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Sample records for adsorbed plasma proteins

  1. Identification of vitronectin as a major plasma protein adsorbed on polymer surfaces of different copolymer composition.

    PubMed

    Bale, M D; Wohlfahrt, L A; Mosher, D F; Tomasini, B; Sutton, R C

    1989-12-01

    The arrays of proteins adsorbed from plasma onto a series of polystyrene copolymeric latexes were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of washed beads and immunoblotting of proteins desorbed from the beads and separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Beads were prepared by continuous emulsion polymerization in the absence of surfactant. Coomassie brilliant blue staining of gel electropherograms of desorbed proteins indicated that the presence of small amounts of comonomers (1 to 10 mole %) significantly influenced the composition of the adsorbed protein layer. Immunoblotting revealed that fibrinogen, fibronectin, and vitronectin were adsorbed by all surfaces investigated. C3 and Clq adsorption varied significantly with copolymer composition. The ELISAs revealed that although the concentrations of vitronectin and fibronectin in plasma are similar, the extent of vitronectin adsorption from 70% to 85% plasma was greater by two orders of magnitude than fibronectin adsorption. Vitronectin adsorbed on carboxylic acid-containing copolymers reacted more strongly with a conformationally sensitive antivitronectin monoclonal antibody (MoAb) than vitronectin adsorbed to polystyrene and was more susceptible to cleavage by plasma proteases(s). The results show that vitronectin is a major protein adsorbed from concentrated plasma and that small changes in the chemical composition of a copolymer profoundly affects the extent and nature of protein adsorption from complex mixtures such as plasma. PMID:2479428

  2. Adsorbed plasma proteins modulate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on neutrophils in blood.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Barinov, Nikolay A; Kostevich, Valeria A; Smolina, Natalia V; Klinov, Dmitry V; Sokolov, Alexey V

    2016-08-01

    Proteins adsorbed on a surface may affect the interaction of this surface with cells. Here, we studied the binding of human serum albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) and evaluated the impact of PEG-SWCNT treated by these proteins on neutrophils in whole blood samples. Measurements of adsorption parameters revealed tight binding of proteins to PEG-SWCNTs. AFM was employed to directly observe protein binding to sidewalls of PEG-SWCNTs. Fluorescein-labeled IgG was used to ascertain the stability of PEG-SWCNT-IgG complexes in plasma. In blood samples, all plasma proteins mitigated damage of neutrophils observed just after blood exposure to PEG-SWCNTs, while only treatment of PEG-SWCNTs with IgG resulted in dose- and time-dependent enhancement of CNT-induced neutrophil activation and in potentiation of oxidative stress. Our study demonstrates the ability of adsorbed plasma proteins to influence neutrophil response caused by PEG-SWCNTs in whole blood. PMID:27015767

  3. Plasma protein adsorbed biomedical polymers: activation of human monocytes and induction of interleukin 1.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, T L; Colton, E; Anderson, J M

    1989-06-01

    These studies involved the evaluation of human monocyte/macrophage activation by biomedical polymers coated with human blood proteins. The biomedical polymers were polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane, woven Dacron fabric, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, Biomer, and tissue culture treated polystyrene as the control. They were adsorbed with human blood proteins: albumin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, hemoglobin, and gamma globulin. The protein adsorbed polymers were evaluated for their potential to activate the monocyte/macrophage cellular population in vitro as assessed by the induction of the monocyte/macrophage inflammatory mediator, Interleukin 1 (IL1). Suppression of IL1 was observed when protein adsorbed polymers were compared to the appropriate protein adsorbed control. Protein adsorbed polymers, when compared to polymers without protein adsorption, stimulated IL1 production. The data presented in this manuscript show the level of induction and secretion of IL1 was dependent on the biomedical polymer and the protein adsorbed, as well as the requirement of lipopolysaccharide. These results show differential interactions occur between the proteins, monocytes/macrophages, and biomedical polymers which alter activation and induction of IL1. PMID:2786877

  4. Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins classifies nanoparticles with different surface properties and size

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Burnum, Kristin E.; Luna, Maria L.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kim, Jong Seo; Qian, Weijun; Moore, Ronald J.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Thrall, Brian D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pounds, Joel G.; Liu, Tao

    2011-12-01

    In biofluids (e.g., blood plasma) nanoparticles are readily embedded in layers of proteins that can affect their biological activity and biocompatibility. Herein, we report a study on the interactions between human plasma proteins and nanoparticles with a controlled systematic variation of properties using stable isotope labeling and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based quantitative proteomics. Novel protocol has been developed to simplify the isolation of nanoparticle bound proteins and improve the reproducibility. Plasma proteins associated with polystyrene nanoparticles with three different surface chemistries and two sizes as well as for four different exposure times (for a total of 24 different samples) were identified and quantified by LC-MS analysis. Quantitative comparison of relative protein abundances were achieved by spiking an 18 O-labeled 'universal reference' into each individually processed unlabeled sample as an internal standard, enabling simultaneous application of both label-free and isotopic labeling quantitation across the sample set. Clustering analysis of the quantitative proteomics data resulted in distinctive pattern that classifies the nanoparticles based on their surface properties and size. In addition, data on the temporal study indicated that the stable protein 'corona' that was isolated for the quantitative analysis appeared to be formed in less than 5 minutes. The comprehensive results obtained herein using quantitative proteomics have potential implications towards predicting nanoparticle biocompatibility.

  5. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  6. Conformation Distributions in Adsorbed Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuse, Curtis W.; Hubbard, Joseph B.; Vrettos, John S.; Smith, Jackson R.; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2007-03-01

    While the structural basis of protein function is well understood in the biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, few methods for the characterization and comparison of protein conformation distributions are available. New methods capable of measuring the stability of protein conformations and the integrity of protein-protein, protein-ligand and protein-surface interactions both in solution and on surfaces are needed to help the development of protein-based products. We are developing infrared spectroscopy methods for the characterization and comparison of molecular conformation distributions in monolayers and in solutions. We have extracted an order parameter describing the orientational and conformational variations of protein functional groups around the average molecular values from a single polarized spectrum. We will discuss the development of these methods and compare them to amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange methods for albumin in solution and on different polymer surfaces to show that our order parameter is related to protein stability.

  7. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  8. In situ modification of chromatography adsorbents using cold atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, P.; Willett, T. C.; Theodosiou, E.; Thomas, O. R. T.; Walsh, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    Efficient manufacturing of increasingly sophisticated biopharmaceuticals requires the development of new breeds of chromatographic materials featuring two or more layers, with each layer affording different functions. This letter reports the in situ modification of a commercial beaded anion exchange adsorbent using atmospheric pressure plasma generated within gas bubbles. The results show that exposure to He-O2 plasma in this way yields significant reductions in the surface binding of plasmid DNA to the adsorbent exterior, with minimal loss of core protein binding capacity; thus, a bi-layered chromatography material exhibiting both size excluding and anion exchange functionalities within the same bead is produced.

  9. Anomalous thermal denaturing of proteins adsorbed to nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichroeb, J. H.; Forrest, J. A.; Ngai, V.; Jones, L. W.

    2006-09-01

    We have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) to monitor the structural changes that accompany thermal denaturing of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed onto gold nanospheres of size 5nm-60nm. The effect of the protein on the LSPR was monitored by visible extinction spectroscopy. The position of the resonance is affected by the conformation of the adsorbed protein layer, and as such can be used as a very sensitive probe of thermal denaturing that is specific to the adsorbed protein. The results are compared to detailed calculations and show that full calculations can lead to significant increases in knowledge where gold nanospheres are used as biosensors. Thermal denaturing on spheres with diameter > 20 nm show strong similarity to bulk calorimetric studies of BSA in solution. BSA adsorbed on nanospheres with d ⩽ 15nm shows a qualitative difference in behavior, suggesting a sensitivity of denaturing characteristics on local surface curvature. This may have important implications for other protein-nanoparticle interactions.

  10. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure-function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  11. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure–function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  12. The density and refractive index of adsorbing protein layers.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Janos

    2004-07-01

    The structure of the adsorbing layers of native and denatured proteins (fibrinogen, gamma-immunoglobulin, albumin, and lysozyme) was studied on hydrophilic TiO(2) and hydrophobic Teflon-AF surfaces using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy techniques. The density and the refractive index of the adsorbing protein layers could be determined from the complementary information provided by the two in situ instruments. The observed density and refractive index changes during the protein-adsorption process indicated the presence of conformational changes (e.g., partial unfolding) in general, especially upon contact with the hydrophobic surface. The structure of the formed layers was found to depend on the size of the proteins and on the experimental conditions. On the TiO(2) surface smaller proteins formed a denser layer than larger ones and the layer of unfolded proteins was less dense than that adsorbed from the native conformation. The hydrophobic surface induced denaturation and resulted in the formation of thin compact protein films of albumin and lysozyme. A linear correlation was found between the quartz crystal microbalance measured dissipation factor and the total water content of the layer, suggesting the existence of a dissipative process that is related to the solvent molecules present inside the adsorbed protein layer. Our measurements indicated that water and solvent molecules not only influence the 3D structure of proteins in solution but also play a crucial role in their adsorption onto surfaces. PMID:15240488

  13. Pattern Recognition of Adsorbing HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew S.; Shi, Guangjie; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.; Schmid, Friederike

    2015-03-01

    Protein adsorption is relevant in fields ranging from medicine to industry, and the qualitative behavior exhibited by course-grained models could shed insight for further research in such fields. Our study on the selective adsorption of lattice proteins utilizes the Wang-Landau algorithm to simulate the Hydrophobic-Polar (H-P) model with an efficient set of Monte Carlo moves. Each substrate is modeled as a square pattern of 9 lattice sites which attract either H or P monomers, and are located on an otherwise neutral surface. The fully enumerated set of 102 unique surfaces is simulated with each protein sequence. A collection of 27-monomer sequences is used- each of which is non-degenerate and protein-like. Thermodynamic quantities such as the specific heat and free energy are calculated from the density of states, and are used to investigate the adsorption of lattice proteins on patterned substrates. Research supported by NSF.

  14. Adsorbed Proteins Influence the Biological Activity and Molecular Targeting of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Debamitra; Sundaram, S. K.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Riley, Brian J.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Kaysen, George A.; Moudgil, Brij M.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2007-11-01

    The possible combination of unique physicochemical properties operating at unique sites of action within cells and tissues has led to considerable uncertainty surrounding nanomaterial toxic potential. Here we have investigated the relative importance of proteins adsorbed onto nanomaterial surfaces in guiding uptake and toxicity to determine whether a priori identification of adsorbed proteins will contribute to nanomaterial toxicity assessment. Albumin was identified as the major protein adsorbed onto single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) following incubation with fetal bovine or human serum/plasma, but not when plasma from the Nagase Analbuminemic Rat (NAR) was used, and precoating SWCNTs with a non-ionic surfactant (Pluronic F127) inhibited albumin adsorption. Damaged or structurally altered albumin is rapidly cleared by scavenger receptors. In the RAW 264.7 macrophage-like model, we observed that SWCNTs inhibited the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 ng/ml, 6 hr) and this anti-inflammatory response was inhibited by fucoidan (scavenger receptor antagonist) and by precoating SWCNTs with Pluronic F127. Fucoidan also reduced the uptake of fluorescent SWCNTs (Alexa647) in RAW 264.7 cells. Albumin-coated SWCNTs reduced LPS-mediated Cox-2 induction. SWCNTs did not appear to reduce binding of a fluorescent LPS (Alexa488) to RAW 264.7 cells. The profile of proteins adsorbed onto amorphous silica (50 – 1000 nm) was qualitatively different, relative to SWCNTs, and coating amorphous silica with Pluronic F127 dramatically reduced protein binding and toxicity. Collectively, these observations are consistent with an important role for adsorbed proteins in guiding nanomaterial disposition and toxicity.

  15. High capacity cryogel-type adsorbents for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naveen Kumar; Dsouza, Roy N; Grasselli, Mariano; Fernández-Lahore, Marcelo

    2014-08-15

    Cryogel bodies were modified to obtain epoxy groups by graft-copolymerization using both chemical and gamma irradiation initiation techniques. The free epoxy adsorbents were reacted further to introduce diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) functionalities. The resulting weak anion-exchange cryogel adsorbents showed dynamic binding capacities of ca. 27±3mg/mL, which was significantly higher than previously reported for this type of adsorbent material. Gamma irradiated grafting initiation showed a 4-fold higher capacity for proteins than chemical grafting initiation procedures. The phosphate capacity for these DEAE cryogels was 119mmol/L and also showed similar column efficiency as compared to commercial adsorbents. The large pores in the cryogel structure ensure convective transport of the molecules to active binding sites located on the polymer-grafted surface of cryogels. However, as cryogels have relatively large pores (10-100μm), the BET area available for surface activation is low, and consequently, the capacity of the cryogels is relatively low for biomolecules, especially when compared to commercial beaded adsorbents. Nevertheless, we have shown that gamma ray mediated surface grafting of cryogel matrices greatly enhance their functional and adsorptive properties. PMID:24980092

  16. Candida albicans binds to saliva proteins selectively adsorbed to silicone.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; van der Wielen, Pauline; Cannon, Richard D; Ruske, Dean; Dawes, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Explanted voice prostheses obtained from 5 patients at the time of prosthesis replacement were consistently colonized by yeast, in particular Candida albicans. A simple, reproducible, in vitro model of C. albicans adherence to saliva-coated voice prosthesis silicone was developed. Whole saliva promoted adherence of C. albicans to silicone in a dose-dependent manner. Saliva rinses from voice prosthesis patients also promoted binding of C. albicans to silicone in vitro (mean adherence 14.9% +/- 2.8% of input C. albicans cells). This was significantly higher than C. albicans adherence to silicone in the absence of saliva (P < .001) or adherence promoted by saliva rinses from healthy volunteers (P < .005). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and a blot overlay adherence assay revealed that certain salivary proteins were selectively adsorbed to silicone and that C. albicans yeast cells adhered specifically to the adsorbed salivary proteins. PMID:16997116

  17. Confocal Raman microscopy of protein adsorbed in chromatographic particles.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuewu; Stone, Thomas; Bell, David; Gillespie, Christopher; Portoles, Marta

    2012-09-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy is a nondestructive analytical technique that combines the chemical information from vibrational spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of confocal microscopy. It was applied, for the first time, to measure conformation and distribution of protein adsorbed in wetted chromatographic particles. Monoclonal antibody was loaded into the Fractogel EMD SO(3) (M) cation exchanger at 2 mS/cm or 10 mS/cm. Amide I and III frequencies in the Raman spectrum of the adsorbed protein suggest that there are no detectable changes of the original β-sheet conformation in the chromatographic particles. Protein depth profile measurements indicate that, when the conductivity is increased from 2 mS/cm to 10 mS/cm, there is a change in mass transport mechanism for protein adsorption, from the shrinking-core model to the homogeneous-diffusion model. In this study, the use of confocal Raman microscopy to measure protein distribution in chromatographic particles fundamentally agrees with previous confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations, but confocal Raman spectroscopy enjoys additional advantages: use of unlabeled protein to eliminate fluorescent labeling, ability for characterization of protein secondary structure, and ability for spectral normalization to provide a nondestructive experimental approach to correct light attenuation effects caused by refractive index (RI) mismatching in semiopaque chromatographic particles. PMID:22803776

  18. Identification of polymer surface adsorbed proteins implicated in pluripotent human embryonic stem cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Moamen; Rao, Wei; Smith, James G W; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Young, Lorraine E; Barrett, David A; Davies, Martyn C; Denning, Chris; Alexander, Morgan R

    2016-08-16

    Improved biomaterials are required for application in regenerative medicine, biosensing, and as medical devices. The response of cells to the chemistry of polymers cultured in media is generally regarded as being dominated by proteins adsorbed to the surface. Here we use mass spectrometry to identify proteins adsorbed from a complex mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) conditioned medium found to support pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) expansion on a plasma etched tissue culture polystyrene surface. A total of 71 proteins were identified, of which 14 uniquely correlated with the surface on which pluripotent stem cell expansion was achieved. We have developed a microarray combinatorial protein spotting approach to test the potential of these 14 proteins to support expansion of a hESC cell line (HUES-7) and a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (ReBl-PAT) on a novel polymer (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) methacrylamide). These proteins were spotted to form a primary array yielding several protein mixture 'hits' that enhanced cell attachment to the polymer. A second array was generated to test the function of a refined set of protein mixtures. We found that a combination of heat shock protein 90 and heat shock protein-1 encourage elevated adherence of pluripotent stem cells at a level comparable to fibronectin pre-treatment. PMID:27466628

  19. Mobility of adsorbed proteins: a Brownian dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, S; Talbot, J

    2000-01-01

    We simulate the adsorption of lysozyme on a solid surface, using Brownian dynamics simulations. A protein molecule is represented as a uniformly charged sphere and interacts with other molecules through screened Coulombic and double-layer forces. The simulation starts from an empty surface and attempts are made to introduce additional proteins at a fixed time interval that is inversely proportional to the bulk protein concentration. We examine the effect of ionic strength and bulk protein concentration on the adsorption kinetics over a range of surface coverages. The structure of the adsorbed layer is examined through snapshots of the configurations and quantitatively with the radial distribution function. We extract the surface diffusion coefficient from the mean square displacement. At high ionic strengths the Coulombic interaction is effectively shielded, leading to increased surface coverage. This effect is quantified with an effective particle radius. Clustering of the adsorbed molecules is promoted by high ionic strength and low bulk concentrations. We find that lateral protein mobility decreases with increasing surface coverage. The observed trends are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental studies. PMID:10620278

  20. Study of the conformational change of adsorbed proteins on biomaterial surfaces using hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinku

    2016-05-01

    There is no doubt that protein adsorption plays a crucial role in determining biocompatibility of biomaterials. Despite the information of the identity and composition of blood plasma/serum proteins adsorbed on surfaces of biomaterials to understand which proteins are involved in blood/biomaterial interactions, it still does not provide information about the conformations and orientations of adsorbed protein, which are very important in determining biological responses to biomaterials. Therefore, our laboratory has developed an experimental technology to probe protein conformations on materials that is applicable to mixtures of proteins. Herein, the new application of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange combined with mass spectrometry was applied to determine conformational changes of adsorbed proteins at biomaterial surfaces. The results suggest that there may be a significant conformational change in adsorbed proteins at 'low' bulk concentrations that leads to a large change in the kinetics of H/D exchange as compared to 'high' bulk concentrations. This technique may eventually be useful for the study of the kinetics of protein conformational changes. PMID:26896658

  1. Shotgun proteomic analytical approach for studying proteins adsorbed onto liposome surface.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caracciolo, Giulio; Cavaliere, Chiara; Crescenzi, Carlo; Pozzi, Daniela; Laganà, Aldo

    2011-09-01

    The knowledge about the interaction between plasma proteins and nanocarriers employed for in vivo delivery is fundamental to understand their biodistribution. Protein adsorption onto nanoparticle surface (protein corona) is strongly affected by vector surface characteristics. In general, the primary interaction is thought to be electrostatic, thus surface charge of carrier is supposed to play a central role in protein adsorption. Because protein corona composition can be critical in modifying the interactive surface that is recognized by cells, characterizing its formation onto lipid particles may serve as a fundamental predictive model for the in vivo efficiency of a lipidic vector. In the present work, protein coronas adsorbed onto three differently charged cationic liposome formulations were compared by a shotgun proteomic approach based on nano-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. About 130 proteins were identified in each corona, with only small differences between the different cationic liposome formulations. However, this study could be useful for the future controlled design of colloidal drug carriers and possibly in the controlled creation of biocompatible surfaces of other devices that come into contact with proteins into body fluids. PMID:21725631

  2. Quantitative surface studies of protein adsorption by infrared spectroscopy. II. Quantification of adsorbed and bulk proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D.J.; Hutson, T.B.; Chittur, K.K.; Gendreau, R.M.

    1987-08-15

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra of surface-adsorbed proteins are correlated with concentration measurements determined by /sup 125/I-labeled proteins. This paper demonstrates that linear correlations between the intensity of the major bands of proteins and the quantity of proteins can be obtained for human albumin and immunoglobulin G up to surface concentrations of approximately 0.25 microgram/cm2. A poorer correlation was observed for human fibrinogen. A linear correlation was also observed between the concentration in the bulk solution and the major bands of albumin up to a concentration of 60 mg/ml.

  3. XPS and bioactivity study of the bisphosphonate pamidronate adsorbed onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Kate; Kumar, Sunil; Smart, Roger St. C.; Dutta, Naba; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Anderson, Gail I.; Sekel, Ron

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate bisphosphonate (BP) adsorption onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings commonly used for orthopaedic implants. BPs exhibit high binding affinity for the calcium present in HA and hence can be adsorbed onto HA-coated implants to exploit their beneficial properties for improved bone growth at the implant interface. A rigorous XPS analysis of pamidronate, a commonly used nitrogenous BP, adsorbed onto plasma sprayed HA-coated cobalt-chromium substrates has been carried out, aimed at: (a) confirming the adsorption of this BP onto HA; (b) studying the BP diffusion profile in the HA coating by employing the technique of XPS depth profiling; (c) confirming the bioactivity of the adsorbed BP. XPS spectra of plasma sprayed HA-coated discs exposed to a 10 mM aqueous BP solution (pamidronate) for periods of 1, 2 and 24 h showed nitrogen and phosphorous photoelectron signals corresponding to the BP, confirming its adsorption onto the HA substrate. XPS depth profiling of the 2 h BP-exposed HA discs showed penetration of the BP into the HA matrix to depths of at least 260 nm. The bioactivity of the adsorbed BP was confirmed by the observed inhibition of osteoclast (bone resorbing) cell activity. In comparison to the HA sample, the HA sample with adsorbed BP exhibited a 25-fold decrease in primary osteoclast cells.

  4. Water-soluble adsorbent β-cyclodextrin-grafted polyethyleneimine for removing bilirubin from plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Wei, Houliang; Jia, Lingyun; Xu, Li; Zou, Chunyi; Xie, Jian

    2012-10-01

    A water-soluble adsorbent was developed for removing bilirubin from the plasma of hyperbilirubinemia patient. The adsorbent was synthesized by grafting β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) to branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) matrix. The resulting β-CD-PEI polymer had an average molecular weight of 163.7 kD, and it contained 56.3 β-CD functional groups. In β-CD-PEI-spiked dialysis, 35.8% of plasma bilirubin was removed, which was higher than that removed by the same concentration of bovine serum albumin. β-CD-PEI also removed aromatic amino acids and bile acids. The results indicated that β-CD-PEI could be an effective adsorbent for blood purification application aiming at the removal of toxins. PMID:22836125

  5. Copper iodide staining and determination of proteins adsorbed to microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Root, D D; Reisler, E

    1990-04-01

    Copper iodide staining and determination of proteins adsorbed to polystyrene microtiter plates are described. The minimum amount of copper iodide-stained protein detected in densitometric measurements is approximately 20 pg/mm2. Enzyme immunoassay readers may also be used for the determination of copper iodide-stained proteins, but are less sensitive than densitometers. The densitometric readings of copper iodide-stained proteins vary linearly with the amount of protein present as verified by enzymatic and radioactive probes. Staining is complete in 2-3 min and may be removed by a 30-min treatment with EDTA without loss of adsorbed protein or immunoreactivity. The exact amount of protein adsorbed to microtiter plate wells can be measured by using protein bound and stained on nitrocellulose as a calibration curve. Copper iodide staining is a rapid, convenient, and inexpensive alternative to radioactive measurements of similar parameters. PMID:1694063

  6. Plasma-induced conversion of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.

    1992-07-01

    Experimental results are reported for an electrical device for direct conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A microchannel plate is excited with electrons from a photoemissive source, and electron impact ionization of methane on the inner surfaces of the microchannels creates an ion feedback process. The resulting low-density plasma creates higher hydrocarbons when charged particles impact the surfaces at grazing incidence. The production Of C{sub 2} to C{sub 8}-containing gases was noted, with a selectivity for C{sub 2} of 39% in one case. The proportions of converted products and the conversion rates depend upon the electrical voltage, the microchannel geometry, and the operating pressure. Conversion rates increase with operating pressure.

  7. Plasma-induced conversion of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental results are reported for an electrical device for direct conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A microchannel plate is excited with electrons from a photoemissive source, and electron impact ionization of methane on the inner surfaces of the microchannels creates an ion feedback process. The resulting low-density plasma creates higher hydrocarbons when charged particles impact the surfaces at grazing incidence. The production Of C{sub 2} to C{sub 8}-containing gases was noted, with a selectivity for C{sub 2} of 39% in one case. The proportions of converted products and the conversion rates depend upon the electrical voltage, the microchannel geometry, and the operating pressure. Conversion rates increase with operating pressure.

  8. Sorbent track: Quantitative monitoring of adsorbed VOCs under in-situ plasma exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zixian; Rousseau, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Sorbent-TRACK is a new device developed to monitor adsorption and surface oxidation of pollutants under direct plasma exposure. It is based on direct transmitted Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. A pyrex reactor under controlled gas pressure and composition is inserted on the infrared beam of a commercially available Nicolet 5700 FTIR spectrometer. A substrate holder is located on the optical path of the infrared beam. A thin pellet of a dedicated catalyst (CeO2 in the present work) is inserted in a substrate holder and can be exposed to direct plasma treatment using a Dielectric Barrier Discharge. The time resolution of Sorbent-TRACK is limited by the time resolution of the Nicolet 5700 FTIR spectrometer and close to 30 s. The dynamic of the adsorption and plasma oxidation of acetone and isopropanol on CeO2 are studied and intermediates are monitored. Performances and sensitivity of Sorbent-TRACK are reported Adsorption and oxidation of acetone leads to production of adsorbed isobutene and acetic acid, where oxidation of isopropanol gives mainly to adsorbed acetone, mesityl oxide and acetate. An increase of the plasma power leads to an increase of the isopropanol and acetone oxidation rate and a related increase of the production of adsorbed intermediates. PMID:27555531

  9. Sorbent track: Quantitative monitoring of adsorbed VOCs under in-situ plasma exposure.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zixian; Rousseau, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Sorbent-TRACK is a new device developed to monitor adsorption and surface oxidation of pollutants under direct plasma exposure. It is based on direct transmitted Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. A pyrex reactor under controlled gas pressure and composition is inserted on the infrared beam of a commercially available Nicolet 5700 FTIR spectrometer. A substrate holder is located on the optical path of the infrared beam. A thin pellet of a dedicated catalyst (CeO2 in the present work) is inserted in a substrate holder and can be exposed to direct plasma treatment using a Dielectric Barrier Discharge. The time resolution of Sorbent-TRACK is limited by the time resolution of the Nicolet 5700 FTIR spectrometer and close to 30 s. The dynamic of the adsorption and plasma oxidation of acetone and isopropanol on CeO2 are studied and intermediates are monitored. Performances and sensitivity of Sorbent-TRACK are reported Adsorption and oxidation of acetone leads to production of adsorbed isobutene and acetic acid, where oxidation of isopropanol gives mainly to adsorbed acetone, mesityl oxide and acetate. An increase of the plasma power leads to an increase of the isopropanol and acetone oxidation rate and a related increase of the production of adsorbed intermediates. PMID:27555531

  10. Protein immobilization in hollow nanostructures and investigation of the adsorbed protein behavior.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Levenstein, Alex; Gagner, Jennifer E; Dordick, Jonathan S; Siegel, Richard W

    2014-02-11

    Understanding nanomaterial-biomolecule interactions is critical to develop broad applications in sensors, devices, and therapeutics. During the past decade, in-depth studies have been performed on the effect of nanoscale surface topography on adsorbed protein structure and function. However, a fundamental understanding of nanobio interactions at concave surfaces is limited; the greatest challenge is to create a nanostructure that allows such interactions to occur and to be characterized. We have synthesized hollow nanocages (AuNG) through careful control of morphology and surface chemistry. Lysozyme was used as a model to probe interactions between a protein and these nanostructures. Solid Au nanoparticles with a similar morphology and surface chemistry were also used as a reference. Through a series of quantitative analyses of protein adsorption profiles and enzymatic activity assays of both nanobioconjugates, we discovered that a significant amount of protein could be delivered into the core of AuNG, while maintaining a substantial fraction of native activity. PMID:24450578

  11. Excitation energy migration in yellow fluorescent protein (citrine) layers adsorbed on modified gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Hanis Mohd; Rzeźnicka, Izabela I.; Hoshi, Hirotaka; Kajimoto, Shinji; Horimoto, Noriko Nishizawa; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    The nature of functional proteins adsorbed on solid surfaces is interesting from the perspective of developing of bioelectronics and biomaterials. Here we present evidence that citrine (one of yellow fluorescent protein variants) adsorbed on modified gold surfaces would not undergo denaturation and energy transfer among the adsorbed citrine molecules would occur. Gold substrates were chemically modified with 3-mercaptopropionic acid and tert-butyl mercaptan for the preparation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, respectively. A pure solution of citrine was dropped and dried on the modified gold substrates and their surface morphology was studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The obtained STM images showed multilayers of citrine adsorbed on the modified surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, citrine was adsorbed more randomly, formed various non-uniform aggregates, while on hydrophilic surfaces, citrine appeared more aligned and isolated uniform protein clusters were observed. Fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay of these dried citrine layers were also measured using the time correlated single photon counting method. Fluorescence anisotropy of citrine on the hydrophobic surface decayed faster than citrine on the hydrophilic surface. From these results we concluded that fluorescence energy migration occurred faster among citrine molecules which were randomly adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface to compare with the hydrophilic surface.

  12. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power. PMID:26844402

  13. Effect of the interplay between protein and surface on the properties of adsorbed protein layers.

    PubMed

    Ouberai, Myriam M; Xu, Kairuo; Welland, Mark E

    2014-08-01

    Although protein adsorption to surface is a common phenomenon, investigation of the process is challenging due to the complexity of the interplay between external factors, protein and surface properties. Therefore experimental approaches have to measure the properties of adsorbed protein layers with high accuracy in order to achieve a comprehensive description of the process. To this end, we used a combination of two biosensing techniques, dual polarization interferometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. From this, we are able to extract surface coverage values, layer structural parameters, water content and viscoelastic properties to examine the properties of protein layers formed at the liquid/solid interface. Layer parameters were examined upon adsorption of proteins of varying size and structural properties, on surfaces with opposite polarity. We show that "soft" proteins such as unfolded α-synuclein and high molecular weight albumin are highly influenced by the surface polarity, as they form a highly diffuse and hydrated layer on the hydrophilic silica surface as opposed to the denser, less hydrated layer formed on a hydrophobic methylated surface. These layer properties are a result of different orientations and packing of the proteins. By contrast, lysozyme is barely influenced by the surface polarity due to its intrinsic structural stability. Interestingly, we show that for a similar molecular weight, the unfolded α-synuclein forms a layer with the highest percentage of solvation not related to surface coverage but resulting from the highest water content trapped within the protein. Together, these data reveal a trend in layer properties highlighting the importance of the interplay between protein and surface for the design of biomaterials. PMID:24780165

  14. Kinetic silver staining and quantification of proteins adsorbed to microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Root, D D; Wang, K

    1993-03-01

    A silver stain was used to detect and quantitate proteins adsorbed to microtiter plate wells. The kinetics of the development of the silver stain were analyzed with an automated microtiter plate reader. The lag time for stain development was found to be a consistent indicator of the amount of protein adsorbed to a microtiter plate well. Protein which was not preadsorbed to the microtiter plate was not effectively stained by silver. Complete adsorption of protein applied to the microtiter plate was possible by drying small amounts of protein in very dilute buffers. Variations in sensitivity for different proteins were less than 30% for the panel of proteins examined. Determinations from kinetic silver staining agreed with those from copper staining for bovine albumin adsorbed to microtiter plates. The precision of kinetic silver staining assay was optimal in the range of 40 to 200 ng per microtiter plate well. In this range, the standard deviations averaged less than 5%. Even smaller amounts of protein can be detected and interpolated down to approximately 10 ng per well. The kinetic silver staining method can be used on standard microtiter plate readers without special filters and is readily adaptable to automated systems. PMID:8470810

  15. Prediction of the orientations of adsorbed protein using an empirical energy function with implicit solvation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Welsh, William J; Latour, Robert A

    2005-06-01

    When simulating protein adsorption behavior, decisions must first be made regarding how the protein should be oriented on the surface. To address this problem, we have developed a molecular simulation program that combines an empirical adsorption free energy function with an efficient configurational search method to calculate orientation-dependent adsorption free energies between proteins and functionalized surfaces. The configuration space is searched systematically using a quaternion rotation technique, and the adsorption free energy is evaluated using an empirical energy function with an efficient grid-based calculational method. In this paper, the developed method is applied to analyze the preferred orientations of a model protein, lysozyme, on various functionalized alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces by the generation of contour graphs that relate adsorption free energy to adsorbed orientation, and the results are compared with experimental observations. As anticipated, the adsorbed orientation of lysozyme is predicted to be dependent on the discrete organization of the functional groups presented by the surface. Lysozyme, which is a positively charged protein, is predicted to adsorb on its 'side' on both hydrophobic and negatively charged surfaces. On surfaces with discrete positively charged sites, attractive interaction energies can also be obtained due to the presence of discrete local negative charges present on the lysozyme surface. In this case, 'end-on' orientations are preferred. Additionally, SAM surface models with mixed functionality suggest that the interactions between lysozyme and surfaces could be greatly enhanced if individual surface functional groups are able to access the catalytic cleft region of lysozyme, similar to ligand-receptor interactions. The contour graphs generated by this method can be used to identify low-energy orientations that can then be used as starting points for further simulations to investigate

  16. Novel plasma-separation dilayer gellan-gellan-sulfate adsorber for direct removal of extra domain A containing fibronectin from the blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Keiichi; Sugihara, Katsuyuki; Abe, Yasunori; Nobori, Tsutomu; Tokita, Masayuki; Komai, Takashi

    2002-06-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, in whom cryogelation occurs in the presence of heparin, exhibit abnormally high concentrations of extra domain A containing fibronectin [EDA(+)FN] in their plasma. The selective removal of EDA(+)FN from patient blood is therefore of potential therapeutic benefit. Gellan-sulfate is a candidate ligand for the removal of EDA(+)FN due to its high affinity for FN. In this study, we prepare a novel adsorber for the direct removal of EDA(+)FN from patient blood. The adsorber has both a plasma separation function and EDA(+)FN trapping zones, and is prepared by cross-linking gellan-sulfate with epichlorohydrine. The ratio of gellan-sulfate to gellan in the adsorber is 48%. The surface and internal structure of gellan beads were observed by a range of microscopic techniques, and the beads were found to have a dilayer structure, consisting of a porous outer layer and an underlying gellan-sulfate phase as the adsorber. The affinity constants of the gellan-sulfate beads for EDA(+)FN were almost the same in blood as in buffer because the porous gellan coating acts to separate plasma from the cellular fraction of the blood. The removal rate of plasma proteins and blood cells from mock RA blood was measured for coated and uncoated gellan-sulfate beads. Removal rates were 30-32% for EDA(+)FN, 6-10% for fibrinogen, 10-14% for antithrombin III, 8% for C3, 4-7% for C4, and 0% for albumin. The removal rates of uncoated beads were 11% for white blood cells, 0% for red blood cells and 33% for platelets, whereas removal rates of 0% for white blood cells, 0% for red blood cells and 20% for platelets were achieved for coated beads. The coating effectively inhibits the adsorption of white blood cells and platelets. Existing problems with direct adsorbers, including selectivity and plasma separation, have been solved by this material. PMID:12063122

  17. Modeling colloid deposition on a protein layer adsorbed to iron-oxide-coated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Flynn, R.; von der Kammer, F.; Hofmann, T.

    2012-11-01

    Our recent study reported that conformation change of granule-associated Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) may influence the role of the protein controlling colloid deposition in porous media (Flynn et al., 2012). The present study conceptualized the observed phenomena with an ellipsoid morphology model, describing BSA as an ellipsoid taking a side-on or end-on conformation on granular surface, and identified the following processes: (1) at low adsorbed concentrations, BSA exhibited a side-on conformation blocking colloid deposition; (2) at high adsorbed concentrations, BSA adapted to an end-on conformation promoted colloid deposition; and (3) colloid deposition on the BSA layer may progressively generate end-on molecules (sites) by conformation change of side-on BSA, resulting in sustained increasing deposition rates. Generally, the protein layer lowered colloid attenuation by the porous medium, suggesting the overall effect of BSA was inhibitory at the experimental time scale. A mathematical model was developed to interpret the ripening curves. Modeling analysis identified the site generation efficiency of colloid as a control on the ripening rate (declining rate in colloid concentrations), and this efficiency was higher for BSA adsorbed from a more dilute BSA solution.

  18. Isolation of calcium-binding proteins on selective adsorbents. Application to purification of bovine calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Ersson, B; Porath, J O

    1996-05-01

    We report the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) with hard metal ions. Various hard metal ions (Mn2+, La3+, Nd3+, Eu(3 were immobilized on cross-linked agarose substituted with Tris(carboxymethyl)ethylenediamine (TED) and used as an adsorbent. After systematic studies, europium was selected for further work on the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins. It was found that the presence of Ca2+ in the sample and the solvent strongly promoted the adsorption and selectivity. Selective elution was accomplished in stepwise mode by the addition of calcium chelators such as malonate, citrate and phosphate. Calmodulin of high purity was isolated from a crude extract. Similar behavior of other calcium-binding proteins indicates that the reported chromatographic procedure can be generally applied to such proteins. PMID:8653201

  19. Determinants of protein elution rates from preparative ion-exchange adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Angelo, James M; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-04-01

    The rate processes involved in elution in preparative chromatography can affect both peak resolution and hence selectivity as well as practical factors such as facility fit. These processes depend on the physical structure of the adsorbent particles, the amount of bound solute, the solution conditions for operation or some combination of these factors. Ion-exchange adsorbents modified with covalently attached or grafted polymer layers have become widely used in preparative chromatography. Their often easily accessible microstructures offer substantial binding capacities for biomolecules, but elution has sometimes been observed to be undesirably slow. In order to determine which physicochemical phenomena control elution behavior, commercially available cellulosic, dextran-grafted and unmodified agarose materials were characterized here by their elution profiles at various conditions, including different degrees of loading. Elution data were analyzed under the assumption of purely diffusion-limited control, including the role of pore structure properties such as porosity and tortuosity. In general, effective elution rates decreased with the reduction of accessible pore volume, but differences among different proteins indicated the roles of additional factors. Additional measurements and analysis, including the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy to observe elution within single chromatographic particles, indicated the importance of protein association within the particle during elution. The use of protein stabilizing agents was explored in systems presenting atypical elution behavior, and l-arginine and disaccharide excipients were shown to alleviate the effects for one protein, lysozyme, in the presence of sodium chloride. Incorporation of these excipients into eluent buffer gave rise to faster elution and significantly lower pool volumes in elution from polymer-modified adsorbents. PMID:26948763

  20. The leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) adsorbs as monomers or dimers onto surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Lea, Alan S.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2010-03-15

    Amelogenin and amelogenin splice variants are believed to be involved in controlling the formation of the highly anisotropic and ordered hydroxyapatite crystallites that form enamel. The adsorption behavior of amelogenin proteins onto substrates is very important because protein-surface interactions are critical to it’s function. We have studied the adsorption of LRAP, a splice variant of amelogenin which may also contribute to enamel function, onto model self-assembled monolayers on gold containing of COOH, CH3, and NH2 end groups. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments indicated that LRAP in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and solutions at saturation with calcium phosphate contained aggregates of nanospheres. Null ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study protein adsorption amounts and structures. Relatively high amounts of adsorption occurred onto the CH3 and NH2 surfaces from both calcium phosphate and PBS solutions. Adsorption was also promoted onto COOH surfaces when calcium was present in the solutions suggesting an interaction that involves calcium bridging with the negatively charged C-terminus. The ellipsometry and AFM studies suggested that the protein adsorbed onto all surfaces as LRAP monomers. We propose that the monomers adsorb onto the surfaces by disassembling or “shedding” from the nanospheres that are present in solution. This work reveals the importance of small subnanosphere-sized structures of LRAP at interfaces, structures that may be important in the biomineralization of tooth enamel.

  1. Extravascular circulation of plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Szabó, G; Magyar, Z

    1982-01-01

    The escape of radioiodinated serum albumin (RISA) from the circulation and lymphatic albumin transport was investigated in anaesthetized rabbits. The fraction of RISA escaping each hour from the circulation was 0.0932 +/- 0.0075, lymphatic albumin transport in the thoracic duct was 0.0389 +/- 0.0026 in the hepatic lymph trunk 0.0115 +/- 0.016, in the intestinal trunk 0.0122 +/- 0.0037 and in the renal lymphatics 0.0185 +/- 0.0021. About 78% of the lymph and 91% of albumin transported by the thoracic duct originated from the abdominal and renal lymphatics. The ratio of albumin escape from the circulation versus lymphatic return was 2.36. From the first slopes of the lymphatic RISA activity curves the albumin escape rates were calculated and found to be 1.89 in the liver, 2.32 in the kidney, 0.69 in the intestine and 0.20 g h-1 kg-1 tissue weight in the leg (skin). The lymph vessels returned 17% of the escaped albumin, from the liver about 12% from the intestines and almost all from the kidneys. A very strong correlation (r = 0.996) was found between lymph to plasma albumin concentration ratios and the first slopes of the RISA equilibration curves, proving that protein concentration in the lymph is determined by the rate of protein escape from the capillaries and that the rates obtained from the first slopes of the RISA cpm/g albumin in lymph per RISA cpm/g albumin in plasma equilibration curves are a measure of capillary permeability to protein. PMID:7184306

  2. Ultra-Thin Optically Transparent Carbon Electrodes Produced from Layers of Adsorbed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alharthi, Sarah A.; Benavidez, Tomas E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a simple, versatile, and inexpensive procedure to prepare optically transparent carbon electrodes, using proteins as precursors. Upon adsorption, the protein-coated substrates were pyrolyzed under reductive conditions (5% H2) to form ultra-thin, conductive electrodes. Because proteins spontaneously adsorb to interfaces forming uniform layers, the proposed method does not require a precise control of the preparation conditions, specialized instrumentation, or expensive precursors. The resulting electrodes were characterized by a combination of electrochemical, optical, and spectroscopic means. As a proof-of-concept, the optically-transparent electrodes were also used as substrate for the development of an electrochemical glucose biosensor. The proposed films represent a convenient alternative to more sophisticated, and less available, carbon-based nanomaterials. Furthermore, these films could be formed on a variety of substrates, without classical limitations of size or shape. PMID:23421732

  3. Optical anisotropy of flagellin layers: in situ and label-free measurement of adsorbed protein orientation using OWLS.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Noemi; Patko, Daniel; Orgovan, Norbert; Kurunczi, Sandor; Ramsden, Jeremy J; Vonderviszt, Ferenc; Horvath, Robert

    2013-06-01

    The surface adsorption of the protein flagellin was followed in situ using optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS). Flagellin did not show significant adsorption on a hydrophilic waveguide, but very rapidly formed a dense monolayer on a hydrophobic (silanized) surface. The homogeneous and isotropic optical layer model, which has hitherto been generally applied in OWLS data interpretation for adsorbed protein films, failed to characterize the flagellin layer, but it could be successfully modeled as an uniaxial thin film. This anisotropic modeling revealed a significant positive birefringence in the layer, suggesting oriented protein adsorption. The adsorbed flagellin orientation was further evidenced by monitoring the surface adsorption of truncated flagellin variants, in which the terminal protein regions or the central (D3) domain were removed. Without the terminal regions the protein adsorption was much slower and the resulting films were significantly less birefringent, implying that intact flagellin adsorbs on the hydrophobic surface via its terminal regions. PMID:23631669

  4. Characterization of cross-linked cellulosic ion-exchange adsorbents: 2. Protein sorption and transport.

    PubMed

    Angelo, James M; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Gantier, Rene; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-03-18

    Adsorption behavior in the HyperCel family of cellulosic ion-exchange materials (Pall Corporation) was characterized using methods to assess, quantitatively and qualitatively, the dynamics of protein uptake as well as static adsorption as a function of ionic strength and protein concentration using several model proteins. The three exchangers studied all presented relatively high adsorptive capacities under low ionic strength conditions, comparable to commercially available resins containing polymer functionalization aimed at increasing that particular characteristic. The strong cation- and anion-exchange moieties showed higher sensitivity to increasing salt concentrations, but protein affinity on the salt-tolerant STAR AX HyperCel exchanger remained strong at ionic strengths normally used in downstream processing to elute material fully during ion-exchange chromatography. Very high uptake rates were observed in both batch kinetics experiments and time-series confocal laser scanning microscopy, suggesting low intraparticle transport resistances relative to external film resistance, even at higher bulk protein concentrations where the opposite is typically observed. Electron microscopy imaging of protein adsorbed phases provided additional insight into particle structure that could not be resolved in previous work on the bare resins. PMID:26905881

  5. Influence of fluoride-detergent combinations on the visco-elasticity of adsorbed salivary protein films.

    PubMed

    Veeregowda, Deepak H; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K

    2011-02-01

    The visco-elasticity of salivary-protein films is related to mouthfeel, lubrication, biofilm formation, and protection against erosion and is influenced by the adsorption of toothpaste components. The thickness and the visco-elasticity of hydrated films (determined using a quartz crystal microbalance) of 2-h-old in vitro-adsorbed salivary-protein films were 43.5 nm and 9.4 MHz, respectively, whereas the dehydrated thickness, measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, was 2.4 nm. Treatment with toothpaste slurries decreased the thickness of the film, depending on the fluoride-detergent combination involved. Secondary exposure to saliva resulted in a regained thickness of the film to a level similar to its original thickness; however, no association was found between the thickness of hydrated and dehydrated films, indicating differences in film structure. Treatment with stannous fluoride/sodium lauryl sulphate (SnF(2)/SLS)-containing toothpaste slurries yielded a strong, immediate two-fold increase in characteristic film frequency (f(c)) with respect to untreated films, indicating cross-linking in adsorbed salivary-protein films by Sn(2+) that was absent when SLS was replaced with sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP). Secondary exposure to saliva of films treated with SnF(2) caused a strong, six-fold increase in f(c) compared with primary salivary-protein films, regardless of whether SLS or NaHMP was the detergent. This suggests that ionized stannous is not directly available for cross-linking in combination with highly negatively charged NaHMP, but becomes slowly available after initial treatment to cause cross-linking during secondary exposure to saliva. PMID:21244507

  6. Protein adsorption to polyethylene glycol modified liposomes from fibrinogen solution and from plasma.

    PubMed

    Price, M E; Cornelius, R M; Brash, J L

    2001-06-01

    Unmodified and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified neutral and negatively charged liposomes were prepared by freeze-thaw and extrusion followed by chromatographic purification. The effects of PEG molecular weight (PEG 550, 2000, 5000), PEG loading (0-15 mol%), and liposome surface charge on fibrinogen adsorption were quantified using radiolabeling techniques. All adsorption isotherms increased monotonically over the concentration range 0-3 mg/ml and adsorption levels were low. Negatively charged liposomes adsorbed significantly more fibrinogen than neutral liposomes. PEG modification had no effect on fibrinogen adsorption to neutral liposomes. An inverse relationship was found between PEG loading of negatively charged liposomes and fibrinogen adsorption. PEGs of all three molecular weights at a loading of 5 mol% reduced fibrinogen adsorption to negatively charged liposomes. Protein adsorption from diluted plasma (10% normal strength) to four different liposome types (neutral, PEG-neutral, negatively charged, and PEG-negatively charged) was investigated using gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. The profiles of adsorbed proteins were similar on all four liposome types, but distinctly different from the profile of plasma itself, indicating a partitioning effect of the lipid surfaces. alpha2-macroglobulin and fibronectin were significantly enriched on the liposomes whereas albumin, transferrin, and fibrinogen were depleted compared to plasma. Apolipoprotein AI was a major component of the adsorbed protein layers. The blot of complement protein C3 adsorbed on the liposomes suggested that the complement system was activated. PMID:11406096

  7. Dry powder pulmonary delivery of cationic PGA-co-PDL nanoparticles with surface adsorbed model protein.

    PubMed

    Kunda, Nitesh K; Alfagih, Iman M; Dennison, Sarah R; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Merchant, Zahra; Hutcheon, Gillian A; Saleem, Imran Y

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary delivery of macromolecules has been the focus of attention as an alternate route of delivery with benefits such as; large surface area, thin alveolar epithelium, rapid absorption and extensive vasculature. In this study, a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was adsorbed onto cationic PGA-co-PDL polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by a single emulsion solvent evaporation method using a cationic surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) at 2% w/w (particle size: 128.64±06.01 nm and zeta-potential: +42.32±02.70 mV). The optimum cationic NPs were then surface adsorbed with BSA, NP:BSA (100:4) ratio yielded 10.01±1.19 μg of BSA per mg of NPs. The BSA adsorbed NPs (5 mg/ml) were then spray-dried in an aqueous suspension of L-leucine (7.5 mg/ml, corresponding to a ratio of 1:1.5/NP:L-leu) using a Büchi-290 mini-spray dryer to produce nanocomposite microparticles (NCMPs) containing cationic NPs. The aerosol properties showed a fine particle fraction (FPF, dae<4.46 μm) of 70.67±4.07% and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 2.80±0.21 μm suggesting a deposition in the respiratory bronchiolar region of the lungs.The cell viability was 75.76±03.55% (A549 cell line) at 156.25 μg/ml concentration after 24 h exposure. SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism (CD) confirmed that the primary and secondary structure of the released BSA was maintained. Moreover, the released BSA showed 78.76±1.54% relative esterolytic activity compared to standard BSA. PMID:26169146

  8. Targeted Mutagenesis and Combinatorial Library Screening Enables Control of Protein Orientation on Surfaces and Increased Activity of Adsorbed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Teran, Carlos A; Carlin, Kevin B; Efimenko, Kirill; Genzer, Jan; Rao, Balaji M

    2016-08-30

    While nonspecific adsorption is widely used for immobilizing proteins on solid surfaces, the random nature of protein adsorption may reduce the activity of immobilized proteins due to occlusion of the active site. We hypothesized that the orientation a protein assumes on a given surface can be controlled by systematically introducing mutations into a region distant from its active site, thereby retaining activity of the immobilized protein. To test this hypothesis, we generated a combinatorial protein library by randomizing six targeted residues in a binding protein derived from highly stable, nonimmunoglobulin Sso7d scaffold; mutations were targeted in a region that is distant from the binding site. This library was screened to isolate binders that retain binding to its cognate target (chicken immunoglobulin Y, cIgY) as well as exhibit adsorption on unmodified silica at pH 7.4 and high ionic strength conditions. A single mutant, Sso7d-2B5, was selected for further characterization. Sso7d-2B5 retained binding to cIgY with an apparent dissociation constant similar to that of the parent protein; both mutant and parent proteins saturated the surface of silica with similar densities. Strikingly, however, silica beads coated with Sso7d-2B5 could achieve up to 7-fold higher capture of cIgY than beads coated with the parent protein. These results strongly suggest that mutations introduced in Sso7d-2B5 alter its orientation relative to the parent protein, when adsorbed on silica surfaces. Our approach also provides a generalizable strategy for introducing mutations in proteins so as to improve their activity upon immobilization, and has direct relevance to development of protein-based biosensors and biocatalysts. PMID:27490089

  9. Inhibition of Lipid Oxidation in Oil-in-Water Emulsions by Interface-Adsorbed Myofibrillar Protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiayi; Xiong, Youling L

    2015-10-14

    This study investigated the role of interfacial myofibrillar protein (MFP) in the oxidative stabilization of meat emulsions. Emulsions with 10% oil were prepared using either 2% (w/v) Tween 20 or 0.25, 0.5, and 1% (w/v) MFP and then subjected to hydroxyl radical oxidation at 4 °C for 0, 2, and 24 h. MFP was more readily oxidized (intrinsic fluorescence quenching, sulfur losses, and carbonyl formation) than oil [conjugated dienes and 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS)]. However, oxidized MFP in the continuous phase stimulated lipid oxidation after 24 h, sharply contrasting with interface-adsorbed MFP that inhibited TBARS formation nearly 90% (p < 0.05). Interfacial MFP from 2 h oxidized samples exhibited greater losses of fluorescence and more extensive polymerization of myosin (detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) than MFP present in the continuous phase. Results indicated that, due to the physical localization, interface-adsorbed MFP in general and myosin in particular provided accentuated protection of emulsions against oxidation. PMID:26414649

  10. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution. PMID:18715021

  11. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Surfactants and Denaturants to Elute and Denature Adsorbed Protein on Different Surface Chemistries.

    PubMed

    Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    The elution and/or denaturation of proteins from material surfaces by chemical excipients such as surfactants and denaturants is important for numerous applications including medical implant reprocessing, bioanalyses, and biodefense. The objective of this study was to develop and apply methods to quantitatively assess how surface chemistry and adsorption conditions influence the effectiveness of three commonly used surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate, n-octyl-β-d-glucoside, and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate) and two denaturants (guanidium hydrochloride and urea) to elute protein (hen egg white lysozyme and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A) from three different surface chemistries (silica glass, poly(methyl methacrylate), and high-density polyethylene). The structure and bioactivity of residual protein on the surface following elution were characterized using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and enzyme assays to assess the extent of protein denaturation. Our results indicate that the denaturants were generally more effective than the surfactants in removing the adsorbed proteins from each type of surface. Also, the denaturing capacity of these excipients on the residual proteins on the surfaces was distinctly different from their influence on the proteins in solution and was unique for each of the adsorption conditions. Taken altogether, these results reveal that the effectiveness of surfactants and denaturants to elute and denature adsorbed protein is significantly influenced by surface chemistry and the conditions from which the protein was adsorbed. These results provide a basis for the selection, design, and further development of chemical agents for protein elution and surface decontamination. PMID:26449787

  12. Protein Homeostasis at the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) and endocytic protein quality control (QC) in conjunction with the endosomal sorting machinery either repairs or targets conformationally damaged membrane proteins for lysosomal/vacuolar degradation. Here, we provide an overview of emerging aspects of the underlying mechanisms of PM QC that fulfill a critical role in preserving cellular protein homeostasis in health and diseases. PMID:24985330

  13. Investigation of the adsorption of blood plasma proteins by activated carbon fiber material

    SciTech Connect

    Eretskaya, E.V.; Nikolaev, V.G.; Sergeev, V.P.; Stefanov, A.V.; Vovyanko, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the adsorption of fibrinogen, albumin, and gamma globulin by carbon fibrous materials by physical immobilization of protein ligands on their surface. The adsorption of proteins from model solutions under standard conditions was studied by an indirect method according to the decrease in the concentration of the adsorbate in solution, determining the protein content. The adsorption of the same proteins from the plasma and their desorption from activated carbon fibrous materials were estimated by a direct radiometric method using /sup 125/I-labeled proteins.

  14. Redox regulation of protein damage in plasma.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Helen R; Dias, Irundika H K; Willetts, Rachel S; Devitt, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The presence and concentrations of modified proteins circulating in plasma depend on rates of protein synthesis, modification and clearance. In early studies, the proteins most frequently analysed for damage were those which were more abundant in plasma (e.g. albumin and immunoglobulins) which exist at up to 10 orders of magnitude higher concentrations than other plasma proteins e.g. cytokines. However, advances in analytical techniques using mass spectrometry and immuno-affinity purification methods, have facilitated analysis of less abundant, modified proteins and the nature of modifications at specific sites is now being characterised. The damaging reactive species that cause protein modifications in plasma principally arise from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidases (NOX), nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and oxygenase activities; reactive nitrogen species (RNS) from myeloperoxidase (MPO) and NOS activities; and hypochlorous acid from MPO. Secondary damage to proteins may be caused by oxidized lipids and glucose autooxidation. In this review, we focus on redox regulatory control of those enzymes and processes which control protein maturation during synthesis, produce reactive species, repair and remove damaged plasma proteins. We have highlighted the potential for alterations in the extracellular redox compartment to regulate intracellular redox state and, conversely, for intracellular oxidative stress to alter the cellular secretome and composition of extracellular vesicles. Through secreted, redox-active regulatory molecules, changes in redox state may be transmitted to distant sites. PMID:24624332

  15. Multi-technique Characterization of Adsorbed Peptide and Protein Orientation: LK310 and Protein G B1

    SciTech Connect

    Baio, J.; Weidner, T; Samuel, N; McCrea, K; Baugh, L; Stayton, P; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The ability to orient biologically active proteins on surfaces is a major challenge in the design, construction, and successful deployment of many medical technologies. As methods to orient biomolecules are developed, it is also essential to develop techniques that can accurately determine the orientation and structure of these materials. In this study, two model protein and peptide systems are presented to highlight the strengths of three surface analysis techniques for characterizing protein films: time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. First, the orientation of Protein G B1, a rigid 6 kDa domain covalently attached to a maleimide-functionalized self-assembled monolayer, was examined using ToF-SIMS. Although the thickness of the Protein G layer was similar to the ToF-SIMS sampling depth, orientation of Protein G was successfully determined by analyzing the C{sub 2}H{sub 5}S{sup +} intensity, a secondary-ion derived from a methionine residue located at one end of the protein. Next, the secondary structure of a 13-mer leucine-lysine peptide (LK{sub 310}) adsorbed onto hydrophilic quartz and hydrophobic fluorocarbon surfaces was examined. SFG spectra indicated that the peptide's lysine side chains were ordered on the quartz surface, while the peptide's leucine side chains were ordered on the fluorocarbon surface. NEXAFS results provided complementary information about the structure of the LK{sub 310} film and the orientations of amide bonds within the LK{sub 310} peptide.

  16. Isolation and Characterization Of Chimeric Human Fc-expressing Proteins Using Protein A Membrane Adsorbers And A Streamlined Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, Monica M.; Reynolds, Nathan M.; Martin, Eric W.; Hawes, Jacquelyn V.; Carlson, Grady E.; Cuckler, Chaz M.; Bates, Michael C.; Barthel, Steven R.; Dimitroff, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory scale to industrial scale purification of biomolecules from cell culture supernatants and lysed cell solutions can be accomplished using affinity chromatography. While affinity chromatography using porous protein A agarose beads packed in columns is arguably the most common method of laboratory scale isolation of antibodies and recombinant proteins expressing Fc fragments of IgG, it can be a time consuming and expensive process. Time and financial constraints are especially daunting in small basic science labs that must recover hundreds of micrograms to milligram quantities of protein from dilute solutions, yet lack access to high pressure liquid delivery systems and/or personnel with expertise in bioseparations. Moreover, product quantification and characterization may also excessively lengthen processing time over several workdays and inflate expenses (consumables, wages, etc.). Therefore, a fast, inexpensive, yet effective protocol is needed for laboratory scale isolation and characterization of antibodies and other proteins possessing an Fc fragment. To this end, we have devised a protocol that can be completed by limited-experience technical staff in less than 9 hr (roughly one workday) and as quickly as 4 hr, as opposed to traditional methods that demand 20+ work hours. Most required equipment is readily available in standard biomedical science, biochemistry, and (bio)chemical engineering labs, and all reagents are commercially available. To demonstrate this protocol, representative results are presented in which chimeric murine galectin-1 fused to human Fc (Gal-1hFc) from cell culture supernatant was isolated using a protein A membrane adsorber. Purified Gal-1hFc was quantified using an expedited Western blotting analysis procedure and characterized using flow cytometry. The streamlined workflow can be modified for other Fc-expressing proteins, such as antibodies, and/or altered to incorporate alternative quantification and characterization

  17. Recombination of chlorine atoms on plasma-conditioned stainless steel surfaces in the presence of adsorbed Cl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Luc; Khare, Rohit; Guha, Joydeep; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Poirier, Jean-Sébastien; Margot, Joëlle

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the interactions of atomic and molecular chlorine with plasma-conditioned stainless steel surfaces through both experiments and modelling. The recombination of Cl during adsorption and desorption of Cl2 was characterized using a rotating-substrate technique in which portions of the cylindrical substrate surface are periodically exposed to an inductively coupled chlorine plasma and then to an Auger electron spectrometer in separate, differentially pumped chambers. After several hours of exposure to the Cl2 plasma, the stainless steel substrate became coated with a Si-oxychloride-based layer (Fe : Si : O : Cl ≈ 1 : 13 : 13 : 3) due to chlorine adsorption and the erosion of the silica discharge tube. Desorption of Cl2 from this surface was monitored through measurements of pressure rises in the Auger chamber as a function of substrate rotation frequency. Significant adsorption and desorption of Cl2 was observed with the plasma off, similar to that observed previously on plasma-conditioned anodized aluminium surfaces, but with much faster desorption rates that are most likely attributable to the smoother and non-porous stainless steel surface morphology. When the plasma was turned on, a much larger pressure rise was observed due to Langmuir-Hinshelwood recombination of Cl atoms. Recombination coefficients, γCl, ranged from 0.004 to 0.03 and increased with Cl-to-Cl2 number density ratio. This behaviour was observed previously for anodized aluminium surfaces, and was explained by the blocking of Cl recombination sites by adsorbed Cl2. Application of this variable recombination coefficient to the modelling of high-density chlorine plasmas gives a much better agreement with measured Cl2 percent dissociations compared with predictions obtained with a recombination coefficient that is independent of plasma conditions.

