amidoxime and carboxylate is reached. For the case of base conditioning with 0.44 M KOH at 80 C, the optimal conditioning time is 1 hour, with respect to the highest uranium loading capacity from

  9. Stochastic molecular motions in the nematic, smectic-A, and solid phases of p,p'-di-n-heptyl-azoxybenzene as seen by quasielastic neutron scattering and 13C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Wojciech; Urban, Stanisław; Domenici, Valentina; Geppi, Marco; Veracini, Carlo Alberto; Telling, Mark T F; Gabryś, Barbara J

    2006-05-01

    Molecular rotational dynamics in p,p'-di-n-heptyl-azoxybenzene was studied by means of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and 13C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR. Fast reorientation of the hydrogen nuclei was observed by QENS in the two liquid crystalline (LC) phases nematic and smectic A, as well as in the crystalline phase. The latter could not be restricted to the -CH3 rotations alone, and a clear indication was found of some other reorientation motions persisting in the crystal. Two Lorentz-type components convoluted with the resolution function gave an excellent fit to the QENS spectra in both LC phases. The narrow (slow) component was attributed to the reorientation of the whole molecule around the long axis. The corresponding characteristic time of approximately 130 ps agreed well with the values obtained in recent dielectric relaxation and 2H NMR studies. The full width at half maximum of the broader (fast) component shows a quadratic Q dependence (Q is the momentum transfer). Hence the corresponding motions could be described by a stretched exponential correlation function and were interpreted as various "crankshaft-type" motions within the alkyl tails. The 13C CPMAS experiments fully corroborated the QENS results, sometimes considered ambiguous in complex systems. PMID:16802951

  10. Stochastic molecular motions in the nematic, smectic-A, and solid phases of p,p{sup '}-di-n-heptyl-azoxybenzene as seen by quasielastic neutron scattering and {sup 13}C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning NMR

    SciTech Connect

    ZajaPc, Wojciech; Urban, Stanislaw; Domenici, Valentina; Geppi, Marco; Veracini, Carlo Alberto; Telling, Mark T. F.; Gabrys, Barbara J.

    2006-05-15

    Molecular rotational dynamics in p,p{sup '}-di-n-heptyl-azoxybenzene was studied by means of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and {sup 13}C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR. Fast reorientation of the hydrogen nuclei was observed by QENS in the two liquid crystalline (LC) phases nematic and smectic A, as well as in the crystalline phase. The latter could not be restricted to the -CH{sub 3} rotations alone, and a clear indication was found of some other reorientation motions persisting in the crystal. Two Lorentz-type components convoluted with the resolution function gave an excellent fit to the QENS spectra in both LC phases. The narrow (slow) component was attributed to the reorientation of the whole molecule around the long axis. The corresponding characteristic time of {approx}130 ps agreed well with the values obtained in recent dielectric relaxation and {sup 2}H NMR studies. The full width at half maximum of the broader (fast) component shows a quadratic Q dependence (Q is the momentum transfer). Hence the corresponding motions could be described by a stretched exponential correlation function and were interpreted as various ''crankshaft-type'' motions within the alkyl tails. The {sup 13}C CPMAS experiments fully corroborated the QENS results, sometimes considered ambiguous in complex systems.

  11. Simultaneous determination of nickel, cobalt and mercury ions in water samples by solid phase extraction using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent after chelating with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate prior to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Xing, An; Zhao, Kuifu

    2014-09-19

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been widely used for the enrichment of trace important pollutants in environment because of its large specific surface area, high extraction efficiency, and easy operation. In this study, a solid phase extraction method was established to determine nickel (Ni(2+)), cobalt (Co(2+)) and mercury (Hg(2+)) ions using MWNTs as the adsorbent and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as the chelating agent. The final analysis was performed on a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The factors that may influence the extraction efficiency were optimized in detail including the type and volume of elution solvent, sample pH, volume of chelating agent solution, and volume of sample solution, etc. The experimental results indicated that good linear relationship between peak area and the concentration of the ions was achieved in the range of 0.1-100μgL(-1), 0.1-50μgL(-1), and 2.7-300μgL(-1) for Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Hg(2+), respectively. The precision was determined by calculating the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) values that were in the range of 6.2-11.7% under the optimal conditions. The detection limits of Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Hg(2+) were in the range of 0.04-0.9μgL(-1) (S/N=3). The presented method was applied for the determination of the metal ions mentioned above in real water samples, and satisfied results were achieved. All these indicated that proposed method will be a good alternative tool for monitoring the target ions in environmental samples in the future.

  12. Determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace selenium ions by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using graphene as solid adsorbent in dispersive micro-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Karina; Leardi, Riccardo; Walczak, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2015-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (DMSPE) with graphene as a solid adsorbent and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) as a chelating agent was proposed for speciation and detemination of inorganic selenium by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). In developed DMSPE, graphene particles are dispersed throughout the analyzed solution, therefore reaction between Se(IV)-APDC complexes and graphene nanoparticles occurs immediately. The concentration of Se(VI) is calculated as the difference between the concentration of selenite after and before prereduction of selenate. A central composite face-centered design with 3 center points was performed in order to optimize conditions and to study the effect of four variables (pH of the sample, concentration of APDC, concentration of Triton-X-100, and sample volume). The best results were obtained when suspension consisting of 200 µg of graphene nanosheets, 1.2 mg of APDC and 0.06 mg of Triton-X-100 was rapidly injected to the 50 mL of the analyzed solution. Under optimized conditions Se ions can be determined with a very good recovery (97.7±5.0% and 99.2±6.6% for Se(IV) and Se(VI), respectively) and precision (RSD=5.1-6.6%). Proposed DMSPE/EDXRF procedure allowed to obtain low detection limits (0.032 ng mL(-1)) and high enrichment factor (1013±15). The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination of Se in mineral, tap, lake and sea water samples as well as in biological materials (Lobster Hepatopancreas and Pig Kidney).

  13. Determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace selenium ions by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using graphene as solid adsorbent in dispersive micro-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Karina; Leardi, Riccardo; Walczak, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2015-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (DMSPE) with graphene as a solid adsorbent and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) as a chelating agent was proposed for speciation and detemination of inorganic selenium by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). In developed DMSPE, graphene particles are dispersed throughout the analyzed solution, therefore reaction between Se(IV)-APDC complexes and graphene nanoparticles occurs immediately. The concentration of Se(VI) is calculated as the difference between the concentration of selenite after and before prereduction of selenate. A central composite face-centered design with 3 center points was performed in order to optimize conditions and to study the effect of four variables (pH of the sample, concentration of APDC, concentration of Triton-X-100, and sample volume). The best results were obtained when suspension consisting of 200 µg of graphene nanosheets, 1.2 mg of APDC and 0.06 mg of Triton-X-100 was rapidly injected to the 50 mL of the analyzed solution. Under optimized conditions Se ions can be determined with a very good recovery (97.7±5.0% and 99.2±6.6% for Se(IV) and Se(VI), respectively) and precision (RSD=5.1-6.6%). Proposed DMSPE/EDXRF procedure allowed to obtain low detection limits (0.032 ng mL(-1)) and high enrichment factor (1013±15). The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination of Se in mineral, tap, lake and sea water samples as well as in biological materials (Lobster Hepatopancreas and Pig Kidney). PMID:25618680

  14. Computer simulations of adsorbed liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Greg D.; Cleaver, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    The structures adopted by adsorbed thin films of Gay-Berne particles in the presence of a coexisting vapour phase are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The films are adsorbed at a flat substrate which favours planar anchoring, whereas the nematic-vapour interface favours normal alignment. On cooling, a system with a high molecule-substrate interaction strength exhibits substrate-induced planar orientational ordering and considerable stratification is observed in the density profiles. In contrast, a system with weak molecule-substrate coupling adopts a director orientation orthogonal to the substrate plane, owing to the increased influence of the nematic-vapour interface. There are significant differences between the structures adopted at the two interfaces, in contrast with the predictions of density functional treatments of such systems.

  15. Interpretation of NMR Relaxation as a Tool for Characterising the Adsorption Strength of Liquids inside Porous Materials

    PubMed Central

    D'Agostino, Carmine; Mitchell, Jonathan; Mantle, Michael D; Gladden, Lynn F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times are shown to provide a unique probe of adsorbate–adsorbent interactions in liquid-saturated porous materials. A short theoretical analysis is presented, which shows that the ratio of the longitudinal to transverse relaxation times (T1/T2) is related to an adsorbate–adsorbent interaction energy, and we introduce a quantitative metric esurf (based on the relaxation time ratio) characterising the strength of this surface interaction. We then consider the interaction of water with a range of oxide surfaces (TiO2 anatase, TiO2 rutile, γ-Al2O3, SiO2, θ-Al2O3 and ZrO2) and show that esurf correlates with the strongest adsorption sites present, as determined by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Thus we demonstrate that NMR relaxation measurements have a direct physical interpretation in terms of the characterisation of activation energy of desorption from the surface. Further, for a series of chemically similar solid materials, in this case a range of oxide materials, for which at least two calibration values are obtainable by TPD, the esurf parameter yields a direct estimate of the maximum activation energy of desorption from the surface. The results suggest that T1/T2 measurements may become a useful addition to the methods available to characterise liquid-phase adsorption in porous materials. The particular motivation for this work is to characterise adsorbate–surface interactions in liquid-phase catalysis. PMID:25146237

  16. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  17. From adsorption to condensation: the role of adsorbed molecular clusters.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubian, Sima; Zandavi, Seyed Hadi; Ward, C A

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of heptane vapour on a smooth silicon substrate with a lower temperature than the vapour is examined analytically and experimentally. An expression for the amount adsorbed under steady state conditions is derived from the molecular cluster model of the adsorbate that is similar to the one used to derive the equilibrium Zeta adsorption isotherm. The amount adsorbed in each of a series of steady experiments is measured using a UV-vis interferometer, and gives strong support to the amount predicted to be adsorbed. The cluster distribution is used to predict the subcooling temperature required for the adsorbed vapour to make a disorder-order phase transition to become an adsorbed liquid, and the subcooling temperature is found to be 2.7 ± 0.4 K. The continuum approach for predicting the thickness of the adsorbed liquid film originally developed by Nusselt is compared with that measured and is found to over-predict the thickness by three-orders of magnitude. PMID:27426944

  18. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  19. NMR Mechanisms and Fluid Typing Based on Numerical Simulation in Gas-Bearing Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, M.; Xu, J.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    In Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) survey of oil- or gas-bearing shales, the relaxation is so fast and the diffusion is so low, and oil or gas typing is difficult to distinguish from each other using the previous analysis method. To study the NMR responses in gas-bearing shale, we supposed an ideal shale model including incredible water, free and adsorbed gas, and kerogen. Firstly, we supposed a series of ideal shale models with incredible water, free and adsorbed gas, and kerogen. Then, some simulations are performed for two-dimensional T2-D plots, and NMR characteristics are summarized successfully. Then, a series of simulations of different models with different adsorbed gas fractions are made, and the NMR responses are analyzed, from which we can identify the adsorbed gas and free gas. In inversion, a hybrid method with LSQR and TSVD is proved suitable for D-T2 NMR of gas shale with slow and fast diffusion, and short and long relaxation. It is noticed that the activation sequence of NMR is also important for accurate fluid typing in gas-bearing shale. We design a series of activation sequences, and simulate the corresponding NMR echo decays, and invert the fluid properties to search for an optimal activation sequence for fluid typing purpose. Figure 1 SEM picture and petrophysical model of organic shale. (a) 2D SEM shows pore and kerogen within shale. Black deposits pore, and dark gray is kerogen, light grey is matrix including clay and silica; (b) Petrophysical model Figure 2 Comparison of 2D-NMR simulations with different adsorbed gas fractions, (a) ɛ =0.0, (b) ɛ =0.2, (c) ɛ=0.4, t (d) ɛ =0.6, (e) ɛ =0.8, and (f) ɛ=1.0. From D-T2 plots, the position and amplitude of signals in T2-D plots indicate the fluid typing and fraction of the gas or adsorbed gas.

  20. NMR study of the electric field gradient in the paramagnetic phase of M3V2O8 (M = Co, Ni) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smol'Nikov, A. G.; Ogloblichev, V. V.; Sadykov, A. F.; Piskunov, Yu. V.; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Verkhovskii, S. V.; Yakubovskii, A. Yu.; Barilo, S. N.; Bychkov, G. L.; Shiryaev, S. V.

    2011-06-01

    The NMR spectra and the decay of a spin echo signal from 51V nuclei in Kagome-staircase Co3V2O8 (CVO) and Ni3V2O8 (NVO) single crystals are measured in the temperature range 30-300 K and a magnetic field H 0 = 20 kOe. The orientation dependences of the 51V NMR line shape are used to determine the electric field gradient (EFG) parameters, namely, quadrupole frequency ν Q and asymmetry parameter η. These parameters for NVO and CVO are ν Q = 180(10) kHz, η = 0.5(1) and ν Q = 130(10) kHz, η = 0.6(1), respectively. A comparison of the results of calculating EFG tensors with a point charge model and the NMR data indicates that the crystallographically equivalent vanadium atoms in the Ni3V2O8 and Co3V2O8 compounds differ in the EFG axis orientation. M3V2O8 crystals are found to have vanadium positions (V1, V2) with different orientations of the z axis, which specifies the direction of the principal value of EFG ( V zz ): these orientations lie in the bc plane and make an angle of either +51(5)° (V1) or -51(5)° (V2) with axis c. In the temperature range 30-300 K, the EFG tensor components and the local symmetry of the charge surrounding of the vanadium positions in NVO and CVO oxides are found to change insignificantly.

  1. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  2. New insights into perfluorinated adsorbents for analytical and bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Nicola; Guzzinati, Roberta; Catani, Martina; Massi, Alessandro; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorinated (F-) adsorbents are generally prepared by bonding perfluoro-functionalized silanes to silica gels. They have been employed for a long time essentially as media for solid-phase extraction of F-molecules or F-tagged molecules in organic chemistry and heterogeneous catalysis. More recently, this approach has been extended to proteomics and metabolomics. Owing to their unique physicochemical properties, namely fluorophilicity and proteinophilicity, and a better understanding of some fundamental aspects of their behavior, new applications of F-adsorbents in the field of environmental science and bio-affinity studies can be envisaged. In this article, we revisit the most important features of F-adsorbents by focusing, in particular, on some basic information that has been recently obtained through (nonlinear) chromatographic studies. Finally, we try to envisage new applications and possibilities that F-adsorbents will allow in the near future. PMID:25358910

  3. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1, 1993--December 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and dosed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and pore surface. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  4. Surface properties of mesoporous carbon-silica gel adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Leboda, R.; Turov, V.V.; Charmas, B.; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J.; Gun'ko, V.M.

    2000-03-01

    Carbon/silica (carbosil) samples prepared utilizing mesoporous silica gel (Si-60) modified by methylene chloride pyrolysis were studied by nitrogen adsorption, quasi-isothermal thermogravimetry, p-nitrophenol adsorption from aqueous solution, and {sup 1}H NMR methods. The structural characteristics and other properties of carbosils depend markedly on the synthetic conditions and the amount of carbon deposited. The changes in the pore size distribution with increasing carbon concentration suggest grafting of carbon mainly in pores, leading to diminution of the mesopore radii. However, heating pure silica gel at the pyrolysis temperature of 550 C leads to an increase in the pore radii. The quasi-isothermal thermogravimetry and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy methods used to investigate the water layers on carbosils showed a significant capability of carbosils to adsorb water despite a relatively large content of the hydrophobic carbon deposit, which represents a nonuniform layer incompletely covering the oxide surface.

  5. Polymorphism and disorder in natural active ingredients. Low and high-temperature phases of anhydrous caffeine: Spectroscopic ((1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR/(14)N NQR) and solid-state computational modelling (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) study.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Apih, Tomaž; Gregorovič, Alan; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz Andrzej; Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia

    2016-03-31

    The polymorphism of anhydrous caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) has been studied by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) double resonance and pure (14)N NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) followed by computational modelling (Density Functional Theory, supplemented Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules with Reduced Density Gradient) in solid state. For two stable (phase II, form β) and metastable (phase I, form α) polymorphs the complete NQR spectra consisting of 12 lines were recorded. The assignment of signals detected in experiment to particular nitrogen sites was verified with the help of DFT. The shifts of the NQR frequencies, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters at each nitrogen site due to polymorphic transition were evaluated. The strongest shifts were observed at N(3) site, while the smallest at N(9) site. The commercial pharmaceutical sample was found to contain approximately 20-25% of phase I and 75-80% of phase II. The orientational disorder in phase II with a local molecular arrangement mimics that in phase I. Substantial differences in the intermolecular interaction phases I and II of caffeine were analysed using computational (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) approach. The analysis of local environment of each nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the topology of interactions in both polymorphs. For the most stable orientations in phase I and phase II the maps of the principal component qz of EFG tensor and its asymmetry parameter at each point of the molecular system were calculated and visualized. The relevant maps calculated for both phases I and II indicates small variation in electrostatic potential upon phase change. Small differences between packings in phases slightly disturb the neighbourhood of the N(1) and N(7) nitrogens, thus are meaningless from the biological point of view. The composition of two phases in pharmaceutical material

  6. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  7. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  8. Activity of lactoperoxidase when adsorbed on protein layers.

    PubMed

    Haberska, Karolina; Svensson, Olof; Shleev, Sergey; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2008-09-15

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is an enzyme, which is used as an antimicrobial agent in a number of applications, e.g., food technology. In the majority of applications LPO is added to a homogeneous product phase or immobilised on product surface. In the latter case, however, the measurements of LPO activity are seldom reported. In this paper we have assessed LPO enzymatic activity on bare and protein modified gold surfaces by means of electrochemistry. It was found that LPO rapidly adsorbs to bare gold surfaces resulting in an amount of LPO adsorbed of 2.9mg/m(2). A lower amount of adsorbed LPO is obtained if the gold surface is exposed to bovine serum albumin, bovine or human mucin prior to LPO adsorption. The enzymatic activity of the adsorbed enzyme is in general preserved at the experimental conditions and varies only moderately when comparing bare gold and gold surface pretreated with the selected proteins. The measurement of LPO specific activity, however, indicate that it is about 1.5 times higher if LPO is adsorbed on gold surfaces containing a small amount of preadsorbed mucin in comparison to the LPO directly adsorbed on bare gold.

  9. Sol-gel synthesis, phase composition, morphological and structural characterization of Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2: XRD, FTIR, SEM, 3D SEM and solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareiva, Simonas; Klimavicius, Vytautas; Momot, Aleksandr; Kausteklis, Jonas; Prichodko, Aleksandra; Dagys, Laurynas; Ivanauskas, Feliksas; Sakirzanovas, Simas; Balevicius, Vytautas; Kareiva, Aivaras

    2016-09-01

    Aqueous sol-gel chemistry route based on ammonium-hydrogen phosphate as the phosphorus precursor, calcium acetate monohydrate as source of calcium ions, and 1,2-ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or 1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetracetic acid (DCTA), or tartaric acid (TA), or ethylene glycol (EG), or glycerol (GL) as complexing agents have been used to prepare calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, CHAp). The phase transformations, composition, and structural changes in the polycrystalline samples were studied by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The local short-range (nano- and mezo-) scale effects in CHAp were studied using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The spatial 3D data from the SEM images of CHAp samples obtained by TA, EG and GL sol-gel routes were recovered for the first time to our knowledge.

  10. Interface Induced Growth and Transformation of Polymer-Conjugated Proto-Crystalline Phases in Aluminosilicate Hybrids: A Multiple-Quantum (23)Na-(23)Na MAS NMR Correlation Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Brus, Jiri; Kobera, Libor; Urbanova, Martina; Doušová, Barbora; Lhotka, Miloslav; Koloušek, David; Kotek, Jiří; Čuba, Pavel; Czernek, Jiri; Dědeček, Jiří

    2016-03-22

    Nanostructured materials typically offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of their large interfacial area. In this contribution, we present a comprehensive structural characterization of aluminosilicate hybrids with polymer-conjugated nanosized zeolites specifically grown at the organic-inorganic interface. The inorganic amorphous Al-O-Si framework is formed by alkali-activated low-temperature transformation of metakaoline, whereas simultaneous copolymerization of organic comonomers creates a secondary epoxide network covalently bound to the aluminosilicate matrix. This secondary epoxide phase not only enhances the mechanical integrity of the resulting hybrids but also introduces additional binding sites accessible for compensating negative charge on the aluminosilicate framework. This way, the polymer network initiates growth and subsequent transformation of protocrystalline short-range ordered zeolite domains that are located at the organic-inorganic interface. By applying an experimental approach based on 2D (23)Na-(23)Na double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR spectroscopy, we discovered multiple sodium binding sites in these protocrystalline domains, in which immobilized Na(+) ions form pairs or small clusters. It is further demonstrated that these sites, the local geometry of which allows for the pairing of sodium ions, are preferentially occupied by Pb(2+) ions during the ion exchange. The proposed synthesis protocol thus allows for the preparation of a novel type of geopolymer hybrids with polymer-conjugated zeolite phases suitable for capturing and storage of metal cations. The demonstrated (23)Na-(23)Na DQ MAS NMR combined with DFT calculations represents a suitable approach for understanding the role of Na(+) ions in aluminositicate solids and related inorganic-organic hybrids, particularly their specific arrangement and clustering at interfacial areas.

  11. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    surface properties of a material by examining the retention behavior of a probe molecule. The IGC method provides information on the surface chemistry of a wide range of samples based on high sensitivity, linearity, and stability of flame ionization detectors (FIDs) employed in IGC, but especially to probe and characterize the distribution of both weak and very strong adsorption sites on oxide surfaces. The drawback to IGC is the inability to identify the surface species reacting with the probe molecule. By adsorbing gas phase 13C labeled ethanol onto glass fiber surfaces and analyzing with 13C cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, the structural identity of the adsorption sites can be determined based upon chemical shifts of the carbon nuclei. The 13C chemical shifts are indicative of chemisorption and physisorption, and in the case of chemisorption, the next nearest neighbor atoms can be identified. The glass fiber surfaces exhibited three distant peaks in TPD-IGC plots and an extra peak in the 13C CP MAS NMR spectra and when adsorbing an alcohol to the surface. A simpler model system assisted with the identification of two of the three/four peaks from the multicomponent glass fibers. The model system chosen was fumed silica, which contains only silicon sites. Alcohol was adsorbed to the surface of fumed silica and IGC and 13C CP MAS NMR experiments were performed. In each of the experiments on fumed silica, two peaks were present. One peak corresponded to a weakly adsorbed alcohol, since the desorption temperature was low and had a narrow linewidth in the NMR spectrum. The second peak corresponded to a chemisorbed alcohol, which was identified by the higher desorption temperature and the broad peak in the NMR spectrum. The desorption temperatures and the chemical shift values from the reactive sites on fumed silica relate to two of the peaks in the multicomponent experiments and are identified as a physisorbed alcohol and a chemisorbed alcohol bound to a silicon site. The

  12. Molecular separations with breathing metal-organic frameworks: modelling packed bed adsorbers.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Tom R C; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2016-03-14

    Various metal-organic framework (MOFs) adsorbents show peculiar adsorption behaviour as they can adopt different crystal phases, each phase with its own adsorption characteristics. Besides external stimuli such as temperature or light, different species of guest adsorbate can trigger a transition (breathing) of the host structure at a different pressure. Such phase transitions also occur during dynamic separations on a packed bed of adsorbent, where the concentrations of the adsorbates vary throughout axial column distance and time. This work presents a general strategy to model the adsorption behavior of such phase changing adsorbents during column separations and focuses on remarkable model predictions for pure components and binary mixtures in diluted and non-diluted conditions. During binary breakthrough experiments, the behaviour of flexible adsorbents is quite complex. A succession of complete or even partial phase transformations (resulting in phase coexistence) can occur during the adsorption process. A variety of unusual breakthrough profiles is observed for diluted binary mixtures. Simulations reveal at least five types of breakthrough profiles to emerge. The occurrence of these cases can be rationalized by the hodograph technique, combined with the phase diagram of the adsorbent. The remarkable experimental breakthrough profiles observed for ortho-xylene/ethylbenzene (diluted) and CO2/CH4 (non-diluted) separation on the flexible MIL-53 framework can be rationalized by application of the proposed model strategy. PMID:26885972

  13. Linear transport models for adsorbing solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.; Jury, W. A.

    1993-04-01

    A unified linear theory for the transport of adsorbing solutes through soils is presented and applied to analyze movement of napropamide through undisturbed soil columns. The transport characteristics of the soil are expressed in terms of the travel time distribution of the mobile phase which is then used to incorporate local interaction processes. This approach permits the analysis of all linear transport processes, not only the small subset for which a differential description is known. From a practical point of view, it allows the direct use of measured concentrations or fluxes of conservative solutes to characterize the mobile phase without first subjecting them to any model. For complicated flow regimes, this may vastly improve the identification of models and estimation of their parameters for the local adsorption processes.

  14. Physical properties of single phospholipid bilayers adsorbed to micro glass beads. A new vesicular model system studied by 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Bayerl, T M; Bloom, M

    1990-08-01

    Spherical supported vesicles (SSVs), a new model system consisting of single dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers adsorbed to spherical glass beads with a narrow size distribution, were prepared at two different sizes (0.5 and 1.5 microns) and their physical properties were studied by deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H-NMR). Such SSV samples can be prepared at any desired size between 0.3 and 10 microns. The 2H-NMR measurements provide evidence for a strong dependence of the spectra and the transverse relaxation times on the curvature of the SSVs in a diameter range between 0.5 and 1.5 microns. For larger SSVs (1.5 microns diameter) their powder spectra and their calculated oriented spectra are similar to those obtained for multilamellar dispersions of DMPC-d54. The lineshape of the smaller SSVs exhibits a temperature dependence which is not found in multilamellar samples. The SSVs are stable in the liquid crystalline phase over days but irreversibly change to multilamellar vesicles in the gel state. The average thickness of the water layer between the single bilayer and the glass bead surface was estimated by 1H-NMR to e 17 +/- 5 A.

  15. Physical properties of single phospholipid bilayers adsorbed to micro glass beads. A new vesicular model system studied by 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Bayerl, T M; Bloom, M

    1990-01-01

    Spherical supported vesicles (SSVs), a new model system consisting of single dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers adsorbed to spherical glass beads with a narrow size distribution, were prepared at two different sizes (0.5 and 1.5 microns) and their physical properties were studied by deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H-NMR). Such SSV samples can be prepared at any desired size between 0.3 and 10 microns. The 2H-NMR measurements provide evidence for a strong dependence of the spectra and the transverse relaxation times on the curvature of the SSVs in a diameter range between 0.5 and 1.5 microns. For larger SSVs (1.5 microns diameter) their powder spectra and their calculated oriented spectra are similar to those obtained for multilamellar dispersions of DMPC-d54. The lineshape of the smaller SSVs exhibits a temperature dependence which is not found in multilamellar samples. The SSVs are stable in the liquid crystalline phase over days but irreversibly change to multilamellar vesicles in the gel state. The average thickness of the water layer between the single bilayer and the glass bead surface was estimated by 1H-NMR to e 17 +/- 5 A. PMID:2207243

  16. Measurement of the intracrystalline self-diffusion of xenon in zeolites by the NMR pulsed field gradient technique

    SciTech Connect

    Heink, W.; Kaerger, J.; Pfeifer, H.; Stallmach, F. )

    1990-03-14

    With use of {sup 129}Xe NMR, the NMR pulsed field gradient technique is applied to study the self-diffusion of xenon adsorbed on zeolites NaX, NaCaA, and ZSM-5. In their dependence on both the type of adsorbent and the sorbate concentration, the self-diffusion coefficients are found to follow the same patterns as previously determined for methane by {sup 1}H NMR. For NaCaA, the comparison of the present results with literature data reveals large discrepancies, while recent computer simulations of xenon self-diffusion in ZSM-5 are found to be in reasonable agreement.

  17. Spin-spin coupling in the HD molecule determined from 1H and 2H NMR experiments in the gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2014-10-01

    The indirect spin-spin coupling of hydrogen deuteride, J(D, H), was determined from a series of 1H and 2H NMR spectra acquired at various densities of gaseous solvents (He, Ar, CO2, and N2O). The analysis of these spectra shows that accurate determination of J(D, H) from this experimental data requires careful examination of the effects of nuclear relaxation and of HD-solvent gas interactions on hydrogen deuteride line shapes. Particularly, it was found that the first-order corrections of the peak-to-peak separations between HD multiplet peaks due to weak van der Waals interactions are proportional to solvent gas density, while these corrections for nuclear relaxation of the proton and the deuteron are proportional to the second power of the inverse of the gas density. Analysis of the data indicates that J(D, H), obtained by correcting for the effects of nuclear relaxation and intermolecular interactions, is 43.136(7) Hz at 300 K.

  18. 81Br NQR and 1H NMR of Guanidinium Hexabromoantimonate(V) [C(NH2)3]SbBr6: Phase Transition and Molecular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Terao, Hiromitsu

    2002-07-01

    Guanidinium hexabromoantimonate(V) [C(NH2)3]SbBr6 was prepared. It was black in color at room temperature and showed a tendency to turn yellow by loosing bromine in open air. Six 81Br NQRlines were observed at 77K.On heating, four of the six lines faded out around 200 K,while the remaining two lines could be observed up to room temperature. This temperature behavior suggests a preferential libration or reorientation around a pseudo C4 axis of the octahedral [SbBr6]- anion. DTA measurement revealed a small heat anomaly at Tc1 = 273 K (on heating), showing a thermal hysteresis, and a sharp and large anomaly at Tc2 = 314 K. The temperature dependence curve of 1H NMR T1 is characterized by a single minimum of 26 ms (32 MHz) near 280 K, which is assigned to the C3 reorientation of the planar [C(NH2)3]+ cations. Its activation energy ( a) is 43.3 kJ/mol

  19. Revealing lithium-silicide phase transformations in nano-structured silicon-based lithium ion batteries via in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ogata, K; Salager, E; Kerr, C J; Fraser, A E; Ducati, C; Morris, A J; Hofmann, S; Grey, C P

    2014-01-01

    Nano-structured silicon anodes are attractive alternatives to graphitic carbons in rechargeable Li-ion batteries, owing to their extremely high capacities. Despite their advantages, numerous issues remain to be addressed, the most basic being to understand the complex kinetics and thermodynamics that control the reactions and structural rearrangements. Elucidating this necessitates real-time in situ metrologies, which are highly challenging, if the whole electrode structure is studied at an atomistic level for multiple cycles under realistic cycling conditions. Here we report that Si nanowires grown on a conducting carbon-fibre support provide a robust model battery system that can be studied by (7)Li in situ NMR spectroscopy. The method allows the (de)alloying reactions of the amorphous silicides to be followed in the 2nd cycle and beyond. In combination with density-functional theory calculations, the results provide insight into the amorphous and amorphous-to-crystalline lithium-silicide transformations, particularly those at low voltages, which are highly relevant to practical cycling strategies.

  20. The molecular structure of silyl cyanide, determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction, microwave spectroscopy and high resolution infra-red spectroscopy, in solution in a nematic phase by NMR spectroscopy, and in the crystalline phase at 100 K by X-ray crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Peter D.; Blake, Alexander J.; Cockman, Russell W.; Cradock, Stephen; Ebsworth, E. A. V.; Rankin, David W. H.

    1989-02-01

    The molecular structure of silyl cyanide has been determined in the gas phase by analysis of electron diffraction data and rotation constants, both separately and together, in solution in a nematic liquid crystal by NMR spectroscopy, and in the crystalline phase at 100 K by X-ray crystallography. In the gas phase the parameters ( rav) are: SiC 184.96(4), CN 115.63(5), SiH 148.73(11) pm and ∠HSiC 107.25(4)°. In the crystalline phase the molecules lie on mirror planes, with near-linear chains of molecules ⋯SiCN⋯SiCN⋯. The non-bonded N⋯Si distance is 278.9(2) pm, and this fairly strong interaction is associated with lengthening of the SiC bondlength to 189.96(18) pm, and narrowing of the HSiC angles to 100.4(7)°. The CN distance is 114.28(23) pm. Angles in the chain are SiCN 179.04(15), N⋯SiC 177.62(6) and CN⋯Si 176.66(13)°. In solution in a liquid crystal solvent the structure ( rα°) also shows narrowing of the HSiC angles, to 104.84(14)°. Absolute values of bondlengths cannot be determined by this method, but the ratios r(SiH): r(CN) = 1.2762(24) and r(SiC): r(CN) = 1.6374(34) are consistent with a structure midway between those observed in the gaseous and crystalline phases. Interaction between cyanide groups in the solvent and silyl groups is postulated to account for this behaviour.

  1. DESIGNING FIXED-BED ADSORBERS TO REMOVE MIXTURES OF ORGANICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A liquid-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) pilot plant and a full-scale GAC adsorber were designed, built, and operated in order to evaluate their performance for treating a groundwater contaminated with several volatile and synthetic organic chemicals. Several empty bed con...

  2. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  3. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  4. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  5. NMR studies of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has long been used as an invaluable tool for structure and dynamic studies of macromolecules. Here we focus on the application of NMR spectroscopy in characterization of metalloproteins, including structural studies and identification of metal coordination spheres by hetero-/homo-nuclear metal NMR spectroscopy. Paramagnetic NMR as well as (13)C directly detected protonless NMR spectroscopy will also be addressed for application to paramagnetic metalloproteins. Moreover, these techniques offer great potential for studies of other non-metal binding macromolecules.

  6. Solid-state NMR studies of biomineralization peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Roehrich, Adrienne; Drobny, Gary

    2013-09-17

    Nature has evolved sophisticated strategies for engineering hard tissues through the interaction of proteins, and ultimately cells, with inorganic mineral phases. This process, called biomineralization, is how living organisms transform inorganic materials such as hydroxyapatite, calcite, and silica into highly intricate and organized structures. The remarkable material properties of shell, bone, and teeth come from the activities of proteins that function at the organic-inorganic interface. A better understanding of the biomolecular mechanisms used to promote or retard the formation of mineral-based structures could provide important design principles for the development of calcification inhibitors and promoters in orthopedics, cardiology, urology, and dentistry. With the knowledge of the structural basis for control of hard tissue growth by proteins, scientists could potentially develop materials using biomimetic principles with applications in catalysis, biosensors, electronic devices, and chromatographic separations, to name a few. Additionally, biomineralization also has potential applications in electronics, catalysis, magnetism, sensory devices, and mechanical design. Where man-made hard materials require the use of extreme temperatures, high pressure, and pH, biological organisms can accomplish these feats at ambient temperature and at physiological pH. Despite the fact that many researchers want to identify and control the structure of proteins at material and biomineral interfaces, there is a decided lack of molecular-level structure information available for proteins at biomaterial interfaces in general. In particular, this holds for mammalian proteins that directly control calcification processes in hard tissue. The most fundamental questions regarding the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins adsorbed to material surfaces, how proteins catalyze the formation of biomineral composites, or how proteins interact at biomaterial interfaces remain

  7. Phase modulation in dipolar-coupled A 2 spin systems: effect of maximum state mixing in 1H NMR in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Schmitz, Christian; Bachert, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Coupling constants of nuclear spin systems can be determined from phase modulation of multiplet resonances. Strongly coupled systems such as citrate in prostatic tissue exhibit a more complex modulation than AX connectivities, because of substantial mixing of quantum states. An extreme limit is the coupling of n isochronous spins (A n system). It is observable only for directly connected spins like the methylene protons of creatine and phosphocreatine which experience residual dipolar coupling in intact muscle tissue in vivo. We will demonstrate that phase modulation of this "pseudo-strong" system is quite simple compared to those of AB systems. Theory predicts that the spin-echo experiment yields conditions as in the case of weak interactions, in particular, the phase modulation depends linearly on the line splitting and the echo time.

  8. NMR methods in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M J; Wareing, J R

    1998-06-01

    The use of NMR spectroscopy in combinatorial chemistry has provided a versatile tool for monitoring combinatorial chemistry reactions and for assessing ligand-receptor interactions. The application of magic angle spinning NMR is widespread and has allowed structure determination to be performed on compounds attached to solid supports. A variety of two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied to enhance the usability of the magic angle spinning NMR data. New developments for solution NMR analysis include high performance liquid chromatography, NMR, mass spectroscopy and flow NMR. NMR based methods currently being investigated may prove valuable as compound screening tools.

  9. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on γ-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  10. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on γ-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  11. Ultraviolet and electron radiation induced fragmentation of adsorbed ferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Welipitiya, D.; Green, A.; Woods, J.P.; Dowben, P.A.; Robertson, B.W.; Byun, D.; Zhang, J.

    1996-06-01

    From thermal desorption spectroscopy we find that ferrocene, Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, adsorbs and desorbs associatively on Ag(100). Photoemission results indicate that the initially adsorbed surface species closely resembles that of molecular ferrocene. The shift in photoemission binding energies relative to the gas phase is largely independent of the molecular orbital. We find that ultraviolet light does lead to partial fragmentation of the ferrocene and that the molecular fragments are much more strongly bound to the surface than the associatively adsorbed ferrocene. Since fragmentation occurs only in the presence of incident radiation, selective area deposition from this class of molecules is possible. Using a focused electron beam in a scanning transmission electron microscope, we show that selective area deposition of features with resolution of a few hundred angstroms is readily achieved. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Comparative differential scanning calorimetric and FTIR and 31P-NMR spectroscopic studies of the effects of cholesterol and androstenol on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, T. P.; Lewis, R. N.; McElhaney, R. N.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the comparative effects of the incorporation of increasing quantities of androstenol and cholesterol on the thermotropic phase behavior of aqueous dispersions of members of a homologous series of linear saturated diacyl PCs1 using high sensitivity DSC. We have also employed FTIR and 31P-NMR spectroscopy to study the comparative effects of androstenol and cholesterol incorporation on the organization of the host PC bilayer in both the gel and liquid-crystalline states. The effects of androstenol and cholesterol incorporation on the thermotropic phase behavior of shorter chain PCs like 14:0 PC are generally similar but not identical. The incorporation of either sterol progressively decreases the temperature and enthalpy, but not the cooperativity, of the pretransition and completely abolishes it at sterol concentrations above 5 mol%. Moreover, at sterol concentrations of 1 to 20-25 mol%, both androstenol and cholesterol incorporation produce DSC endotherms consisting of superimposed sharp and broad components, the former due to the hydrocarbon chain melting of sterol-poor and the latter to the melting of sterol-rich 14:0 PC domains. The temperature and cooperativity of the sharp component are reduced slightly with increasing concentration of androstenol or cholesterol, and the enthalpy of the sharp component decreases progressively and becomes zero at 20-25 mol% sterol. As well, at cholesterol or androstenol concentrations above 20-25 mol%, the enthalpy of the broad component also decreases linearly with increasing sterol incorporation and becomes zero at sterol levels of about 50 mol%. However, whereas cholesterol incorporation progressively increases the temperature of the broad component of the DSC endotherm, androstenol incorporation decreases the temperature of this component. In contrast, the effects of androstenol and cholesterol incorporation on the thermotropic phase behavior of the intermediate and longer chain PCs studied here are

  13. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  14. NMR in a Diamond Anvil Pressure Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Matthew; Dioguardi, Adam; Weir, Samuel; Bush, Blaine; Dunuwille, Mihindra; Deemyad, Shanti; Curro, Nichlas

    We present recent advances in the use of diamond anvil pressure cells in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. This technique allows access to new regions of the phase diagrams of iron pnictide and heavy fermion materials, and promises to allow NMR experiments under pressures not previously accessible.

  15. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  16. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarter report No. 4, 1 October 1992--30 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties. A special NMR probe will be constructed which will allow the concurrent measurement of NMR properties and adsorption uptake at a variety of temperatures. All samples will be subjected to a suite of ``conventional`` pore structure analyses. These include nitrogen adsorption at 77 K with BET analysis, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption at 273 K with D-R (Dubinin-Radushkevich) analysis, helium pycnometry, and small angle X-ray scattering as well as gas diffusion measurements.

  17. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 7, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-09-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultramicro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2},{sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2},{sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals.

  18. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 3, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. We believe that measurement of the NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide the resolution to this problem. We now have two suites of well-characterized microporous materials including oxides (zeolites and silica gel) and activated carbons from our industrial partner, Air Products in Allentown, PA. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  19. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarter report {number_sign}8, 7/1/93--9/30/93

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultramicro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. The dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals is investigated. In particular, the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 14}N{sub 2},{sup 14}NH{sub 3},{sup 15}N{sub 2},{sup 13} CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and pore surface is studied.

  20. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 6, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2},{sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sup 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals.

  1. Tungsten bronze-based nuclear waste form ceramics. Part 2: Conversion of granular microporous tungstate polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite adsorbents to leach resistant ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher S.; Sebesta, Ferdinand; Hanna, John V.; Yee, Patrick; Drabarek, Elizabeth; Smith, Mark E.; Luca, Vittorio

    2006-11-01

    Conversion of a granular molybdenum-doped, hexagonal tungsten bronze (MoW-HTB)-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite adsorbent to a leach resistant ceramic waste form capable of immobilizing adsorbed Cs + and Sr 2+ has been achieved by heating in air at temperatures in the range 600-1200 °C. Thermal treatment of the Cs- and Sr-loaded composite material at 1000 °C was sufficient to invoke a 60% reduction in volume of the composite while still retaining its spherical morphology. Cs-133 MAS NMR studies of this sample suite at 9.4 T and 14.1 T showed that multiple Cs sites are present throughout the entire thermal treatment range. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of the phase assemblages resulting from thermal treatment demonstrated that the full complement of Cs, and the majority of Sr, partitions into HTB phases (A 0.16-0.3MO 3; A = Cs +, Sr 2+ and Na +; M = Mo, W). The potentially reducing conditions resulting from the removal of the PAN matrix or the presence of high concentrations of Na + relative to either Cs + or Sr 2+ does not retard the formation of the high temperature HTB phases. The fraction of Cs + and Sr 2+ leached from the tungstate phase assemblages was superior or comparable with cesium hollandite (Cs 0.8Ba 0.4Ti 8O 18; f = ≈8 × 10 -5; rate = <1.2 × 10 -4 g/m 2/day) and strontium titanate (SrTiO 3; f = 3.1 × 10 -3; rate = 2.63 × 10 -4 g/m 2/day), respectively, using a modified PCT test in Millipore water at 90 °C. Furthermore, where aggressive leaching conditions were employed (0.1 M HNO 3; 150 °C; 4 days), the tungstate phase assemblages displayed leach resistance almost two orders of magnitude greater than the reference phases.

  2. Method And Apparatus For Regenerating Nox Adsorbers

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, J. Joshua; Endicott, Dennis L.; Faulkner, Stephen A.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-03-28

    Methods and apparatuses for regenerating a NOx adsorber coupled with an exhaust of an engine. An actuator drives a throttle valve to a first position when regeneration of the NOx adsorber is desired. The first position is a position that causes the regeneration of the NOx adsorber. An actuator drives the throttle valve to a second position while regeneration of the NOx adsorber is still desired. The second position being a position that is more open than the first position and operable to regenerate a NOx adsorber.

  3. Complexation of trace metals by adsorbed natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and solution speciation of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were studied in model systems containing colloidal alumina particles and dissolved natural organic matter. At equilibrium a significant fraction of the alumina surface was covered by adsorbed organic matter. Cu(II) was partitioned primarily between the surface-bound organic matter and dissolved Cu-organic complexes in the aqueous phase. Complexation of Cu2+ with the functional groups of adsorbed organic matter was stronger than complexation with uncovered alumina surface hydroxyls. It is shown that the complexation of Cu(II) by adsorbed organic matter can be described by an apparent stability constant approximately equal to the value found for solution phase equilibria. In contrast, Cd(II) adsorption was not significantly affected by the presence of organic matter at the surface, due to weak complex formation with the organic ligands. The results demonstrate that general models of trace element partitioning in natural waters must consider the presence of adsorbed organic matter. ?? 1984.

  4. Influences of Dilute Organic Adsorbates on the Hydration of Low-Surface-Area Silicates.

    PubMed

    Sangodkar, Rahul P; Smith, Benjamin J; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J; Roberts, Lawrence R; Funkhouser, Gary P; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2015-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of dilute quantities of certain organic molecules and water at silicate surfaces strongly influence the rates of silicate dissolution, hydration, and crystallization. Here, we determine the molecular-level structures, compositions, and site-specific interactions of adsorbed organic molecules at low absolute bulk concentrations on heterogeneous silicate particle surfaces at early stages of hydration. Specifically, dilute quantities (∼0.1% by weight of solids) of the disaccharide sucrose or industrially important phosphonic acid species slow dramatically the hydration of low-surface-area (∼1 m(2)/g) silicate particles. Here, the physicochemically distinct adsorption interactions of these organic species are established by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced solid-state NMR techniques. These measurements provide significantly improved signal sensitivity for near-surface species that is crucial for the detection and analysis of dilute adsorbed organic molecules and silicate species on low-surface-area particles, which until now have been infeasible to characterize. DNP-enhanced 2D (29)Si{(1)H}, (13)C{(1)H}, and (31)P{(1)H} heteronuclear correlation and 1D (29)Si{(13)C} rotational-echo double-resonance NMR measurements establish hydrogen-bond-mediated adsorption of sucrose at distinct nonhydrated and hydrated silicate surface sites and electrostatic interactions with surface Ca(2+) cations. By comparison, phosphonic acid molecules are found to adsorb electrostatically at or near cationic calcium surface sites to form Ca(2+)-phosphonate complexes. Although dilute quantities of both types of organic molecules effectively inhibit hydration, they do so by adsorbing in distinct ways that depend on their specific architectures and physicochemical interactions. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNP-enhanced NMR techniques to measure and assess dilute adsorbed molecules and their molecular interactions on low

  5. Solid-phase peptide synthesis and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of (Ala/sup 3/-/sup 15/N)(Val/sup 1/)gramicidin A

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, G.B.; Fields, C.G.; Petefish, J.; Van Wart, H.E.; Cross, T.A.

    1988-03-01

    (Ala/sup 3-15/N)(Val/sup 1/)Gramicidin A has been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis and studied by solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The synthesis of desformyl(Ala/sup 3-15/N)(Val/sup 1/)gramicidin A employed N-hydroxysuccinimide esters of 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-N/sup ..cap alpha../-amino acids and completely avoided the use of acid. Since deblocking was done with piperidine and the peptide was removed from the resin by treatment with ethanolamine, this synthetic protocol prevented oxidation of the indole rings of this tryptophan-rich peptide and reduced truncations produced by acid hydrolysis. After formylation and purification by anion-exchange and high-pressure liquid chromatography, the peptide was obtained in an overall yield of 30%. Solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of this peptide and uniformly labeled (/sup 15/N)gramicidin A' oriented in hydrated lipid bilayers have been obtained, allowing unambiguous assignment of the (/sup 15/N)Ala/sup 3/ resonance in the latter. The solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance experiments provide evidence that (Val/sup 1/)gramicidin A is rotating about an axis that is perpendicular to the plane of the lipid bilayer and that the N-H axis is nearly parallel with the rotational axis. This study demonstrates that site-specifically labeled (/sup 15/N)gramicidin A analogs prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis are valuable tools in the study of the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of samples in oriented lipid bilayers.

  6. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  7. Highly dealuminated Y zeolite as efficient adsorbent for the hydrophobic fraction from wastewater treatment plants effluents.

    PubMed

    Navalon, Sergio; Alvaro, Mercedes; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2009-07-15

    In this work we report that highly dealuminated zeolite Y is a hydrophobic material that is able to remove selectively fatty acids and hydrocarbon compounds from the effluent of an urban wastewater treatment plant (UWTP). This adsorbent capability of zeolite Y could lead to an improved quality of UWTP effluents. Typical domestic wastewaters contain detergents, soaps and surfactants that are only partially removed in conventional UWTP. In the present work using an effluent from a UWTP located at Ribarroja del Turia (Valencia, Spain) containing 10 ppm of total organic carbon, we have been able to retain by adsorption on the dealuminated Y zeolite up to 16 and 60% of the organic matter of the effluent at pH values 7.2 and 4, respectively. Characterization of the adsorbed organic matter by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), (1)H NMR and GC-MS after derivatization has shown that the zeolite adsorbs selectively the hydrophobic compounds of the effluent.

  8. Solid state NMR and LVSEM studies on the hardening of latex modified tile mortar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rottstegge, J.; Arnold, M.; Herschke, L.; Glasser, G.; Wilhelm, M.; Spiess, H.W. . E-mail: spiess@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hergeth, W.D.

    2005-12-15

    Construction mortars contain a broad variety of both inorganic and organic additives beside the cement powder. Here we present a study of tile mortar systems based on portland cement, quartz, methyl cellulose and different latex additives. As known, the methyl cellulose stabilizes the freshly prepared cement paste, the latex additive enhances final hydrophobicity, flexibility and adhesion. Measurements were performed by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) to probe the influence of the latex additives on the hydration, hardening and the final tile mortar properties. While solid state NMR enables monitoring of the bulk composition, scanning electron microscopy affords visualization of particles and textures with respect to their shape and the distribution of the different phases. Within the alkaline cement paste, the poly(vinyl acetate) (VAc)-based latex dispersions stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were found to be relatively stable against hydrolysis. The influence of the combined organic additives methyl cellulose, poly(vinyl alcohol) and latexes stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) on the final silicate structure of the cement hydration products is small. But even small amounts of additives result in an increased ratio of ettringite to monosulfate within the final hydrated tile mortar as monitored by {sup 27}Al NMR. The latex was found to be adsorbed to the inorganic surfaces, acting as glue to the inorganic components. For similar latex water interfaces built up by poly(vinyl alcohol), a variation in the latex polymer composition results in modified organic textures. In addition to the networks of the inorganic cement and of the latex, there is a weak network build up by thin polymer fibers, most probably originating from poly(vinyl alcohol). Besides the weak network, polymer fibers form well-ordered textures covering inorganic crystals such as portlandite.

  9. Structural and sorption characteristics of adsorbed humic acid on clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaijun; Xing, Baoshan

    2005-01-01

    Clay-humic complexes are commonly distributed in natural environments. They play very important roles in regulating the transport and retention of hydrophobic organic contaminants in soils and sediments. This study examined the structural changes of humic acid (HA) after adsorption by clay minerals and determined phenanthrene sorption by clay-humic complexes. Solid- and liquid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the first time, provided direct evidence for HA fractionation during adsorption on mineral surfaces, that is, aliphatic fractions were preferentially adsorbed by clay minerals while aromatic fractions were left in the solution. The ratio of UV absorbance of HA at 465 and 665 nm (E4 to E6 ratio), which is related to aromaticity, corroborated with the NMR results. For both montmorillonite and kaolinite, adsorbed HA fractions had higher sorption linearity (N) and affinity (K(oc)) than the source HA. The K(oc) of adsorbed HA for the clay-humic complexes could be up to several times higher than that of the source HA. This large increase may be contributed by the low polarity of the bound HA. Moreover, for each mineral, the N values of adsorbed HA increased with increasing HA loading. It is believed that HA may develop a more condensed structure on mineral surface at lower HA loading level due to the stronger interactions between HA and mineral surface as a result of close contacts. PMID:15647564

  10. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  11. NMR methodologies in the analysis of blueberries.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Delfini, Maurizio; Vista, Silvia; Antiochia, Riccarda; Proietti, Noemi; Bubici, Salvatore; Ferrante, Gianni; Carradori, Simone; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    An NMR analytical protocol based on complementary high and low field measurements is proposed for blueberry characterization. Untargeted NMR metabolite profiling of blueberries aqueous and organic extracts as well as targeted NMR analysis focused on anthocyanins and other phenols are reported. Bligh-Dyer and microwave-assisted extractions were carried out and compared showing a better recovery of lipidic fraction in the case of microwave procedure. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phenolic compounds, as well as metabolites soluble in organic solvent such as triglycerides, sterols, and fatty acids, were identified. Five anthocyanins (malvidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, and petunidin-3-glucoside) and 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl quercetin were identified in solid phase extract. The water status of fresh and withered blueberries was monitored by portable NMR and fast-field cycling NMR. (1) H depth profiles, T2 transverse relaxation times and dispersion profiles were found to be sensitive to the withering.