  18. Preparation of new amphiphilic macroporous nonwoven polymeric adsorbents aimed for selective removal of low-density lipoprotein from plasma.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaodong; Zhang, Tao; Cao, Amin

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, new amphiphilic macroporous polymeric adsorbent (AMPA) membranes for LDL-apheresis were prepared by (60)Co γ-ray irradiation-induced grafting copolymerization of polypropylene (PP) nonwoven fabric with acrylic acid, followed by bonding cholesterol through linkers of different length. The new AMPA membranes were characterized by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and contact angle microscopy. Static adsorption and hemo-perfusion tests show these new adsorbents could efficiently remove LDL from human plasma. Meanwhile, the AMPA displayed good adsorption capacity for triglyceride (TG) as well. The static adsorption performance of the AMPA membranes depends on the length of linker. In addition, a balance between the amount of bonded cholesterol and remaining carboxyl group was found necessary to reach the optimal adsorption performance. The best result was achieved by the AMPA membrane PA15C6-3, by which 62.8 ± 3.8 μg of LDL-C, 16.5 ± 0.71 μg of HDL-C, 132.4 ± 3.0 μg of TG are removed from human plasma per square centimeter. PMID:24764047

  19. Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Helen C.; Richardson, Patricia R.; Campbell, Gaynor A.; Kovalev, Valeri I.; Maier, Robert; Barton, James S.; Jones, Anita C.; De Large, Greg; Casey, Mark; Baxter, Robert L.

    2009-11-01

    The development of methods for measuring the efficiency of gas-plasma decontamination has lagged far behind application. An approach to measuring the efficiency of protein removal from solid surfaces using fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin and epifluorescence scanning (EFSCAN) is described. A method for fluorescently labelling proteins, which are adsorbed and denatured on metal surfaces, has been developed. Both approaches have been used to evaluate the efficiency of radio frequency (RF) gas-plasma decontamination protocols. Examples with 'real' surgical instruments demonstrate that an argon-oxygen RF gas-plasma treatment can routinely reduce the protein load by about three orders of magnitude beyond that achieved by current decontamination methods.

  20. A novel adsorbent for protein chromatography: supermacroporous monolithic cryogel embedded with Cu2+-attached sporopollenin particles.

    PubMed

    Erzengin, Mahmut; Ünlü, Nuri; Odabaşı, Mehmet

    2011-01-21

    The aim of this study is to prepare supermacroporous cryogels embedded with Cu(2+)-attached sporopollenin particles (Cu(2+)-ASP) having large surface area for high protein adsorption capacity. Supermacroporous poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA)-based monolithic cryogel column embedded with Cu(2+)-ASP was prepared by radical cryo-copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBAAm) as cross-linker directly in a plastic syringe for affinity purification of human serum albumin (HSA). Firstly, Cu(2+) ions were attached to sporopollenin particles (SP), then the supermacroporous PHEMA cryogel with embedded Cu(2+)-ASP was produced by free radical polymerization using N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator/activator pair in an ice bath. Embedded particles (10 mg) in PHEMA-based cryogel column were used in the adsorption/desorption of HSA from aqueous solutions. Optimum conditions of adsorption experiments were performed at pH 8.0 phosphate buffer, with flow rate of 0.5 mL/min, and at 5°C. The maximum amount of HSA adsorption from aqueous solution was very high (677.4 mg/g SP) with initial concentration 6 mg/mL. It was observed that HSA could be repeatedly adsorbed and desorbed to the embedded Cu(2+)-ASP in PHEMA cryogel without significant loss of adsorption capacity. PMID:21176840

  1. Analysis of rat plasma proteins desorbed from gold and methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated alkane thiols on gold surfaces.

    PubMed

    Källtorp, M; Carlén, A; Thomsen, P; Olsson, J; Tengvall, P

    2000-03-01

    It is believed that adsorbed blood or plasma components, such as water, peptides, carbohydrates and proteins, determine key events in the concomitant inflammatory tissue response close to implants. The aim of the present study was to develop a procedure for the collection and analysis of minor amounts of proteins bound to solid metal implant surfaces. The combination of a sodium dodecyl sulfate washing method coupled with a polyacylamide gel electrophoretic protein separation technique (SDS-PAGE), Western blot and image analysis enabled the desorption, identification and semiquantification of specific proteins. The analyzed proteins were albumin, immunoglobulin G, fibrinogen and fibronectin. Concentration procedures of proteins were not required with this method despite the small area of the test surfaces. The plasma proteins were adsorbed to pure gold and hydroxylated and methylated gold surfaces, which elicit different tissue responses in vivo and plasma protein adsorption patterns in vitro. The image analysis revealed that the pure gold surfaces adsorbed the largest amount of total and specific proteins. This is in accordance with previous ellipsometry/antibody experiments in vitro. Further, the principles described for the protein analysis can be applied on implant surfaces ex vivo. PMID:15348048

  2. In vitro studies of PBT Nonwoven Fabrics adsorbent for the removal of low density lipoprotein from hyperlipemia plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Hong; Yang, Chao; Zhong, Rui; Lei, Yu; Sun, Kang; Liu, Jiaxin

    2011-06-01

    Polyanion ligands such as acrylic acid (AA) and heparin were grafted on PBT Nonwoven Fabrics (PBTNF) to study their effect on the adsorption of low density lipoprotein (LDL). These modified PBTNFs were characterized by Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy. The blood compatibilities of the modified PBTNFs were examined using in vitro hemolysis rate (HR), platelet adhesion, total protein (TP) and activated partial thromboplastin time. The results showed that direct immobilized heparin could improve PBTNF-PAA's blood compatibility and decrease the adsorption capability of useful high density lipoprotein, but would possess so low bioactivity that could not further improve the absorption of LDL and TC. Since the PBTNF-PAA55-Heparin adsorbent had quite good adsorption selectivity for these proteins, it can be an excellent candidate for depletion of LDL with good blood compatibility.

  3. Adsorbability of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoromethane (HFC134a) onto plasma-treated activated carbon in CF{sub 4} and CCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, Seiki; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Ohue, Takashi; Abe, Ikuo

    1997-07-15

    The adsorbability of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC134a), which has been the CFC12 replacement, onto tetrafluoromethane and tetrachloromethane plasma-treated activated carbon (FT-ACs and CT-ACs) was investigated. It is proved that the fluorine and the chlorine, which were produced by plasma treatment, were included into the pores having radii greater than 7.5 {angstrom} and with less than 7.5 {angstrom} by plasma treatment, respectively. The adsorption site of HFC134a onto activated carbon may change with the quantities of fluorine or chlorine on the surface of the activated carbon. The amount of HFC134a adsorbed per unit specific surface area of FT-ACs and CT-ACs slightly increased a little compared to the untreated activated carbon (U-AC). The amount of fluoride ion eluted before the adsorption of HFC134a from the FT-ACs increased with the increasing plasma treatment time. That after the adsorption of HFC134a from only the activated carbon with the shortest plasma treatment time decreased. The amount of chloride ion eluted before the adsorption of HFC134a from the CT-ACs increased after 15 min of plasma treatment, but decreased with 30 min of plasma treatment. The chloride ion amount from the CT-ACs decreased after the adsorption of HCF134a. These results could be explained by the Langmuir constants a and Ws, which represent the adsorption equilibrium constant and the saturated amount of HFC134a adsorbed, respectively. The ratio of fluorine and chlorine species, the adsorption type, the layer interstitial type, and the covalent type, is different based on the plasma treatment time. It is concluded that the amount of HFC134a adsorbed onto the FT-ACs and CT-ACs did not depend upon the change of pore structure by the fluorine and chlorine.

  4. Age-Related Differences in Plasma Proteins: How Plasma Proteins Change from Neonates to Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ignjatovic, Vera; Lai, Cera; Summerhayes, Robyn; Mathesius, Ulrike; Tawfilis, Sherif; Perugini, Matthew A.; Monagle, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of major diseases such as cardiovascular disease, thrombosis and cancer increases with age and is the major cause of mortality world-wide, with neonates and children somehow protected from such diseases of ageing. We hypothesized that there are major developmental differences in plasma proteins and that these contribute to age-related changes in the incidence of major diseases. We evaluated the human plasma proteome in healthy neonates, children and adults using the 2D-DIGE approach. We demonstrate significant changes in number and abundance of up to 100 protein spots that have marked differences in during the transition of the plasma proteome from neonate and child through to adult. These proteins are known to be involved in numerous physiological processes such as iron transport and homeostasis, immune response, haemostasis and apoptosis, amongst others. Importantly, we determined that the proteins that are differentially expressed with age are not the same proteins that are differentially expressed with gender and that the degree of phosphorylation of plasma proteins also changes with age. Given the multi-functionality of these proteins in human physiology, understanding the differences in the plasma proteome in neonates and children compared to adults will make a major contribution to our understanding of developmental biology in humans. PMID:21365000

  5. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  6. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  7. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  8. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  9. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  10. Identification of PDC-109-like protein(s) in buffalo seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Harshan, Hiron M; Sankar, Surya; Singh, L P; Singh, Manish Kumar; Sudharani, S; Ansari, M R; Singh, S K; Majumdar, A C; Joshi, P

    2009-10-01

    The FN-2 family of seminal plasma proteins represents the major protein fraction of bovine seminal plasma. These proteins also constitute the major seminal plasma proteins fraction in horse, goat and bison seminal plasma and are present in pig, rat, mouse, hamster and human seminal plasma. BSP-A1 and BSP-A2, the predominant proteins of the FN-2 family, are collectively termed as PDC-109. Fn-2 proteins play an important role in fertilization, including sperm capacitation and formation of oviductal sperm reservoirs. Significantly, BSP proteins were also shown to have negative effects in the context of sperm storage. No conclusive evidence for the presence of buffalo seminal plasma protein(s) similar to PDC-109 exists. Studies with buffalo seminal plasma indicated that isolation and identification of PDC-109-like protein(s) from buffalo seminal plasma by conventional methods might be difficult. Thus, antibodies raised against PDC-109 isolated, and purified from cattle seminal plasma, were used for investigating the presence of PDC-109-like protein(s) in buffalo seminal plasma. Buffalo seminal plasma proteins were resolved on SDS-PAGE, blotted to nitro cellulose membranes and probed for the presence of PDC-109-like protein(s) using the PDC-109 antisera raised in rabbits. A distinct immunoreactive band well below the 20-kDa regions indicated the presence of PDC-109-like protein(s) in buffalo seminal plasma. PMID:19117702

  11. Human plasma protein N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Florent; Reiding, Karli R; Jansen, Bas C; Kammeijer, Guinevere S M; Bondt, Albert; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation is the most abundant and complex protein modification, and can have a profound structural and functional effect on the conjugate. The oligosaccharide fraction is recognized to be involved in multiple biological processes, and to affect proteins physical properties, and has consequentially been labeled a critical quality attribute of biopharmaceuticals. Additionally, due to recent advances in analytical methods and analysis software, glycosylation is targeted in the search for disease biomarkers for early diagnosis and patient stratification. Biofluids such as saliva, serum or plasma are of great use in this regard, as they are easily accessible and can provide relevant glycosylation information. Thus, as the assessment of protein glycosylation is becoming a major element in clinical and biopharmaceutical research, this review aims to convey the current state of knowledge on the N-glycosylation of the major plasma glycoproteins alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, antithrombin-III, apolipoprotein B-100, apolipoprotein D, apolipoprotein F, beta-2-glycoprotein 1, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, immunoglobulin (Ig) A, IgG, IgM, haptoglobin, hemopexin, histidine-rich glycoprotein, kininogen-1, serotransferrin, vitronectin, and zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein. In addition, the less abundant immunoglobulins D and E are included because of their major relevance in immunology and biopharmaceutical research. Where available, the glycosylation is described in a site-specific manner. In the discussion, we put the glycosylation of individual proteins into perspective and speculate how the individual proteins may contribute to a total plasma N-glycosylation profile determined at the released glycan level. PMID:26555091

  12. Synthesis of adsorbents with dendronic structures for protein hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Marco A; Yaman, Sena; Valencia-Gallegos, Jesus A; Tari, Canan; Rito-Palomares, Marco; González-Valdez, José

    2016-04-22

    Here, we introduced a new technology based on the incorporation of dendrons-branched chemical structures-onto supports for synthesis of HIC adsorbents. In doing so we studied the synthesis and performance of these novel HIC dendron-based adsorbents. The adsorbents were synthesized in a facile two-step reaction. First, Sepharose 4FF (R) was chemically modified with polyester dendrons of different branching degrees i.e. third (G3) or fifth (G5) generations. Then, butyl-end valeric acid ligands were coupled to dendrons via ester bond formation. UV-vis spectrophotometry and FTIR analyses of the modified resins confirmed the presence of the dendrons and their ligands on them. Inclusion of dendrons allowed the increment of ligand density, 82.5 ± 11 and 175.6 ± 5.7 μmol ligand/mL resin for RG3 and RG5, respectively. Static adsorption capacity of modified resins was found to be ∼ 60 mg BSA/mL resin. Interestingly, dynamic binding capacity was higher at high flow rates, 62.5 ± 0.8 and 58.0 ± 0.5mg/mL for RG3 and RG5, respectively. RG3 was able to separate lipase, β-lactoglobulin and α-chymotrypsin selectively as well as fractionating of a whole proteome from yeast. This innovative technology will improve the existing HIC resin synthesis methods. It will also allow the reduction of the amount of adsorbent used in a chromatographic procedure and thus permit the use of smaller columns resulting in faster processes. Furthermore, this method could potentially be considered as a green technology since both, dendrons and ligands, are formed by ester bonds that are more biodegradable allowing the disposal of used resin waste in a more ecofriendly manner when compared to other exiting resins. PMID:27018188

  13. Elevated nonspecific plasma proteins in allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Niess, J H; Bär, C; Zwacka, G; Markert, U R

    2003-01-01

    Several allergen-specific plasma proteins, such as IgE and IgG subclasses, are commonly used for the evaluation of grade of allergy. In the present investigation, we compared the concentration of various nonspecific plasma proteins, mostly known as inflammation markers, in an allergic and a healthy population. Plasma from 130 children with single inhalation allergies to grass pollen, birch pollen, or house dust mites as well as from 42 healthy children was obtained during the symptom-free period. Patients showed symptoms including allergic rhinitis, dermatitis, and asthma with one single radioallergosorbent test (RAST) class 3 or higher. Plasma concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1(sICAM-1), soluble interleukin-2 receptor(sIL-2R), sE-selectin, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (1sVCAM-1) were analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Concentrations of sICAM-1 and sE-selectin were significantly increased in all patients compared to controls. In the single allergen groups, sICAM-1 elevation was significant in the grass and mite groups, but not in the birch group; while sE-selection increase was significant in the birch and mite groups, but not in the grass group. The elevation of sIL-2R in the allergic patients was obvious in each single allergen group, but not significant. No difference was observed in sVCAM-1 expression. In two groups of patients with mean age of 9.5 years versus 17.5 years, the analyzed parameters were not age dependent. The increased proteins may be useful as additional markers for efficacy and follow-up investigations of allergy therapies. PMID:12861853

  14. Experience of Treatments of Amanita phalloides-Induced Fulminant Liver Failure with Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System and Therapeutic Plasma Exchange.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jicheng; Zhang, Ying; Peng, Zhiyong; Maberry, Donald; Feng, Xueqiang; Bian, Pengfei; Ma, Wenjuan; Wang, Chunting; Qin, Chengyong

    2014-01-01

    Ingestion of the mushroom containing Amanita phalloides can induce fulminant liver failure and death. There are no specific antidotes. Blood purifications, such as molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) and therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), are potential therapies. However, the extent to which these technologies avert the deleterious effects of amatoxins remains controversial; the optimal intensity, duration, and initiation criteria have not been determined yet. This study aimed to retrospectively observe the effects of MARS and TPE on nine patients with A. phalloides-induced fulminant liver failure. The survival rate for the nine patients was 66.7%. Both TPE and MARS might remove toxins and improve liver functions. However, a single session of TPE produced immediately greater improvements in alanine aminotransferase (-60% vs. -16.3%), aspartate aminotransferase (-47.6% vs. -15.4%), and total bilirubin (-37.3% vs. -17.1%) (compared with the values of pretreatment, all p < 0.05) than MARS compared with MARS. Early intervention may be more effective than delayed therapy. Additionally, the presence of severe liver failure and renal failure indicated worse outcome. Although these findings are promising, additional case-controlled, randomized studies are required to confirm our results. PMID:24727538

  15. Analysis of Chemical Reactions between Radical Growth Precursors Adsorbed on Plasma-Deposited Silicon Thin-Film Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Tamas; Valipa, Mayur; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2006-03-01

    The dominant precursor in the plasma deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films is the SiH3 radical. In this presentation, we report results of first-principles density functional theory calculations on the crystalline Si(001)-(2x1):H surface and molecular-dynamics simulations on a-Si:H surfaces for the interactions between SiH3 radicals adsorbed on Si thin-film surfaces. The analysis reveals that two SiH3 radicals may either form disilane (Si2H6) that desorbs from the surface or undergo a disproportionation reaction producing an SiH2 radical that is incorporated in the film and a silane molecule that is released in the gas phase. The corresponding activation barriers depend on the local atomic coordination of the surface Si atoms; Si2H6 formation is barrierless if both radicals are bonded to overcoordinated surface Si atoms and exhibits barriers in excess of 1 eV for two chemisorbed SiH3 radicals.

  16. Fabrication of a biomimetic adsorbent imprinted with a common specificity determinant for the removal of α- and β-amanitin from plasma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; He, Rong; Li, Yongxian; Liang, Yong; Li, He; Tang, Youwen

    2016-08-12

    α-Amanitin and β-amanitin are the main toxins of mushroom poisoning. The application of traditional non-selective adsorbents is not satisfactory in clinical treatment of amanita mushroom poisoning due to lack of specificity adsorption capability of these adsorbents toward amanitin toxins. In the current work, we introduce a novel molecularly imprinted biomimetic adsorbent based on a ligand specificity determinant through surface imprinted strategy. Owing to the expensive price of the amanitin sources, we selected a typical common moiety of α, β-amanitin as specificity determinant to synthesize a template necessary for the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). Computer simulation was used to initially select acidic methacrylic acid (MAA) and basic 4-vinyl pyridine (4-VP) together as functional monomers. The experiments further demonstrated that the synergistic interaction of MAA and 4-VP played a primary role in the recognition of α, β-amanitin by MIPs. By means of batch and packed-bed column experiment and the hemocompatibility evaluation, the resultant biomimetic adsorbent has been proved to be capable of selectively removing α, β-amanitin and possess good hemocompatibility. This novel adsorbent has great potential to find application in human plasma purification. PMID:27394089

  17. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  18. Pluripotency transcription factor Sox2 is strongly adsorbed by heparin but requires a protein transduction domain for cell internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Albayrak, Cem; Yang, William C.; Swartz, James R.

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Both R9Sox2 and Sox2 bind heparin with comparable affinity. ► Both R9Sox2 and Sox2 bind to fibroblasts, but only R9Sox2 is internalized. ► Internalization efficiency of R9Sox2 is 0.3% of the administered protein. ► Heparan sulfate adsorption may be part of a mechanism for managing cell death. -- Abstract: The binding of protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated proteins to heparan sulfate is an important step in cellular internalization of macromolecules. Here, we studied the pluripotency transcription factor Sox2, with or without the nonaarginine (R9) PTD. Unexpectedly, we observed that Sox2 is strongly adsorbed by heparin and by the fibroblasts without the R9 PTD. However, only the R9Sox2 fusion protein is internalized by the cells. These results collectively show that binding to heparan sulfate is not sufficient for cellular uptake, thereby supporting a recent hypothesis that other proteins play a role in cell internalization of PTD-conjugated proteins.

  19. Preliminary study on the effects of ageing cold oxygen plasma treated PET/PP with respect to protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Bayon, Yves; Hunt, John A

    2012-08-01

    Surfaces of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polypropylene (PP) have been modified by oxygen plasma. The surface hydrophilicity and changes in topography during up to 90 days storage in water and in dry air in a desiccator were analysed by dynamic contact angle test and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Clear ageing effects on the plasma treated surface were observed as increases in contact angle and changes in roughness as functions of increasing storage time. However, the effect of oxygen plasma treatment to increase the hydrophilicity of surface was still evident on the treated surfaces even after 90 days storage either in dry air or in water. In protein adsorption experiments, human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) were adsorbed on untreated and oxygen plasma treated PET and PP surfaces. The quantified ATR-FTIR results showed that both HSA and Fg adsorption on PET and PP surfaces decreased after oxygen plasma treatment, with the effect most evident for HSA. Although for both proteins adsorption increased with ageing, the amount of adsorbed proteins was still lower than untreated surface at 30 days. This suggests the shelf life of oxygen plasma treated samples could be as long as 30 days. PMID:22521680

  20. The 82-plex plasma protein signature that predicts increasing inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tepel, Martin; Beck, Hans C.; Tan, Qihua; Borst, Christoffer; Rasmussen, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to define the specific plasma protein signature that predicts the increase of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein from index day to next-day using proteome analysis and novel bioinformatics tools. We performed a prospective study of 91 incident kidney transplant recipients and quantified 359 plasma proteins simultaneously using nano-Liquid-Chromatography-Tandem Mass-Spectrometry in individual samples and plasma C-reactive protein on the index day and the next day. Next-day C-reactive protein increased in 59 patients whereas it decreased in 32 patients. The prediction model selected and validated 82 plasma proteins which determined increased next-day C-reactive protein (area under receiver-operator-characteristics curve, 0.772; 95% confidence interval, 0.669 to 0.876; P < 0.0001). Multivariable logistic regression showed that 82-plex protein signature (P < 0.001) was associated with observed increased next-day C-reactive protein. The 82-plex protein signature outperformed routine clinical procedures. The category-free net reclassification index improved with 82-plex plasma protein signature (total net reclassification index, 88.3%). Using the 82-plex plasma protein signature increased net reclassification index with a clinical meaningful 10% increase of risk mainly by the improvement of reclassification of subjects in the event group. An 82-plex plasma protein signature predicts an increase of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein. PMID:26445912

  1. Theory and applications of refractive index-based optical microscopy to measure protein mass transfer in spherical adsorbent particles.

    PubMed

    Bankston, Theresa E; Stone, Melani C; Carta, Giorgio

    2008-04-25

    This work provides the theoretical foundation and a range of practical application examples of a recently developed method to measure protein mass transfer in adsorbent particles using refractive index-based optical microscopy. A ray-theoretic approach is first used to predict the behavior of light traveling through a particle during transient protein adsorption. When the protein concentration gradient in the particle is sharp, resulting in a steep refractive index gradient, the rays bend and intersect, thereby concentrating light in a sharp ring that marks the position of the adsorption front. This behavior is observed when mass transfer is dominated by pore diffusion and the adsorption isotherm is highly favorable. Applications to protein cation-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and affinity adsorption are then considered using, as examples, the three commercial, agarose-based stationary phases SP-Sepharose-FF, Butyl Sepharose 4FF, and MabSelect. In all three cases, the method provides results that are consistent with measurements based on batch adsorption and previously published data confirming its utility for the determination of protein mass transfer kinetics under a broad range of practically relevant conditions. PMID:18353343

  2. Nanoporous Gyroid-Structured Epoxy from Block Copolymer Templates for High Protein Adsorbability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Bo; Lin, Tze-Chung; Hsueh, Han-Yu; Lin, Shih-Chieh; He, Xiao-Dong; Ho, Rong-Ming

    2016-06-28

    Nanoporous epoxy with gyroid texture is fabricated by using a nanoporous polymer with gyroid-forming nanochannels as a template for polymerization of epoxy. The nanoporous polymer template is obtained from the self-assembly of degradable block copolymer, polystyrene-b-poly(l-lactide) (PS-PLLA), followed by hydrolysis of PLLA blocks. Templated polymerization can be conducted under ambient conditions to create well-defined, bicontinuous epoxy networks in a PS matrix. By taking advantage of multistep curing of epoxy, well-ordered robust nanoporous epoxy can be obtained after removal of PS template, giving robust porous materials. The through-hole nanoporous epoxy in the film state can be used as a coated layer to enhance the adsorbability for both lysozyme and bovine serum albumin. PMID:27245380

  3. Nonspecific plasma proteins during sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Zwacka, G; Markert, U R

    2003-01-01

    Usually, specific allergy-related plasma proteins such as immunoglobulin E (IgE) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) are used for estimating the grade of sensitization and follow-up of immunotherapy. In recent years, several nonspecific inflammatory markers, such as sICAM-1 and sIL-2R, have been shown as being suitable for therapy control in allergy. In our investigation of patients under sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), plasma from 42 healthy controls and 133 children with single inhalation allergies to grass pollen, birch pollen or house dust mites was obtained during the symptom-free period. Patients showed symptoms including allergic rhinitis, dermatitis and allergic asthma with one single RAST class 3 or higher. Plasma concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), sE-selectin, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and specific IgG4 were analyzed with the ELISA technique. After 1 year of SLIT, concentrations of sICAM-1, sIL-2R and sE-selectin declined significantly when results from all patients were taken as one group. Regarding the single allergen groups, the sICAM-1 and sIL-2R decrease was significant in the grass and mite group, but not in the birch group, while the sE-selectin decline was only significant in the birch group after 1 year of SLIT, but not in the grass and the mite group. No difference was observed in IL-12 and IgG4 expression. In two groups of controls with a mean age of 9.5 versus 17.5 years, the analyzed parameters were not age-dependent. The increased proteins may be useful as additional markers for the evaluation of immunological effects and follow-up investigations of allergy therapies. PMID:12947996

  4. High levels of plasma protein C in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pabinger-Fasching, I; Lechner, K; Niessner, H; Schmidt, P; Balzar, E; Mannhalter, C

    1985-02-18

    In patients with severe nephrotic syndrome determinations of plasma protein C: Ag levels (8 patients: 5 adults, 3 children) and protein C activity (3 out of 8 patients) revealed significantly elevated plasma protein C concentrations. Furthermore we observed a significant inverse correlation of protein C: Ag to AT III: Ag levels. No protein C: Ag could be detected in the urine of two patients studied. We conclude from our data, that changes of plasma protein C do not contribute to the high thrombotic tendency in nephrotic syndrome. PMID:3838827

  5. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Holinga IV, George Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  6. Elastic response of a protein monolayer adsorbed at decorated water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amarjeet; Konovalov, Oleg

    2015-05-01

    Under the in-plane isothermal compression the self-assembled protein monolayer expand in the direction perpendicular to the applied force as a function of applied compression. The structure finally buckle beyond a critical compression, which finally returns to the initial structure when the compression force was removed, behaving like an elastic body. We modelled the layer as homogeneous elastic medium and calculated elastic constants. Young's modulus of the protein layer is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the bulk lysozyme crystals. It is of fundamental significance to be able to predict the elastic properties of the proteins at air-water interface since protein remains in their natural environment unlike protein crystals.

  7. Porous ceramic/agarose composite adsorbents for fast protein liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haifeng; Jin, Xionghua; Wu, Puqiang; Zheng, Zhiyong

    2012-02-01

    Porous ceramic/agarose composite adsorbents were designed and prepared with silica ceramic beads and 4% agarose gel, and then functionalized with a special ligand carboxymethyl. A novel method was introduced to fabricating of the porous silica ceramic beads. The morphology of SEM shows a spherical shape and a porous structure of the ceramic beads. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis gives an average pore size of 287.5 Å, a BET surface area of 29.33 m²/g and a porosity of 41.8%, respectively. Additionally, X-ray diffraction pattern indicates that the amorphous silica has been transformed into two crystal phases of quartz and cristobalite, leading to a porous and rigid skeleton and ensuring the application of the composite beads at high flow velocities. Lysozyme of hen egg-white with the activity of 12,700 U/mg was purified by the composite ion-exchanger in one step and the recovery and purification factor reaches 95.2% and 7.9, respectively. PMID:22226554

  8. Competitive Adsorption of Plasma Proteins Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

    PubMed

    Felgueiras, Helena P; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Sommerfeld, Sven D; Brás, M Manuela; Migonney, Véronique; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that get adsorbed onto the surfaces of biomaterials immediately upon their implantation mediate the interactions between the material and the environment. This process, in which proteins in a complex mixture compete for adsorption sites on the surface, is determined by the physicochemical interactions at the interface. Competitive adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibronectin (Fn), and collagen type I (Col I), sequentially and from mixtures, was investigated so as to understand the performances of different surfaces used in biomedical applications. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation was used to monitor the adsorption of these proteins onto two materials used in functional bone replacement, a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and Ti6Al4V physisorbed with poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) [poly(NaSS)], and three controls, gold, poly(desaminotyrosyltyrosine ethyl ester carbonate) [poly(DTEc)], and polystyrene (PS). In experiments with individual proteins, the adsorption was the highest with Fn and Col I and the least with BSA. Also, protein adsorption was the highest on poly(NaSS) and Ti6Al4V and the least on poly(DTEc). In sequential adsorption experiments, protein exchange was observed in BSA + Fn, Fn + Col I, and BSA + Col I sequences but not in Fn + BSA and Col I + BSA because of the lower affinity of BSA to surfaces relative to Fn and Col I. Protein adsorption was the highest with Col I + Fn on hydrophobic surfaces. In experiments with protein mixtures, with BSA & Fn, Fn appears to be preferentially adsorbed; with Fn & Col I, both proteins were adsorbed, probably as multilayers; and with Col I & BSA, the total amount of protein was the highest, greater than that in sequential and individual adsorption of the two proteins, probably because of the formation of BSA and Col I complexes. Protein conformational changes induced by the adsorbing surfaces, protein-protein interactions, and affinities of proteins appear to be the important factors that

  9. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry of basic proteins using a new physically adsorbed polymer coating. Some applications in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Elvira, Carlos; González, Nieves; San Román, J; Barbas, Coral; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2004-07-01

    A new physically adsorbed capillary coating for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) of basic proteins is presented, which is easily obtained by flushing the capillary with a polymer aqueous solution for two min. This coating significantly reduces the electrostatic adsorption of a group of basic proteins (i.e., cytochrome c, lysozyme, and ribonuclease A) onto the capillary wall allowing their analysis by CE-MS. The coating protocol is compatible with electrospray inonization (ESI)-MS via the reproducible separation of the standard basic proteins (%RSD values (n = 5) < 1% for analysis time reproducibility and < 5% for peak heights, measured from the total ion electropherograms (TIEs) within the same day). The LODs determined using cytochrome c with total ion current and extracted ion current defection were 24.5 and 2.9 fmol, respectively. Using this new coating lysozymes from chicken and turkey egg white could be easily distinguished by CE-MS, demonstrating the usefulness of this method to differentiate animal species. Even after sterilization at 120 degrees C for 30 min, lysozyme could be detected, as well as in wines at concentrations much lower than the limit marked by the EC Commission Regulation. Adulteration of minced meat with 5% of egg-white could also be analysed by our CE-MS protocol. PMID:15237406

  10. Paramagnetic Nanoparticles Leave Their Mark on Nuclear Spins of Transiently Adsorbed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zanzoni, Serena; Pedroni, Marco; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Speghini, Adolfo; Assfalg, Michael

    2016-01-13

    The successful application of nanomaterials in biosciences necessitates an in-depth understanding of how they interface with biomolecules. Transient associations of proteins with nanoparticles (NPs) are accessible by solution NMR spectroscopy, albeit with some limitations. The incorporation of paramagnetic centers into NPs offers new opportunities to explore bio-nano interfaces. We propose NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement as a new tool to detect NP-binding surfaces on proteins with increased sensitivity, also extending the applicability of NMR investigations to heterogeneous biomolecular mixtures. The adsorption of ubiquitin on gadolinium-doped fluoride-based NPs produced residue-specific NMR line-broadening effects mapping to a contiguous area on the surface of the protein. Importantly, an identical paramagnetic fingerprint was observed in the presence of a competing protein-protein association equilibrium, exemplifying possible interactions taking place in crowded biological media. The interaction was further characterized using isothermal titration calorimetry and upconversion emission measurements. The data indicate that the used fluoride-based NPs are not biologically inert but rather are capable of biomolecular recognition. PMID:26683352

  11. Oxidative damage to human plasma proteins by ozone.

    PubMed

    Cross, C E; Reznick, A Z; Packer, L; Davis, P A; Suzuki, Y J; Halliwell, B

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of human plasma to ozone produces oxidative protein damage, measured as protein carbonyl formation. Isolated human albumin or creatine phosphokinase are oxidized much faster than are total proteins. Consideration must be given to proteins as targets of oxidative injury by ozone in vivo. PMID:1568641

  12. Effect of acidification and heating on the rheological properties of oil-water interfaces with adsorbed milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Mellema, M; Isenbart, J G

    2004-09-01

    The behavior of casein and whey proteins at the oil-water interface was studied using a dynamic drop tensiometer (DDT). The dilational modulus of the interface was measured for aqueous solutions of skim milk powder (SMP) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) with various additions (salt, calcium, lactose) and (order of) various processing steps. Acidification or heating was performed before or after creation of the interface. The elastic properties of oil-water interfaces with adsorbed milk proteins could partly determine the rate of partial coalescence and resulting product instability. For WPC, preacidification slows down the adsorption, but the modulus is not affected. This is probably because, although the whey proteins change conformation more slowly at the interface, still a homogeneous film is formed. If postacidification is applied, coarsening of the protein film leads to loss of interfacial rigidity. Preheating of the aqueous phase with WPC leads to denaturation and aggregation, but the aggregates formed are still surface active and give high moduli. If preheating of a WPC solution is followed by postacidification, the resulting modulus is high (approximately 60 mN/m). The oil-water interfacial properties of SMP are only minimally affected by preheating or by choice of powder (low, medium, or high heat). At low pH, however, aggregates are formed that are less surface active, and interfacial moduli are lower. If measurements are performed at high temperature (i.e., if postheating is applied), for both SMP and WPC systems, moduli became much lower (approximately 10 mN/m). This is probably because of accelerated rearrangements, leading to the formation of inhomogeneous film structures. PMID:15375034

  13. Clinical relevance of drug binding to plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Pallottini, Valentina; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Binding to plasma proteins highly influences drug efficacy, distribution, and disposition. Serum albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, is a monomeric multi-domain macromolecule that displays an extraordinary ligand binding capacity, providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds, such as fatty acids and most acidic drugs. α-1-Acid glycoprotein, the second main plasma protein, is a glycoprotein physiologically involved in the acute phase reaction and is the main carrier for basic and neutral drugs. High- and low-density lipoproteins play a limited role in drug binding and are natural drug delivery system only for few lipophilic drugs or lipid-based formulations. Several factors influence drug binding to plasma proteins, such as pathological conditions, concurrent administration of drugs, sex, and age. Any of these factors, in turn, influences drug efficacy and toxicity. Here, biochemical, biomedical, and biotechnological aspects of drug binding to plasma proteins are reviewed.

  14. Adsorption kinetics of plasma proteins on ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jansch, M; Stumpf, P; Graf, C; Rühl, E; Müller, R H

    2012-05-30

    In this study the kinetics of plasma protein adsorption onto ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles have been analyzed and compared to previously published kinetic studies on polystyrene particles (PS particles), oil-in-water nanoemulsions and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). SPIO and USPIO nanoparticles are commonly used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancers for tumor imaging as well as in drug delivery applications. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) has been used to determine the plasma protein adsorption onto the citrate/triethylene glycol-stabilized iron oxide surface. The results indicate that the existence of a Vroman effect, a displacement of previously adsorbed abundant proteins, such as albumin or fibrinogen, respectively, on USPIO particles has to be denied. Previously, identical findings have been reported for oil-in-water nanoemulsions. Furthermore, the protein adsorption kinetics differs dramatically from that of other solid drug delivery systems (PS, SLN). More relevant for the in vivo fate of long circulating particles is the protein corona after several minutes or even hours. Interestingly, the patterns received after an incubation time of 0.5 min to 240 min are found to be qualitatively and quantitatively similar. This leads to the assumption of a long-lived ("hard") protein corona around the iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:22342465

  15. Plasma and Plasma Protein Product Transfusion: A Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Al-Habsi, Khalid S; Golder, Mia; Walsh, Geraldine M; Sheffield, William P

    2015-07-01

    Plasma obtained via whole blood donation processing or via apheresis technology can either be transfused directly to patients or pooled and fractionated into plasma protein products that are concentrates of 1 or more purified plasma protein. The evidence base supporting clinical efficacy in most of the indications for which plasma is transfused is weak, whereas high-quality evidence supports the efficacy of plasma protein products in at least some of the clinical settings in which they are used. Transfusable plasma utilization remains composed in part of applications that fall outside of clinical practice guidelines. Plasma contains all of the soluble coagulation factors and is frequently transfused in efforts to restore or reinforce patient hemostasis. The biochemical complexities of coagulation have in recent years been rationalized in newer cell-based models that supplement the cascade hypothesis. Efforts to normalize widely used clinical hemostasis screening test values by plasma transfusion are thought to be misplaced, but superior rapid tests have been slow to emerge. The advent of non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants has brought new challenges to clinical laboratories in plasma testing and to clinicians needing to reverse non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants urgently. Current plasma-related controversies include prophylactic plasma transfusion before invasive procedures, plasma vs prothrombin complex concentrates for urgent warfarin reversal, and the utility of increased ratios of plasma to red blood cell units transfused in massive transfusion protocols. The first recombinant plasma protein products to reach the clinic were recombinant hemophilia treatment products, and these donor-free equivalents to factors VIII and IX are now being supplemented with novel products whose circulatory half-lives have been increased by chemical modification or genetic fusion. Achieving optimal plasma utilization is an ongoing challenge in the interconnected

  16. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  17. Comparative changes in plasma protein concentration, hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise, bedrest and + Gz acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of experiments which indicate that under conditions of a constant red cell volume the proportional changes in hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise are never equal. On the basis of direct measurements and calculated changes of plasma volume it is concluded that during maximal exercise there is a small loss of protein from the plasma. It is clear that changes in content of blood constituents can only be evaluated correctly after determination of changes in plasma volume.

  18. Relative Quantification of Several Plasma Proteins during Liver Transplantation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Parviainen, Ville; Joenväärä, Sakari; Tukiainen, Eija; Ilmakunnas, Minna; Isoniemi, Helena; Renkonen, Risto

    2011-01-01

    Plasma proteome is widely used in studying changes occurring in human body during disease or other disturbances. Immunological methods are commonly used in such studies. In recent years, mass spectrometry has gained popularity in high-throughput analysis of plasma proteins. In this study, we tested whether mass spectrometry and iTRAQ-based protein quantification might be used in proteomic analysis of human plasma during liver transplantation surgery to characterize changes in protein abundances occurring during early graft reperfusion. We sampled blood from systemic circulation as well as blood entering and exiting the liver. After immunodepletion of six high-abundant plasma proteins, trypsin digestion, iTRAQ labeling, and cation-exchange fractionation, the peptides were analyzed by reverse phase nano-LC-MS/MS. In total, 72 proteins were identified of which 31 could be quantified in all patient specimens collected. Of these 31 proteins, ten, mostly medium-to-high abundance plasma proteins with a concentration range of 50–2000 mg/L, displayed relative abundance change of more than 10%. The changes in protein abundance observed in this study allow further research on the role of several proteins in ischemia-reperfusion injury during liver transplantation and possibly in other surgery. PMID:22187521

  19. Molecular interactions of graphene oxide with human blood plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenry, Affa Affb Affc; Loh, Kian Ping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between graphene oxide (GO) and human blood plasma proteins. To gain an insight into the bio-physico-chemical activity of GO in biological and biomedical applications, we performed a series of biophysical assays to quantify the molecular interactions between GO with different lateral size distributions and the three essential human blood plasma proteins. We elucidate the various aspects of the GO-protein interactions, particularly, the adsorption, binding kinetics and equilibrium, and conformational stability, through determination of quantitative parameters, such as GO-protein association constants, binding cooperativity, and the binding-driven protein structural changes. We demonstrate that the molecular interactions between GO and plasma proteins are significantly dependent on the lateral size distribution and mean lateral sizes of the GO nanosheets and their subtle variations may markedly influence the GO-protein interactions. Consequently, we propose the existence of size-dependent molecular interactions between GO nanosheets and plasma proteins, and importantly, the presence of specific critical mean lateral sizes of GO nanosheets in achieving very high association and fluorescence quenching efficiency of the plasma proteins. We anticipate that this work will provide a basis for the design of graphene-based and other related nanomaterials for a plethora of biological and biomedical applications.

  20. Plasma protein profiles of neonatal pigs before and after suckling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyun; Olson, Douglas J; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Simko, Elemir

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of colostral proteins ingested by neonatal piglets within 24 to 36 h after birth is generally considered to be non-selective. Nevertheless, the transfer of colostral proteins, except immunoglubulins, from gut to bloodstream after natural suckling is still poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in 2-dimensional electrophoretic plasma protein profiles of neonatal piglets before and after suckling, in order to characterize the gastrointestinal absorption of colostral proteins into the neonatal bloodstream. As expected, the most significant change in plasma after suckling is the presence of a large amount of immunoglobulin. However, while the concentration of a few proteins was mildly increased in post-suckling plasma, the evidence of absorption of colostral non-immunoglobulin proteins by neonatal piglets was not detected in this study. PMID:22754088

  1. Plasma protein profiles of neonatal pigs before and after suckling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyun; Olson, Douglas J.; Gordon, John R.; Middleton, Dorothy M.; Simko, Elemir

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of colostral proteins ingested by neonatal piglets within 24 to 36 h after birth is generally considered to be non-selective. Nevertheless, the transfer of colostral proteins, except immunoglubulins, from gut to bloodstream after natural suckling is still poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in 2-dimensional electrophoretic plasma protein profiles of neonatal piglets before and after suckling, in order to characterize the gastrointestinal absorption of colostral proteins into the neonatal bloodstream. As expected, the most significant change in plasma after suckling is the presence of a large amount of immunoglobulin. However, while the concentration of a few proteins was mildly increased in post-suckling plasma, the evidence of absorption of colostral non-immunoglobulin proteins by neonatal piglets was not detected in this study. PMID:22754088

  2. Conformational changes of α-lactalbumin adsorbed at oil-water interfaces: interplay between protein structure and emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jiali; Hoffmann, Søren V; Day, Li; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Augustin, Mary Ann; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Wooster, Tim J

    2012-02-01

    The conformation and structural dimensions of α-lactalbumin (α-La) both in solution and adsorbed at oil-water interfaces of emulsions were investigated using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy, front-face tryptophan fluorescence (FFTF) spectroscopy, and dual polarization interferometry (DPI). The near-UV SRCD and the FFTF results demonstrated that the hydrophobic environment of the aromatic residues located in the hydrophobic core of native α-La was significantly altered upon adsorption, indicating the unfolding of the hydrophobic core of α-La upon adsorption. The far-UV SRCD results showed that adsorption of α-La at oil-water interfaces created a new non-native secondary structure that was more stable to thermally induced conformational changes. Specifically, the α-helical conformation increased from 29.9% in solution to 45.8% at the tricaprylin-water interface and to 58.5% at the hexadecane-water interface. However, the β-sheet structure decreased from 18.0% in solution to less than 10% at both oil-water interfaces. The DPI study showed that adsorption of α-La to a hydrophobic C18-water surface caused a change in the dimensions of α-La from the native globule-like shape (2.5-3.7 nm) to a compact/dense layer approximately 1.1 nm thick. Analysis of the colloidal stability of α-La stabilized emulsions showed that these emulsions were physically stable against droplet flocculation at elevated temperatures both in the absence and in the presence of 120 mM NaCl. In the absence of salt, the thermal stability of emulsions was due to the strong electrostatic repulsion provided by the adsorbed α-La layer, which was formed after the adsorption and structural rearrangement. In the presence of salt, although the electrostatic repulsion was reduced via electrostatic screening, heating did not induce strong and permanent droplet flocculation. The thermal stability of α-La stabilized emulsions in the presence of salt is a combined effect of

  3. Plasma protein binding of nitroxynil in several species.

    PubMed

    Alvinerie, M; Floc'h, R; Galtier, P

    1991-06-01

    The binding of nitroxynil to total plasma proteins of cows, sheep and rabbits was characterized using equilibrium dialysis. The data indicate clearly that nitroxynil was highly (97-98%) bound to plasma protein of each animal. This linear binding would be due to the particular power exerted by serum albumin. The results are in good agreement with known pharmacokinetic properties of nitroxynil in domestic species. PMID:1920604

  4. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-11-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy.

  5. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8–12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  6. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, M; Ng, E-P; Bakhtiari, K; Vinciguerra, M; Ali Ahmad, H; Awala, H; Mintova, S; Daghighi, M; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F; de Vries, M; Motazacker, M M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Mahmoudi, M; Rezaee, F

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  7. Dietary fat, carbohydrate and protein: effects on plasma lipoprotein profiles fat, carbohydrate and protein and plasma lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In general, under isoweight conditions, different types of dietary protein or individual amino acids have little effect on lipoprotein patterns. Dietary carbohydrate tends to increase plasma triglyceride when it displaces fat, accompanied by a decrease in HDL cholesterol concentrations. Potential ...

  8. Comparative Plasma Protein Profiling of Hemoglobin H Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khungwanmaythawee, Kornpat; Paemanee, Atchara; Chaichana, Chartchai; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Fucharoen, Suthat; Svasti, Saovaros; Smith, Duncan R.

    2014-01-01

    HbH and HbH-constant spring (HbH-CS) are the most common forms of α-thalassemia detected in the Thai population. The accumulation of excess β globin chains in these diseases results in increased red cell hemolysis, and patients with HbH-CS normally have a more severe clinical presentation than patients with HbH disease. This study aimed to detect alterations in the expression of plasma proteins of HbH and HbH-CS patients as compared to normal plasma. Platelet poor plasma was separated from HbH and HbH-CS and normal subjects and differential plasma proteins were detected using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified using LC/MS/MS. A total of 14 differentially expressed proteins were detected of which 5 proteins were upregulated and 9 were downregulated. Most of the differentially expressed proteins are liver secreted proteins involved in hemolysis, oxidative stress response, and hemoglobin degradation. Seven proteins were found to be differentially expressed between HbH and HbH-CS. Levels of haptoglobin, a hemoglobin scavenging protein, were significantly increased in HbH patients as compared to HbH-CS patients. The identification of differentially expressed proteins may lead to a better understanding of the biological events underlying the clinical presentation of HbH and HbH-CS patients and can have application as hemolytic markers or severity predictors. PMID:25024506

  9. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  10. Neutrophils Turn Plasma Proteins into Weapons against HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hagleitner, Magdalena; Rambach, Günter; Van Aken, Hugo; Dierich, Manfred; Kehrel, Beate E.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of innate immune activation granulocytes and macrophages produce hypochlorite/hypochlorous acid (HOCl) via secretion of myeloperoxidase (MPO) to the outside of the cells, where HOCl immediately reacts with proteins. Most proteins that become altered by this system do not belong to the invading microorganism but to the host. While there is no doubt that the myeloperoxidase system is capable of directly inactivating HIV-1, we hypothesized that it may have an additional indirect mode of action. We show in this article that HOCl is able to chemically alter proteins and thus turn them into Idea-Ps (Idea-P = immune defence-altered protein), potent amyloid-like and SH-groups capturing antiviral weapons against HIV-1. HOCl-altered plasma proteins (Idea-PP) have the capacity to bind efficiently and with high affinity to the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120, and to its receptor CD4 as well as to the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Idea-PP was able to inhibit viral infection and replication in a cell culture system as shown by reduced number of infected cells and of syncytia, resulting in reduction of viral capsid protein p24 in the culture supernatant. The unmodified plasma protein fraction had no effect. HOCl-altered isolated proteins antithrombin III and human serum albumin, taken as representative examples of the whole pool of plasma proteins, were both able to exert the same activity of binding to gp120 and inhibition of viral proliferation. These data offer an opportunity to improve the understanding of the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and allow the generation of the following hypothetical scheme: natural immune defense mechanisms generate by posttranslational modification of plasma proteins a potent virucidal weapon that immobilizes the virus as well as inhibits viral fusion and thus entry into the host cells. Furthermore simulation of this mechanism in vitro might provide an interesting new therapeutic approach against microorganisms

  11. Cardiovascular-related proteins identified in human plasma by the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Beniam T; Zong, Chenggong; Liem, David A; Huang, Aaron; Le, Steven; Edmondson, Ricky D; Jones, Richard C; Qiao, Xin; Whitelegge, Julian P; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2005-08-01

    Proteomic profiling of accessible bodily fluids, such as plasma, has the potential to accelerate biomarker/biosignature development for human diseases. The HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase examined human plasma with distinct proteomic approaches across multiple laboratories worldwide. Through this effort, we confidently identified 3020 proteins, each requiring a minimum of two high-scoring MS/MS spectra. A critical step subsequent to protein identification is functional annotation, in particular with regard to organ systems and disease. Performing exhaustive literature searches, we have manually annotated a subset of these 3020 proteins that have cardiovascular-related functions on the basis of an existing body of published information. These cardiovascular-related proteins can be organized into eight groups: markers of inflammation and/or cardiovascular disease, vascular and coagulation, signaling, growth and differentiation, cytoskeletal, transcription factors, channels/receptors and heart failure and remodeling. In addition, analysis of the peptide per protein ratio for MS/MS identification reveals group-specific trends. These findings serve as a resource to interrogate the functions of plasma proteins, and moreover, the list of cardiovascular-related proteins in plasma constitutes a baseline proteomic blueprint for the future development of biosignatures for diseases such as myocardial ischemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:16052623

  12. Plasma proteins in children with trichuris dysentery syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, E S; Ramdath, D D; Whyte-Alleng, C; Howell, S; Serjeant, B E

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether in Trichuris trichiura dysentery there is (1) evidence of a systemic inflammatory response, (2) evidence that the plasma protein disturbance has special characteristics compared with uninfected children in the endemic environment. METHODS: Three groups of children (age 1.6 to 11.4 years) were studied: 53 cases of trichuris dysentery syndrome (TDS), 16 cases of chronic non-secretory diarrhoea not infected with the parasite ("disease controls", DC), and 20 asymptomatic, parasite-free primary schoolchildren (normal controls, NC). C reactive protein, alpha 1 antitrypsin, caeruloplasmin, albumin, total globulin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, ferritin, and transferrin were measured on a single occasion for each. The study was thus a cross sectional descriptive survey for group comparison. Plasma viscosity was measured on admission for TDS and DC and repeated after six weeks and six months for TDS. RESULTS: Plasma C reactive protein, alpha 1 antitrypsin, total globulin, fibronectin, and viscosity were significantly higher in TDS than in NC. DC children also had acute phase protein elevations (C reactive protein, caeruloplasmin, viscosity). However, the increase in caeruloplasmin was specific to the DC group while an increase in fibronectin was specific to the TDS group. Serial measurement of viscosity in TDS showed a modest but significant fall during the six months following treatment. CONCLUSIONS: There is an acute phase response in intense trichuriasis and a specific elevation of plasma fibronectin. Plasma viscosity remains abnormally high six months after treatment, although lower than at diagnosis. Images PMID:9155675

  13. Protein polymorphism of a human plasma apolipoprotein D antigenic epitope.

    PubMed

    Camato, R; Marcel, Y L; Milne, R W; Lussier-Cacan, S; Weech, P K

    1989-06-01

    Based on our previous observation that monoclonal antibody anti-apoD-4E11 reacted with several HDL proteins we studied them further with three questions in mind: i) is there common protein polymorphism in healthy individuals? ii) how many proteins are present and what are their characteristics? iii) are they all apolipoproteins and do they have the same lipoprotein distribution as apoD? Isolated, delipidated apoD was used as a standard for radioimmunometric assay of plasma with antibody 4E11. The antigen varied from 3 to 11 mumol-equivalents of apoD per liter of plasma (equivalent to 5-20 mg apoD/dl plasma) with means of 6.1 and 6.8 mumol/l in men and women, respectively. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of plasma found up to eight 4E11-antigenic-proteins of different Mr, each heterogeneous in pI. All plasmas tested contained apoD and an Mr 38,000 antigen, the latter being the most immunoreactive. Six proteins of Mr 70,000-94,000 were found, but the number varied between subjects. Eighty nine percent of the plasma antigen was associated with lipoproteins: 83% with HDL and VHDL, 5% with LDL and VLDL. Lipoproteins of all sizes, separated by polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, contained the antigen. ApoD was almost the only 4E11-antigen in LDL, and was in two states: the one free, the other an apoD-apoB mixed disulfide complex. The apparent proportions of higher Mr antigens increased with increasing lipoprotein density, and the proportion of apoD decreased reciprocally. None of these 4E11-antigenic-proteins cross-reacted with antiserum to retinol-binding protein. PMID:2477480

  14. Instability of the biotin-protein bond in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Mock, Nell I; Mock, Donald M

    2004-04-15

    Labeling proteins with biotin offers an alternative to labeling with radioisotopes for pharmacokinetic studies in humans. However, stability of the biotin-protein bond is a critical tacit assumption. Using release of biotin from immunoglobulin G as the outcome, we individually evaluated stability of the biotin label produced by six biotinylation agents: biotin PEO-amine, 5-(biotinamido)-pentylamine, iodoacetyl-LC-biotin, NHS-LC-biotin, sulfo-NHS-LC-biotin, and biotin-LC-hydrazide. Each of the six biotinylated proteins was incubated at room temperature for 4h in human plasma or in phosphate-buffered saline (control). Free biotin was separated from the biotinylated protein by ultrafiltration and quantitated by avidin-binding assay. For each biotinylation reagent, biotin release was significantly increased by plasma (p < 0.0001 vs control by unpaired t test). Moreover, the hydrazide bond was also unstable in buffer. Biotin remaining on the protein was quantitated directly using capture of europium-streptavidin by the immobilized biotinylated immunoglobulin G. Consistent with biotin release data, streptavidin capture was reduced by plasma to 8% of control. We conclude that all of the biotinylating agents produce biotin-protein bonds that are susceptible to hydrolysis by factors present in human plasma; five of six are stable in buffer. PMID:15051531

  15. Characterization of mercury-containing protein in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yun, Zhaojun; Li, Lu; Liu, Lihong; He, Bin; Zhao, Xingchen; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-06-01

    Characterization of mercury binding protein in the human body is very important for understanding the metabolism and the mechanism of toxication of ingested mercuric compounds. In this study, mercury-containing protein in human plasma was separated by on-line heart-cutting two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (2D-HPLC). This 2D separation system used size exclusion liquid chromatography (SEC) followed by weak anion exchange liquid chromatography (WAX) and the two LC parts were coupled by a six-port valve equipped with a storage loop and controled by the computer. The WAX effluent was determined by both UV detection and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to locate the mercury-containing protein. A unique mercury-containing protein fraction was obtained by 2D-HPLC separation and subsequently identified by HPLC coupled with linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HPLC-LTQ-FT). The database search confirmed that the mercury-containing protein in the human plasma is human serum albumin (HSA). The stoichiometry and thermodyamics interaction of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) with HSA was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and two binding types were observed. Mercury-containing protein in human plasma was separated and identified in the present study and it is important for understanding the metabolism of mercury in the human body. PMID:23748885

  16. The nano-plasma interface: implications of the protein corona

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Joy; Yang, Yong; Shen, Jianliang; Moten, Asad; Chen, Chunying; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between nanoparticles and macromolecules in the blood plasma dictate the biocompatibility and efficacy of nanotherapeutics. Accordingly, the properties of nanoparticles and endogenous biomolecules change at the nano-plasma interface. Here, we review the implications of such changes including toxicity, immunological recognition, molecular targeting, biodistribution, intracellular uptake, and drug release. Although this interface poses several challenges for nanomedicine, it also presents opportunities for exploiting nanoparticle-protein interactions. PMID:24656615

  17. The nano-plasma interface: Implications of the protein corona.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Yang, Yong; Shen, Jianliang; Moten, Asad; Chen, Chunying; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between nanoparticles and macromolecules in the blood plasma dictate the biocompatibility and efficacy of nanotherapeutics. Accordingly, the properties of nanoparticles and endogenous biomolecules change at the nano-plasma interface. Here, we review the implications of such changes including toxicity, immunological recognition, molecular targeting, biodistribution, intracellular uptake, and drug release. Although this interface poses several challenges for nanomedicine, it also presents opportunities for exploiting nanoparticle-protein interactions. PMID:24656615

  18. Glycan Moieties as Bait to Fish Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Zhao, Qun; Sui, Zhigang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Hao; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-05-17

    Plasma membrane proteome analysis is of significance for screening candidate biomarkers and drug targets. However, due to their low abundance and lack of specific groups that can enable their capture, the plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) are under-represented. On the basis of the fact that PMPs are embedded in or anchored to the phospholipid bilayer of the plasma membrane and the glycan moieties of proteins and lipids located on the plasma membrane are exposed outside of the cell surface, we proposed a strategy to capture PMPs, termed as glycan moieties-directed PMPs enrichment (GMDPE). With the glycan moieties exposed outside of the cells as bait to ensure the selectivity and the phospholipid bilayer as raft to provide the sensitivity, we applied this strategy into the plasma membrane proteome analysis of HeLa cells, and in total, 772 PMPs were identified, increased by 4.5 times compared to those identified by the reported cell surface biotinylation method. Notably, among them, 86 CD antigens and 16 ion channel proteins were confidently identified. All these results demonstrated that our proposed approach has great potential in the large scale plasma membrane proteome profiling. PMID:27088673

  19. Integrated system for temperature-controlled fast protein liquid chromatography comprising improved copolymer modified beaded agarose adsorbents and a travelling cooling zone reactor arrangement.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tobias K H; Cao, Ping; Ewert, Stephanie; Wohlgemuth, Jonas; Liu, Haiyang; Willett, Thomas C; Theodosiou, Eirini; Thomas, Owen R T; Franzreb, Matthias

    2013-04-12

    An integrated approach to temperature-controlled chromatography, involving copolymer modified agarose adsorbents and a novel travelling cooling zone reactor (TCZR) arrangement, is described. Sepharose CL6B was transformed into a thermoresponsive cation exchange adsorbent (thermoCEX) in four synthetic steps: (i) epichlorohydrin activation; (ii) amine capping; (iii) 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid) immobilization; and 'graft from' polymerization of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-tert-butylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid-co-N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide). FT-IR, (1)H NMR, gravimetry and chemical assays allowed precise determination of the adsorbent's copolymer composition and loading, and identified the initial epoxy activation step as a critical determinant of 'on-support' copolymer loading, and in turn, protein binding performance. In batch binding studies with lactoferrin, thermoCEX's binding affinity and maximum adsorption capacity rose smoothly with temperature increase from 20 to 50 °C. In temperature shifting chromatography experiments employing thermoCEX in thermally jacketed columns, 44-51% of the lactoferrin adsorbed at 42 °C could be desorbed under binding conditions by cooling the column to 22 °C, but the elution peaks exhibited strong tailing. To more fully exploit the potential of thermoresponsive chromatography adsorbents, a new column arrangement, the TCZR, was developed. In TCZR chromatography, a narrow discrete cooling zone (special assembly of copper blocks and Peltier elements) is moved along a bespoke fixed-bed separation columnfilled with stationary phase. In tests with thermoCEX, it was possible to recover 65% of the lactoferrin bound at 35 °C using 8 successive movements of the cooling zone at a velocity of 0.1mm/s; over half of the recovered protein was eluted in the first peak in more concentrated form than in the feed. Intra-particle diffusion of desorbed protein out of the support pores, and the ratio between the velocities of the cooling

  20. Development of high-productivity, strong cation-exchange adsorbers for protein capture by graft polymerization from membranes with different pore sizes

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Robinson, Julie R.; Hobley, Eboni; Husson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the surface modification of macroporous membranes using ATRP (atom transfer radical polymerization) to create cation-exchange adsorbers with high protein binding capacity at high product throughput. The work is motivated by the need for a more economical and rapid capture step in downstream processing of protein therapeutics. Membranes with three reported nominal pore sizes (0.2, 0.45, 1.0 μm) were modified with poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) tentacles, to create a high density of protein binding sites. A special formulation was used in which the monomer was protected by a crown ether to enable surface-initiated ATRP of this cationic polyelectrolyte. Success with modification was supported by chemical analysis using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and indirectly by measurement of pure water flux as a function of polymerization time. Uniformity of modification within the membranes was visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Static and dynamic binding capacities were measured using lysozyme protein to allow comparisons with reported performance data for commercial cation-exchange materials. Dynamic binding capacities were measured for flow rates ranging from 13 to 109 column volumes (CV)/min. Results show that this unique ATRP formulation can be used to fabricate cation-exchange membrane adsorbers with dynamic binding capacities as high as 70 mg/mL at a throughput of 100 CV/min and unprecedented productivity of 300 mg/mL/min. PMID:23175597

  1. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor. PMID:25707701

  2. Supramolecular Structures with Blood Plasma Proteins, Sugars and Nanosilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turov, V. V.; Gun'ko, V. M.; Galagan, N. P.; Rugal, A. A.; Barvinchenko, V. M.; Gorbyk, P. P.