  12. Integrated system for temperature-controlled fast protein liquid chromatography comprising improved copolymer modified beaded agarose adsorbents and a travelling cooling zone reactor arrangement.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tobias K H; Cao, Ping; Ewert, Stephanie; Wohlgemuth, Jonas; Liu, Haiyang; Willett, Thomas C; Theodosiou, Eirini; Thomas, Owen R T; Franzreb, Matthias

    2013-04-12

    An integrated approach to temperature-controlled chromatography, involving copolymer modified agarose adsorbents and a novel travelling cooling zone reactor (TCZR) arrangement, is described. Sepharose CL6B was transformed into a thermoresponsive cation exchange adsorbent (thermoCEX) in four synthetic steps: (i) epichlorohydrin activation; (ii) amine capping; (iii) 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid) immobilization; and 'graft from' polymerization of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-tert-butylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid-co-N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide). FT-IR, (1)H NMR, gravimetry and chemical assays allowed precise determination of the adsorbent's copolymer composition and loading, and identified the initial epoxy activation step as a critical determinant of 'on-support' copolymer loading, and in turn, protein binding performance. In batch binding studies with lactoferrin, thermoCEX's binding affinity and maximum adsorption capacity rose smoothly with temperature increase from 20 to 50 °C. In temperature shifting chromatography experiments employing thermoCEX in thermally jacketed columns, 44-51% of the lactoferrin adsorbed at 42 °C could be desorbed under binding conditions by cooling the column to 22 °C, but the elution peaks exhibited strong tailing. To more fully exploit the potential of thermoresponsive chromatography adsorbents, a new column arrangement, the TCZR, was developed. In TCZR chromatography, a narrow discrete cooling zone (special assembly of copper blocks and Peltier elements) is moved along a bespoke fixed-bed separation columnfilled with stationary phase. In tests with thermoCEX, it was possible to recover 65% of the lactoferrin bound at 35 °C using 8 successive movements of the cooling zone at a velocity of 0.1mm/s; over half of the recovered protein was eluted in the first peak in more concentrated form than in the feed. Intra-particle diffusion of desorbed protein out of the support pores, and the ratio between the velocities of the cooling

  13. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  14. Topological features of engineered arrays of adsorbates in honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Arraga, Luis A.; Lado, J. L.; Guinea, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen adatoms are one of the most the promising proposals for the functionalization of graphene. The adatoms induce narrow resonances near the Dirac energy, which lead to the formation of magnetic moments. Furthermore, they also create local lattice distortions which enhance the spin-orbit coupling. The combination of magnetism and spin-orbit coupling allows for a rich variety of phases, some of which have non-trivial topological features. We analyze the interplay between magnetism and spin-orbit coupling in ordered arrays of adsorbates on honeycomb lattice monolayers, and classify the different phases that may arise. We extend our model to consider arrays of adsorbates in graphene-like crystals with stronger intrinsic spin-orbit couplings. We also consider a regime away from half-filling in which the Fermi level is at the bottom of the conduction band, we find a Berry curvature distribution corresponding to a Valley-Hall effect.

  15. pyIAST: Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) Python package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Cory M.; Smit, Berend; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) is a widely-used thermodynamic framework to readily predict mixed-gas adsorption isotherms from a set of pure-component adsorption isotherms. We present an open-source, user-friendly Python package, pyIAST, to perform IAST calculations for an arbitrary number of components. pyIAST supports several common analytical models to characterize the pure-component isotherms from experimental or simulated data. Alternatively, pyIAST can use numerical quadrature to compute the spreading pressure for IAST calculations by interpolating the pure-component isotherm data. pyIAST can also perform reverse IAST calculations, where one seeks the required gas phase composition to yield a desired adsorbed phase composition.

  16. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  17. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  18. STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF BIOMATERIALS USING DOUBLE-QUANTUM SOLID-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Drobny, Gary P.; Long, J. R.; Karlsson, T.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Popham, Jennifer M.; Oyler, N.; Bower, Paula M.; Stringer, J.; Gregory, D.; Mehta, M.; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2004-10-31

    Proteins directly control the nucleation and growth of biominerals, but the details of molecular recognition at the protein-biomineral interface remain poorly understood. The elucidation of recognition mechanisms at this interface may provide design principles for advanced materials development in medical and ceramic composites technologies. Here, we describe both the theory and practice of double-quantum solid-stateNMR(ssNMR) structure-determination techniques, as they are used to determine the secondary structures of surface-adsorbed peptides and proteins. In particular, we have used ssNMR dipolar techniques to provide the first high-resolution structural and dynamic characterization of a hydrated biomineralization protein, salivary statherin, adsorbed to its biologically relevant hydroxyapatite (HAP) surface. Here, we also review NMR data on peptides designed to adsorb from aqueous solutions onto highly porous hydrophobic surfaces with specific helical secondary structures. The adsorption or covalent attachment of biological macromolecules onto polymer materials to improve their biocompatibility has been pursued using a variety of approaches, but key to understanding their efficacy is the verification of the structure and dynamics of the immobilized biomolecules using double-quantum ssNMR spectroscopy.

  19. Bowl inversion of surface-adsorbed sumanene.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Rached; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Bussi, Giovanni; Aït-Mansour, Kamel; Groening, Oliver; Amaya, Toru; Hirao, Toshikazu; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    Bowl-shaped π-conjugated compounds offer the possibility to study curvature-dependent host-guest interactions and chemical reactivity in ideal model systems. For surface-adsorbed π bowls, however, only conformations with the bowl opening pointing away from the surface have been observed so far. Here we show for sumanene on Ag(111) that both bowl-up and bowl-down conformations can be stabilized. Analysis of the molecular layer as a function of coverage reveals an unprecedented structural phase transition involving a bowl inversion of one-third of the molecules. On the basis of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and complementary atomistic simulations, we develop a model that describes the observed phase transition in terms of a subtle interplay between inversion-dependent adsorption energies and intermolecular interactions. In addition, we explore the coexisting bowl-up and -down conformations with respect to host-guest binding of methane. STM reveals a clear energetic preference for methane binding to the concave face of sumanene. PMID:25181621

  20. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  1. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Baoliang; Tao, Shu; Chiou, Cary T

    2003-09-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insightto interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  2. NMR blood vessel imaging method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Riederer, S.J.

    1988-04-26

    A high speed method of forming computed images of blood vessels based on measurements of characteristics of a body is described comprising the steps of: subjecting a predetermined body area containing blood vessels of interest to, successively, applications of a short repetition time (TR) NMR pulse sequence during the period of high blood velocity and then to corresponding applications during the period of low blood velocity for successive heart beat cycles; weighting the collected imaging data from each application of the NMR pulse sequence according to whether the data was acquired during the period of high blood velocity or a period of low blood velocity of the corresponding heart beat cycle; accumulating weighted imaging data from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to high blood velocity periods and from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to low blood velocity periods; subtracting the weighted imaging data corresponding to each specific phase encoding acquired during the high blood velocity periods from the weighted imaging data for the same phase encoding corresponding to low blood velocity periods in order to compute blood vessel imaging data; and forming an image of the blood vessels of interest from the blood vessel imaging data.

  3. Quasiparticle excitations of adsorbates on doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Dillon; Karrasch, Christoph; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jiong; Omrani, Arash A.; Brar, Victor; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wu, Qiong; Corsetti, Fabiano; Mostofi, Arash; Kawakami, Roland K.; Moore, Joel; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Mike

    Adsorbed atoms and molecules can modify the electronic structure of graphene, but in turn it is also possible to control the properties of adsorbates via the graphene substrate. In my talk, I will discuss the electronic structure of F4-TCNQ molecules on doped graphene and present a first-principles based theory of quasiparticle excitations that captures the interplay of doping-dependent image charge interactions between substrate and adsorbate and electron-electron interaction effects on the molecule. The resulting doping-dependent quasiparticle energies will be compared to experimental scanning tunnelling spectra. Finally, I will also discuss the effects of charged adsorbates on the electronic structure of doped graphene.

  4. pH-controlled quaternary ammonium herbicides capture/release by carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized magnetic adsorbents: Mechanisms and application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Peng; Shen, Zhigang; Liu, Xueke; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Liu, Donghui

    2015-12-11

    In our work, the pH-controlled magnetic solid phase extraction for the determination of paraquat and diquat was introduced firstly. Furthermore, to clarify the mechanism of carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized magnetic adsorbents, we studied the pH-responsive supramolecular interaction between carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) and paraquat/diquat by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, and the energy-minimized structures were also obtained. Then, the functional group CM-β-CD was modified on the surface of magnetic materials to synthesize the adsorbent. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR) results proved the successful modification of CM-β-CD. Thus, this absorbent was applied for the determination of paraquat and diquat in water. Under the optimal condition, limits of detection (LODs) of paraquat and diquat were 0.8 μg L(-1) and 0.9 μg L(-1), relative standard deviations (RSD) and recoveries varied 0.7-4.6% and 86.5-106.6%, respectively. Good recoveries (70.2-100.0%) and low RSD (1.7-9.6%) were achieved in analyzing spiked water samples. Furthermore, with the capillary electrophoresis (CE) as the analyser, the whole analytical process did not need the attendance of organic solvents.

  5. pH-controlled quaternary ammonium herbicides capture/release by carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized magnetic adsorbents: Mechanisms and application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Peng; Shen, Zhigang; Liu, Xueke; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Liu, Donghui

    2015-12-11

    In our work, the pH-controlled magnetic solid phase extraction for the determination of paraquat and diquat was introduced firstly. Furthermore, to clarify the mechanism of carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized magnetic adsorbents, we studied the pH-responsive supramolecular interaction between carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) and paraquat/diquat by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, and the energy-minimized structures were also obtained. Then, the functional group CM-β-CD was modified on the surface of magnetic materials to synthesize the adsorbent. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR) results proved the successful modification of CM-β-CD. Thus, this absorbent was applied for the determination of paraquat and diquat in water. Under the optimal condition, limits of detection (LODs) of paraquat and diquat were 0.8 μg L(-1) and 0.9 μg L(-1), relative standard deviations (RSD) and recoveries varied 0.7-4.6% and 86.5-106.6%, respectively. Good recoveries (70.2-100.0%) and low RSD (1.7-9.6%) were achieved in analyzing spiked water samples. Furthermore, with the capillary electrophoresis (CE) as the analyser, the whole analytical process did not need the attendance of organic solvents. PMID:26614057

  6. Magnetic reduced graphene oxide functionalized with β-cyclodextrin as magnetic solid-phase extraction adsorbents for the determination of phytohormones in tomatoes coupled with high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Chen, Juan; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2016-04-01

    A β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) functionalized magnetic reduced graphene oxide composite (Fe3O4/RGO@β-CD) has been prepared and its application as a selective adsorbent for the determination of the two naphthalene-derived phytohormones (1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (2-NOA)) has been investigated. Magnetic reduced graphene oxide composite (Fe3O4/RGO) was first synthesized via in situ chemical precipitation method and then β-CD was applied to further functionalize the resultant Fe3O4/RGO composite. The as-prepared Fe3O4/RGO@β-CD was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Compared with Fe3O4/RGO, the as-prepared Fe3O4/RGO@β-CD showed better molecular selectivity and higher extraction efficiency for NAA and 2-NOA by dint of the size complementarity brought by the introduction of β-CD. Response surface methodology (RSM), a multivariate experimental design technique, was used to optimize experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency in detail. Under the optimal conditions, good performance data was obtained. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranging from 2 to 600 ngg(-1) with correlation coefficients (R(2)) between 0.9995 and 0.9997 for all the analytes. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.67 ngg(-1) for both NAA and 2-NOA. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 6.02% and 7.34%, respectively. The recoveries ranged from 91.45% to 95.89%. Taken together, the proposed method was an efficient pretreatment and enrichment procedure and could be successfully applied for selective extraction and determination of naphthalene-derived phytormones in complex matrices.

  7. Magnetic reduced graphene oxide functionalized with β-cyclodextrin as magnetic solid-phase extraction adsorbents for the determination of phytohormones in tomatoes coupled with high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Chen, Juan; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2016-04-01

    A β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) functionalized magnetic reduced graphene oxide composite (Fe3O4/RGO@β-CD) has been prepared and its application as a selective adsorbent for the determination of the two naphthalene-derived phytohormones (1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (2-NOA)) has been investigated. Magnetic reduced graphene oxide composite (Fe3O4/RGO) was first synthesized via in situ chemical precipitation method and then β-CD was applied to further functionalize the resultant Fe3O4/RGO composite. The as-prepared Fe3O4/RGO@β-CD was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Compared with Fe3O4/RGO, the as-prepared Fe3O4/RGO@β-CD showed better molecular selectivity and higher extraction efficiency for NAA and 2-NOA by dint of the size complementarity brought by the introduction of β-CD. Response surface methodology (RSM), a multivariate experimental design technique, was used to optimize experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency in detail. Under the optimal conditions, good performance data was obtained. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranging from 2 to 600 ngg(-1) with correlation coefficients (R(2)) between 0.9995 and 0.9997 for all the analytes. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.67 ngg(-1) for both NAA and 2-NOA. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 6.02% and 7.34%, respectively. The recoveries ranged from 91.45% to 95.89%. Taken together, the proposed method was an efficient pretreatment and enrichment procedure and could be successfully applied for selective extraction and determination of naphthalene-derived phytormones in complex matrices. PMID:26949214

  8. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  9. A concise methodology for the stereoselective synthesis of O-glycosylated amino acid building blocks: complete 1H NMR assignments and their application in solid-phase glycopeptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, J; Gururaja, T L; Naganagowda, G A; Ramasubbu, N; Levine, M J

    1998-09-01

    A facile strategy for the stereoselective synthesis of suitably protected O-glycosylated amino acid building blocks, namely, Nalpha-Fmoc-Ser-[Ac4-beta-D-Gal-(1-3)-Ac2-alpha or beta-D-GalN3]-OPfp and Nalpha-Fmoc-Thr-[Ac4-beta-D-Gal-(1-3)-Ac2-alpha or beta-D-GalN3]-OPfp is described. What is new and novel in this report is that Koenigs-Knorr type glycosylation of an aglycon serine/threonine derivative (i.e. Nalpha-Fmoc-Ser-OPfp or Nalpha-Fmoc-Thr-OPfp) with protected beta-D-Gal(1-3)-D-GalN3 synthon mediated by silver salts resulted in only alpha- and/or beta-isomers in excellent yields under two different reaction conditions. The subtle differences in stereoselectivity were demonstrated clearly when glycosylation was carried out using only AgClO4 at -40 degrees C which afforded a-isomer in a quantitative yield (alpha:beta = 5:1). On the other hand, the beta-isomer was formed exclusively when the reaction was performed in the presence of Ag2CO3/AgClO4 at room temperature. A complete assignment of 1H resonances to individual sugar ring protons and the characteristic anomeric alpha-1 H and beta-1 H in Ac4Galbeta(1-3)Ac2GalN3 alpha and/or beta linked to Ser/Thr building blocks was accomplished unequivocally by two-dimensional double-quantum filtered correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser enhancement and exchange spectroscopy NMR experiments. An unambiguous structural characterization and documentation of chemical shifts, including the coupling constants for all the protons of the aforementioned alpha- and beta-isomers of the O-glycosylated amino acid building blocks carrying protected beta-D-Gal(1-3)-D-GalN3, could serve as a template in elucidating the three-dimensional structure of glycoproteins. The synthetic utility of the building blocks and versatility of the strategy was exemplified in the construction of human salivary mucin (MUC7)-derived, O-linked glycopeptides with varied degrees of glycosylation by solid-phase Fmoc chemistry. Fmoc

  10. NMR studies of structure and dynamics of liquid molecules confined in extended nanospaces.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Takehiko; Mizutani, Wataru; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2009-08-01

    -donating ability, while they did not appear for aprotic and nonpolar solvent cases. Based on these NMR results, we suggested that an intermediate phase, in which protons migrate through a hydrogen-bonding network and the water molecules are loosely coupled within 50 nm from the surface, exists mainly in extended nanospaces. This model could be supported by a three-phase theory based on the weight average of three phases invoking the bulk, adsorbed, and intermediate phases.

  11. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; et al

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  12. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  13. Experimental study of a three-adsorber sorption refrigerator for utilization of renewable sources of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitovich, A. P.

    2013-03-01

    A three-adsorber refrigerator has been created and experimentally tested, in which use is made of a composite sorbent consisting of activated carbon fiber and alkali salts. This sorbent has a high capacity of storage of refrigeration characteristic of chemical coolers and a high sorption rate characteristic of adsorption refrigerators. The sorbent structure makes it possible to effect a convective intrapore process of cooling of the sorbent through intense two-phase heat transfer. A three-adsorber refrigerator has a higher refrigeration efficiency and smaller mass and overall dimensions than a traditional two-stage four-adsorber refrigerator.

  14. UV-induced protonation of molecules adsorbed on ice surfaces at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eui-Seong; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Joon-Ki; Park, Seong-Chan; Kang, Heon

    2008-05-21

    UV irradiation of ice films adsorbed with methylamine molecules induces protonation of the adsorbate molecules at low temperature (50-130 K). The observation indicates that long-lived protonic defects are created in the ice film by UV light, and they transfer protons to the adsorbate molecules via tunneling mechanism at low temperature. The methylammonium ion formed by proton transfer remains to be stable at the ice surface. It is suggested that this solid-phase protonation might play a significant role in the production of molecular ions in interstellar clouds.

  15. Gaseous mixed adsorbed films of octadecanol and cholesterol at the oil/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Matubayasi, Norihiro; Azumaya, Susumu; Kanaya, Kazuhiko

    1992-08-01

    Gaseous/expanded and expanded/condensed phase transitions have been observed in adsorbed films of cholesterol at oil/water interfaces, while only the expanded/condensed phase transition has been observed in adsorbed films of octadecanol. To confirm that the octadecanol films do not exhibit the gaseous/expanded transition and to make clear the gaseous adsorbed film, the interfacial tension was measured in a dilute concentration region as a function of the total concentration and composition of the octadecanol-cholesterol mixture at 25{degrees}C. The result indicated that the gaseous films are expressed by the two-dimensional ideal gas law and the gaseous/expanded transition at oil/water interfaces cannot be observed for octadecanol. Further, the mixed adsorbed film was shown to be enriched with cholesterol which is more surface active than octadecanol. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Electrical properties of porous oxides with adsorbed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Feodor A.; Kytin, Vladimir G.; Nosova, Ludmila; Kozlov, Sergei N.

    2005-05-01

    The impedance of porous alumina (por-Al2O3) and titanium oxide (por-TiO2) with adsorbed water has been investigated in a wide frequency range and at temperatures near the water-ice phase transition. The equivalent circuit of the investigated structures has been determined. It has been shown that water adsorption in the pores of a solid-state matrix has a great influence on its electrical properties. The characteristics of the electrical properties of experimental structures related to the water-ice phase transition have been revealed.

  17. Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 205 NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials (Web, free access)   The NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials is a free, web-based catalog of adsorbent materials and measured adsorption properties of numerous materials obtained from article entries from the scientific literature. Search fields for the database include adsorbent material, adsorbate gas, experimental conditions (pressure, temperature), and bibliographic information (author, title, journal), and results from queries are provided as a list of articles matching the search parameters. The database also contains adsorption isotherms digitized from the cataloged articles, which can be compared visually online in the web application or exported for offline analysis.

  18. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  19. NMR velocity mapping of gas flow around solid objects.

    PubMed

    Han, Song-I; Pierce, Kimberly L; Pines, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    We present experimental visualizations of gas flow around solid blunt bodies by NMR imaging. NMR velocimetry is a model-free and tracer-free experimental means for quantitative and multi-dimensional flow visualization. Hyperpolarization of (129)Xe provided sufficient NMR signal to overcome the low density of the dilute gas phase, and its long coherence time allows for true velocity vector mapping. In this study, the diverging gas flow around and wake patterns immediately behind a sphere could be vectorally visualized and quantified. In a similar experiment, the flow over an aerodynamic model airplane body revealed a less disrupted flow pattern.

  20. NMR velocity mapping of gas flow around solid objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Song-I.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Pines, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    We present experimental visualizations of gas flow around solid blunt bodies by NMR imaging. NMR velocimetry is a model-free and tracer-free experimental means for quantitative and multi-dimensional flow visualization. Hyperpolarization of Xe129 provided sufficient NMR signal to overcome the low density of the dilute gas phase, and its long coherence time allows for true velocity vector mapping. In this study, the diverging gas flow around and wake patterns immediately behind a sphere could be vectorally visualized and quantified. In a similar experiment, the flow over an aerodynamic model airplane body revealed a less disrupted flow pattern.

  1. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  2. NMR Relaxation and Diffusion in Polymerized Microemulsions of HEMA and MMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Meerwall, E.; Chandran, S.; Slivka, J.; Lopina, S.; Cheung, M.

    2002-10-01

    In an effort to develop a class of materials for use in controlled drug delivery via implantation, we have used proton NMR T2 relaxation and pulsed-field-gradient diffusion (D) measurements to study bicontinuous microemulsions formed with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), polymerized and crosslinked with 4 wt. percent ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in the presence of water containing ten percent surfactant, either the inert sodium alkyl sulfate or the polymerizable TREM-LF-40. Measurements were made at 50 deg. C over the full two-phase range (e. g., 30 to 96 percent aqueous, depending on HEMA/MMA ratio). We identify a trimodal T2 spectrum with components attributable to the semi-glassy network, adsorbed surfactant and ingested water, and the interstitial aqueous phase. In the latter, two distinct D rates are due to free water and dissolved surfactant; specimens are permeable to both. Component intensity ratios are non-monotonic in aqueous content. Results suggest a wide range of pore sizes and complex interactions between the mobile molecules and the network surfaces, pores, and swellable bulk. Surfactant reactivity seems to play a minor role. Results of other characterizations complement and support these findings.

  3. Live cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Freedberg, Darón I; Selenko, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Ever since scientists realized that cells are the basic building blocks of all life, they have been developing tools to look inside them to reveal the architectures and mechanisms that define their biological functions. Whereas "looking into cells" is typically said in reference to optical microscopy, high-resolution in-cell and on-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful method that offers exciting new possibilities for structural and functional studies in and on live cells. In contrast to conventional imaging techniques, in- and on-cell NMR methods do not provide spatial information on cellular biomolecules. Instead, they enable atomic-resolution insights into the native cell states of proteins, nucleic acids, glycans, and lipids. Here we review recent advances and developments in both fields and discuss emerging concepts that have been delineated with these methods.

  4. Forsterite Carbonation in Wet-scCO2: Dependence on Adsorbed Water Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, J.; Benezeth, P.; Qafoku, O.; Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Bonneville, A.; McGrail, P.; Felmy, A.; Rosso, K.

    2013-12-01

    Capturing and storing CO2 in basaltic formations is one of the most promising options for mitigating atmospheric CO2 emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. These geologic reservoirs have high reactive potential for CO2-mineral trapping due to an abundance of divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4). Recent studies have shown that carbonation of these silicates under wet scCO2 conditions, e. g. encountered near a CO2 injection well, proceeds along a different pathway and is more effective than in CO2-saturated aqueous fluids. The presence of an adsorbed water film on the forsterite surface seems to be key to reactivity towards carbonation. In this study, we employed in situ high pressure IR spectroscopy to investigate the dependence of adsorbed water film thickness on forsterite carbonation chemistry. Post reaction ex situ SEM, TEM, TGA, XRD, and NMR measurements will also be discussed. Several IR titrations were performed of forsterite with water at 50 °C and 90 bar scCO2. Aliquots of water were titrated at 4-hour reaction-time increments. Once a desired total water concentration was reached, data were collected for about another 30 hours. One titration involved 10 additions, which corresponds to 6.8 monolayers of adsorbed water. Clearly, a carbonate was precipitating, and its spectral signature matched magnesite. Another titration involved 8 aliquots, or up to 4.4 monolayers of water. The integrated absorbance under the CO stretching bands of carbonate as a function of time after reaching 4.4 monolayers showed an increase and then a plateau. We are currently unsure of the identity of the carbonate that precipitated, but it could be an amorphous anhydrous phase or magnesite crystals with dimensions of only several nanometers. A third titration only involved 3 additions, or up to 1.6 monolayers of water. The integrated absorbance under the CO stretching bands of carbonate as a function of time after reaching 1.6 monolayers

  5. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  6. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  7. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  8. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  9. Phase Coexistence in a Dynamic Phase Diagram.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Coppola, Luigi; Balog, Sandor; Mortensen, Kell; Ranieri, Giuseppe A; Olsson, Ulf

    2015-08-01

    Metastability and phase coexistence are important concepts in colloidal science. Typically, the phase diagram of colloidal systems is considered at the equilibrium without the presence of an external field. However, several studies have reported phase transition under mechanical deformation. The reason behind phase coexistence under shear flow is not fully understood. Here, multilamellar vesicle (MLV)-to-sponge (L3 ) and MLV-to-Lα transitions upon increasing temperature are detected using flow small-angle neutron scattering techniques. Coexistence of Lα and MLV phases at 40 °C under shear flow is detected by using flow NMR spectroscopy. The unusual rheological behavior observed by studying the lamellar phase of a non-ionic surfactant is explained using (2) H NMR and diffusion flow NMR spectroscopy with the coexistence of planar lamellar-multilamellar vesicles. Moreover, a dynamic phase diagram over a wide range of temperatures is proposed.

  10. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  11. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, R. |

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework {sup 27}Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na{sup +} cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  12. Heat transfer to the adsorbent in solar adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Papucik, Stefan; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with design and construction of solar adsorption cooling device and with heat transfer problem in adsorber. The most important part of adsorption cooling system is adsorber/desorber containing adsorbent. Zeolith (adsorbent) type was chosen for its high adsorption capacity, like a coolant was used water. In adsorber/desorber occur, at heating of adsorbent, to heat transfer from heat change medium to the adsorbent. The time required for heating of adsorber filling is very important, because on it depend flexibility of cooling system. Zeolith has a large thermal resistance, therefore it had to be adapted the design and construction of adsorber. As the best shows the tube type of adsorber with double coat construction. By this construction is ensured thin layer of adsorbent and heating is quick in all volume of adsorbent. The process of heat transfer was experimentally measured, but for comparison simulated in ANSYS, too.

  13. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  14. States of water adsorbed on perindopril crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. A.; Khmelevskaya, V. S.; Bogdanov, N. Yu.; Gorchakov, K. A.

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between the structural state of adsorbed water, the crystal structure of the substances, and the solubility of the perindopril salt C19H32N2O5 · C4H11N in water was studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The high-frequency shift of the stretching vibrations of adsorbed water and the solubility depend on the crystal structure of the drug substance. A reversible chemical reaction occurred between the adsorbed water and the perindopril salt.

  15. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  16. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR.II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. T. S.; Rods, M. S.; Newmark, R. D.; Budinger, T. F.

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high-field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies where the peak RF power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. A stochastic NMR experiment excites the spin system with a sequence of RF pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. In a previous paper the stochastic experiment was analyzed and analytic expressions for the input-output cross-correlations, average signal power, and signal spectral density were obtained for a general stochastic RF excitation. In this paper specific cases of excitation with random phase, fixed flip angle, and excitation with two random components in quadrature are analyzed. The input-output cross-correlation for these two types of excitations is shown to be Lorentzian. Line broadening is the only spectral distortion as the RF excitation power is increased. The systematic noise power is inversely proportional to the number of data points N used in the spectral reconstruction. The use of a complete maximum length sequence (MLS) may improve the signal-to-systematic-noise ratio by 20 dB relative to random binary excitation, but peculiar features in the higher-order autocorrelations of MLS cause noise-like distortion in the reconstructed spectra when the excitation power is high. The amount of noise-like distortion depends on the choice of the MLS generator.

  17. Novel adsorbent applicability for decontamination of printing wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiurski, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Ranogajec, Jonjaua; Kecic, Vesna

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption capacity of clayey minerals can be enhanced by replacing the natural exchangeable cations with organic cations, which makes the clay surface more hydrophobic. Different solids such as activated carbon, clay minerals, zeolites, metal oxides and organic polymers have been tested as effective adsorbents. On a global scale, clays have a large applicability for decontamination, purification of urban and industrial residual waters, protection of waste disposal areas, and purification of industrial gases and so on. Clay derivative materials with high adsorption capacities are very attractive from an economical point of view. Due to the economic constraints, a development of cost effective and clean processes is desired. Adsorption processes has proved to be the most effective, especially for effluents with moderate and low heavy metal concentrations, as like as in printing wastewaters. Among several removal technologies, the adsorption of Zn(II) ion onto NZ, B, pure C and C with PEG 600 addition could be of great importance for the printing wastewaters purification. However, the newly designed adsorbent of the defined pore size distribution and phase structure considered as the most suitable material for Zn(II) ion removal. The values of distribution coefficient (Kd) increased with decreasing of the adsorbent amount. The Kd values depend also on the type of used adsorbent, the following increased order is obtained: NZ < B = pure C < C with PEG 600 addition. The adsorption equilibrium data of Zn(II) ion on NZ, B, pure C and C with PEG 600 were analyzed in terms of the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR) isotherm models. The characteristic parameters for each isotherms and related correlation coefficients were determined. The values of correlation coefficient (R2) indicated the following order of the isotherm models: Freundlich > Langmuir > DKR. The study also showed that the fired clay modified with PEG 600 addition has great potential

  18. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  19. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  20. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  1. Mesoporous Silica: A Suitable Adsorbent for Amines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous silica with KIT-6 structure was investigated as a preconcentrating material in chromatographic systems for ammonia and trimethylamine. Its adsorption capacity was compared to that of existing commercial materials, showing its increased adsorption power. In addition, KIT-6 mesoporous silica efficiently adsorbs both gases, while none of the employed commercial adsorbents did. This means that KIT-6 Mesoporous silica may be a good choice for integrated chromatography/gas sensing micro-devices. PMID:20628459

  2. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  3. Determination of 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol from environmental waters by magnetic solid phase extraction with Fe@MgAl-layered double hydroxides nanoparticles as the adsorbents prior to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Lei, Man; Li, Jing; Zhao, Kuifu; Liu, Yongli

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic Fe@MgAl-layered double hydroxides (MgAl-LDHs) composite was firstly synthesized by coating MgAl-layered double hydroxides on the surface of the dispersed nanoscale zero valent irons with co-precipitation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The synthesized Fe@MgAl-LDHs nanoparticles were investigated for magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) of 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol from the water samples. The elutent containing 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with variable wavelength detection (HPLC-UV). Under optimal conditions, there is good linear relationship between the concentration and the peak area in the range of 0.5-200 μgL(-1) with the correlation coefficients (r(2)) above 0.998 for 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol. The limits of detection were 0.22 μgL(-1) and 0.19 μgL(-1) for 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol, respectively, and precisions were both below 2.5% (n=6). The real water analysis demonstrated that the spiked recoveries were in the range of 79.2-80.9% (n=3). All these results indicated that the developed MSPE-HPLC-UV method was proved to be an efficient tool for the analysis of naphthols.

  4. The use of dielectric and NMR measurements to determine the pore-scale location of organic. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of the three-year research project is to investigate the effect of adsorbed organics on the dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response of porous geological materials. This will allow the author to assess the use of dielectric and NMR measurements at a site to determine whether organic contaminants are present in the central volume of the pore space or are adsorbed to the solid surfaces. In addition, she proposes to use laboratory dielectric and NMR measurements to study the kinetics of the adsorption and desorption of organics. This report summarizes work completed after 20 months of a three-year project. The research involves the study of the NMR and dielectric behavior of sands with three types of solid surfaces: water-wet, where water spontaneously coats and adsorbs to the solid surfaces; hydrophobic, where water is repelled from the solid surfaces by an organosilane coating; and oil-wet, where oil coats the solid surfaces. The oil-wet case is representative of a contaminated soil, in which oil has become adsorbed to the solid surfaces.'

  5. Contaminant removal from enclosed atmospheres by regenerable adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, R. L.; Mcnulty, K. J.; Freedland, G. M.; Turk, A.; Nwankwo, J.

    1974-01-01

    A system for removing contaminants from spacecraft atmospheres was studied, which utilizes catalyst-impregnated activated carbon followed by in-situ regeneration by low-temperature catalytic oxidation of the adsorbed contaminants. Platinum was deposited on activated carbon by liquid phase impregnation with chloroplatinic acid, followed by drying and high-temperature reduction. Results were obtained for the seven selected spacecraft contaminants by means of three experimental test systems. The results indicate that the contaminants could be removed by oxidation with very little loss in adsorptive capacity. The advantages of a catalyst-impregnated carbon for oxidative regeneration are found to be significant enough to warrent its use.

  6. Mobilization of arsenite by dissimilatory reduction of adsorbed arsenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zobrist, J.; Dowdle, P.R.; Davis, J.A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum barnesii is capable of anaerobic growth using ferric iron or arsenate as electron acceptors. Cell suspensions of S. barnesii were able to reduce arsenate to arsenite when the former oxyanion was dissolved in solution, or when it was adsorbed onto the surface of ferrihydrite, a common soil mineral, by a variety of mechanisms (e.g., coprecipitation, presorption). Reduction of Fe(III) in ferrihydrite to soluble Fe(II) also occurred, but dissolution of ferrihydrite was not required in order for adsorbed arsenate reduction to be achieved. This was illustrated by bacterial reduction of arsenate coprecipitated with aluminum hydroxide, a mineral that does not undergo reductive dissolution. The rate of arsenate reduction was influenced by the method in which arsenate became associated with the mineral phases and may have been strongly coupled with arsenate desorption rates. The extent of release of arsenite into solution was governed by adsorption of arsenite onto the ferrihydrite or alumina phases. The results of these experiments have interpretive significance to the mobilization of arsenic in large alluvial aquifers, such as those of the Ganges in India and Bangladesh, and in the hyporheic zones of contaminated streams.Sulfurospirillum barnesii is capable of anaerobic growth using ferric iron or arsenate as electron acceptors. Cell suspensions of S. barnesii were able to reduce arsenate to arsenite when the former oxyanion was dissolved in solution, or when it was adsorbed onto the surface of ferrihydrite a common soil mineral, by a variety of mechanisms (e.g., coprecipitation, presorption). Reduction of Fe(III) in ferrihydrite to soluble Fe(II) also occurred, but dissolution of ferrihydrite was not required in order for adsorbed arsenate reduction to be achieved. This was illustrated by bacterial reduction of arsenate coprecipitated with aluminum hydroxide, a mineral that does not undergo reductive dissolution. The rate of arsenate reduction was

  7. Titanate-based adsorbents for radioactive ions entrapment from water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjiang; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2013-03-21

    This feature article reviews some titanate-based adsorbents for the removal of radioactive wastes (cations and anions) from water. At the beginning, we discuss the development of the conventional ion-exchangeable titanate powders for the entrapment of radioactive cations, such as crystalline silicotitanate (CST), monosodium titanate (MST), peroxotitanate (PT). Then, we specially emphasize the recent progress in the uptake of radioactive ions by one-dimensional (1D) sodium titanate nanofibers and nanotubes, which includes the synthesis and phase transformation of the 1D nanomaterials, adsorption ability (capacity, selectivity, kinetics, etc.) of radioactive cations and anions, and the structural evolution during the adsorption process.

  8. Investigation of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays by {sup 129}Xe NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsaio, C.-J.; Carrado, K. A.; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry

    1998-04-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy of xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays has been used to glean information on the interlayer gallery height of clays before and after pillaring. Two clay minerals were studied, a Ca{sup 2+}-montmorillonite and Bentonite L. The NMR results indicate that the effective interlamellar spacing of the montmorillonite increased from 5.4 to 8.0 Angstroms after pillaring with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. These data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in gallery height from 5.6 to 8.4 Angstroms.

  9. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications. PMID:27131811

  10. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastián C.

    2006-03-01

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon® seat, and Kalrez® O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  11. Supported polytertiary amines: highly efficient and selective SO2 adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Ritesh; Abboud, Mohamed; Sayari, Abdelhamid

    2014-01-01

    Tertiary amine containing poly(propyleneimine) second (G2) and third (G3) generation dendrimers as well as polyethyleneimine (PEI) were developed for the selective removal of SO2. N-Alkylation of primary and secondary amines into tertiary amines was confirmed by FTIR and NMR analysis. Such modified polyamines were impregnated on two nanoporous supports, namely, SBA-15PL silica with platelet morphology and ethanol-extracted pore-expanded MCM-41 (PME) composite. In the presence of 0.1% SO2/N2 at 23 °C, the uptake of modified PEI, G2, and G3 supported on SBA-15PL was 2.07, 2.35, and 1.71 mmol/g, respectively; corresponding to SO2/N ratios of 0.22, 0.4, and 0.3. Under the same conditions, the SO2 adsorption capacity of PME-supported modified PEI and G3 was significantly higher, reaching 4.68 and 4.34 mmol/g, corresponding to SO2/N ratios of 0.41 and 0.82, respectively. The working SO2 adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature, reflecting the exothermic nature of the process. The adsorption capacity of these materials was enhanced dramatically in the presence of humidity in the gas mixture. FTIR data before SO2 adsorption and after adsorption and regeneration did not indicate any change in the materials. Nonetheless, the SO2 working capacity decreased in consecutive adsorption/regeneration cycles due to evaporation of impregnated polyamines, rather than actual deactivation. FTIR and (13)C and (15)N CP-MAS NMR of fresh and SO2 adsorbed modified G3 on PME confirmed the formation of a complexation adduct.

  12. Supported polytertiary amines: highly efficient and selective SO2 adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Ritesh; Abboud, Mohamed; Sayari, Abdelhamid

    2014-01-01

    Tertiary amine containing poly(propyleneimine) second (G2) and third (G3) generation dendrimers as well as polyethyleneimine (PEI) were developed for the selective removal of SO2. N-Alkylation of primary and secondary amines into tertiary amines was confirmed by FTIR and NMR analysis. Such modified polyamines were impregnated on two nanoporous supports, namely, SBA-15PL silica with platelet morphology and ethanol-extracted pore-expanded MCM-41 (PME) composite. In the presence of 0.1% SO2/N2 at 23 °C, the uptake of modified PEI, G2, and G3 supported on SBA-15PL was 2.07, 2.35, and 1.71 mmol/g, respectively; corresponding to SO2/N ratios of 0.22, 0.4, and 0.3. Under the same conditions, the SO2 adsorption capacity of PME-supported modified PEI and G3 was significantly higher, reaching 4.68 and 4.34 mmol/g, corresponding to SO2/N ratios of 0.41 and 0.82, respectively. The working SO2 adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature, reflecting the exothermic nature of the process. The adsorption capacity of these materials was enhanced dramatically in the presence of humidity in the gas mixture. FTIR data before SO2 adsorption and after adsorption and regeneration did not indicate any change in the materials. Nonetheless, the SO2 working capacity decreased in consecutive adsorption/regeneration cycles due to evaporation of impregnated polyamines, rather than actual deactivation. FTIR and (13)C and (15)N CP-MAS NMR of fresh and SO2 adsorbed modified G3 on PME confirmed the formation of a complexation adduct. PMID:24437448

  13. Achievement of 1020MHz NMR.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Matsumoto, Shinji; Nishijima, Gen; Goto, Atsushi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Takashi; Sakai, Shuji; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Iguchi, Seiya; Yamazaki, Toshio; Maeda, Hideaki; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Suematsu, Hiroto; Miki, Takashi; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    We have successfully developed a 1020MHz (24.0T) NMR magnet, establishing the world's highest magnetic field in high resolution NMR superconducting magnets. The magnet is a series connection of LTS (low-Tc superconductors NbTi and Nb3Sn) outer coils and an HTS (high-Tc superconductor, Bi-2223) innermost coil, being operated at superfluid liquid helium temperature such as around 1.8K and in a driven-mode by an external DC power supply. The drift of the magnetic field was initially ±0.8ppm/10h without the (2)H lock operation; it was then stabilized to be less than 1ppb/10h by using an NMR internal lock operation. The full-width at half maximum of a (1)H spectrum taken for 1% CHCl3 in acetone-d6 was as low as 0.7Hz (0.7ppb), which was sufficient for solution NMR. On the contrary, the temporal field stability under the external lock operation for solid-state NMR was 170ppb/10h, sufficient for NMR measurements for quadrupolar nuclei such as (17)O; a (17)O NMR measurement for labeled tri-peptide clearly demonstrated the effect of high magnetic field on solid-state NMR spectra. PMID:25978708

  14. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  15. Correlation between the Sorption-Induced Deformation of Nanoporous Glass and the Continuous Freezing of Adsorbed Argon.

    PubMed

    Schappert, Klaus; Reiplinger, Nicolas; Pelster, Rolf

    2016-08-01

    In this article we study the dependence of the sorption-induced deformation of nanoporous glass on the liquid-solid phase transition of adsorbed argon. During cooling we observe a continuous reduction of the expansion of the porous glass matrix caused by the adsorbate. The contraction is attended by a likewise continuous change of the adsorbed argon's phase state from liquid to solid. This simultaneous behavior evidences that the liquid-solid phase transition leads to a reduction of the pressure the adsorbate exerts on the pore walls. Furthermore, the study shows that small temperature changes can temporarily cause strong deformations of the porous material that decay in long time intervals of up to 1 week. We expect that our observations for the model system of argon and porous glass can be generalized to other systems. Consequently, this study will have implications when considering porous materials for applications, e.g., as a medium for storage. PMID:27398774

  16. NMR Studies of Quantum Tunneling in Monolayers of Helium Three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Charles; Stachowiak, Piotr; Sullivan, Neil

    2002-03-01

    The results of NMR studies of the nuclear spin-spin relaxation are reported for commensurate monolayers of helium three adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride. The measurements were made using pulsed NMR techniques for low temperatures, 0.01 < T < 5.0 K, and for moderately high magnetic fields (up to 6 T). The relaxation rate is independent of temperature at low temperatures, 0.12 < T < 0.85 K, and this behavior is interpreted in terms of particle-particle exchange motions of the adsorbed helium atoms. The effective exchange rates were observed to change significantly on replacing a fraction of the helium atoms with relatively immobile neon atoms. This is understood if there is a significant 3-particle exchange in addition to 2-particle exchange. The analyses of the experimental results indicate that the 3-spin exchange term in the exchange Hamiltonian is of opposite sign to that of the 2-spin exchange and also has a larger amplitude. At high temperatures, 0.8 < T < 5.0 K, an exponential temperature dependence of the rate is observed that is attributed to the thermal activation of vacancies.

  17. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  18. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  19. Black molecular adsorber coatings for spaceflight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-09-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  20. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    developed methodology using that data to determine spatially resolved permeability distributions. We investigate the use of intrinsic properties for developing improved correlations for predicting permeability from NMR well-logging data and for obtaining more accurate estimates of multiphase flow properties--the relative permeability and capillary pressure--from displacement experiments. We demonstrate the use of MRI measurements of saturation and relaxation for prediction wetting-phase relative permeability for unstable experiments. Finally, we developed an improved method for determining surface relaxivity with NMR experiments, which can provide better descriptions of permeable media microstructures and improved correlations for permeability predictions.

  1. Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel C. Diaz; Karen M. Steel; Trevor C. Drage; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape

    2005-12-01

    High-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry measurements were carried out on 4:1 wt/wt blends of a medium volatile bituminous coal with two anthracites, two petroleum cokes, charcoal, wood, a low-temperature coke breeze, tyre crumb, and active carbon to determine the effects on fluidity development to identify the parameters responsible for these effects during pyrolysis and to study possible relationships among the parameters derived from these techniques. Positive, negative, and neutral effects were identified on the concentration of fluid material. Small positive effects (ca. 5-6%) were caused by blending the coal with petroleum cokes. Charcoal, wood, and active carbon all exerted negative effects on concentration (18-27% reduction) and mobility (12-25% reduction in T2) of the fluid phase, which have been associated with the inert character and high surface areas of these additives that adsorb the fluid phase of the coal. One of the anthracites and the low-temperature coke breeze caused deleterious effects to a lesser extent on the concentration (7-12%) and mobility (13-17%) of the fluid material, possibly due to the high concentration of metals in these additives (ca. 11% ash). Despite the high fluid character of tyre crumb at the temperature of maximum fluidity of the coal (73%), the mobility of the fluid phase of the blend was lower than expected. The comparison of {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry results indicated that to account for the variations in minimum complex viscosity for all the blends, both the maximum concentration of fluid phase and the maximum mobility of the fluid material had to be considered. For individual blends, two exponential relationships have been found between the complex viscosity and the concentration of solid phase in both the softening and resolidification stages but the parameters are different for each blend. 30 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Photoexcitation of adsorbates on metal surfaces: One-step or three-step

    SciTech Connect

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-09-07

    In this essay we discuss the light-matter interactions at molecule-covered metal surfaces that initiate surface photochemistry. The hot-electron mechanism for surface photochemistry, whereby the absorption of light by a metal surface creates an electron-hole pair, and the hot electron scatters through an unoccupied resonance of adsorbate to initiate nuclear dynamics leading to photochemistry, has become widely accepted. Yet, ultrafast spectroscopic measurements of molecule-surface electronic structure and photoexcitation dynamics provide scant support for the hot electron mechanism. Instead, in most cases the adsorbate resonances are excited through photoinduced substrate-to-adsorbate charge transfer. Based on recent studies of the role of coherence in adsorbate photoexcitation, as measured by the optical phase and momentum resolved two-photon photoemission measurements, we examine critically the hot electron mechanism, and propose an alternative description based on direct charge transfer of electrons from the substrate to adsorbate. The advantage of this more quantum mechanically rigorous description is that it informs how material properties of the substrate and adsorbate, as well as their interaction, influence the frequency dependent probability of photoexcitation and ultimately how light can be used to probe and control surface femtochemistry.

  3. [Adsorbed non-point source pollution load of Jialing River basin].

    PubMed

    Long, Tian-Yu; Li, Ji-Cheng; Liu, La-Mei

    2008-07-01

    Based on the American Universal Soil Loss Equation, focused on the two main factors that are hydrology condition and land management practice which can influence the soil loss in the watershed change yearly, and took into account the sediment transport process which can effect the soil loss differ spatially, a new sediment load evaluation method was put forward which can reflect the yearly change process of soil loss. Took Jialing River basin as a research example and validated the new evaluation method. Furthermore, according to the correlation between the sediment load and adsorbed nitrogen and phosphorus pollution load, established a yearly load evaluation model of the adsorbed nitrogen and phosphorus pollution. By virtue of the geographical information technology, the yearly load and spatial distribution of the adsorbed nitrogen and phosphorus pollution due to soil erosion in the Jialing River basin from 1990 to 2005 have been studied by the established model. The results show that adsorbed phase of nitrogen and phosphorus pollution are quite seriously in the subbasin of Bailong River and Xihanshui River. In recent years, adsorbed nitrogen and phosphorus pollution loads have declined year by year because of the conservation practices of soil and water in this basin. The average loads of adsorbed nitrogen and phosphorus pollution are 34 423 t/a and 1 848 t/a respectively in the past five years, which have reduced by about 60% from 1990.

  4. Method for modifying trigger level for adsorber regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.

    2010-05-25

    A method for modifying a NO.sub.x adsorber regeneration triggering variable. Engine operating conditions are monitored until the regeneration triggering variable is met. The adsorber is regenerated and the adsorbtion efficiency of the adsorber is subsequently determined. The regeneration triggering variable is modified to correspond with the decline in adsorber efficiency. The adsorber efficiency may be determined using an empirically predetermined set of values or by using a pair of oxygen sensors to determine the oxygen response delay across the sensors.

  5. Ion counting in supercapacitor electrodes using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Wang, Hao; Trease, Nicole M; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2014-01-01

    (19)F NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the local environments of anions in supercapacitor electrodes and to quantify changes in the populations of adsorbed species during charging. In the absence of an applied potential, anionic species adsorbed within carbon micropores (in-pore) are distinguished from those in large mesopores and spaces between particles (ex-pore) by a characteristic nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS). Adsorption experiments and two-dimensional exchange experiments confirm that anions are in dynamic equilibrium between the in- and ex-pore environments with an exchange rate in the order of tens of Hz. (19)F in situ NMR spectra recorded at different charge states reveal changes in the intensity and NICS of the in-pore resonances, which are interpreted in term of changes in the population and local environments of the adsorbed anions that arise due to the charge-storage process. A comparison of the results obtained for a range of electrolytes reveals that several factors influence the charging mechanism. For a tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, positive polarisation of the electrode is found to proceed by anion adsorption at a low concentration, whereas increased ion exchange plays a more important role for a high concentration electrolyte. In contrast, negative polarization of the electrode proceeds by cation adsorption for both concentrations. For a tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, anion expulsion is observed in the negative charging regime; this is attributed to the reduced mobility and/or access of the larger cations inside the pores, which forces the expulsion of anions in order to build up ionic charge. Significant anion expulsion is also observed in the negative charging regime for alkali metal bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide electrolytes, suggesting that more subtle factors also affect the charging mechanism.

  6. A study on Effective Thermal Conductivity of Packed Bed of Adsorbent Including Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Yoshio; Ohta, Ryuma; Takegoshi, Eisyun

    In the present study, an effective thermal conductivity of the packed bed of an adsorbent including water was measured experimentally by using the transient hot wire method in temperature range from about -40°C to room temperature. Zeolite particle and activated carbon particle were employed as the adsorbent. The water included in the adsorbent was classified to three kinds; namely, the adsorbed water in the adsorption site with a nanometer order in particle, the osmosis water existing in gap with lager size than the adsorption site and the free water around particle. The measurement was performed with changing the mass ratio of adsorbed water and osmosis water and was also performed for the particle filled by the free water. As the results, the effective thermal conductivity of the packed bed increased with the increase of temperature except the case containing free water. In zeolite, the effective thermal conductivity of the packed bed of particles with adsorbed water became bigger than that of the desorbed particle about 10% though the adsorbed water was trapped in the adsorption site as a single molecular in zeolite particle. In activated carbon, the effective thermal conductivity was larger than that of desorbed particle about 20%. Next, in the packed bed of particle with the osmosis water, the effective thermal conductivity indicated about two times of that of particle with the adsorbed water. In the packed bed of particle filled by free water, the effective thermal conductivity increased suddenly under 0°C. It is considered that the thermal conductivity of ice affected seriously to the effective thermal conductivity because ice was the continuous phase in the bed.

  7. Enhancing uranium uptake by amidoxime adsorbent in seawater: An investigation for optimum alkaline conditioning parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Sadananda; Tsouris, Costas; Zhang, Chenxi; Brown, Suree; Janke, Christopher James; Mayes, Richard T.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Gill, Gary; Dai, Sheng; Kim, J.; et al

    2015-09-07

    A high-surface-area polyethylene-fiber adsorbent (AF160-2) has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid. The grafted nitriles were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) by varying different reaction parameters such as KOH concentration (0.2, 0.44, and 0.6 M), duration (1, 2, and 3 h), and temperature (60, 70, and 80 °C). Adsorbent screening was then performed with simulated seawater solutions containing sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate, at concentrations found in seawater, and uranium nitrate at a uranium concentration ofmore » ~7–8 ppm and pH 8. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and solid-state NMR analyses indicated that a fraction of amidoxime groups was hydrolyzed to carboxylate during KOH conditioning. The uranium adsorption capacity in the simulated seawater screening solution gradually increased with conditioning time and temperature for all KOH concentrations. It was also observed that the adsorption capacity increased with an increase in concentration of KOH for all the conditioning times and temperatures. AF160-2 adsorbent samples were also tested with natural seawater using flow-through experiments to determine uranium adsorption capacity with varying KOH conditioning time and temperature. Based on uranium loading capacity values of several AF160-2 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning time from 3 to 1 h at 60, 70, and 80 °C resulted in an increase of the uranium loading capacity in seawater, which did not follow the trend found in laboratory screening with stimulated solutions. Longer KOH conditioning times lead to significantly higher uptake of divalent metal ions, such as calcium and magnesium, which is a result of amidoxime conversion into less selective carboxylate. The scanning electron microscopy showed that long

  8. Enhancing uranium uptake by amidoxime adsorbent in seawater: An investigation for optimum alkaline conditioning parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadananda; Tsouris, Costas; Zhang, Chenxi; Brown, Suree; Janke, Christopher James; Mayes, Richard T.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Gill, Gary; Dai, Sheng; Kim, J.; Oyola, Y.; Wood, J. R.

    2015-09-07

    A high-surface-area polyethylene-fiber adsorbent (AF160-2) has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid. The grafted nitriles were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) by varying different reaction parameters such as KOH concentration (0.2, 0.44, and 0.6 M), duration (1, 2, and 3 h), and temperature (60, 70, and 80 °C). Adsorbent screening was then performed with simulated seawater solutions containing sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate, at concentrations found in seawater, and uranium nitrate at a uranium concentration of ~7–8 ppm and pH 8. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and solid-state NMR analyses indicated that a fraction of amidoxime groups was hydrolyzed to carboxylate during KOH conditioning. The uranium adsorption capacity in the simulated seawater screening solution gradually increased with conditioning time and temperature for all KOH concentrations. It was also observed that the adsorption capacity increased with an increase in concentration of KOH for all the conditioning times and temperatures. AF160-2 adsorbent samples were also tested with natural seawater using flow-through experiments to determine uranium adsorption capacity with varying KOH conditioning time and temperature. Based on uranium loading capacity values of several AF160-2 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning time from 3 to 1 h at 60, 70, and 80 °C resulted in an increase of the uranium loading capacity in seawater, which did not follow the trend found in laboratory screening with stimulated solutions. Longer KOH conditioning times lead to significantly higher uptake of divalent metal ions, such as calcium and magnesium, which is a result of amidoxime conversion into less selective carboxylate. The scanning electron microscopy showed that long conditioning

  9. Multinuclear NMR approach to coal fly ash characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the application of various nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to study the hydration kinetics and mechanisms, the structural properties, and the adsorption characteristics of coal fly ash. Coal fly ash samples were obtained from the Dave Johnston and Laramie River electric power generating plants in Wyoming. Hydrogen NMR relaxation times were measured as a function of time to observe the kinetics of hydration for the two coal fly ashes at different temperatures and water-to-cement ration. The kinetic data for the hydrated coal fly ashes were compared to the hydration of portland cement. The mechanism used to describe the kinetic data for the hydration of portland cement was applied, with reservation, to describe the hydration of the coal fly ashes. The results showed that the coal fly ashes differ kinetically from that of portland cement and from each other. Consequently, both coal fly ashes were judged to be poorer cementitious materials than portland cement. Carbon-13 NMR CP/MAS spectra were obtained for the anhydrous coal fly ashes in an effort to determine the type of organic species that may be present, either adsorbed on the surface or entrained.