    Supramolecular structures with blood plasma proteins (albumin, immunoglobulin and fibrinogen (HPF)), protein/water/silica and protein/water/ silica/sugar (glucose, fructose and saccharose) were studied by NMR, adsorption, IR and UV spectroscopy methods. Hydration parameters, amounts of weakly and strongly bound waters and interfacial energy (γ S) were determined over a wide range of component concentrations. The γ S(C protein,C silica) graphs were used to estimate the energy of protein-protein, protein-surface and particle-particle interactions. It was shown that interfacial energy of self-association (γ as) of protein molecules depends on a type of proteins. A large fraction of water bound to proteins can be displaced by sugars, and the effect of disaccharide (saccharose) was greater than that of monosugars. Changes in the structural parameters of cavities in HPF molecules and complexes with HPF/silica nanoparticles filled by bound water were analysed using NMR-cryoporometry showing that interaction of proteins with silica leads to a significant decrease in the amounts of water bound to both protein and silica surfaces. Bionanocomposites with BSA/nanosilica/sugar can be used to influence states of living cells and tissues after cryopreservation or other treatments. It was shown that interaction of proteins with silica leads to strong decrease in the volume of all types of internal cavities filled by water.

  3. Graft copolymer composed of cationic backbone and bottle brush-like side chains as a physically adsorbed coating for protein separation by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Xiang, Lina; Zeng, Rongju; Cao, Fuhu; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Wang, Yanmei

    2011-12-01

    To stabilize electroosmotic flow (EOF) and suppress protein adsorption onto the silica capillary inner wall, a cationic hydroxyethylcellulose-graft-poly (poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA) graft copolymer composed of cationic backbone and bottle brush-like side chains was synthesized for the first time and used as a novel physically adsorbed coating for protein separation by capillary electrophoresis. Reversed (anodal) and very stable EOF was obtained in cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA-coated capillary at pH 2.2-7.8. The effects of degree of cationization, PEGMA grafting ratio, PEGMA molecular mass, and buffer pH on the separation of basic proteins were investigated. A systematic comparative study of protein separation in bare and HEC-coated capillaries and in cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA-coated capillary was also performed. The basic proteins can be well separated in cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA-coated capillary over the pH range of 2.8-6.8 with good repeatability and high separation efficiency, because the coating combines good protein-resistant property of bottle brush-like PPEGMA side chains with excellent coating ability of cat-HEC backbone. Besides its success in separation of basic proteins, the cat-HEC-g-PPEGMA coating was also superior in the fast separation of other protein samples, such as protein mixture, egg white, and saliva, which indicates that it is a promising coating for further proteomics analysis. PMID:22038787

  4. Experience With a Hepatitis-free Plasma Protein Solution

    PubMed Central

    Salsbury, A. J.; Brozovich, M.

    1968-01-01

    Clinical experience with a 4.3% solution of plasma protein treated to render it free of the agent of serum hepatitis is satisfactory. Sixty-seven transfusions of 400 ml. of the commercial preparation were given to 33 patients (25 with acute blood loss, 4 with severe burns, and 4 with hypoproteinaemia secondary to hepatic or renal disease). The solution was clinically as effective as reconstituted dried plasma in expanding plasma volume and in replacing serum protein lost in burns. Adverse effects were mild pyrexial reactions in one case and facial flushing in another. No cases of serum hepatitis occurred. The solution is available for immediate use, it can be kept at room temperature, and, as it does not cause rouleaux formation, it can be given before blood is taken for grouping and cross-matching. PMID:5662990

  5. Prediction of colorectal cancer diagnosis based on circulating plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Surinova, Silvia; Choi, Meena; Tao, Sha; Schüffler, Peter J; Chang, Ching-Yun; Clough, Timothy; Vysloužil, Kamil; Khoylou, Marta; Srovnal, Josef; Liu, Yansheng; Matondo, Mariette; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Weisser, Hendrik; Buhmann, Joachim M; Hajdúch, Marián; Brenner, Hermann; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-09-01

    Non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer with blood-based markers is a critical clinical need. Here we describe a phased mass spectrometry-based approach for the discovery, screening, and validation of circulating protein biomarkers with diagnostic value. Initially, we profiled human primary tumor tissue epithelia and characterized about 300 secreted and cell surface candidate glycoproteins. These candidates were then screened in patient systemic circulation to identify detectable candidates in blood plasma. An 88-plex targeting method was established to systematically monitor these proteins in two large and independent cohorts of plasma samples, which generated quantitative clinical datasets at an unprecedented scale. The data were deployed to develop and evaluate a five-protein biomarker signature for colorectal cancer detection. PMID:26253081

  6. Disproportional changes in hematocrit, plasma volume, and proteins during exercise and bed rest.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L.

    1972-01-01

    The interrelationships between the changes in plasma volume, hematocrit, and plasma proteins during muscular exercise and bed rest were investigated. Proportionally, the changes in hematocrit are always smaller than the changes in plasma volume. For this reason changes in the concentration of blood constituents can only be quantitated on the basis of plasma volume changes. During short periods of intensive exercise, there was a small loss of plasma proteins. With prolonged submaximal exercise there was a net gain in plasma protein, which contributes to stabilization of the vascular volume. Prolonged bed rest induced hypoproteinemia; this loss of plasma protein probably plays an important role in recumbency hypovolemia.

  7. Rapid formation of plasma protein corona critically affects nanoparticle pathophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Stefan; Docter, Dominic; Kuharev, Jörg; Musyanovych, Anna; Fetz, Verena; Hecht, Rouven; Schlenk, Florian; Fischer, Dagmar; Kiouptsi, Klytaimnistra; Reinhardt, Christoph; Landfester, Katharina; Schild, Hansjörg; Maskos, Michael; Knauer, Shirley K.; Stauber, Roland H.

    2013-10-01

    In biological fluids, proteins bind to the surface of nanoparticles to form a coating known as the protein corona, which can critically affect the interaction of the nanoparticles with living systems. As physiological systems are highly dynamic, it is important to obtain a time-resolved knowledge of protein-corona formation, development and biological relevancy. Here we show that label-free snapshot proteomics can be used to obtain quantitative time-resolved profiles of human plasma coronas formed on silica and polystyrene nanoparticles of various size and surface functionalization. Complex time- and nanoparticle-specific coronas, which comprise almost 300 different proteins, were found to form rapidly (<0.5 minutes) and, over time, to change significantly in terms of the amount of bound protein, but not in composition. Rapid corona formation is found to affect haemolysis, thrombocyte activation, nanoparticle uptake and endothelial cell death at an early exposure time.

  8. Radioimmunoassay for pregnancy-associated plasma protein A

    SciTech Connect

    Sinosich, M.J.; Teisner, B.; Folkerson, J.; Saunders, D.M.; Grudzinskas, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    A specific and highly sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in human serum is described. The minimum detection limit for this protein was 2.9 ..mu..g/L. The within- and between-assay coefficients of variation were 4.0 and 4.5%, respectively. The circulating protein was detected within 32 days of conception in eight normal pregnancies and within 21 days in a twin pregnancy. Circulating concentrations in the mother at term were consistently higher (10-fold) than in matched amniotic fluid; none was detected in the umbilical circulation. This protein was also detected in the circulation of patients with hydatidiform mole. This assay will permit investigations into the clinical evaluation of measurements of the protein during early pregnancy and trophoblastic disease.

  9. Impact of Protein Stability, Cellular Localization, and Abundance on Proteomic Detection of Tumor-Derived Proteins in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Faca, Vitor M.; Zhang, Wenxuan; Zhang, Qing; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Mallick, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-derived, circulating proteins are potentially useful as biomarkers for detection of cancer, for monitoring of disease progression, regression and recurrence, and for assessment of therapeutic response. Here we interrogated how a protein's stability, cellular localization, and abundance affect its observability in blood by mass-spectrometry-based proteomics techniques. We performed proteomic profiling on tumors and plasma from two different xenograft mouse models. A statistical analysis of this data revealed protein properties indicative of the detection level in plasma. Though 20% of the proteins identified in plasma were tumor-derived, only 5% of the proteins observed in the tumor tissue were found in plasma. Both intracellular and extracellular tumor proteins were observed in plasma; however, after normalizing for tumor abundance, extracellular proteins were seven times more likely to be detected. Although proteins that were more abundant in the tumor were also more likely to be observed in plasma, the relationship was nonlinear: Doubling the spectral count increased detection rate by only 50%. Many secreted proteins, even those with relatively low spectral count, were observed in plasma, but few low abundance intracellular proteins were observed. Proteins predicted to be stable by dipeptide composition were significantly more likely to be identified in plasma than less stable proteins. The number of tryptic peptides in a protein was not significantly related to the chance of a protein being observed in plasma. Quantitative comparison of large versus small tumors revealed that the abundance of proteins in plasma as measured by spectral count was associated with the tumor size, but the relationship was not one-to-one; a 3-fold decrease in tumor size resulted in a 16-fold decrease in protein abundance in plasma. This study provides quantitative support for a tumor-derived marker prioritization strategy that favors secreted and stable proteins over all but the

  10. Impact of protein stability, cellular localization, and abundance on proteomic detection of tumor-derived proteins in plasma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qiaojun; Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M; Zhang, Wenxuan; Zhang, Qing; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B; McIntosh, Martin W; Mallick, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-derived, circulating proteins are potentially useful as biomarkers for detection of cancer, for monitoring of disease progression, regression and recurrence, and for assessment of therapeutic response. Here we interrogated how a protein's stability, cellular localization, and abundance affect its observability in blood by mass-spectrometry-based proteomics techniques. We performed proteomic profiling on tumors and plasma from two different xenograft mouse models. A statistical analysis of this data revealed protein properties indicative of the detection level in plasma. Though 20% of the proteins identified in plasma were tumor-derived, only 5% of the proteins observed in the tumor tissue were found in plasma. Both intracellular and extracellular tumor proteins were observed in plasma; however, after normalizing for tumor abundance, extracellular proteins were seven times more likely to be detected. Although proteins that were more abundant in the tumor were also more likely to be observed in plasma, the relationship was nonlinear: Doubling the spectral count increased detection rate by only 50%. Many secreted proteins, even those with relatively low spectral count, were observed in plasma, but few low abundance intracellular proteins were observed. Proteins predicted to be stable by dipeptide composition were significantly more likely to be identified in plasma than less stable proteins. The number of tryptic peptides in a protein was not significantly related to the chance of a protein being observed in plasma. Quantitative comparison of large versus small tumors revealed that the abundance of proteins in plasma as measured by spectral count was associated with the tumor size, but the relationship was not one-to-one; a 3-fold decrease in tumor size resulted in a 16-fold decrease in protein abundance in plasma. This study provides quantitative support for a tumor-derived marker prioritization strategy that favors secreted and stable proteins over all but the

  11. Application of electroimmunoassay to the study of plasma protein synthesis in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grieninger, G; Pindyck, J; Hertzberg, K M; Mosesson, M W

    1979-01-01

    Electroimmunoassay has been applied to the study of plasma protein synthesis and secretion in liver cell cultures. The assay is performed on unconcentrated samples of culture medium containing the secreted plasma proteins and yields results within 2 hours. The characteristics of plasma protein production by the cultured hepatocytes coupled with the sensitivity of this assay permit the study of plasma protein in synthesis and its regulation by hormones and other agents without the routine use of radioisotopes. PMID:518014

  12. Effects of adsorbed proteins, an antifouling agent and long-duration DC voltage pulses on the impedance of silicon-based neural microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Sommakia, Salah; Rickus, Jenna L; Otto, Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    The successful use of implantable neural microelectrodes as neuroprosthetic devices depends on the mitigation of the reactive tissue response of the brain. One of the factors affecting the ultimate severity of the reactive tissue response and the in vivo electrical properties of the microelectrodes is the initial adsorption of proteins onto the surface of the implanted microelectrodes. In this study we quantify the increase in microelectrode impedance magnitude at physiological frequencies following electrode immersion in a 10% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution. We also demonstrate the efficacy of a common antifouling molecule, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), in preventing a significant increase in microelectrode impedance. In addition, we show the feasibility of using long-duration DC voltage pulses to remove adsorbed proteins from the microelectrode surface. PMID:19963693

  13. Phospholipid transfer from vesicles to high density lipoproteins, catalyzed by human plasma phospholipid transfer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) catalyzes the mass transfer of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Partial purification of PLTP yielded proteins with apparent M/sub r/ = 59,000 and 40,000 by SDS-PAGE. PLTP activity was measured by transfer of (/sup 14/C)L-..cap alpha..-dipalmitoyl PC from egg-PC vesicles to HDL. Activity was enhanced at low pH (4.5) upon addition of ..beta..-mercaptoethanol while Ca/sup +2/ and Na/sup +/ had no effect. E/sub act/ for facilitated PC transfer was 18.2 +/- 2 kcal/mol. The donor specificity of PLTP was examined using vesicles containing egg-PC plus cholesterol or sphingomyelin. The fluidity of the donor membrane (measured by fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene) correlated strongly with a decrease in PLTP activity. Phosphatidic acid did not affect activity. Increase in vesicle size reduced activity. The acceptor specificity of PLTP was examined using chemically modified HDL. PLTP activity increased up to 1.7-fold with an initial increase in negative charge and then decreased upon extensive modification. A mechanism is proposed where PLTP binds to vesicls and enhances the diffusion of PC into the medium where it is adsorbed by HDL.

  14. Palmitoylation of POTE family proteins for plasma membrane targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudipto; Ise, Tomoko; Nagata, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Bera, Tapan K.; Pastan, Ira

    2007-11-23

    The POTE gene family is composed of 13 paralogs and likely evolved by duplications and remodeling of the human genome. One common property of POTE proteins is their localization on the inner aspect of the plasma membrane. To determine the structural elements required for membrane localization, we expressed mutants of different POTEs in 293T cells as EGFP fusion proteins. We also tested their palmitoylation by a biotin-switch assay. Our data indicate that the membrane localizations of different POTEs are mediated by similar 3-4 short cysteine rich repeats (CRRs) near the amino-terminuses and that palmitoylation on paired cysteine residues in each CRR motif is responsible for the localization. Multiple palmitoylation in the small CRRs can result in the strong association of whole POTEs with plasma membrane.

  15. Liver takes up retinol-binding protein from plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gjoen, T.; Bjerkelund, T.; Blomhoff, H.K.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.; Blomhoff, R.

    1987-08-15

    Retinol is transported in plasma bound to a specific transport protein, retinol-binding protein. We prepared /sup 125/I-tyramine cellobiose-labeled rat retinol-binding protein and studied its tissue uptake 1, 5, and 24 h after intravenous injection into rats. The liver was the organ containing most radioactivity at all time points studied. After 5 and 24 h, 30 and 22% of the injected dose were recovered in liver, respectively. After separating the liver into parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells in the 5-h group, we found that both cell fractions contained approximately the same amount of radioactivity (per gram of liver). Most of the retinol-binding protein radioactivity in the nonparenchymal cell fraction was in the stellate cells. The implication of these results for a possible transfer mechanism for retinol between parenchymal and stellate cells is discussed.

  16. A Protein Extract from Chicken Reduces Plasma Homocysteine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lysne, Vegard; Bjørndal, Bodil; Vik, Rita; Nordrehaug, Jan Erik; Skorve, Jon; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf K

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate effects of a water-soluble protein fraction of chicken (CP), with a low methionine/glycine ratio, on plasma homocysteine and metabolites related to homocysteine metabolism. Male Wistar rats were fed either a control diet with 20% w/w casein as the protein source, or an experimental diet where 6, 14 or 20% w/w of the casein was replaced with the same amount of CP for four weeks. Rats fed CP had reduced plasma total homocysteine level and markedly increased levels of the choline pathway metabolites betaine, dimethylglycine, sarcosine, glycine and serine, as well as the transsulfuration pathway metabolites cystathionine and cysteine. Hepatic mRNA level of enzymes involved in homocysteine remethylation, methionine synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, were unchanged, whereas cystathionine gamma-lyase of the transsulfuration pathway was increased in the CP treated rats. Plasma concentrations of vitamin B2, folate, cobalamin, and the B-6 catabolite pyridoxic acid were increased in the 20% CP-treated rats. In conclusion, the CP diet was associated with lower plasma homocysteine concentration and higher levels of serine, choline oxidation and transsulfuration metabolites compared to a casein diet. The status of related B-vitamins was also affected by CP. PMID:26053618

  17. A Protein Extract from Chicken Reduces Plasma Homocysteine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lysne, Vegard; Bjørndal, Bodil; Vik, Rita; Nordrehaug, Jan Erik; Skorve, Jon; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf K.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate effects of a water-soluble protein fraction of chicken (CP), with a low methionine/glycine ratio, on plasma homocysteine and metabolites related to homocysteine metabolism. Male Wistar rats were fed either a control diet with 20% w/w casein as the protein source, or an experimental diet where 6, 14 or 20% w/w of the casein was replaced with the same amount of CP for four weeks. Rats fed CP had reduced plasma total homocysteine level and markedly increased levels of the choline pathway metabolites betaine, dimethylglycine, sarcosine, glycine and serine, as well as the transsulfuration pathway metabolites cystathionine and cysteine. Hepatic mRNA level of enzymes involved in homocysteine remethylation, methionine synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, were unchanged, whereas cystathionine gamma-lyase of the transsulfuration pathway was increased in the CP treated rats. Plasma concentrations of vitamin B2, folate, cobalamin, and the B-6 catabolite pyridoxic acid were increased in the 20% CP-treated rats. In conclusion, the CP diet was associated with lower plasma homocysteine concentration and higher levels of serine, choline oxidation and transsulfuration metabolites compared to a casein diet. The status of related B-vitamins was also affected by CP. PMID:26053618

  18. Thyroid hormone stimulation of plasma protein synthesis in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, K M; Pindyck, J; Mosesson, M W; Grieninger, G

    1981-01-25

    The direct effect of thyroid hormones on hepatocellular plasma protein synthesis has been studied in primary monolayer cultures derived from chick embryo liver. The chemically defined medium used for plating and maintaining the cultures contained no other hormones, protein, or serum supplement. Addition of physiological concentrations (10 nM) of triiodothyronine or thyroxine produced 3-fold or greater increases in the rates of synthesis of fibrinogen and three other major secreted proteins. By comparison albumin, transferrin, and total protein synthesis were not substantially increased. The enhanced synthesis of selected plasma proteins could be detected 6 h after initial addition of triiodothyronine. Exposure of the cells to the hormone for only 30 min was nearly as effective as continuous exposure in eliciting the ultimate response. Triiodothyronine exerted its half-maximal effect at a concentration of 1 nM. Diminished potency was associated with less iodination of the hormone; a marked reduction was noted with di-iodinated thyronine and no stimulatory activity at all with either mono- or non-iodinated thyronine. PMID:7451459

  19. Dietary zinc depletion and repletion affects plasma proteins: an analysis of the plasma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Wickwire, Kathie; Ho, Emily; Chung, Carolyn S.; King, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a problem worldwide. Current methods for assessing Zn status are limited to measuring plasma or serum Zn within populations suspected of deficiency. Despite the high prevalence of Zn deficiency in the human population there are no methods currently available for sensitively assessing Zn status among individuals. The purpose of this research was to utilize a proteomic approach using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry to identify protein biomarkers that were sensitive to changes in dietary Zn levels in humans. Proteomic analysis was performed in human plasma samples (n = 6) obtained from healthy adult male subjects that completed a dietary Zn depletion/repletion protocol, current dietary zinc intake has a greater effect on fractional zinc absorption than does longer term zinc consumption in healthy adult men. Chung et al. (Am J Clin Nutr 87 (5):1224–1229, 2008). After a 13 day Zn acclimatization period where subjects consumed a Zn-adequate diet, the male subjects consumed a marginal Zn-depleted diet for 42 days followed by consumption of a Zn-repleted diet for 28 days. The samples at baseline, end of depletion and end of repletion were pre-fractionated through immuno-affinity columns to remove 14 highly abundant proteins, and each fraction separated by 2DE. Following staining by colloidal Coomassie blue and densitometric analysis, three proteins were identified by mass spectrometry as affected by changes in dietary Zn. Fibrin β and chain E, fragment double D were observed in the plasma protein fraction that remained bound to the immuno-affinity column. An unnamed protein that was related to immunoglobulins was observed in the immunode-pleted plasma fraction. Fibrin β increased two-fold following the Zn depletion period and decreased to baseline values following the Zn repletion period; this protein may serve as a viable biomarker for Zn status in the future. PMID:23255060

  20. Smoking, COPD and 3-Nitrotyrosine Levels of Plasma Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hongjun; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Peterson, Elena S.; Tan, Ruimin; Bigelow, Diana J.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Hoidal, John R.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide is a physiologically regulator of endothelial function and hemodynamics. Oxidized products of nitric oxide can form nitrotyrosine, which is a marker of nitrative stress. Cigarette smoking decreases exhaled nitric oxide, and the underlying mechanism may be important in the cardiovascular toxicity of cigarette smoke, although it is not clear if this effect results from decreased nitric oxide production or oxidation of nitric oxide to reactive, nitrating, species. These processes would be expected to have opposite effects on nitrotyrosine levels, a marker of nitrative stress. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we determine the effects of smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on circulating levels of nitrotyrosine, and thereby gain insight into the processes regulating nitrotyrosine formation. METHODS: A custom antibody microarray platform was used to analyze the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine modifications on 24 proteins in plasma. Plasma samples from 458 individuals were analyzed. RESULTS: Nitrotyrosine levels in circulating proteins were uniformly reduced in smokers but increased in COPD patients. We also observed a persistent suppression of nitrotyrosine in former smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking broadly suppresses the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine in plasma proteins, suggesting that cigarette smoke suppresses endothelial nitric oxide production. In contrast, the increase in nitrotyrosine levels in COPD patients most likely results from inflammatory processes. This study provides the first evidence that smoking has irreversible effects on endothelial production of nitric oxide, and provides insight into how smoking could induce a loss of elasticity in the vasculature and a long-term increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Techniques to Purify Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Michael P.; Antrobus, Robin; Lill, Jennie R.; Duncan, Lidia M.; Hör, Simon; Lehner, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this project was to identify the best method for the enrichment of plasma membrane (PM) proteins for proteomics experiments. Following tryptic digestion and extended liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry acquisitions, data were processed using MaxQuant and Gene Ontology (GO) terms used to determine protein subcellular localization. The following techniques were examined for the total number and percentage purity of PM proteins identified: (a) whole cell lysate (total number, 84–112; percentage purity, 9–13%); (b) crude membrane preparation (104–111; 17–20%); (c) biotinylation of surface proteins with N-hydroxysulfosuccinimydyl-S,S-biotin and streptavidin pulldown (78–115; 27–31%); (d) biotinylation of surface glycoproteins with biocytin hydrazide and streptavidin pulldown (41–54; 59–85%); or (e) biotinylation of surface glycoproteins with amino-oxy-biotin (which labels the sialylated fraction of PM glycoproteins) and streptavidin pulldown (120; 65%). A two- to threefold increase in the overall number of proteins identified was achieved by using stop and go extraction tip (StageTip)-based anion exchange (SAX) fractionation. Combining technique (e) with SAX fractionation increased the number of proteins identified to 281 (54%). Analysis of GO terms describing these proteins identified a large subset of proteins integral to the membrane with no subcellular assignment. These are likely to be of PM location and bring the total PM protein identifications to 364 (68%). This study suggests that selective biotinylation of the cell surface using amino-oxy-biotin in combination with SAX fractionation is a useful method for identification of sialylated PM proteins. PMID:20808639

  2. Partitioning lung and plasma proteins: circulating surfactant proteins as biomarkers of alveolocapillary permeability.

    PubMed

    Doyle, I R; Nicholas, T E; Bersten, A D

    1999-03-01

    1. The alveolocapillary membrane faces an extraordinary task in partitioning the plasma and lung hypophase proteins, with a surface area approximately 50-fold that of the body and only 0.1-0.2 micron thick. 2. Lung permeability is compromised under a variety of circumstances and the delineation between physiological and pathological changes in permeability is not always clear. Although the tight junctions of the epithelium, rather than the endothelium, are regarded as the major barrier to fluid and protein flux, it is becoming apparent that the permeability of both are dynamically regulated. 3. Whereas increased permeability and the flux of plasma proteins into the alveolar compartment has dire consequences, fortuitously the flux of surfactant proteins from the airspaces into the circulation may provide a sensitive means of non-invasively monitoring the lung, with important implications for treatment modalities. 4. Surfactant proteins are unique in that they are present in the alveolar hypophase in high concentrations. They diffuse down their vast concentration gradients (approximately 1:1500-7000) into the circulation in a manner that reflects lung function and injury score. Surfactant proteins vary markedly in size (approximately 20-650 kDa) and changes in the relative amounts appear particularly diagnostic with regard to disease severity. Alveolar levels of surfactant proteins remain remarkably constant despite respiratory disease and, unlike the flux of plasma proteins into the alveolus, which may reach equilibrium in acute lung injury, the flux of surfactant proteins is unidirectional because of the concentration gradient and because they are rapidly cleared from the circulation. 5. Ultimately, the diagnostic usefulness of surfactant proteins as markers of alveolocapillary permeability will demand a sound understanding of their kinetics through the vascular compartment. PMID:10081613

  3. In Situ Quantification of Protein Binding to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a fluorescence-based assay that allows for direct measurement of protein binding to the plasma membrane inside living cells. An axial scan through the cell generates a fluorescence intensity profile that is analyzed to determine the membrane-bound and cytoplasmic concentrations of a peripheral membrane protein labeled by the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The membrane binding curve is constructed by mapping those concentrations for a population of cells with a wide range of protein expression levels, and a fit of the binding curve determines the number of binding sites and the dissociation coefficient. We experimentally verified the technique, using myosin-1C-EGFP as a model system and fit its binding curve. Furthermore, we studied the protein-lipid interactions of the membrane binding domains from lactadherin and phospholipase C-δ1 to evaluate the feasibility of using competition binding experiments to identify specific lipid-protein interactions in living cells. Finally, we applied the technique to determine the lipid specificity, the number of binding sites, and the dissociation coefficient of membrane binding for the Gag matrix domain of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, which provides insight into early assembly steps of the retrovirus. PMID:26039166

  4. [Immunodiffusion analysis of plasma proteins in the canine family].

    PubMed

    Baranov, O K; Iurishina, N A; Savina, M A

    1976-01-01

    Immunodiffusion studies have been made on the plasma of 9 species (Vulpes vulpes, V. corsak, Alopex lagopus, Canis aureus, C. lupus, C. familiaris, C. dingo, Nyctereutes procynoides, Fennecus zerde) from the family of Canidae using milk antisera. Unlike rabbit antisera used earlier, milk antisera make it possible to detect more significant antigenic divergency with respect to 5 alpha- and beta-globulins. These globulins seem to have a higher evolution rate of antigenic mosaics as compared to other plasma proteins in the family investigated. The family Canidae serologically may be divided into two main groups: 1) the genus Canis which includes the wolf, domestic dog, dingo, jackal and 2) species which significantly differ from the former (the fox, polar fox, dog fox, fennec). In relation to these two groups, the raccoon dog occupies special position. PMID:62473

  5. Changes in total plasma content of electrolytes and proteins with maximal exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Strand, J. C.; Petrofsky, J. S.; Hipskind, S. G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    To determine to what extent the increases in concentration of plasma proteins and electrolytes with short maximal work were a result of hemoconcentration, the changes in plasma volume and total content of the plasma constituents were simultaneously evaluated. The results obtained from six human subjects indicated that in comparison to preexercise values there was a net decrease in total content of plasma protein, sodium, and chloride in the first 2 min of the postexercise period, due primarily to a significant loss (13-15%) of plasma fluid. The total plasma potassium content was increased immediately after exercise but was significantly below the preexercise plasma content after 2 min of recovery.

  6. Bovine plasma proteins increase virulence of Haemophilus somnus in mice.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Roger S; Kimball, Richard A; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2007-01-01

    The role of bovine serum or plasma proteins in Haemophilus somnus virulence was investigated in a mouse model of septicemia. An increase in virulence was detected when the organism was pre-incubated for 5 min and inoculated with fetal calf serum. When purified bovine serum or plasma proteins were pre-incubated with H. somnus before inoculating into mice, transferrin was found to increase virulence. Bovine lactoferrin was also noted to increase virulence, but to a lesser extent and had a delayed time course when compared with transferrin. Using an ELISA assay, an increased amount of H. somnus whole cells and culture supernatant bound to bovine transferrin when the organism was grown in iron-restricted media. Lactoferrin also bound to H. somnus, but binding was not affected by growth in iron-restricted media and it was eliminated with 2M NaCl, which reversed charge mediated binding. Transferrin, but not lactoferrin, supported growth of H. somnus on iron-depleted agar based media using a disk assay. Therefore, lactoferrin increased virulence by an undetermined mechanism whereas transferrin increased virulence of H. somnus by binding to iron-regulated outer-membrane proteins (IROMPs) and providing iron to the pathogen. PMID:17125964

  7. Loss of propranolol during ultrafiltration in plasma protein binding studies.

    PubMed

    Parsons, D L; Fan, H F

    1986-12-01

    A commercial ultrafiltration device was examined for propranolol plasma protein binding studies. A nonspecific loss of free drug resulted in a low recovery in the ultrafiltrate. Use of a rinse filtrate did not completely compensate for this loss. Use of different centrifugal forces indicated the loss was not due to significant membrane rejection of drug. Equilibrating the device with sample for four hours slightly improved the recovery while use of a higher ionic strength buffer had no effect. Propranolol was bound by the membrane, but there was a larger, continuous loss to the o-ring. Results with an alternate commercial device were also unsatisfactory. PMID:3797814

  8. Protein adsorption on low temperature isotropic carbon. III. Isotherms, competitivity, desorption and exchange of human albumin and fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Andrade, J D

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we consider the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on low temperature isotropic carbon (LTIC). A subsequent paper considers the adsorption of other plasma proteins [Feng L, Andrade JD, Colloids and Surfaces (in press)]. Carbon fragments and silica plates were used as adsorbents. Adsorption was carried out by incubating the adsorbents in solutions of 125I-labelled and unlabelled proteins (single component system), or with buffer-diluted human plasma (multicomponent system). Adsorbed proteins then underwent displacement by buffer, by single protein solutions or by dilute plasma. Results show that the LTIC substrate adsorbs a large amount of proteins before saturation, which may be due to multilayer adsorption. LTIC also irreversibly holds adsorbed proteins against the exchange agents used; little adsorbed proteins can be displaced, even after a very short adsorption time. There is no preferential adsorption for either albumin or fibrinogen on LTIC from their binary solutions, suggesting that both proteins have high affinities for the surface. Such strong interactions between LTIC and proteins are not attributed to electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, protein adsorption on the silica surface is selective and reversible, with a much higher affinity for fibrinogen than albumin and an even higher affinity for some other plasma proteins. The paper also discusses the effect of sequential protein addition to a solution on the surface concentration and suppression of adsorption of both proteins in the presence of other plasma proteins. A very important conclusion is that the LTIC surface is very active towards proteins adsorption. PMID:8061122

  9. Effect of animal plasma proteins on intestinal damage and recovery of neonatal pigs infected with rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Corl, Benjamin A; Harrell, Robert J; Moon, Hong Kil; Phillips, Oulayvahn; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Arthington, John D; Odle, Jack

    2007-12-01

    Rotaviruses infect and elicit diarrhea in neonates of most mammalian species and cause 800,000 infant deaths a year. We used neonatal piglets to study the effects of dietary animal plasma proteins on intestinal health following rotavirus infection. Plasma protein contains a diverse mixture of functional components with biological activity and improves the health of animals challenged with other diarrhea-causing pathogens. In a 2 x 2 factorial design, we compared plasma protein- and soy protein-based diets in rotavirus-infected and noninfected piglets to determine if plasma protein reduced acute rotavirus intestinal damage or improved recovery. All infected animals shed rotavirus particles in their feces. Infected, plasma protein-fed piglets maintained growth rates similar to noninfected piglets in the first 3 days of infection; however, soy protein-fed piglets experienced reduced gains. Furthermore, infected, plasma protein-fed piglets showed no clinical signs of diarrhea. Infection reduced intestinal villus height and the villus height/crypt depth ratio by Day 3 of infection; however, reductions were not attenuated with dietary plasma protein. Infected, plasma protein-fed pigs maintained greater intestinal mucosa protein and estimated total lactase activity than infected, soy protein-fed piglets. Plasma proteins contain growth factors that may aid in rate of recovery as well as virus-binding proteins that may reduce infection pressure in the intestine. These data, combined with findings from other studies using plasma proteins in animal models of diarrhea, indicate the potential for using plasma proteins to improve the health of diarrheic neonates. PMID:17475463

  10. Plasma Proteins Interaction with Curcumin Nanoparticles: Implications in Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural bioactive polyphenol, has been widely investigated as a conventional medicine for centuries. Over the past two decades, major pre-clinical and clinical trials have demonstrated its safe therapeutic profile but clinical translation has been hampered due to rapid degradation, poor water solubility, bioavailability and pharmaco-kinetics. To overcome such translational issues, many laboratories have focused on developing curcumin nanoformulations for cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the evolution of curcumin nanomedicine in cancer therapeutics, the possible interactions between the surface of curcumin nanoparticles and plasma proteins, the role of nanoparticle-protein complex architecture parameters, and the rational design of clinically useful curcumin nanoformulations. Considering all the biologically relevant phenomena, curcumin nanoformulations can be developed as a new neutraceutical or pharmaceutical agent. PMID:23566382

  11. Detecting protein association at the T cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Florian; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2015-04-01

    At the moment, many models on T cell signaling rely on results obtained via rather indirect methodologies, which makes direct comparison and conclusions to the in vivo situation difficult. Recently, a variety of new imaging methods were developed, which have the potential to directly shed light onto the mysteries of protein association at the T cell membrane. While the new modalities are extremely promising, for a broad readership it may be difficult to judge the results, since technological shortcomings are not always obvious. In this review article, we put key questions on the mechanism of protein interactions in the T cell plasma membrane into relation with techniques that allow to address such questions. We discuss applicability of the techniques, their strengths and weaknesses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling. PMID:25300585

  12. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lösche, M; Piepenstock, M; Diederich, A; Grünewald, T; Kjaer, K; Vaknin, D

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of approximately 40 A. A systematic dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state depends on the dipole moment density at the interface. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE A1 PMID:8298041

  13. Analyte induced water adsorbability in gas phase biosensors: the influence of ethinylestradiol on the water binding protein capacity.

    PubMed

    Snopok, Borys; Kruglenko, Ivanna

    2015-05-01

    An ultra-sensitive gas phase biosensor/tracer/bio-sniffer is an emerging technology platform designed to provide real-time information on air-borne analytes, or those in liquids, through classical headspace analysis. The desired bio-sniffer measures gaseous 17α- ethinylestradiol (ETED) as frequency changes on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), which is a result of the interactions of liquid sample components in the headspace (ETED and water) with a biorecognition layer. The latter was constructed by immobilization of polyclonal antiserum against a phenolic A-ring of estrogenic receptors through protein A. The QCM response exhibited stretched exponential kinetics of negative frequency shifts with reversible and "irreversible" components of mass uptake onto the sensor surface in static headspace conditions when exposed to water solutions of ETED over the sensor working range, from 10(-10) to 10(-17) g L(-1). It was shown that the variations in the QCM response characteristics are due to the change of the water-binding capacity of the sensing layer induced by protein transformations initiated by the binding of ETED molecules. This result is well correlated with the natural physiological function of estrogens in controlling the homeostasis of body fluids in living beings. PMID:25763411

  14. Properties of proteins binding plasma progesterone in pregnant Cape porcupines (Hystrix africaeaustralis).

    PubMed

    Louw, A I; van Wyk, V; van Aarde, R J

    1992-09-01

    The properties of progesterone-binding proteins in plasma of pregnant Cape porcupines were investigated using radiolabelled progesterone and either progesterone or cortisol as competing ligands as well as native plasma and heated (60 degrees C for 30 min) plasma. The results demonstrated that plasma from pregnant porcupines contains corticosteroid-binding globulin, but that it constitutes a significant portion of plasma progesterone-binding proteins only during the early stages of pregnancy. Corticosteroid-binding globulin of porcupines appears to be as heat labile as that of guinea-pigs. Concentrations of progesterone-binding proteins in plasma increased during pregnancy to reach concentrations at the eleventh week that were 25 times higher than those of progesterone; concentrations increased significantly (r2 = 0.88) with the increase in progesterone concentration. The results indicate that plasma progesterone-binding proteins in Cape porcupines (Old World hystricomorph) are similar in composition to those in guinea-pigs (New World hystricomorph). PMID:1432942

  15. Industrial-scale proteomics: from liters of plasma to chemically synthesized proteins.

    PubMed

    Rose, Keith; Bougueleret, Lydie; Baussant, Thierry; Böhm, Günter; Botti, Paolo; Colinge, Jacques; Cusin, Isabelle; Gaertner, Hubert; Gleizes, Anne; Heller, Manfred; Jimenez, Silvia; Johnson, Andrew; Kussmann, Martin; Menin, Laure; Menzel, Christoph; Ranno, Frederic; Rodriguez-Tomé, Patricia; Rogers, John; Saudrais, Cedric; Villain, Matteo; Wetmore, Diana; Bairoch, Amos; Hochstrasser, Denis

    2004-07-01

    Human blood plasma is a useful source of proteins associated with both health and disease. Analysis of human blood plasma is a challenge due to the large number of peptides and proteins present and the very wide range of concentrations. In order to identify as many proteins as possible for subsequent comparative studies, we developed an industrial-scale (2.5 liter) approach involving sample pooling for the analysis of smaller proteins (M(r) generally < ca. 40 000 and some fragments of very large proteins). Plasma from healthy males was depleted of abundant proteins (albumin and IgG), then smaller proteins and polypeptides were separated into 12 960 fractions by chromatographic techniques. Analysis of proteins and polypeptides was performed by mass spectrometry prior to and after enzymatic digestion. Thousands of peptide identifications were made, permitting the identification of 502 different proteins and polypeptides from a single pool, 405 of which are listed here. The numbers refer to chromatographically separable polypeptide entities present prior to digestion. Combining results from studies with other plasma pools we have identified over 700 different proteins and polypeptides in plasma. Relatively low abundance proteins such as leptin and ghrelin and peptides such as bradykinin, all invisible to two-dimensional gel technology, were clearly identified. Proteins of interest were synthesized by chemical methods for bioassays. We believe that this is the first time that the small proteins in human blood plasma have been separated and analyzed so extensively. PMID:15221774

  16. Protein composition of seminal plasma in fractionated stallion ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Kareskoski, A M; del Alamo, M M Rivera; Güvenc, K; Reilas, T; Calvete, J J; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Andersson, M; Katila, T

    2011-02-01

    Seminal plasma (SP) contains several types of compounds derived from the epididymides and accessory glands. The aim of this study was to examine the protein composition of different ejaculate fractions. Trial I: fractionated ejaculates were collected from two normal and two subfertile stallions. Samples containing pre-sperm fluid and the first sperm-rich jets (HIGH-1), the main sperm-rich portion (HIGH-2), the jets with low sperm concentrations (LOW), and a combined whole-ejaculate (WE) sample was centrifuged, and the SP was filtered and frozen. A part of each SP sample was stored (5°C, 24 h) with spermatozoa from HIGH-2 and skim milk extender. Sperm motility was evaluated after storage in extender mixed with the stallion's own SP or SP from one of the other stallions (sperm from a normal stallion stored in SP from a subfertile stallion and vice versa). Protein composition was analysed using reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. The area-under-the-curve (AUC) was used for quantitative comparison of proteins within fractions. Trial II: semen samples were collected from seven stallions. Fractions with the highest (HIGH) and lowest (LOW) sperm concentrations and WE samples were examined using SDS-PAGE and densitometry. No significant differences emerged between fractions in the AUC-values of the Horse Seminal Protein-1 (HSP-1) and HSP-2 peaks, or the peak containing HSP-3 and HSP-4 (HSP-3/4). Levels of HSP-1, HSP-2 and HSP-3/4 were not significantly correlated with total sperm motility, progressive sperm motility or average path velocity after storage. Significant differences between ejaculate fractions in the amount of different protein groups present in SP were not found in Trial I; but in Trial II, the proteins in the 60-70 kDa range were more abundant in LOW than in HIGH and WE, indicating that this band contained proteins derived mainly from the seminal vesicles, which produce most of the SP in LOW. PMID

  17. Subproteomics: identification of plasma membrane proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Navarre, Catherine; Degand, Hervé; Bennett, Keiryn L; Crawford, Janne S; Mørtz, Ejvind; Boutry, Marc

    2002-12-01

    As a consequence of their poor solubility during isoelectric focusing, integral membrane proteins are generally absent from two-dimensional gel proteome maps. In order to analyze the yeast plasma membrane proteome, a plasma membrane purification protocol was optimized in order to reduce contaminating membranes and cytosolic proteins. Specifically, the new fractionation scheme largely depleted the plasma membrane fraction of cytosolic proteins by deoxycholate stripping and ribosomal proteins by sucrose gradient flotation. The plasma membrane complement was resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis using the cationic detergent cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide in the first, and sodium dodecyl sulfate in the second dimension, and fifty spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectometry. In spite of the presence of still contaminating ribosomal proteins, major proteins corresponded to known plasma membrane residents, the ABC transporters Pdr5p and Snq2p, the P-type H(+)-ATPase Pma1p, the glucose transporter Hxt7p, the seven transmembrane-span Mrh1p, the low affinity Fe(++) transporter Fet4p, the twelve-span Ptr2p, and the plasma membrane anchored casein kinase Yck2p. The four transmembrane-span proteins Sur7p and Nce102p were also present in the isolated plasma membranes, as well as the unknown protein Ygr266wp that probably contains a single transmembrane span. Thus, combining subcellular fractionation with adapted two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in the identification of intrinsic plasma membrane proteins. PMID:12469340

  18. Characterization of auxin-binding proteins from zucchini plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rice, M. S.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified two auxin-binding polypeptides in plasma membrane (PM) preparations from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) (Hicks et al. 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4948-4952). These polypeptides have molecular weights of 40 kDa and 42 kDa and label specifically with the photoaffinity auxin analog 5-N3-7-3H-IAA (azido-IAA). Azido-IAA permits both the covalent and radioactive tagging of auxin-binding proteins and has allowed us to characterize further the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, including the nature of their attachment to the PM, their relationship to each other, and their potential function. The azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides remain in the pelleted membrane fraction following high-salt and detergent washes, which indicates a tight and possibly integral association with the PM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of partially purified azido-IAA-labeled protein demonstrates that, in addition to the major isoforms of the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, which possess isoelectric points (pIs) of 8.2 and 7.2, respectively, several less abundant isoforms that display unique pIs are apparent at both molecular masses. Tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of the auxin-binding proteins indicates that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are closely related or are modifications of the same polypeptide. Phase extraction with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in partitioning of the azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides into the aqueous (hydrophilic) phase. This apparently paradoxical behavior is also exhibited by certain integral membrane proteins that aggregate to form channels. The results of gel filtration indicate that the auxin-binding proteins do indeed aggregate strongly and that the polypeptides associate to form a dimer or multimeric complex in vivo. These characteristics are consistent with the hypothesis that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are subunits of a multimeric integral membrane protein which has an auxin-binding site, and which may

  19. Fumonisin mycotoxicosis in broilers: plasma proteins and coagulation modifications.

    PubMed

    Espada, Y; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Cuadradas, C; Cabañes, F J

    1997-01-01

    The effects of fumonisin B1 (FB1) intoxication in chickens were evaluated in three experiments. Two-day-old broiler chicks were fed a diet containing 10 mg pure FB1/kg feed for 6 days; some chicks were necropsied at this time, and others were allowed to recover for 5 wk before necropsy. In two other experiments, 2-day-old chicks were fed a broiler starter ration prepared with Fusarium moniliforme culture material containing FB1; one group received 30 mg/kg for 2 wk, and another received 300 mg FB1/kg for 8 days. Compared with controls, intoxicated chicks exhibited decreased prothrombin time, increased plasma fibrinogen (not included for the group receiving 30 mg/kg of culture material), and increased antithrombin III activity. Simultaneously decreased serum albumin concentration and increased serum globulins could be observed in groups intoxicated with F. moniliforme culture material containing FB1. The group allowed to recover for 5 wk did not exhibit modifications in hemostasis or serum proteins compared with controls. The results indicate that low doses of pure FB1 (10 mg/kg) and FB1 from F. moniliforme culture material (30 mg/kg) may alter hemostasis and serum proteins in young chicks. PMID:9087322

  20. Extraction of methocarbamol from human plasma with a polypyrrole/multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite decorated with magnetic nanoparticles as an adsorbent followed by electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Khayamian, Taghi; Hashemian, Zahra

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a polypyrrole/multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite decorated with Fe3 O4 nanoparticles was chemically synthesized and applied as a novel adsorbent for the extraction of methocarbamol from human plasma. Electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry was used for the determination of the analyte. The properties of the magnetic-modified adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The effects of experimental parameters on the extraction efficiency of the sorbent were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the linear dynamic range was found to be 2-150 ng/mL with the detection limit of 0.9 ng/mL. The relative standard deviation was 5.3% for three replicate measurements of methocarbamol in plasma sample. The extraction efficiency of the sorbent for the determination of different drugs with various polarities was also compared to that of Fe3 O4 -polypyrrole and Fe3 O4 -multiwalled carbon nanotubes sorbents. Finally, the method was used for the determination of methocarbamol in blood samples. PMID:25243817

  1. A Multi-technique Characterization of Adsorbed Protein Films: Orientation and Structure by ToF-SIMS, NEXAFS, SFG, and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baio, Joseph E.

    immobilization schemes. This protein contained both a hexahistidine tag and a cysteine residue, introduced at opposite ends of the HuLys Fv, for immobilization onto nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and maleimide oligo- (ethylene glycol) (MEG)-terminated substrates. The thiol group on the cysteine residue selectively binds to the MEG groups, while the his-tag selectively binds to the Ni-loaded NTA groups. XPS was used to monitor protein coverage on both surfaces by following the change in the nitrogen atomic %. The ToF-SIMS data provided a clear differentiation between the two samples due to the intensity differences of secondary ions originating from asymmetrically located amino acids in HuLys Fv. Indicating that the HuLys Fv fragment when adsorbed into the NTA and MEG substrates will be induced into two different orientations. On the NTA substrate the protein's binding site is accessible, while on the MEG substrate the binding site is oriented towards the surface. By taking advantage of the electron pathway through the heme group in cytochrome c (CytoC) electrochemists have built sensors based upon CytoC immobilized onto functionalized metal electrodes. When immobilized onto a charged surface, CytoC, with its distribution of lysine and glutamate residues around its surface, should orient and form a well-ordered protein film. Here a detailed examination of CytoC orientation when electrostatically immobilized onto both amine (NH 3+) and carboxyl (COO-) functionalized gold is presented. Again, protein coverage, on both surfaces, was monitored by the change in the atomic % N, as determined by XPS. ToF-SIMS data demonstrated a clear separation between the two samples based on the intensity differences of secondary ions stemming from amino acids located asymmetrically within CytoC, indicating opposite orientations of the protein on the two different surfaces. Spectral features within the in situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectra, acquired for the protein interacting with

  2. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; et al

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  3. The Uranium from Seawater Program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T; Bonheyo, George; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana; Warner, Marvin G; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David; Mayes, Richard T; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas; Addleman, Shane R; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Dr. Ken; Breier, Crystalline; D'Alessandro, Dr. Evan

    2016-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory s (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing at Woods Hole

  4. Treatment Characteristics of Second Order Structure of Proteins Using Low-Pressure Oxygen RF Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Nakahigashi, Akari; Kawaguchi, Ryutaro; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-10-01

    Removal of proteins from the surface of medical equipments is attempted using oxygen plasma produced by RF discharge. FTIR spectra indicate that the bonding of C-H and N-H in the casein protein is reduced after irradiation of oxygen plasma. Also, the second order structure of a protein such as α-helix and β-sheet are modified by the oxygen plasma. Complete removal of casein protein with the concentration of 0.016 mg/cm2 that is equivalent to remnants on the medical equipment requires two hours avoiding the damage to medical equipments.

  5. Treatment Characteristics of Second Order Structure of Proteins Using Low-Pressure Oxygen RF Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Nakahigashi, Akari; Kawaguchi, Ryutaro; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-10-13

    Removal of proteins from the surface of medical equipments is attempted using oxygen plasma produced by RF discharge. FTIR spectra indicate that the bonding of C-H and N-H in the casein protein is reduced after irradiation of oxygen plasma. Also, the second order structure of a protein such as {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet are modified by the oxygen plasma. Complete removal of casein protein with the concentration of 0.016 mg/cm{sup 2} that is equivalent to remnants on the medical equipment requires two hours avoiding the damage to medical equipments.

  6. Protein diffusion in plant cell plasma membranes: the cell-wall corral

    PubMed Central

    Martinière, Alexandre; Runions, John

    2013-01-01

    Studying protein diffusion informs us about how proteins interact with their environment. Work on protein diffusion over the last several decades has illustrated the complex nature of biological lipid bilayers. The plasma membrane contains an array of membrane-spanning proteins or proteins with peripheral membrane associations. Maintenance of plasma membrane microstructure can be via physical features that provide intrinsic ordering such as lipid microdomains, or from membrane-associated structures such as the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence indicates, that in the case of plant cells, the cell wall seems to be a major player in maintaining plasma membrane microstructure. This interconnection / interaction between cell-wall and plasma membrane proteins most likely plays an important role in signal transduction, cell growth, and cell physiological responses to the environment. PMID:24381579

  7. Binding contribution between synaptic vesicle membrane and plasma membrane proteins in neurons: an AFM study.

    PubMed

    Sritharan, K C; Quinn, A S; Taatjes, D J; Jena, B P

    1998-01-01

    The final step in the exocytotic process is the docking and fusion of membrane-bound secretory vesicles at the cell plasma membrane. This docking and fusion is brought about by several participating vesicle membrane, plasma membrane and soluble cytosolic proteins. A clear understanding of the interactions between these participating proteins giving rise to vesicle docking and fusion is essential. In this study, the binding force profiles between synaptic vesicle membrane and plasma membrane proteins have been examined for the first time using the atomic force microscope. Binding force contributions of a synaptic vesicle membrane protein VAMP1, and the plasma membrane proteins SNAP-25 and syntaxin, are also implicated from these studies. Our study suggests that these three proteins are the major, if not the only contributors to the interactive binding force that exist between the two membranes. PMID:10452835

  8. In vitro protein binding of liraglutide in human plasma determined by reiterated stepwise equilibrium dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Plum, Anne; Jensen, Lisbeth Bjerring; Kristensen, Jesper Bøggild

    2013-01-01

    Liraglutide is a human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It is based on human GLP-1 with the addition of a 16-carbon fatty acid, which facilitates binding to plasma proteins, thus prolonging the elimination half-life and allowing once-daily administration. It has not been possible to quantify liraglutide protein binding by ultrafiltration (the usual method of choice), as the lipophilic molecule becomes trapped in the filter membrane. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a methodology that could determine the extent of liraglutide binding to plasma proteins in vitro. We report here the details of a novel reiterated stepwise equilibrium dialysis assay that has successfully been used to quantify liraglutide plasma protein binding. The assay allowed quantification of liraglutide binding to proteins in purified plasma protein solutions and human plasma samples and was effective at plasma dilutions as low as 5%. At a clinically relevant liraglutide concentration (104 pM), greater than 98.9% of liraglutide was bound to protein. Specific binding to human serum albumin and α1-acid glycoprotein was 99.4% and 99.3%, respectively. The novel methodology described herein could have an application in the quantification of plasma protein binding of other highly lipophilic drug molecules. PMID:23853127

  9. Biofield-effect protein-sensor: Plasma functionalization of polyaniline, protein immobilization, and sensing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chae-Ryong; Lee, Hyun-Uk; Ahn, Kyun; Jeong, Se-Young; Choi, Jun-Hee; Kim, Jinwoo; Cho, Jiung

    2014-06-01

    We report the fabrication of a biofield-effect protein-sensor (BioFEP) based on atmospheric-pressure plasma (AP) treatment of a conducting polyaniline (PANI) film. Successive H2 and O2 AP (OHAP) treatment generated dominant hydrophilic -OH and O=CO- functional groups on the PANI film surface, which served as strong binding sites to immobilize bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein molecules. The output current changes of the BioFEP as a function of BSA concentration were obtained. The resistance of the OHAP surface could be sensitively increased from 2.5 × 108 Ω to 2.0 × 1012 Ω with increasing BSA concentrations in the range of 0.025-4 μg/ml. The results suggest that the method is a simple and cost-effective tool to determine the concentration of BSA by measuring electrical resistance.

  10. Continuous Reduction of Protein-Bound Uraemic Toxins with Improved Oxidative Stress by Using the Oral Charcoal Adsorbent AST-120 in Haemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Suguru; Kazama, Junichiro J.; Omori, Kentaro; Matsuo, Koji; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Kawamura, Kazuko; Matsuto, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Toru; Narita, Ichiei

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of protein-bound uraemic toxins (PBUTs) is one of the reasons for the development of uraemia-related complications including cardiovascular disease; however, conventional haemodialysis is limited in its ability to remove PBUTs. We aimed to examine whether the oral charcoal adsorbent AST-120 has an additive effect on PBUT removal in haemodialysis patients. During the 4-week study, anuric patients undergoing haemodialysis received AST-120 (6 g/day) in the last 2 weeks (n = 10) or the first 2 weeks (n = 10). Serum levels of total and free PBUTs such as indoxyl sulfate, p-cresyl sulfate, and phenyl sulfate at the pre- and postdialysis sessions were measured before and after AST-120 use and after discontinuation. Levels of the oxidative stress markers oxidized albumin and 8-isoprostane were also measured. AST-120 use induced dramatic reduction of indoxyl sulfate (total, 45.7% [33.2–50.5%]; free, 70.4% [44.8–79.8%]), p-cresyl sulfate (total, 31.1% [25.0–48.0%]; free, 63.5% [49.3–70.9%]), and phenyl sulfate (free, 50.6% [32.3–71.2%]) levels; however, this effect disappeared after the discontinuation of AST-120. AST-120 use also induced substantial reduction of the oxidized albumin and 8-isoprostane levels. In conclusion, oral administration of AST-120 had additive effects on the continuous reduction of some PBUTs in anuric patients undergoing haemodialysis. PMID:26395517

  11. Electroejaculation increases low molecular weight proteins in seminal plasma modifying sperm quality in Corriedale rams.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, A; Manes, J; Cesari, A; Alberio, R; Hozbor, F

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of seminal collection method (artificial vagina or electroejaculation) on the protein composition of seminal plasma and sperm quality parameters in Corriedale rams. To address this question, we assessed the effect of seminal collection method on motility, plasma membrane integrity and functionality, mitochondrial functionality and the decondensation state of nuclear chromatin in sperm cells. Volume, pH, osmolarity, protein concentration, total protein content and protein profile using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and 2-D polyacrylamide electrophoresis of seminal plasma collected with artificial vagina and electroejaculation were also analysed. The main findings from this study were that ejaculates obtained with electroejaculation had (i) a higher number of spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane and functional mitochondria and (ii) a higher proportion of seminal plasma, total protein content and relative abundance of low molecular weight proteins than ejaculates obtained with artificial vagina. Five of these proteins were identified by mass spectrometry: binder of sperm 5 precursor; RSVP14; RSVP22; epididymal secretory protein E1 and clusterin. One protein spot with molecular weight of approximately 31 kDa and isoelectric point of 4.8 was only found in the seminal plasma from electroejaculation. PMID:24494601

  12. STIM Proteins and the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Silvia; Meyer, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic organelles can interact with each other through stable junctions where the two membranes are kept in close apposition. The junction that connects the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane (ER-PM junction) is unique in providing a direct communication link between the ER and the PM. In a recently discovered signaling process, STIM (stromal-interacting molecule) proteins sense a drop in ER Ca2+ levels and directly activate Orai PM Ca2+ channels across the junction space. In an inverse process, a voltage-gated PM Ca2+ channel can directly open ER ryanodine-receptor Ca2+ channels in striated-muscle cells. Although ER-PM junctions were first described 50 years ago, their broad importance in Ca2+ signaling, as well as in the regulation of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol lipid transfer, has only recently been realized. Here, we discuss research from different fields to provide a broad perspective on the structures and unique roles of ER-PM junctions in controlling signaling and metabolic processes. PMID:21548779

  13. Fibroblastic synoviocytes secrete plasma proteins via α2 -macroglobulins serving as intracellular and extracellular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke-Wei; Murray, Elsa J Brochmann; Murray, Samuel S

    2015-11-01

    Changes in plasma protein levels in synovial fluid (SF) have been implicated in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It was previously thought that the presence of plasma proteins in SF reflected ultrafiltration or extravasation from the vasculature, possibly due to retraction of inflamed endothelial cells. Recent proteomic analyses have confirmed the abundant presence of plasma proteins in SF from control and arthritic patients. Systematic depletion of high-abundance plasma proteins from SF and conditioned media from synoviocytes cultured in serum, and protein analysis under denaturing/reducing conditions have limited our understanding of sources and the native structures of "plasma protein" complexes in SF. Using Western blotting, qPCR, and mass spectrometry, we found that Hig-82 lapine fibroblastic synovicytes cultured under serum-free conditions expressed and secreted plasma proteins, including the cytokine-binding protein secreted phosphoprotein 24 kDa (Spp24) and many of the proteases and protease inhibitors found in SF. Treating synoviocytes with TGF-β1 or BMP-2 for 24 h upregulated the expression of plasma proteins, including Spp24, α2 -HS-glycoprotein, α1 -antitrypsin, IGF-1, and C-reactive protein. Furthermore, many of the plasma proteins of mass <151 kDa were secreted as disulfide-bound complexes with members of the α2 -macroglobulin (A2M) family, which serve as intracellular and extracellular chaperones, not protease inhibitors. Using brefeldin A to block vesicular traffic and protease inhibitors to inhibit endogenous activation of naïve A2M, we demonstrated that the complexes were formed in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and that Ca(2+) cysteine protease-dependent processes are involved. PMID:25900303

  14. Determination of Cremophor EL in plasma after sample preparation with solid phase extraction and plasma protein precipitation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T H; Böhler, J; Frahm, A W

    2001-01-01

    The non-ionic emulsifier Cremophor EL can be quantified using a special potentiometric titration technique with barium chloride activation and precipitation with sodium tetraphenylborate. The end point of the titration is indicated by an ionsensitive coated wire electrode which responds to an excess of tetraphenylborate ions. Sample preparation is necessary to quantify the excipient in plasma of patients receiving ciclosporin formulations with Cremophor EL (Sandimmun), since plasma proteins cause disturbances of the titration. Solid phase extraction was tested with various sorbent materials. Although some of the sorbents yielded good extraction rates of Cremophor EL from aqueous solutions, the extraction rates from plasma were significantly lower. Therefore, plasma protein precipitation with acetonitrile has been examined as an alternative to SPE and has been proved the superior method. Using the precipitation technique, a recovery rate of above 90% was achieved. Furthermore, the limit of detection from plasma was found to be 30 microg, in analogy to the determination from aqueous solutions. The combination of the plasma protein precipitation with the potentiometric titration allows quantitation and thus pharmakokinetic investigations of Cremophor EL in patients treated with Sandimmun after kidney-transplantation. PMID:11199229

  15. Meal composition and plasma amino acid ratios: Effect of various proteins or carbohydrates, and of various protein concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of meals containing various proteins and carbohydrates, and of those containing various proportions of protein (0 percent to 20 percent of a meal, by weight) or of carbohydrate (0 percent to 75 percent), on plasma levels of certain large neutral amino acids (LNAA) in rats previously fasted for 19 hours were examined. Also the plasma tryptophan ratios (the ratio of the plasma trytophan concentration to the summed concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids) and other plasma amino acid ratios were calculated. (The plasma tryptophan ratio has been shown to determine brain tryptophan levels and, thereby, to affect the synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter serotonin). A meal containing 70 percent to 75 percent of an insulin-secreting carbohydrate (dextrose or dextrin) increased plasma insulin levels and the tryptophan ratio; those containing 0 percent or 25 percent carbohydrate failed to do so. Addition of as little as 5 percent casein to a 70 percent carbohydrate meal fully blocked the increase in the plasma tryptophan ratio without affecting the secretion of insulin - probably by contributing much larger quantities of the other LNAA than of tryptophan to the blood. Dietary proteins differed in their ability to suppress the carbohydrate-induced rise in the plasma tryptophan ratio. Addition of 10 percent casein, peanut meal, or gelatin fully blocked this increase, but lactalbumin failed to do so, and egg white did so only partially. (Consumption of the 10 percent gelatin meal also produced a major reduction in the plasma tyrosine ratio, and may thereby have affected brain tyrosine levels and catecholamine synthesis.) These observations suggest that serotonin-releasing neurons in brains of fasted rats are capable of distinguishing (by their metabolic effects) between meals poor in protein but rich in carbohydrates that elicit insulin secretion, and all other meals. The changes in brain serotonin caused by carbohydrate-rich, protein

  16. WHEY PROTEIN SUPPRESSES PLASMA GHRELIN CONCENTRATIONS IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE MEN AND WOMEN.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most satiating macronutrient appears to be dietary protein; however, it is unclear if different dietary protein sources have differing effects on satiety. Few studies that have investigated the effects of whey protein on satiety hormones, such as plasma ghrelin, in overweight and obese men and w...