  10. Elution of uranium and transition metals from amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents for sequestering uranium from seawater

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Miyamoto, Naomi; Wood, Jordana; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary; Janke, Christopher James; Wai, Chien

    2015-11-30

    High-surface-area amidoxime and carboxylic acid grafted polymer adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were tested for sequestering uranium in a flowing seawater flume system at the PNNL-Marine Sciences Laboratory. FTIR spectra indicate that a KOH conditioning process is necessary to remove the proton from the carboxylic acid and make the sorbent effective for sequestering uranium from seawater. The alkaline conditioning process also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. Both Na2CO3 H2O2 and hydrochloric acid elution methods can remove ~95% of the uranium sequestered by the adsorbent after 42 days of exposure in real seawater. Themore » Na2CO3 H2O2 elution method is more selective for uranium than conventional acid elution. Iron and vanadium are the two major transition metals competing with uranium for adsorption to the amidoxime-based adsorbents in real seawater. Tiron (4,5-Dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid disodium salt, 1 M) can remove iron from the adsorbent very effectively at pH around 7. The coordination between vanadium (V) and amidoxime is also discussed based on our 51V NMR data.« less

  11. Trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a sol–gel synthesized silica adsorbent functionalized with sulphonic acid groups

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Sergio Efrain; Carbajal-Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe; Manriquez-Gonzalez, Ricardo; De la Cruz-Hernandez, Wencel; Gomez-Salazar, Sergio

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Corpuscular sulphonic acid-functionalized silica holds improved uptake of chromium. • Mesopores on adsorbent facilitate (CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}Cr{sup +} ion uptake on sulphonate sites. • Formation of chromium acetate sulphonate complex proposed from XPS results. • Fixed bed chromium uptake results suggest potential industrial use. - Abstract: A high capacity hybrid silica adsorbent was synthesized via sol–gel processing with sulphonic acid groups as trivalent chromium complex ions chelators from aqueous solutions. The synthesis included co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS), and oxidation of thiol to sulphonic acid groups. Chromium uptake kinetic, batch and fixed-bed experiments were performed to assess the removal of this metal from aqueous solutions. {sup 13}C, {sup 29}Si CPMAS NMR, FTIR, XPS were used to characterize the adsorbent structure and the nature of chromium complexes on the adsorbent surface. Chromium maximum uptake was obtained at pH 3 (72.8 mg/g). Elemental analysis results showed ligand density of 1.48 mmol sulphonic groups/g. About 407 mL of Cr(III) solution (311 mg/L) were treated to breakthrough point reaching ≤0.06 mg/L at the effluent. These results comply with USEPA regulation for chromium concentration in drinking water (≤0.1 mg/L). The adsorbent shows potential to be used in chromium separations to the industrial level.

  12. Elution of uranium and transition metals from amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents for sequestering uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Miyamoto, Naomi; Wood, Jordana; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary; Janke, Christopher James; Wai, Chien

    2015-11-30

    High-surface-area amidoxime and carboxylic acid grafted polymer adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were tested for sequestering uranium in a flowing seawater flume system at the PNNL-Marine Sciences Laboratory. FTIR spectra indicate that a KOH conditioning process is necessary to remove the proton from the carboxylic acid and make the sorbent effective for sequestering uranium from seawater. The alkaline conditioning process also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. Both Na2CO3 H2O2 and hydrochloric acid elution methods can remove ~95% of the uranium sequestered by the adsorbent after 42 days of exposure in real seawater. The Na2CO3 H2O2 elution method is more selective for uranium than conventional acid elution. Iron and vanadium are the two major transition metals competing with uranium for adsorption to the amidoxime-based adsorbents in real seawater. Tiron (4,5-Dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid disodium salt, 1 M) can remove iron from the adsorbent very effectively at pH around 7. The coordination between vanadium (V) and amidoxime is also discussed based on our 51V NMR data.

  13. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  14. TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILIZATION OF ARSENIC ADSORBED ON GRANULAR FERRIC HYDROXIDE UNDER BIO-REDUCTIVE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotic and abiotic reduction of arsenic (V) and iron (III) influences the partioning of arsenic (As) between the solid and aqueous phases in soils, sediments and wastes. In this study, laboratory experiments on arsenic adsorbed on granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) was performed to ...

  15. The leading role of association in framework modification of highly siliceous zeolites with adsorbed methylamine.

    PubMed

    Han, Ai-Jie; Guo, Juan; Yu, Hui; Zeng, Yu; Huang, Yue-Fang; He, He-Yong; Long, Ying-Cai

    2006-03-13

    Affinity index (AT value), adsorption heat, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and 13C and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopies were used to study the interaction of highly siliceous MFI-, FAU-, and FER-type zeolites with adsorbed methylamine (MA). Compared with the data for methanol, the much higher AT values and adsorption heats, and significant changes in XRD patterns, 29Si MAS NMR spectra, and FTIR spectra for the zeolites after adsorption of MA, revealed a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between the perfect framework of the zeolites and the adsorbed MAs. This interaction results from the fact that the H atom of the amine group attacks the [Si-O] framework to form a Si-OHN bond, which leads to the appearance of Si-N bonds in the zeolites at 323 K. Therefore, the zeolite framework can be modified with MA under mild conditions. The highly siliceous MFI zeolite and the H-ZSM-5 zeolite with SiO2/Al2O3=31:1 were modified with MA and investigated by temperature-programmed desorption of CO2. The modified zeolites exhibited greatly enhanced basic properties in comparison with those of the raw materials. The influence of defects in the zeolite on the adsorption and the interaction with MA is discussed.

  16. Anomalous fast dynamics of adsorbate overlayers near an incommensurate structural transition.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2013-09-20

    We investigate the dynamics of a compressively strained adsorbed layer on a periodic substrate via a simple two-dimensional model that admits striped and hexagonal incommensurate phases. We show that the mass transport is superfast near the striped-hexagonal phase boundary and in the hexagonal phase. For an initial step profile separating a bare substrate region (or "hole") from the rest of a striped incommensurate phase, the superfast domain wall dynamics leads to a bifurcation of the initial step profile into two interfaces or profiles propagating in opposite directions with a hexagonal phase in between. This yields a theoretical understanding of the recent experiments for the Pb/Si(111) system.

  17. Pulsed zero field NMR of solids and liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, A.M.

    1987-02-01

    This work describes the development and applications to solids and liquid crystals of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with pulsed dc magnetic fields. Zero field NMR experiments are one approach for obtaining high resolution spectra of amorphous and polycrystalline materials which normally (in high field) display broad featureless spectra. The behavior of the spin system can be coherently manipulated and probed in zero field with dc magnetic field pulses which are employed in a similar manner to radiofrequency pulses in high field NMR experiments. Nematic phases of liquid crystalline systems are studied in order to observe the effects of the removal of an applied magnetic field on sample alignment and molecular order parameters. In nematic phases with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies, a comparison between the forms of the spin interactions in high and low fields is made. High resolution zero field NMR spectra of unaligned smectic samples are also obtained and reflect the symmetry of the liquid crystalline environment. These experiments are a sensitive measure of the motionally induced asymmetry in biaxial phases. Homonuclear and heteronuclear solute spin systems are compared in the nematic and smectic phases. Nonaxially symmetric dipolar couplings are reported for several systems. The effects of residual fields in the presence of a non-zero asymmetry parameter are discussed theoretically and presented experimentally. Computer programs for simulations of these and other experimental results are also reported. 179 refs., 75 figs.

  18. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  19. Improving the Performance of an Adsorption Heat Converter in Condensation and Evaporation of the Adsorbate in Sorbent Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakh, M. Yu.; Rabinovich, O. S.; Vasiliev, L. L.; Tsitovich, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    The possibilities of raising the specific refrigerating capacity and the cooling temperature of an adsorption refrigerator through the phase transition of the adsorbate in low-temperature-sorbent pores have been investigated by the computer-modeling method. Using an adsorption refrigerator with busofite-based MnCl2 and BaCl2 sorbents (in the high-temperature and low-temperature adsorbers respectively) as an example, it has been shown that the operating regime of the refrigerator with adsorbate condensation and evaporation enables one to raise the specific capacity of the apparatus by 20% and to double the average cooling temperature.

  20. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  1. Radon emanation from radium specific adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Alabdula'aly, Abdulrahman I; Maghrawy, Hamed B

    2010-01-01

    Pilot studies were undertaken to quantify the total activity of radon that is eluted following no-flow periods from several Ra-226 adsorbents loaded to near exhaustion. The adsorbents studied included two types of barium sulphate impregnated alumina (ABA-8000 and F-1) and Dowex MSC-1 resin treated by either barium hydroxide or barium chloride. In parallel, radium loaded plain activated aluminas and Dowex MSC-1 resin were similarly investigated. The results revealed that radon was quantitatively eluted during the first few bed volumes of column operation after no-flow periods. Although similar radon elution profiles were obtained, the position of the radon peak was found to vary and depended on the adsorbent type. Radon levels up to 24 and 14 kBq dm(-3) were measured after a rest period of 72h from radium exhausted Dowex MSC-1 treated with barium chloride and F-1 impregnated alumina with barium sulphate, respectively. The eluted radon values measured experimentally were compared to those calculated theoretically from accumulated radium quantities for the different media. For plain adsorbents, an agreement better than 10% was obtained. For treated resin-types a consistency within 30% but for impregnated alumina-types high discrepancy between respective values were obtained.

  2. Unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertel, E.

    1991-11-01

    Experimental work on unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems on metallic substrates is reviewed with emphasis on recent developments. The first part is devoted to molecular adsorbates. Weakly chemisorbed hydrocarbons are briefly discussed. An exhaustive inverse photoemission (IPE) study of the CO bond to the transition metals Ni, Pb, and Pt is presented. Adsorbed NO is taken as an example to demonstrate the persisting discrepancies in the interpretation of IPE spectra. Atomic adsorbates are discussed in the second part. The quantum well state model is applied to interpret the surface states in reconstructing and non-reconstructing adsorption systems of alkali metals and hydrogen. A recent controversy on the unoccupied electronic states of the Cu(110)/O p(2×1) surface is critically reviewed. The quantum well state model is then compared to tight binding and local-density-functional calculations of the unoccupied bands and the deficiencies of the various approaches are pointed out. Finally, the relation between the surface state model and more chemically oriented models of surface bonding is briefly discussed.

  3. Continuum elastic theory of adsorbate vibrational relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Steven P.; Pykhtin, M. V.; Mele, E. J.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the damping of low-frequency adsorbate vibrations via resonant coupling to the substrate phonons. The system is treated classically, with the substrate modeled as a semi-infinite elastic continuum and the adsorbate overlayer modeled as an array of point masses connected to the surface by harmonic springs. The theory provides a simple expression for the relaxation rate in terms of fundamental parameters of the system: γ=mω¯02/AcρcT, where m is the adsorbate mass, ω¯0 is the measured frequency, Ac is the overlayer unit-cell area, and ρ and cT are the substrate mass density and transverse speed of sound, respectively. This expression is strongly coverage dependent, and predicts relaxation rates in excellent quantitative agreement with available experiments. For a half-monolayer of carbon monoxide on the copper (100) surface, the predicted damping rate of in-plane frustrated translations is 0.50×1012s-1, as compared to the experimental value of (0.43±0.07)×1012s-1. Furthermore it is shown that, for all coverages presently accessible to experiment, adsorbate motions exhibit collective effects which cannot be treated as stemming from isolated oscillators.

  4. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  5. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  6. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  7. In Situ NMR Spectroscopy of Supercapacitors: Insight into the Charge Storage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical capacitors, commonly known as supercapacitors, are important energy storage devices with high power capabilities and long cycle lives. Here we report the development and application of in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies to study changes at the electrode–electrolyte interface in working devices as they charge and discharge. For a supercapacitor comprising activated carbon electrodes and an organic electrolyte, NMR experiments carried out at different charge states allow quantification of the number of charge storing species and show that there are at least two distinct charge storage regimes. At cell voltages below 0.75 V, electrolyte anions are increasingly desorbed from the carbon micropores at the negative electrode, while at the positive electrode there is little change in the number of anions that are adsorbed as the voltage is increased. However, above a cell voltage of 0.75 V, dramatic increases in the amount of adsorbed anions in the positive electrode are observed while anions continue to be desorbed at the negative electrode. NMR experiments with simultaneous cyclic voltammetry show that supercapacitor charging causes marked changes to the local environments of charge storing species, with periodic changes of their chemical shift observed. NMR calculations on a model carbon fragment show that the addition and removal of electrons from a delocalized system should lead to considerable increases in the nucleus-independent chemical shift of nearby species, in agreement with our experimental observations. PMID:24274637

  8. In situ NMR spectroscopy of supercapacitors: insight into the charge storage mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Forse, Alexander C; Griffin, John M; Trease, Nicole M; Trognko, Lorie; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2013-12-18

    Electrochemical capacitors, commonly known as supercapacitors, are important energy storage devices with high power capabilities and long cycle lives. Here we report the development and application of in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies to study changes at the electrode-electrolyte interface in working devices as they charge and discharge. For a supercapacitor comprising activated carbon electrodes and an organic electrolyte, NMR experiments carried out at different charge states allow quantification of the number of charge storing species and show that there are at least two distinct charge storage regimes. At cell voltages below 0.75 V, electrolyte anions are increasingly desorbed from the carbon micropores at the negative electrode, while at the positive electrode there is little change in the number of anions that are adsorbed as the voltage is increased. However, above a cell voltage of 0.75 V, dramatic increases in the amount of adsorbed anions in the positive electrode are observed while anions continue to be desorbed at the negative electrode. NMR experiments with simultaneous cyclic voltammetry show that supercapacitor charging causes marked changes to the local environments of charge storing species, with periodic changes of their chemical shift observed. NMR calculations on a model carbon fragment show that the addition and removal of electrons from a delocalized system should lead to considerable increases in the nucleus-independent chemical shift of nearby species, in agreement with our experimental observations.

  9. Gaseous and adsorbed PAH in an iron foundry.

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, U; Elliehausen, H J; Woitowitz, H J

    1986-01-01

    The increased risk of lung cancer among foundry workers is assumed to be associated with the inhalation of gaseous and particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These compounds are produced during pyrolysis of carbon containing loading material in the moulding sand. The concentrations of 20 PAH, some of which are carcinogenic, have been determined in the dusty casting area of an iron foundry by means of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The total dust was fractionated by means of a precision cascade impactor. It was possible to differentiate the PAH load in microgram/mg dust in seven particle size fractions ranging from 0.36- greater than or equal to 24.95 microns. Initially, there was an increase of the adsorbed PAH mass concentration with increasing particle diameter up to a maximum of 1.1 microgram/mg in the dust of the 1.57 micron fraction. Thereafter there was a continuous decrease of PAH mass concentration with increasing particle size. When the differing weights of the seven fractions are taken into account, however, the total PAH load of the individual fractions increases steadily with increasing particle size. The inhalable fine dust, 31.4% of the total dust, contains 49.9% of the total adsorbed PAH. The gas phase contained on average three times more carcinogenic PAH with four and five rings than was adsorbed on the dust. Thus the percentage of the gaseous substances amounts to 77% of the total PAH load at the place of work in an iron foundry. PMID:3801335

  10. Characterization of zeolite structure and fluorocarbon reactivity using solid state NMR and x-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraolo, Michael Frank

    The research presented in this thesis involves a combination of techniques used to study the structure and interactions zeolites adsorbed with fluorocarbons. This research is specifically aimed at understanding the processes of adsorption, binding, and reactivity of fluorocarbons on cation exchanged faujasite type zeolites. The solid state ion exchange process has also been studied since it is one way to obtain materials with higher exchange levels, which has been shown to effect adsorption and catalytic activity. To improve the understanding of the adsorption and separation processes a time resolved in-situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction study has been undertaken. Since faujasite type zeolites have been found to be effective in separating mixtures of HFC-134 (CF2HCF2H) and HFC-134a (CFH2CF3) isomers, the adsorption of these fluorocarbons on NaY have been studied. It has been shown that both the extent of loading and the kinetics of the sorption process in molecular sieves can be followed using this technique. A model for the binding of hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) 124a (CF 2HCF2Cl) adsorbed on NaX at 100K has been determined using a combination x-ray and neutron powder diffraction and solid state NMR. Using Rietveld refinement of the diffraction data, the HCFC molecule was found localized in the zeolite cavities bound on either end by sodium cations in the SII and SIII' positions. The model is consistent with hydrogen bonding between the proton of the HCFC and the framework oxygen. The NMR results further confirm the model and are consistent with Na-F binding and HCFC-framework interactions. Solid-state MAS NMR, synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and a mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph catalysis system have been used to study the reactivity of HCFC-124a (CF2HCF2Cl) on NaX, Zn 2+-exchanged NaX (ZnX) and Rb+-exchanged NaX (RbX). We have chosen to study HCFC-124a (CF2HCF2Cl) since HCFC-124a can undergo both dehydrofluorination and dehydrochlorination

  11. NMR study of magnetism and superparamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shaojie

    behavior. The magnetic shape memory alloys Ni-Mn-Sn exhibit interesting properties including, field induced transformations, conventional and inverse magnetocaloric effects. They have potential for use as sensors, actuators and energy conversion devices. The Heusler alloy, Ni50Mn50-xSnx with x = 10 is one of these materials. It undergoes a transition from an austenite phase to a martensitic phase at 400 K, with the emergence of rich interesting magnetic properties below the transition. Coexistence of ferromagnetic (F) and AF spin configurations is reported in these compounds. 55Mn NMR has been used as a local probe to study the magnetic properties of this alloy. Rich peak features are observed with the various components assigned to nanoscale F or AF regions. Our results have provided detailed information on the AF regions, which has not been provided by other techniques. Measurements of the temperature dependence of the NMR spectra, in ZF and in a perturbing field were made. The spin-lattice relaxation dependence on T provides detailed information on the nanocluster size distribution and relative concentrations of the F and AF regions. Recently, the Heusler alloy Ni50-xCoxMn40Sn10, with 5 ≤ x ≤ 8, have attracted interest because the low thermal hysteresis and the large change in magnetization which they exhibit at the martensitic transition. Evidence for phase separation of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic regions at low temperatures is provided by magnetization and small angle neutron scattering measurements. Superparamagnetism and intrinsic exchange bias effects have been detected below 50 K. Zero field 55Mn NMR has provided detailed information on the nanoscale magnetic properties of samples with x = 7 and, for comparison, x = 14. For x = 7 F and AF regions, with a broad size distribution are identified and our results show that F clusters with the highest blocking temperatures are associated with regions rich in Co ions.

  12. Computer compensation for NMR quantitative analysis of trace components

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Fujiwara, Y.

    1981-07-22

    A computer program has been written that determines trace components and separates overlapping components in multicomponent NMR spectra. This program uses the Lorentzian curve as a theoretical curve of NMR spectra. The coefficients of the Lorentzian are determined by the method of least squares. Systematic errors such as baseline/phase distortion are compensated and random errors are smoothed by taking moving averages, so that there processes contribute substantially to decreasing the accumulation time of spectral data. The accuracy of quantitative analysis of trace components has been improved by two significant figures. This program was applied to determining the abundance of 13C and the saponification degree of PVA.

  13. Natural Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii by Adsorbed Chromosomal DNA: Role of Adsorbed DNA Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, N.; Zilles, J.; Nguyen, H.

    2008-12-01

    Recent increases in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms and the accompanying public health concerns result both from the widespread use of antibiotics and from the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among microorganisms. To understand the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and identify efficient measures to minimize these transfers, an interdisciplinary approach was used to identify physical and chemical factors that control the fate and biological availability of extracellular DNA. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to study extracellular DNA adsorption and the conformation of the adsorbed DNA on silica and natural organic matter (NOM) surfaces. Solution chemistry was varied systematically to investigate the role of adsorbed DNA conformation on transformation. Gene transfer was assessed under the same conditions using natural transformation of chromosomal DNA into the soil bacteria Azotobacter vinelandii. DNA adsorbed to both silica and NOM surfaces has a more compact and rigid conformation in the presence of Ca2+ compared to Na+. Extracellular DNA adsorbed on silica and NOM surfaces transformed A. vinelandii. The transformation efficiency of adsorbed DNA was up to 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of dissolved DNA. Preliminary results suggest that the presence of Ca2+ in groundwater (e.g. hardness) reduces the availability of adsorbed DNA for transformation.

  14. Fibrous adsorbent for removal of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Jun; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Yamada, Toshiro; Takagi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Bundles of a strongly hydrophobic fibrous material (p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole; PBO; Zylon) were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of aqueous aromatic compounds, because the PBO fibers are too rigid to be woven and did not entrap suspended solids. The removal performance for nine kinds of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was evaluated. PAHs and DEHP at initial concentrations of 50 microg L(-1) were removed at 72.5-99.9% and ca. 95%, respectively, although the removal efficiencies were affected by the phase ratio (fiber weight/solution volume). The logarithm of the partition coefficient (log K) for planar PAHs was linearly correlated with the logarithm of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P), but nonplanar PAHs, such as cis-stilbene, p-terphenyl, and o-terphenyl, showed significantly lower adsorption performance. The adsorbed PAHs were not desorbed effectively with CH3CN, CH2Cl2, and toluene. On the other hand, DEHP was effectively desorbed with methanol.

  15. Fibrous adsorbent for removal of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Jun; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Yamada, Toshiro; Takagi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Bundles of a strongly hydrophobic fibrous material (p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole; PBO; Zylon) were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of aqueous aromatic compounds, because the PBO fibers are too rigid to be woven and did not entrap suspended solids. The removal performance for nine kinds of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was evaluated. PAHs and DEHP at initial concentrations of 50 microg L(-1) were removed at 72.5-99.9% and ca. 95%, respectively, although the removal efficiencies were affected by the phase ratio (fiber weight/solution volume). The logarithm of the partition coefficient (log K) for planar PAHs was linearly correlated with the logarithm of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P), but nonplanar PAHs, such as cis-stilbene, p-terphenyl, and o-terphenyl, showed significantly lower adsorption performance. The adsorbed PAHs were not desorbed effectively with CH3CN, CH2Cl2, and toluene. On the other hand, DEHP was effectively desorbed with methanol. PMID:17585293

  16. Structural relaxation of adlayers in the presence of adsorbate-induced reconstruction: C60/Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Woei Wu; Hsu, Ching-Ling; Lin, M. C.; Lin, K. C.; Tang, T. B.

    2004-03-01

    We revisit submonolayer growth of C60 on Cu(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), with emphasis on the formation of higher-order commensurate metastable states. These phases show concomitant interfacial reconstruction, adlayer buckling, and adlayer rotation in order to match as closely as possible the 10.0 Å C60 nearest neighbor (NN) distance. Most interestingly, a clear correlation between the adlayer rotation angle and molecular contrast patterns is demonstrated. This is caused by the C60-induced reconstruction at preferred binding sites and adlayer buckling in adjustment to strain. Four contrast patterns, i.e., “disordered maze,” “linear-wall maze,” “p(√(7)×√(7)),” and “p(2×2),” with increasing C60 NN distances are categorized. In the most compressed phase, buckling is favored and it is analogous to the ground state of a strongly-coupled antiferromagnetic system on a triangular lattice with alike adlayer buckling and interfacial corrugation. In contrast, the molecular orderings in the other structures are mostly dictated by lateral displacements of C60 toward preferred reconstructive binding sites. These metastable phases thus illustrate structural relaxation of a molecular layer on an adsorbate-induced reconstructed substrate in different adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interaction limits.

  17. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  18. Properties and potential environmental applications of carbon adsorbents from waste tire rubber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehmann, C.M.B.; Rameriz, D.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2000-01-01

    The properties of tire-derived carbon adsorbents (TDCA) produced from select tire chars were compared with those derived from an Illinois coal and pistachio nut shells. Chemical analyses of the TDCA indicated that these materials contain metallic elements not present in coal-and nut shell-derived carbons. These metals, introduced during the production of tire rubber, potentially catalyze steam gasification reactions of tire char. TDCA carbons contained larger meso-and macopore volumes than their counterparts derived from coal and nut shell (on the moisture-and ash-free-basis). Adsorptive properties of the tire-derived adsorbent carbons for air separation, gas storage, and gas clean up were also evaluated and compared with those of the coal-and nut shell derived carbons as well as a commercial activated carbon. The results revealed that TDCA carbons are suitable adsorbents for removing vapor-phase mercury from combustion flue gases and hazardous organic compounds from industrial gas streams.

  19. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  20. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites.

  1. The relationship between reorientational molecular motions and phase transitions in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, studied with the use of {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR and FT-MIR

    SciTech Connect

    Mikuli, Edward Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Grad, Bartłomiej; Kozak, Asja; Wąsicki, Jan W.; Bilski, Paweł; Hołderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-02-14

    A {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance study of [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} has confirmed the existence of two phase transitions at T{sub c1} ≈ 257 K and T{sub c2} ≈ 142 K, detected earlier by the DSC method. These transitions were reflected by changes in the temperature dependences of both proton and fluorine of second moments M{sub 2}{sup H} and M{sub 2}{sup F} and of spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1}{sup H} and T{sub 1}{sup F}. The study revealed anisotropic reorientations of whole [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} cations, reorientations by 180° jumps of H{sub 2}O ligands, and aniso- and isotropic reorientations of BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The activation parameters for these motions were obtained. It was found that the phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with the reorientation of the cation as a whole unit around the C{sub 3} axis and that at T{sub c2} with isotropic reorientation of the BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The temperature dependence of the full width at half maximum value of the infrared band of ρ{sub t}(H{sub 2}O) mode (at ∼596 cm{sup −1}) indicated that in phases I and II, all H{sub 2}O ligands in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} perform fast reorientational motions (180° jumps) with a mean value of activation energy equal to ca 10 kJ mole{sup −1}, what is fully consistent with NMR results. The phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with a sudden change of speed of fast (τ{sub R} ≈ 10{sup −12} s) reorientational motions of H{sub 2}O ligands. Below T{sub c2} (in phase III), the reorientations of certain part of the H{sub 2}O ligands significantly slow down, while others continue their fast reorientation with an activation energy of ca 2 kJ mole{sup −1}. This fast reorientation cannot be evidenced in NMR relaxation experiments. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with H{sub 2}O ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a reduction of the symmetry of the octahedral [Mg(H{sub 2}O

  2. PVDF membranes containing hybrid nanoparticles for adsorbing cationic dyes: physical insights and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Maya; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, Fe (iron) and Ag (silver) based adsorbents were synthesized using solution combustion and in situ reduction techniques. The synthesized adsorbents were comprehensively characterized by different techniques including electron microscopy, BET, XRD, Zeta potential etc. Three chlorinated cationic dyes used were malachite green, methyl violet and pyronin Y. These dyes were adsorbed on various synthesized adsorbents [iron III oxide (Fe2O3)], iron III oxide decorated silver nanoparticles by combustion synthesis technique [Fe2O3–Ag(C)] and iron III oxide decorated silver nanoparticles using in situ reduction, [Fe2O3–Ag (S)]. The isotherm and the adsorption kinetics have been studied systematically. The kinetic data can be explained by the pseudo second order model and the adsorption equilibrium followed Langmuir isotherm. The equilibrium and kinetics results suggest that Fe2O3–Ag(S) nanoparticles showed the maximum adsorption among all the adsorbents. Hence, Polyvinylidene fluoride based membranes containing Fe2O3–Ag(S) nanoparticles were prepared via phase inversion (precipitation immersion using DMF/water) technique. The adsorption kinetics were studied in detail and it was observed that the composite membrane showed synergistic improvement in dye adsorption. Such membranes can be used for water purification.

  3. PVDF membranes containing hybrid nanoparticles for adsorbing cationic dyes: physical insights and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Maya; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, Fe (iron) and Ag (silver) based adsorbents were synthesized using solution combustion and in situ reduction techniques. The synthesized adsorbents were comprehensively characterized by different techniques including electron microscopy, BET, XRD, Zeta potential etc. Three chlorinated cationic dyes used were malachite green, methyl violet and pyronin Y. These dyes were adsorbed on various synthesized adsorbents [iron III oxide (Fe2O3)], iron III oxide decorated silver nanoparticles by combustion synthesis technique [Fe2O3-Ag(C)] and iron III oxide decorated silver nanoparticles using in situ reduction, [Fe2O3-Ag (S)]. The isotherm and the adsorption kinetics have been studied systematically. The kinetic data can be explained by the pseudo second order model and the adsorption equilibrium followed Langmuir isotherm. The equilibrium and kinetics results suggest that Fe2O3-Ag(S) nanoparticles showed the maximum adsorption among all the adsorbents. Hence, Polyvinylidene fluoride based membranes containing Fe2O3-Ag(S) nanoparticles were prepared via phase inversion (precipitation immersion using DMF/water) technique. The adsorption kinetics were studied in detail and it was observed that the composite membrane showed synergistic improvement in dye adsorption. Such membranes can be used for water purification.

  4. Formalism for Hypercomplex Multidimensional NMR Employing Partial-Component Subsampling

    PubMed Central

    Schuyler, Adam D; Maciejewski, Mark W; Stern, Alan S; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2012-01-01

    Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy typically employs phase-sensitive detection, which results in hypercomplex data (and spectra) when utilized in more than one dimension. Nonuniform sampling approaches have become commonplace in multidimensional NMR, enabling dramatic reductions in experiment time, increases in sensitivity and/or increases in resolution. In order to utilize nonuniform sampling optimally, it is necessary to characterize the relationship between the spectrum of a uniformly sampled data set and the spectrum of a subsampled data set. In this work we construct an algebra of hypercomplex numbers suitable for representing multidimensional NMR data along with partial-component nonuniform sampling (i.e. the hypercomplex components of data points are subsampled). This formalism leads to a modified DFT–convolution relationship involving a partial-component, hypercomplex point-spread function set. The framework presented here is essential for the continued development and appropriate characterization of partial-component nonuniform sampling. PMID:23246651

  5. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  6. Magnesium silicates adsorbents of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielczyk, Filip; Krysztafkiewicz, Andrzej; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2007-08-01

    Studies were presented on production of highly dispersed magnesium silicate at a pilote scale. The process of silicate adsorbent production involved precipitation reaction using water glass (sodium metasilicate) solution and appropriate magnesium salt, preceded by an appropriate optimization stage. Samples of best physicochemical parameters were in addition modified (in order to introduce to silica surface of several functional groups) using the dry technique and various amounts of 3-isocyanatepropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-thiocyanatepropyltrimethoxysilane, N-phenyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane. The so prepared samples were subjected to a comprehensive physicochemical analysis. At the terminal stage of studies attempts were made to adsorb phenol from its aqueous solutions on the surface of unmodified and modified magnesium silicates. Particle size distributions were determined using the ZetaSizer Nano ZS apparatus. In order to define adsorptive properties of studied magnesium silicates isotherms of nitrogen adsorption/desorption on their surfaces were established. Efficiency of phenol adsorption was tested employing analysis of post-adsorption solution.

  7. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  8. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.

  9. Sensitization of a stray-field NMR to vibrations: a potential for MR elastometry with a portable NMR sensor.

    PubMed

    Mastikhin, Igor; Barnhill, Marie

    2014-11-01

    An NMR signal from a sample in a constant stray field of a portable NMR sensor is sensitized to vibrations. The CPMG sequence is synchronized to vibrations so that the constant gradient becomes an "effective" square-wave gradient, leading to the vibration-induced phase accumulation. The integrating nature of the spot measurement, combined with the phase distribution due to a non-uniform gradient and/or a wave field, leads to a destructive interference, the drop in the signal intensity and changes in the echo train shape. Vibrations with amplitudes as small as 140 nm were reliably detected with the permanent gradient of 12.4 T/m. The signal intensity depends on the phase offset between the vibrations and the pulse sequence. This approach opens the way for performing elastometry and micro-rheology measurements with portable NMR devices beyond the walls of a laboratory. Even without synchronization, if a vibration frequency is comparable to 1/2TE of the CPMG sequence, the signal can be severely affected, making it important for potential industrial applications of stray-field NMR.

  10. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Adsorbent Packed Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideo; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Suguru

    The effective thermal conductivity of adsorbent packed beds of granular zeolite 13X and granular silica gel A in the presence of stagnant steam or air was measured under different conditions of the adsorbent bed temperature, particle size and filler-gas pressure. The measured effective thermal conductivity showed to become smaller with decreasing particle size or decreasing pressure, but it was nearly independent of the bed temperature. When steam was the filler-gas, the rise in the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent particles due to steam adsorption led to the increase in the effective thermal conductivity of the bed, and this effect was not negligible at high steam pressure for the bed of large particle size. It was found that both the predictions of the effective thermal conductivity by the Hayashi et al.'s model and the Bauer-Schlünder model generally agreed well with the measurements, by considering the particle thermal conductivity rise due to steam adsorption. The thermal conductivity of a consolidated bed of granular zeolite 13X was also measured, and it was found to be much larger than that of the packed bed especially at lower pressure. The above prediction models underestimated the effective thermal conductivity of the consolidated bed.

  11. Orbital tomography for highly symmetric adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtmüller, B.; Willenbockel, M.; Reinisch, E. M.; Ules, T.; Bocquet, F. C.; Soubatch, S.; Puschnig, P.; Koller, G.; Ramsey, M. G.; Tautz, F. S.; Kumpf, C.

    2012-10-01

    Orbital tomography is a new and very powerful tool to analyze the angular distribution of a photoemission spectroscopy experiment. It was successfully used for organic adsorbate systems to identify (and consequently deconvolute) the contributions of specific molecular orbitals to the photoemission data. The technique was so far limited to surfaces with low symmetry like fcc(110) oriented surfaces, owing to the small number of rotational domains that occur on such surfaces. In this letter we overcome this limitation and present an orbital tomography study of a 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetra-carboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer film adsorbed on Ag(111). Although this system exhibits twelve differently oriented molecules, the angular resolved photoemission data still allow a meaningful analysis of the different local density of states and reveal different electronic structures for symmetrically inequivalent molecules. We also discuss the precision of the orbital tomography technique in terms of counting statistics and linear regression fitting algorithm. Our results demonstrate that orbital tomography is not limited to low-symmetry surfaces, a finding which makes a broad field of complex adsorbate systems accessible to this powerful technique.

  12. Sensitive and robust electrophoretic NMR: Instrumentation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Furó, István; Yushmanov, Pavel V.; Stilbs, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although simple as a concept, electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) has so far failed to find wider application. Problems encountered are mainly due to disturbing and partly irreproducible convection-like bulk flow effects from both electro-osmosis and thermal convection. Additionally, bubble formation at the electrodes and rf noise pickup has constrained the typical sample geometry to U-tube-like arrangements with a small filling factor and a low resulting NMR sensitivity. Furthermore, the sign of the electrophoretic mobility cancels out in U-tube geometries. We present here a new electrophoretic sample cell based on a vertically placed conventional NMR sample tube with bubble-suppressing palladium metal as electrode material. A suitable radiofrequency filter design prevents noise pickup by the NMR sample coil from the high-voltage leads which extend into the sensitive sample volume. Hence, the obtained signal-to-noise ratio of this cell is one order of magnitude higher than that of our previous U-tube cells. Permitted by the retention of the sign of the displacement-related signal phase in the new cell design, an experimental approach is described where bulk flow effects by electro-osmosis and/or thermal convection are compensated through parallel monitoring of a reference signal from a non-charged species in the sample. This approach, together with a CPMG-like pulse train scheme provides a superior first-order cancellation of non-electrophoretic bulk flow effects.

  13. Solid state 13C NMR studies of methane dehydroaromatization reaction on Mo/HZSM-5 and W/HZSM-5 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Ma, Ding; Deng, Feng; Luo, Qing; Zhang, Mingjin; Bao, Xinhe; Ye, Chaohui

    2002-12-21

    Methane dehydroaromatization on Mo/HZSM-5 and W/HZSM-5 catalysts was studied by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy, both variation of the state of transition metal component and products such as ethane, benzene, ethene adsorbed on or in zeolite were observed after high temperature (900-1000 K) reaction.

  14. Solution NMR conformation of glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been giving a pivotal contribution to the progress of glycomics, mostly by elucidating the structural, dynamical, conformational and intermolecular binding aspects of carbohydrates. Particularly in the field of conformation, NOE resonances, scalar couplings, residual dipolar couplings, and chemical shift anisotropy offsets have been the principal NMR parameters utilized. Molecular dynamics calculations restrained by NMR-data input are usually employed in conjunction to generate glycosidic bond dihedral angles. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are a special class of sulfated polysaccharides extensively studied worldwide. Besides regulating innumerous physiological processes, these glycans are also widely explored in the global market as either clinical or nutraceutical agents. The conformational aspects of GAGs are key regulators to the quality of interactions with the functional proteins involved in biological events. This report discusses the solution conformation of each GAG type analyzed by one or more of the above-mentioned methods.

  15. Designing fixed-bed adsorbers to remove mixtures of organics

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, D.W.; Crittenden, J.C.; Arora, H.; Miller, J.M.; Lykins, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) pilot plant and a full-scale GAC adsorber were designed, built, and operated in order to evaluate their performance for treating a groundwater contaminated with several volatile and synthetic organic chemicals. Several empty bed contact times (EBCTs) ranging from 1 to 30 min were used during the pilot-plant study, and a simple method for evaluating the GAC use rate as a function of the EBCT was developed and demonstrated for dichloroethene and trichloroethene (TCE). Pilot-plant data were compared with the pore surface diffusion model, which considers external and internal mass transfer mechanisms of pore and surface diffusion. Natural organic matter in the water was found to decrease GAC capacity and kinetics for TCE.

  16. 51V-NMR study of the Kagome staircase compound Co3V2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogloblichev, V.; Kumagai, K.; Yakubovsky, A.; Mikhalev, K.; Furukawa, Y.; Verkhovskii, S.; Gerashenko, A.; Barilo, S.; Bychkov, G.; Shiryaev, S.; Korolev, A.

    2009-03-01

    Kagome staircase compound Co3V2O8 (S = 3/2) has a structure very similar to multiferroic compound Ni3V2Og (S = 1), but their magnetic phase diagrams differ noticeably. We present the results of the first NMR study in Co3V2O8 single crystal. From 51V-NMR spectra, the components of electric field gradient (EFG) tensor and of magnetic shifts tensor, Ki, are obtained. The temperature dependences of NMR shifts 51Ki for each main crystal axis direction are well described by a spin contributions in the paramagnetic phase. In ferromagnetic phase the zero field 51V-NMR spectrum is observed in the temperature range of 1.5-6.3 K.

  17. NMR investigation of iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    We report NMR investigation of the electronic properties of iron-based superconductors with primary focus on the 11 (FeSe) and 122 (Co-doped BaFe2As2) systems. From the ^77Se and ^75As NMR Knight shift K measurements, we will deduce the intrinsic temperature and concentration dependences of the uniform spin susceptibility, χspin, in these systems. We will also demonstrate the evolution of antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations (AFSF) as a function of pressure (in FeSe) or the doping level (in Ba[Fe1-xCox]2As2). Our results show that the optimal superconducting phase exists in close proximity with SDW order; superconductivity sets in only after AFSF grow toward Tc. This work was carried out in collaboration with F.L. Ning and K. Ahilan (McMaster), T. McQueen and R.J. Cava (Princeton), A.S. Sefat, M.A. McGuire, B. C. Sales, and D. Mandrus (Oak Ridge), P. Cheng, B. Shen, and H.-H Wen (Chinese Academy of Sciences). The work at McMaster was supported by NSERC, CIFAR, and CFI.

  18. Miscibility of sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate in the adsorbed film and aggregate.

    PubMed

    Iyota, Hidemi; Krastev, Rumen

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption, micelle formation, and salting out of sodium dodecyl sulfate in the presence of sodium chloride were studied from the viewpoint of their mixed adsorption and aggregate formation. The surface tension of aqueous solutions of a sodium chloride-sodium dodecyl sulfate mixture was measured as a function of the total molality and composition of the mixture. Phase diagrams of adsorption and aggregate formation were obtained by applying thermodynamic equations to the surface tension. Judging from the phase diagrams, sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate are miscible in the adsorbed film at very large composition of sodium chloride and in the salted-out crystalline particle, while they are immiscible in the micelle. The miscibilities in the adsorbed film, micelle, and crystalline particle increase in the following order: particle > adsorbed film > micelle. The difference in miscibility among the oriented states was ascribed to the difference in geometry between the adsorbed film and micelle and to the interaction between bilayer surfaces in the particle.

  19. Municipal sludge-industrial sludge composite desulfurization adsorbents: synergy enhancing the catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Bandosz, Teresa J; Block, Karin

    2006-05-15

    Mixtures of sewage sludge, waste oil sludge, and metal oil sludge were prepared and carbonized at 950 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. Dynamic adsorption of H2S was measured on the materials obtained, and the breakthrough capacity was calculated. The initial and exhausted adsorbents after the breakthrough tests were characterized using sorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis, and XRF, XRD, and surface pH measurements. Mixing sludges leads to very high capacity adsorbents on which hydrogen sulfide is oxidized to elemental sulfur. Although the micropore volume of the adsorbents obtained is not high, their high volume of mesopores contributes significantly to reactive adsorption and provides space to store the oxidation products. The H2S breakthrough capacity on the new materials reaches 10 wt %. These adsorbents work until all active pores are filled and the catalytic centers are exhausted. The reason for such high capacity is in the formation of catalytically active mineral like phases during pyrolysis in the presence of nitrogen and carbon. This highly dispersed phase provides basicity and catalytic centers for hydrogen sulfide dissociation and its oxidation to sulfur.

  20. MULTIPLE-QUANTUM NMR IN SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y-S.

    1982-11-01

    Time domain multiple-quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for spectral simplification and for providing new information on molecular dynamics. In this thesis, applications of MQ NMR are presented and show distinctly the advantages of this method over the conventional single-quantum NMR. Chapter 1 introduces the spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism and some basic concepts of MQ NMR spectroscopy. In chapter 2, {sup 14}N double-quantum coherence is observed with high sensitivity in isotropic solution, using only the magnetization of bound protons. Spin echoes are used to obtain the homogeneous double-quantum spectrum and to suppress a large H{sub 2}O solvent signal. Chapter 3 resolves the main difficulty in observing high MQ transitions in solids. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation and detection of high quantum transitions by normal schemes are thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and thereby to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum {sup 1}H absorption in solid adamantane is observed. A time dependence study shows an increase in spin correlations as the excitation time increased. In chapter 4, a statistical theory of MQ second moments is developed for coupled spins of spin I = 1/2. The model reveals that the ratio of the average dipolar coupling to the rms value largely determines the dependence of second moments on the number of quanta. The results of this model are checked against computer-calculated and experimental second moments, and show good agreement. A simple scheme is proposed in chapter 5 for sensitivity improvement in a MQ experiment. The scheme involves acquiring all of the signal energy available in the detection period by applying pulsed spinlocking and sampling between pulses. Using this technique on polycrystalline adamantane, a large

  1. Cationic motions and phase transitions in [(CH 3) 4N] 2SO 4·4H 2O, [(CH 3) 4N] 2SO 4, and [(CH 3) 4N] 2SeO 4 as studied by 1H NMR, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Setsuko; Endo, Midori; Hara, Naoki; Nakamura, Daiyu; Ikeda, Ryuichi

    1995-02-01

    Cationic reorientations have been studied in solid [(CH 3) 4N] 2SO 4·4H 2O, [(CH 3) 4N] 2SO 4, and [(CH 3) 4N] 2SeO 4 by measuring 1H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times, T1. These motions have been discussed in association with the crystal structures and the phase transitions examined by X-ray powder diffraction and differential thermal analysis, respectively. In crystals of [(CH 3) 4N] 2SO 4·4H 2O, there are two kinds of cations distorted from regular tetrahedra. T1 is calculated according to the interpretation that two T1 minima are due to the two inequivalent (NH 3) 4N + ions reorienting at different frequencies. The result shows that at the phase transition temperatures, the correlation times to those cationic reorientations are very different from each other in this compound in contrast with (NH 4) 2SO 4 and [(CH 3) 4N] 2CdX 4 (X = Cl and Br). For the sulfate and selenate, there is a single kind of cation which can be considered tetrahedral, and the phase transitions occur in the temperature region where the narrowing of the resonance line owing to the overall cationic reorientations starts.

  2. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  3. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  4. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  5. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  6. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  7. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  8. Recovery of Technetium Adsorbed on Charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Mark D.; Metz, Lori A.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2006-05-01

    Two methods capable of near complete recovery of technetium adsorbed on charcoal are presented. The first involves liquid extraction of the technetium from the charcoal by hot 4M nitric acid. An average recovery of 98% (n=3) is obtained after three rounds of extraction. The second method involves dry ashing with air in a quartz combustion tube at 400-450 C. This method yields an average recovery of 96% (n=5). Other thermal methods were attempted, but resulted in reduced recovery and incomplete material balance

  9. Conformational properties of an adsorbed charged polymer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Ho; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2005-06-01

    The behavior of a strongly charged polymer adsorbed on an oppositely charged surface of a low-dielectric constant is formulated by the functional integral method. By separating the translational, conformational, and fluctuational degrees of freedom, the scaling behaviors for both the height of the polymer and the thickness of the diffusion layer are determined. Unlike the results predicted by scaling theory, we identified the continuous crossover from the weak compression to the compression regime. All the analytical results are found to be consistent with Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, an alternative (operational) definition of a charged polymer adsorption is proposed. PMID:16089715

  10. Deuteron NMR study of dynamics and of coexistence of paraelectric and ferroelectric phases in Rb0.90(ND4)0.10D2AsO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Nicholas J.; Howell, Francis L.; Schmidt, V. Hugo

    1993-09-01

    The deuteron glass Rb1-x(ND4)xD2AsO4 (DRADA) is a mixed crystal of RbD2AsO4 (DRDA) and ND4D2AsO4 (DADA). Deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance has been performed on the acid and ammonium deuterons. The crystal studied has an ammonium concentration (x=0.10) that puts it in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Line-shape measurements of the ammonium deuterons show the coexistence of the ferroelectric (FE) and paraelectric (PE) phases as the temperature is lowered below the ferroelectric-phase-transition temperature Tc. The acid deuteron line shape on the other hand is found to broaden as the temperature is reduced but is unaffected by the ferroelectric transition. Spin-lattice-relaxation measurements have been performed and the activation energies for the relaxation processes have been computed. The relaxation-rate anomaly for acid deuterons in the ferroelectric-transition range indicates a short correlation length for the FE phase in the coexistence region of the phase diagram.

  11. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes.

  12. Influence of carboxylic ion-pairing reagents on retention of peptides in thin-layer chromatography systems with C18 silica-based adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Gwarda, Radosław Ł; Aletańska-Kozak, Monika; Klimek-Turek, Anna; Ziajko-Jankowska, Agnieszka; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Dzido, Tadeusz H

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems related to chromatography of peptides concerns adverse interactions of their strong basic groups with free silanol groups of the silica based stationary phase. Influence of type and concentration of ion-pairing regents on peptide retention in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) systems has been discussed before. Here we present influence of these mobile phase additives on retention of some peptide standards in high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) systems with C18 silica-based adsorbents. We prove, that due to different characteristic of adsorbents used in both techniques (RP HPLC and HPTLC), influence of ion-pairing reagents on retention of basic and/or amphoteric compounds also may be quite different. C18 silica-based HPTLC adsorbents provide more complex mechanism of retention and should be rather considered as mixed-mode adsorbents.

  13. Determination of Molecular Self-Diffusion Coefficients Using Pulsed-Field-Gradient NMR: An Experiment for Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Jennifer; Coffman, Cierra; Villarrial, Spring; Chabolla, Steven; Heisel, Kurt A.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V.

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become one of the primary tools that chemists utilize to characterize a range of chemical species in the solution phase, from small organic molecules to medium-sized proteins. A discussion of NMR spectroscopy is an essential component of physical and biophysical chemistry lecture courses, and a number of instructional…

  14. Mimetite Formation from Goethite-Adsorbed Ions.

    PubMed

    Kleszczewska-Zębala, Anna; Manecki, Maciej; Bajda, Tomasz; Rakovan, John; Borkiewicz, Olaf J

    2016-06-01

    Bioavailability of arsenic in contaminated soils and wastes can be reduced to insignificant levels by precipitation of mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl. The objective of this study is to elucidate mechanisms of the reaction between solution containing lead ions and arsenates adsorbed on synthetic goethite (AsO4-goethite), or arsenate ions in the solution and goethite saturated with adsorbed Pb (Pb-goethite). These reactions, in the presence of Cl, result in rapid crystallization of mimetite. Formation of mimetite is faster than desorption of AsO4 but slower than desorption of Pb from the goethite surface. Slow desorption of arsenates from AsO4-goethite results in heterogeneous precipitation and formation of mimetite incrustation on goethite crystals. Desorption of lead from Pb-goethite is at least as fast as diffusion and advection of AsO4 and Cl in suspension allowing for homogeneous crystallization of mimetite in intergranular solution. Therefore, the mechanism of nucleation is primarily driven by the kinetics of constituent supply to the saturation front, rather than by the thermodynamics of nucleation. The products of the reactions are well documented using microscopy methods such as scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  15. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers.

    PubMed

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-21

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role. PMID:27353115

  16. Nitric oxide releasing material adsorbs more fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Lantvit, Sarah M; Barrett, Brittany J; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-11-01

    One mechanism of the failure of blood-contacting devices is clotting. Nitric oxide (NO) releasing materials are seen as a viable solution to the mediation of surface clotting by preventing platelet activation; however, NO's involvement in preventing clot formation extends beyond controlling platelet function. In this study, we evaluate NO's effect on factor XII (fibrinogen) adsorption and activation, which causes the initiation of the intrinsic arm of the coagulation cascade. This is done by utilizing a model plasticized poly(vinyl) chloride (PVC), N-diazeniumdiolate system and looking at the adsorption of fibrinogen, an important clotting protein, to these surfaces. The materials have been prepared in such a way to eliminate changes in surface properties between the control (plasticized PVC) and composite (NO-releasing) materials. This allows us to isolate NO release and determine the effect on the adsorption of fibrinogen, to the material surface. Surprisingly, it was found that an NO releasing material with a surface flux of 17.4 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) showed a significant increase in the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed to the material surface compared to one with a flux of 13.0 ± 1.6 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) and the control (2334 ± 496, 226 ± 99, and 103 ±31% fibrinogen adsorbed of control, respectively). This study suggests that NO's role in controlling clotting is extended beyond platelet activation. PMID:23554300

  17. Optimizing heterosurface adsorbent synthesis for liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovskii, S. Yu.; Serdan, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural and geometric parameters of a silica matrix (SM) for the synthesis of heterosurface adsorbents (HAs) are optimized. Modification is performed by shielding the external surfaces of alkyl-modified silica (AS) using human serum albumin and its subsequent crosslinking. The structural and geometric characteristics of the SM, AS, and HA are measured via low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. It is found that the structural characteristics of AS pores with diameters D < 6 nm do not change during HA synthesis, while the volume of pores with diameters of 6 nm < D < 9 nm shrinks slightly due to the adsorption of albumin in the pore orifices. It is established that the volume of pores with diameters D > 9 nm reduces significantly due to adsorption of albumin. It is concluded that silica gel with a maximum pore size distribution close to 5 nm and a minimal proportion of pores with D > 9 nm is optimal for HA synthesis; this allows us to achieve the greatest similarity between the chromatographic retention parameters for HA and AS. The suitability of the synthesized adsorbents for analyzing drugs in biological fluids through direct sample injection is confirmed by chromatography. It was found that the percentage of the protein fraction detected at the outlet of the chromatographic column is 98%.

  18. Equilibrium molecular theory of two-dimensional adsorbate drops on surfaces of heterogeneous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2016-08-01

    A molecular statistical theory for calculating the linear tension of small multicomponent droplets in two-dimensional adsorption systems is developed. The theory describes discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a scale comparable to molecular size) and continuous distributions of molecules (at short distances inside cells) in their translational and vibrational motions. Pair intermolecular interaction potentials (the Mie type potential) in several coordination spheres are considered. For simplicity, it is assumed that distinctions in the sizes of mixture components are slight and comparable to the sizes of adsorbent adsorption centers. Expressions for the pressure tensor components inside small droplets on the heterogeneous surface of an adsorbent are obtained, allowing calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of a vapor-fluid interface, including linear tension. Problems in refining the molecular theory are discussed: describing the properties of small droplets using a coordination model of their structure, considering the effect an adsorbate has on the state of a near-surface adsorbent region, and the surface heterogeneity factor in the conditions for the formation of droplets.