  17. Soluble Proteins Form Film by the Treatment of Low Temperature Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, Sanae; Sakakita, Hajime; Ishikawa, Kenji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Hori, Masaru; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2015-09-01

    It has been pointed out that low temperature plasma in atmosphere was feasible to use for hemostasis without heat injury. Indeed, earlier studies demonstrated that low temperature plasma played an important role to stimulate platelets to aggregate and turned on the proteolytic activities of coagulation factors, resulting in the acceleration of the natural blood coagulation process. On the other hands, our developed equips could immediately form clots upon the contact with plasma flair, while the histological appearance was different from natural coagulation. Based on these findings in formed clots, we sought to determine if plasma flair supplied by our devices was capable of forming film using a series of soluble proteins Following plasma treatment, films were formed from bovine serum albumin, and the other plasma proteins at physiological concentration. Analysis of trans-electron microscope demonstrated that plasma treatment generated small protein particles and made them fuse to be larger aggregations The combined results demonstrated that plasma are capable of aggregating soluble proteins and that platelets and coagulation factors are not necessary for plasma induced blood coagulation. Supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Area (21590454, 24590498, and 24108006 to Y. I.).

  18. Multi-protein assemblies underlie the mesoscale organization of the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Sinem K.; Honigmann, Alf; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; Lang, Thorsten; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2014-01-01

    Most proteins have uneven distributions in the plasma membrane. Broadly speaking, this may be caused by mechanisms specific to each protein, or may be a consequence of a general pattern that affects the distribution of all membrane proteins. The latter hypothesis has been difficult to test in the past. Here, we introduce several approaches based on click chemistry, through which we study the distribution of membrane proteins in living cells, as well as in membrane sheets. We found that the plasma membrane proteins form multi-protein assemblies that are long lived (minutes), and in which protein diffusion is restricted. The formation of the assemblies is dependent on cholesterol. They are separated and anchored by the actin cytoskeleton. Specific proteins are preferentially located in different regions of the assemblies, from their cores to their edges. We conclude that the assemblies constitute a basic mesoscale feature of the membrane, which affects the patterning of most membrane proteins, and possibly also their activity. PMID:25060237

  19. Multi-protein assemblies underlie the mesoscale organization of the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, Sinem K.; Honigmann, Alf; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; Lang, Thorsten; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2014-07-01

    Most proteins have uneven distributions in the plasma membrane. Broadly speaking, this may be caused by mechanisms specific to each protein, or may be a consequence of a general pattern that affects the distribution of all membrane proteins. The latter hypothesis has been difficult to test in the past. Here, we introduce several approaches based on click chemistry, through which we study the distribution of membrane proteins in living cells, as well as in membrane sheets. We found that the plasma membrane proteins form multi-protein assemblies that are long lived (minutes), and in which protein diffusion is restricted. The formation of the assemblies is dependent on cholesterol. They are separated and anchored by the actin cytoskeleton. Specific proteins are preferentially located in different regions of the assemblies, from their cores to their edges. We conclude that the assemblies constitute a basic mesoscale feature of the membrane, which affects the patterning of most membrane proteins, and possibly also their activity.

  20. Increased levels of hyper-stable protein aggregates in plasma of older adults.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Trasatti, Hannah; Wymer, James P; Colón, Wilfredo

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that misfold into hyper-stable/degradation-resistant species during aging may accumulate and disrupt protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis), thereby posing a survival risk to any organism. Using the method diagonal two-dimensional (D2D) SDS-PAGE, which separates hyper-stable SDS-resistant proteins at a proteomics level, we analyzed the plasma of healthy young (<30 years) and older (60-80 years) adults. We discovered the presence of soluble SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults, but found significantly lower levels in the plasma of young adults. We identified the inflammation-related chaperone protein haptoglobin as the main component of the hyper-stable aggregates. This observation is consistent with the growing link between accumulations of protein aggregates and aging across many organisms. It is plausible higher amounts of SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults may reflect a compromise in proteostasis that may potentially indicate cellular aging and/or disease risk. The results of this study have implications for further understanding the link between aging and the accumulation of protein aggregates, as well as potential for the development of aging-related biomarkers. More broadly, this novel application of D2D SDS-PAGE may be used to identify, quantify, and characterize the degradation-resistant protein aggregates in human plasma or any biological system. PMID:27179971

  1. Progranulin protein levels are differently regulated in plasma and CSF

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Alexandra M.; Finch, NiCole A.; Thomas, Colleen S.; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the relationship between plasma and CSF progranulin (PGRN) levels. Methods: Plasma and CSF PGRN were measured in a cohort of 345 subjects from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging by ELISA. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping was performed using TaqMan assays. Associations between PGRN and sex, age at sample collection, diagnosis, single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes (GRN, SORT1, and APOE), and Pittsburgh compound B score were explored separately in CSF and plasma using single variable linear regression models. Pearson partial correlation coefficient was used to estimate the correlation of PGRN in CSF and plasma. Results: Plasma (p = 0.0031) and CSF (p = 0.0044) PGRN significantly increased with age, whereas plasma PGRN levels were 7% lower (p = 0.0025) and CSF PGRN levels 5% higher (p = 0.0024) in male compared with female participants. Correcting for age and sex, higher plasma PGRN was associated with higher CSF PGRN (partial r = 0.17, p = 0.004). In plasma, both rs5848 (GRN; p = 0.002) and rs646776 (SORT1; p = 3.56E-7) were associated with PGRN, while only rs5848 showed highly significant association in CSF (p = 5.59E-14). Age, sex, rs5848 genotype, and plasma PGRN together accounted for only 18% of the variability observed in CSF PGRN. Conclusions: While some correlation exists between plasma and CSF PGRN, age, sex, and genetic factors differently affect PGRN levels. Therefore, caution should be taken when using plasma PGRN to predict PGRN changes in the brain. These findings further highlight that plasma PGRN levels may not accurately predict clinical features or response to future frontotemporal lobar degeneration therapies. PMID:24771538

  2. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases. PMID:26577786

  3. Synthesis and secretion of plasma proteins by embryonic chick hepatocytes: changing patterns during the first three days of culture

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    A simple model system is described for studying synthesis of plasma proteins. The system is based on chick embryo hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture which synthesize a broad spectrum of plasma proteins and secrete them into the culture medium. The secreted proteins are stable and consist almost exclusively of plasma proteins. The cultured cells are nonproliferating hepatic parenchymal cells whose cell mass remains constant in culture. By a modification of Laurell's rocket immunoelectrophoresis, the secreted plasma proteins can be detected in nanogram amounts in 3 microliter of unconcentrated culture medium. Kinetics of secretion are obtained by sequential assay of proteins accumulating in the medium. In this system it is demonstrated that: (a) intracellular plasma protein levels are equivalent to less than 5% of the daily secretion; (b) synthesis and secretion are continuous; and (c) the overall half-time for plasma protein movement along the secretory pathway is less than 10 min. From these results, it follows that the rate at which the plasma proteins are secreted gives a valid estimate of their rate of synthesis. This feature of the culture and the sensitivity of the assay allow routine measurements of plasma protein synthesis without disruption of the cells and without the use of radioisotopes. It is shown, furthermore, that the overall rate of plasma protein synthesis in cultured hepatocytes is constant over a 3- day period and is similar to that of the intact liver. 3,000,000 cells, containing 1 mg cell protein, synthesize 0.2 mg of plasma proteins daily, amounting to one-fifth of hepatocellular protein synthesis. Under the conditions used, albumin synthesis steadily decreases with culture time whereas the synthesis of many other plasma proteins increases. The observed phenotypic changes and reorganization of plasma protein synthesis illustrate how the system may be exploited for studying the regulatory processes governing plasma protein synthesis. PMID

  4. Depletion of the highly abundant protein albumin from human plasma using the Gradiflow.

    PubMed

    Rothemund, Deborah L; Locke, Vicki L; Liew, Audrey; Thomas, Theresa M; Wasinger, Valerie; Rylatt, Dennis B

    2003-03-01

    Analysis of complex protein samples by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) is often more difficult in the presence of a few predominant proteins. In plasma, proteins such as albumin mask proteins of lower abundance, as well as significantly limiting the amount of protein that can be loaded onto the immobilized pH gradient strip. In this paper the Gradiflow, a preparative electrophoresis system, has been used to deplete human plasma of the highly abundant protein albumin under native and denatured conditions. A three step protocol incorporating a charge separation to collect proteins with an isoelectric point greater than albumin and two size separations to isolate proteins larger and smaller than albumin, was used. When the albumin depleted fractions were analysed on pH 3-10 2-DE gels, proteins that were masked by albumin were revealed and proteins not seen in the unfractionated plasma sample were visualised. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the identification of the protein that lies beneath albumin to be C4B-binding protein alpha chain. The liquid fractions from the Gradiflow separations were also analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to confirm the proteins were separated according to their size and charge mobility in an electric field. PMID:12627381

  5. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by leucine is dependent on plasma amino acid availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reported that a physiological increase in plasma leucine increased translation initiation factor activity during 60- and 120-min leucine infusion. Muscle protein synthesis was stimulated at 60 min but not at 120 min, perhaps due to the decrease (-50%) in plasma essential amino acids (AA). ...

  6. Prednisolone-induced predisposition to femoral head separation and the accompanying plasma protein changes in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head separation (FHS) is an idiopathic bone problem that causes lameness and production losses in commercial poultry. In a model of prednisolone induced susceptibility to FHS, the changes in plasma proteins and peptides were analyzed to find possible biomarkers. Plasma from control and FHS-s...

  7. Detection of boar sperm plasma membrane protein using Rhodamine 640; implications for cryobiology and physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhodamine 640 (R640) was used to detect changes in boar sperm plasma membrane protein (PMP) during cryopreservation; a poorly understood phenomenon. The protocol was adapted for boar sperm so that semen samples (n = 17) could be analyzed for PMP (R640 positive) and plasma membrane integrity (PMI; Y...

  8. Plasma Protein Oxidation and Its Correlation with Antioxidant Potential During Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kanti Bhooshan; Mehdi, Mohd Murtaza; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the main molecular characteristic of aging is the progressive accumulation of oxidative damages in cellular macromolecules. Proteins are one of the main molecular targets of age-related oxidative stress, which have been observed during aging process in cellular systems. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to oxidation of amino acid side chains, formation of protein-protein cross-linkages, and oxidation of the peptide backbones. In the present study, we report the age-dependent oxidative alterations in biomarkers of plasma protein oxidation: protein carbonyls (PCO), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) and plasma total thiol groups (T-SH) in the Indian population and also correlate these parameters with total plasma antioxidant potential. We show an age dependent decrease in T-SH levels and increase in PCO and AOPPs level. The alterations in the levels of these parameters correlated significantly with the total antioxidant capacity of the plasma. The levels of oxidized proteins in plasma provide an excellent biomarker of oxidative stress due to the relative long half-life of such oxidized proteins. PMID:20826915

  9. Identification of Trypanosome Proteins in Plasma from African Sleeping Sickness Patients Infected with T. b. rhodesiense

    PubMed Central

    Enyaru, John C.; Carr, Steven A.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Control of human African sleeping sickness, caused by subspecies of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is based on preventing transmission by elimination of the tsetse vector and by active diagnostic screening and treatment of infected patients. To identify trypanosome proteins that have potential as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of African sleeping sickness, we have used a ‘deep-mining” proteomics approach to identify trypanosome proteins in human plasma. Abundant human plasma proteins were removed by immunodepletion. Depleted plasma samples were then digested to peptides with trypsin, fractionated by basic reversed phase and each fraction analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This sample processing and analysis method enabled identification of low levels of trypanosome proteins in pooled plasma from late stage sleeping sickness patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. A total of 254 trypanosome proteins were confidently identified. Many of the parasite proteins identified were of unknown function, although metabolic enzymes, chaperones, proteases and ubiquitin-related/acting proteins were found. This approach to the identification of conserved, soluble trypanosome proteins in human plasma offers a possible route to improved disease diagnosis and monitoring, since these molecules are potential biomarkers for the development of a new generation of antigen-detection assays. The combined immuno-depletion/mass spectrometric approach can be applied to a variety of infectious diseases for unbiased biomarker identification. PMID:23951171

  10. Preparation of core-shell structure Fe3 O4 @SiO2 superparamagnetic microspheres immoblized with iminodiacetic acid as immobilized metal ion affinity adsorbents for His-tag protein purification.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qian; Chen, Bing; Dong, Shaohua; Tian, Lei; Bai, Quan

    2016-04-01

    The core-shell structure Fe3 O4 /SiO2 magnetic microspheres were prepared by a sol-gel method, and immobiled with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) as metal ion affinity ligands for protein adsorption. The size, morphology, magnetic properties and surface modification of magnetic silica nanospheres were characterized by various modern analytical instruments. It was shown that the magnetic silica nanospheres exhibited superparamagnetism with saturation magnetization values of up to 58.1 emu/g. Three divalent metal ions, Cu(2+) , Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) , were chelated on the Fe3 O4 @SiO2 -IDA magnetic microspheres to adsorb lysozyme. The results indicated that Ni(2+) -chelating magnetic microspheres had the maximum adsorption capacity for lysozyme of 51.0 mg/g, adsorption equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min and the adsorbed protein could be easily eluted. Furthermore, the synthesized Fe3 O4 @SiO2 -IDA-Ni(2+) magnetic microspheres were successfully applied for selective enrichment lysozyme from egg white and His-tag recombinant Homer 1a from the inclusion extraction expressed in Escherichia coli. The result indicated that the magnetic microspheres showed unique characteristics of high selective separation behavior of protein mixture, low nonspecific adsorption, and easy handling. This demonstrates that the magnetic silica microspheres can be used efficiently in protein separation or purification and show great potential in the pretreatment of the biological sample. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26268650

  11. Desialylation of plasma proteins in severe dengue infection: possible role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, Soundravally; Lakshamanappa, Hoti Sugeerappa; Zachariah, Bobby; Nambiar, Selvaraj

    2008-09-01

    Oxidative stress in dengue infection has been suggested. This study was carried out to explore the plasma protein oxidation and its sialic acid content in dengue infection. Thirty-two dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), 25 dengue shock syndrome (DSS), 29 dengue fever (DF), and 63 healthy controls were included in this study. The extent of carbonylation, sulphydryl content, and desialylation of plasma protein was estimated in acute phase sample. Significantly higher levels of protein carbonyls and lower levels of sialic acid and sulphydryl groups were found in DHF and DSS compared with DF using one-way analysis of variance. Regression analysis showed that desialylation is dependent on protein carbonyls in DHF/DSS. This study indicates that, in dengue infection, plasma proteins undergo increased levels of desialylation, which can be attributed to the oxidative stress. Future studies on sialylation status of endothelium and platelets can show light into the pathogenesis of the dengue infection. PMID:18784228

  12. Nanoparticle size matters in the formation of plasma protein coronas on Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengyan; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-09-01

    When nanoparticles (NPs) enter into biological systems, proteins would interact with NPs to form the protein corona that can critically impact the biological identity of the nanomaterial. Owing to their fundamental scientific interest and potential applications, Fe3O4 NPs of different sizes have been developed for applications in cell separation and protein separation and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), etc. Here, we investigated whether nanoparticle size affects the formation of protein coronas around Fe3O4 NPs. Both the identification and quantification results demonstrated that particle size does play an important role in the formation of plasma protein coronas on Fe3O4 NPs; it not only influenced the protein composition of the formed plasma protein corona but also affected the abundances of the plasma proteins within the coronas. Understanding the different binding profiles of human plasma proteins on Fe3O4 NPs of different sizes would facilitate the exploration of the bio-distributions and biological fates of Fe3O4 NPs in biological systems. PMID:24974013

  13. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  14. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  15. Plasma protein alterations in the refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 1 subgroup of myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 1 (RAEB-1) is a subgroup of myelodysplastic syndrome. It represents a heterogeneous group of oncohematological bone marrow diseases, which occur particularly in elderly patients. The aim of this proteomic study was to search for plasma protein alterations in RAEB-1 patients. Results A total of 24 plasma samples were depleted of fourteen high-abundant plasma proteins, analyzed with 2D SDS-PAGE, compared, and statistically processed with Progenesis SameSpots software. Proteins were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Retinol-binding protein 4 and leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein were relatively quantified using mass spectrometry. 56 significantly differing spots were found; and in 52 spots 50 different proteins were successfully identified. Several plasma proteins that changed either in their level or modification have been described herein. The plasma level of retinol-binding protein 4 was decreased, while leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein was modified in RAEB-1 patients. Changes in the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, altered protein fragmentation, or fragments modifications were observed. Conclusions This study describes proteins, which change quantitatively or qualitatively in the plasma of RAEB-1 patients. It is the first report on qualitative changes in the leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein in the RAEB-1 subgroup of myelodysplastic syndrome. Described changes in the composition or modification of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragments in RAEB-1 are in agreement with those changes observed in previous study of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, and thus H4 fragments could be a marker specific for myelodysplastic syndrome. PMID:22568928

  16. Translocation of signalling proteins to the plasma membrane revealed by a new bioluminescent procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Activation by extracellular ligands of G protein-coupled (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs), results in the generation of second messengers that in turn control specific cell functions. Further, modulation/amplification or inhibition of the initial signalling events, depend on the recruitment onto the plasma membrane of soluble protein effectors. High throughput methodologies to monitor quantitatively second messenger production, have been developed over the last years and are largely used to screen chemical libraries for drug development. On the contrary, no such high throughput methods are yet available for the other aspect of GPCRs regulation, i.e. protein translocation to the plasma membrane, despite the enormous interest of this phenomenon for the modulation of receptor downstream functions. Indeed, to date, the experimental procedures available are either inadequate or complex and expensive. Results Here we describe the development of a novel conceptual approach to the study of cytosolic proteins translocation to the inner surface of the plasma membrane. The basis of the technique consists in: i) generating chimeras between the protein of interests and the calcium (Ca2+)-sensitive, luminescent photo-protein, aequorin and ii) taking advantage of the large Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+] difference between bulk cytosolic and the sub-plasma membrane rim. Conclusion This approach, that keeps unaffected the translocation properties of the signalling protein, can in principle be applied to any protein that, upon activation, moves from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Thus, not only the modulation of GPCRs and RTKs can be investigated in this way, but that of all other proteins that can be recruited to the plasma membrane also independently of receptor activation. Moreover, its automated version, which can provide information about the kinetics and concentration-dependence of the process, is also applicable to high throughput screening of drugs

  17. Contribution of protein fractionation to depth of analysis of the serum and plasma proteomes.

    PubMed

    Faca, Vitor; Pitteri, Sharon J; Newcomb, Lisa; Glukhova, Veronika; Phanstiel, Doug; Krasnoselsky, Alexei; Zhang, Qing; Struthers, Jason; Wang, Hong; Eng, Jimmy; Fitzgibbon, Matt; McIntosh, Martin; Hanash, Samir

    2007-09-01

    In-depth analysis of the serum and plasma proteomes by mass spectrometry is challenged by the vast dynamic range of protein abundance and substantial complexity. There is merit in reducing complexity through fractionation to facilitate mass spectrometry analysis of low-abundance proteins. However, fractionation reduces throughput and has the potential of diluting individual proteins or inducing their loss. Here, we have investigated the contribution of extensive fractionation of intact proteins to depth of analysis. Pooled serum depleted of abundant proteins was fractionated by an orthogonal two-dimensional system consisting of anion-exchange and reversed-phase chromatography. The resulting protein fractions were aliquotted; one aliquot was analyzed by shotgun LC-MS/MS, and another was further resolved into protein bands in a third dimension using SDS-PAGE. Individual gel bands were excised and subjected to in situ digestion and mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that increased fractionation results in increased depth of analysis based on total number of proteins identified in serum and based on representation in individual fractions of specific proteins identified in gel bands following a third-dimension SDS gel analysis. An intact protein analysis system (IPAS) based on a two-dimensional plasma fractionation schema was implemented that resulted in identification of 1662 proteins with high confidence with representation of protein isoforms that differed in their chromatographic mobility. Further increase in depth of analysis was accomplished by repeat analysis of aliquots from the same set of two-dimensional fractions resulting in overall identification of 2254 proteins. We conclude that substantial depth of analysis of proteins from milliliter quantities of serum or plasma and detection of isoforms are achieved with depletion of abundant proteins followed by two-dimensional protein fractionation and MS analysis of individual fractions. PMID:17696519

  18. In situ ATR-IR spectroscopy study of adsorbed protein: Visible light denaturation of bovine serum albumin on TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhekka, A.; Bürgi, T.

    2012-11-01

    In this work in situ Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy in a flow-through cell was used to study the effect of visible light irradiation on bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed on porous TiO2 films. The experiments were performed in water at concentrations of 10-6 mol/l at room temperature. The curve fitting method of the second derivative spectra allowed us to explore details of the secondary structure of pure BSA in water and conformation changes upon adsorption as well as during and after illumination by visible light. The results clearly show that visible light influences the conformation of adsorbed BSA. The appearance of a shift of the amide I band, in the original spectra, from 1653 cm-1 to 1648 cm-1, is interpreted by the creation of random coil in the secondary structure of adsorbed BSA. The second derivative analysis of infrared spectra permits direct quantitative analysis of the secondary structural components of BSA, which show that the percentage of α-helix decreases during visible light illumination whereas the percentage of random coil increases.

  19. Plasma-surface modification vs air oxidation on carbon obtained from peach stone: Textural and chemical changes and the efficiency as adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Velasco Maldonado, Paola S.; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia; Montes-Morán, Miguel A.

    2016-10-01

    Carbons were prepared from peach stones (Prunus persica) using different carbonization temperatures (600, 800 and 1000 °C). A selected sample was modified by oxidation using conventional oxidation techniques (thermal treatment in air atmosphere) and with cold oxygen plasma oxidation, under different conditions. Samples were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms at -196 °C, SEM/EDX analysis, potentiometric titration and XPS analysis. Carbons with and without oxidation were employed in the adsorption of Pb2+ in aqueous solution. Results obtained indicated that the materials with high contents of acidic oxygen groups were more efficient in the removal of Pb2+, values as high as approx. 40 mg g-1 being obtained for the best performing carbon. Textural properties of the original, un-oxidized carbon were significantly altered only after oxidation under air atmosphere at 450 °C. On the other hand, the samples oxidized with plasma show little changes in the textural parameters and a slight increase in the specific surface was observed for the sample treated at high RF power (100 W). Additionally, a significant increment of the oxygen content was observed for the plasma oxidized samples, as measured by XPS.

  20. Mining the plasma proteome for disease applications across seven logs of protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Faca, V; Hanash, S

    2011-01-01

    The current state of proteomics technologies has sufficiently advanced to allow in-depth quantitative analysis of the plasma proteome and development of a related knowledge base. Here we review approaches that have been applied to increase depth of analysis by mass spectrometry given the substantial complexity of plasma and the vast dynamic range of protein abundance. Fractionation strategies resulting in reduced complexity of individual fractions followed by mass spectrometry analysis of digests from individual fractions has allowed well in excess of 1000 proteins to be identified and quantified with high confidence that span more than seven logs of protein abundance. Such depth of analysis has contributed to elucidation of plasma proteome variation in health and of protein changes associated with disease states. PMID:21062094

  1. Differential protein expression in seminal plasma from fertile and infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid J, Angela P.; Alvarez, Angela; Markert, Udo R.; Maya, Walter Cardona

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze human seminal plasma proteins in association with male fertility status using the proteomic mass spectrometry technology Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (SELDI-TOF-MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Semen analysis was performed using conventional methods. Protein profiles of the seminal plasma were obtained by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry over a strong anion exchanger, ProteinChip® Q10 array. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We found statistically significant differences in motility and sperm count between fertile and infertile men. In addition, we observed ten seminal proteins that are significantly up-regulated in the infertile group. In conclusion, comparison of seminal plasma proteome in fertile and infertile men provides new aspects in the physiology of male fertility and might help in identifying novel markers of male infertility. PMID:25395747

  2. Selectivity analysis of single binder assays used in plasma protein profiling

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, Maja; Fredolini, Claudia; Johansson, Henrik; Lehtiö, Janne; Nygren, Per-Åke; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of antibodies toward human proteins enables broad explorations of the proteomic landscape in cells, tissues, and body fluids. This includes assays with antibody suspension bead arrays that generate protein profiles of plasma samples by flow cytometer analysis. However, antibody selectivity is context dependent so it is necessary to corroborate on-target detection over off-target binding. To address this, we describe a concept to directly verify interactions from antibody-coupled beads by analysis of their eluates by Western blots and MS. We demonstrate selective antibody binding in complex samples with antibodies toward a set of chosen proteins with different abundance in plasma and serum, and illustrate the need to adjust sample and bead concentrations accordingly. The presented approach will serve as an important tool for resolving differential protein profiles from antibody arrays within plasma biomarker discoveries. PMID:24151238

  3. Plasma Biomarker Discovery Using 3D Protein Profiling Coupled with Label-Free Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lynn A.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery remains quite challenging. One promising alternative to chemical derivatization with stable isotope labels for quantitative comparisons is direct, label-free, quantitative comparison of raw LC–MS data. But, in order to achieve high-sensitivity detection of low-abundance proteins, plasma proteins must be extensively pre-fractionated, and results from LC–MS runs of all fractions must be integrated efficiently in order to avoid misidentification of variations in fractionation from sample to sample as “apparent” biomarkers. This protocol describes a powerful 3D protein profiling method for comprehensive analysis of human serum or plasma proteomes, which combines abundant protein depletion and high-sensitivity GeLC–MS/MS with label-free quantitation of candidate biomarkers. PMID:21468938

  4. Proteomic Profiling of Nonenzymatically Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma and Erythrocyte Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. In this report, a thorough proteomic profiling of glycated proteins was attempted by using phenylboronate affinity chromatography to enrich glycated proteins and glycated, tryptic peptides from human plasma and erythrocyte membranes. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, and 76 and 31 proteins were confidently identified as glycated from human plasma and erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It was observed that most of the glycated proteins can be identified in samples from individuals with normal glucose tolerance, although samples from individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus have slightly higher numbers of glycated proteins and more glycation sites identified.

  5. LDL Receptor-related Protein 1 Regulates the Abundance of Diverse Cell-signaling Proteins in the Plasma Membrane Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Gaultier, Alban; Simon, Gabriel; Niessen, Sherry; Dix, Melissa; Takimoto, Shinako; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Gonias, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is an endocytic receptor, reported to regulate the abundance of other receptors in the plasma membrane, including uPAR and tissue factor. The goal of this study was to identify novel plasma membrane proteins, involved in cell-signaling, which are regulated by LRP1. Membrane protein ectodomains were prepared from RAW 264.7 cells in which LRP1 was silenced and control cells using protease K. Peptides were identified by LC-MS/MS. By analysis of spectral counts, 31 transmembrane and secreted proteins were regulated in abundance at least 2-fold when LRP1 was silenced. Validation studies confirmed that semaphorin4D (Sema4D), plexin domain-containing protein-1 (Plxdc1), and neuropilin-1 were more abundant in the membranes of LRP1 gene-silenced cells. Regulation of Plxdc1 by LRP1 was confirmed in CHO cells, as a second model system. Plxdc1 co-immunoprecipitated with LRP1 from extracts of RAW 264.7 cells and mouse liver. Although Sema4D did not co-immunoprecipitate with LRP1, the cell-surface level of Sema4D was increased by RAP, which binds to LRP1 and inhibits binding of other ligands. These studies identify Plxdc1, Sema4D, and neuropilin-1 as novel LRP1-regulated cell-signaling proteins. Overall, LRP1 emerges as a generalized regulator of the plasma membrane proteome. PMID:20919742

  6. Proteomic Identification of Novel Differentiation Plasma Protein Markers in Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia. Methods In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat induced by hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 7620 m (25,000 ft, 282 mm Hg) in a hypobaric chamber. Total plasma proteins collected at different time points (0, 6, 12 and 24 h), separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF). Biological processes that were enriched in the plasma proteins during hypobaric hypoxia were identified using Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. According to their properties and obvious alterations during hypobaric hypoxia, changes of plasma concentrations of Ttr, Prdx-2, Gpx -3, Apo A-I, Hp, Apo-E, Fetub and Nme were selected to be validated by Western blot analysis. Results Bioinformatics analysis of 25 differentially expressed proteins showed that 23 had corresponding candidates in the database. The expression patterns of the eight selected proteins observed by Western blot were in agreement with 2-DE results, thus confirming the reliability of the proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins identified are related to cellular defense mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. Their presence reflects the consequence of serial cascades initiated by hypobaric hypoxia. Conclusion/Significance This study provides information about the plasma proteome changes induced in response to hypobaric hypoxia and thus identification of the candidate proteins which can act as novel biomarkers. PMID:24842778

  7. With or without you - Proteomics with or without major plasma/serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Gianazza, Elisabetta; Miller, Ingrid; Palazzolo, Luca; Parravicini, Chiara; Eberini, Ivano

    2016-05-17

    The first sections of this review compile and discuss strategies and protocols for managing plasma/serum as a source of biomarkers relevant to human disease. In many such cases, depletion of abundant protein(s) is a crucial preliminary step to the procedure; specific conceptual and technical approaches, however, make it possible to effectively use to this purpose whole plasma/serum. The final sections focus instead on the complexity associated with each of the major serum/plasma proteins in terms of both, multiple molecular structures (existence of a number of protein species) and of multiple molecular functions (behavior as multifunctional/multitasking/moonlighting proteins). Reviewing evidence in these and some related fields (regulation of the synthetic pattern by proteins and non-protein compounds and its connection with health and disease) prompts the suggestion/recommendation that information on the abundant components of plasma/serum proteome is routinely obtained and processed/mined as a valuable contribution to the characterization of any non-physiological condition and to the understanding of its mechanisms and of its implications/sequels. PMID:27072114

  8. The effect of colostrum intake on blood plasma proteome profile in newborn lambs: low abundance proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colostrum intake by newborn lambs plays a fundamental role in the perinatal period, ensuring lamb survival. In this study, blood plasma samples from two groups of newborn lambs (Colostrum group and Delayed Colostrum group) at 2 and 14 h after birth were treated to reduce the content of high abundance proteins and analyzed using Two-Dimensional Differential in Gel Electrophoresis and MALDI MS/MS for protein identification in order to investigate low abundance proteins with immune function in newborn lambs. Results The results showed that four proteins were increased in the blood plasma of lambs due to colostrum intake. These proteins have not been previously described as increased in blood plasma of newborn ruminants by colostrum intake. Moreover, these proteins have been described as having an immune function in other species, some of which were previously identified in colostrum and milk. Conclusions In conclusion, colostrum intake modified the low abundance proteome profile of blood plasma from newborn lambs, increasing the concentration of apolipoprotein A-IV, plasminogen, serum amyloid A and fibrinogen, demonstrating that colostrum is essential, not only for the provision of immunoglobulins, but also because of increases in several low abundance proteins with immune function. PMID:24708841

  9. Age-related variations of protein carbonyls in human saliva and plasma: is saliva protein carbonyls an alternative biomarker of aging?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Yanyi; Liu, Hongchen; Che, Yuwei; Xu, Yingying; E, Lingling

    2015-06-01

    Free radical hypothesis which is one of the most acknowledged aging theories was developed into oxidative stress hypothesis. Protein carbonylation is by far one of the most widely used markers of protein oxidation. We studied the role of age and gender in protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma among 273 Chinese healthy subjects (137 females and 136 males aged between 20 and 79) and discussed the correlation between protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma. Protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma were, respectively, 2.391 ± 0.639 and 0.838 ± 0.274 nmol/mg. Variations of saliva and plasma different age groups all reached significant differences in both male and female (all p < 0.05) while both saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were found to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.6582 and r = 0.5176, all p < 0.001). Gender was discovered to be unrelated to saliva and plasma protein carbonyl levels (all p > 0.05). Saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were positively related (r = 0.4405, p < 0.001). Surprisingly, saliva and plasma protein carbonyls/ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) ratios were proved to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.7796 and r = 0.6938, all p < 0.001) while saliva protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio and plasma protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio were also correlated (r = 0.5573, p < 0.001). We concluded that saliva protein carbonyls seem to be an alternative biomarker of aging while the mechanisms of protein carbonylation and oxidative stress and the relationship between saliva protein carbonyls and diseases need to be further investigated. PMID:25943699

  10. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  11. Thiophilic adsorbents for RIA and ELISA procedures.

    PubMed

    Oscarsson, S; Chaga, G; Porath, J

    1991-10-25

    Three types of agarose derivatives have been prepared and investigated as adsorbents for radioimmunoassay and ELISA analysis. The analytical systems were evaluated using beta 2 microglobulin as a model. After a competitive reaction between the immunocomponents in solution, the formed immune complexes were adsorbed onto the adsorbent in the presence of 0.5 M potassium sulfate in 0.1 M Tris, pH 7.5. The binding constant between the interaction site on human IgG and the adsorbent 3-(2-pyridylthio)-2-hydroxypropylagarose (Py-S-gel) was determined to be 1.5 x 10(7) M-1 and the binding capacity was 20 mg/ml gel. The immune complex was desorbed by deleting potassium sulfate from the buffer, and only 0.5% of the total applied protein remained after washing the adsorbent with 0.5 M NaOH. The same adsorbent can be used repetitively with different systems. PMID:1940385

  12. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics. PMID:26732734

  13. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics. PMID:26732734

  14. Characterization of Plasma Membrane Proteins from Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, David L.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Feldhaus, Jane M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wunsch, David M.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-01-01

    To determine how the repertoire of plasma membrane proteins change with disease state, specifically related to cancer, several methods for preparation of plasma membrane proteins were evaluated. Cultured cells derived from stage IV ovarian tumors were grown to 90% confluence and harvested in buffer containing CHAPS detergent. This preparation was centrifuged at low speed to remove insoluble cellular debris resulting in a crude homogenate. Glycosylated proteins in the crude homogenate were selectively enriched using lectin affinity chromatography. The crude homogenate and the lectin purified sample were prepared for mass spectrometric evaluation. The general procedure for protein identification began with trypsin digestion of protein fractions followed by separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography that was coupled directly to a conventional tandem mass spectrometer (i.e. LCQ ion trap). Mass and fragmentation data for the peptides were searched against a human proteome data base using the informatics program SEQUEST. Using this procedure 398 proteins were identified with high confidence, including receptors, membrane-associated ligands, proteases, phosphatases, as well as structural and adhesion proteins. Results indicate that lectin chromatography provides a select subset of proteins and that the number and quality of the identifications improve as does the confidence of the protein identifications for this subset. These results represent the first step in development of methods to separate and successfully identify plasma membrane proteins from advanced ovarian cancer cells. Further characterization of plasma membrane proteins will contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying progression of this deadly disease and may lead to new targeted interventions as well as new biomarkers for diagnosis.

  15. Characterization of Plasma Membrane Proteins from Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Springer, David L.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Feldhaus, Jane M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wunschel, David S.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2004-01-01

    To determine how the repertoire of plasma membrane proteins change with disease state, specifically related to cancer, several methods for preparation of plasma membrane proteins were evaluated. Cultured cells derived from stage IV ovarian tumors were grown to 90% confluence and harvested in buffer containing CHAPS detergent. This preparation was centrifuged at low speed to remove insoluble cellular debris resulting in a crude homogenate. Glycosylated proteins in the crude homogenate were selectively enriched using lectin affinity chromatography. The crude homogenate and the lectin purified sample were prepared for mass spectrometric evaluation. The general procedure for protein identification began with trypsinmore » digestion of protein fractions followed by separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography that was coupled directly to a conventional tandem mass spectrometer (i.e. LCQ ion trap). Mass and fragmentation data for the peptides were searched against a human proteome data base using the informatics program SEQUEST. Using this procedure 398 proteins were identified with high confidence, including receptors, membrane-associated ligands, proteases, phosphatases, as well as structural and adhesion proteins. Results indicate that lectin chromatography provides a select subset of proteins and that the number and quality of the identifications improve as does the confidence of the protein identifications for this subset. These results represent the first step in development of methods to separate and successfully identify plasma membrane proteins from advanced ovarian cancer cells. Further characterization of plasma membrane proteins will contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying progression of this deadly disease and may lead to new targeted interventions as well as new biomarkers for diagnosis.« less

  16. Preparation of a high-performance multi-lectin affinity chromatography (HP-M-LAC) adsorbent for the analysis of human plasma glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kullolli, Majlinda; Hancock, William S; Hincapie, Marina

    2008-08-01

    We report on the preparation of an improved multi-lectin affinity support for HPLC separations. We combined the selectivity of three different lectins: concanavalin A (ConA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and jacalin (JAC). Each lectin was first covalently immobilized onto a polymeric matrix and then the three lectin media were combined in equal ratios. The beads were packed into a column to produce a mixed-bed multi-lectin HPLC column (high-performance multi-lectin affinity chromatography (HP-M-LAC)) for fast chromatographic affinity separations. The support was characterized with respect to kinetics of immobilization, ligand density, and binding capacity for human plasma glycoproteins. A high lectin density (15 mg/mL of beads) was found to be optimal for the binding of glycoproteins from human plasma. A single clinical sample can be fractionated in less than 10 min per run, making this a useful sample preparation tool for proteomics/glycoproteomics studies associated with disease abnormalities. PMID:18693314

  17. RNAi-mediated downregulation of poplar plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) changes plasma membrane proteome composition and affects leaf physiology.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zhen; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Uehlein, Norbert; Zimmer, Ina; Mühlhans, Stefanie; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Palme, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Block, Katja

    2015-10-14

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are one subfamily of aquaporins that mediate the transmembrane transport of water. To reveal their function in poplar, we generated transgenic poplar plants in which the translation of PIP genes was downregulated by RNA interference investigated these plants with a comprehensive leaf plasma membrane proteome and physiome analysis. First, inhibition of PIP synthesis strongly altered the leaf plasma membrane protein composition. Strikingly, several signaling components and transporters involved in the regulation of stomatal movement were differentially regulated in transgenic poplars. Furthermore, hormonal crosstalk related to abscisic acid, auxin and brassinosteroids was altered, in addition to cell wall biosynthesis/cutinization, the organization of cellular structures and membrane trafficking. A physiological analysis confirmed the proteomic results. The leaves had wider opened stomata and higher net CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates as well as greater mesophyll conductance for CO2 (gm) and leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). Based on these results, we conclude that PIP proteins not only play essential roles in whole leaf water and CO2 flux but have important roles in the regulation of stomatal movement. PMID:26248320

  18. Snythesis and differentiation of plasma proteins in cultured embryonic chicken liver cells: a system for study of regulation of protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Grieninger, G; Granick, S

    1975-01-01

    A new system is described for studying the control of protein synthesis. In a monolayer culture of chick embryo liver cells, plasma proteins are synthesized for three days at in vivo rates. The plasma proteins are secreted into the culture medium and without concentration are detected there simply and sensitively by a modified Laurell electronimmunoassay. Secretion of the newly synthesized plasma proteins occurs within 30 min of their synthesis. Thus, rates of synthesis of the plasma proteins can be followed readily from rates of their accumulation in the culture medium. This system has the following advantages for the study of protein synthesis: cells do not have to be disrupted for the assay; the cell population can be followed over several days; it is not necessary to label the proteins radioactively; and turnover of plasma proteins is negligible and need not be taken into account. The usefulness of the system is illustrated by a number of findings. The spectrum of plasma proteins synthesized in culture changed qualitatively and quantitatively. Albumin synthesis steadily decreased with culture time and stopped at the third day, whereas the synthesis of some new plasma proteins ("adult") was induced. These qualitative changes suggest differential gene expression in culture and a special control of albumin synthesis in vivo, different from the synthesis of the other plasma proteins. Quantitative changes in the rates of synthesis of specific plasma proteins suggest a competition among their messenger RNAs for components of the translational machinery. Insulin has a differential effect on the synthesis of specific plasma proteins at concentrations within the physiological range of the hormone. Images PMID:1061087

  19. First evidence for accumulation of protein-bound and protein-free pyrraline in human uremic plasma by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Odani, H; Shinzato, T; Matsumoto, Y; Takai, I; Nakai, S; Miwa, M; Iwayama, N; Amano, I; Maeda, K

    1996-07-01

    Glucose-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) cross-link proteins and cause various biological tissue damage. One of them, pyrraline [epsilon-2-(formyl-5-hydroxymethyl-pyrrol-1-yl) -L-norleucine], has been demonstrated by utilizing antibody to accumulate in plasma and sclerosed matrix of diabetic individuals, suggesting responsibility for diabetic complications. To elucidate the involvement of pyrraline in uremia, we examined the pyrraline levels in patients with chronic renal failure by a mass spectrometric approach. Here we show that protein-free pyrraline as well as pyrraline with binding protein are significantly increased in non-diabetic uremic plasma compared to healthy subjects. Our results suggest that circulating pyrraline could be a substance contributing to complications in uremia. PMID:8694819

  20. Protein retention on plasma-treated hierarchical nanoscale gold-silver platform

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jinghua; Levchenko, Igor; Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Keidar, Michael; Cvelbar, Uros; Filipic, Gregor; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2015-01-01

    Dense arrays of gold-supported silver nanowires of about 100 nm in diameter grown directly in the channels of nanoporous aluminium oxide membrane were fabricated and tested as a novel platform for the immobilization and retention of BSA proteins in the microbial-protective environments. Additional treatment of the silver nanowires using low-temperature plasmas in the inductively-coupled plasma reactor and an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet have demonstrated that the morphology of the nanowire array can be controlled and the amount of the retained protein may be increased due to the plasma effect. A combination of the neutral gold sublayer with the antimicrobial properties of silver nanowires could significantly enhance the efficiency of the platforms used in various biotechnological processes. PMID:26307515

  1. Protein retention on plasma-treated hierarchical nanoscale gold-silver platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jinghua; Levchenko, Igor; Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Keidar, Michael; Cvelbar, Uros; Filipic, Gregor; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2015-08-01

    Dense arrays of gold-supported silver nanowires of about 100 nm in diameter grown directly in the channels of nanoporous aluminium oxide membrane were fabricated and tested as a novel platform for the immobilization and retention of BSA proteins in the microbial-protective environments. Additional treatment of the silver nanowires using low-temperature plasmas in the inductively-coupled plasma reactor and an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet have demonstrated that the morphology of the nanowire array can be controlled and the amount of the retained protein may be increased due to the plasma effect. A combination of the neutral gold sublayer with the antimicrobial properties of silver nanowires could significantly enhance the efficiency of the platforms used in various biotechnological processes.

  2. Adsorbed serum albumin is permissive to macrophage attachment to perfluorocarbon polymer surfaces in culture

    PubMed Central

    Godek, M.L.; Michel, R.; Chamberlain, L. M.; Castner, D. G.; Grainger, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophage adhesion to biomaterials, correlated with foreign body response, occurs through protein-mediated surface interactions. Albumin-selective perfluorocarbon (FC) biomaterials are generally poorly cell-conducive due to insufficient receptor-mediated surface interactions, but macrophages bind to albumin-coated substrates and also preferentially to highly hydrophobic fluorinated surfaces. Bone marrow macrophages (BMMO) and IC-21, RAW 264.7 and J774A.1 monocyte/macrophage cells were cultured on FC surfaces. Protein deposition onto two distinct FC surfaces from complex and single-component solutions was tracked using fluorescence and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) methods. Cell adhesion and growth on protein pre-treated substrates were compared by light microscopy. Flow cytometry and integrin-directed antibody receptor blocking assessed integrins critical for monocyte/macrophage adhesion in vitro. Albumin predominantly adsorbs onto both FC surfaces from 10% serum. In cultures pre-adsorbed with albumin or serum-dilutions, BMMO responded similar to IC-21 at early time points. Compared to Teflon® AF, plasma-polymerized FC was less permissive to extended cell proliferation. The β2 integrins play major roles in macrophage adhesion to FC surfaces: antibody blocking significantly disrupted cell adhesion. Albumin-mediated cell adhesion mechanisms to FC surfaces could not be clarified. Primary BMMO and secondary IC-21 macrophages behave similarly on FC surfaces, regardless of pre-adsorbed protein biasing, with respect to adhesion, cell morphology, motility and proliferation. PMID:18306309

  3. Separation of proteins from human plasma by sample displacement chromatography in hydrophobic interaction mode

    PubMed Central

    Josic, Djuro; Breen, Lucas; Clifton, James; Gajdosik, Martina Srajer; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Rucevic, Marijana; Müller, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) in reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced approximately twenty years ago. This method was first used for the preparative purification of peptides and proteins. Recently, SDC in ion-exchange mode was also successfully used for enrichment of low abundance proteins from human plasma. In this paper, the use of SDC for the separation of plasma proteins in hydrophobic interaction mode is demonstrated. By use of two or more columns coupled in series during sample application, and subsequent elution of detached columns in parallel, additional separation of bound proteins was achieved. Further low-abundance, physiologically active proteins could be highly enriched and detected by ESI-MS/MS. PMID:22740472

  4. Barriers to diffusion of plasma membrane proteins form early during guinea pig spermiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, A E; Nakhimovsky, L; Myles, D G; Koppel, D E

    1997-01-01

    The plasma membrane of the mature guinea pig sperm is segregated into at least four domains of different composition. Previous studies have shown that some proteins localized within these domains are free to diffuse laterally, suggesting that barriers to protein diffusion are responsible for maintaining the nonuniform distribution of at least some surface proteins in mature sperm. The different membrane domains appear sequentially during sperm morphogenesis in the testis and during later passage through the epididymis. To determine when diffusion barriers become functional during sperm development, we examined the diffusion of two proteins that are expressed on the cell surface of developing spermatids and become segregated to different plasma membrane domains during the course of spermiogenesis. Both proteins exhibited rapid lateral diffusion throughout spermiogenesis, even after they become localized to specific regions of the surface membrane. These results suggest that barriers to membrane diffusion form concomitantly with membrane domains during spermiogenesis. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:9199813

  5. Protein profiles of CCL5, HPGDS, and NPSR1 in plasma reveal association with childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Hamsten, C; Häggmark, A; Grundström, J; Mikus, M; Lindskog, C; Konradsen, J R; Eklund, A; Pershagen, G; Wickman, M; Grunewald, J; Melén, E; Hedlin, G; Nilsson, P; van Hage, M

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease with many different phenotypes that need to be identified. We analyzed a broad range of plasma proteins in children with well-characterized asthma phenotypes to identify potential markers of childhood asthma. Using an affinity proteomics approach, plasma levels of 362 proteins covered by antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas were investigated in a total of 154 children with persistent or intermittent asthma and controls. After screening, chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) were selected for further investigation. Significantly lower levels of both CCL5 and HPGDS were found in children with persistent asthma, while NPSR1 was found at higher levels in children with mild intermittent asthma compared to healthy controls. In addition, the protein levels were investigated in another respiratory disease, sarcoidosis, showing significantly higher NPSR1 levels in sera from sarcoidosis patients compared to healthy controls. Immunohistochemical staining of healthy tissues revealed high cytoplasmic expression of HPGDS in mast cells, present in stroma of both airway epithelia, lung as well as in other organs. High expression of NPSR1 was observed in neuroendocrine tissues, while no expression was observed in airway epithelia or lung. In conclusion, we have utilized a broad-scaled affinity proteomics approach to identify three proteins with altered plasma levels in asthmatic children, representing one of the first evaluations of HPGDS and NPSR1 protein levels in plasma. PMID:27145233

  6. Identification of DNA-binding proteins on human umbilical vein endothelial cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T M; Frampton, G; Cameron, J S

    1993-01-01

    The binding of anti-DNA antibodies to the endothelial cell is mediated through DNA, which forms a bridge between the immunoglobulin and the plasma membrane. We have shown that 32P-labelled DNA bound to the plasma membrane of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by a saturable process, which could be competitively inhibited by non-radiolabelled DNA. In addition, DNA-binding was enhanced in HUVEC that had been treated with IL-1 alpha or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000, 92,000, and 84,000 were identified by the binding of 32P-labelled DNA to plasma membrane proteins separated on SDS-PAGE. DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000 and 84,000 were also present in the cytosol and nucleus. Murine anti-DNA MoAb410 bound to a single band, at mol. wt 46,000, of plasma membrane protein, in the presence of DNA. Our results showed that DNA-binding proteins are present in different cellular fractions of endothelial cells. DNA-binding proteins on the cell membrane could participate in the in situ formation of immune deposits; and their presence in the cell nucleus suggests a potential role in the modulation of cell function. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8419070

  7. Isolation and partial characterization of a fatty acid binding protein in rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Stremmel, W; Strohmeyer, G; Borchard, F; Kochwa, S; Berk, P D

    1985-01-01

    When [14C]oleate-bovine serum albumin complexes were incubated in vitro with rat liver plasma membranes (LPM), specific, saturable binding of oleate to the membranes was observed. Maximal heat-sensitive (i.e., specific) binding was 3.2 nmol/mg of membrane protein. Oleate-agarose affinity chromatography of Triton X-100-solubilized LPM was used to isolate a single 40-kDa protein with high affinity for oleate. On gel filtration, the protein comigrated with various fatty acids but not with [14C]bilirubin, [35S]sulfobromophthalein, [14C]taurocholate, [14C]phosphatidylcholine, or [14C]cholesteryloleate. A rabbit antibody to this membrane fatty acid-binding protein gave a single precipitin line with the antigen but no reactivity with concentrated cytosolic proteins, LPM bilirubin/sulfobromophthalein-binding protein, or rat albumin or other rat plasma proteins. The antibody selectively inhibited heat-sensitive binding of [14C]oleate to LPM. Immunofluorescence studies localized the antigen in liver-cell plasma membranes as well as in other major sites of fatty acid transport. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that this protein may act as a receptor in a hepatocellular uptake mechanism for fatty acids. Images PMID:3881757

  8. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  9. Plasma-induced surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane aimed at reducing salt and protein deposition.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Nele; Rymarczyk-Machal, Monika; Schacht, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is an elastomer that is widely used in construction and for biological and biomedical applications. The biocompatibility of PDMS was improved by different surface treatment methods, i.e., plasma treatment or a combination of plasma treatment with UV-irradiation or redox initiator, to minimize the effects of deposition of salts and proteins. In this work we used the vinyl monomers sulfobetaine and AMPS which have good biocompatible properties. PMID:21176391

  10. [The virological safety and bacterial sterility of a method for fractionating blood plasma proteins with rivanol].

    PubMed

    Zhurina, N A; Shatskaia, T L; Katushkina, N V

    1993-01-01

    The bacterial and virological safety of the method of rivanol fractionation of blood plasma proteins has been evaluated in experiments with samples of donor blood plasma mixed with the suspension of viruses and Escherichia coli used as models. The bacteriostatic action of rivanol and the elimination of bacteriophage and influenza virus from the end product at the stages of rivanol precipitation and adsorption on carbon have been established. PMID:8067072

  11. Characterization of plasma protein binding dissociation with online SPE-HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Fan, Yiran; Wang, Yunlong; Lu, Yaxin; Yin, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    A novel parameter of relative recovery (Rre) was defined and determined by online SPE-HPLC to characterize plasma protein binding (PPB) kinetics of highly plasma binding drugs. The proportional relationship of Rre with koff of PPB has been established with a new SPE model. A rapid, easy to use method could potentially be used to categorize PK properties of the drug candidates in the decision process of drug discovery and development. PMID:26460813

  12. Optimization of hydrolysis conditions for bovine plasma protein using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Eun-Young; Go, Gwang-Woong; Kim, Gap-Don; Joo, Seon-Tea; Yang, Han-Sul

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to establish optimal conditions for the hydrolysis of bovine plasma protein. Response surface methodology was used to model and optimize responses [degree of hydrolysis (DH), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity and Fe(2+)-chelating activity]. Hydrolysis conditions, such as hydrolysis temperature (46.6-63.4 °C), hydrolysis time (98-502 min), and hydrolysis pH (6.32-9.68) were selected as the main processing conditions in the hydrolysis of bovine plasma protein. Optimal conditions for maximum DH (%), DPPH radical-scavenging activity (%) and Fe(2+)-chelating activity (%) of the hydrolyzed bovine plasma protein, were respectively established. We discovered the following three conditions for optimal hydrolysis of bovine plasma: pH of 7.82-8.32, temperature of 54.1 °C, and time of 338.4-398.4 min. We consequently succeeded in hydrolyzing bovine plasma protein under these conditions and confirmed the various desirable properties of optimal hydrolysis. PMID:25952847

  13. Serum stimulation of plasma protein synthesis in culture is selective and rapidly reversible.

    PubMed

    Plant, P W; Liang, T J; Pindyck, J; Grieninger, G

    1981-10-27

    Primary hepatocyte monolayers, derived from chick embryos, can be cultured from the onset in a completely chemically defined medium, free of added hormones. The liver cells synthesize and secrete a wide spectrum of plasma proteins for several days in this serum-free environment. Addition of fetal bovine serum elicits a 3-5-fold increase in the production of certain plasma proteins: fibrinogen, albumin, and the alpha1-globulin M. This effect of serum is selective; transferrin and plasminogen syntheses are enhanced less than 1.5-fold. Significant stimulation is observed with 0.1% fetal bovine serum, and half-maximal values for individual plasma proteins are obtained with concentrations ranging between 0.4 and 1%. The stimulatory activity of serum shows no developmental or species specificity. Plasma is active as serum derived from the same blood sample. The hepatocytes respond rapidly to serum, significant changes in albumin synthesis occurring less than 1 h after serum addition or removal. The effect of short exposure is fully reversible. These results establish the capacity of low concentrations of serum to stimulate plasma protein synthesis and underscore the importance of studying the effects of hormones and other factors under serum-free conditions. The findings suggest that, in addition to the classical hormones, ubiquitous but as yet uncharacterized serum components play a role in controlling this major hepatic function. PMID:7284395

  14. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane. PMID:26353761

  15. Tumour regression after extracorporeal affinity chromatography of blood plasma across agarose beads containing staphylococcal protein A.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, L; Jonsson, S; Söderberg, M; Eneström, S; Liedén, G; Lindgren, S

    1984-11-01

    The therapeutic effect of absorbing plasma from tumour patients with immobilized staphylococcal protein A was tested. Plasma prepared by centrifugation was passed over protein A-Sepharose and then reinfused into the patient. Five patients were thus treated. One with malignant melanoma and one with renal adenocarcinoma showed measurable regression of metastatic lesions. In another with malignant melanoma a subcutaneous metastasis showed histopathological changes compatible with a therapeutic effect. In two patients, one with malignant melanoma and one with renal adenocarcinoma, no signs of regression were found. No severe adverse effects of the treatment were observed. PMID:6542007

  16. Molecular Weight Determinations of Proteins by Californium Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, B.; Roepstorff, Peter; Fohlman, J.; Hedin, A.; Hakansson, P.; Kamensky, I.; Lindberg, M.; Salehpour, M.; Sawe, G.

    1984-11-01

    The plasma desorption mass spectrometry method is used to determine the molecular weights of larger molecules than before, to determine the molecular weights of proteins and peptides in mixtures, and to monitor protein modification reactions. Proteins up to molecular weight 25,000 can now be studied with a mass spectrometric technique. Protein-peptide mixtures that could not be resolved with conventional techniques were successfully analyzed by this technique. The precision of the method is good enough to permit one to follow the different steps in the conversion of porcine insulin to human insulin.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a new zinc-binding protein from albacore tuna plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dyke, B.; Hegenauer, J.; Saltman, P.; Laurs, R.M.

    1987-06-02

    The protein responsible for sequestering high levels of zinc in the plasma of the albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) has been isolated by sequential chromatography. The glycoprotein has a molecular weight of 66,000. Approximately 8.2% of its amino acid residues are histidines. Equilibrium dialysis experiments show it to bind 3 mol of zinc/mol of protein. The stoichiometric constant for the association of zinc with a binding site containing three histidines was determined to be 10/sup 9.4/. This protein is different from albumin and represents a previously uncharacterized zinc transport protein.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a new zinc-binding protein from albacore tuna plasma.

    PubMed

    Dyke, B; Hegenauer, J; Saltman, P; Laurs, R M

    1987-06-01

    The protein responsible for sequestering high levels of zinc in the plasma of the albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) has been isolated by sequential chromatography. The glycoprotein has a molecular weight of 66,000. Approximately 8.2% of its amino acid residues are histidines. Equilibrium dialysis experiments show it to bind 3 mol of zinc/mol of protein. The stoichiometric constant for the association of zinc with a binding site containing three histidines was determined to be 10(9.4). This protein is different from albumin and represents a previously uncharacterized zinc transport protein. PMID:3607021

  19. Maternal Low Quality Protein Diet Alters Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations of Weaning Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kabasakal Cetin, Arzu; Dasgin, Halil; Gülec, Atila; Onbasilar, İlyas; Akyol, Asli

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated the influence of a maternal low protein diet on the fetus. However, the effect of a maternal low quality protein diet on fetal growth and development is largely unknown. Wistar rats (11 weeks old) were mated and maintained on either a chow diet with 20% casein (n = 6) as the control group (C), or a low quality protein diet with 20% wheat gluten (n = 7) as the experimental group (WG) through gestation and lactation. Maternal body weights were similar in both groups throughout the study. Birth weights were not influenced by maternal diet and offspring body weights during lactation were similar between the groups. Offspring’s plasma amino acid profiles showed that plasma methionine, glutamine and lysine were significantly lower and aspartic acid, ornithine and glycine-proline were significantly higher in the WG. Plant based protein comprises an important part of protein intake in developing countries. It is well-known that these diets can be inadequate in terms of essential amino acids. The current study shows differential effects of a maternal low quality protein diet on the offspring’s plasma amino acids. Future studies will examine further aspects of the influence of maternal low quality protein diets on fetal growth and development. PMID:26633475

  20. Possible detection of pancreatic cancer by plasma protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kazufumi; Hayashida, Yasuharu; Umaki, Tomoko; Okusaka, Takuji; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kikuchi, Satoru; Endo, Mitsufumi; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Aoki, Tatsuya; Itoi, Takao; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Hirohashi, Setsuo; Yamada, Tesshi

    2005-11-15

    The survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients is the lowest among those with common solid tumors, and early detection is one of the most feasible means of improving outcomes. We compared plasma proteomes between pancreatic cancer patients and sex- and age-matched healthy controls using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization coupled with hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Proteomic spectra were generated from a total of 245 plasma samples obtained from two institutes. A discriminating proteomic pattern was extracted from a training cohort (71 pancreatic cancer patients and 71 healthy controls) using a support vector machine learning algorithm and was applied to two validation cohorts. We recognized a set of four mass peaks at 8,766, 17,272, 28,080, and 14,779 m/z, whose mean intensities differed significantly (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.01), as most accurately discriminating cancer patients from healthy controls in the training cohort [sensitivity of 97.2% (69 of 71), specificity of 94.4% (67 of 71), and area under the curve value of 0.978]. This set discriminated cancer patients in the first validation cohort with a sensitivity of 90.9% (30 of 33) and a specificity of 91.1% (41 of 45), and its discriminating capacity was further validated in an independent cohort at a second institution. When combined with CA19-9, 100% (29 of 29 patients) of pancreatic cancers, including early-stage (stages I and II) tumors, were detected. Although a multi-institutional large-scale study will be necessary to confirm clinical significance, the biomarker set identified in this study may be applicable to using plasma samples to diagnose pancreatic cancer. PMID:16288055

  1. Interaction of Globular Plasma Proteins with Water-Soluble CdSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Jyotsana; Rawat, Kamla; Sanwlani, Shilpa; Bohidar, H B

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between water-soluble semiconductor quantum dots [hydrophilic 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-coated CdSe] and three globular plasma proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) and human serum albumin (HSA), are investigated. Acidic residues of protein molecules form electrostatic interactions with these quantum dots (QDs). To determine the stoichiometry of proteins bound to QDs, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential techniques. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments revealed energy transfer from tryptophan residues in the proteins to the QD particles. Quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of protein molecules was noticed during this binding process (hierarchy HSA<β-Lg protein molecules). Upon binding with QD particles, the protein molecules underwent substantial conformational changes at the secondary-structure level (50 % helicity lost), due to loss in hydration. PMID:25767054

  2. In Situ Synthesis of Porous Carbons by Using Room-Temperature, Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma as High-Performance Adsorbents for Solid-Phase Microextraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yao; Wu, Li; Xu, Kailai; Tian, Yunfei; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2015-09-21

    A one-step, template-free method is described to synthesize porous carbons (PCs) in situ on a metal surface by using a room-temperature, atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. This method not only features high efficiency, environmentally friendliness, and low cost and simple equipment, but also can conveniently realize large-area synthesis of PCs by only changing the design of the DBD reactor. The synthesized PCs have a regulated nestlike morphology, and thus, provide a high specific surface area and high pore volume, which result in excellent adsorption properties. Its applicability was demonstrated by using a PC-coated stainless-steel fiber as a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber to preconcentrate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) prior to analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The results showed that the fiber exhibited excellent enrichment factors (4.1×10(4) to 3.1×10(5)) toward all tested PAHs. Thus, the PC-based SPME-GC-FID provides low limits of detection (2 to 20 ng L(-1)), good precision (<7.8%), and good recoveries (80-115%) for ultra-sensitive determination of PAHs in real water samples. In addition, the PC-coated fiber could be stable enough for more than 500 replicate extraction cycles. PMID:26267394

  3. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  4. The role of plasma proteins in formation of obstructive protamine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    De Paulis, R.; Mohammad, S.F.; Chiariello, L.; Morea, M.; Olsen, D.B. )

    1991-06-01

    Formation of complexes between heparin and protamine (in saline), or heparin, plasma proteins, and protamine (in plasma) was assessed by measurements of light transmission through different test solutions. To examine the formation of these complexes, 125I-labeled protamine was used. Addition of 125I-protamine to plasma or blood resulted in the sedimentation of 125I-protamine in the form of insoluble complexes. This complex formation was not affected by the presence of heparin, suggesting that protamine-plasma protein interaction may be primarily responsible for precipitation of 125I-protamine. To assess the capability of these complexes to obstruct the pulmonary circulation, an in vitro experimental model was developed. Citrated serum, plasma, blood, or saline were allowed to flow through a glass bead column with the help of a peristaltic pump. A pressure transducer positioned before the column allowed pressure measurements at a constant flow rate during the experiment. Mixing of protamine with plasma or blood prior to their passage through the glass bead column resulted in a significant increase in pressure suggesting that the column was being clogged with insoluble complexes. The increase in pressure occurred both in the presence and absence of heparin in plasma or blood. Under identical experimental conditions, the increase in pressure was insignificant when protamine was added to saline or serum regardless of whether heparin was present or absent. This was further confirmed by the use of 125I-protamine. These observations suggest that protamine forms insoluble complexes with certain plasma proteins. Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that following intravenous administration, protamine immediately forms complexes in circulating blood.

  5. Cell wall constrains lateral diffusion of plant plasma-membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Martinière, Alexandre; Lavagi, Irene; Nageswaran, Gayathri; Rolfe, Daniel J.; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Luu, Doan-Trung; Botchway, Stanley W.; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Mongrand, Sebastien; Maurel, Christophe; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L.; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Friml, Jirí; Moreau, Patrick; Runions, John

    2012-01-01

    A cell membrane can be considered a liquid-phase plane in which lipids and proteins theoretically are free to diffuse. Numerous reports, however, describe retarded diffusion of membrane proteins in animal cells. This anomalous diffusion results from a combination of structuring factors including protein–protein interactions, cytoskeleton corralling, and lipid organization into microdomains. In plant cells, plasma-membrane (PM) proteins have been described as relatively immobile, but the control mechanisms that structure the PM have not been studied. Here, we use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to estimate mobility of a set of minimal PM proteins. These proteins consist only of a PM-anchoring domain fused to a fluorescent protein, but their mobilities remained limited, as is the case for many full-length proteins. Neither the cytoskeleton nor membrane microdomain structure was involved in constraining the diffusion of these proteins. The cell wall, however, was shown to have a crucial role in immobilizing PM proteins. In addition, by single-molecule fluorescence imaging we confirmed that the pattern of cellulose deposition in the cell wall affects the trajectory and speed of PM protein diffusion. Regulation of PM protein dynamics by the plant cell wall can be interpreted as a mechanism for regulating protein interactions in processes such as trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:22689944

  6. Pharmacokinetics and plasma protein binding of rutin deca (H-) sulfate sodium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-jun; Lu, Si-jie; Yao, Tong-wei; Zeng, Su

    2009-11-01

    Rutin deca (H-) sulfate sodium (RDS) possesses very good activity as an inhibitor of the complement system of warm-blooded animals and HIV. An ion-pair coupled with solid-phase extraction technique (IP-SPE) was developed to extract RDS from rat plasma, urine, bile and protein solution samples. The assay was applied to pharmacokinetics of RDS, including plasma pharmacokinetics, excretion and protein binding studies. After i.v. 5, 20 and 100 mg x kg(-1) RDS via tail vein in rats, the plasma concentration-time profiles were fitted using 3P97 software. The average terminal half-life (t(1/2)) was 3.432 +/- 0.185 2 h. The relationship of dose and AUC of RDS was linear within the dosage range. This suggested that the disposition of RDS in rats belong to linear kinetics and the pharmacokinetic parameters of RDS were dose independent. After iv RDS 20 mg x kg(-1) in rats, the biliary excretion amount of parent drug amount was only 0.3181% +/- 0.2087% of given dosage, and the urinary excretion was 86.0% +/- 6.1% in 36 h. Ultrafiltration techniques were applied to determine the protein binding of RDS in plasma (from SD rat, Beagle dog and human), human serum albumin (HSA) and human alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). The mean protein binding rate in plasma of SD rat, Beagle dog and human plasma of RDS were 80%-90%, in which the range of concentration of RDS was 5 to 100 microg x mL(-1). The protein binding to HSA was 85.7% +/- 1.3% and 14.0% +/- 3.2% to AGP. PMID:21351726

  7. Quantitative and epitope-specific antigenicity analysis of the human papillomavirus 6 capsid protein in aqueous solution or when adsorbed on particulate adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wang, Xin; Cao, Lu; Lin, Zhijie; Wei, Minxi; Fang, Mujin; Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ningshao; Zhao, Qinjian

    2016-08-17

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 is a human pathogen which causes genital warts. Recombinant virus-like particle (VLP) based antigens are the active components in prophylactic vaccines to elicit functional antibodies. The binding and functional characteristics of a panel of 15 murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against HPV6 was quantitatively assessed. Elite conformational indicators, recognizing the conformational epitopes, are also elite viral neutralizers as demonstrated with their viral neutralization efficiency (5 mAbs with neutralization titer below 4ng/mL) in a pseudovirion (PsV)-based system. The functionality of a given mAb is closely related to the nature of the corresponding epitope, rather than the apparent binding affinity to antigen. The epitope-specific antigenicity assays can be used to assess the binding activity of PsV or VLP preparations to neutralizing mAbs. These mAb-based assays can be used for process monitoring and for product release and characterization to confirm the existence of functional epitopes in purified antigen preparations. Due to the particulate nature of the alum adjuvants, the vaccine antigen adsorbed on adjuvants was considered largely as "a black box" due to the difficulty in analysis and visualization. Here, a novel method with fluorescence-based high content imaging for visualization and quantitating the immunoreactivity of adjuvant-adsorbed VLPs with neutralizing mAbs was developed, in which antigen desorption was not needed. The facile and quantitative in situ antigenicity analysis was amendable for automation. The integrity of a given epitope or two non-overlapping epitopes on the recombinant VLPs in their adjuvanted form can be assessed in a quantitative manner for cross-lot or cross-product comparative analysis with minimal manipulation of samples. PMID:27426626

  8. The metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) as efficient adsorbent in a vortex-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction of imatinib mesylate in rat plasma coupled with ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry: Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chao; Cai, Qianqian; Zhao, Pan; Jia, Xiuna; Lu, Nan; He, Lu; Hou, Xiaohong

    2016-06-01

    Metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) was successfully used as an efficient sorbent in a vortex-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction (VA-DSPE) and applied for the determination and the pharmacokinetic of imatinib mesylate in rat plasma by UPLC-MS/MS. In the enrichment of imatinib from rat plasma, the analyte was efficiently adsorbed on MIL-101(Cr) and simply recovered by using initial mobile phase (0.1% formic acid-methanol (6:4 v/v)) as elution solvent. Meanwhile, the protein in the plasma samples was excluded from the porous structure of MIL-101(Cr), leading to direct extraction of drug molecule from protein-rich biological samples without any other pretreatment procedure. After being removed, the supernatant was filtered and directly injected into the UPLC-MS/MS for the analysis of the target. The experimental parameters, including nature of MOFs, amount of MIL-101(Cr), pH value of aqueous solution, extraction time, type and volume of elution solvent, were systematically optimized. After VA-DSPE, chromatographic separation was performed on an ACQUITY UPLC(®) BEH C18 column (2.1mm×100mm, 1.7μm) with a 3min gradient elution using 0.1% formic acid and methanol as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.3mL/min. The detection was accomplished on a tandem mass spectrometer via an electrospray ionization (ESI) source by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in the positive ionization mode. The lower limit of quantification of 1ng/mL was achieved and the mean recovery of the analyte was higher than 81.2%. Moreover, computational simulation was primarily applied to predict the adsorption behavior and revealed the molecular interactions and free binding energies between MIL-101(Cr) and imatinib with the molecular modeling method, providing certain explanation of the adsorption mechanism. The originally established pretreatment and detection method has some merits, such as less solvent consumption, easy operation, higher sensitivity and lower matrix effect. And the MIL-101

  9. Low plasma protein nitrotyrosine levels distinguish primary Raynaud's phenomenon from scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Kingdon, E J; Mani, A R; Frost, M T; Denton, C P; Powis, S H; Black, C M; Moore, K P

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the hypothesis that increased formation of reactive nitrogen species may contribute to the vascular pathology that develops in patients with connective tissue disease such as scleroderma. Patients and methods The level of protein‐bound nitrotyrosine in plasma was measured by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionisation mass spectrometry in 11 patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon, 37 with scleroderma, 13 with chronic renal impairment, and in 23 healthy controls. Results Plasma protein‐bound nitrotyrosine was markedly decreased in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (mean (SEM) 0.60 (0.06) ng/mg dry protein) compared with patients with scleroderma (1.78 (0.21) ng/mg protein), chronic renal impairment (1.42 (0.17) ng/mg protein) or healthy controls (1.63±0.15 ng/mg protein, ANOVA p<0.001). Conclusion These data suggest that there is decreased nitration of plasma proteins, or increased degradation of nitrated proteins from the circulation of patients with primary but not secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. PMID:16308344

  10. Adsorption of protein streptavidin to the plasma treated surface of polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesel, Alenka; Elersic, Kristina

    2012-05-01

    Immobilization of protein streptavidin to the surface of polystyrene (PS) polymer was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Two different protocols were used to attach streptavidin to the PS surface: physical adsorption and chemical coupling. In both cases the surface properties of PS samples were modified by exposure to cold oxygen plasma for 10 s. Plasma was created in oxygen at 75 Pa by en electrode-less RF discharge. The RF generator operated at 27.12 MHz and the nominal power was about 120 W. The electron temperature was about 3 eV, the plasma density was about 3 × 1015 m-3 and the neutral oxygen atom density was about 3 × 1021 m-3. Oxygen plasma treatment caused formation of O-rich functional groups on the surface of PS. The concentration of oxygen was determined by XPS and was about 28 at.%. A thin film of streptavidin was deposited by physical adsorption and chemical bonding. The appearance of streptavidin on the surface was determined from XPS spectra measuring the ratio between N and C peaks. The plasma treatment caused poor adsorption and but strong chemisorption of streptavidin. The results were explained by specific interaction of protein with polar functional groups on the surface of PS after plasma treatment.

  11. Stimulus-dependent secretion of plasma proteins from human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, N; Kjeldsen, L; Rygaard, K; Bastholm, L; Nielsen, M H; Sengeløv, H; Bjerrum, O W; Johnsen, A H

    1992-01-01

    In search for matrix proteins released from secretory vesicles of human neutrophils, a prominent 67-kD protein was identified in the extracellular medium of neutrophils stimulated by the chemotactic peptide, FMLP. The protein was purified to apparent homogeneity and partially sequenced. The sequence of the first 32 NH2-terminal amino acids was identical to the sequence of albumin. mRNA for human albumin could not be detected in bone marrow cells, nor could biosynthetic labeling of albumin be demonstrated in bone marrow cells during incubation with [14C]leucine. Immunofluorescence studies on single cells demonstrated the presence of intracellular albumin in fixed permeabilized neutrophils. Light microscopy of immunogold-silver-stained cryosections visualized albumin in cytoplasmic "granules." The morphology of these was determined by immunoelectron microscopy as vesicles of varying form and size. Subcellular fractionation studies on unstimulated neutrophils demonstrated the presence of albumin in the low density pre-gamma and gamma-regions that contain secretory vesicles, but are devoid of specific granules and azurophil granules. Albumin was readily released from these structures during activation of neutrophils with inflammatory mediators. Immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of immunoglobulin and transferrin along with albumin in exocytosed material from stimulated neutrophils. This indicates that secretory vesicles are unique endocytic vesicles that can be triggered to exocytose by inflammatory stimuli. Images PMID:1378856

  12. Quantitative immunological determination of 12 plasma proteins excreted in human urine collected before and after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, Jacques; Jeanloz, Roger W.

    1968-01-01

    Urine was collected from 6 healthy male adults at rest and from 20 male adults after a marathon race (25 miles). The concentrated urines were quantitatively analyzed, by single radial immunodiffusion, for their content in 12 different plasma proteins: tryptophan-rich prealbumin, albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, α1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, Gc-globulin, transferrin, hemopexin, β2-glycoprotein I, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin. Albumin, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin represent the major part of the plasma proteins detected in normal urine excreted by humans at rest (12, 0.5, and 2.5 mg respectively, out of a total excretion of 17.5 mg of plasma proteins per 24 hr). The other plasma proteins were excreted at a lower rate (< 0.4 mg/24 hr). The relative content of tryptophan-rich prealbumin, α1-antitrypsin, Gc-globulin, transferrin, and γG-globulin was lower in normal urine than in normal serum, whereas that of α1-acid glycoprotein, β2-glycoprotein I, and γA-globulin was higher. The ratio of γG-globulin to γA-globulin was 4.9:1. When plotted on a logarithmic scale, no direct relationship between the molecular weight of a protein and the value of its renal clearance could be observed. Strenuous exercise increased (up to 50-fold) the excretion of plasma proteins which represent 82% of the total proteins found in urine, instead of 57% in urine collected from humans at rest. There was particularly a significant rise of tryptophan-rich albumin, albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, transferrin, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin (0.26, 127, 11.8, 3.3, 1.2, and 2.0 μg respectively, out of a total excretion of 167 μg of plasma proteins per min). The ratio of γG-globulin to γA-globulin was 16:1. After exercise, the renal clearance of proteins increased from 2 to 40 times, but, as for the urine of normal subjects at rest, no direct relationship between molecular weight and renal clearance could be observed. Images PMID:4170390

  13. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPAR{gamma} as an exosome-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W.; Shen Rongfong; Daniels, Mathew P.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2009-01-16

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPAR{gamma} as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  14. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  15. Circulating plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity and blood pressure tracking in the community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical trials using cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors to raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations reported an 'off-target' blood pressure (BP) raising effect. We evaluated the relations of baseline plasma CETP activity and longitudinal BP change. One tho...

  16. Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins from Maize Cluster in Two Sequence Subgroups with Differential Aquaporin Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Chaumont, François; Barrieu, François; Jung, Rudolf; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    2000-01-01

    The transport of water through membranes is regulated in part by aquaporins or water channel proteins. These proteins are members of the larger family of major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Plant aquaporins are categorized as either tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) or plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs). Sequence analysis shows that PIPs form several subclasses. We report on the characterization of three maize (Zea mays) PIPs belonging to the PIP1 and PIP2 subfamilies (ZmPIP1a, ZmPIP1b, and ZmPIP2a). The ZmPIP2a clone has normal aquaporin activity in Xenopus laevis oocytes. ZmPIP1a and ZmPIP1b have no activity, and a review of the literature shows that most PIP1 proteins identified in other plants have no or very low activity in oocytes. Arabidopsis PIP1 proteins are the only exception. Control experiments show that this lack of activity of maize PIP1 proteins is not caused by their failure to arrive at the plasma membrane of the oocytes. ZmPIP1b also does not appear to facilitate the transport of any of the small solutes tried (glycerol, choline, ethanol, urea, and amino acids). These results are discussed in relationship to the function and regulation of the PIP family of aquaporins. PMID:10759498

  17. Coarse-grained model of adsorption of blood plasma proteins onto nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hender; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for evaluation of interactions of globular proteins with nanoparticles (NPs). The protein molecules are represented by one bead per aminoacid and the nanoparticle by a homogeneous sphere that interacts with the aminoacids via a central force that depends on the nanoparticle size. The proposed methodology is used to predict the adsorption energies for six common human blood plasma proteins on hydrophobic charged or neutral nanoparticles of different sizes as well as the preferred orientation of the molecules upon adsorption. Our approach allows one to rank the proteins by their binding affinity to the nanoparticle, which can be used for predicting the composition of the NP-protein corona. The predicted ranking is in good agreement with known experimental data for protein adsorption on surfaces.

  18. [The oxidative modification of blood plasma proteins in patients in critical states].

    PubMed

    Riabov, G A; Azizov, Iu M; Dorokhov, S I; Kulabukhov, V V; Titova, I A; Pasechnik, I N; Brazhnik, T B; Rybintsev, V Iu

    2000-01-01

    Current concepts on the formation and biological activity of activated oxygen forms (AOF) in humans are discussed. The main AOF types are produced as a result of consecutive single-electron recovery of molecular oxygen (O2) and are more reactive than O2. AOF are initially normal components of cellular metabolism with certain biological functions. Their reactive aggressiveness is regulated by a potent antioxidant system which is present in any live organism. In disease this balance is distorted towards uncontrolled AOF generation and formation of oxidative stress, when AOF impair all biological structures, including proteins. Unregulated modification of proteins by AOF results in loss of protein biological activities (enzymatic, receptor, transporting function, etc.). Moreover, oxidative modification of proteins generates new antigens and provokes immune response. The authors present experimental data which confirm significant modification of plasma proteins in critical patients. The role of the detrimental effect of AOF on proteins in the formation of critical states deserves special studies. PMID:10833843

  19. Plasma reciprocal pool specific activity predicts that of intracellular free leucine for protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Horber, F.F.; Horber-Feyder, C.M.; Krayer, S.; Schwenk, W.F.; Haymond, M.W. )

    1989-09-01

    We previously proposed that, during the infusion of either labeled leucine or its alpha-ketoacid, alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC), the plasma specific activity (SA) of the transaminated product of the infused tracer (reciprocal pool SA) may better reflect the intracellular leucine SA than the plasma SA of either infused tracer (primary pool SA). To test this hypothesis, 14 dogs were simultaneously infused intravenously with (3H)leucine and (14C)KIC, and blood and tissue compartments were sampled. The ratios of (3H)-leucine to (14C)leucine (3H)/(14C)leucine in mixed tissue proteins and in the intracellular space of striated muscle were the same as the ratio of the isotope infusion rates and similar, although slightly lower (P less than 0.01), than (3H)KIC/(14C)leucine SA (ratio of reciprocal pool SA) in plasma. Plasma (3H)KIC/(14C)leucine SA were essentially identical to the (3H)/(14C) of leucine in (1) mixed liver proteins, (2) intrahepatic free leucine, and (3) fibrin. The (3H)/(14C)leucine in mixed renal proteins and in the intracellular space of kidney and erythrocytes were similar to those of the venous plasma (3H)/(14C)leucine SA. The plasma (3H)KIC and (14C)leucine SA (the reciprocal pool SA) were similar to the SA of (3H)- and (14C)leucine in the intracellular space of all organs investigated with the exception of kidney. Therefore, in postabsorptive dogs, the plasma SA of the transaminated product of the infused labeled KIC or leucine is an excellent predictor of the intracellular leucine SA in all tissues investigated with the exception of kidney.

  20. Heterogeneity of Arabinogalactan-Proteins on the Plasma Membrane of Rose Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Serpe, M. D.; Nothnagel, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) have been purified from the plasma membrane of suspension-cultured Paul's Scarlet rose (Rosa sp.) cells. The two most abundant and homogeneous plasma membrane AGP fractions were named plasma membrane AGP1 (PM-AGP1) and plasma membrane AGP2 (PM-AGP2) and had apparent molecular masses of 140 and 217 kD, respectively. Both PM-AGP1 and PM-AGP2 had [beta]-(1-3)-, [beta]-(1,6)-, and [beta]-(1,3,6)-galactopyranosyl residues, predominantly terminal [alpha]-arabinofuranosyl residues, and (1,4)- and terminal glucuronopyranosyl residues. The protein moieties of PM-AGP1 and PM-AGP2 were both rich in hydroxyproline, alanine, and serine, but differed in the abundance of hydroxyproline, which was 1.6 times higher in PM-AGP2 than in PM-AGP1. Another difference was the overall protein content, which was 3.7% (w/w) in PM-AGP1 and 15% in PM-AGP2. As judged by their behavior on reverse-phase chromatography, PM-AGP1 and PM-AGP2 were not more hydrophobic than AGPs from the cell wall or culture medium. In contrast, a minor plasma membrane AGP fraction eluted later on reverse-phase chromatography and was more negatively charged at pH 5 than either PM-AGP1 or PM-AGP2. The more negatively charged fraction contained molecules with a glycosyl composition characteristic of AGPs and included at least two different macromolecules. The results of this investigation indicate that Rosa plasma membrane contains at least four distinct AGPs or AGP-like molecules. These molecules differed from each other in size, charge, hydrophobicity, amino-acyl composition, and/or protein content. PMID:12226444

  1. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J.; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples. PMID:26141921

  2. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here, we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase, nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane. PMID:25897971

  3. Screening Preeclamptic Cord Plasma for Proteins Associated with Decreased Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Low, Hoi Pang; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Qiu, Li; Chang, Chien-I; Strohsnitter, William C.; Norwitz, Errol R.; Tam, Sun W.; Evans, James E.; Green, Karin M.; Paulo, Joao A.; Lambe, Mats; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia, a complication of pregnancy characterized by hypertension and proteinuria, has been found to reduce the subsequent risk for breast cancer in female offspring. As this protective effect could be due to exposure to preeclampsia-specific proteins during intrauterine life, the proteomic profiles of umbilical cord blood plasma between preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies were compared. Umbilical cord plasma samples, depleted of 14 abundant proteins, were subjected to proteomic analysis using the quantitative method of nanoACQUITY ultra performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry with elevated energy mode of acquisitionE (NanoUPLC-MSE). Sixty-nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which 15 and 6 proteins were only detected in preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies, respectively. Additionally, expression of 8 proteins (gelsolin, complement C5, keratin type I cytoskeletal 10, pigment epithelium-derived factor, complement factor B, complement component C7, hemoglobin subunit gamma-2 and alpha-fetoprotein) were up-regulated in preeclampsia with a fold change of ⩾2.0 when compared to normotensive pregnancies. The identification of alpha-fetoprotein in preeclamptic umbilical cord blood plasma supported the validity of this screen as alpha-fetoprotein has anti-estrogenic properties and has previously been linked to preeclampsia as well as a reduced breast cancer risk. The findings of this pilot study may provide new insights into the mechanistic link between preeclampsia and potentially reduced breast cancer susceptibility in adult life. PMID:24296084

  4. Screening preeclamptic cord plasma for proteins associated with decreased breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Low, Hoi Pang; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Qiu, Li; Chang, Chien-I; Strohsnitter, William C; Norwitz, Errol R; Tam, Sun W; Evans, James E; Green, Karin M; Paulo, Joao A; Lambe, Mats; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Preeclampsia, a complication of pregnancy characterized by hypertension and proteinuria, has been found to reduce the subsequent risk for breast cancer in female offspring. As this protective effect could be due to exposure to preeclampsia-specific proteins during intrauterine life, the proteomic profiles of umbilical cord blood plasma between preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies were compared. Umbilical cord plasma samples, depleted of 14 abundant proteins, were subjected to proteomic analysis using the quantitative method of nanoACQUITY ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with elevated energy mode of acquisition(E) (NanoUPLC-MS(E)). Sixty-nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which 15 and 6 proteins were only detected in preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies, respectively. Additionally, expression of 8 proteins (gelsolin, complement C5, keratin type I cytoskeletal 10, pigment epithelium-derived factor, complement factor B, complement component C7, hemoglobin subunit gamma-2 and alpha-fetoprotein) were up-regulated in preeclampsia with a fold change of ≥2.0 when compared to normotensive pregnancies. The identification of alpha-fetoprotein in preeclamptic umbilical cord blood plasma supported the validity of this screen as alpha-fetoprotein has anti-estrogenic properties and has previously been linked to preeclampsia as well as a reduced breast cancer risk. The findings of this pilot study may provide new insights into the mechanistic link between preeclampsia and potentially reduced breast cancer susceptibility in adult life. PMID:24296084

  5. [Prognostic value of S-100B protein plasma measurement after cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Ziani, S; Bertho, N; Atlan, G; Fievet, M-L; Ecollan, P; Beaudeux, J-L

    2010-01-01

    S-100B protein is selectively synthesized by glial cells, and is released in biological fluids after acute brain damage. We analyzed initial levels and evolution of plasma S-100B protein concentrations after resuscitated cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). S-100B levels were determined in 27 subjects at the time of CPA (H0) then 12, 24 and 48 h after resuscitation. Initial levels of S-100B and kinetics revealed that: 1) 95% the of subjects with a concentration of protein S-100B greater than 0.80 microg/L at H0 did not survive; 2) 62% of subjects with a concentration of protein S-100B lower than 0.80 microg/L at H0 survived; 3) 100% of subjects with a protein S-100B level lower than 0.80 microg/L at H0 and whose evolution kinetics of S-100B levels showed a decrease survived; 4) 100% of the subjects whose S-100B levels increased from H12 died. In summary, this study suggests that the threshold of 0.80 microg/L for S-100B plasma levels at H0 could be predictive for the outcome of the CPA, when associated with the kinetic study of S-100B plasma concentration. PMID:20146976

  6. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2015-01-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane. PMID:25897971

  7. Moesin, ezrin, and p205 are actin-binding proteins associated with neutrophil plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Pestonjamasp, K; Amieva, M R; Strassel, C P; Nauseef, W M; Furthmayr, H; Luna, E J

    1995-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins in bovine neutrophil plasma membranes were identified using blot overlays with 125I-labeled F-actin. Along with surface-biotinylated proteins, membranes were enriched in major actin-binding polypeptides of 78, 81, and 205 kDa. Binding was specific for F-actin because G-actin did not bind. Further, unlabeled F-actin blocked the binding of 125I-labeled F-actin whereas other acidic biopolymers were relatively ineffective. Binding also was specifically inhibited by myosin subfragment 1, but not by CapZ or plasma gelsolin, suggesting that the membrane proteins, like myosin, bind along the sides of the actin filaments. The 78- and 81-kDa polypeptides were identified as moesin and ezrin, respectively, by co-migration on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation with antibodies specific for moesin and ezrin. Although not present in detectable amounts in bovine neutrophils, radixin (a third and closely related member of this gene family) also bound 125I-labeled F-actin on blot overlays. Experiments with full-length and truncated bacterial fusion proteins localized the actin-binding site in moesin to the extreme carboxy terminus, a highly conserved sequence. Immunofluorescence micrographs of permeabilized cells and cell "footprints" showed moesin co-localization with actin at the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, consistent with a role as a membrane-actin-linking protein. Images PMID:7612961

  8. Effect of parasitism on plasma sex-specific proteins in Cyphocarax gilbert (Teleost, Curimatidae).

    PubMed

    Da Silva, L Gomes; Azevedo, J S; Silva-Neto, M A; Lima, N R Wille; Dansa-Petretski, M

    2005-06-01

    Cyphocarax gilbert (Szidat, L., 1948) is a fish commonly found in coastal drainage of eastern Brazil. This fish is sometimes caught with signs of infection by the crustacean Riggia paranensis, a haematophagous parasite. A remarkable feature of infected fish is that they lack gonads. In this paper we have analysed the frequency of parasitism, the gonadal development of non-infected fish and the profile of plasma proteins in both infected and non-infected specimens. Two reproductive periods/year were observed, beginning in February and August. On average, 40% of fish were infected, in the Itabapoana River (Brazil). Sex-specific proteins were identified by electrophoresis. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that a 143 kDa female-specific glycolipoprotein (FSP) is a calcium-binding phosphoprotein. FSP was isolated through ultracentrifugation and SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the native protein is composed of three polypeptides of 143, 100 and 70 kDa. Both FSP and a 33 kDa male-specific protein (MSP) are absent from infected fish plasma. FSP levels in female plasma changes with the developmental stage of gonads. Altogether these data suggest that the FSP corresponds to fish vitellogenin. Furthermore, the absence of the above-mentioned proteins in infected fish suggests that R. paranensis might interfere with the regular hormonal process of fish vitellogenesis. PMID:15977902

  9. Protein and cholesterol electrophoresis of plasma samples from captive cownose ray (Rhinoptera bonasus).

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Field, Cara; McDermott, Alexa; Leppert, Lynda; Clauss, Tonya; Bossart, Gregory D

    2015-11-01

    Our study was undertaken to assess the application of semiautomated methods available at the reference laboratory level for the evaluation of plasma protein and cholesterol via electrophoresis in samples from cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus). Three groups of animals were assessed: clinically normal, clinically abnormal, and parasitized with leeches. As reported previously, the albumin band was negligible; the protein electrophoretograms were dominated by a large beta-globulin fraction. While the group of samples from the leech-parasitized rays did not show any large differences, the abnormal group exhibited significantly elevated total solids and cholesterol levels. The latter was related to a significant increase in very low density lipoprotein levels. The results demonstrate the potential application of these laboratory methods in quantitation of plasma proteins and cholesterol fractions in subclass Elasmobranchii. PMID:26450839

  10. Extensive dataset of boar seminal plasma proteome displaying putative reproductive functions of identified proteins.

    PubMed

    Perez-Patiño, Cristina; Barranco, Isabel; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Martinez, Emilio A; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Roca, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    A complete proteomic profile of seminal plasma (SP) remains challenging, particularly in porcine. The data reports on the analysis of boar SP-proteins by using a combination of SEC, 1-D SDS PAGE and NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS from 33 pooled SP-samples (11 boars, 3 ejaculates/boar). A complete dataset of the 536 SP-proteins identified and validated with confidence ≥95% (Unused Score >1.3) and a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤1%, is provided. In addition, the relative abundance of 432 of them is also shown. Gene ontology annotation of the complete SP-proteome complemented by an extensive description of the putative reproductive role of SP-proteins, providing a valuable source for a better understanding of SP role in the reproductive success. This data article refers to the article entitled "Characterization of the porcine seminal plasma proteome comparing ejaculate portions" (Perez-Patiño et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27583342

  11. Plasma protein(s) yields met-enkephalin-related peptides in near-micromolar concentrations when treated with pepsin.

    PubMed

    Singer, E A; Mitra, S P; Carraway, R E

    1986-10-01

    Treatment of animal and human plasmas with pepsin yielded large quantities of immunoreactive methionine5-enkephalin (i-met-ENK). The concentrations measured after pepsin treatment were 0.1-0.5 microM, about 1000 times the normal circulating level of i-met-ENK (0.03-0.3 nM). The reaction was shown to be time and pH dependent and to involve the action of pepsin on a protein(s) of about 65,000 mol wt. Pepsin-generated i-met-ENK from rat plasma gave three major peaks during reverse phase HPLC, one of which (approximately 25% of the total) coeluted with methionine5-enkephalin sulfoxide and also completed in a radioreceptor assay for opiate-related substances. In addition, this material produced met-ENK-like effects on vascular permeability in rat skin and inhibited electrically induced contractions of the isolated guinea pig ileum in a naloxone-sensitive manner. The plasma substrate(s) that yielded i-met-ENK was distinguished from adrenal proenkephalins, since partially purified plasma substrate(s) did not liberate i-met-ENK upon digestion with trypsin and carboxypeptidase B. Although it is possible that these peptides differ from met-ENK in amino acid sequence, the results presented here suggest that met-ENK-related substances might be formed physiologically by the action of a pepsin-related processing enzyme(s) on plasma substrate(s). Such a mechanism would be analogous to that used in the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:3093194

  12. Characterization of Differential Protein Tethering at the Plasma Membrane in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan D.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Physical tethering of membrane proteins to the cortical actin cytoskeleton provides functional organization to the plasma membrane and contributes to diverse cellular processes including cell signaling, vesicular trafficking, endocytosis, and migration. For these processes to occur, membrane protein tethering must be dynamically regulated in response to environmental cues. In this study, we describe a novel biochemical scheme for isolating the complement of plasma membrane proteins that are physically tethered to the actin cytoskeleton. We utilized this method in combination with tandem liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) to demonstrate that cytoskeletal tethering of membrane proteins is acutely regulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in normal human kidney (HK2) cells. Our results indicate that several proteins known to be involved in EGF signaling, as well as other proteins not traditionally associated with this pathway, are tethered to the cytoskeleton in dynamic fashion. Further analysis of one hit from our proteomic survey, the receptor phosphotyrosine phosphatase PTPRS, revealed a correlation between cytoskeletal tethering and endosomal trafficking in response to EGF. This finding parallels previous indications that PTPRS is involved in the desensitization of EGFR and provides a potential mechanism to coordinate localization of these two membrane proteins in the same compartment upon EGFR activation. PMID:22559174

  13. Dietary protein and plasma total homocysteine, cysteine concentrations in coronary angiographic subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary patterns are associated with plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in healthy populations, but the associations between dietary protein and tHcy, total cysteine (tCys) in high risk populations are unclear. We therefore examined the association between dietary protein and tHcy and tCys concentrations in coronary angiographic subjects. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1015 Chinese patients who underwent coronary angiography (40–85 y old). With the use of food-frequency questionnaires, we divided the total protein intakes into high animal-protein and high plant-protein diets. Circulating concentrations of tHcy and tCys were simultaneously measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Results We found that high animal-protein diet was positively associated with hyperhomocysteinemia after adjustment for potential confounders, with the subjects in the highest quartile of intake having the greatest increase in risk (OR: 4.14, 95% CI: 2.67-6.43), whereas high plant-protein diet was inversely related to hyperhomocysteinemia, with a higher intake being protective. Compared with the first quartile of intake, the adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI: 0.38-0.91) for the fourth quartile. The total protein intake was positively associated with the risk of hypercysteinemia and the participants in highest quartile had significant OR of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.02-2.87) compared with those in lowest quartile. In multivariate linear regression analyses, high animal-protein and total-protein intakes were positively associated with plasma tHcy and tCys concentrations. The plant-protein intake was a negative determinant of plasma tHcy concentrations. Conclusions High animal-protein diet was positively associated with high tHcy concentrations, whereas high plant-protein diet was inversely associated with tHcy concentrations. Furthermore the total protein intake was strongly related to tCys concentrations. PMID:24195518

  14. Plasma volume and intravascular protein masses in trained boys and fit young men.

    PubMed

    Koch, G; Röcker, L

    1977-12-01

    Plasma volumes and intravascular protein masses were measured in eight well-trained boys (VO2 max = 59.6 +/- 6.5 ml/kg body wt) aged 13-15 yr and compared with two groups of adult athletes aged 17-20 yr (VO2 max = 61.8 +/- 3.4 ml/kg body wt) and 24-30 yr (VO2 max = 63.3 +/- 4.1 ml/kg body wt), respectively. The trained boys had larger plasma volumes and increased intravascular masses of albumin and hepatogenic globulins as compared with values available for children with normal physical activity. There was no significant difference between the boys and the adults concerning maximal oxygen uptake, plasma volume, albumin, immunoglobins, and haptoglobin, when allowance was made for differences in body dimensions; probably due to the young age, however, the boys had considerably higher relative alpha2-macroglobulin and transferrin masses. Endurance training apparently elicits the same response of the plasma protein system regardless of age, at least after pubertal age has been attained. The overall effect of these changes implies an increase of the water binding capacity of the plasma PMID:75204

  15. Stimulated synthesis of plasma protein species in Q fever and endotoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Picking, W.D.; Ershadi, M.; Hackstadt, T.; Paretsky, D.

    1987-05-01

    Q fever stimulates hepatic transcription and translation. Products of stimulated transcription have been identified, but not of translation. Protein (Pr) synthesis and rPr S6 phosphorylation correlated. The authors now report stimulated synthesis of plasma Pr species in early febrile responses to Q fever and Coxiella burnetii lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Guinea pigs received 400 g LPS intraperitoneally and 7 hr later 250 Ci L-(TVS)met, then sacrificed 3 hr later. Plasma Pr sp act (cpm/mg Pr) increased 2.3X over controls (N). Exptl plasma Pr PAGE autorads showed intensified Pr bands at M/sub r/ 55K. Guinea pigs infected with C. burnetii (Inf) received 400 Ci (TVS)met 84 hr p.i. and were sacrificed 3 hr later. Inf plasma Pr 1D-PAGE showed bands at 55K similar to that found with LPS, with lower albumin concn. Coomassie stain and autorads of 2-D PAGEs showed intensified or new acidic peptide species in Inf plasma. PAGE autorads in vitro translations using liver mRNA and ribosomes showed major species in Inf systems at 49K (4+) and 62K (2+) compared to N. The data indicate acute phase protein induction by LPS or rickettsial infection.

  16. Triton X-114 cloud point extraction to subfractionate blood plasma proteins for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Flemming; Wulff, Tune

    2015-09-15

    A simple and reproducible procedure for enrichment of a plasma protein subfraction suitable for two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE) was developed, using a Triton X-114-based cloud point extraction (CPE). Appropriate conditions for such a CPE procedure were found by SDS-PAGE to be a plasma protein concentration of about 10mg/ml in 3% (w/v) Triton X-114. 2DE of proteins obtained by CPE of 400 μl of human plasma revealed about 200 spots constituting a spot pattern very different from the pattern of total plasma. The CPE procedure only had a limited contribution to the technical variation. Identification of about 60 spots, representing only 22 proteins, revealed that several proteins in the obtained subfraction were present in more isoforms or modifications. Among these were apolipoproteins (A-1, D, E, L1, and M), haptoglobin-related protein, phosphatidylcholine-sterol acyltransferase, serum amyloid A, and serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1, which are proteins of a hydrophobic nature, as in plasma they relate to lipoprotein particles. Thus, Triton X-114-based CPE is a simple plasma prefractionation tool, attractive for detailed 2DE studies of hydrophobic plasma proteins and their isoforms or modifications. PMID:26080275

  17. Treatment of Second-Order Structures of Proteins Using Oxygen Radio Frequency Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Nakahigashi, Akari; Liu, Hao; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-08-01

    Decomposition characteristics of second-order structures of proteins are determined using an oxygen radio frequency (RF) plasma sterilizer in order to prevent infectious proteins from contaminating medical equipment in hospitals. The removal of casein protein as a test protein with a concentration of 50 mg/cm2 on the plane substrate requires approximately 8 h when singlet atomic oxygen is irradiated. The peak intensity of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of the β-sheet structures decreases at approximately the same rate as those of the α-helix and first-order structures of proteins. Active oxygen has a sufficient oxidation energy to dissociate hydrogen bonds within the β-sheet structure.

  18. Plasma membrane protein trafficking in plant–microbe interactions: a plant cell point of view

    PubMed Central

    Nathalie Leborgne-Castel; Bouhidel, Karim

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure their physiological and cellular functions, plasma membrane (PM) proteins must be properly conveyed from their site of synthesis, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum, to their final destination, the PM, through the secretory pathway. PM protein homeostasis also relies on recycling and/or degradation, two processes that are initiated by endocytosis. Vesicular membrane trafficking events to and from the PM have been shown to be altered when plant cells are exposed to mutualistic or pathogenic microbes. In this review, we will describe the fine-tune regulation of such alterations, and their consequence in PM protein activity. We will consider the formation of intracellular perimicrobial compartments, the PM protein trafficking machinery of the host, and the delivery or retrieval of signaling and transport proteins such as pattern-recognition receptors, producers of reactive oxygen species, and sugar transporters. PMID:25566303

  19. Novel platelet-agglutinating protein from a thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, F A; Lian, E C

    1985-01-01

    A novel platelet-agglutinating protein (PAP) was purified approximately 2,000-fold from the plasma of a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel and concanavalin A-Sepharose chromatographies. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with and without reduction, this preparation revealed a major protein band with a molecular weight of 37,000, and a minor band with a molecular weight of 32,000-34,000. After elution from the gel, only the 37,000-mol wt protein corresponding to the major band induced the platelet agglutination. When four normal plasmas and the recovery plasma from the same TTP patient were subjected to the similar purification steps, the 37,000-mol wt major band was absent. The 125I-PAP bound to the platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. The platelet agglutination induced by PAP was not inhibited by hirudin, heparin in the presence of antithrombin III, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, apyrase, aspirin, or prostaglandin I2. However, it was inhibited by IgG from normal adults and from the same TTP patient after recovery. The anti-37,000-mol wt PAP antiserum prepared in the rabbit formed a single precipitin line against the highly purified PAP. Using this antiserum in the Western immunoblotting, the 37,000-mol wt protein band was found in the three TTP plasmas, of which the platelet-agglutinating activity was inhibited by the anti-37,000-mol wt PAP IgG. The 37,000-mol wt immunoprecipitin band was absent in the plasmas obtained from another two TTP patients, two normal subjects, two patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and two patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation. These results suggest that the 37,000-mol wt PAP is present only in certain cases of TTP, and is likely to be responsible for the formation of platelet thrombi in the microcirculation. Images PMID:3932464

  20. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins in wheat roots exposed to phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Du, Jiangxue; Yue, Le; Zhan, Xinhua

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potentially carcinogenic and toxic to humans through ingestion of contaminated food crops. PAHs can enter crop roots through proton/PAH symporters; however, to date, the symporter remains unclear. Here we reveal, for the first time, the plasma membrane proteome of Triticum aestivum seedling roots in response to phenanthrene (a model PAH) exposure. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and protein database search engines were employed to analyze and identify phenanthrene-responsive proteins. Over 192 protein spots are reproducibly detected in each gel, while 8 spots are differentially expressed under phenanthrene treatment. Phenanthrene induces five up-regulated proteins distinguished as 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate-homocysteine methyltransferase 2, enolase, heat shock protein 80-2, probable mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 37e (heat shock 70-kDa protein 1), and lactoylglutathione lyase. Three proteins identified as adenosine kinase 2, 4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-yl glucoside beta-D-glucosidase 1c, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 3 are down-regulated under exposure to phenanthrene. The up-regulated proteins are related to plant defense response, antioxidant system, and glycolysis. The down-regulated proteins involve the metabolism of high-energy compounds and plant growth. Magnesium, which is able to bind to enolase, can enhance the transport of phenanthrene into wheat roots. Therefore, it is concluded that phenanthrene can induce differential expression of proteins in relation to carbohydrate metabolism, self-defense, and plant growth on wheat root plasma membrane. This study not only provides novel insights into PAH uptake by plant roots and PAH stress responses, but is also a good starting point for further determination and analyses of their functions using genetic and other approaches. PMID:26897580

  1. Ellipsometric studies of synthetic albumin-binding chitosan-derivatives and selected blood plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    This dissertation summarizes work on the synthesis of chitosan-derivatives and the development of ellipsometric methods to characterize materials of biological origin. Albumin-binding chitosan-derivatives were synthesized via addition reactions that involve amine groups naturally present in chitosan. These surfaces were shown to have an affinity towards human serum albumin via ELISA, UV spectroscopy and SDS PAGE. Modified surfaces were characterized with IR ellipsometry at various stages of their synthesis using appropriate optical models. It was found that spin cast chitosan films were anisotropic in nature. All optical models used for characterizing chitosan-derivatives were thus anisotropic. Chemical signal dependence on molecular structure and composition was illustrated via IR spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE). An anisotropic optical model of an ensemble of Lorentz oscillators were used to approximate material behavior. The presence of acetic acid in spin-cast non-neutralized chitosan samples was thus shown. IRSE application to biomaterials was also demonstrated by performing a step-wise chemical characterizations during synthesis stages. Protein adsorbed from single protein solutions on these modified surfaces was monitored by visible in-situ variable wavelength ellipsometry. Based on adsorption profiles obtained from single protein adsorption onto silicon surfaces, lumped parameter kinetic models were developed. These models were used to fit experimental data of immunoglobulin-G of different concentrations and approximate conformational changes in fibrinogen adsorption. Biomaterial characterization by ellipsometry was further extended to include characterization of individual protein solutions in the IR range. Proteins in an aqueous environment were characterized by attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) IR ellipsometry using a ZnSe prism. Parameterized dielectric functions were created for individual proteins using Lorentz oscillators. These

  2. Seminal plasma protein profiles of ejaculates obtained by internal artificial vagina and electroejaculation in Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Rego, J P A; Moura, A A; Nouwens, A S; McGowan, M R; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate if differences exist in the seminal plasma protein profile from mature Brahman bulls using two methods of semen collection: internal artificial vagina (IAV) and electroejaculation (EEJ). Semen was collected four times from three bulls on the same day and parameters were assessed immediately post-collection. Seminal plasma proteins were evaluated by 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. Semen volume was greater (P < 0.05) for EEJ (4.6 ± 0.35 mL) than for IAV (1.86 ± 0.24 mL) but sperm concentration was greater in IAV (1505 ± 189 × 10(6) sperm/mL) than in EEJ samples (344 ± 87 × 10(6) sperm/mL). Sperm motility and the percentage of normal sperm were not different between treatments. Total concentration of seminal plasma proteins was greater for samples collected by IAV as compared to EEJ (19.3 ± 0.9 compared with 13.0 ± 1.8 mg/mL, P < 0.05; respectively). Based on 2-D gels, 22 spots had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from IAV samples, corresponding to 21 proteins identified as transferrin, albumin, epididymal secretory glutathione peroxidase, among others. Thirty-three spots, corresponding to 26 proteins, had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from EEJ samples. These proteins were identified as spermadhesin-1, Bovine Sperm Protin 1, 3 and 5 isoforms, angiogenin-1, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, clusterin, nucleobindin-1, cathepsins, spermadhesin Z13, annexins, among others. Thus, proteins in greater amounts in samples obtained by IAV and EEJ were mainly of epididymal origin and accessory sex glands, respectively. PMID:26282524

  3. Interstitial fluid, plasma protein, colloid, and leukocyte uptake into initial lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Ikomi, F; Hunt, J; Hanna, G; Schmid-Schönbein, G W

    1996-11-01

    Lymphatics serve to remove from the interstitium a range of materials, including plasma proteins, colloid materials, and cells. Lymph flow rates can be enhanced by periodic tissue compression or venous pressure elevation, but little is known to what degree enhancement of lymph flow affects material transport. The objective was to examine the uptake of plasma proteins, a colloidal perflubron emulsion (LA-11063, mean particle diameter = 0.34 micron), and leukocytes into lymphatics. Prenodal collecting lymphatics in the lower hindlimb of rabbits were cannulated with and without foot massage and after elevation of venous pressure (40 mmHg). The average lymph flow rates were elevated approximately 22-fold by the skin massage but only about threefold by venous pressure elevation. Lymph-to-plasma protein concentration ratio remained unchanged by the massage but decreased significantly after venous pressure elevation. Lymph colloid concentration and leukocyte counts were elevated on average 47 and 8.5 times, respectively, by foot massage, but both decreased after venous pressure elevation. These results suggest that skin movement by massage and elevation of the venous pressure lead to opposite lymph transport kinetics of protein, colloids, and cells. Massage is more effective to enhance material transport out of the interstitium into the initial lymphatics. PMID:8941530

  4. HIV-1 RNA genome dimerizes on the plasma membrane in the presence of Gag protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Rahman, Sheikh Abdul; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Grunwald, David; Sardo, Luca; Burdick, Ryan C; Plisov, Sergey; Liang, Edward; Tai, Sheldon; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2016-01-12

    Retroviruses package a dimeric genome comprising two copies of the viral RNA. Each RNA contains all of the genetic information for viral replication. Packaging a dimeric genome allows the recovery of genetic information from damaged RNA genomes during DNA synthesis and promotes frequent recombination to increase diversity in the viral population. Therefore, the strategy of packaging dimeric RNA affects viral replication and viral evolution. Although its biological importance is appreciated, very little is known about the genome dimerization process. HIV-1 RNA genomes dimerize before packaging into virions, and RNA interacts with the viral structural protein Gag in the cytoplasm. Thus, it is often hypothesized that RNAs dimerize in the cytoplasm and the RNA-Gag complex is transported to the plasma membrane for virus assembly. In this report, we tagged HIV-1 RNAs with fluorescent proteins, via interactions of RNA-binding proteins and motifs in the RNA genomes, and studied their behavior at the plasma membrane by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We showed that HIV-1 RNAs dimerize not in the cytoplasm but on the plasma membrane. Dynamic interactions occur among HIV-1 RNAs, and stabilization of the RNA dimer requires Gag protein. Dimerization often occurs at an early stage of the virus assembly process. Furthermore, the dimerization process is probably mediated by the interactions of two RNA-Gag complexes, rather than two RNAs. These findings advance the current understanding of HIV-1 assembly and reveal important insights into viral replication mechanisms. PMID:26712001

  5. New protein kinase from plasma membrane of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells activated by natural polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Racker, E; Abdel-Ghany, M; Sherrill, K; Riegler, C; Blair, E A

    1984-01-01

    A polypeptide-dependent protein kinase was purified about 80-fold from an extract of plasma membranes of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. The membranes were extracted with Nonidet P-40, and the extract was purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and hydroxylapatite and affinity chromatography. The activity was stimulated 10-fold or more by polypeptide preparations from a variety of tissues, including placenta and hypothalamus. Polypeptide-dependent protein kinase had a pH optimum of about 7.5 and required Mg2+ for activity. Mn2+ at low concentrations (200 microM) stimulated enzyme activity somewhat but inhibited activity strongly at higher concentrations. The best available substrate for polypeptide-dependent protein kinase was beta-casein, and little or no phosphorylation was observed with alpha-casein, kappa-casein, phosvitin, alpha-lactalbumin, alpha-lactoglobulin, and histone. However, several endogenous substrates from plasma membranes of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were phosphorylated. Polypeptide-dependent protein kinase activity was not inhibited by 10 mM N-ethylmaleimide, and this resistance was useful in differentiating this protein kinase from other protein kinases that were present in crude fractions and sensitive to the inhibitor. Images PMID:6589591

  6. Vitamin D plasma binding protein. Turnover and fate in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, J G; Fraser, D R; Lawson, D E

    1981-01-01

    The metabolic disposition of the plasma binding protein (DBP) for vitamin D and its metabolites was studied in adult rabbits. Apo-DBP was purified from rabbit plasma and enzymatically labeled with radioiodine. The radioiodine-labeled protein retained its ability to bind vitamin D sterols and its physicochemical properties. When 125I-labeled DBP and 131I-labeled rabbit albumin were simultaneously injected intravenously, the 125I was cleared from plasma at a faster rate (t 1/2 = 1.7 d) than 131I (t 1/2 = 5 d) and 125I was present in excess of 131I in kidney, liver, skeletal muscle, heart, lung, intestine, testis, and bone 1 h after injection. In contrast to DBP, 25(OH)D3 was cleared more slowly (t 1/2 = 10.7 d). Compared to albumin, DBP radioactivity appeared earlier and in greater quantity in the urine of catheterized rabbits. Gel filtration analyses of plasma revealed most of the 125I to elute in the position of DBP, with only small amounts in the less than 1,000-dalton region. In contrast, almost all of the urine 125I eluted in this small molecular weight fraction. The molar ratio of DBP to 25(OH)D3 in normal rabbit plasma was 138/1. The extravascular pool of DBP was calculated to be 1.5-2.4 times larger than the intravascular DBP pool, and the molar replacement rate of DBP was 1,350-fold higher than that of 25(OH)D3. The plasma disappearance curves of holo-DBP, prepared either by saturating with 25(OH)D3 or by covalently linking 3 beta-bromoacetoxy-25(OH)D3, were very similar to that of apo-DBP. Neuraminidase treatment of DBP did not alter its plasma survival. These studies indicate that DBP or DBP-25(OH)D3 complex is removed from plasma by a variety of tissues, that the DBP moiety is degraded during this process, and that a significant recirculation of 25(OH)D3 probably occurs. The molar excess of DBP to 25(OH)D3 in plasma, and the relatively rapid turnover of DBP indicate that a high capacity, high affinity, and dynamic transport mechanism for vitamin D sterols

  7. Sequestration of bovine seminal plasma proteins by different assemblies of phosphatidylcholine: A new technical approach.

    PubMed

    Le Guillou, J; Ropers, M-H; Gaillard, C; David-Briand, E; van Leeuwen-Ibarrola, J; Desherces, S; Schmitt, E; Bencharif, D; Amirat-Briand, L; Anton, M; Tainturier, D

    2016-04-01

    Binder of SPerm (BSP) proteins, the main proteins from bovine seminal plasma, are known to partially intercalate into the outer leaflet of the spermatozoa membrane and bind to choline-containing lipids being present therein. This insertion generates a negative effect on semen quality after cryopreservation by inducing an early-stage capacitation of spermatozoa. The assumption of surface properties exhibited by BSP proteins was checked by tensiometry measurements: BSP proteins are highly surface active. This suggests that BSP proteins can reach the interface covered by phospholipids not only by interactions between one and each other but also due to their own surface activity. The insertion of BSP proteins into the lipid domains outer leaflet of spermatozoa was reproduced on a biomimetic system such as Langmuir monolayers. The insertion of BSP proteins can be performed in the compressible fluid domains which contain choline-bearing lipids. Monolayer films were used as well to study the complexation of BSP proteins by two phospholipid assemblies: low density lipoprotein (LDLs) from egg yolk or liposomes produced from egg phospholipids. Irrespective of the phospholipid structure (lipoprotein or liposome), BSP was hindered to alter the structure of the membrane. Only the overall ratio BSP proteins:phosphatidylcholine was important. The difference between the two sequestering agents lies on their surface properties: LDL have a strong tendency to merge with the outer layer whereas liposomes mainly remain in the bulk on the same time scale. PMID:26628332

  8. Interactions of normal and mutant vesicular stomatitis virus matrix proteins with the plasma membrane and nucleocapsids.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, L D; Rose, J K

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that a fraction of the matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) binds tightly to cellular membranes in vivo when expressed in the absence of other VSV proteins. This membrane-associated M protein was functional in binding purified VSV nucleocapsids in vitro. Here we show that the membrane-associated M protein is largely associated with a membrane fraction having the density of plasma membranes, indicating membrane specificity in the binding. In addition, we analyzed truncated forms of M protein to identify regions responsible for membrane association and nucleocapsid binding. Truncated M protein lacking the amino-terminal basic domain still associated with cellular membranes, although not as tightly as wild-type M protein, and could not bind nucleocapsids. In contrast, deletion of the carboxy-terminal 14 amino acids did not disrupt stable membrane association or nucleocapsid interaction. These results suggest that the amino terminus of M protein either interacts directly with membranes and nucleocapsids or stabilizes a conformation that is required for M protein to mediate both of these interactions. Images PMID:8254754

  9. Construction of a functional S-layer fusion protein comprising an immunoglobulin G-binding domain for development of specific adsorbents for extracorporeal blood purification.

    PubMed

    Völlenkle, Christine; Weigert, Stefan; Ilk, Nicola; Egelseer, Eva; Weber, Viktoria; Loth, Fritz; Falkenhagen, Dieter; Sleytr, Uwe B; Sára, Margit

    2004-03-01

    The chimeric gene encoding a C-terminally-truncated form of the S-layer protein SbpA from Bacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 and two copies of the Fc-binding Z-domain was constructed, cloned, and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli HMS174(DE3). The Z-domain is a synthetic analogue of the B-domain of protein A, capable of binding the Fc part of immunoglobulin G (IgG). The S-layer fusion protein rSbpA(31-1068)/ZZ retained the specific properties of the S-layer protein moiety to self-assemble in suspension and to recrystallize on supports precoated with secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP), which is the natural anchoring molecule for the S-layer protein in the bacterial cell wall. Due to the construction principle of the S-layer fusion protein, the ZZ-domains remained exposed on the outermost surface of the protein lattice. The binding capacity of the native or cross-linked monolayer for human IgG was determined by surface plasmon resonance measurements. For batch adsorption experiments, 3-microm-diameter, biocompatible cellulose-based, SCWP-coated microbeads were used for recrystallization of the S-layer fusion protein. In the case of the native monolayer, the binding capacity for human IgG was 5.1 ng/mm(2), whereas after cross-linking with dimethyl pimelimidate, 4.4 ng of IgG/mm(2) was bound. This corresponded to 78 and 65% of the theoretical saturation capacity of a planar surface for IgGs aligned in the upright position, respectively. Compared to commercial particles used as immunoadsorbents to remove autoantibodies from sera of patients suffering from an autoimmune disease, the IgG binding capacity of the S-layer fusion protein-coated microbeads was at least 20 times higher. For that reason, this novel type of microbeads should find application in the microsphere-based detoxification system. PMID:15006773

  10. Identification of differentially expressed plasma proteins in atherosclerotic patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lepedda, Antonio Junior; Lobina, Omar; Rocchiccioli, Silvia; Nieddu, Gabriele; Ucciferri, Nadia; De Muro, Pierina; Idini, Michela; Nguyen, Hai Quy Tram; Guarino, Anna; Spirito, Rita; Formato, Marilena

    2016-07-01

    Besides hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, several factors are associated with a higher cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), many of them being closely related to each other owing to common origins or pathways. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunctions in diabetes include reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide, increased ROS and prothrombotic factors production, as well as activation of receptors for advanced glycation end-products. These alterations contribute to create a pro-inflammatory/thrombotic state that ultimately leads to plaque formation and complication. This study aimed at identifying differentially expressed plasma proteins between T2DM and non-diabetic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with LC-MS/MS. Before analysis, plasma samples were enriched in low-expression proteins through combinatorial hexapeptide ligand libraries. Both mono- and two-dimensional western blotting were performed for data validation. Differentially expressed proteins were mapped onto STRING v10 to build a protein-protein interaction network. Sixteen differentially expressed spots were identified with a high score. Among them, there were fibrinogen beta and gamma chains, complement C1r, C3 and C4-B subcomponents, alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), vitronectin and CD5 antigen-like. Protein-Protein interaction analysis evidenced a network among differentially expressed proteins in which vitronectin seems to represent a potentially pivotal node among fibrinolysis, complement dependent immune responses and inflammation in accordance with a number of in vitro and in vivo evidences for a contributory role of these proteins to the development of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:27037039

  11. A hybrid multi-loop genetic-algorithm/simplex/spatial-grid method for locating the optimum orientation of an adsorbed protein on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Mu, Shengjing; Nakano, Aiichiro; Shing, Katherine

    2009-05-01

    Atomistic simulation of protein adsorption on a solid surface in aqueous environment is computationally demanding, therefore the determination of preferred protein orientations on the solid surface usually serves as an initial step in simulation studies. We have developed a hybrid multi-loop genetic-algorithm/simplex/spatial-grid method to search for low adsorption-energy orientations of a protein molecule on a solid surface. In this method, the surface and the protein molecule are treated as rigid bodies, whereas the bulk fluid is represented by spatial grids. For each grid point, an effective interaction region in the surface is defined by a cutoff distance, and the possible interaction energy between an atom at the grid point and the surface is calculated and recorded in a database. In searching for the optimum position and orientation, the protein molecule is translated and rotated as a rigid body with the configuration obtained from a previous Molecular Dynamic simulation. The orientation-dependent protein-surface interaction energy is obtained using the generated database of grid energies. The hybrid search procedure consists of two interlinked loops. In the first loop A, a genetic algorithm (GA) is applied to identify promising regions for the global energy minimum and a local optimizer with the derivative-free Nelder-Mead simplex method is used to search for the lowest-energy orientation within the identified regions. In the second loop B, a new population for GA is generated and competitive solution from loop A is improved. Switching between the two loops is adaptively controlled by the use of similarity analysis. We test the method for lysozyme adsorption on a hydrophobic hydrogen-terminated silicon (110) surface in implicit water (i.e., a continuum distance-dependent dielectric constant). The results show that the hybrid search method has faster convergence and better solution accuracy compared with the conventional genetic algorithm.