  19. Comprehensive multiphase NMR: a promising technology to study plants in their native state.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Heather L; Soong, Ronald; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Botana, Adolfo; Fortier-Mcgill, Blythe; Maas, Werner E; Fey, Michael; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J; Campbell, Malcolm M; Simpson, Andre

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is arguably one the most powerful tools to study the interactions and molecular structure within plants. Traditionally, however, NMR has developed as two separate fields, one dealing with liquids and the other dealing with solids. Plants in their native state contain components that are soluble, swollen, and true solids. Here, a new form of NMR spectroscopy, developed in 2012, termed comprehensive multiphase (CMP)-NMR is applied for plant analysis. The technology composes all aspects of solution, gel, and solid-state NMR into a single NMR probe such that all components in all phases in native unaltered samples can be studied and differentiated in situ. The technology is evaluated using wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the cellulose-deficient mutant ectopic lignification1 (eli1) as examples. Using CMP-NMR to study intact samples eliminated the bias introduced by extraction methods and enabled the acquisition of a more complete structural and metabolic profile; thus, CMP-NMR revealed molecular differences between wild type (WT) and eli1 that could be overlooked by conventional methods. Methanol, fatty acids and/or lipids, glutamine, phenylalanine, starch, and nucleic acids were more abundant in eli1 than in WT. Pentaglycine was present in A. thaliana seedlings and more abundant in eli1 than in WT. PMID:25855560

  20. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E S; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets. PMID:26723664

  1. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  2. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn; Smith, Pieter E. S.

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials’ structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences’ phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, “ultrafast” NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  3. Reduced colloidal repulsion imparted by adsorbed polymer of particle dimensions.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu Ho; Lin, Po-Chang; Lee, Chun Yi; Hua, Chi Chung; Lee, Tai-Chou

    2010-09-01

    This work investigated the detailed interparticle interactions in a concentrated polymer-coated colloidal system in which the bare colloidal particles and the adsorbed polymers are of comparable size and, hence, the polymer adsorption cannot be foreseen to induce repulsive or attractive interactions. Specifically, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) chains (R(g) approximately 10nm) adsorbed onto fine silica colloidal particles (SAXS-determined radius approximately 7.4nm; width of log-normal size distribution approximately 0.28) were considered as a model system, for which the impact of a small amount of polymer adsorption (0.18mg/m(2)) in controlling the interactions of the PEO-coated silica particles was systematically explored by analyzing the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data against three interaction potentials-the equivalent hard-sphere (EHS) potential, the Hayter-Penfold-Yukawa (HPY) potential, and the square-well (SW) potential. Moreover, the SAXS analysis was enforced by dynamic light scattering (DLS) for predetermining the adsorption behavior, as well as for evaluating the possibility of polymer bridging. Under a dilute condition, the DLS analysis showed no sign of forming colloidal multiplets. In concentrated dispersions, both the HPY and SW potentials clearly revealed a systematic decrease of colloidal repulsions with increased PEO coverage, ascribed to a partially "screened" electrostatic interaction and/or the formation of PEO-bridged silica doublets. The present findings have interesting implications for controlling the colloidal interactions and microstructures of fine polymer-coated particles in dense or condensed phases.

  4. SEnD NMR: Sensitivity Enhanced n-Dimensional NMR

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, John M.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Sparse sampling offers tremendous potential for overcoming the time limitations imposed by traditional Cartesian sampling of indirectly detected dimensions of multidimensional NMR data. However, in many instances sensitivity rather than time remains of foremost importance when collecting data on protein samples. Here we explore how to optimize the collection of radial sampled multidimensional NMR data to achieve maximal signal-to-noise. A method is presented that exploits a rigorous definition of the minimal set of radial sampling angles required to resolve all peaks of interest in combination with a fundamental statistical property of radial sampled data. The approach appears general and can achieve a substantial sensitivity advantage over Cartesian sampling for the same total data acquisition time. Termed Sensitivity Enhanced n-Dimensional or SEnD NMR, the method involves three basic steps. First, data collection is optimized using routines to determine a minimal set of radial sampling angles required to resolve frequencies in the radially sampled chemical shift evolution dimensions. Second, appropriate combinations of experimental parameters (transients and increments) are defined by simple statistical considerations in order to optimize signal-to-noise in single angle frequency domain spectra. Finally, the data is processed with a direct multidimensional Fourier transform and a statistical artifact and noise removal step is employed. PMID:20004602

  5. Bubble-surface interactions with graphite in the presence of adsorbed carboxymethylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jueying; Delcheva, Iliana; Ngothai, Yung; Krasowska, Marta; Beattie, David A

    2015-01-21

    The adsorption of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), and the subsequent effect on bubble-surface interactions, has been studied for a graphite surface. CMC adsorbs on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in specific patterns: when adsorbed from a solution of low concentration it forms stretched, isolated and sparsely distributed chains, while upon adsorption from a solution of higher concentration, it forms an interconnected network of multilayer features. The amount and topography of the adsorbed CMC affect the electrical properties as well as the wettability of the polymer-modified HOPG surface. Adsorption of CMC onto the HOPG surface causes the zeta potential to be more negative and the modified surface becomes more hydrophilic. This increase in both the absolute value of zeta potential and the surface hydrophilicity originates from the carboxymethyl groups of the CMC polymer. The effect of the adsorbed polymer layer on wetting film drainage and bubble-surface/particle attachment was determined using high speed video microscopy to monitor single bubble-surface collision, and single bubble Hallimond tube flotation experiments. The time of wetting film drainage and the time of three-phase contact line spreading gets significantly longer for polymer-modified HOPG surfaces, indicating that the film rupture and three-phase contact line expansion were inhibited by the presence of polymer. The effect of longer drainage times and slower dewetting correlated with reduced flotation recovery. The molecular kinetic (MK) model was used to quantify the effect of the polymer on dewetting dynamics, and showed an increase in the jump frequency for the polymer adsorbed at the higher concentration.

  6. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    prevent dendrite formation. The in situ method was also applied to monitor (by (11)B NMR) electrochemical double-layer formation in supercapacitors in real time. Though this method is useful, it comes with challenges. The separation of the contributions from the different cell components in the NMR spectra is not trivial because of overlapping resonances. In addition, orientation-dependent NMR interactions, including the spatial- and orientation-dependent bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) effects, can lead to resonance broadening. Efforts to understand and mitigate these BMS effects are discussed in this Account. The in situ NMR investigation of fuel cells initially focused on the surface electrochemistry at the electrodes and the electrochemical oxidation of methanol and CO to CO2 on the Pt cathode. On the basis of the (13)C and (195)Pt NMR spectra of the adsorbates and electrodes, CO adsorbed on Pt and other reaction intermediates and complete oxidation products were detected and their mode of binding to the electrodes investigated. Appropriate design and engineering of the NMR hardware has allowed researchers to integrate intact direct methanol fuel cells into NMR probes. Chemical transformations of the circulating methanol could be followed and reaction intermediates could be detected in real time by either (2)H or (13)C NMR spectroscopy. By use of the in situ NMR approach, factors that control fuel cell performance, such as methanol cross over and catalyst performance, were identified.

  7. Physical and Chemical Effects of Two-Phase Brine/Supercritical-CO2 Fluid Flow on Clastic Rocks: Real-Time Monitoring and NMR Imaging of Flow-Through Core Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, C. A.; Vogt, S.; Maneval, J. E.; Brox, T.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Sandstone core samples were challenged with a supercritical CO2-saturated brine mixture in a laboratory flow-through core reactor system over a range of temperatures and brine strengths. Cores of quartz arenite from the Berea formation were selected to represent ideal ‘clean’ sandstone These laboratory experiments potentially provide an analog for the acidification of pore fluids near the brine/CO2 interface during CO2 flooding of depleted clastic hydrocarbon reservoirs for carbon sequestration. Flow in the reactor was perpendicular to bedding. Initial experiments were run at 50°C and 100°C with brine concentrations of 1g/L and 10g/L (TDS) to test effects of different temperatures and brine compositions. Real-time monitoring of fluid pH and conductivity provided a measure of reaction rates. Introduction of supercritical CO2 into the brine-saturated cores initiated a reduction in pH accompanied by an increase in conductivity. NMR images of fresh cores were compared with images of challenged cores using a protocol for pixel-by-pixel comparison to determine the effects on bulk pore volume and geometry. Two types of imaging experiments were conducted: multi-slice spin echo and 3-D spin echo images. Multi-slice experiments had a slice thickness of 1.5 mm and an in-plane resolution of 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm, and 3-D experiments had a resolution of 0.47 mm x 0.55 mm x 0.55mm. Imaging results reflected the observed changes in the physical and chemical structure post-challenge. Two-dimensional relaxation correlation experiments were also conducted to probe the pore sizes, connectivity and fluid saturation of the rock cores before and after challenging. Chemical analyses and microscopic examination of the challenged cores will provide a better understanding of alteration in the cores and the changes in the volume, geometry and connectivity of pore space.

  8. A general algorithm for peak-tracking in multi-dimensional NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Ravel, P; Kister, G; Malliavin, T E; Delsuc, M A

    2007-04-01

    We present an algorithmic method allowing automatic tracking of NMR peaks in a series of spectra. It consists in a two phase analysis. The first phase is a local modeling of the peak displacement between two consecutive experiments using distance matrices. Then, from the coefficients of these matrices, a value graph containing the a priori set of possible paths used by these peaks is generated. On this set, the minimization under constraint of the target function by a heuristic approach provides a solution to the peak-tracking problem. This approach has been named GAPT, standing for General Algorithm for NMR Peak Tracking. It has been validated in numerous simulations resembling those encountered in NMR spectroscopy. We show the robustness and limits of the method for situations with many peak-picking errors, and presenting a high local density of peaks. It is then applied to the case of a temperature study of the NMR spectrum of the Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP).

  9. Elucidating the effects of adsorbent flexibility on fluid adsorption using simple models and flat-histogram sampling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Vincent K. Siderius, Daniel W.

    2014-06-28

    Using flat-histogram Monte Carlo methods, we investigate the adsorptive behavior of the square-well fluid in two simple slit-pore-like models intended to capture fundamental characteristics of flexible adsorbent materials. Both models require as input thermodynamic information about the flexible adsorbent material itself. An important component of this work involves formulating the flexible pore models in the appropriate thermodynamic (statistical mechanical) ensembles, namely, the osmotic ensemble and a variant of the grand-canonical ensemble. Two-dimensional probability distributions, which are calculated using flat-histogram methods, provide the information necessary to determine adsorption thermodynamics. For example, we are able to determine precisely adsorption isotherms, (equilibrium) phase transition conditions, limits of stability, and free energies for a number of different flexible adsorbent materials, distinguishable as different inputs into the models. While the models used in this work are relatively simple from a geometric perspective, they yield non-trivial adsorptive behavior, including adsorption-desorption hysteresis solely due to material flexibility and so-called “breathing” of the adsorbent. The observed effects can in turn be tied to the inherent properties of the bare adsorbent. Some of the effects are expected on physical grounds while others arise from a subtle balance of thermodynamic and mechanical driving forces. In addition, the computational strategy presented here can be easily applied to more complex models for flexible adsorbents.

  10. Extraction of uranium from seawater using magnetic adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, H.; Fujita, K.; Nakajima, F.; Ozawa, Y.; Murata, T.

    1981-01-01

    A new process for the extraction of uranium from seawater was developed. In the process, uranium adsorption is effected using powdered magnetic adsorbents; the adsorbents are then separated from seawater using magnetic separation technology. This process is superior to a column method using a granulated hydrous titanium oxide adsorber bed in the following ways: (1) a higher rate of adsorption is realized because smaller particles are used in the uranium adsorption; and (2) blocking, which is inevitable in an adsorber bed, is eliminated. The composite hydrous titanium-iron oxide as a magnetic adsorbent having high uranium adsorption capacity and magnetization can be prepared by adding urea to a mixed solution of titanium sulfate and ferrous sulfate. Adsorption and desoprtion of uranium and the removal of the adsorbent using a small-scale uranium extraction plant (about 15 m/sup 3//d) is reported, and the feasibility of uranium extraction from seawater by this process is demonstrated. 10 figures.

  11. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  12. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  13. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  14. Removal of antibiotics from water using sewage sludge- and waste oil sludge-derived adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ding, Rui; Zhang, Pengfei; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-09-01

    Sewage sludge- and waste oil sludge-derived materials were tested as adsorbents of pharmaceuticals from diluted water solutions. Simultaneous retention of eleven antibiotics plus two anticonvulsants was examined via batch adsorption experiments. Virgin and exhausted adsorbents were examined via thermal and FTIR analyses to elucidate adsorption mechanisms. Maximum adsorption capacities for the 6 materials tested ranged from 80 to 300 mg/g, comparable to the adsorption capacities of antibiotics on various activated carbons (200-400 mg/g) reported in the literature. The performance was linked to surface reactivity, polarity and porosity. A large volume of pores similar in size to the adsorbate molecules with hydrophobic carbon-based origin of pore walls was indicated as an important factor promoting the separation process. Moreover, the polar surface of an inorganic phase in the adsorbents attracted the functional groups of target molecules. The presence of reactive alkali metals promoted reaction with acidic groups, formation of salts and their precipitation in the pore system. PMID:22673337

  15. Removal of antibiotics from water using sewage sludge- and waste oil sludge-derived adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ding, Rui; Zhang, Pengfei; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-09-01

    Sewage sludge- and waste oil sludge-derived materials were tested as adsorbents of pharmaceuticals from diluted water solutions. Simultaneous retention of eleven antibiotics plus two anticonvulsants was examined via batch adsorption experiments. Virgin and exhausted adsorbents were examined via thermal and FTIR analyses to elucidate adsorption mechanisms. Maximum adsorption capacities for the 6 materials tested ranged from 80 to 300 mg/g, comparable to the adsorption capacities of antibiotics on various activated carbons (200-400 mg/g) reported in the literature. The performance was linked to surface reactivity, polarity and porosity. A large volume of pores similar in size to the adsorbate molecules with hydrophobic carbon-based origin of pore walls was indicated as an important factor promoting the separation process. Moreover, the polar surface of an inorganic phase in the adsorbents attracted the functional groups of target molecules. The presence of reactive alkali metals promoted reaction with acidic groups, formation of salts and their precipitation in the pore system.

  16. Adsorbent capability testing using desorption efficiency method on palm oil fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manap, Nor Rahafza Abdul; Shamsudin, Roslinda

    2015-09-01

    The palm oil fiber had been used as filler in making thermoplastics, biocomposites and also used as adsorbent in treating waste water. In this study, palm oil fiber was used as adsorbent to treat indoor air pollutants that caused by toluene, ethylbenzene, ortho-, meta-, and para- xylene (o-, m-, p-xylene). Known amount of pollutants, ranges between 1.3 to 28 ppm was spiked into palm oil fiber and left in refrigerator for 24 hours. Then, elution of the pollutants was carried out by carbon disulphide as mobile phase or eluent. The ability of palm oil fiber as adsorbent was determine using desorption efficiency technique by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). The desorption efficiency percentage given by toluene was in the range of 88.9% to 100%, 91% to 100% for ethylbenzene, 65% to 100% for pm-xylene and 92.9% to 100% for o-xylene. This percentage indicates that palm oil fiber can be used as adsorbent to treat indoor air pollutants.

  17. From MDF and PB wastes to adsorbents for the removal of pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. A. F. L.; Azaruja, B. A.; Mourão, P. A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The production of activated carbons in powder and monolith forms, by physical activation with CO2, with specific surface areas between 804 and 1469 m2 g-1, porous volume between 0.33 and 0.59 cm3 g-1, with basic nature (PZC ∼ 9.6-10.6) was achieved in our lab, from medium density fibreboard (MDF) and particleboard (PB), engineered wood composites wastes. These highly porous adsorbents were applied in kinetic and equilibrium adsorption studies, in batch and dynamic modes, in powder and monolith forms, of specific adsorptives, considered pollutants, namely phenol (P), p-nitrophenol (PNP) and neutral red (NR). In batch the maximum adsorbed amount was 267, 162 and 92 mg g-1, for PNP, P and NR, respectively. The application of different kinetic models (pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion model) leads to a better knowledge of the adsorption mechanisms of those adsorptives. The results obtained in the kinetic and equilibrium tests show that the combination of the structural features and the surface chemistry nature of the adsorbents, with the adsorptives properties, establish the kinetic performance, the type and amount adsorbed for each system. This work confirms the potential of these types of wastes in the production of activated carbons and its application in adsorption from liquid phase.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of titanium dioxide nanotubes as novel lithium adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Moazeni, Maryam; Hajipour, Hengameh; Askari, Masoud; Nusheh, Mohammad

    2015-01-15

    The ion exchange process is a promising method for lithium extraction from brine and seawater having low concentrations of this element. To achieve this goal, it is vital to use an effective adsorbent with maximum lithium adsorption potential together with a stable structure during extraction and insertion of the ions. In this study, titanium dioxide and then lithium titanate spinel with nanotube morphology was synthesized via a simple two-step hydrothermal process. The produced Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} spinel ternary oxide nanotube with about 70 nm diameter was then treated with dilute acidic solution in order to prepare an adsorbent suitable for lithium adsorption from local brine. Morphological and phase analysis of the obtained nanostructured samples were done by using transmission and scanning electron microscopes along with X-ray diffraction. Lithium ion exchange capacity of this adsorbent was finally evaluated by means of adsorption isotherm. The results showed titanium dioxide adsorbent could recover 39.43 mg/g of the lithium present in 120 mg/L of lithium solution.

  19. Heat capacity measurements of atoms and molecules adsorbed on evaporated metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, T.W.

    1989-05-01

    Investigations of the properties of absorbed monolayers have received great experimental and theoretical attention recently, both because of the importance of surface processes in practical applications such as catalysis, and the importance of such systems to the understanding of the fundamentals of thermodynamics in two dimensions. We have adapted the composite bolometer technology to the construction of microcalorimeters. For these calorimeters, the adsorption substrate is an evaporated film deposited on one surface of an optically polished sapphire wafer. This approach has allowed us to make the first measurements of the heat capacity of submonolayer films of /sup 4/He adsorbed on metallic films. In contrast to measurements of /sup 4/He adsorbed on all other insulating substrates, we have shown that /sup 4/He on silver films occupies a two-dimensional gas phase over a broad range of coverages and temperatures. Our apparatus has been used to study the heat capacity of Indium flakes. CO multilayers, /sup 4/He adsorbed on sapphire and on Ag films and H/sub 2/ adsorbed on Ag films. The results are compared with appropriate theories. 68 refs., 19 figs.

  20. [Preparation of novel magnetic dextran affinity adsorbents and their application to purify urokinase].

    PubMed

    Dong, Y S; Liang, F; Yu, X Y; Guo, L A; Chang, J H

    2001-01-01

    The reverse phase suspension and embedment technique were adopted to prepare magnetic dextran microsphere (MDMS). The dispersion medium was mixture of some organic solvents. Span-80 was used as stabilizer. The aqueous dextran with magnetic fluid was suspended in dispersion medium with epichlorohydrin as cross-linking reagent. The mixture was stirred for 30 minutes at room temperature and then heated at 70 degrees C for 4 hours, MDMS was thus obtained. MDMS was activated by epichlorohydrin on which 6-aminohexanoic acid, glycine or ethylene diamine was bonded as spacers. Then it was coupled with p-aminobenzamide, L-arginine methyl ester or guanidohexanoic acid and five magnetic affinity adsorbents were prepared. The MDMS was polydisperse particles with the size of 50-300 meshes and the content of Fe3O4 was about 6.2 per cent in the MDMS. Influence of some parameters such as viscosity and density of organic phase, the volume ratio of organic and aqueous phase, the quantity of surfactant and stirring speed on preparing MDMS was studied. Magnetic affinity adsorbents were used to purify crude urokinase in a bath mode and the effect of coupling reagents and ligands on results of purification was discussed. The bioactivity recovery was 40.0 to 60.7 per cent, the purification-fold was between 14.9 and 32.8, and the adsorptive capacity varies from 89 mg to 121 mg per milliliter of adsorbent. PMID:12541840

  1. Structural relaxation of an adlayer in presence of adsorbate-induced reconstruction: C_60/Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Woei Wu; Hsu, C. L.; Lin, M. C.; Lin, K. C.

    2004-03-01

    We revisit submonolayer growth of C_60 on Cu(111) by STM, with emphasis on the formation of higher-order commensurate metastable states. These phases show concomitant interfacial reconstruction, adlayer buckling, and adlayer rotation to match to the 10.0 ÅC_60 nearest neighbor (NN) distance. Most interestingly, a clear correlation between the adlayer rotation angle and molecular contrast patterns is demonstrated. This is caused by the C_60-induced reconstruction at preferred binding sites and adlayer buckling in adjustment to strain. Four contrast patterns, i.e., ''disordered-maze'', ''linear-wall-maze'', ''p(√7 × √7)'', and ''p (2 × 2)'', with increasing C_60 NN distances are categorized. In the most compressed phase, buckling is favored and it is analogous to the ground state of an antiferromagnetic system on a triangular lattice with alike adlayer buckling and interfacial corrugation. In contrast, the molecular orderings in the other structures are mostly dictated by lateral displacements of C_60 toward preferred reconstructive binding sites. These phases thus illustrate structural relaxation of a molecular layer on an adsobate-induced reconstructed substrate in different adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interaction limits.

  2. NMR Measures of Heterogeneity Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, Hans W.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced solid state NMR spectroscopy provides a wealth of information about structure and dynamics of complex systems. On a local scale, multidimensional solid state NMR has elucidated the geometry and the time scale of segmental motions at the glass transition. The higher order correlation functions which are provided by this technique led to the notion of dynamic heterogeneities, which have been characterized in detail with respect to their rate memory and length scale. In polymeric and low molar mass glass formers of different fragility, length scales in the range 2 to 4 nm are observed. In polymeric systems, incompatibility of backbone and side groups as in polyalkylmethacrylates leads to heteogeneities on the nm scale, which manifest themselves in unusual chain dynamics at the glass transition involving extended chain conformations. References: K. Schmidt-Rohr and H.W. Spiess, Multidimensional Solid-State NMR and Polymers,Academic Press, London (1994). U. Tracht, M. Wilhelm, A. Heuer, H. Feng, K. Schmidt-Rohr, H.W. Spiess, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2727 (1998). S.A. Reinsberg, X.H. Qiu, M. Wilhelm, M.D. Ediger, H.W. Spiess, J.Chem.Phys. 114, 7299 (2001). S.A. Reinsberg, A. Heuer, B. Doliwa, H. Zimmermann, H.W. Spiess, J. Non-Crystal. Solids, in press (2002)

  3. NMR of fd coat protein.

    PubMed

    Cross, T A; Opella, S J

    1979-01-01

    The conformations of the major coat protein of a filamentous bacteriophage can be described by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the protein and the virus. The NMR experiments involve detection of the 13C and 1H nuclei of the coat protein. Both the 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra show that regions of the polypeptide chain have substantially more motion than a typical globular protein. The fd coat protein was purified by gel chromatography of the SDA solubilized virus. Natural abundance 13C NMR spectra at 38 MHz resolve all of the nonprotonated aromatic carbons from the three phenylalanines, two tyrosines, and one tryptophan of the coat protein. The alpha carbons of the coat protein show at least two different classes of relaxation behavior, indicative of substantial variation in the motion of the backbone carbons in contrast to the rigidity of the alpha carbons of globular proteins. The 1H spectrum at 360 MHz shows all of the aromatic carbons and many of the amide protons. Titration of a 1H spectra gives the pKas for the tyrosines.

  4. NMR-Based Milk Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Sundekilde, Ulrik K.; Larsen, Lotte B.; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics applications elucidating how the differential regulated genes affects milk composition are also reported. This review will highlight the recent advances in NMR-based metabolomics on milk, as well as give a brief summary of when NMR spectroscopy can be useful for gaining a better understanding of how milk composition is linked to nutritional or quality traits. PMID:24957988

  5. In-cell NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serber, Zach; Corsini, Lorenzo; Durst, Florian; Dötsch, Volker

    2005-01-01

    The role of a protein inside a cell is determined by both its location and its conformational state. Although fluorescence techniques are widely used to determine the cellular localization of proteins in vivo, these approaches cannot provide detailed information about a protein's three-dimensional state. This gap, however, can be filled by NMR spectroscopy, which can be used to investigate both the conformation as well as the dynamics of proteins inside living cells. In this chapter we describe technical aspects of these "in-cell NMR" experiments. In particular, we show that in the case of (15)N-labeling schemes the background caused by labeling all cellular components is negligible, while (13)C-based experiments suffer from high background levels and require selective labeling schemes. A correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio of in-cell NMR experiments with the overexpression level of the protein shows that the current detection limit is 150-200 muM (intracellular concentration). We also discuss experiments that demonstrate that the intracellular viscosity is not a limiting factor since the intracellular rotational correlation time is only approximately two times longer than the correlation time in water. Furthermore, we describe applications of the technique and discuss its limitations. PMID:15808216

  6. Isomerization reactions on single adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Karina

    2009-02-17

    Molecular switches occur throughout nature. In one prominent example, light induces the isomerization of retinal from the compact 11-cis form to the elongated all-trans form, a conversion that triggers the transformation of light into a neural impulse in the eye. Applying these natural principles to synthetic systems offers a promising way to construct smaller and faster nanoelectronic devices. In such systems, electronic switches are essential components for storage and logical operations. The development of molecular switches on the single-molecule level would represent a major step toward incorporating molecules as building units into nanoelectronic circuits. Molecular switches must be both reversible and bistable. To meet these requirements, a molecule must have at least two different thermally stable forms and a way to repeatedly interconvert between those forms based on changes in light, heat, pressure, magnetic or electric fields, pH, mechanical forces, or electric currents. The conversion should be connected to a measurable change in electronic, optical, magnetic, or mechanical properties. Because isomers can differ significantly in physical and chemical properties, isomerization could serve as a molecular switching mechanism. Integration of molecular switches into larger circuits will probably require arranging them on surfaces, which will require a better understanding of isomerization reactions in these environments. In this Account, we describe our scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the isomerization of individual molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Investigating chlorobenzene and azobenzene derivatives on the fcc(111) faces of Ag, Cu, and Au, we explored the influence of substituents and the substrate on the excitation mechanism of the isomerization reaction induced by inelastically tunneling electrons. We achieved an irreversible configurational (cis-trans) isomerization of individual 4-dimethyl-amino-azobenzene-4-sulfonic acid molecules on Au

  7. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry enantioseparation of pomalidomide on cyclodextrin-bonded chiral stationary phases and the elucidation of the chiral recognition mechanisms by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zoltán-István; Szőcs, Levente; Horváth, Péter; Komjáti, Balázs; Nagy, József; Jánoska, Ádám; Muntean, Daniela-Lucia; Noszál, Béla; Tóth, Gergő

    2016-08-01

    A sensitive and validated liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method was developed for the enantioseparation of the racemic mixture of pomalidomide, a novel, second-generation immunomodulatory drug, using β-cyclodextrin-bonded stationary phases. Four cyclodextrin columns (β-, hydroxypropyl-β-, carboxymethyl-β-, and sulfobutyl-β-cyclodextrin) were screened and the effects of eluent composition, flow rate, temperature, and organic modifier on enantioseparation were studied. Optimized parameters, offering baseline separation (resolution = 2.70 ± 0.02) were the following: β-cyclodextrin stationary phase, thermostatted at 15°C, and mobile phase consisting of methanol/0.1% acetic acid 10:90 v/v, delivered with 0.8 mL/min flow rate. For the optimized parameter at multiple reaction monitoring mode 274.1-201.0 transition with 20 eV collision energy and 100 V fragmentor voltage the limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 0.75 and 2.00 ng/mL, respectively. Since enantiopure standards were not available, elution order was determined upon comparison of the circular dichroism signals of the separated pomalidomide enantiomers with that of enantiopure thalidomide. The mechanisms underlying the chiral discrimination between the enantiomers were also investigated. Pomalidomide-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex was characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The thermodynamic aspects of chiral separation were also studied.