  12. Quantitative analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma by AAL-enrichment and MRM mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Yong-Sam; Oh, Na Ree; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Lee, Yeon Jung; Kim, Sung Ho; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2013-11-01

    A lectin-coupled mass spectrometry (MS) approach was employed to quantitatively monitor aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma. To do this, we compared the difference in the total protein abundance of a target glycoprotein between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) plasmas and hepatitis B virus (HBV) plasmas, as well as the difference in lectin-specific protein glycoform abundance of the target glycoprotein. Capturing the lectin-specific protein glycoforms from a plasma sample was accomplished by using a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) immobilized onto magnetic beads via a biotin-streptavidin conjugate. Following tryptic digestion of both the total plasma and its AAL-captured fraction of each HCC and HBV sample, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry was conducted quantitatively by a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. From the MRM-based analysis of the total plasmas and AAL-captured fractions, differences between HCC and HBV plasma groups in fucosylated glycoform levels of target glycoproteins were confirmed to arise from both the change in the total protein abundance of the target proteins and the change incurred by aberrant fucosylation on target glycoproteins in HCC plasma, even when no significant change occurs in the total protein abundance level. Combining the MRM-based analysis method with the lectin-capturing technique proved to be a successful means of quantitatively investigating aberrant protein glycosylation in cancer plasma samples. Additionally, it was elucidated that the differences between HCC and control groups in fucosylated biomarker candidates A1AT and FETUA mainly originated from an increase in fucosylation levels on these target glycoproteins, rather than an increase in the total protein abundance of the target glycoproteins. PMID:24027776

  13. Simulated gastrointestinal digestion, intestinal permeation and plasma protein interaction of white, green, and black tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Tenore, Gian Carlo; Campiglia, Pietro; Giannetti, Daniela; Novellino, Ettore

    2015-02-15

    The gastrointestinal digestion, intestinal permeation, and plasma protein interaction of polyphenols from a single tea cultivar at different stages of processing (white, green, and black teas) were simulated. The salivary phase contained 74.8-99.5% of native polyphenols, suggesting potential bioavailability of significant amounts of antioxidants through the oral mucosal epithelium that might be gastric sensitive and/or poorly absorbed in the intestine. White tea had the highest content and provided the best intestinal bioaccessibility and bioavailability for catechins. Since most of native catechins were not absorbed, they were expected to accumulate in the intestinal lumen where a potential inhibition capacity of cellular glucose and cholesterol uptake was assumed. The permeated catechins (approximately, 2-15% of intestinal levels) significantly bound (about 37%) to plasma HDLs, suggesting a major role in cholesterol metabolism. White tea and its potential nutraceuticals could be effective in the regulation of plasma glucose and cholesterol levels. PMID:25236233

  14. Study of plasma modified-PTFE for biological applications: relationship between protein resistant properties, plasma treatment, surface composition and surface roughness

    PubMed Central

    Vandencasteele, Nicolas; Nisol, Bernard; Viville, Pascal; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Castner, David G.; Reniers, François

    2013-01-01

    PTFE samples were treated by low-pressure, O2 RF plasmas. The adsorption of BSA was used as a probe for the protein resistant properties. The exposure of PTFE to an O2 plasma leads to an increase in the chamber pressure. OES reveals the presence of CO, CO2 and F in the gas phase, indicating a strong etching of the PTFE surface by the O2 plasma. Furthermore, the high resolution C1s spectrum shows the appearance of CF3, CF and C-CF components in addition to the CF2 component, which is consistent with etching of the PTFE surface. WCA as high as 160° were observed, indicating a superhydrophobic behaviour. AFM Images of surfaces treated at high plasma power showed a increase in roughness. Lower amounts of BSA adsorption were detected on high power, O2 plasma-modified PTFE samples compared to low power, oxygen plasma-modified ones. PMID:24795545

  15. Detection of cellular prion protein in exosomes derived from ovine plasma.

    PubMed

    Berrone, Elena; Corona, Cristiano; Mazza, Maria; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Faro, Monica Lo; Properzi, Francesca; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Maurella, Cristiana; Caramelli, Maria; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Camussi, Giovanni; Casalone, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is present at extremely low levels in the blood of animals and its detection is complicated by the poor sensitivity of current standard methodologies. Interesting results have been obtained with recent advanced technologies that are able to detect minute amounts of the pathological PrP (PrPSc), but their efficiency is reduced by various factors present in blood. In this study, we were able to extract cellular PrP (PrPC) from plasma-derived exosomes by a simple, fast method without the use of differential ultracentrifugation and to visualize it by Western blotting, reducing the presence of most plasma proteins. This result confirms that blood is capable of releasing PrP in association with exosomes and could be useful to better study its role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. PMID:26399471

  16. Synthesis of Photoactivatable Analogues of Lysophosphatidic Acid and Covalent Labeling of Plasma Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zaiguo; Baker, Daniel L.; Tigyi, Gabor; Bittman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid bearing a benzophenone group in either the sn-1 or sn-2 chain of an oleoyl-type ester or oleyl-type ether chain and 32P in the phosphate group were synthesized. The benzophenone moiety was introduced by selective hydroboration of the double bond of enyne 11 at low temperature, followed by Suzuki reaction with 4-bromobenzophenone. The key intermediates for the preparation of ester-linked LPA 1 and 3 were obtained in one pot by a modified DIBAL-H reduction of orthoformate intermediate 22. These probes were shown to covalently modify a single protein target in rat plasma containing albumin and several protein targets in rat plasma containing a low level of albumin. PMID:16408973

  17. Blood volume and plasma protein responses to heat acclimatization in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, M.H.; Edwards, R.J.; Graveney, M.J.; Cochrane, L.A.; Davies, J.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of heat acclimatization on intravascular volume and protein responses to acute heat stress and exercise were studied in six male subjects. Absolute values for hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were lower after acclimatization, indicating hemodilution. Also, after acclimatization, the magnitude of the hemoconcentration response to exercise in the heat was significantly increased. There was no change in the concentration of plasma protein during or after acclimatization compared with before acclimatization, but there was a net increase in the total intravascular protein content. It is suggested that the hemodilution associated with heat acclimatization may be explained in terms of an increase in the intravascular oncotic pressure following an exercise-induced augmentation of protein, occurring at the expense of the interstitial compartment. It is concluded that this hemodilution is unlikely to be primarily responsible for the cardiovascular adjustment accompanying heat acclimatization and that it should be regarded as a secondary feature of adaptation to heat.

  18. The importance of selecting a proper biological milieu for protein corona analysis in vitro: Human plasma versus human serum.

    PubMed

    Mirshafiee, Vahid; Kim, Raehyun; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) exposure to biological fluids in the body results in protein binding to the NP surface, which forms a protein coating that is called the "protein corona". To simplify studies of protein-NP interactions and protein corona formation, NPs are incubated with biological solutions, such as human serum or human plasma, and the effects of this exposure are characterized in vitro. Yet, how NP exposure to these two different biological milieus affects protein corona composition and cell response has not been investigated. Here, we explore the differences between the protein coronas that form when NPs are incubated in human serum versus human plasma. NP characterization indicated that NPs that were exposed to human plasma had higher amounts of proteins bound to their surfaces, and were slightly larger in size than those exposed to human serum. In addition, significant differences in corona composition were also detected with gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, where a higher fraction of coagulation proteins and complement factors were found on the plasma-exposed NPs. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that the uptake of plasma-exposed NPs was higher than that of serum-exposed NPs by RAW 264.7 macrophage immune cells, but not by NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. This difference is likely due to the elevated amounts of opsonins, such as fibrinogen, on the surfaces of the NPs exposed to plasma, but not serum, because these components trigger NP internalization by immune cells. As the human plasma better mimics the composition of the in vivo environment, namely blood, in vitro protein corona studies should employ human plasma, and not human serum, so the biological phenomena that is observed is more similar to that occurring in vivo. PMID:26643610

  19. Formation of High-Capacity Protein-Adsorbing Membranes Through Simple Adsorption of Poly(acrylic acid)-Containing Films at low pH

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Dong, Jinlan; Ma, Yiding; Hovde, Stacy; Geiger, James H; Baker, Gregory L.; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2012-01-01

    Layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte adsorption is a simple, convenient method for introducing ion-exchange sites in porous membranes. This study demonstrates that adsorption of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-containing films at pH 3 rather than pH 5 increases the protein-binding capacity of such polyelectrolyte-modified membranes 3- to 6-fold. The low adsorption pH generates a high density of –COOH groups that function as either ion-exchange sites or points for covalent immobilization of metal-ion complexes that selectively bind tagged proteins. When functionalized with nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-Ni2+ complexes, membranes containing PAA/polyethyleneimine (PEI)/PAA films bind 93 mg of histidine6-tagged (His-tagged) ubiquitin per cm3 of membrane. Additionally these membranes isolate His-tagged COP9 signalosome complex subunit 8 from cell extracts and show >90% recovery of His-tagged ubiquitin. Although modification with polyelectrolyte films occurs by simply passing polyelectrolyte solutions through the membrane for as little as 5 min, with low-pH deposition the protein binding capacities of such membranes are as high as for membranes modified with polymer brushes and 2–3 fold higher than for commercially available IMAC resins. Moreover, the buffer permeabilities of polyelectrolyte-modified membranes that bind His-tagged protein are ~30% of the corresponding permeabilities of unmodified membranes, so protein capture can occur rapidly with low pressure drops. Even at a solution linear velocity of 570 cm/h, membranes modified with PAA/PEI/PAA exhibit a lysozyme dynamic binding capacity (capacity at 10% breakthrough) of ~ 40 mg/cm3. Preliminary studies suggest that these membranes are stable under depyrogenation conditions (1 M NaOH). PMID:22468687

  20. One step physically adsorbed coating of silica capillary with excellent stability for the separation of basic proteins by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2015-11-01

    The coating of capillary inner surface is considered to be an effective approach to suppress the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface in CE. However, most of coating materials reported are water-soluble, which may dissolve in BGE during the procedure of electrophoresis. In this study, a novel strategy for selection of physically coating materials has been illustrated to get coating layer with excellent stability using materials having poor solubility in commonly used solvents. Taking natural chitin as example (not hydrolyzed water soluble chitosan), a simple one step coating method using chitin solution in hexafluoroisopropanol was adopted within only 21 min with good coating reproducibility (RSDs of EOF for within-batch coated capillaries of 1.55% and between-batch coated capillaries of 2.31%), and a separation of four basic proteins on a chitin coated capillary was performed to evaluate the coating efficacy. Using chitin coating, the adsorption of proteins on capillary inner surface was successfully suppressed with reversed and stable EOF, and four basic proteins including lysozyme, cytochrome c, ribonuclease A and α-chymotrypsinogen A were baseline separated within 16 min with satisfied separation efficiency using 20 mM pH 2.0 H3PO4-Na2HPO4 as back ground electrolyte and 20 kV as separation voltage. What is more important, the chitin coating layer could be stable for more than two months during this study, which demonstrates that chitin is an ideal material for preparing semi-permanent coating on bare fused silica capillary inner wall and has hopeful potential in routine separation of proteins with CE. PMID:26452799

  1. Nanostructure protein repellant amphiphilic copolymer coatings with optimized surface energy by Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Sudhir; Pulpytel, Jérome; Ceccone, Giacomo; Lisboa, Patricia; Rossi, François; Kumar, Virendra; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2011-12-01

    Statistically designed amphiphilic copolymer coatings were deposited onto Thermanox, Si wafer, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) substrates via Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate and diethylene glycol vinyl ether in an Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma reactor. Plasma deposited amphiphilic coatings were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Water Contact Angle techniques. The surface energy of the coatings can be adjusted between 12 and 70 mJ/m(2). The roughness of the coatings can be tailored depending on the plasma mode used. A very smooth coating was deposited with a CW (continuous wave) power, whereas a rougher surface with R(a) in the range of 2 to 12 nm was deposited with the PW (pulsed wave) mode. The nanometer scale roughness of amphiphilic PFDA-co-DEGVE coatings was found to be in the range of the size of the two proteins namely BSA and lysozyme used to examine for the antifouling properties of the surfaces. The results show that the statistically designed surfaces, presenting a surface energy around 25 mJ/m(2), present no adhesion with respect to both proteins measured by QCM. PMID:22029599

  2. Plasma steroid-binding proteins: primary gatekeepers of steroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Geoffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Biologically active steroids are transported in the blood by albumin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). These plasma proteins also regulate the non-protein-bound or 'free' fractions of circulating steroid hormones that are considered to be biologically active; as such, they can be viewed as the 'primary gatekeepers of steroid action'. Albumin binds steroids with limited specificity and low affinity, but its high concentration in blood buffers major fluctuations in steroid concentrations and their free fractions. By contrast, SHBG and CBG play much more dynamic roles in controlling steroid access to target tissues and cells. They bind steroids with high (~nM) affinity and specificity, with SHBG binding androgens and estrogens and CBG binding glucocorticoids and progesterone. Both are glycoproteins that are structurally unrelated, and they function in different ways that extend beyond their transportation or buffering functions in the blood. Plasma SHBG and CBG production by the liver varies during development and different physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and abnormalities in the plasma levels of SHBG and CBG or their abilities to bind steroids are associated with a variety of pathologies. Understanding how the unique structures of SHBG and CBG determine their specialized functions, how changes in their plasma levels are controlled, and how they function outside the blood circulation provides insight into how they control the freedom of steroids to act in health and disease. PMID:27113851

  3. Targeting NEU Protein in Melanoma Cells with Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma and Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byul Bora; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Uk Kyu; Hong, Jin Woo; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Gyoo Cheon

    2015-05-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma effectively kills cancer cells, but it cannot selectively kill cancer cells. The authors targeted NEU (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) protein, which is frequently over-expressed in the cell membrane of melanoma cells, using anti-NEU antibody-labeled gold nanoparticles. The labeled nanoparticles preferentially targeted melanoma cells rather than normal keratinocytes. After the addition of labeled gold nanoparticles to melanoma and normal keratinocyte cells, both cells were exposed to non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma. The death rate of melanoma cells was significantly higher than that of normal keratinocyte cells; many vacuoles, indicative of cell death, were observed in melanoma cells treated with anti-NEU antibody labeled gold nanoparticles and plasma. This selective cancer cell death was attributed to the selective destruction of NEU protein and a downstream effector of NEU. Our study findings show that treatment with a combination of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma and anti-NEU antibody-labeled gold nanoparticles effectively and selectively kills melanoma cells. PMID:26349401

  4. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  5. Bloodstream form Trypanosome plasma membrane proteins: antigenic variation and invariant antigens.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Angela; Carrington, Mark

    2010-12-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is exposed to the adaptive immune system and complement in the blood of its mammalian hosts. The aim of this review is to analyse the role and regulation of the proteins present on the external face of the plasma membrane in the long-term persistence of an infection and transmission. In particular, the following are addressed: (1) antigenic variation of the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), (2) the formation of an effective VSG barrier shielding invariant surface proteins, and (3) the rapid uptake of VSG antibody complexes combined with degradation of the immunoglobulin and recycling of the VSG. PMID:20109254

  6. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-14

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  7. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  8. Multifunctional Transmembrane Protein Ligands for Cell-Specific Targeting of Plasma Membrane-Derived Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chi; Busch, David J; Vershel, Connor P; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-07-01

    Liposomes and nanoparticles that bind selectively to cell-surface receptors can target specific populations of cells. However, chemical conjugation of ligands to these particles is difficult to control, frequently limiting ligand uniformity and complexity. In contrast, the surfaces of living cells are decorated with highly uniform populations of sophisticated transmembrane proteins. Toward harnessing cellular capabilities, here it is demonstrated that plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) derived from donor cells can display engineered transmembrane protein ligands that precisely target cells on the basis of receptor expression. These multifunctional targeting proteins incorporate (i) a protein ligand, (ii) an intrinsically disordered protein spacer to make the ligand sterically accessible, and (iii) a fluorescent protein domain that enables quantification of the ligand density on the PMV surface. PMVs that display targeting proteins with affinity for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) bind at increasing concentrations to breast cancer cells that express increasing levels of EGFR. Further, as an example of the generality of this approach, PMVs expressing a single-domain antibody against green fluorescence protein (eGFP) bind to cells expressing eGFP-tagged receptors with a selectivity of ≈50:1. The results demonstrate the versatility of PMVs as cell targeting systems, suggesting diverse applications from drug delivery to tissue engineering. PMID:27294846

  9. Barrier-free paths of directed protein motion in the erythrocyte plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Boal, D H; Boey, S K

    1995-01-01

    A model is presented for the steric interaction between a plasma membrane protein and the membrane cytoskeleton in the human erythrocyte. The cytoskeleton is treated as a network of polymer chains attached to a flat bilayer, and the membrane protein is a hemisphere of effective radius R(e) with center on the bilayer edge. The simulation is used to investigate the barrier-free path L for linear guided motion of a protein in the bilayer plane. It is shown that the barrier-free paths of small proteins can be used to extract the effective in-plane diameter of cytoskeletal components. For example, the in-plane diameter of an ankyrin attachment site is found to be approximately 12 nm in the simulation, or twice the computational spectrin diameter. The barrier-free paths of large proteins (R(e) > 23 nm) vanish when the proteins are corralled by the cytoskeleton. For intermediate size proteins, L decreases approximately as L is directly proportional to S-1.4 where S is proportional to the sum of the protein and cytoskeleton chain radii. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8527650

  10. Abundance of plasma antioxidant proteins confers tolerance to acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure.

    PubMed

    Padhy, Gayatri; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Ganju, Lilly; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2013-09-01

    Systematic identification of molecular signatures for hypobaric hypoxia can aid in better understanding of human adaptation to high altitude. In an attempt to identify proteins promoting hypoxia tolerance during acute exposure to high altitude, we screened and identified hypoxia tolerant and susceptible rats based on hyperventilation time to a simulated altitude of 32,000 ft (9754 m). The hypoxia tolerance was further validated by estimating 8-isoprotane levels and protein carbonyls, which revealed that hypoxia tolerant rats possessed significant lower plasma levels as compared to susceptible rats. We used a comparative plasma proteome profiling approach using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) combined with MALDI TOF/TOF for both groups, along with an hypoxic control group. This resulted in the identification of 19 differentially expressed proteins. Seven proteins (TTR, GPx-3, PON1, Rab-3D, CLC11, CRP, and Hp) were upregulated in hypoxia tolerant rats, while apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) was upregulated in hypoxia susceptible rats. We further confirmed the consistent higher expression levels of three antioxidant proteins (PON1, TTR, and GPx-3) in hypoxia-tolerant animals using ELISA and immunoblotting. Collectively, these proteomics-based results highlight the role of antioxidant enzymes in conferring hypoxia tolerance during acute hypobaric hypoxia. The expression of these antioxidant enzymes could be used as putative biomarkers for screening altitude adaptation as well as aiding in better management of altered oxygen pathophysiologies. PMID:24067188

  11. Development of reduced fat minced meats using inulin and bovine plasma proteins as fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Furlán, Laura T; Padilla, Antonio Pérez; Campderrós, Mercedes E

    2014-02-01

    This work deals with the effect of the addition of inulin and bovine plasma proteins as fat replacers, on the quality of minced meat. The proteins are obtained by ultrafiltration and freeze-drying. The following determinations were carried out: chemical composition, sensorial analysis (color, flavor, taste and consistency), emulsion stability and instrumental texture analysis of samples. The resulting formulations were compared with full-fat minced meat, as control. The results showed an increase of protein contents after fat replacement, while a fat reduction of 20-35% produced light products enriched with proteins and inulin as the functional ingredient. No change was observed in color, flavor, or taste among the samples. However, the sensory analysis showed that the combination of plasma protein (2.5%w/w) and inulin (2%w/w) had the best acceptability with respect to consistency, and had a lower fat drain from the emulsion. Texture profile analysis revealed that this formulation assimilated the control texture properties, being that this result is required for adequate consumer acceptance. PMID:24200568

  12. Forward transport of proteins in the plasma membrane of migrating cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-nan; Yuan, Xiao-bing; Wen, Yunqing; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-12-18

    Directional flow of membrane components has been detected at the leading front of fibroblasts and the growth cone of neuronal processes, but whether there exists global directional flow of plasma membrane components over the entire migrating neuron remains largely unknown. By analyzing the trajectories of antibody-coated single quantum dots (QDs) bound to two membrane proteins, overexpressed myc-tagged synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP2 and endogenous neurotrophin receptor TrkB, we found that these two proteins exhibited net forward transport, which is superimposed upon Brownian motion, in both leading and trailing processes of migrating cerebellar granule cells in culture. Furthermore, no net directional transport of membrane proteins was observed in nonmigrating cells with either growing or stalling leading processes. Analysis of the correlation of motion direction between two QDs on the same process in migrating neurons also showed a higher frequency of correlated forward than rearward movements. Such correlated QD movements were markedly reduced in the presence of myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin,suggesting the involvement of myosin II-dependent active transport processes. Thus, a net forward transport of plasma membrane proteins exists in the leading and trailing processes of migrating neurons, in line with the translocation of the soma. PMID:23213239

  13. Altered Plasma Profile of Antioxidant Proteins as an Early Correlate of Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Taiyi; Kim-Muller, Ja Young; McGraw, Timothy E; Accili, Domenico

    2016-04-29

    Insulin resistance and β cell dysfunction contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Unlike insulin resistance, β cell dysfunction remains difficult to predict and monitor, because of the inaccessibility of the endocrine pancreas, the integrated relationship with insulin sensitivity, and the paracrine effects of incretins. The goal of our study was to survey the plasma response to a metabolic challenge in order to identify factors predictive of β cell dysfunction. To this end, we combined (i) the power of unbiased iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification) mass spectrometry with (ii) direct sampling of the portal vein following an intravenous glucose/arginine challenge (IVGATT) in (iii) mice with a genetic β cell defect. By so doing, we excluded the effects of peripheral insulin sensitivity as well as those of incretins on β cells, and focused on the first phase of insulin secretion to capture the early pathophysiology of β cell dysfunction. We compared plasma protein profiles with ex vivo islet secretome and transcriptome analyses. We detected changes to 418 plasma proteins in vivo, and detected changes to 262 proteins ex vivo The impairment of insulin secretion was associated with greater overall changes in the plasma response to IVGATT, possibly reflecting metabolic instability. Reduced levels of proteins regulating redox state and neuronal stress markers, as well as increased levels of coagulation factors, antedated the loss of insulin secretion in diabetic mice. These results suggest that a reduced complement of antioxidants in response to a mixed secretagogue challenge is an early correlate of future β cell failure. PMID:26917725

  14. Plasma Protein Pentosidine and Carboxymethyllysine, Biomarkers for Age-related Macular Degeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jiaqian; Yuan, Xianglin; Gu, Jiayin; Yue, Xiuzhen; Gu, Xiaorong; Nagaraj, Ram H.; Crabb, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes severe vision loss in the elderly; early identification of AMD risk could help slow or prevent disease progression. Toward the discovery of AMD biomarkers, we quantified plasma protein Nε-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine from 58 AMD and 32 control donors. CML and pentosidine are advanced glycation end products that are abundant in Bruch membrane, the extracellular matrix separating the retinal pigment epithelium from the blood-bearing choriocapillaris. We measured CML and pentosidine by LC-MS/MS and LC-fluorometry, respectively, and found higher mean levels of CML (∼54%) and pentosidine (∼64%) in AMD (p < 0.0001) relative to normal controls. Plasma protein fructosyl-lysine, a marker of early glycation, was found by amino acid analysis to be in equal amounts in control and non-diabetic AMD donors, supporting an association between AMD and increased levels of CML and pentosidine independent of other diseases like diabetes. Carboxyethylpyrrole (CEP), an oxidative modification from docosahexaenoate-containing lipids and also abundant in AMD Bruch membrane, was elevated ∼86% in the AMD cohort, but autoantibody titers to CEP, CML, and pentosidine were not significantly increased. Compellingly higher mean levels of CML and pentosidine were present in AMD plasma protein over a broad age range. Receiver operating curves indicate that CML, CEP adducts, and pentosidine alone discriminated between AMD and control subjects with 78, 79, and 88% accuracy, respectively, whereas CML in combination with pentosidine provided ∼89% accuracy, and CEP plus pentosidine provided ∼92% accuracy. Pentosidine levels appeared slightly altered in AMD patients with hypertension and cardiovascular disease, indicating further studies are warranted. Overall this study supports the potential utility of plasma protein CML and pentosidine as biomarkers for assessing AMD risk and susceptibility, particularly in combination with CEP

  15. A radioiodinated, intracellularly trapped ligand for determining the sites of plasma protein degradation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, R C; Carew, T E; Glass, C K; Green, S R; Taylor, C A; Attie, A D

    1983-01-01

    We recently developed a general method for determining tissue sites of degradation of plasma proteins in vivo that made use of covalently attached radioactive sucrose. On degradation of the protein, the sucrose remained trapped in the cells as a cumulative marker of protein degradation. The method described here depends on the same principles, but uses an adduct of cellobiose and tyramine that is radioiodinated to high specific radioactivity and then covalently attached to protein. Use of the radioiodinated ligand increases the sensitivity of the method at least 100-fold and allows simplified tissue analysis. Proteins derivatized with the radioiodinated ligand were recognized as underivatized proteins both in vitro and in vivo. On degradation of derivatized low-density lipoprotein, the rate of leakage from cultured fibroblasts was only 5% during 24 h. Similarly, on injection of labelled proteins into rats and rabbits, urinary excretion of the label was in all cases less than 10% of total labelled catabolic products recovered 24 h after injection. Examination of the tissue contents of label at two times after injection of labelled asialofetuin or apolipoprotein A1 in rats, and asialotransferrin in rabbits showed that the label did not detectably redistribute between tissues after initial uptake and catabolism; a significant leakage from liver was quantitatively accounted for by label appearing in gut contents and faeces. A simple double-label method was devised to provide a correction for intact protein in trapped plasma, the extravascular spaces, and within cells. By using this method it becomes unnecessary to fractionate tissue samples. PMID:6882394

  16. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  17. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  18. Combining Ultracentrifugation and Peptide Termini Group-specific Immunoprecipitation for Multiplex Plasma Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Sonja; Schreiber, Thomas D.; Eisen, David; Wiese, Calvin; Planatscher, Hannes; Pynn, Christopher J.; Stoll, Dieter; Templin, Markus F.; Joos, Thomas O.; Pötz, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Blood plasma is a valuable source of potential biomarkers. However, its complexity and the huge dynamic concentration range of its constituents complicate its analysis. To tackle this problem, an immunoprecipitation strategy was employed using antibodies directed against short terminal epitope tags (triple X proteomics antibodies), which allow the enrichment of groups of signature peptides derived from trypsin-digested plasma. Isolated signature peptides are subsequently detected using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Sensitivity of the immunoaffinity approach was, however, compromised by the presence of contaminant peaks derived from the peptides of nontargeted high abundant proteins. A closer analysis of the enrichment strategy revealed nonspecific peptide binding to the solid phase affinity matrix as the major source of the contaminating peptides. We therefore implemented a sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation separation step into the procedure. This yielded a 99% depletion of contaminating peptides from a sucrose fraction containing 70% of the peptide-antibody complexes and enabled the detection of the previously undetected low abundance protein filamin-A. Assessment of this novel approach using 15 different triple X proteomics antibodies demonstrated a more consistent detection of a greater number of targeted peptides and a significant reduction in the intensity of nonspecific peptides. Ultracentrifugation coupled with immunoaffinity MS approaches presents a powerful tool for multiplexed plasma protein analysis without the requirement for demanding liquid chromatography separation techniques. PMID:22527512

  19. Affinity Proteomics Reveals Elevated Muscle Proteins in Plasma of Children with Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Pramana, Setia; Conte, Ianina; Brown, Biobele J.; Orimadegun, Adebola E.; Ajetunmobi, Wasiu A.; Afolabi, Nathaniel K.; Akinkunmi, Francis; Omokhodion, Samuel; Akinbami, Felix O.; Shokunbi, Wuraola A.; Kampf, Caroline; Pawitan, Yudi; Uhlén, Mathias; Sodeinde, Olugbemiro; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Wahlgren, Mats; Fernandez-Reyes, Delmiro; Nilsson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammation and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes are central processes in the pathophysiology of severe Plasmodium falciparum childhood malaria. However, it is still not understood why some children are more at risks to develop malaria complications than others. To identify human proteins in plasma related to childhood malaria syndromes, multiplex antibody suspension bead arrays were employed. Out of the 1,015 proteins analyzed in plasma from more than 700 children, 41 differed between malaria infected children and community controls, whereas 13 discriminated uncomplicated malaria from severe malaria syndromes. Markers of oxidative stress were found related to severe malaria anemia while markers of endothelial activation, platelet adhesion and muscular damage were identified in relation to children with cerebral malaria. These findings suggest the presence of generalized vascular inflammation, vascular wall modulations, activation of endothelium and unbalanced glucose metabolism in severe malaria. The increased levels of specific muscle proteins in plasma implicate potential muscle damage and microvasculature lesions during the course of cerebral malaria. PMID:24743550

  20. Affinity proteomics reveals elevated muscle proteins in plasma of children with cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Julie; Burté, Florence; Pramana, Setia; Conte, Ianina; Brown, Biobele J; Orimadegun, Adebola E; Ajetunmobi, Wasiu A; Afolabi, Nathaniel K; Akinkunmi, Francis; Omokhodion, Samuel; Akinbami, Felix O; Shokunbi, Wuraola A; Kampf, Caroline; Pawitan, Yudi; Uhlén, Mathias; Sodeinde, Olugbemiro; Schwenk, Jochen M; Wahlgren, Mats; Fernandez-Reyes, Delmiro; Nilsson, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Systemic inflammation and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes are central processes in the pathophysiology of severe Plasmodium falciparum childhood malaria. However, it is still not understood why some children are more at risks to develop malaria complications than others. To identify human proteins in plasma related to childhood malaria syndromes, multiplex antibody suspension bead arrays were employed. Out of the 1,015 proteins analyzed in plasma from more than 700 children, 41 differed between malaria infected children and community controls, whereas 13 discriminated uncomplicated malaria from severe malaria syndromes. Markers of oxidative stress were found related to severe malaria anemia while markers of endothelial activation, platelet adhesion and muscular damage were identified in relation to children with cerebral malaria. These findings suggest the presence of generalized vascular inflammation, vascular wall modulations, activation of endothelium and unbalanced glucose metabolism in severe malaria. The increased levels of specific muscle proteins in plasma implicate potential muscle damage and microvasculature lesions during the course of cerebral malaria. PMID:24743550

  1. Plasma protein thiols, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein and red blood cell acetylcholinesterase in patients undergoing intrauterine insemination

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Krishnananda; Kumar, Pratap; Adiga, Satish Kumar; Rao, Anjali; Lanka, Anupama; Singh, Jaipal

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), protein thiols (PT), ceruloplasmin (CP) and C-reactive proteins (CRPs) to assess any change in their levels following intrauterine insemination (IUI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-two patients aged 31 ± 4.65 years (mean ± SD) with primary infertility selected for IUI. All of them had induced ovulation with clomiphene citrate 50 mg from day 2 to day 6. After taking the consent, 2 ml of blood was withdrawn before and after 24 h of IUI for biochemical estimations. RESULTS: We observed a significant decrease in plasma CP, PT and RBC AChE (P < 0.001) following IUI compared with the respective pre-procedure levels. Highly sensitive CRP showed a marginal increase after IUI. CONCLUSION: Fluctuations in levels of the above parameters point to their role in the female reproductive system and in the outcome of the IUI. PMID:19562071

  2. Evaluation of Multi-Protein Immunoaffinity Subtraction for Plasma Proteomics and Candidate Biomarker Discovery Using Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    The detection of low-abundance protein disease biomarkers from human blood poses significant challenges due to the high dynamic range of protein concentrations that span more than 10 orders of magnitude, as well as the extreme complexity of the serum/plasma proteome. Therefore, experimental strategies that include the removal of high-abundance proteins have been increasingly utilized in proteomic studies of serum, plasma, and other body fluids to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins and achieve broader proteome coverage. However, both the specificity and reproducibility of the high-abundance protein depletion process represent common concerns. Here, we report a detailed evaluation of the performance of two commercially available immunoaffinity subtraction systems commonly used in human serum/plasma proteome characterization by high resolution LC-MS/MS. One system uses mammalian IgG antibodies to remove six of the most abundant plasma proteins, and the other uses chicken immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) antibodies to remove twelve of the most abundant plasma proteins. Plasma samples were repeatedly processed using these two systems, and the resulting flow-through fractions and bound fractions were individually analyzed for comparison. Removal of target proteins by both immunoaffinity subtraction systems proved reproducible and efficient. Nontarget proteins, including spiked protein standards, were also observed to bind to the columns, but in a fairly reproducible manner. The results suggest that these multi-protein immunoaffinity subtraction systems are both highly effective and reproducible for removing high-abundance proteins and therefore, can be readily integrated into quantitative strategies to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins in biomarker discovery studies.

  3. Lipid transfer protein transports compounds from lipid nanoparticles to plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Seki, Junzo; Sonoke, Satoru; Saheki, Akira; Koike, Tomohiro; Fukui, Hiroshi; Doi, Masaharu; Mayumi, Tadanori

    2004-05-01

    Nanometer-sized lipid emulsion particles with a diameter of 25-50 nm, called Lipid Nano-Sphere (LNS), are expected as a promising drug carrier to show prolonged plasma half-life of an incorporating drug. In terms of successful drug delivery using LNS, a drug should be incorporated into the lipid particles and remain within the particle, not only in the formulation in vitro but also after administration into the systemic blood circulation. In this study, we showed that phospholipids and some water-insoluble molecules also moved from lipid particles to plasma lipoproteins or albumin in serum and plasma half-lives of these compounds did not reflect that of the drug carriers. It was suggested that phospholipid or its derivative were transferred from LNS particles to plasma lipoproteins by lipid transfer proteins (LTP) in the circulation. These phenomena leaded to unsuccessful delivery of the drug with lipid-particulate drug carriers. On the other hand, lipophilic derivatives with cholesterol pro-moiety tested in this study were not released from LNS particles and showed prolonged plasma half-lives. Lipophilicity is known to be an important parameter for incorporating drugs into lipid particles but substrate specificity for LTP seems to be another key to success promising drug design using lipid emulsion particulate delivery system. PMID:15081154

  4. Ovulation-inducing factor: a protein component of llama seminal plasma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previously, we documented the presence of ovulation-inducing factor (OIF) in the seminal plasma of llamas and alpacas. The purpose of the study was to define the biochemical characteristics of the molecule(s) in seminal plasma responsible for inducing ovulation. Methods In Experiment 1, llama seminal plasma was centrifuged using filtration devices with nominal molecular mass cut-offs of 30, 10 and 5 kDa. Female llamas (n = 9 per group) were treated i.m. with whole seminal plasma (positive control), phosphate-buffered saline (negative control), or the fraction of seminal plasma equal or higher than 30 kDa, 10 to 30 kDa, 5 to 10 kDa, or < 5 kDa. In Experiment 2, female llamas (n = 7 per group) were given an i.m. dose of seminal plasma treated previously by: 1) enzymatic digestion with proteinase-K, 2) incubation with charcoal-dextran, 3) heating to 65°C, or 4) untreated (control). In Experiment 3, female llamas (n = 10 per group) were given an i.m. dose of pronase-treated or non-treated (control) seminal plasma. In all experiments, llamas were examined by transrectal ultrasonography to detect ovulation and CL formation. Ovulation rate was compared among groups by Fisher's exact test and follicle and CL diameters were compared among groups by analyses of variance or student's t-tests. Results In Experiment 1, all llamas in the equal or higher than 30 kDa and positive control groups ovulated (9/9 in each), but none ovulated in the other groups (P < 0.001). In Experiment 2, ovulations were detected in all llamas in each treatment group; i.e., respective treatments of seminal plasma failed to inactivate the ovulation-inducing factor. In Experiment 3, ovulations were detected in 0/10 llamas given pronase-treated seminal plasma and in 9/10 controls (P < 0.01). Conclusions We conclude that ovulation-inducing factor (OIF) in llama seminal plasma is a protein molecule that is resistant to heat and enzymatic digestion with proteinase K, and has a molecular mass of

  5. Plasma protein profiling of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease across two independent cohorts.

    PubMed

    Muenchhoff, Julia; Poljak, Anne; Song, Fei; Raftery, Mark; Brodaty, Henry; Duncan, Mark; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Schofield, Peter W; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2015-01-01

    To unlock the full potential of disease modifying treatments, it is essential to develop early biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). For practical reasons, blood-based markers that could provide a signal at the stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or even earlier would be ideal. Using the proteomic approach of isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), we compared the plasma protein profiles of MCI, AD, and cognitively normal control subjects from two independent cohorts: the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study (261 MCI subjects, 24 AD subjects, 411 controls) and the Hunter Community Study (180 MCI subjects, 153 controls). The objective was to identify any proteins that are differentially abundant in MCI and AD plasma in both cohorts, since they might be of interest as potential biomarkers, or could help direct future mechanistic studies. Proteins representative of biological processes relevant to AD pathology, such as the complement system, the coagulation cascade, lipid metabolism, and metal and vitamin D and E transport, were found to differ in abundance in MCI. In particular, levels of complement regulators C1 inhibitor and factor H, fibronectin, ceruloplasmin, and vitamin D-binding protein were significantly decreased in MCI participants from both cohorts. Several apolipoproteins, including apolipoprotein AIV, B-100, and H were also significantly decreased in MCI. Most of these proteins have previously been reported as potential biomarkers for AD; however, we show for the first time that a significant decrease in plasma levels of two potential biomarkers (fibronectin and C1 inhibitor) is evident at the MCI stage. PMID:25159666

  6. pH-dependent immobilization of proteins on surfaces functionalized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of poly(acrylic acid)- and poly(ethylene oxide)-like films.

    PubMed

    Belegrinou, Serena; Mannelli, Ilaria; Lisboa, Patricia; Bretagnol, Frederic; Valsesia, Andrea; Ceccone, Giacomo; Colpo, Pascal; Rauscher, Hubert; Rossi, François

    2008-07-15

    The interaction of the proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (Lys), lactoferrin (Lf), and fibronectin (Fn) with surfaces of protein-resistant poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and protein-adsorbing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been studied with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). We focus on several parameters which are crucial for protein adsorption, i.e., the isoelectric point (pI) of the proteins, the pH of the solution, and the charge density of the sorbent surfaces, with the zeta-potential as a measure for the latter. The measurements reveal adsorption stages characterized by different segments in the plots of the dissipation vs frequency change. PEO remains protein-repellent for BSA, Lys, and Lf at pH 4-8.5, while weak adsorption of Fn was observed. On PAA, different stages of protein adsorption processes could be distinguished under most experimental conditions. BSA, Lys, Lf, and Fn generally exhibit a rapid initial adsorption phase on PAA, often followed by slower processes. The evaluation of the adsorption kinetics also reveals different adsorption stages, whereas the number of these stages does not always correspond to the structurally different phases as revealed by the D- f plots. The results presented here, together with information obtained in previous studies by other groups on the properties of these proteins and their interaction with surfaces, allow us to develop an adsorption scenario for each of these proteins, which takes into account electrostatic protein-surface and protein-protein interaction, but also the pH-dependent properties of the proteins, such as shape and exposure of specific domains. PMID:18549295

  7. Specific alterations in plasma proteins during depressed, manic, and euthymic states of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Song, Y.R.; Wu, B.; Yang, Y.T.; Chen, J.; Zhang, L.J.; Zhang, Z.W.; Shi, H.Y.; Huang, C.L.; Pan, J.X.; Xie, P.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common psychiatric mood disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the general population of different European countries. Unfortunately, there is no objective laboratory-based test to aid BD diagnosis or monitor its progression, and little is known about the molecular basis of BD. Here, we performed a comparative proteomic study to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins in various BD mood states (depressed BD, manic BD, and euthymic BD) relative to healthy controls. A total of 10 euthymic BD, 20 depressed BD, 15 manic BD, and 20 demographically matched healthy control subjects were recruited. Seven high-abundance proteins were immunodepleted in plasma samples from the 4 experimental groups, which were then subjected to proteome-wide expression profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic results were validated by immunoblotting and bioinformatically analyzed using MetaCore. From a total of 32 proteins identified with 1.5-fold changes in expression compared with healthy controls, 16 proteins were perturbed in BD independent of mood state, while 16 proteins were specifically associated with particular BD mood states. Two mood-independent differential proteins, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and Apo L1, suggest that BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, down-regulation of one mood-dependent protein, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA-1), suggests it may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes in BD. Thus, BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism that are independent of mood state, while CA-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes. PMID:26375446

  8. Specific alterations in plasma proteins during depressed, manic, and euthymic states of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Song, Y R; Wu, B; Yang, Y T; Chen, J; Zhang, L J; Zhang, Z W; Shi, H Y; Huang, C L; Pan, J X; Xie, P

    2015-11-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common psychiatric mood disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the general population of different European countries. Unfortunately, there is no objective laboratory-based test to aid BD diagnosis or monitor its progression, and little is known about the molecular basis of BD. Here, we performed a comparative proteomic study to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins in various BD mood states (depressed BD, manic BD, and euthymic BD) relative to healthy controls. A total of 10 euthymic BD, 20 depressed BD, 15 manic BD, and 20 demographically matched healthy control subjects were recruited. Seven high-abundance proteins were immunodepleted in plasma samples from the 4 experimental groups, which were then subjected to proteome-wide expression profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic results were validated by immunoblotting and bioinformatically analyzed using MetaCore. From a total of 32 proteins identified with 1.5-fold changes in expression compared with healthy controls, 16 proteins were perturbed in BD independent of mood state, while 16 proteins were specifically associated with particular BD mood states. Two mood-independent differential proteins, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and Apo L1, suggest that BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, down-regulation of one mood-dependent protein, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA-1), suggests it may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes in BD. Thus, BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism that are independent of mood state, while CA-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes. PMID:26375446

  9. EFR3s are palmitoylated plasma membrane proteins that control responsiveness to G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Bojjireddy, Naveen; Guzman-Hernandez, Maria Luisa; Reinhard, Nathalie Renée; Jovic, Marko; Balla, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Efr3p protein is a main regulator of the Stt4p phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase at contact sites between the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane. A mutation in its fly homologue Rbo, leads to diminished light responses in the eye attributed to progressively impaired PLC signaling. Here, we find that Efr3s plays a role in maintaining responsiveness to the type-I angiotensin II (AngII) receptors. siRNA-mediated depletion of EFR3A and EFR3B impaired the sustained phase of cytosolic Ca(2+) response to high concentration of AngII in HEK293 cells that express wild type but not truncated AGTR1 (AT1a receptor), missing the phosphorylation sites. Efr3 depletion had minimal effect on the recovery of plasma membrane phosphoinositides during stimulation, and AT1 receptors still underwent ligand-induced internalization. A higher level of basal receptor phosphorylation and a larger response was observed after stimulation. Moreover, Gq activation more rapidly desensitized after AngII stimulation in Efr3 downregulated cells. A similar but less pronounced effect of EFR3 depletion was observed on the desensitization of the cAMP response after stimulation with isoproterenol. These data suggest that mammalian Efr3s contribute to the control of the phosphorylation state and, hence, desensitization of AT1a receptors, and could affect responsiveness of G-protein-coupled receptors in higher eukaryotes. PMID:25380825

  10. EFR3s are palmitoylated plasma membrane proteins that control responsiveness to G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bojjireddy, Naveen; Guzman-Hernandez, Maria Luisa; Reinhard, Nathalie Renée; Jovic, Marko; Balla, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Efr3p protein is a main regulator of the Stt4p phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase at contact sites between the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane. A mutation in its fly homologue Rbo, leads to diminished light responses in the eye attributed to progressively impaired PLC signaling. Here, we find that Efr3s plays a role in maintaining responsiveness to the type-I angiotensin II (AngII) receptors. siRNA-mediated depletion of EFR3A and EFR3B impaired the sustained phase of cytosolic Ca2+ response to high concentration of AngII in HEK293 cells that express wild type but not truncated AGTR1 (AT1a receptor), missing the phosphorylation sites. Efr3 depletion had minimal effect on the recovery of plasma membrane phosphoinositides during stimulation, and AT1 receptors still underwent ligand-induced internalization. A higher level of basal receptor phosphorylation and a larger response was observed after stimulation. Moreover, Gq activation more rapidly desensitized after AngII stimulation in Efr3 downregulated cells. A similar but less pronounced effect of EFR3 depletion was observed on the desensitization of the cAMP response after stimulation with isoproterenol. These data suggest that mammalian Efr3s contribute to the control of the phosphorylation state and, hence, desensitization of AT1a receptors, and could affect responsiveness of G-protein-coupled receptors in higher eukaryotes. PMID:25380825

  11. Independent mobility of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nenninger, Anja; Mastroianni, Giulia; Robson, Alexander; Lenn, Tchern; Xue, Quan; Leake, Mark C; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2014-06-01

    Fluidity is essential for many biological membrane functions. The basis for understanding membrane structure remains the classic Singer-Nicolson model, in which proteins are embedded within a fluid lipid bilayer and able to diffuse laterally within a sea of lipid. Here we report lipid and protein diffusion in the plasma membrane of live cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli, using Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to measure lateral diffusion coefficients. Lipid and protein mobility within the membrane were probed by visualizing an artificial fluorescent lipid and a simple model membrane protein consisting of a single membrane-spanning alpha-helix with a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) tag on the cytoplasmic side. The effective viscosity of the lipid bilayer is strongly temperature-dependent, as indicated by changes in the lipid diffusion coefficient. Surprisingly, the mobility of the model protein was unaffected by changes in the effective viscosity of the bulk lipid, and TIRF microscopy indicates that it clusters in segregated, mobile domains. We suggest that this segregation profoundly influences the physical behaviour of the protein in the membrane, with strong implications for bacterial membrane function and bacterial physiology. PMID:24735432

  12. Treatment of Second Order Structures of Protein on Medical Equipments Using Oxygen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Goto, Masaaki; Yagyu, Yoshihito; Yonesu, Akira

    2009-10-01

    Removal of proteins from the surface of medical equipments are attempted using an RF plasma. Oxygen gas is introduced into a vacuum chamber with dimensions of 450 mm in length, 200 mm in diameter and 20L of capacity. When an RF power (13.56 MHz, 60W) is applied to an ICP type antenna, oxygen radicals (atomic oxygen and excited oxygen molecule) are produced below the antenna. The characteristics of removing protein from the medical equipments was investigated using casein and heat-resistive keratin proteins. Initial concentration of the proteins on a CaF2 substrate is several mg/cm2. The treatment effect of proteins is determined by the peak height of chemical bonds in amide and second order structures appeared on FTIR spectra. The second order structure of a protein such as alpha-helix and beta-sheet are decomposed with the treatment period. Complete treatment of proteins including the second order structure requires several hours avoiding the damage to medical equipments.

  13. Integrin-like proteins are localized to plasma membrane fractions, not plastids, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swatzell, L. J.; Edelmann, R. E.; Makaroff, C. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Integrins are a large family of integral membrane proteins that function in signal transduction in animal systems. These proteins are conserved in vertebrates, invertebrates, and fungi. Evidence from previous research suggests that integrin-like proteins may be present in plants as well, and that these proteins may function in signal transduction during gravitropism. In past studies, researchers have used monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to localize beta 1 integrin-like proteins in plants. However, there is a disparity between data collected from these studies, especially since molecular weights obtained from these investigations range from 55-120 kDa for integrin-like proteins. To date, a complete investigation which employs all three basic immunolabeling procedures, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunogold labeling, in addition to extensive fractionation and exhaustive controls, has been lacking. In this paper, we demonstrate that use of a polyclonal antibody against the cytoplasmic domain of avian beta 1-integrin can produce potential artifacts in immunolocalization studies. However, these problems can be eliminated through use of starchless mutants or proper specimen preparation prior to electrophoresis. We also show that this antibody, when applied within the described parameters and with careful controls, identifies a large (100 kDa) integrin-like protein that is localized to plasma membrane fractions in Arabidopsis.

  14. Protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis found in human plasma using global quantitative proteomics profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Crispin, David A.; May, Damon; Stevens, Tyler; McIntosh, Martin; Bronner, Mary P.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose at early stages when curable treatments are effective. Biomarkers that can improve current pancreatic cancer detection would have great value in improving patient management and survival rate. A large scale quantitative proteomics study was performed to search for the plasma protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer. The enormous complexity of the plasma proteome and the vast dynamic range of protein concentration therein present major challenges for quantitative global profiling of plasma. To address these challenges, multi-dimensional fractionation at both protein and peptide levels was applied to enhance the depth of proteomics analysis. Employing stringent criteria, more than thirteen hundred proteins total were identified in plasma across 8-orders of magnitude in protein concentration. Differential proteins associated with pancreatic cancer were identified, and their relationship with the proteome of pancreatic tissue and pancreatic juice from our previous studies was discussed. A subgroup of differentially expressed proteins was selected for biomarker testing using an independent cohort of plasma and serum samples from well-diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and non-pancreatic disease controls. Using ELISA methodology, the performance of each of these protein candidates was benchmarked against CA19-9, the current gold standard for a pancreatic cancer blood test. A composite marker of TIMP1 and ICAM1 demonstrate significantly better performance than CA19-9 in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from the non-pancreatic disease controls and chronic pancreatitis controls. In addition, protein AZGP1 was identified as a biomarker candidate for chronic pancreatitis. The discovery and technical challenges associated with plasma-based quantitative proteomics are discussed and may benefit the development of plasma proteomics technology in general. The protein

  15. A fluorogenic probe for SNAP-tagged plasma membrane proteins based on the solvatochromic molecule Nile Red.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Efthymia; Reymond, Luc; Umebayashi, Miwa; Hovius, Ruud; Riezman, Howard; Johnsson, Kai

    2014-03-21

    A fluorogenic probe for plasma membrane proteins based on the dye Nile Red and SNAP-tag is introduced. It takes advantage of Nile Red, a solvatochromic molecule highly fluorescent in an apolar environment, such as cellular membranes, but almost dark in a polar aqueous environment. The probe possesses a tuned affinity for membranes allowing its Nile Red moiety to insert into the lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane, becoming fluorescent, only after its conjugation to a SNAP-tagged plasma membrane protein. The fluorogenic character of the probe was demonstrated for different SNAP-tag fusion proteins, including the human insulin receptor. This work introduces a new approach for generating a powerful turn-on probe for "no-wash" labeling of plasma membrane proteins with numerous applications in bioimaging. PMID:24471525

  16. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  17. EVALUATION OF A WASTEWATER DISCHARGE USING VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION AND PLASMA PROTEIN LEVELS IN MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liver vitellogenin gene expression and plasma vitellogenin protein presence, indicators of exposure of fish to estrogens, were measured in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) caged at two locations in a constructed wetland below a sewage treatment plant effluent outfall in...

  18. [Protein assay by the modified Dumas method applied to preparations of plasma proteins].

    PubMed

    Blondel, P; Vian, L

    1993-01-01

    Quantify protein according Pharmacopoeia method, based on Kjeldahl method, needs a long time to do. The development of an automaton which used the modified Dumas method divide the analysis time by 15 (6 minutes versus over 90 minutes). The results show no statistical differences between official method and this one. PMID:8154798

  19. Effect of auranofin on plasma fibronectin, C reactive protein, and albumin levels in arthritic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, K M; Stecher, V J; Pruden, D J

    1988-01-01

    Auranofin, a member of a class of compounds with disease modifying activity, was given to arthritic rats to determine if it could reverse the abnormal plasma concentrations of fibronectin (Fn), C reactive protein (CRP), and albumin, which were unaffected by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). When auranofin was orally administered for two weeks to adjuvant induced arthritic rats it significantly inhibited swelling of the injected and non-injected paws at doses of 3 and 10 mg/kg. Rocket electroimmunoassay measurement of plasma proteins in normal, arthritic, and auranofin treated arthritic rats indicated that auranofin at 10 mg/kg significantly decreased (by 77%) the abnormally high concentration of arthritic rat plasma Fn, though it had no effect on Fn concentrations when administered to normal rats. CRP, which was raised approximately twofold above normal in arthritic rats, was reduced by 56% after treatment of arthritic rats with auranofin at 10 mg/kg, though CRP concentrations in normal rats were unaffected by auranofin treatment. Depressed albumin concentrations in arthritic rats were significantly enhanced (by 30%) by dosing with 10 mg/kg of auranofin. At the 3 mg/kg dose, auranofin did not significantly change plasma concentrations of Fn, CRP, and albumin in arthritic rats. At a dose of 10 mg/kg, however, auranofin, in addition to inhibiting chronic systemic paw inflammation, also altered abnormal concentrations of plasma Fn, CRP, and albumin in the adjuvant arthritic rat, thus distinguishing auranofin from standard NSAIDs we have previously tested. PMID:3260094

  20. Chemoselective small molecules that covalently modify one lysine in a non-enzyme protein in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungwook; Connelly, Stephen; Reixach, Natàlia; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2010-02-19

    A small molecule that could bind selectively to and then react chemoselectively with a non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid, such as blood, could have numerous practical applications. Herein, we report a family of designed stilbenes that selectively and covalently modify the prominent plasma protein transthyretin in preference to more than 4,000 other human plasma proteins. They react chemoselectively with only one of eight lysine {epsilon}-amino groups within transthyretin. The crystal structure confirms the expected binding orientation of the stilbene substructure and the anticipated conjugating amide bond. These covalent transthyretin kinetic stabilizers exhibit superior amyloid inhibition potency compared to their noncovalent counterparts, and they prevent cytotoxicity associated with amyloidogenesis. Though there are a few prodrugs that, upon metabolic activation, react with a cysteine residue inactivating a specific non-enzyme, we are unaware of designed small molecules that react with one lysine {epsilon}-amine within a specific non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid.

  1. Seminal plasma proteins inhibit in vitro- and cooling-induced capacitation in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vadnais, Melissa L; Roberts, Kenneth P

    2010-01-01

    Dilute boar seminal plasma (SP) has been shown to inhibit in vitro capacitation and cooling-induced capacitation-like changes in boar spermatozoa, as assessed by the ability of the spermatozoa to undergo an ionophore-induced acrosome reaction. We hypothesised that the protein component of SP is responsible for this effect. To test this hypothesis, varying concentrations of total SP protein or SP proteins fractionated by heparin binding were assayed for their ability to inhibit in vitro capacitation, as well as cooling- and cryopreservation-induced capacitation-like changes. In vitro capacitation and cooling-induced capacitation-like changes were prevented by 10% whole SP, as well as by total proteins extracted from SP at concentrations greater than 500 microg mL(-1). No amount of SP protein was able to prevent cryopreservation-induced capacitation-like changes. Total SP proteins were fractionated based on their heparin-binding properties and the heparin-binding fraction was shown to possess capacitation inhibitory activity at concentrations as low as 250 microg mL(-1). The proteins in the heparin-binding fraction were subjected to mass spectrometry and identified. The predominant proteins were three members of the spermadhesin families, namely AQN-3, AQN-1 and AWN, and SP protein pB1. We conclude that one or more of these heparin-binding SP proteins is able to inhibit in vitro capacitation and cooling-induced capacitation-like changes, but not cryopreservation-induced capacitation-like changes, in boar spermatozoa. PMID:20591323

  2. High-protein-PUFA supplementation, red blood cell membranes, and plasma antioxidant activity in volleyball athletes.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Marco; Baldini, Marta; Angeloni, Cristina; Biagi, Pierluigi; Hrelia, Silvana

    2008-06-01

    The authors evaluated the role of a high-protein, low-calorie, polyunsaturated fatty-acid (PUFA) -supplemented diet on anthropometric parameters, erythrocyte-membrane fatty-acid composition, and plasma antioxidant defenses of nonprofessional volleyball athletes. The athletes were divided in two groups: One (n = 5) followed the Mediterranean diet, and the other (n = 6) followed a high-protein, low-calorie diet with a 3-g/day fish-oil supplementation. All the athletes had anthropometric measurements taken, both at the beginning and at the end of the study, which lasted for 2 months. Body-mass index and total body fat were significantly diminished in the second group, while they remained unchanged in the first. Plasma total antioxidant activity (TAA) was significantly increased in the plasma of both groups, with no differences between the groups, suggesting that physical activity, not the different diets, is the main contributor to the increase of plasma TAA. The second group showed a significant increase in erythrocyte-membrane PUFA content and in the unsaturation index value (UI) because of the fish-oil supplementation.A high-protein, low-carbohydrate, fish-oil-supplemented diet seems to be useful only when the aim of the diet is to obtain weight loss in a short-term period. The significant increase in the UI of erythrocyte membranes indicates the potential for harm, because a high intake of PUFA might increase susceptibility to lipid peroxidation not counterbalanced by a higher increase in TAA. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet seems to be the better choice. PMID:18562771

  3. Plasma protein biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease endophenotypes in asymptomatic older twins: early cognitive decline and regional brain volumes

    PubMed Central

    Kiddle, S J; Steves, C J; Mehta, M; Simmons, A; Xu, X; Newhouse, S; Sattlecker, M; Ashton, N J; Bazenet, C; Killick, R; Adnan, J; Westman, E; Nelson, S; Soininen, H; Kloszewska, I; Mecocci, P; Tsolaki, M; Vellas, B; Curtis, C; Breen, G; Williams, S C R; Lovestone, S; Spector, T D; Dobson, R J B

    2015-01-01

    There is great interest in blood-based markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), especially in its pre-symptomatic stages. Therefore, we aimed to identify plasma proteins whose levels associate with potential markers of pre-symptomatic AD. We also aimed to characterise confounding by genetics and the effect of genetics on blood proteins in general. Panel-based proteomics was performed using SOMAscan on plasma samples from TwinsUK subjects who are asymptomatic for AD, measuring the level of 1129 proteins. Protein levels were compared with 10-year change in CANTAB-paired associates learning (PAL; n=195), and regional brain volumes (n=34). Replication of proteins associated with regional brain volumes was performed in 254 individuals from the AddNeuroMed cohort. Across all the proteins measured, genetic factors were found to explain ~26% of the variability in blood protein levels on average. The plasma level of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) MAPKAPK5 protein was found to positively associate with the 10-year change in CANTAB-PAL in both the individual and twin difference context. The plasma level of protein MAP2K4 was found to suggestively associate negatively (Q<0.1) with the volume of the left entorhinal cortex. Future studies will be needed to assess the specificity of MAPKAPK5 and MAP2K4 to eventual conversion to AD. PMID:26080319

  4. Plasma proteins as early biomarkers of exposure to carcinogenic aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Parmelee, D C; Benjamin, T; Sechi, S; Dooley, K L; Kadlubar, F F

    1994-12-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DG) has been used to study the changes induced in dog plasma polypeptides by the known urinary bladder carcinogens, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) and 2-naphthylamine (2-NA). Treatment with 3-aminobiphenyl (3-ABP) and 1-naphthylamine (1-NA), both considered to be non-carcinogenic, were used as controls. The purpose of this study was: (1) to determine whether or not changes that occurred in the plasma protein patterns were specific to 4-ABP and/or other related carcinogenic arylamines; (2) to measure the time course in the changes of the major polypeptides during dosing and their resynthesis during a recovery period; and (3) to determine, by microsequencing, the biochemical identity of the affected proteins. The results indicate that only the most potent carcinogen, 4-ABP, had the effect of suppressing the expression of some proteins, while the other aromatic amines caused no discernible change in the 2DG patterns during a 12-week dosing period. The 4-ABP caused dramatic suppression of two sets of proteins. One set of three spots had an apparent molecular weight of 32.5 kDa, and a pI of 5.8-6.0. The major component in this group was identified as the beta-chain of haptoglobin. Expression of this protein decreased markedly during the first 2 weeks of treatment and recovered slowly after dosing stopped. Since haptoglobin functions to bind with free hemoglobin and facilitates its elimination from the blood stream, these results can be rationalized as a consequence of 4-ABP binding to hemoglobin in the erythrocyte, resulting in cell death and hemolysis. The 4-ABP modified hemoglobin then binds to haptoglobin and this tertiary complex is purged from the blood stream, resulting in the disappearance of free haptoglobin. A second set of spots (mol. wt., 65 kDa; pI, 6.5-6.6) disappeared much faster than the haptoglobin, and recovered more quickly. The major protein is about one-fifth the intensity of haptoglobin and appeared to be N

  5. Accuracy and Reproducibility in Quantification of Plasma Protein Concentrations by Mass Spectrometry without the Use of Isotopic Standards

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Gertjan; Woolerton, Yvonne; van Straalen, Jan P.; Vissers, Johannes P. C.; Dekker, Nick; Langridge, James I.; Beynon, Robert J.; Speijer, Dave; Sturk, Auguste; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantitative proteomic analysis with mass spectrometry holds great promise for simultaneously quantifying proteins in various biosamples, such as human plasma. Thus far, studies addressing the reproducible measurement of endogenous protein concentrations in human plasma have focussed on targeted analyses employing isotopically labelled standards. Non-targeted proteomics, on the other hand, has been less employed to this end, even though it has been instrumental in discovery proteomics, generating large datasets in multiple fields of research. Results Using a non-targeted mass spectrometric assay (LCMSE), we quantified abundant plasma proteins (43 mg/mL—40 ug/mL range) in human blood plasma specimens from 30 healthy volunteers and one blood serum sample (ProteomeXchange: PXD000347). Quantitative results were obtained by label-free mass spectrometry using a single internal standard to estimate protein concentrations. This approach resulted in quantitative results for 59 proteins (cut off ≥11 samples quantified) of which 41 proteins were quantified in all 31 samples and 23 of these with an inter-assay variability of ≤ 20%. Results for 7 apolipoproteins were compared with those obtained using isotope-labelled standards, while 12 proteins were compared to routine immunoassays. Comparison of quantitative data obtained by LCMSE and immunoassays showed good to excellent correlations in relative protein abundance (r = 0.72–0.96) and comparable median concentrations for 8 out of 12 proteins tested. Plasma concentrations of 56 proteins determined by LCMSE were of similar accuracy as those reported by targeted studies and 7 apolipoproteins quantified by isotope-labelled standards, when compared to reference concentrations from literature. Conclusions This study shows that LCMSE offers good quantification of relative abundance as well as reasonable estimations of concentrations of abundant plasma proteins. PMID:26474480

  6. Expression and secretion of rabbit plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein by Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Kotake, H; Li, Q; Ohnishi, T; Ko, K W; Agellon, L B; Yokoyama, S

    1996-03-01

    The rabbit cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris by introducing the CETP cDNA under the control of the methanol-inducible alcohol oxidase promoter. The cDNA was cloned from in vitro amplified cDNA of rabbit liver mRNA. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned cDNA differed slightly from the previously published sequence that changed the amino acid sequence in six residues. Interestingly, five of these replacements are identical to the corresponding residues in human CEPT. In addition, the encoded mature N-terminal sequence was changed from Cys- to Arg-Glu-Phe- to link the CETP sequence to the yeast acid phosphatase signal peptide. The culture medium of the transformed cells induced with 1% methanol contained both cholesteryl ester and triglyceride transfer activity comparable to that of rabbit plasma. Like rabbit plasma, the lipid transfer activity in the medium could be inhibited by monoclonal antibodies that block CE/TG transfer or TG transfer alone. Immunoblot analysis of M(r) = 80 K and minor species of M(r) = 60-100 K. In spite of these differences, the specific transfer activity of the recombinant CETP was indistinguishable from that of rabbit plasma CETP of M(r) = 74 K. N-Glycosidase F treatment converted both the recombinant and plasma CETP to a single species of M(r) = 55 K. Both the plasma and recombinant CETP lost their activity after removal of N-linked carbohydrate and sialic acid. A single 55 K component was found in the cell-lysates. The intracellular form of the recombinant CETP was not modified by N-glycosidase F treatment. In conclusion, the recombinant CETP is synthesized as an inactive polypeptide that is processed and secreted as a functional glycoprotein. In addition, the N-terminal Cys residue of the plasma CETP is not required for its activity. PMID:8728322

  7. Evaluation of Plasma Fibrinogen Degradation Products and Total Serum Protein Concentration in Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    B.N.V.S., Satish; B., Maharudrappa; K.M., Prashant; Hugar, Deepa; Allad, Umesh; Prabhu, Prasanth S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant disorder with a multifactorial etiology. Malnutrition is a major problem for the inhabitants of most countries where OSMF is prevalent. Recently, a new direction in the etiopathogenesis was provided by the identification of fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) in the plasma of OSMF patients. Aims and Objectives: To assess the role of FDP in the etiology of OSMF and to correlate with the nutritional status by evaluating the total serum protein level. The study also determines to evaluate the correlation between the levels of plasma FDP with respect to the staging and grading of OSMF. Correlation between the levels of Total Serum Protein (TSP) with respect to the staging and grading of OSMF was also evaluated. Materials and Methods: The study included 30 cases clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as oral submucous fibrosis. The FDP levels were assessed using both qualitative and semi quantitative method as supplied by ‘Tulip Diagnostics (P) Ltd. Total Serum Protein (TSP) estimation was done by Biuret method using Liquixx Protein kit by Erba, Manheim. Results: The study indicates that in qualitative assessment of FDP only 14 subjects showed the presence of FDP levels>200ng/ml. In semiquantitative assessment there is no significant association between varying clinical stages and histopathological grades and FDP levels. Total serum Protein level showed a marginal increase in all subjects. The study revealed a positive correlation between FDP and TSP in all OSMF subjects. Conclusion: A larger sample size which would be a better representation of the population and the use of different methods which have higher sensitivities and specificities to evaluate FDP level and detailed fractional analysis of protein along with immunoglobulin profiling would facilitate in attaining more conclusive results. PMID:24995245

  8. Site-specific O-Glycosylation Analysis of Human Blood Plasma Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marcus; Marx, Kristina; Reichl, Udo; Wuhrer, Manfred; Rapp, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific glycosylation analysis is key to investigate structure-function relationships of glycoproteins, e.g. in the context of antigenicity and disease progression. The analysis, though, is quite challenging and time consuming, in particular for O-glycosylated proteins. In consequence, despite their clinical and biopharmaceutical importance, many human blood plasma glycoproteins have not been characterized comprehensively with respect to their O-glycosylation. Here, we report on the site-specific O-glycosylation analysis of human blood plasma glycoproteins. To this end pooled human blood plasma of healthy donors was proteolytically digested using a broad-specific enzyme (Proteinase K), followed by a precipitation step, as well as a glycopeptide enrichment and fractionation step via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, the latter being optimized for intact O-glycopeptides carrying short mucin-type core-1 and -2 O-glycans, which represent the vast majority of O-glycans on human blood plasma proteins. Enriched O-glycopeptide fractions were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled online to an ion trap mass spectrometer operated in positive-ion mode. Peptide identity and glycan composition were derived from low-energy collision-induced dissociation fragment spectra acquired in multistage mode. To pinpoint the O-glycosylation sites glycopeptides were fragmented using electron transfer dissociation. Spectra were annotated by database searches as well as manually. Overall, 31 O-glycosylation sites and regions belonging to 22 proteins were identified, the majority being acute-phase proteins. Strikingly, also 11 novel O-glycosylation sites and regions were identified. In total 23 O-glycosylation sites could be pinpointed. Interestingly, the use of Proteinase K proved to be particularly beneficial in this context. The identified O-glycan compositions most probably correspond to mono- and disialylated core-1

  9. Extracellular vesicles are rapidly purified from human plasma by PRotein Organic Solvent PRecipitation (PROSPR)

    PubMed Central

    Gallart-Palau, Xavier; Serra, Aida; Wong, Andrew See Weng; Sandin, Sara; Lai, Mitchell K. P.; Chen, Christopher P.; Kon, Oi Lian; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as exosomes and microvesicles mediate intercellular communication and regulate a diverse range of crucial biological processes. Host cells that are damaged, infected or transformed release biomarker-containing EVs into the peripheral circulation, where they can be readily accessed for use in diagnostic or prognostic testing. However, current methods of EV isolation from blood plasma are complex and often require relatively large sample volumes, hence are inefficient for widespread use in clinical settings. Here, we report a novel and inexpensive method of rapidly isolating EVs from small volumes of human blood plasma by PRotein Organic Solvent PRecipitation (PROSPR). PROSPR encompasses a rapid three-step protocol to remove soluble proteins from plasma via precipitation in cold acetone, leaving the lipid-encapsulated EVs behind in suspension. This generates higher purity EVs that can then be obtained from filtration or classical ultracentrifugation methods. We foresee that PROSPR-based purification of EVs will significantly accelerate the discovery of new disease biomarkers and the characterization of EVs with potential for clinical applications. PMID:26419333

  10. NEU3 Sialidase Protein Interactors in the Plasma Membrane and in the Endosomes.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Federica; Ghiroldi, Andrea; Fania, Chiara; Piccoli, Marco; Torretta, Enrica; Tettamanti, Guido; Gelfi, Cecilia; Anastasia, Luigi

    2016-05-13

    NEU3 sialidase has been shown to be a key player in many physio- and pathological processes, including cell differentiation, cellular response to hypoxic stress, and carcinogenesis. The enzyme, peculiarly localized on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, has been shown to be able to remove sialic acid residues from the gangliosides present on adjacent cells, thus creating cell to cell interactions. Nonetheless, herein we report that the enzyme localization is dynamically regulated between the plasma membrane and the endosomes, where a substantial amount of NEU3 is stored with low enzymatic activity. However, under opportune stimuli, NEU3 is shifted from the endosomes to the plasma membrane, where it greatly increases the sialidase activity. Finally, we found that NEU3 possesses also the ability to interact with specific proteins, many of which are different in each cell compartment. They were identified by mass spectrometry, and some selected ones were also confirmed by cross-immunoprecipitation with the enzyme, supporting NEU3 involvement in the cell stress response, protein folding, and intracellular trafficking. PMID:26987901

  11. The human multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump.

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, G J; Flens, M J; van Leusden, M R; de Haas, M; Mülder, H S; Lankelma, J; Pinedo, H M; Scheper, R J; Baas, F; Broxterman, H J

    1994-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP is a 180- to 195-kDa membrane protein associated with resistance of human tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs. We have investigated how MRP confers drug resistance in SW-1573 human lung carcinoma cells by generating a subline stably transfected with an expression vector containing MRP cDNA. MRP-overexpressing SW-1573 cells are resistant to doxorubicin, daunorubicin, vincristine, VP-16, colchicine, and rhodamine 123, but not to 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide or taxol. The intracellular accumulation of drug (daunorubicin, vincristine, and VP-16) is decreased and the efflux of drug (daunorubicin) is increased in the transfectant. The decreased accumulation of daunorubicin is abolished by permeabilization of the plasma membrane with digitonin, showing that MRP can lower the intracellular daunorubicin level against a concentration gradient. Anti-MRP antisera predominantly stain the plasma membrane of MRP-overexpressing cells. We conclude that MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump. Images PMID:7916458

  12. Neutrophils recruited by chemoattractants in vivo induce microvascular plasma protein leakage through secretion of TNF

    PubMed Central

    Finsterbusch, Michaela; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Williams, Timothy John

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular plasma protein leakage is an essential component of the inflammatory response and serves an important function in local host defense and tissue repair. Mediators such as histamine and bradykinin act directly on venules to increase the permeability of endothelial cell (EC) junctions. Neutrophil chemoattractants also induce leakage, a response that is dependent on neutrophil adhesion to ECs, but the underlying mechanism has proved elusive. Through application of confocal intravital microscopy to the mouse cremaster muscle, we show that neutrophils responding to chemoattractants release TNF when in close proximity of EC junctions. In vitro, neutrophils adherent to ICAM-1 or ICAM-2 rapidly released TNF in response to LTB4, C5a, and KC. Further, in TNFR−/− mice, neutrophils accumulated normally in response to chemoattractants administered to the cremaster muscle or dorsal skin, but neutrophil-dependent plasma protein leakage was abolished. Similar results were obtained in chimeric mice deficient in leukocyte TNF. A locally injected TNF blocking antibody was also able to inhibit neutrophil-dependent plasma leakage, but had no effect on the response induced by bradykinin. The results suggest that TNF mediates neutrophil-dependent microvascular leakage. This mechanism may contribute to the effects of TNF inhibitors in inflammatory diseases and indicates possible applications in life-threatening acute edema. PMID:24913232

  13. Sulfur-based absolute quantification of proteins using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Seok; Heun Kim, Sook; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yim, Yong-Hyeon

    2015-10-01

    An element-based reductive approach provides an effective means of realizing International System of Units (SI) traceability for high-purity biological standards. Here, we develop an absolute protein quantification method using double isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with microwave-assisted acid digestion for the first time. We validated the method and applied it to certify the candidate protein certified reference material (CRM) of human growth hormone (hGH). The concentration of hGH was determined by analysing the total amount of sulfur in hGH. Next, the size-exclusion chromatography method was used with ICP-MS to characterize and quantify sulfur-containing impurities. By subtracting the contribution of sulfur-containing impurities from the total sulfur content in the hGH CRM, we obtained a SI-traceable certification value. The quantification result obtained with the present method based on sulfur analysis was in excellent agreement with the result determined via a well-established protein quantification method based on amino acid analysis using conventional acid hydrolysis combined with an ID liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The element-based protein quantification method developed here can be generally used for SI-traceable absolute quantification of proteins, especially pure-protein standards.

  14. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants. PMID:27041337

  15. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Nature's fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5's active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  16. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E.; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nature’s fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5’s active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  17. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5–6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5–6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development. PMID:26338058

  18. Measurement of canine gastric vascular permeability to plasma proteins in the normal and protein-losing states

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.G.; Davenport, H.W.

    1982-04-01

    An isolated segment of the greater curvature of a dog's stomach was perfused at constant flow through a single cannulated artery with donor blood containing 131I-albumin, 125I-fibrinogen, and papaverine. Perfusion pressure was 30-50 mmHg, and venous pressure was set at 15 mmHg. Venous blood was collected in 1-min samples for 60 min. Filtration of fluid and loss of labeled proteins were calculated as the difference between measured arterial inflow and venous outflow. Permeability-surface area products (PS) were calculated for the proteins, and reflection coefficients (sigma) were calculated from solute flux and filtration. Intraarterial infusion of histamine (1.6-1.9 microgram . ml-1) increased filtration and PS and decreased sigma for albumin but not fibrinogen. When protein-losing was established by topical irrigation with 10 mM dithiothreitol in neutral solution, filtration and PS increased, and sigma for albumin but not fibrinogen decreased. Irrigation of the mucosa with 10 mM salicylic acid in 100 mN HCl caused bleeding that was quantitated by addition of 51Cr-erythrocytes to perfusing blood. Filtration and PS increased, and sigma for albumin but not fibrinogen decreased. Hematocrit of blood lost remained low during extensive mucosal damage. Effects of histamine infusion were attenuated or abolished by cimetidine (4 mg . kg-1 loading, 1.4 mg . kg-1 . h-1 continuous infusion) or by pyrilamine maleate (5 mg . kg-1 bolus injection at beginning of irrigation, repeated at 40-50 min). Pyrilamine attenuated or abolished effects of topical dithiothreitol or salicylic acid. We conclude that during protein loss caused by dithiothreitol or salicylic acid, histamine released within the mucosa causes increased vascular permeability for plasma proteins.

  19. Reliability of plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) from repeated measures in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Citronberg, Jessica S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Lim, Unhee; Hullar, Meredith A J; White, Emily; Newcomb, Polly A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lampe, Johanna W

    2016-09-01

    Plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), a measure of internal exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, has been associated with several chronic conditions and may be a marker of chronic inflammation; however, no studies have examined the reliability of this biomarker in a healthy population. We examined the temporal reliability of LBP measured in archived samples from participants in two studies. In Study one, 60 healthy participants had blood drawn at two time points: baseline and follow-up (either three, six, or nine months). In Study two, 24 individuals had blood drawn three to four times over a seven-month period. We measured LBP in archived plasma by ELISA. Test-retest reliability was estimated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Plasma LBP concentrations showed moderate reliability in Study one (ICC 0.60, 95 % CI 0.43-0.75) and Study two (ICC 0.46, 95 % CI 0.26-0.69). Restricting the follow-up period improved reliability. In Study one, the reliability of LBP over a three-month period was 0.68 (95 % CI: 0.41-0.87). In Study two, the ICC of samples taken ≤seven days apart was 0.61 (95 % CI 0.29-0.86). Plasma LBP concentrations demonstrated moderate test-retest reliability in healthy individuals with reliability improving over a shorter follow-up period. PMID:27392432

  20. Plasma Surface Modification for Immobilization of Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 on Polycaprolactone Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Myung, Sung Woon; Jung, Sang Chul; Ko, Yeong Mu

    2013-11-01

    The immobilization of recombinant human bone formation protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was performed by plasma polymerization. RhBMP-2, which induces osteoblast differentiation in various cell types, is a growth factor that plays an important role in bone formation and repair. The surface of the PCL scaffold was functionalized with the carboxyl groups of plasma-polymerized acrylic acid (PPAA) thin films. Plasma polymerization was carried out at a discharge power of 60 W at an acrylic acid flow rate of 7 sccm for 5 min. The PPAA thin film exhibited moderate hydrophilic properties and possessed a high density of carboxyl groups. Carboxyl groups and rhBMP-2 on the PCL scaffolds surface were identified by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase activity assay showed that the rhBMP-2 immobilized PCL scaffold increased the level of MG-63 cell differentiation. Plasma surface modification for the preparation of biomaterials, such as biofunctionalized polymer scaffolds, can be used for the binding of bioactive molecules in tissue engineering.

  1. Femtomolar Detection of Tau Proteins in Undiluted Plasma Using Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suhee; Wark, Alastair W; Lee, Hye Jin

    2016-08-01

    The ability to directly detect Tau protein and other neurodegenerative biomarkers in human plasma at clinically relevant concentrations continues to be a significant hurdle for the establishment of diagnostic tests for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this article, we introduce a new DNA aptamer/antibody sandwich assay pairing and apply it for the detection of human Tau 381 in undiluted plasma at concentrations as low as 10 fM. This was achieved on a multichannel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) platform with the challenge of working in plasma overcome through the development of a tailored mixed monolayer surface chemistry. In addition, a robust methodology was developed involving various same chip control measurements on reference channels to which the detection signal was normalized. Comparative measurements in plasma between SPR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurements were also performed to highlight both the 1000-fold performance enhancement of SPR and the ability to measure both spiked and native concentrations that are not achievable with ELISA. PMID:27399254

  2. Irreversible binding of an anticancer compound (BI-94) to plasma proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Nagsen; Thakare, Rhishikesh; Rana, Sandeep; Natarajan, Amarnath; Alnouti, Yazen

    2015-01-01

    1. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the in vivo instability of a benzofurazan compound BI-94 (NSC228148) with potent anti-cancer activity. 2. BI-94 was stable in MeOH, water, and in various buffers at pHs 2.5–5, regardless of the buffer composition. In contrast, BI-94 was unstable in NaOH and at pHs 7–9, regardless of the buffer composition. BI-94 disappeared immediately after spiking into mice, rat, monkey, and human plasma. BI-94 stability in plasma can be only partially restored by acidifying it, which indicated other mechanisms in addition to pH for BI-94 instability in plasma. 3. BI-94 formed adducts with the trapping agents, glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), in vivo and in vitro via nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The kinetics of adduct formation showed that neutral or physiological pHs enhanced and accelerated GSH and NAC adduct formation with BI-94, whereas acidic pHs prevented it. Therefore, physiological pHs not only altered BI-94 chemical stability but also enhanced adduct formation with endogenous nucleophiles. In addition, adduct formation with human serum albumin-peptide 3 (HSA-T3) at the Cys34 position was demonstrated. 4. In conclusion, BI-94 was unstable at physiological conditions due to chemical instability and irreversible binding to plasma proteins. PMID:25869245

  3. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and plasma protein binding study of chicoric acid by HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Xie, Guo; Liu, Qian; Duan, Xiang; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Xuebo

    2016-09-15

    Chicoric acid is a major active constituent of Echinacea purpurea and has a variety of biological functions. In this study, a liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) approach was developed and validated for the determination of chicoric acid in rat plasma and various tissues using ferulic acid as an internal standard (IS). This method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and plasma protein binding (PPB) study of chicoric acid in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats dosed with 50mg/kg by gastric gavage. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined and showed a half-life (t1/2) of 4.53±1.44h, an apparent volume of mean residual time (MRT) of 18.58±4.43h, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 26.14 mghL(-1). The tissue distribution of chicoric acid in rats after gavage administration showed a decreasing tendency in different tissues (liver>lung>kidney>heart>spleen>brain). The PPB rates in rat plasma, human plasma, and bovine serum albumin were 98.3, 96.9, and 96.6%, respectively. These results provide insight for the further pharmacological investigation of chicoric acid. PMID:27479684

  4. Plasma-treated polystyrene film that enhances binding efficiency for sensitive and label-free protein biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bihong; Li, Shaopeng; Song, Lusheng; Yang, Mo; Zhou, Wenfei; Tyagi, Deependra; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-08-01

    A plasma-treated ultrathin polystyrene (PS) film surface was explored as a simple, robust, and low-cost surface chemistry solution for protein biosensing applications. This surface could dramatically improve the binding efficiency of the protein-protein interactions, which is defined as the binding signal per immobilized ligand. The PS-modified protein biosensor was readily fabricated by spin coating and plasma treatment. Various parameters for fabrication, including the concentration of the PS solution, rate of spin coating, and duration of plasma treatment, were systematically optimized based on the improvement of fluorescence signal yielded by the microfluidic network-aided fluorescence immunoassay. The performance of the label-free protein detection on the optimized surfaces was further evaluated by surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). PS surfaces with optimal fabrication parameters exhibited up to an 620% enhancement of the protein binding response and approximately 210% of the protein binding per immobilized protein ligand compared with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface of 11-mercapto undecanoic acid (MUA). The relationship between the fabrication parameters used and changes to the surface chemistry and the morphological properties were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was revealed that the morphological changes observed in the plasma-treated PS film were the dominant factor for the improvement of the protein bioassay performance, rather than the chemical changes.

  5. In vitro, in silico and integrated strategies for the estimation of plasma protein binding. A review.

    PubMed

    Lambrinidis, George; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2015-06-23

    Plasma protein binding (PPB) strongly affects drug distribution and pharmacokinetic behavior with consequences in overall pharmacological action. Extended plasma protein binding may be associated with drug safety issues and several adverse effects, like low clearance, low brain penetration, drug-drug interactions, loss of efficacy, while influencing the fate of enantiomers and diastereoisomers by stereoselective binding within the body. Therefore in holistic drug design approaches, where ADME(T) properties are considered in parallel with target affinity, considerable efforts are focused in early estimation of PPB mainly in regard to human serum albumin (HSA), which is the most abundant and most important plasma protein. The second critical serum protein α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), although often underscored, plays also an important and complicated role in clinical therapy and thus the last years it has been studied thoroughly too. In the present review, after an overview of the principles of HSA and AGP binding as well as the structure topology of the proteins, the current trends and perspectives in the field of PPB predictions are presented and discussed considering both HSA and AGP binding. Since however for the latter protein systematic studies have started only the last years, the review focuses mainly to HSA. One part of the review highlights the challenge to develop rapid techniques for HSA and AGP binding simulation and their performance in assessment of PPB. The second part focuses on in silico approaches to predict HSA and AGP binding, analyzing and evaluating structure-based and ligand-based methods, as well as combination of both methods in the aim to exploit the different information and overcome the limitations of each individual approach. Ligand-based methods use the Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) methodology to establish quantitate models for the prediction of binding constants from molecular descriptors, while they provide

  6. Association of Plasma Heat Shock Protein 70, Interleukin 6, and Creatine Kinase Concentrations in a Healthy, Young Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Sesvold, Carmen; Revenis, Bradley D.; O'Connor, Francis G.; Deuster, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Variations of baseline plasma concentrations of creatine kinase (CK), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) have been reported. We report categorical associations which may influence these protein levels. Methods. Blood was harvested for DNA and plasma protein analysis from 567 adults. Mean protein levels of CK, HSP70, and IL-6 were compared by sex, ethnicity, genetic variants—CKMM Nco1 (rs1803285), HSPA1B +A1538G (rs1061581), and IL6 G-174C (rs1800795)—self-reported history of exercise, oral contraceptive use, and dietary supplement use. Results. SNP major allele frequencies for CKMM, HSPA1B, and IL6 were 70% A, 57% A, and 60%. Mean CK statistically differed by sex, ethnicity, oral contraceptives, and caffeine. Plasma HSP70 differed by caffeine and protein. Mean IL-6 concentration differed by sex, ethnicity, and genotype. Plasma IL-6 was significantly lower (29%) in males (1.92 ± 0.08 pg/mL) and higher (29%) among African Americans (2.85 ± 0.50 pg/mL) relative to the others. IL6 G-174C GG genotype (2.23 ± 0.14 pg/mL) was 19% greater than CG or CC genotypes. Conclusion. Differences in baseline CK and IL-6 plasma protein concentrations are associated with genetics, sex, ethnicity, and the use of oral contraceptives, caffeine, and protein supplements in this young and athletic population. PMID:26664829

  7. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Plasma adenosine triphosphate and heat shock protein 72 concentrations after aerobic and eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kishiko; Seta, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shinkai, Shoji; Calderwood, Stuart K; Nakazato, Koichi; Takahashi, Kazue

    2011-01-01

    The endolysosome pathway has been proposed for secretion of heat shock protein (Hsp)72 with a regulatory role for extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Here, we tested the hypothesis that extracellular ATP mediates the increase in plasma Hsp72 after exercise. We measured plasma ATP Hsp72, cathepsin D, norepinephrine, free fatty acid, glucose, and myoglobin in 8 healthy young males (mean +/- SE: age, 22.3 +/- 0.3 years; height, 171.4 +/- 0.8 cm; weight, 68.8 +/- 3.1 kg; body mass index, 23.5 +/- 1.1 kg/cm2; VO2 max, 44.1 +/- 3.8 mL/kg/min) before and at 0, 10, 30, and 60 min after aerobic exercise (cycling) and elbow flexor eccentric exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 70-75% VO2 max (mean +/- SE; 157.4 +/- 6.9 W). Eccentric strength exercise consisted of flexing the elbow joint to 90 degrees with motion speed set at 30 degrees/sec at extension and 10 degrees/sec at flexion. Subjects performed 7 sets of 10 eccentric actions with a set interval of 60 sec. The motion range of the elbow joint was 90 degrees-180 degrees. Compared with the levels of Hsp72 and ATP in plasma after bicycle exercise, those after eccentric exercise did not change. A significant group x time interaction was not observed for Hsp72 or ATP in plasma. A significant correlation was found between Hsp72 and ATP in plasma (r=0.79, P<0.05), but not between Hsp72 and norepinephrine (r=0.64, P=0.09) after bicycle exercise. A significant correlation between ATP and norepinephrine in plasma was found (r=0.89 P<0.01). We used stepwise multiple-regression analysis to determine independent predictors of exercise-induced elevation of eHsp72. Candidate predictor variables for the stepwise multiple-regression analysis were time (Pre, Post, Post10, Post30, Post60), exercise type (aerobic, eccentric), ATP, cathepsin D, norepinephrine, epinephrine, glucose, and FFA. In the regression model for Hsp72 in plasma, increased ATP and glucose were the strongest predictors of increased Hsp72 (ATP: R2=0.213, beta

  9. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: A tumoricidal protein-lipid complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L.; James, Ho C. S.; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N.; Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N.; et al

    2015-11-12

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ‘’protein-centric” view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. Wemore » identify a ‘’receptor independent” transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. In conclusion, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death.« less

  10. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L.; James, Ho C. S.; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N.; Klausen, Thomas Kjær; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N.; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ‘’protein-centric” view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a ‘’receptor independent” transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. Finally, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death. PMID:26561036

  11. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: A tumoricidal protein-lipid complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L.; James, Ho C. S.; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N.; Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N.; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-11-12

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ‘’protein-centric” view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a ‘’receptor independent” transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. In conclusion, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death.

  12. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L; James, Ho C S; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N; Klausen, Thomas Kjær; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ''protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a ''receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. Finally, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death. PMID:26561036

  13. C-reactive protein collaborates with plasma lectins to boost immune response against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ng, Patricia M L; Le Saux, Agnès; Lee, Chia M; Tan, Nguan S; Lu, Jinhua; Thiel, Steffen; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak L

    2007-07-25

    Although human C-reactive protein (CRP) becomes upregulated during septicemia, its role remains unclear, since purified CRP showed no binding to many common pathogens. Contrary to previous findings, we show that purified human CRP (hCRP) binds to Salmonella enterica, and that binding is enhanced in the presence of plasma factors. In the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, CRP is a major hemolymph protein. Incubation of hemolymph with a range of bacteria resulted in CRP binding to all the bacteria tested. Lipopolysaccharide-affinity chromatography of the hemolymph co-purified CRP, galactose-binding protein (GBP) and carcinolectin-5 (CL5). Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays suggested that these pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) form pathogen recognition complexes. We show the conservation of PRR crosstalk in humans, whereby hCRP interacts with ficolin (CL5 homologue). This interaction stabilizes CRP binding to bacteria and activates the lectin-mediated complement pathway. We propose that CRP does not act alone but collaborates with other plasma PRRs to form stable pathogen recognition complexes when targeting a wide range of bacteria for destruction. PMID:17581635

  14. Effect of plasma phospholipid transfer protein deficiency on lethal endotoxemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Thomas; Klein, Alexis; Deckert, Valérie; Desrumaux, Catherine; Ogier, Nicolas; Sberna, Anne-Laure; Paul, Catherine; Le Guern, Naig; Athias, Anne; Montange, Thomas; Monier, Serge; Piard, Françoise; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Masson, David; Lagrost, Laurent

    2008-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are components of Gram-negative bacteria. The cellular response from the host to LPS is mediated through stepwise interactions involving the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), CD14, and MD-2, which produces the rearrangement of TLR4. In addition to LBP, the lipid transfer/lipopolysaccharide-binding protein gene family includes the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). Here we show that the intravascular redistribution of LPS from the plasma lipoprotein-free fraction toward circulating lipoproteins is delayed in PLTP-deficient mice. In agreement with earlier in vitro studies, which predicted the neutralization of the endotoxic properties of LPS when associated with lipoproteins, significant increases in the plasma concentration of proinflammatory cytokines were found in PLTP-deficient as compared with wild type mice. Similar inflammatory damage occurred in tissues from wild type and PLTP-deficient mice 24 h after one single intraperitoneal injection of LPS but with a more severe accumulation of red blood cells in glomeruli of LPS-injected PLTP-deficient mice. Complementary ex vivo experiments on isolated splenocytes from wild type and PLTP-deficient mice further supported the ability of cell-derived PLTP to prevent LPS-mediated inflammation and cytotoxicity when combined with lipoprotein acceptors. Finally, PLTP deficiency in mice led to a significant increase in LPS-induced mortality. It is concluded that increasing circulating levels of PLTP may constitute a new and promising strategy in preventing endotoxic shock. PMID:18458077

  15. Change in N-Glycosylation of Plasma Proteins in Japanese Semisupercentenarians

    PubMed Central

    Tsumoto, Hiroki; Takakura, Daisuke; Ohta, Yuki; Abe, Yukiko; Arai, Yasumichi; Kawasaki, Nana; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Endo, Tamao

    2015-01-01

    An N-glycomic analysis of plasma proteins was performed in Japanese semisupercentenarians (SSCs) (mean 106.7 years), aged controls (mean 71.6 years), and young controls (mean 30.2 years) by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) using a graphitized carbon column. Characteristic N-glycans in SSCs were discriminated using a multivariate analysis; orthogonal projections to latent structures (O-PLS). The results obtained showed that multi-branched and highly sialylated N-glycans as well as agalacto- and/or bisecting N-glycans were increased in SSCs, while biantennary N-glycans were decreased. Since multi-branched and highly sialylated N-glycans have been implicated in anti-inflammatory activities, these changes may play a role in the enhanced chronic inflammation observed in SSCs. The levels of inflammatory proteins, such as CRP, adiponectin, IL-6, and TNF-α, were elevated in SSCs. These results suggested that responses to inflammation may play an important role in extreme longevity and healthy aging in humans. This is the first study to show that the N-glycans of plasma proteins were associated with extreme longevity and healthy aging in humans. PMID:26559536

  16. Transmembrane domain-dependent sorting of proteins to the ER and plasma membrane in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, J C; Pelham, H R

    1997-01-01

    Sorting of membrane proteins between compartments of the secretory pathway is mediated in part by their transmembrane domains (TMDs). In animal cells, TMD length is a major factor in Golgi retention. In yeast, the role of TMD signals is less clear; it has been proposed that membrane proteins travel by default to the vacuole, and are prevented from doing so by cytoplasmic signals. We have investigated the targeting of the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER) t-SNARE Ufe1p. We show that the amino acid sequence of the Ufe1p TMD is important for both function and ER targeting, and that the requirements for each are distinct. Targeting is independent of Rer1p, the only candidate sorting receptor for TMD sequences currently known. Lengthening the Ufe1p TMD allows transport along the secretory pathway to the vacuole or plasma membrane. The choice between these destinations is determined by the length and composition of the TMD, but not by its precise sequence. A longer TMD is required to reach the plasma membrane in yeast than in animal cells, and shorter TMDs direct proteins to the vacuole. TMD-based sorting is therefore a general feature of the yeast secretory pathway, but occurs by different mechanisms at different points. PMID:9155009

  17. Flow induced dispersion analysis rapidly quantifies proteins in human plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Andersen, Nina Z; Østergaard, Jesper; Zhuang, Guisheng; Petersen, Nickolaj J; Jensen, Henrik

    2015-07-01

    Rapid and sensitive quantification of protein based biomarkers and drugs is a substantial challenge in diagnostics and biopharmaceutical drug development. Current technologies, such as ELISA, are characterized by being slow (hours), requiring relatively large amounts of sample and being subject to cumbersome and expensive assay development. In this work a new approach for quantification based on changes in diffusivity is presented. The apparent diffusivity of an indicator molecule interacting with the protein of interest is determined by Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA) in a hydrodynamic flow system. In the presence of the analyte the apparent diffusivity of the indicator changes due to complexation. This change in diffusivity is used to quantify the analyte. This approach, termed Flow Induced Dispersion Analysis (FIDA), is characterized by being fast (minutes), selective (quantification is possible in a blood plasma matrix), fully automated, and being subject to a simple assay development. FIDA is demonstrated for quantification of the protein Human Serum Albumin (HSA) in human plasma as well as for quantification of an antibody against HSA. The sensitivity of the FIDA assay depends on the indicator-analyte dissociation constant which in favourable cases is in the sub-nanomolar to picomolar range for antibody-antigen interactions. PMID:26031223

  18. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Highly Protein-Bound Drugs and Impact of Errors in Plasma Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data was often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding, and blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for terminal elimination half-life (t1/2, 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax, 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–t, 95.4%), clearance (CLh, 95.4%), mean retention time (MRT, 95.4%), and steady state volume (Vss, 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. PMID:26531057

  19. Relative Abundance of Integral Plasma Membrane Proteins in Arabidopsis Leaf and Root Tissue Determined by Metabolic Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bernfur, Katja; Larsson, Olaf; Larsson, Christer; Gustavsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic labeling of proteins with a stable isotope (15N) in intact Arabidopsis plants was used for accurate determination by mass spectrometry of differences in protein abundance between plasma membranes isolated from leaves and roots. In total, 703 proteins were identified, of which 188 were predicted to be integral membrane proteins. Major classes were transporters, receptors, proteins involved in membrane trafficking and cell wall-related proteins. Forty-one of the integral proteins, including nine of the 13 isoforms of the PIP (plasma membrane intrinsic protein) aquaporin subfamily, could be identified by peptides unique to these proteins, which made it possible to determine their relative abundance in leaf and root tissue. In addition, peptides shared between isoforms gave information on the proportions of these isoforms. A comparison between our data for protein levels and corresponding data for mRNA levels in the widely used database Genevestigator showed an agreement for only about two thirds of the proteins. By contrast, localization data available in the literature for 21 of the 41 proteins show a much better agreement with our data, in particular data based on immunostaining of proteins and GUS-staining of promoter activity. Thus, although mRNA levels may provide a useful approximation for protein levels, detection and quantification of isoform-specific peptides by proteomics should generate the most reliable data for the proteome. PMID:23990937

  20. A Phospholipid-Protein Complex from Antarctic Krill Reduced Plasma Homocysteine Levels and Increased Plasma Trimethylamine-N-Oxide (TMAO) and Carnitine Levels in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bjørndal, Bodil; Ramsvik, Marie S.; Lindquist, Carine; Nordrehaug, Jan E.; Bruheim, Inge; Svardal, Asbjørn; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf K.

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is assumed to be beneficial for cardiovascular health, mainly based on plasma lipid lowering and anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, other plasma risk factors linked to cardiovascular disease are less studied. This study aimed to penetrate the effect of a phospholipid-protein complex (PPC) from Antarctic krill on one-carbon metabolism and production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed isoenergetic control, 6%, or 11% PPC diets for four weeks. Rats fed PPC had reduced total homocysteine plasma level and increased levels of choline, dimethylglycine and cysteine, whereas the plasma level of methionine was unchanged compared to control. PPC feeding increased the plasma level of TMAO, carnitine, its precursors trimethyllysine and γ-butyrobetaine. There was a close correlation between plasma TMAO and carnitine, trimethyllysine, and γ-butyrobetaine, but not between TMAO and choline. The present data suggest that PPC has a homocysteine lowering effect and is associated with altered plasma concentrations of metabolites related to one-carbon metabolism and B-vitamin status in rats. Moreover, the present study reveals a non-obligatory role of gut microbiota in the increased plasma TMAO level as it can be explained by the PPC’s content of TMAO. The increased level of carnitine and carnitine precursors is interpreted to reflect increased carnitine biosynthesis. PMID:26371012

  1. Purification of a sarcoplasmic reticulum protein that binds Ca2+ and plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, S.L.; Brown, M.S.; Lee, E.; Pathak, R.K.; Anderson, R.G.; Goldstein, J.L. )

    1989-05-15

    A protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit skeletal and cardiac muscle was identified because of its ability to bind 125I-labeled low density lipoprotein (LDL) with high affinity after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This protein, referred to as the 165-kDa protein, is restricted to striated muscle. It was not detected in 14 other tissues, including several that contain smooth muscle, but it appears in rat L6 myoblasts when they differentiate into myocytes. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopic studies revealed that the protein is present throughout the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the terminal cisternae. It binds 45Ca2+ on nitrocellulose blots and stains metachromatically with Stains-all, a cationic dye that stains Ca2+-binding proteins. It does not appear to be a glycoprotein, and it appears slightly larger than the 160-kDa glycoprotein previously described in sarcoplasmic reticulum. The 165-kDa protein binds LDL, beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein, and a cholesterol-induced high density lipoprotein particle that contains apoprotein E as its sole apoprotein with much higher affinity than it binds high density lipoprotein. The protein is stable to boiling and to treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate, but it becomes sensitive to these treatments when its cystine residues are reduced and alkylated. The protein was purified 1300-fold to apparent homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle membranes. It differs from the cell surface LDL receptor in that (1) its apparent molecular weight is not changed by reduction and alkylation; (2) it is present in Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, which lack functional LDL receptors; (3) binding of lipoproteins is not inhibited by EDTA; and (4) it is located within the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum where it has no access to plasma lipoproteins.

  2. Determination of plasma protein binding of positron emission tomography radioligands by high-performance frontal analysis.

    PubMed

    Amini, Nahid; Nakao, Ryuji; Schou, Magnus; Halldin, Christer

    2014-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging technique based on the use of radioligands labeled with short lived radionuclides, such as (11)C (t½=20.4min) and (18)F (t½=109.8min), which as a consequence often requires rapid plasma protein binding analysis methods. In addition, PET radioligands can suffer from non-specific binding to the membrane when ultrafiltraion, which is the most commonly used method for measuring protein binding in PET, is employed. In this study a high-performance frontal analysis (HPFA) method based on incorporation of a gel filtration column (discovery(®) BIO GFC 100, 50mm×4.6mm, 5μm, 100Å) into a radio-LC system with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) at a flow rate of 3ml/min as mobile phase was developed and investigated for four PET radioligands. The minimum injection volume (MIV) of plasma, which is a crucial factor in HPFA, was determined to be 200μl (human), 500μl (monkey), 700μl (human) and 1000μl (monkey) for these four radioligands. The MIV values increased as a higher fraction of the radioligand was present in the protein-free form. The protein binding results obtained were in good agreement with ultrafiltration and the method did not suffer from non-specific binding. The short analysis time (<12min) allowed multiple protein binding measurements during time course of a human [(11)C]PBR28 PET study. PMID:24922085

  3. Overexpression of BAX INHIBITOR-1 Links Plasma Membrane Microdomain Proteins to Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshiki; Aki, Toshihiko; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Kawai-Yamada, Maki

    2015-01-01

    BAX INHIBITOR-1 (BI-1) is a cell death suppressor widely conserved in plants and animals. Overexpression of BI-1 enhances tolerance to stress-induced cell death in plant cells, although the molecular mechanism behind this enhancement is unclear. We recently found that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BI-1 is involved in the metabolism of sphingolipids, such as the synthesis of 2-hydroxy fatty acids, suggesting the involvement of sphingolipids in the cell death regulatory mechanism downstream of BI-1. Here, we show that BI-1 affects cell death-associated components localized in sphingolipid-enriched microdomains of the plasma membrane in rice (Oryza sativa) cells. The amount of 2-hydroxy fatty acid-containing glucosylceramide increased in the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM; a biochemical counterpart of plasma membrane microdomains) fraction obtained from BI-1-overexpressing rice cells. Comparative proteomics analysis showed quantitative changes of DRM proteins in BI-1-overexpressing cells. In particular, the protein abundance of FLOTILLIN HOMOLOG (FLOT) and HYPERSENSITIVE-INDUCED REACTION PROTEIN3 (HIR3) markedly decreased in DRM of BI-1-overexpressing cells. Loss-of-function analysis demonstrated that FLOT and HIR3 are required for cell death by oxidative stress and salicylic acid, suggesting that the decreased levels of these proteins directly contribute to the stress-tolerant phenotypes in BI-1-overexpressing rice cells. These findings provide a novel biological implication of plant membrane microdomains in stress-induced cell death, which is negatively modulated by BI-1 overexpression via decreasing the abundance of a set of key proteins involved in cell death. PMID:26297139

  4. Effect of degree of hydrolysis of whey protein on in vivo plasma amino acid appearance in humans.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Storm, Adam C; Klitgaard, Søren; Jørgensen, Henry; Bibby, Bo M; Serena, Anja; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein is generally found to be faster digested and to promote faster and higher increases in plasma amino acid concentrations during the immediate ~60 min following protein ingestion compared to casein. The aim of the present study was to compare three different whey protein hydrolysates with varying degrees of hydrolysis (DH, % cleaved peptide bonds) to evaluate if the degree of whey protein hydrolysis influences the rate of amino acid plasma appearance in humans. A casein protein was included as reference. The three differentially hydrolysed whey proteins investigated were: High degree of hydrolysis (DH, DH = 48 %), Medium DH (DH = 27 %), and Low DH (DH = 23 %). The casein protein was intact. Additionally, since manufacturing of protein products may render some amino acids unavailable for utilisation in the body the digestibility and the biological value of all four protein fractions were evaluated in a rat study. A two-compartment model for the description of the postprandial plasma amino acid kinetics was applied to investigate the rate of postprandial total amino acid plasma appearance of the four protein products. The plasma amino acid appearance rates of the three whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) were all significantly higher than for the casein protein, however, the degree of hydrolysis of the WPH products did not influence plasma total amino acid appearance rate (estimates of DH and 95 % confidence intervals [CI] (mol L(-1) min(-1)): High DH 0.0585 [0.0454, 0.0754], Medium DH 0.0594 [0.0495, 0.0768], Low DH 0.0560 [0.0429, 0.0732], Casein 0.0194 [0.0129, 0.0291]). The four protein products were all highly digestible, while the biological value decreased with increasing degree of hydrolysis. In conclusion, the current study does not provide evidence that the degree of whey protein hydrolysis is a strong determinant for plasma amino acid appearance rate within the studied range of hydrolysis and protein dose. PMID:27065230

  5. Intrinsic stability of Brassicaceae plasma membrane in relation to changes in proteins and lipids as a response to salinity.

    PubMed

    Chalbi, Najla; Martínez-Ballesta, Ma Carmen; Youssef, Nabil Ben; Carvajal, Micaela

    2015-03-01

    Changes in plasma membrane lipids, such as sterols and fatty acids, have been observed as a result of salt stress. These alterations, together with modification of the plasma membrane protein profile, confer changes in the physical properties of the membrane to be taken into account for biotechnological uses. In our experiments, the relationship between lipids and proteins in three different Brassicaceae species differing in salinity tolerance (Brassica oleracea, B. napus and Cakile maritima) and the final plasma membrane stability were studied. The observed changes in the sterol (mainly an increase in sitosterol) and fatty acid composition (increase in RUFA) in each species led to physical adaptation of the plasma membrane to salt stress. The in vitro vesicles stability was higher in the less tolerant (B. oleracea) plants together with low lipoxygenase activity. These results indicate that the proteins/lipids ratio and lipid composition is an important aspect to take into account for the use of natural vesicles in plant biotechnology. PMID:25544590

  6. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    PubMed

    Sobczynski, Daniel J; Charoenphol, Phapanin; Heslinga, Michael J; Onyskiw, Peter J; Namdee, Katawut; Thompson, Alex J; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid) (PLGA) spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer) is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases. PMID:25229244

  7. Protein, cell and bacterial response to atmospheric pressure plasma grafted hyaluronic acid on poly(methylmethacrylate).

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Raechelle A; Raj, Jog; Dickinson, Peter J; McMahon, M Ann S; McDowell, David A; Meenan, Brian J

    2015-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been immobilised on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces using a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma process for the purposes of repelling protein, cellular and bacterial adhesion in the context of improving the performance of ophthalmic devices. Grafting was achieved by the following steps: (1) treatment of the PMMA with a DBD plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, (2) amine functionalisation of the activated polymer surface by exposure to a 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) linker molecule and (3) reaction of HA with the surface bound amine. The mechanism and effectiveness of the grafting process was verified by surface analysis. XPS data indicates that the APTMS linker molecule binds to PMMA via the Si-O chemistry and has the required pendant amine moiety. The carboxylic acid moiety on HA then binds with this -NH2 group via standard carbodiimide chemistry. ToF-SIMS confirms the presence of a coherent HA layer the microstructure of which is verified by AFM. The plasma grafted HA coating surfaces showed a pronounced decrease in protein and cellular adhesion when tested with bovine serum albumin and human corneal epithelial cells, respectively. The ability of these coatings to resist bacterial adhesion was established using Staphylococcus aureus NTC8325. Interestingly, the coatings did not repel bacterial adhesion, indicating that the mechanism of adhesion of bacterial cells is different to that for the surface interactions of mammalian cells. It is proposed that this difference is a consequence of the specific HA conformation that occurs under the conditions employed here. Hence, it is apparent that the microstructure/architecture of the HA coatings is an important factor in fabricating surfaces intended to repel proteins, mammalian and bacterial cells. PMID:26449450

  8. Modification of a PAMPA model to predict passive gastrointestinal absorption and plasma protein binding.

    PubMed

    Bujard, Alban; Voirol, Hervé; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Schappler, Julie

    2015-09-18

    The Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA) is a well-known high throughput screening (HTS) technique for predicting in vivo passive absorption. In this technique, two compartments are separated by an artificial membrane that mimics passive permeability through biological membranes such as the dermal layer, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and the blood brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, a hexadecane artificial membrane (HDM)-PAMPA was used to predict the binding of compounds towards the human plasma using a mixture of human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). The ratio of HSA and AGP was equivalent to that found in the human plasma for both proteins (∼20:1). A pH gradient (5.0-7.4) was performed to increase the screening capacity and overcome the issue of passive permeability for acidic and amphoteric compounds. With this assay, the prediction of passive GIT absorption was maintained and the compounds were discriminated according to their permeability (on a no-to-high scale). The plasma protein binding (PPB) was estimated via the correlation of the differences between the amount of compound crossing the artificial membrane in assays conducted with and without protein using only a two end-point measurement. The use of a mixture of HSA and AGP to modulate drug permeation was compared to the use of the same concentrations of HSA and AGP used separately. The addition of HSA alone in the acceptor compartment was sufficient for estimating PPB, while it was demonstrated that AGP alone could enable the estimation of AGP binding. PMID:26118348

  9. Nectin-like molecule 1 is a protein 4.1N associated protein and recruits protein 4.1N from cytoplasm to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Du, Guangwei; Hu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Shun; Liu, Yaobo; Xu, Yaqin; Huang, Xiaowei; Liu, Jin; Yin, Bin; Fan, Ming; Peng, Xiaozhong; Qiang, Boqin; Yuan, Jiangang

    2005-05-20

    Nectins are immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecules that participate in the organization of epithelial and endothelial junctions. Sharing high homology with the poliovirus receptor (PVR/CD155), nectins were also named poliovirus receptor-related proteins (PRRs). Four nectins and five nectin-like molecules have been identified. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of human and mouse nectin-like molecular 1 (NECL1). Human and mouse NECL1 share 87.3% identity at the amino acid level. NECL1 contains an ectodomain made of three immunoglobulin-like domains, and a cytoplasmic region homologous to those of glycophorin C and contactin-associated protein. RNA blot and in situ hybridization analysis showed that NECL1 predominantly expressed in the central nervous system, mainly in neuronal cell bodies in a variety of brain regions including the cerebellum, cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In vitro binding assay proved the association of NECL1 with protein 4.1N. NECL1 localizes to the cell-cell junctions and recruits protein 4.1N to the plasma membranes through its C-terminus, thus may regulate the function of the cell-cell junction. We propose that the NECL1 and protein 4.1N complex is involved in the morphological development, stability, and dynamic plasticity of the nervous system. PMID:15893517

  10. Effects of three liquid diets on nutrition-sensitive plasma proteins of tube-fed elderly men.

    PubMed

    Feller, A G; Caindec, N; Rudman, I W; Rudman, D

    1990-06-01

    The effects on three nutrition-sensitive plasma proteins of isocaloric feedings with three enteral formulas were compared in 10 tube-fed male nursing home residents. The enteral products were Isocal (based on whole protein), Peptamen (based on a mixture of oligopeptides), and Vivonex T.E.N. (based on free amino acids). The nutrition-sensitive plasma proteins were albumin, transferrin, and retinol-binding protein. After observation during four weeks of feeding with Isocal, each subject was then monitored during four weeks of Peptamen and four weeks of Vivonex T.E.N. The latter two products were alternated in a crossover design. The shift of Isocal to Peptamen did not significantly (P greater than .05) influence the serum level of albumin, transferrin, or retinol-binding protein. In contrast, the shift of Isocal to Vivonex T.E.N. or of Peptamen to Vivonex caused a significant (P less than .05) decline in all three plasma proteins, the kinetics of their reductions corresponding to their known half-lives. The behavior of the three nutrition-sensitive plasma proteins suggests that in elderly nursing home men without gastrointestinal disease the nutritional value of the protein component of the three formulas follows the order Isocal = Peptamen greater than Vivonex T.E.N. However, this conclusion will require confirmation by nitrogen balance studies. PMID:2113546

  11. Brain phosphoproteome obtained by a FASP-based method reveals plasma membrane protein topology.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Zougman, Alexandre; Gnad, Florian; Mann, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    Taking advantage of the recently developed Filter Assisted Sample Preparation (FASP) method for sample preparation, we performed an in-depth analysis of phosphorylation sites in mouse brain. To maximize the number of detected phosphorylation sites, we fractionated proteins by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) or separated tryptic peptides on an anion exchanger (SAX) prior or after the TiO(2)-based phosphopeptide enrichment, respectively. SEC allowed analysis of minute tissue samples (1 mg total protein), and resulted in identification of more than 4000 sites in a single experiment, comprising eight fractions. SAX in a pipet tip format offered a convenient and rapid way to fractionate phosphopeptides and mapped more than 5000 sites in a single six fraction experiment. To enrich peptides containing phosphotyrosine residues, we describe a filter aided antibody capturing and elution (FACE) method that requires only the uncoupled instead of resin-immobilized capture reagent. In total, we identified 12,035 phosphorylation sites on 4579 brain proteins of which 8446 are novel. Gene Ontology annotation reveals that 23% of identified sites are located on plasma membrane proteins, including a large number of ion channels and transporters. Together with the glycosylation sites from a recent large-scale study, they can confirm or correct predicted membrane topologies of these proteins, as we show for the examples calcium channels and glutamate receptors. PMID:20415495

  12. A plasma protein corona enhances the biocompatibility of Au@Fe3O4 Janus particles.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Lisa; Christner, Carolin; Storck, Wiebke; Schick, Isabel; Krumbein, Ines; Dähring, Heidi; Haedicke, Katja; Heinz-Herrmann, Karl; Teichgräber, Ulf; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Tremel, Wolfgang; Tenzer, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    Au@Fe3O4 Janus particles (JPs) are heteroparticles with discrete domains defined by different materials. Their tunable composition and morphology confer multimodal and versatile capabilities for use as contrast agents and drug carriers in future medicine. Au@Fe3O4 JPs have colloidal properties and surface characteristics leading to interactions with proteins in biological fluids. The resulting protein adsorption layer ("protein corona") critically affects their interaction with living matter. Although Au@Fe3O4 JPs displayed good biocompatibility in a standardized in vitro situation, an in-depth characterization of the protein corona is of prime importance to unravel underlying mechanisms affecting their pathophysiology and biodistribution in vitro and in vivo. Here, we comparatively analyzed the human plasma corona of Au-thiol@Fe3O4-SiO2-PEG JPs (NH2-functionalized and non-functionalized) and spherical magnetite (Fe3O4-SiO2-PEG) particles and investigated its effects on colloidal stability, biocompatibility and cellular uptake. Label-free quantitative proteomic analyses revealed that complex coronas including almost 180 different proteins were formed within only one minute. Remarkably, in contrast to spherical magnetite particles with surface NH2 groups, the Janus structure prevented aggregation and the adhesion of opsonins. This resulted in an enhanced biocompatibility of corona sheathed JPs compared to spherical magnetite particles and corona-free JPs. PMID:26276693

  13. Plasma protein thiolation index (PTI) as a biomarker of thiol-specific oxidative stress in haemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Reggiani, Francesco; Podestà, Manuel A; Garavaglia, Maria Lisa; Portinaro, Nicola M; Milzani, Aldo; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2015-12-01

    The role of oxidative stress in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), which occurs at significantly higher levels than in the general population, is often underestimated in clinical practice. Emerging evidence highlights the strong correlation of oxidative stress with chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease, which are highly prevalent in most patients on maintenance haemodialysis (HD) and are a major risk factor for mortality in this population. In this study, total plasma thiols and plasma S-thiolated proteins were measured in patients with ESRD, before and after a regular HD session, and compared to age-matched healthy subjects. We found a significant decrease in the level of total plasma thiols and, conversely, a significant increase in the level of S-thiolated proteins in these patients. In most patients, post-HD plasma level of total thiols did not differ from the one in healthy subjects, whereas plasma level of S-thiolated proteins was lower in HD patients than in age-matched healthy controls. This suggests that a single HD session restores plasma thiol redox status and re-establishes the antioxidant capacity of plasma thiols. Additionally, we determined protein thiolation index (PTI), i.e., the molar ratio between the sum of all low molecular mass thiols bound to S-thiolated plasma proteins and protein free cysteinyl residues. Patients with ESRD had a significantly higher PTI compared to age-matched healthy subjects and HD was associated with a decrease in PTI to normal, or lower than normal, levels. Although this study is limited in size, our results suggest that PTI is a useful indicator of thiol-specific oxidative stress in patients with ESRD on maintenance HD. This study also emphasizes that PTI determination is a cheap and simple tool suitable for large-scale clinical studies that could be used for routine screening of thiol-specific oxidative stress. PMID:26453922

  14. Evaluation of Serum Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein-A & Plasma D-Dimer in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Vivian Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a spectrum comprising unstable angina pectoris, ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) & Non ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI) is the major cause of presentation in Emergency Department today. Though ECG and cardiac enzymes are used for diagnosis, they mislead the diagnosis sometimes and delay in treatment initiation. This leads us to search certain new parameters which reflect the pathophysiology of ACS. Markers of plaque stability like Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein-A and D-Dimer, a marker of ongoing thrombosis are found to be better markers in early diagnosis. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic competence of PAPP-A and D-Dimer in acute coronary syndrome over CK-MB and to compare with the inflammatory marker High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP) which is associated with atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods Fifty patients presenting with acute onset of chest pain to Emergency Department with or without ECG changes served as cases and 50 healthy people served as controls. Serum PAPP-A is measured by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), D-Dimer and hs-CRP by using Latex Turbidimetry method. Results A statistical significant difference of PAPP-A and D-Dimer was noted between the ACS and controls (p < 0.001) whereas CK-MB shows no much difference (p 0.09). Statistically significant positive correlation is noted between parameters. Conclusion PAPP-A marker of plaque instability and D-Dimer marker of ongoing thrombosis are raised in acute coronary syndrome and thus can be considered as one of the marker in ACS for diagnosis. PMID:26894054

  15. [Mechanism of changes in amine binding to plasma proteins during allergy].