  8. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry enantioseparation of pomalidomide on cyclodextrin-bonded chiral stationary phases and the elucidation of the chiral recognition mechanisms by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zoltán-István; Szőcs, Levente; Horváth, Péter; Komjáti, Balázs; Nagy, József; Jánoska, Ádám; Muntean, Daniela-Lucia; Noszál, Béla; Tóth, Gergő

    2016-08-01

    A sensitive and validated liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method was developed for the enantioseparation of the racemic mixture of pomalidomide, a novel, second-generation immunomodulatory drug, using β-cyclodextrin-bonded stationary phases. Four cyclodextrin columns (β-, hydroxypropyl-β-, carboxymethyl-β-, and sulfobutyl-β-cyclodextrin) were screened and the effects of eluent composition, flow rate, temperature, and organic modifier on enantioseparation were studied. Optimized parameters, offering baseline separation (resolution = 2.70 ± 0.02) were the following: β-cyclodextrin stationary phase, thermostatted at 15°C, and mobile phase consisting of methanol/0.1% acetic acid 10:90 v/v, delivered with 0.8 mL/min flow rate. For the optimized parameter at multiple reaction monitoring mode 274.1-201.0 transition with 20 eV collision energy and 100 V fragmentor voltage the limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 0.75 and 2.00 ng/mL, respectively. Since enantiopure standards were not available, elution order was determined upon comparison of the circular dichroism signals of the separated pomalidomide enantiomers with that of enantiopure thalidomide. The mechanisms underlying the chiral discrimination between the enantiomers were also investigated. Pomalidomide-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex was characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The thermodynamic aspects of chiral separation were also studied. PMID:27279456

  9. Resin Dynamics Contributes to the NMR Line Broadening of Organic Molecules Grafted onto a Polystyrene Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippens, Guy; Chessari, Gianni; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel

    2002-06-01

    Despite the use of high resolution magic angle spinning NMR, the NMR linewidth of anchored molecules on the commonly used Merrifield solid phase resins remains larger than that of the corresponding molecules in solution. We investigate the different mechanisms that might be at the origin of this line broadening. Experimentally, we use the CPMG method to determine the 15N relaxation times of a tethered tripeptide and show that the slow resin dynamics significantly contributes to the transverse relaxation.

  10. Quantitative produced water analysis using mobile 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lisabeth; Kalli, Chris; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; May, Eric F.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Graham, Brendan F.; Carroll, Matthew R. J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of oil contamination of produced water is required in the oil and gas industry to the (ppm) level prior to discharge in order to meet typical environmental legislative requirements. Here we present the use of compact, mobile 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in combination with solid phase extraction (SPE), to meet this metrology need. The NMR hardware employed featured a sufficiently homogeneous magnetic field, such that chemical shift differences could be used to unambiguously differentiate, and hence quantitatively detect, the required oil and solvent NMR signals. A solvent system consisting of 1% v/v chloroform in tetrachloroethylene was deployed, this provided a comparable 1H NMR signal intensity for the oil and the solvent (chloroform) and hence an internal reference 1H signal from the chloroform resulting in the measurement being effectively self-calibrating. The measurement process was applied to water contaminated with hexane or crude oil over the range 1-30 ppm. The results were validated against known solubility limits as well as infrared analysis and gas chromatography.

  11. X-ray CT and NMR imaging of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    In little more than a decade, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging have become the premier modalities of medical radiology. Both of these imaging techniques also promise to be useful tools in petrophysics and reservoir engineering, because CT and NMR can nondestructively image a host of physical and chemical properties of porous rocks and multiple fluid phases contained within their pores. The images are taken within seconds to minutes, at reservoir temperatures and pressures, with spatial resolution on the millimeter and submillimeter level. The physical properties imaged by the two techniques are complementary. CT images bulk density and effective atomic number. NMR images the nuclide concentration, M/sub 0/, of a variety of nuclei (/sup 1/H, /sup 19/F, /sup 23/Na, /sup 31/P, etc.), their longitudinal and transverse relaxation-time curves (t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/), and their chemical shift spectra. In rocks, CT images both rock matrix and pore fluids, while NMR images only mobile fluids and the interactions of these mobile fluids with the confining surfaces of the pores.

  12. NMR spin relaxation rates in the Heisenberg bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Tiago; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard; Paiva, Thereza; Dos Santos, Raimundo R.

    One of the striking features of heavy fermions is the fact that in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition these systems exhibit the breakdown of Fermi-liquid behavior and superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) expirements play an important role in the study of these phenomena. Measurements of NMR spin relaxation rates and Knight shift, for instance, can be used to probe the electronic spin susceptibility of these systems. Here we studied the NMR response of the Heisenberg bilayer model. In this model, it is well known that the increase of the interplane coupling between the planes, Jperp, supresses the antiferromagnetic order at a quantum critical point (QCP). We use stochastic series expansion (SSE) and the maximum-entropy analytic continuation method to calculate the NMR spin lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 and the spin echo decay 1 /T2 G as function of Jperp. The spin echo decay, T2 G increases for small Jperp, due to the increase of the order parameter, and then vanishes abruptly in the QCP. The effects of Jperp dilution disorder in the QCP and the relaxation rates are also discussed. This research was supported by the NNSA Grant Number DE-NA 0002908, and Ciência sem fronteiras program/CNPQ.

  13. Detecting and Quantifying Organic Contaminants in Sediments with NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, E. L.; Knight, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the potential to detect and monitor free-phase organic contaminants in sediments, both in the laboratory and in the field. NMR directly detects signal from hydrogen-bearing fluids; the signal amplitude is proportional to the total amount of hydrogen present, while the signal decay rate provides information about fluid properties and interactions with the surrounding sediments. Contrasting relaxation times (T2) or diffusion coefficients (D) allow the separation of water signal from contaminant signal. In this work, we conduct a laboratory study to assess the use of NMR measurements to detect and quantify diesel, gasoline, crude oil, and tri-chloroethylene in sediments. We compare the T2 distributions for sediments containing only water, only contaminant, and both water and contaminant, confirming that the identification and quantification of contaminants using T2 data alone is limited by overlapping water and contaminant T2 distributions in some sediments. We leverage the contrast between the diffusion coefficient of water and that of diesel and crude oil to separate contaminant signal from water signal in D-T2 maps. D-T2 distributions are measured both using a pulsed gradient method and a static gradient method similar to methods used with logging tools, allowing us to compare the ability of each method to quantify diesel and crude oil when water is also present. There is the potential to apply these methods to characterize and monitor contaminated sites using commercially available NMR logging tools.

  14. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, Gunnar I.; Dietz, Russell N.

    1994-01-01

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

  15. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1994-04-05

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

  16. In situ determination of the depuration of three- and four-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons co-adsorbed onto mangrove leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haifeng; Shi, Jing; Guo, Shuai; Zhang, Yong; Duan, Lusha

    2016-01-01

    A dual-wavelength fiber-optic fluorimetry for the in situ simultaneous determinations of fluorene (Flu), phenanthrene (Phe) and pyrene (Pyr) adsorbed onto the leaf surfaces of living Avicennia marina (Am) seedling were developed and used to study the depuration kinetics of the three PAHs, adsorbed individually or mixed together, onto living Am leaf surfaces. Limits of detection for the in situ measurements of adsorbed Flu, Phe and Pyr were 4.62, 2.75 and 1.38 ng spot(-1), respectively. The depuration kinetics of the three selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are divided into rapid and slow phases; both phases followed the same first-order kinetics with relative clearance rates of Flu > Phe > Pyr during the rapid phase, and a clearance rate order of Pyr > Flu > Phe during the slow phase. For the three PAHs co-adsorbed on living Am leaf surfaces, a significant synergistic effect was detected during the rapid phase clearance; conversely, an antagonistic effect was observed during the slow phase. However, the synergistic effect dominated during both phases of the depuration process, and the co-adsorption of PAHs promoted the clearance of all three compounds from the mangrove leaf surfaces. These findings demonstrate a novel analytical method for in situ characterization of multiple PAHs adsorbed onto the plant surfaces.

  17. Air stripper VOC treatment using specialized adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Craven, C.N.; Blystone, P.G.; Grant, A.

    1994-12-31

    Abatement of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions is required by federal, state and local regulatory agencies. Sources of VOC emissions include air stripping processes at groundwater remediation and industrial wastewater operations. The Purus A2000 system is an innovative emission control system that utilizes specialized adsorbent resins, on-site regeneration and solvent recovery for abatement of VOCs. This paper describes two applications in which air stripper off-gas is treated by the Purus A2000 Adsorption System. The first is a groundwater remediation pump-and-treat operation in which the air stripper off-gas contains chlorinated solvents. At the second site, benzene and styrene emissions from an industrial wastewater air stripper operation were successfully treated. At both sites the recovered solvent was recycled. Capital and operating costs will be compared to other treatment methods.

  18. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  19. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A. Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-01

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role.The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth

  20. Ozonolysis of surface adsorbed methoxyphenols: kinetics of aromatic ring cleavage vs. alkene side-chain oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, E. M.; Kawam, A. Z.; Van Ry, D. A.; Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2013-07-01

    Lignin pyrolysis products, which include a variety of substituted methoxyphenols, constitute a major component of organics released by biomass combustion and may play a central role in the formation of atmospheric brown carbon. Understanding the atmospheric fate of these compounds upon exposure to trace gases is therefore critical to predicting the chemical and physical properties of biomass burning aerosol. We used diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy to monitor the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, and isoeugenol adsorbed on NaCl and α-Al2O3 substrates. Adsorption of gaseous methoxyphenols onto these substrates produced near monolayer surface concentrations of 3 × 1018 molecules m-2. The subsequent dark heterogeneous ozonolysis of adsorbed 4-propylguaiacol cleaved the aromatic ring between the methoxy and phenol groups with the product conclusively identified by GC-MS and 1H-NMR. Kinetic analysis of eugenol and isoeugenol dark ozonolysis also suggested the formation of ring-cleaved products, although ozonolysis of the unsaturated substituent groups forming carboxylic acids and aldehydes was an order of magnitude faster. Average uptake coefficients for NaCl-adsorbed methoxyphenols were γ = 2.3 (±0.8) × 10-7 and 2 (±1) × 10-6 for ozonolysis of the aromatic ring and the unsaturated side chain, respectively, and reactions on α-Al2O3 were approximately two times slower. UV-visible radiation (λ>300 nm) enhanced eugenol ozonolysis of the aromatic ring by a factor of 4(±1) but had no effect on ozonolysis of the alkene side-chain.

  1. Critical Effect of Segmental Dynamics in Polybutadiene / Clay Nanocomposites Characterized by Solid State 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Rongchun; Sun, Pingchuan; Winter, H. Henning; Xue, Gi

    2014-03-01

    The segmental dynamics of rigid, intermediate, and mobile molecular components in end-functionalized polybutadiene (PB) / organo-clay systems was characterized by fully refocused 1H NMR FID. In addition, 1H DQ NMR experiments allowed to semi- quantitatively monitor changes in segmental dynamics near the interface. Both methods suggested a critical concentration of end-functionalized polybutadiene, indicating a saturation effect for the surface-adsorbed polymer. The critical concentration depended on molecular weight of PB and PB-clay interaction. Based on the 1H NMR results, a tentative model was proposed to illustrate the evolution of the structure and segmental dynamics in PB/organo-clay nanocomposites. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants: 21174062).

  2. NMR of solutes in nematic and smectic A liquid crystals: the anisotropic intermolecular potential.

    PubMed

    Burnell, E Elliott; Dong, Ronald Y; C J Weber, Adrian; Yethiraj, Anand

    2014-10-01

    Orientational order parameters determined from (1)H NMR spectroscopy of solutes in liquid crystals that form both nematic and smectic A phases are used to determine the solute smectic A order parameters and the smectic-nematic coupling term. For the analysis, it is necessary to know the nematic part of the potential in the smectic A phase: various ways of extrapolating parameters from the nematic phase to the smectic phase are explored.

  3. Xenon-129 NMR study of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiao, C.; Carrado, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR studies have been carried out using xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays. Data from the measurements provide information on the pore structure of clays before and after pillaring. The results indicate that the effective pore diameter of montmorillonite increases, for example, from 5.4 {Angstrom} to 8.0 {Angstrom} after pillaring cheto-montmorillonite with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. The data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in the interlamellar gallery height from 5.6 {Angstrom} to 8.4 {Angstrom}.

  4. Automated data evaluation and modelling of simultaneous (19) F-(1) H medium-resolution NMR spectra for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Paul, Andrea; Engel, Dirk; Guthausen, Gisela; Kraume, Matthias; Maiwald, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Medium-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MR-NMR) currently develops to an important analytical tool for both quality control and process monitoring. In contrast to high-resolution online NMR (HR-NMR), MR-NMR can be operated under rough environmental conditions. A continuous re-circulating stream of reaction mixture from the reaction vessel to the NMR spectrometer enables a non-invasive, volume integrating online analysis of reactants and products. Here, we investigate the esterification of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol with acetic acid to 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acetate both by (1) H HR-NMR (500 MHz) and (1) H and (19) F MR-NMR (43 MHz) as a model system. The parallel online measurement is realised by splitting the flow, which allows the adjustment of quantitative and independent flow rates, both in the HR-NMR probe as well as in the MR-NMR probe, in addition to a fast bypass line back to the reactor. One of the fundamental acceptance criteria for online MR-MNR spectroscopy is a robust data treatment and evaluation strategy with the potential for automation. The MR-NMR spectra are treated by an automated baseline and phase correction using the minimum entropy method. The evaluation strategies comprise (i) direct integration, (ii) automated line fitting, (iii) indirect hard modelling (IHM) and (iv) partial least squares regression (PLS-R). To assess the potential of these evaluation strategies for MR-NMR, prediction results are compared with the line fitting data derived from the quantitative HR-NMR spectroscopy. Although, superior results are obtained from both IHM and PLS-R for (1) H MR-NMR, especially the latter demands for elaborate data pretreatment, whereas IHM models needed no previous alignment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-07-11

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials’ properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: • Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen. • Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure. • Hydrogen storage material made from activated

  6. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Hua, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    During the 3 year term of the project, new methods have been developed for characterizing the pore structure of porous materials such as coals, carbons, and amorphous silica gels. In general, these techniques revolve around; (1) combining multiple techniques such as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and adsorption of contrast-matched adsorbates or {sup 129}Xe NMR and thermoporometry (the change in freezing point with pore size), (2) combining adsorption isotherms over several pressure ranges to obtain a more complete description of pore filling, or (3) applying NMR ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}) techniques with well-defined porous solids with pores in the large micropore size range (>1 nm).

  7. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  8. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  9. A new laboratory approach to shale analysis using NMR relaxometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry is a non-invasive technique commonly used to assess hydrogen-bearing fluids in petroleum reservoir rocks. Measurements made using LF-NMR provide information on rock porosity, pore-size distributions, and in some cases, fluid types and saturations (Timur, 1967; Kenyon et al., 1986; Straley et al., 1994; Brown, 2001; Jackson, 2001; Kleinberg, 2001; Hurlimann et al., 2002). Recent improvements in LF-NMR instrument electronics have made it possible to apply methods used to measure pore fluids to assess highly viscous and even solid organic phases within reservoir rocks. T1 and T2 relaxation responses behave very differently in solids and liquids; therefore the relationship between these two modes of relaxation can be used to differentiate organic phases in rock samples or to characterize extracted organic materials. Using T1-T2 correlation data, organic components present in shales, such as kerogen and bitumen, can be examined in laboratory relaxometry measurements. In addition, implementation of a solid-echo pulse sequence to refocus T2 relaxation caused by homonuclear dipolar coupling during correlation measurements allows for improved resolution of solid-phase protons. LF-NMR measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions were carried out on raw oil shale samples from the Eocene Green River Formation and pyrolyzed samples of these shales processed by hydrous pyrolysis and techniques meant to mimic surface and in-situ retorting. Samples processed using the In Situ Simulator approach ranged from bitumen and early oil generation through to depletion of petroleum generating potential. The standard T1-T2 correlation plots revealed distinct peaks representative of solid- and liquid-like organic phases; results on the pyrolyzed shales reflect changes that occurred during thermal processing. The solid-echo T1 and T2 measurements were used to improve assessment of the solid organic phases, specifically

  10. Magnesium oxide-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic: a novel cadmium(II) adsorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Md; Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Maneesh, Namburath; Munekage, Yukihiro; Motomura, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    The contamination of cadmium (Cd) in the aquatic environment is one of the serious environmental and human health's risks. The present study attempted to develop the potential magnesium oxide (MgO)-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic (MITDC)-based novel adsorbent media for adsorbing higher rate of cadmium [Cd(II)] from water phase. A potential MITDC adsorbent media was developed using volcanic raw tuff soil and its Cd(II) adsorption capacity from water phase was evaluated comparing with the raw tuff soil. A series of studies were carried out in an agitated batch method at 20 ± 2 °C to characterize the adsorption capacity of MITDC under different conditions of factors, such as contact time (0-360 min), initial pH (3-11) of solution, dose of MITDC (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 g/L), and initial concentration of Cd(II) (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg/L), influencing the adsorption mechanism. MITDC exhibited the equilibrium state of maximum Cd(II) adsorption at the contact time 120 min and pH 4.7 (removed 98.2 % Cd) when initial Cd(II) concentration was 10 mg/L in the present study. The dose of 7.5 g MITDC/L showed maximum removal of Cd(II) from water. Experimental data were described by the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherms and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model (R 2 = 0.996). The Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MITDC was 31.25 mg/g. The high Cd(II) adsorption capacity indicated that novel MITDC could be used as a potential ceramic adsorbent media to remove high rate of Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  11. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elastic modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.

  12. Evaluation of the surface affinity of water in three biochars using fast field cycling NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Bubici, Salvatore; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Kučerik, Jiří; Conte, Pellegrino

    2016-05-01

    Many soil functions depend on the interaction of water with soil. The affinity of water for soils can be altered by applying soil amendments like stone meal, manure, or biochar (a carbonaceous material obtained by pyrolysis of biomasses). In fact, the addition of hydrophobic biochar to soil may increase soil repellency, reduce water-adsorbing capacity, inhibit microbial activity, alter soil filter, buffer, storage, and transformation functions. For this reason, it is of paramount importance to monitor water affinity for biochar surface (also referred to as 'wettability') in order to better address its applications in soil systems. In this study, we propose the use of fast field cycling NMR relaxometry technique with the application of a new mathematical model for data interpretation, as a valid alternative to the traditional contact angle (CA) measurements for biochar wettability evaluation. Either NMR or CA results revealed the same wettability trend for the biochars studied here. The advantage of NMR relaxometry over CA measurements lies in the possibility to obtain at the microscopic level a variety of different information in only one shot. In fact, while CA provides only wettability evaluation, NMR relaxometry also allows achievement of the mechanisms for water molecular dynamics on biochar surface, thereby leading to the possibility to understand better, in future research, the role of biochar in increasing soil quality and plant nutrition. PMID:27062147

  13. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  14. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  15. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated. PMID:25429955

  16. 'Shim pulses' for NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magneticfields

    SciTech Connect

    Topgaard, Daniel; Martin, Rachel W.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos; Pines, Alexander

    2004-05-19

    NMR spectroscopy conveys information about chemical structure through ppm-scale shifts of the resonance frequency depending on the chemical environment. In order to observe these small shifts, magnets with highly homogeneous magnetic field B{sub 0} are used. The high cost and large size of these magnets are a consequence of the requirement for high homogeneity. In this contribution we introduce a new method for recording high-resolution NMR spectra from samples in inhomogeneous B{sub 0}, opening up the possibility of exploiting magnets of lower homogeneity and cost. Instead of using the traditional B{sub 0} ''shim coils'', adiabatic radiofrequency (RF) pulse sequences and modulated B{sub 0} gradients generated by coils in the probe are used to produce ''shim pulses''. A great deal of work has been devoted to finding methods for retrieving chemical shift information even when B{sub 0} is inhomogeneous. One class of methods relies on zero- or multiple quantum coherences which evolve independently of B{sub 0}. These methods are inherently two-dimensional and the high-resolution information is obtained indirectly. In order to minimize experimental time it is desirable to acquire a high-resolution spectrum directly just as for traditional NMR in homogeneous fields. A further advantage with direct acquisition is that modification of already existing multidimensional NMR techniques is facilitated. A fundamentally different approach utilizes inhomogeneity of the RF magnetic field to periodically refocus the phase dispersion from the inhomogeneous B{sub 0}. With this technique a high-resolution spectrum can indeed be acquired in a single shot. The main drawback is the requirement for spatial matching between the RF and B{sub 0} inhomogeneities. Based on this latter technique we propose the use of ''shim pulses'', i.e. modulated, spatially constant, B{sub 0} gradient pulses together with spatially homogeneous adiabatic frequency sweeps to induce non-linear phase shifts in

  17. Anomalous fast dynamics of adsorbate overlayers near an incommensurate structural transition.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2013-09-20

    We investigate the dynamics of a compressively strained adsorbed layer on a periodic substrate via a simple two-dimensional model that admits striped and hexagonal incommensurate phases. We show that the mass transport is superfast near the striped-hexagonal phase boundary and in the hexagonal phase. For an initial step profile separating a bare substrate region (or "hole") from the rest of a striped incommensurate phase, the superfast domain wall dynamics leads to a bifurcation of the initial step profile into two interfaces or profiles propagating in opposite directions with a hexagonal phase in between. This yields a theoretical understanding of the recent experiments for the Pb/Si(111) system. PMID:24093278

  18. Improvements in Technique of NMR Imaging and NMR Diffusion Measurements in the Presence of Background Gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianyu

    In this work, modification of the cosine current distribution rf coil, PCOS, has been introduced and tested. The coil produces a very homogeneous rf magnetic field, and it is inexpensive to build and easy to tune for multiple resonance frequency. The geometrical parameters of the coil are optimized to produce the most homogeneous rf field over a large volume. To avoid rf field distortion when the coil length is comparable to a quarter wavelength, a parallel PCOS coil is proposed and discussed. For testing rf coils and correcting B _1 in NMR experiments, a simple, rugged and accurate NMR rf field mapping technique has been developed. The method has been tested and used in 1D, 2D, 3D and in vivo rf mapping experiments. The method has been proven to be very useful in the design of rf coils. To preserve the linear relation between rf output applied on an rf coil and modulating input for an rf modulating -amplifying system of NMR imaging spectrometer, a quadrature feedback loop is employed in an rf modulator with two orthogonal rf channels to correct the amplitude and phase non-linearities caused by the rf components in the rf system. The modulator is very linear over a large range and it can generate an arbitrary rf shape. A diffusion imaging sequence has been developed for measuring and imaging diffusion in the presence of background gradients. Cross terms between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and background gradients or imaging gradients can complicate diffusion measurement and make the interpretation of NMR diffusion data ambiguous, but these have been eliminated in this method. Further, the background gradients has been measured and imaged. A dipole random distribution model has been established to study background magnetic fields Delta B and background magnetic gradients G_0 produced by small particles in a sample when it is in a B_0 field. From this model, the minimum distance that a spin can approach a particle can be determined by measuring

  19. Ultra-broadband NMR probe: numerical and experimental study of transmission line NMR probe.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Shinji

    2003-06-01

    We have reinvestigated a transmission line NMR probe first published by Lowe and co-workers in 1970s [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 45 (1974) 631; 48 (1977) 268] numerically and experimentally. The probe is expected to be ultra-broadband, thus might enable new types of solid-state NMR experiments. The NMR probe consists of a coil and capacitors which are connected to the coil at regular intervals. The circuit is the same as a cascaded LC low-pass filter, except there are nonzero mutual inductances between different coil sections. We evaluated the mutual inductances by Neumann's formula and calculated the electrical characteristics of the probe as a function of a carrier frequency. We found that they were almost the same as those of a cascaded LC low-pass filter, when the inductance L of a section was estimated from the inductance of the whole coil divided by the number of the sections, and if C was set to the capacitance in a section. For example, the characteristic impedance of a transmission line coil is given by Z=(L/C)(1/2). We also calculated the magnitude and the distribution of RF magnetic field inside the probe. The magnitude of RF field decreases when the carrier frequency is increased because the phase delay between neighboring sections is proportional to the carrier frequency. For cylindrical coils, the RF field is proportional to (pinu/2nu(d))(1/2)exp(-nu/nu(d)), where the decay frequency nu(d) is determined by the dimensions of the coil. The observed carrier frequency thus must be much smaller than the decay frequency. This condition restricts the size of transmission line coils. We made a cylindrical coil for a 1H NMR probe operating below 400 MHz. It had a diameter 2.3mm and a pitch 1.2mm. Five capacitors of 6pF were connected at every three turns. The RF field strength was 40 and 60 kHz at the input RF power 100 W by a calculation and by experiments, respectively. The calculations showed that the RF field inhomogeneity along the coil axis was caused by a

  20. Rheo-NMR Measurements of Cocoa Butter Crystallized Under

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, E.; Mazzanti, G

    2009-01-01

    Modifications of a benchtop NMR instrument were made to apply temperature control to a shearing NMR cell. This has enabled the determination in situ of the solid fat content (SFC) of cocoa butter under shearing conditions. The cocoa butter was cooled at 3 C/min to three final temperatures of 17.5, 20.0, and 22.5 C with applied shear rates between 45 and 720 s-1. Polymorphic transitions of the cocoa butter were determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with an identical shearing system constructed of Lexan. Sheared samples were shown to have accelerated phase transitions compared to static experiments. In experiments where form V was confirmed to be the dominant polymorph, the final SFC averaged around 50%. However, when other polymorphic forms were formed, a lower SFC was measured because the final temperature was within the melting range of that polymorph and only partial crystallization happened. A shear rate of 720 s-1 delayed phase transitions, likely due to viscous heating of the sample. Pulsed NMR is an invaluable tool for determining the crystalline fraction in hydrogen containing materials, yet its use for fundamental and industrial research on fat or alkanes crystallization under shear has only recently been developed.