    PubMed

    Shleĭkin, A G; Gor'kova, L B; Pozhilenkova, K S; Zvezdochkin, A G

    1989-01-01

    Blood plasma of healthy persons bound 13.13 +/- 1.07 mmol/l of p-phenylene diamine (PDA), histamine pectic index constituted 33.3 +/- 2.18%. In patients with neurodermitis and eczema both these patterns were markedly reduced. Unitiol (10(-3) mol/l) increased PDA binding and histamine level in vitro. The same concentration of cystamine decreased histamine pectic index in healthy persons. Importance of protein SH-groups in binding of amines is discussed. PMID:2741420

  16. Identification of the interactome between fish plasma proteins and Edwardsiella tarda reveals tissue-specific strategies against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Huang, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Zaohai; Peng, Xuan-Xian; Peng, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the complex pathogen-host interaction is essential for a comprehensive understanding of how these remarkable agents invade their hosts and how the hosts defend against these invaders. During the infection, pathogens interact intensively with host to enable their survival, which can be revealed through their interactome. Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing huge economic loss in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. E. tarda is an ideal model for host-pathogen investigation as it infects fish in three distinct steps: entering the host, circulating through the blood and establishing infection. We adopted a previous established proteomic approach that inactivated E. tarda cells and covalent crosslink fish plasma proteins were used to capture plasma proteins and bacterial outer membrane proteins, respectively. By the combinatorial use of proteomic and biochemical approaches, six plasma proteins and seven outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were identified. Interactions among these proteins were validated with protein-array, far-Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation. At last, seventeen plasma protein-bacteria protein-protein interaction were confirmed to be involved in the interaction network, forming a complex interactome. Compared to our previous results, different host proteins were detected, whereas some of the bacterial proteins were similar, which indicates that hosts adopt tissue-specific strategies to cope with the same pathogen during infection. Thus, our results provide a robust demonstration of both bacterial initiators and host receptors or interacting proteins to further explore infection and anti-infective mechanisms between hosts and microbes. PMID:27458055

  17. [Development of online conventional array-based two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for proteins separation in human plasma].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi; Hong, Guangfeng; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2014-04-01

    Human plasma is one of the proteins-containing samples most difficult to characterize on account of the wide dynamic concentration range of its intact proteins. Herein, we developed a high-throughput conventional array-based two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for proteins separation in human plasma in online mode. In the system, a conventional strong-anion exchange chromatographic column was used as the first separation dimension and eight parallel conventional reversed-phase liquid chromatographic columns were integrated as the second separation dimension. The fractions from the first dimension were sequentially transferred into the corresponding reversed-phase liquid chromatographic precolumns for retention and enrichment using a 10-port electrically actuated multi-position valve. The second dimensional solvent flow was directly and identically split into 8 channels. The fractions were concurrently back-flushed from the precolumns into the 8 conventional RP columns and were separated simultaneously. An 8-channel fraction collector was refitted to collect the reversed-phase liquid chromatographic fractions for further investigation. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) dyein solution was conveniently used for high-abundance protein location. Two separation dimensions were relatively independent parts, as well as each channel of the second dimensional array separation. Therefore, the new system could improve the separation throughput and total peak capacity. The system was successfully applied for the separation of human plasma intact proteins. The results indicated the established system is an effective method for removing high abundance proteins in plasma and in-depth research in plasma proteomics. PMID:25069321

  18. Quantification of horse plasma proteins altered by xylazine using the fluorogenic derivatization-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Miwako; ICHIBANGASE, Tomoko; YAMASHITA, Shozo; KIJIMA-SUDA, Isao; KAWAHARA, Masahiro; IMAI, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the doping tests currently used in horse racing, prohibited substances or their metabolites are usually directly detected in urine or blood samples. However, despite their lasting pharmaceutical effects, some prohibited substances are rapidly eliminated from horse urine and blood, making them difficult to detect. Therefore, new indirect biomarkers for doping, such as plasma proteins that are increased by the prohibited substances, have recently attracted much attention. Here, a fluorogenic derivatization-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (FD-LC-MS/MS) method was adopted for horse plasma proteomics analysis, in order to identify plasma proteins whose concentrations were altered in response to xylazine in Thoroughbred horses. Xylazine, which is rapidly absorbed and eliminated and has possibility of the change in the levels of plasma proteins, was selected as a model drug. Of the ten plasma proteins identified, four proteins, including three acute phase proteins (haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, and α-2-macroglobulin-like), were significantly increased after xylazine administration. Therefore, our present approach might be useful in identifying indirect biomarkers of drug administration. PMID:26858580

  19. Plasma and liver acetaminophen-protein adduct levels in mice after acetaminophen treatment: Dose–response, mechanisms, and clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Norris, Hye-Ryun K.; Slawson, Matthew H.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Xie, Yuchao; Williams, C. David; Wilkins, Diana G.; Rollins, Douglas E.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-06-15

    At therapeutic doses, acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic. However, overdose of APAP is the principal cause of acute liver failure in the West. Binding of the reactive metabolite of APAP (NAPQI) to proteins is thought to be the initiating event in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity. Early work suggested that APAP-protein binding could not occur without glutathione (GSH) depletion, and likely only at toxic doses. Moreover, it was found that protein-derived APAP-cysteine could only be detected in serum after the onset of liver injury. On this basis, it was recently proposed that serum APAP-cysteine could be used as diagnostic marker of APAP overdose. However, comprehensive dose–response and time course studies have not yet been done. Furthermore, the effects of co-morbidities on this parameter have not been investigated. We treated groups of mice with APAP at multiple doses and measured liver GSH and both liver and plasma APAP-protein adducts at various timepoints. Our results show that protein binding can occur without much loss of GSH. Importantly, the data confirm earlier work that showed that protein-derived APAP-cysteine can appear in plasma without liver injury. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that this may involve multiple mechanisms, including secretion of adducted proteins and diffusion of NAPQI directly into plasma. Induction of liver necrosis through ischemia–reperfusion significantly increased the plasma concentration of protein-derived APAP-cysteine after a subtoxic dose of APAP. While our data generally support the measurement of serum APAP-protein adducts in the clinic, caution is suggested in the interpretation of this parameter. - Highlights: • Extensive GSH depletion is not required for APAP-protein binding in the liver. • APAP-protein adducts appear in plasma at subtoxic doses. • Proteins are adducted in the cell and secreted out. • Coincidental liver injury increases plasma APAP-protein adducts at subtoxic doses

  20. Quantitative immunoelectrophoretic analysis of the plasma proteins in the sol phase of sputum from patients with chronic bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Ryley, H. C.; Brogan, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of the plasma proteins in the sol phase of sputum was carried out using quantitative cross immunoelectrophoresis. The average concentrations of nine plasma proteins were estimated in the sol phase of sputum specimens from 30 patients with chronic bronchitis and the values were compared with the concentrations of these proteins in saliva and serum specimens from the same group of patients. The results showed that alpha1 antichymotrypsin and IgA concentrations were higher in the sol phase of sputum than would be expected if their presence were due entirely to passive transudation. Images PMID:4128930

  1. Proteomic identification of plasma proteins as markers of growth promoter abuse in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kinkead, Ruth A; Elliott, Christopher T; Cannizzo, Francesca T; Biolatti, Bartolomeo; Mooney, Mark H

    2015-06-01

    Growth-promoting agents are continually misused for increasing animal growth and fraudulent gain in the meat industry, yet detection rates from conventional targeted testing for drug residues do not reflect this. This is because testing currently relies on direct detection of drugs or related metabolites and administrators of such compounds can take adaptive measures to avoid detection through the use of endogenous or unknown drugs, and low dose or combined mixtures. New detection methods are needed which focus on the screening of biological responses of an animal to such growth-promoting agents as it has been demonstrated that genomic, proteomic and metabolomics profiles are altered by xenobiotic intake. Therefore, an untargeted proteomics approach using comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) was carried out to identify putative proteins altered in plasma after treatment with oestradiol, dexamethasone or prednisolone. Twenty-four male cattle were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 6) for experimental treatment over 40 days, namely a control group of non-treated cattle, and three groups administered 17β-oestradiol-3-benzoate (0.01 mg/kg, intramuscular), dexamethasone sodium phosphate (0.7 mg/day, per os) or prednisolone acetate (15 mg/day, per os), respectively. Plasma collected from each animal at day 25 post study initiation was subjected to proteomic analysis by 2DE for comparison of protein expression between treated and untreated animals. Analysis of acquired gel images revealed 22 plasma proteins which differed in expression by more than 50% (p < 0.05) in treated animals compared to untreated animals. Proteins of interest underwent identification by LC-MS/MS analysis and were found to have associated roles in transport, blood coagulation, immune response and metabolism pathways. In this way, seven proteins are highlighted as novel biomarker candidates including transthyretin which is shown to be significantly increased in all

  2. Relationships between plasma lipids, proteins, surface tension and post-dive bubbles.

    PubMed

    Schellart, Nico A M; Rozložník, Miroslav; Balestra, Costantino

    2015-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) in divers is caused by bubbles of inert gas. When DCS occurs, most bubbles can be found in the venous circulation: venous gas emboli (VGE). Bubbles are thought to be stabilized by low molecular weight surfactant reducing the plasma-air surface tension (γ). Proteins may play a role as well. We studied the interrelations between these substances, γ and VGE, measured before and after a dry dive simulation. VGE of 63 dive simulations (21-msw/40-minute profile) of 52 divers was examined 40, 80, 120 and 160 minutes after surfacing (precordial Doppler method) and albumin, total protein, triglycerides, total cholesterol and free fatty acids were determined pre- and post-exposure. To manipulate blood plasma composition, half of the subjects obtained a fat-rich breakfast, while the other half got a fat-poor breakfast pre-dive. Eleven subjects obtained both. VGE scores measured with the precordial Doppler method were transformed to the logarithm of Kisman Integrated Severity Scores. With statistical analysis, including (partial) correlations, it could not be established whether γ as well as VGE scores are related to albumin, total protein or total cholesterol. With triglycerides and fatty acids correlations were also lacking, despite the fact that these compounds varied substantially. The same holds true for the paired differences between the two exposures of the 11 subjects. Moreover, no correlation between surface tension and VGE could be shown. From these findings and some theoretical considerations it seems likely that proteins lower surface tension rather than lipids. Since the findings are not in concordance with the classical surfactant hypothesis, reconsideration seems necessary. PMID:26094288

  3. Plasma membrane lipid–protein interactions affect signaling processes in sterol-biosynthesis mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Henrik; Burgos, Asdrubal; Garapati, Prashanth; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane is an important organelle providing structure, signaling and transport as major biological functions. Being composed of lipids and proteins with different physicochemical properties, the biological functions of membranes depend on specific protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions. Interactions of proteins with their specific sterol and lipid environment were shown to be important factors for protein recruitment into sub-compartmental structures of the plasma membrane. System-wide implications of altered endogenous sterol levels for membrane functions in living cells were not studied in higher plant cells. In particular, little is known how alterations in membrane sterol composition affect protein and lipid organization and interaction within membranes. Here, we conducted a comparative analysis of the plasma membrane protein and lipid composition in Arabidopsis sterol-biosynthesis mutants smt1 and ugt80A2;B1. smt1 shows general alterations in sterol composition while ugt80A2;B1 is significantly impaired in sterol glycosylation. By systematically analyzing different cellular fractions and combining proteomic with lipidomic data we were able to reveal contrasting alterations in lipid–protein interactions in both mutants, with resulting differential changes in plasma membrane signaling status. PMID:24672530

  4. Plasma oxidative stress biomarkers, nitric oxide and heat shock protein 70 in trained elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Banfi, G; Malavazos, A; Iorio, E; Dolci, A; Doneda, L; Verna, R; Corsi, M M

    2006-03-01

    The physiological response to the physical exercise involves a number of changes in the oxidative balance and in the metabolism of some important biological molecules, including nitric oxide (NO) and heat shock proteins (Hsp 70). With the aim to optimise previous laboratory diagnostic panels, we measured the plasma concentration of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), total antioxidant status (TAS), glutathione reductase (GR) activity, and NO and Hsp 70 levels in 44 elite, antioxidant-supplemented and trained soccer players and in 15 sedentary controls. Although no statistically significant difference between athletes and controls was detected in the plasma level of ROMs and TAS, soccer players showed a significantly higher plasma GR activity, NO and Hst 70 levels than those of sedentary controls. These findings suggest that the measuring of relatively novel biomarkers in sport medicine, like GR, NO and Hsp 70, in addition to the well-known and reliable assays (d-ROMs test and TAS) may be useful to a clinician to better assess and evaluate the benefits of training and/or supplementation programs. PMID:16344941

  5. Kinetics of lipids, apolipoproteins, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein in plasma after a bicycle marathon.

    PubMed

    Föger, B; Wohlfarter, T; Ritsch, A; Lechleitner, M; Miller, C H; Dienstl, A; Patsch, J R

    1994-05-01

    The short-term effects of prolonged intense exercise on plasma lipid transport parameters including cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), low-density lipoprotein (LD) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and its subfractions HDL2 cholesterol and HDL3 cholesterol, on apolipoproteins (apos) A-I, A-II, and B, and on mass and activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) were studied in eight male endurance-trained athletes over the first week after a bicycle marathon. CETP mass concentration in plasma was quantified by a newly developed immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, TGs, LDL cholesterol, apo B, CETP, and cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) were significantly reduced in the recovery period compared with pre-exercise values (cholesterol by 20%, P < .05; TGs by 63%, P < .05; LDL cholesterol by 32%, P < .05; apo B by 18%, P < .05; CETP mass by 29%, P < .05; and CETA by 14%, P < .05). HDL cholesterol and HDL2 cholesterol, in contrast, were significantly increased in the post-exercise period (HDL cholesterol by 12%, P < .05, and HDL2 cholesterol by 96%, P < .05), whereas HDL3 cholesterol showed a tendency to decrease in the late recovery period (by 8%, NS). Although changes in cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apo B, and CETP mass and activity were already evident in the early recovery period, HDL2 cholesterol showed a delayed response, reaching its maximum 72 hours after initiation of exercise.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8177053

  6. Plasma Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Maziarz, Marlena; Biggs, Mary L.; Ix, Joachim H.; Zieman, Susan J.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Tracy, Russell P.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Siscovick, David S.; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2013-01-01

    Although fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) may increase risk of diabetes and exert negative cardiac inotropy, it is unknown whether plasma concentrations of FABP4 are associated with incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD). We prospectively analyzed data on 4,560 participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study. FABP4 was measured at baseline using ELISA, and SCD events were adjudicated through review of medical records. We used Cox proportional hazards to estimate effect measures. During a median followup of 11.8 years, 146 SCD cases occurred. In a multivariable model adjusting for demographic, lifestyle, and metabolic factors, relative risk of SCD associated with each higher standard deviation (SD) of plasma FABP4 was 1.15 (95% CI: 0.95–1.38), P = 0.15. In a secondary analysis stratified by prevalent diabetes status, FABP4 was associated with higher risk of SCD in nondiabetic participants, (RR per SD higher FABP4: 1.33 (95% CI: 1.07–1.65), P = 0.009) but not in diabetic participants (RR per SD higher FABP4: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.62–1.27), P = 0.50), P for diabetes-FABP4 interaction 0.049. In summary, a single measure of plasma FABP4 obtained later in life was not associated with the risk of SCD in older adults overall. Confirmation of our post-hoc results in nondiabetic people in other studies is warranted. PMID:24455402

  7. G-protein-coupled receptor participates in 20-hydroxyecdysone signaling on the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Animal steroid hormones are conventionally known to initiate signaling via a genomic pathway by binding to the nuclear receptors. The mechanism by which 20E initiates signaling via a nongenomic pathway is unclear. Results We illustrate that 20E triggered the nongenomic pathway through a plasma membrane G-protein-coupled receptor (named ErGPCR) in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. The transcript of ErGPCR was increased at the larval molting stage and metamorphic molting stage by 20E regulation. Knockdown of ErGPCR via RNA interference in vivo blocked larval–pupal transition and suppressed 20E-induced gene expression. ErGPCR overexpression in the H. armigera epidermal cell line increased the 20E-induced gene expression. Through ErGPCR, 20E modulated Calponin nuclear translocation and phosphorylation, and induced a rapid increase in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. The inhibitors of T-type voltage-gated calcium channels and canonical transient receptor potential calcium channels repressed the 20E-induced Ca2+ increase. Truncation of the N-terminal extracellular region of ErGPCR inhibited its localization on the plasma membrane and 20E-induced gene expression. ErGPCR was not detected to bind with the steroid hormone analog [3H]Pon A. Conclusion These results suggest that ErGPCR participates in 20E signaling on the plasma membrane. PMID:24507557

  8. Characterization of modified proteins in plasma from a subtype of schizophrenia based on carbonyl stress: Protein carbonyl is a possible biomarker of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Koike, Shin; Kayama, Tasuku; Arai, Makoto; Horiuchi, Yasue; Kobori, Akiko; Miyashita, Mitsuhiro; Itokawa, Masanari; Ogasawara, Yuki

    2015-11-13

    Although it's well known that protein carbonyl (PCO) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) levels are elevated in plasma from patients with renal dysfunction, we recently identified patients who had no renal dysfunction but possessed high levels of plasma pentosidine (PEN), which is an AGEs, and low vitamin B6 levels in serum. In this study, we investigated the status of carbonyl stress to characterize the subtype of schizophrenia. When plasma samples were subjected to Western blot analysis for various AGEs, clear differences were only observed with the anti-PEN antibody in the plasma from schizophrenic patients. Moreover, we determined the formation of protein carbonyl (PCO), a typical indicator of carbonyl stress, occurred prior to the accumulation of PEN in the plasma of schizophrenic patients. PCO levels in the plasma from schizophrenic patients were significantly higher than that from healthy subjects. Western blots analysis clearly showed that albumin and IgG were markedly carbonylated in the plasma of some patients. Thus, PCOs may be a novel marker of carbonyl stress-type schizophrenia in addition to albumin containing PEN structure. PMID:26431870

  9. High precision quantification of human plasma proteins using the automated SISCAPA Immuno-MS workflow.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Morteza; Leigh Anderson, N; Pope, Matthew E; Yip, Richard; Pearson, Terry W

    2016-09-25

    Efficient robotic workflows for trypsin digestion of human plasma and subsequent antibody-mediated peptide enrichment (the SISCAPA method) were developed with the goal of improving assay precision and throughput for multiplexed protein biomarker quantification. First, an 'addition only' tryptic digestion protocol was simplified from classical methods, eliminating the need for sample cleanup, while improving reproducibility, scalability and cost. Second, methods were developed to allow multiplexed enrichment and quantification of peptide surrogates of protein biomarkers representing a very broad range of concentrations and widely different molecular masses in human plasma. The total workflow coefficients of variation (including the 3 sequential steps of digestion, SISCAPA peptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis) for 5 proteotypic peptides measured in 6 replicates of each of 6 different samples repeated over 6 days averaged 3.4% within-run and 4.3% across all runs. An experiment to identify sources of variation in the workflow demonstrated that MRM measurement and tryptic digestion steps each had average CVs of ∼2.7%. Because of the high purity of the peptide analytes enriched by antibody capture, the liquid chromatography step is minimized and in some cases eliminated altogether, enabling throughput levels consistent with requirements of large biomarker and clinical studies. PMID:26772726

  10. Dietary aspartame with protein on plasma and brain amino acids, brain monoamines and behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), was investigated for its ability to alter levels of the large neutral amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume meals with or without protein for two hours. Additionally, the possible long term behavioral consequences of APM in 25% casein diets with or without 10% sucrose were determined. Acute APM ingestion increased both plasma and brain phenylalanine and tyrosine levels, but brain tryptophan levels were not altered regardless of dietary protein. Brain norepinephrine and dopamine levels were unaltered by any of the diet while serotonin levels were slightly increased when a protein-free diet was consumed. But APM and/or protein ingestion minimized this increase of brain serotonin levels as much as controls. Chronic APM ingestion failed to influence diurnal feeding patterns, meal size distributions, or diurnal patterns of spontaneous motor activity. The chronic ingestion of abuse doses of APM produced no significant chemical changes in brain capable of altering behavioral parameters believed to be controlled by monoamines in rats. PMID:3714850

  11. A major integral protein of the plant plasma membrane binds flavin.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Astrid; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Hertel, Rainer

    2003-05-01

    Abundant flavin binding sites have been found in membranes of plants and fungi. With flavin mononucleotide-agarose affinity columns, riboflavin-binding activity from microsomes of Cucurbita pepoL. hypocotyls was purified and identified as a specific PIP1-homologous protein of the aquaporin family. Sequences such as gi|2149955 in Phaseolus vulgaris, PIP1b of Arabidopsis thaliana, and NtAQP1 of tobacco are closely related. The identification as a riboflavin-binding protein was confirmed by binding tests with an extract of Escherichia coli cells expressing the tobacco NtAQP1 as well as leaves of transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress NtAQP1 or were inhibited in PIP1 expression by antisense constructs. When binding was assayed in the presence of dithionite, the reduced flavin formed a relatively stable association with the protein. Upon dilution under oxidizing conditions, the adduct was resolved, and free flavin reappeared with a half time of about 30 min. Such an association can also be induced photochemically, with oxidized flavin by blue light at 450 nm, in the presence of an electron donor. Several criteria, localization in the plasma membrane, high abundance, affinity to roseoflavin, and photochemistry, argue for a role of the riboflavin-binding protein PIP1 as a photoreceptor. PMID:12768338

  12. Binding of plasma proteins to titanium dioxide nanotubes with different diameters.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Flašker, Ajda; Lokar, Maruša; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Mazare, Anca; Artenjak, Andrej; Čučnik, Saša; Kralj, Slavko; Velikonja, Aljaž; Schmuki, Patrik; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are considered to be one of the most applicable materials in medical devices because of their suitable properties, most importantly high corrosion resistance and the specific combination of strength with biocompatibility. In order to improve the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces, the current report initially focuses on specifying the topography of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) by electrochemical anodization. The zeta potential (ζ-potential) of NTs showed a negative value and confirmed the agreement between the measured and theoretically predicted dependence of ζ-potential on salt concentration, whereby the absolute value of ζ-potential diminished with increasing salt concentrations. We investigated binding of various plasma proteins with different sizes and charges using the bicinchoninic acid assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results showed effective and comparatively higher protein binding to NTs with 100 nm diameters (compared to 50 or 15 nm). We also showed a dose-dependent effect of serum amyloid A protein binding to NTs. These results and theoretical calculations of total available surface area for binding of proteins indicate that the largest surface area (also considering the NT lengths) is available for 100 nm NTs, with decreasing surface area for 50 and 15 nm NTs. These current investigations will have an impact on increasing the binding ability of biomedical devices in the body leading to increased durability of biomedical devices. PMID:25733829

  13. Binding of plasma proteins to titanium dioxide nanotubes with different diameters

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Flašker, Ajda; Lokar, Maruša; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Mazare, Anca; Artenjak, Andrej; Čučnik, Saša; Kralj, Slavko; Velikonja, Aljaž; Schmuki, Patrik; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are considered to be one of the most applicable materials in medical devices because of their suitable properties, most importantly high corrosion resistance and the specific combination of strength with biocompatibility. In order to improve the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces, the current report initially focuses on specifying the topography of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) by electrochemical anodization. The zeta potential (ζ-potential) of NTs showed a negative value and confirmed the agreement between the measured and theoretically predicted dependence of ζ-potential on salt concentration, whereby the absolute value of ζ-potential diminished with increasing salt concentrations. We investigated binding of various plasma proteins with different sizes and charges using the bicinchoninic acid assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results showed effective and comparatively higher protein binding to NTs with 100 nm diameters (compared to 50 or 15 nm). We also showed a dose-dependent effect of serum amyloid A protein binding to NTs. These results and theoretical calculations of total available surface area for binding of proteins indicate that the largest surface area (also considering the NT lengths) is available for 100 nm NTs, with decreasing surface area for 50 and 15 nm NTs. These current investigations will have an impact on increasing the binding ability of biomedical devices in the body leading to increased durability of biomedical devices. PMID:25733829

  14. Distribution and concentration of cholesteryl ester transfer protein in plasma of normolipemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Marcel, Y L; McPherson, R; Hogue, M; Czarnecka, H; Zawadzki, Z; Weech, P K; Whitlock, M E; Tall, A R; Milne, R W

    1990-01-01

    A MAb (TP-2) directed against human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) has been applied to the development of a competitive solid-phase RIA. Experiments with immobilized CETP have shown that upon incubation with plasma or HDL in the presence of Tween (0.05%) apo A-I (but not apo A-II) binds to CETP while TP-2 binding to CETP is concomitantly decreased. With high detergent concentration (0.5% Triton), the interference is eliminated and a specific RIA in which all plasma CETP fractions have the same affinity can be obtained. Plasma levels of CETP, apo A-I, lipids, and lipoproteins were measured in 50 normolipemic, healthy subjects of both sexes. CETP levels varied nearly fourfold with a mean value of 1.7 micrograms/ml. CETP was positively correlated only with apo A-I (r = 0.38) and HDL-triglyceride (r = 0.39). In 29 other normolipemic subjects, where several apolipoproteins were also measured, significant correlations of CETP with apo A-I (0.41), apo E (0.43), and HDL-cholesterol (0.41) were observed, but there was no significant relationship between CETP and either apo A-II, B, or D. In other experiments CETP was shown to be present mostly in HDL3 and VHDL, to display exclusively an alpha 2-electrophoretic migration, and to occur within discrete particles ranging in size from 129 to 154 kD. In conclusion, the association of CETP with apo A-I-containing lipoproteins probably explains the correlation between CETP and apo A-I levels. The relationship between CETP and apo E suggests either a common metabolism or a specific cooperative role in cholesterol ester transport for these proteins. PMID:2295691

  15. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Clinical Outcomes after Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Ago, Tetsuro; Hata, Jun; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is elevated in response to inflammation caused by brain infarction, the association of CRP with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke remains uncertain. This study examined whether plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) levels at onset were associated with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors and acute infections after stroke. Methods We prospectively included 3653 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent and were hospitalized within 24 h of onset. Plasma hsCRP levels were measured on admission and categorized into quartiles. The association between hsCRP levels and clinical outcomes, including neurological improvement, neurological deterioration, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≥3 at 3 months), were investigated using a logistic regression analysis. Results Higher hsCRP levels were significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke subtype, conventional risk factors, intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, and acute infections during hospitalization (multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile as a reference: 0.80 [0.65–0.97] for neurological improvement, 1.72 [1.26–2.34] for neurological deterioration, and 2.03 [1.55–2.67] for a poor functional outcome). These associations were unchanged after excluding patients with infectious diseases occurring during hospitalization, or those with stroke recurrence or death. These trends were similar irrespective of stroke subtypes or baseline stroke severity, but more marked in patients aged <70 years (Pheterogeneity = 0.001). Conclusions High plasma hsCRP is independently associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27258004

  16. A simultaneous electrochemical multianalyte immunoassay of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and soluble CD40 ligand based on reduced graphene oxide-tetraethylene pentamine that directly adsorb metal ions as labels.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guolin; Yu, Chao; Xia, Chunyong; Gao, Liuliu; Xu, Wailan; Li, Wenjuan; He, Junlin

    2015-10-15

    A simplified electrochemical multianalyte immunosensor for the simultaneous detection of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) that uses reduced graphene oxide-tetraethylene pentamine (rGO-TEPA) that directly adsorbs metal ions as labels is reported. rGO-TEPA contains a large number of amino groups and has excellent conductivity, making it an ideal template for the loading of Pb(2+) and Cu(2+), which greatly amplifies the detection signals. The signals could be directly detected in a single run through differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), and each biorecognition event produces a distinct voltammetric peak. The position and size of each peak reflects the identity and the level of the corresponding antigen. Primarily designed for an application in a sandwich-type immunoassay based on Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) labels, two main challenges are accomplished with the herein presented nanosheets: fabrication of the template and the amination process for Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) adsorption. To further improve the analytical performance of the immunosensor, Au@bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanospheres synthesized through a "green" synthesis route were used as a sensor platform, which not only provides a biocompatible microenvironment for the immobilization of antibodies but also amplifies the electrochemical signals. Under optimal conditions, hsCRP and sCD40L could be assayed in the range of 0.05 to 100 ng mL(-1) with detection limits of 16.7 and 13.1 pg mL(-1) (S/N=3), respectively. The assay results on clinical serum samples with the proposed immunosensor were in acceptable agreement with those using the standard single-analyte test of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This novel immunosensing system provides a simple, sensitive and low-cost approach for a multianalyte immunoassay. PMID:25985199

  17. In-Depth Analysis of a Plasma or Serum Proteome Using a 4D Protein Profiling Method

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Yao; Beer, Lynn A.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human plasma or serum has been a major strategy used to identify biomarkers that serve as indicators of disease. However, such in-depth proteomic analyses are challenging due to the complexity and extremely large dynamic range of protein concentrations in plasma. Therefore, reduction in sample complexity through multidimensional pre-fractionation strategies is critical, particularly for the detection of low-abundance proteins that have the potential to be the most specific disease biomarkers. We describe here a 4D protein profiling method that we developed for comprehensive proteomic analyses of both plasma and serum. Our method consists of abundant protein depletion coupled with separation strategies – microscale solution isoelectrofocusing and 1D SDS-PAGE – followed by reversed-phase separation of tryptic peptides prior to LC–MS/MS. Using this profiling strategy, we routinely identify a large number of proteins over nine orders of magnitude, including a substantial number of proteins at the low ng/mL or lower levels from approximately 300 μL of plasma sample. PMID:21468940

  18. Effect of caffeine on the plasma protein binding and the disposition of ceftriaxone.

    PubMed

    Kwon, K I; Bourne, D W; Ho, P C

    1985-11-01

    The effects of caffeine on the in-vitro protein binding and the pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone (a highly protein bound cephalosporin) were investigated. Caffeine failed to decrease in-vitro protein binding of ceftriaxone. Rabbit plasma concentrations of ceftriaxone (30 mg kg-1 i.v.) were elevated significantly (P less than 0.05 at 0.3, 0.6 and 1 h after injection) when caffeine 5 or 10 mg kg-1 i.v. was co-administered compared with ceftriaxone given alone. Caffeine increased the volume of distribution of the central compartment (V1) for ceftriaxone significantly from 49 +/- 38 ml kg-1 (mean +/- s.d., n = 6) to 97 +/- 33 ml kg-1 (caffeine 5 mg kg-1, P less than 0.05), and 94 +/- 8 ml kg-1 (caffeine 10 mg kg-1, P less than 0.05) and decreased the volume of distribution of the peripheral compartment (V2) from 145 +/- 106 ml kg-1 (mean +/- s.d., n = 6) to 31 +/- 18 ml kg-1 (caffeine 5 mg kg-1, P less than 0.5) and 36 +/- 31 ml kg-1 (caffeine 10 mg kg-1, P less than 0.1). The rate of transfer of ceftriaxone to the peripheral compartment (k12) was also decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) after caffeine. The elevated plasma concentration of ceftriaxone, increased V1 value and the decreased V2 and k12 values are probably the result of caffeine altering the distribution of ceftriaxone to the central and the peripheral compartments. PMID:2867172

  19. N2 Gas Plasma Inactivates Influenza Virus by Inducing Changes in Viral Surface Morphology, Protein, and Genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2013-01-01

    We have recently treated with N2 gas plasma and achieved inactivation of bacteria. However, the effect of N2 gas plasma on viruses remains unclear. With the aim of developing this technique, we analyzed the virucidal effect of N2 gas plasma on influenza virus and its influence on the viral components. We treated influenza virus particles with inert N2 gas plasma (1.5 kpps; kilo pulses per second) produced by a short high-voltage pulse generated from a static induction thyristor power supply. A bioassay using chicken embryonated eggs demonstrated that N2 gas plasma inactivated influenza virus in allantoic fluid within 5 min. Immunochromatography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Coomassie brilliant blue staining showed that N2 gas plasma treatment of influenza A and B viruses in nasal aspirates and allantoic fluids as well as purified influenza A and B viruses induced degradation of viral proteins including nucleoprotein. Analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that N2 gas plasma treatment induced changes in the viral RNA genome. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that aggregation and fusion of influenza viruses were induced by N2 gas plasma treatment. We believe these biochemical changes may contribute to the inactivation of influenza viruses by N2 gas plasma. PMID:24195077

  20. N 2 gas plasma inactivates influenza virus by inducing changes in viral surface morphology, protein, and genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have recently treated with N2 gas plasma and achieved inactivation of bacteria. However, the effect of N2 gas plasma on viruses remains unclear. With the aim of developing this technique, we analyzed the virucidal effect of N2 gas plasma on influenza virus and its influence on the viral components. We treated influenza virus particles with inert N2 gas plasma (1.5 kpps; kilo pulses per second) produced by a short high-voltage pulse generated from a static induction thyristor power supply. A bioassay using chicken embryonated eggs demonstrated that N2 gas plasma inactivated influenza virus in allantoic fluid within 5 min. Immunochromatography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Coomassie brilliant blue staining showed that N2 gas plasma treatment of influenza A and B viruses in nasal aspirates and allantoic fluids as well as purified influenza A and B viruses induced degradation of viral proteins including nucleoprotein. Analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that N2 gas plasma treatment induced changes in the viral RNA genome. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that aggregation and fusion of influenza viruses were induced by N2 gas plasma treatment. We believe these biochemical changes may contribute to the inactivation of influenza viruses by N2 gas plasma. PMID:24195077

  1. Multi-site assessment of the precision and reproducibility of multiple reaction monitoring-based measurements of proteins in plasma.

    PubMed

    Addona, Terri A; Abbatiello, Susan E; Schilling, Birgit; Skates, Steven J; Mani, D R; Bunk, David M; Spiegelman, Clifford H; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Ham, Amy-Joan L; Keshishian, Hasmik; Hall, Steven C; Allen, Simon; Blackman, Ronald K; Borchers, Christoph H; Buck, Charles; Cardasis, Helene L; Cusack, Michael P; Dodder, Nathan G; Gibson, Bradford W; Held, Jason M; Hiltke, Tara; Jackson, Angela; Johansen, Eric B; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Li, Jing; Mesri, Mehdi; Neubert, Thomas A; Niles, Richard K; Pulsipher, Trenton C; Ransohoff, David; Rodriguez, Henry; Rudnick, Paul A; Smith, Derek; Tabb, David L; Tegeler, Tony J; Variyath, Asokan M; Vega-Montoto, Lorenzo J; Wahlander, Asa; Waldemarson, Sofia; Wang, Mu; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Lei; Anderson, N Leigh; Fisher, Susan J; Liebler, Daniel C; Paulovich, Amanda G; Regnier, Fred E; Tempst, Paul; Carr, Steven A

    2009-07-01

    Verification of candidate biomarkers relies upon specific, quantitative assays optimized for selective detection of target proteins, and is increasingly viewed as a critical step in the discovery pipeline that bridges unbiased biomarker discovery to preclinical validation. Although individual laboratories have demonstrated that multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) coupled with isotope dilution mass spectrometry can quantify candidate protein biomarkers in plasma, reproducibility and transferability of these assays between laboratories have not been demonstrated. We describe a multilaboratory study to assess reproducibility, recovery, linear dynamic range and limits of detection and quantification of multiplexed, MRM-based assays, conducted by NCI-CPTAC. Using common materials and standardized protocols, we demonstrate that these assays can be highly reproducible within and across laboratories and instrument platforms, and are sensitive to low mug/ml protein concentrations in unfractionated plasma. We provide data and benchmarks against which individual laboratories can compare their performance and evaluate new technologies for biomarker verification in plasma. PMID:19561596

  2. Glycotope Sharing between Snail Hemolymph and Larval Schistosomes: Larval Transformation Products Alter Shared Glycan Patterns of Plasma Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Timothy P.; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Hongdi; Gonzalez, Laura A.; Deelder, André M.; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the involvement of inducible, highly diverse lectin-like recognition molecules in snail hemocyte-mediated responses to larval Schistosoma mansoni. Because host lectins likely are involved in initial parasite recognition, we sought to identify specific carbohydrate structures (glycans) shared between larval S. mansoni and its host Biomphalaria glabrata to address possible mechanisms of immune avoidance through mimicry of elements associated with the host immunoreactivity. A panel of monoclonal antibodies (mABs) to specific S. mansoni glycans was used to identify the distribution and abundance of shared glycan epitopes (glycotopes) on plasma glycoproteins from B. glabrata strains that differ in their susceptibilities to infection by S. mansoni. In addition, a major aim of this study was to determine if larval transformation products (LTPs) could bind to plasma proteins, and thereby alter the glycotopes exposed on plasma proteins in a snail strain-specific fashion. Plasma fractions (<100 kDa/>100 kDa) from susceptible (NMRI) and resistant (BS-90) snail strains were subjected to SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses using mAB to LacdiNAc (LDN), fucosylated LDN variants, Lewis X and trimannosyl core glycans. Results confirmed a high degree of glycan sharing, with NMRI plasma exhibiting a greater distribution/abundance of LDN, F-LDN and F-LDN-F than BS-90 plasma (<100 kDa fraction). Pretreatment of blotted proteins with LTPs significantly altered the reactivity of specific mABs to shared glycotopes on blots, mainly through the binding of LTPs to plasma proteins resulting in either glycotope blocking or increased glycotope attachment to plasma. Many LTP-mediated changes in shared glycans were snail-strain specific, especially those in the <100 kDa fraction for NMRI plasma proteins, and for BS-90, mainly those in the >100 kDa fraction. Our data suggest that differential binding of S. mansoni LTPs to plasma proteins of susceptible and resistant B

  3. Glycotope sharing between snail hemolymph and larval schistosomes: larval transformation products alter shared glycan patterns of plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Timothy P; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Hongdi; Gonzalez, Laura A; Deelder, André M; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the involvement of inducible, highly diverse lectin-like recognition molecules in snail hemocyte-mediated responses to larval Schistosoma mansoni. Because host lectins likely are involved in initial parasite recognition, we sought to identify specific carbohydrate structures (glycans) shared between larval S. mansoni and its host Biomphalaria glabrata to address possible mechanisms of immune avoidance through mimicry of elements associated with the host immunoreactivity. A panel of monoclonal antibodies (mABs) to specific S. mansoni glycans was used to identify the distribution and abundance of shared glycan epitopes (glycotopes) on plasma glycoproteins from B. glabrata strains that differ in their susceptibilities to infection by S. mansoni. In addition, a major aim of this study was to determine if larval transformation products (LTPs) could bind to plasma proteins, and thereby alter the glycotopes exposed on plasma proteins in a snail strain-specific fashion. Plasma fractions (< 100 kDa/> 100 kDa) from susceptible (NMRI) and resistant (BS-90) snail strains were subjected to SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses using mAB to LacdiNAc (LDN), fucosylated LDN variants, Lewis X and trimannosyl core glycans. Results confirmed a high degree of glycan sharing, with NMRI plasma exhibiting a greater distribution/abundance of LDN, F-LDN and F-LDN-F than BS-90 plasma (< 100 kDa fraction). Pretreatment of blotted proteins with LTPs significantly altered the reactivity of specific mABs to shared glycotopes on blots, mainly through the binding of LTPs to plasma proteins resulting in either glycotope blocking or increased glycotope attachment to plasma. Many LTP-mediated changes in shared glycans were snail-strain specific, especially those in the < 100 kDa fraction for NMRI plasma proteins, and for BS-90, mainly those in the > 100 kDa fraction. Our data suggest that differential binding of S. mansoni LTPs to plasma proteins of susceptible and resistant B

  4. Effects of Chinese herbal medicine on plasma glucose, protein and energy metabolism in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of antibiotics in animal diets is facing negative feedback due to the hidden danger of drug residues to human health. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine has been used to replace antibiotics in the past two decades and played an increasingly important role in livestock production. The present study was carried out to assess the feeding effects of a traditional nourishing Chinese herbal medicine mixture on kinetics of plasma glucose, protein and energy metabolism in sheep. Ruminal fermentation characteristics were also determined. Methods Four sheep were fed on either mixed hay (MH-diet) or MH-diet supplemented with 2% of Chinese herbal medicine (mixture of Astragalus root, Angelica root and Atractylodes rhizome; CHM-diet) over two 35-day periods using a crossover design. The turnover rate of plasma glucose was measured with an isotope dilution method using [U-13C]glucose. The rates of plasma leucine turnover and leucine oxidation, whole body protein synthesis (WBPS) and metabolic heat production were measured using the [1-13C]leucine dilution and open circuit calorimetry. Results Body weight gain of sheep was higher (P = 0.03) for CHM-diet than for MH-diet. Rumen pH was lower (P = 0.02), concentration of rumen total volatile fatty acid tended to be higher (P = 0.05) and acetate was higher (P = 0.04) for CHM-diet than for MH-diet. Turnover rates of plasma glucose and leucine did not differ between diets. Oxidation rate of leucine tended to be higher (P = 0.06) for CHM-diet than for MH-diet, but the WBPS did not differ between diets. Metabolic heat production tended to be greater (P = 0.05) for CHM-diet than for MH-diet. Conclusions The sheep fed on CHM-diet had a higher body weight gain and showed positive impacts on rumen fermentation and energy metabolism without resulting in any adverse response. Therefore, these results suggested that the Chinese herbal medicine mixture should be considered as a potential feed additive

  5. Binding of lithium and boron to human plasma proteins II: results for a bipolar patient not on lithium therapy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, W Brian; Guscott, Richard; Lindstrom, Richard M

    2004-02-01

    We report further measurements of lithium and boron bound to human plasma proteins using the techniques of gel chromatography, thermal-neutron activation, and high-sensitivity helium isotope mass spectrometry. The plasma sample was donated by a bipolar patient who had never been on lithium therapy. The plasma lithium-binding pattern for the bipolar patient is distinctly different from that previously observed in this laboratory for plasma donated by a normal individual. In the bipolar case, virtually all of the lithium is bound to low-molecular-weight proteins (approx 1000 amu), whereas in the normal case, most of the lithium eluted from the gel column was bound to five high-molecular-weight proteins (approx 50,000 amu to approx 1,000,000 amu). The gel elution profiles for boron were roughly similar for the normal and bipolar cases. The lithium results are in agreement with our previous speculation that lithium-binding plasma proteins are missing or exist in very low concentrations in some individuals suffering from affective disorders. PMID:14985622

  6. Identification of cDNA clones encoding valosin-containing protein and other plant plasma membrane-associated proteins by a general immunoscreening strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, J; Dixon, R A; Gonzales, R A; Kjellbom, P; Bhattacharyya, M K

    1995-01-01

    An approach was developed for the isolation and characterization of soybean plasma membrane-associated proteins by immunoscreening of a cDNA expression library. An antiserum was raised against purified plasma membrane vesicles. In a differential screening of approximately 500,000 plaque-forming units with the anti-(plasma membrane) serum and DNA probes derived from highly abundant clones isolated in a preliminary screening, 261 clones were selected from approximately 1,200 antiserum-positive plaques. These clones were classified into 40 groups by hybridization analysis and 5'- and 3'-terminal sequencing. By searching nucleic acid and protein sequence data bases, 11 groups of cDNAs were identified, among which valosin-containing protein (VCP), clathrin heavy chain, phospholipase C, and S-adenosylmethionine:delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase have not to date been cloned from plants. The remaining 29 groups did not match any current data base entries and may, therefore, represent additional or yet uncharacterized genes. A full-length cDNA encoding the soybean VCP was sequenced. The high level of amino acid identity with vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein indicates that the soybean protein is a plant homolog of vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753826

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of radioactive and fluorescent residualizing labels for identifying sites of plasma protein catabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, J.L.; Baynes, J.W.; Thorpe, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    Inulin and lactose were each coupled to tyramine by reductive amination with NaBH/sub 3/CN and the tyramine then labeled with /sup 125/I. Dilactitol-/sup 125/I-tyramine (DLT) and inulin-/sup 125/I-tyramine (InTn) were coupled by reductive amination and cyanuric chloride, respectively, to asialofetuin (ASF), fetuin and rat serum albumin (RSA). Attachment of either label had no effect on the circulating half-lives of the proteins. Radioactivity from labeled ASF was recovered in rat liver (> 90%) by 1 h post-injection and remained in liver with half-lives of 2 and 6 days, respectively, for the DLT and InTn labels. Whole body recoveries of radioactivity from DLT- and InTn labels. Whole body recoveries of radioactivity from DLT- and InTn-labeled RSA were 5 and 6.5 days, respectively, again indicating that the larger glycoconjugate label residualized more efficiently in cells following protein degradation. (Lactitol)/sub 2/-N-CH/sub 2/-CH/sub 2/-NH-fluroescein (DLF) was also coupled to ASF by reductive amination and recovered quantitatively in liver at 1 h post-injection. Native ASF was an effective competitor for clearance of DLF-ASF from the circulation. Fluorescent degradation products were retained in liver with a half-life of 1.2 days. Residualizing fluorescent labels should be useful for identification and sorting of cells active in the degradation of plasma proteins.

  8. Rapid changes in plasma membrane protein phosphorylation during initiation of cell wall digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Blowers, D.P.; Boss, W.F.; Trewavas, A.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at M{sub r} 22,000. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic {sup 32}P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselas preparation was required for the observed responses.

  9. Mutational scanning reveals the determinants of protein insertion and association energetics in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan; Biran, Ido; Fridman, Yearit; Bibi, Eitan; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Insertion of helix-forming segments into the membrane and their association determines the structure, function, and expression levels of all plasma membrane proteins. However, systematic and reliable quantification of membrane-protein energetics has been challenging. We developed a deep mutational scanning method to monitor the effects of hundreds of point mutations on helix insertion and self-association within the bacterial inner membrane. The assay quantifies insertion energetics for all natural amino acids at 27 positions across the membrane, revealing that the hydrophobicity of biological membranes is significantly higher than appreciated. We further quantitate the contributions to membrane-protein insertion from positively charged residues at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and reveal large and unanticipated differences among these residues. Finally, we derive comprehensive mutational landscapes in the membrane domains of Glycophorin A and the ErbB2 oncogene, and find that insertion and self-association are strongly coupled in receptor homodimers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12125.001 PMID:26824389

  10. Plasma membrane protein polarity and trafficking in RPE cells: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Guillermo L.; Benedicto, Ignacio; Philp, Nancy J.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) comprises a monolayer of polarized pigmented epithelial cells that is strategically interposed between the neural retina and the fenestrated choroid capillaries. The RPE performs a variety of vectorial transport functions (water, ions, metabolites, nutrients and waste products) that regulate the composition of the subretinal space and support the functions of photoreceptors (PRs) and other cells in the neural retina. To this end, RPE cells display a polarized distribution of channels, transporters and receptors in their plasma membrane (PM) that is remarkably different from that found in conventional extra-ocular epithelia, e.g. intestine, kidney, and gall bladder. This characteristic PM protein polarity of RPE cells depends on the interplay of sorting signals in the RPE PM proteins and sorting mechanisms and biosynthetic/recycling trafficking routes in the RPE cell. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the RPE trafficking machinery, most available data have been obtained from immortalized RPE cell lines that only partially maintain the RPE phenotype and by extrapolation of data obtained in the prototype Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. The increasing availability of RPE cell cultures that more closely resemble the RPE in vivo together with the advent of advanced live imaging microscopy techniques provides a platform and an opportunity to rapidly expand our understanding of how polarized protein trafficking contributes to RPE PM polarity. PMID:25152359

  11. Purification and identification of the fusicoccin binding protein from oat root plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H; Watson, B A; Cleland, R E

    1989-01-01

    Fusicoccin (FC), a fungal phytotoxin, stimulates the H(+) -ATPase located in the plasma membrane (PM) of higher plants. The first event in the reaction chain leading to enhanced H(+) -efflux seems to be the binding of FC to a FC-binding protein (FCBP) in the PM. We solubilized 90% of the FCBP from oat (Avena sativa L. cv Victory) root PM in an active form with 1% octyl-glucoside. The FCBP was stabilized by the presence of protease inhibitors. The FCBP was purified by affinity chromatography using FC-linked adipic acid dihydrazide agarose (FC-AADA). Upon elution with 8 molar urea, two major protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyaerylamide gel electrophoresis with molecular weights of 29,700 and 31,000 were obtained. Successive chromatography on BBAB Bio-Gel A, hexyl agarose, and FC-AADA resulted in the same two bands when the FC-AADA was eluted with sodium dodecyl sulfate. A direct correlation was made between 3H-FC-binding activity and the presence of the two protein bands. The stoichiometry of the 29,700 and 31,000 molecular weight bands was 1:2. This suggests that the FCBP occurs in the native form as a heterotrimer with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 92,000. PMID:11537448

  12. Myelin Basic Protein Induces Neuron-Specific Toxicity by Directly Damaging the Neuronal Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Sixin; Liu, Xiao; Jin, Jinghua; Ren, Yi; Luo, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP). MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage. PMID:25255088

  13. Purification and identification of the fusicoccin binding protein from oat root plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Boer, A. H.; Watson, B. A.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    Fusicoccin (FC), a fungal phytotoxin, stimulates the H(+) -ATPase located in the plasma membrane (PM) of higher plants. The first event in the reaction chain leading to enhanced H(+) -efflux seems to be the binding of FC to a FC-binding protein (FCBP) in the PM. We solubilized 90% of the FCBP from oat (Avena sativa L. cv Victory) root PM in an active form with 1% octyl-glucoside. The FCBP was stabilized by the presence of protease inhibitors. The FCBP was purified by affinity chromatography using FC-linked adipic acid dihydrazide agarose (FC-AADA). Upon elution with 8 molar urea, two major protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyaerylamide gel electrophoresis with molecular weights of 29,700 and 31,000 were obtained. Successive chromatography on BBAB Bio-Gel A, hexyl agarose, and FC-AADA resulted in the same two bands when the FC-AADA was eluted with sodium dodecyl sulfate. A direct correlation was made between 3H-FC-binding activity and the presence of the two protein bands. The stoichiometry of the 29,700 and 31,000 molecular weight bands was 1:2. This suggests that the FCBP occurs in the native form as a heterotrimer with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 92,000.

  14. A comparison of adsorbed and grafted fibronectin coatings under static and dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Montaño-Machado, Vanessa; Hugoni, Ludivine; Díaz-Rodríguez, Sergio; Tolouei, Ranna; Chevallier, Pascale; Pauthe, Emmanuel; Mantovani, Diego

    2016-09-21

    Coatings for medical devices are expected to improve their surface biocompatibility mainly by being bioactive, i.e. stimulating healing-oriented interactions with living cells, tissues and organs. In particular, for stent applications, coatings are often designed to enhance the endothelialization process. The coating strategy will be primarily responsible for the interfacial properties between the substrate and the coating, which must show high stability. Therefore, the present work aims at comparing the stability of adsorbed and grafted fibronectin, a protein well-known to promote endothelialization. Fibronectin coatings were deposited on fluorocarbon films generated by a plasma-based process on stainless steel substrates. Then, deformation tests were performed in order to simulate the stenting procedure and stability tests were completed under static and under-flow conditions. Coatings were characterized by XPS, AFM, water contact angle, immunostaining and ToF-SIMS analyses. The results show higher stability for the grafted coatings; indeed, the integrity of the protein simply adsorbed was strongly compromised especially after under-flow tests. Both coatings exhibited similar behavior after deformation and static tests. These results clearly show the impact of the coating strategy on the overall stability of the coatings as well as the importance of under-flow investigations. PMID:27546569

  15. PLASMA PROTEIN Z CONCENTRATIONS IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH IDIOPATHIC INTRAUTERINE BLEEDING AND IN WOMEN WITH SPONTANEOUS PRETERM LABOR

    PubMed Central

    Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Espinoza, Jimmy; Romero, Roberto; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Nien, Jyh Kae; Kim, Chong Jai; Erez, Offer; Soto, Eleazar; Fareed, Jawed; Edwin, Sam; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Than, Nandor G.; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Gomez, Ricardo; Papp, Zoltan; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Preterm parturition has been associated with decidual vascular disorders and excessive thrombin generation. The objective of this study was to examine maternal plasma concentrations of protein Z in normal pregnancies, as well as in those presenting with spontaneous preterm labor (PTL) and intrauterine bleeding during pregnancy. Study design A cross-sectional study was designed to include patients with preterm labor and intact membranes and those with idiopathic intrauterine bleeding during pregnancy. Protein Z plasma concentrations were measured in the following groups: 1) normal pregnant women (n=71); 2) patients at term with (n=67) and without labor (n=88); 3) patients with spontaneous PTL before 34 weeks who were classified into: a) PTL with intra-amniotic infection/inflammation (IAI; n=35), b) PTL without IAI (n=54), and c) patients with PTL who delivered at term (n=49); and 4) patients with idiopathic intrauterine bleeding in the second and third trimester who were divided into: a) subsequent spontaneous PTL and delivery, and b) term delivery. Maternal plasma protein Z concentration was measured by a specific and sensitive immunoassay. Moreover, the amniotic fluid concentration of protein Z was determined in a subset of patients with preterm labor (n=30). Results 1) There was no correlation between maternal plasma protein Z concentration and gestational age in normal pregnant women. 2) The mean maternal plasma concentration of protein Z was significantly lower in women during spontaneous labor at term than in those not in labor [mean: 2.15 μg/mL (95% CI: 2.01-2.29) vs. mean: 2.45 ± 0.52 μg/mL (95% CI: 2.34-2.56), respectively; p=0.001]; 3) Women with PTL without IAI who delivered preterm had a significantly lower mean protein Z concentration than normal pregnant women [mean: 2.12 μg/mL (95% CI: 1.98-2.26) vs. mean: 2.39 μg/mL (95% CI: 2.28-2.5); p=0.008); 4) Of interest, PTL with IAI was not associated with lower plasma concentrations of protein

  16. A Common Missense Variant in the Glucokinase Regulatory Protein Gene (GCKR) Is Associated with Increased Plasma Triglyceride and C-Reactive Protein but Lower Fasting Glucose Concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE-Using the genome-wide-association approach, we recently identified the glucokinase regulatory protein gene (GCKR, rs780094) region as a novel quantitative trait locus for plasma triglyceride concentration in Europeans. Here, we sought to study the association of GCKR variants with metaboli...

  17. A high-capacity hydrophobic adsorbent for human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Belew, M; Peterson, E A; Porath, J

    1985-12-01

    A simple method, based on salting out hydrophobic interaction chromatography, for the efficient removal of trace amounts of serum albumin from partially purified protein preparations is described. The method is also successfully applied for the purification of albumin from Cohn fraction IV, a by-product obtained from the commercial fractionation of human serum proteins by the ethanol precipitation procedure. About 70% of the adsorbed albumin can be eluted by buffer of low ionic strength and can thus be lyophilized directly, if required. The adsorbent can be used for several cycles of adsorption and desorption without affecting its selectivity or capacity. Its adsorption properties and capacity for serum albumin are compared with those of the commercially available adsorbent Blue Sepharose CL-6B. PMID:3879424

  18. Ultracentrifugation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for metal-protein equilibrium studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Holcombe, James A.

    2012-10-01

    The coupling of separation by preparative ultracentrifugation and metal detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been explored for metal-protein equilibrium determinations. This study characterizes the stoichiometry as well as apparent (Kapp) and intrinsic (Kint) binding affinities of the metal-protein association for a model protein. In particular, the affinity of Cu2 + for the high affinity binding site in bovine serum albumin (BSA) is determined. Once equilibrium is established between Cu2 + and BSA, preparative ultracentrifugation moves the metalloprotein away from the meniscus, leaving unbound equilibrium copper in the protein free solution. Since the initial (total) concentrations of purified BSA and Cu2 + can be determined, the free copper concentration at equilibrium can also be determined by taking a small aliquot above the sedimenting boundary for analysis using ICP-MS. This analysis allows for the determination of free Cu2 + ion, which is identical to the equilibrium concentration prior to ultracentrifugation. From these data Kapp and Kint were determined at two different conditions, 100 mM Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) at pH 9.53 and pH 7.93. log Kapp values of 17.6 and 14.6 were determined at pH 9.53 and pH 7.93, respectively. Furthermore, pH-independent log Kint values of - 1.43 and - 1.04 were determined at pH 9.53 and 7.93, respectively. While the log Kint at pH 9.53 was in good agreement with literature values obtained from alternative methods, Kint at pH 7.93 was about 2.5 × larger than previously reported. BSA undergoes a structural rearrangement between pH 7-9, and the generally accepted pH-dependency of protein tertiary structure may be responsible for the variations in the "intrinsic" binding constant. The Cu-BSA binding affinity was also monitored in 100 mM Tris 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution at pH 7.93 in order to determine the effect of a denaturant on metal binding. Results for both log

  19. Allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent for removing endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-10-01

    In this study we present a simple and robust method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions by using crystals of the small-molecule compound 2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl urea (allantoin) as a solid phase adsorbent. Allantoin crystalline powder is added to a protein solution at supersaturated concentrations, endotoxins bind and undissolved allantoin crystals with bound endotoxins are removed by filtration or centrifugation. This method removes an average of 99.98% endotoxin for 20 test proteins. The average protein recovery is ∼80%. Endotoxin binding is largely independent of pH, conductivity, reducing agent and various organic solvents. This is consistent with a hydrogen-bond based binding mechanism. Allantoin does not affect protein activity and stability, and the use of allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent provides better endotoxin removal than anion exchange, polymixin affinity and biological affinity methods for endotoxin clearance. PMID:24001944

  20. Nanosize electropositive fibrous adsorbent

    DOEpatents

    Tepper, Frederick; Kaledin, Leonid

    2005-01-04

    Aluminum hydroxide fibers approximately 2 nanometers in diameter and with surface areas ranging from 200 to 650 m.sup.2 /g have been fount to be highly electropositive. When dispersed in water they are able to attach to and retain electronegative particles. When combined into a composite filter with other fibers or particles they can filter bacteria and nano size particulates such as viruses and colloidal particles at high flux through the filter. Such filters can be used for purification and sterilization of water, biological, medical and pharmaceutical fluids, and as a collector/concentrator for detection and assay of mirobes and viruses. The alumina fibers are also capable of filtering sub-micron inorganic and metallic particles to produce ultra pure water. The fibers are suitable as a substrate for growth of cells. Macromolicules such as proteins may be separated from each other based on their electronegative charges.

  1. Implications of Plasma Protein Binding for Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of the γ-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianmei; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Matherly, Larry H.; Li, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Understanding of plasma protein binding will provide mechanistic insights into drug interactions or unusual pharmacokinetic properties. This study investigated RO4929097 binding in plasma and its implications for the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of this compound. Experimental Design RO4929097 binding to plasma proteins was determined using a validated equilibrium dialysis method. Pharmacokinetics of total and unbound RO4929097 was evaluated in eight patients with breast cancer receiving RO4929097 alone and in combination with the Hedgehog inhibitor GDC-0449. The impact of protein binding on RO4929097 pharmacodynamics was assessed using an in vitro Notch cellular assay. Results RO4929097 was extensively bound in human plasma, with the total binding constant of 1.0 × 106 and 1.8 × 104 L/mol for α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) and albumin, respectively. GDC-0449 competitively inhibited RO4929097 binding to AAG. In patients, RO4929097 fraction unbound (Fu) exhibited large intra- and interindividual variability; GDC-0449 increased RO4929097 Fu by an average of 3.7-fold. Concomitant GDC-0449 significantly decreased total (but not unbound) RO4929097 exposure. RO4929097 Fu was strongly correlated with the total drug exposure. Binding to AAG abrogated RO4929097 in vitro Notch-inhibitory activity. Conclusions RO4929097 is highly bound in human plasma with high affinity to AAG. Changes in plasma protein binding caused by concomitant drug (e.g., GDC-0449) or disease states (e.g., ↑AAG level in cancer) can alter total (but not unbound) RO4929097 exposure. Unbound RO4929097 is pharmacologically active. Monitoring of unbound RO4929097 plasma concentration is recommended to avoid misleading conclusions on the basis of the total drug levels. PMID:22351688

  2. Supplementation of Pork Patties with Bovine Plasma Protein Hydrolysates Augments Antioxidant Properties and Improves Quality.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyun-Woo; Seo, Jin-Kyu; Yang, Han-Sul

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of bovine plasma protein (PP) hydrolysates on the antioxidant and quality properties of pork patties during storage. Pork patties were divided into 4 groups: without butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and PP hydrolysates (control), 0.02% BHT (T1), 1% PP hydrolysates (T2), and 2% PP hydrolysates (T3). Pork patty supplemented with PP hydrolysates had higher pH values and lower weight loss during cooking than the control patties. Results showed that lightness and hardness both decreased upon the addition of PP hydrolysates. All samples containing BHT and PP hydrolysates had reduced TBARS and peroxide values during storage. In particular, 2% PP hydrolysates were more effective in delaying lipid oxidation than were the other treatments. It was concluded that treatment with 2% PP hydrolysates can enhance the acceptance of pork patty. PMID:27194928

  3. Supplementation of Pork Patties with Bovine Plasma Protein Hydrolysates Augments Antioxidant Properties and Improves Quality

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of bovine plasma protein (PP) hydrolysates on the antioxidant and quality properties of pork patties during storage. Pork patties were divided into 4 groups: without butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and PP hydrolysates (control), 0.02% BHT (T1), 1% PP hydrolysates (T2), and 2% PP hydrolysates (T3). Pork patty supplemented with PP hydrolysates had higher pH values and lower weight loss during cooking than the control patties. Results showed that lightness and hardness both decreased upon the addition of PP hydrolysates. All samples containing BHT and PP hydrolysates had reduced TBARS and peroxide values during storage. In particular, 2% PP hydrolysates were more effective in delaying lipid oxidation than were the other treatments. It was concluded that treatment with 2% PP hydrolysates can enhance the acceptance of pork patty. PMID:27194928

  4. Tetraspanins and Transmembrane Adaptor Proteins As Plasma Membrane Organizers—Mast Cell Case

    PubMed Central

    Halova, Ivana; Draber, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains diverse and specialized membrane domains, which include tetraspanin-enriched domains (TEMs) and transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP)-enriched domains. Recent biophysical, microscopic, and functional studies indicated that TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains are involved in compartmentalization of physicochemical events of such important processes as immunoreceptor signal transduction and chemotaxis. Moreover, there is evidence of a cross-talk between TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains. In this review we discuss the presence and function of such domains and their crosstalk using mast cells as a model. The combined data based on analysis of selected mast cell-expressed tetraspanins [cluster of differentiation (CD)9, CD53, CD63, CD81, CD151)] or TRAPs [linker for activation of T cells (LAT), non-T cell activation linker (NTAL), and phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (PAG)] using knockout mice or specific antibodies point to a diversity within these two families and bring evidence of the important roles of these molecules in signaling events. An example of this diversity is physical separation of two TRAPs, LAT and NTAL, which are in many aspects similar but show plasma membrane location in different microdomains in both non-activated and activated cells. Although our understanding of TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these domains are under way. PMID:27243007

  5. Changes in IgG and total plasma protein glycomes in acute systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Novokmet, Mislav; Lukić, Edita; Vučković, Frano; –Durić, Željko; Keser, Toma; Rajšl, Katarina; Remondini, Daniel; Castellani, Gastone; Gašparović, Hrvoje; Gornik, Olga; Lauc, Gordan

    2014-01-01

    Recovery after cardiac surgery is a complex process that has to compensate for both individual variability and extensive tissue damage in the context of systemic inflammation. Protein glycosylation is essential in many steps of the inflammatory cascade, but due to technological limitations the role of individual variation in glycosylation in systemic inflammation has not been addressed until now. We analysed composition of the total plasma and IgG N-glycomes in 107 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. In nearly all individuals plasma N-glycome underwent the same pattern of changes in the first 72 h, revealing a general mechanism of glycosylation changes. To the contrary, changes in the IgG glycome were very individualized. Bi-clustering analysis revealed the existence of four distinct patterns of changes. One of them, characterized by a rapid increase in galactosylated glycoforms, was associated with nearly double mortality risk measured by EuroSCORE II. Our results indicate that individual variation in IgG glycosylation changes during acute systemic inflammation associates with increased mortality risk and indicates new avenues for the development of personalized diagnostic and therapeutic approach. PMID:24614541

  6. The Plasma Membrane Protein Nce102 Implicated in Eisosome Formation Rescues a Heme Defect in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung J; Jeong, Mi-Young; Parnell, Timothy J; Babst, Markus; Phillips, John D; Winge, Dennis R

    2016-08-12

    The cellular transport of the cofactor heme and its biosynthetic intermediates such as protoporphyrin IX is a complex and highly coordinated process. To investigate the molecular details of this trafficking pathway, we created a synthetic lesion in the heme biosynthetic pathway by deleting the gene HEM15 encoding the enzyme ferrochelatase in S. cerevisiae and performed a genetic suppressor screen. Cells lacking Hem15 are respiratory-defective because of an inefficient heme delivery to the mitochondria. Thus, the biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochromes is negatively affected. The suppressor screen resulted in the isolation of respiratory-competent colonies containing two distinct missense mutations in Nce102, a protein that localizes to plasma membrane invaginations designated as eisosomes. The presence of the Nce102 mutant alleles enabled formation of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes and respiratory growth in hem15Δ cells cultured in supplemental hemin. Respiratory function in hem15Δ cells can also be restored by the presence of a heterologous plasma membrane heme permease (HRG-4), but the mode of suppression mediated by the Nce102 mutant is more efficient. Attenuation of the endocytic pathway through deletion of the gene END3 impaired the Nce102-mediated rescue, suggesting that the Nce102 mutants lead to suppression through the yeast endocytic pathway. PMID:27317660

  7. Grafting of bovine serum albumin proteins on plasma-modified polymers for potential application in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasálková, Nikola Slepičková; Slepička, Petr; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hodačová, Petra; Kučková, Štěpánka; Švorčík, Václav

    2014-04-01

    In this work, an influence of bovine serum albumin proteins grafting on the surface properties of plasma-treated polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid was studied. The interaction of the vascular smooth muscle cells with the modified polymer surface was determined. The surface properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nano-LC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry, electrokinetic analysis, and goniometry. One of the motivations for this work is the idea that by the interaction of the cell with substrate surface, the proteins will form an interlayer between the cell and the substrate. It was proven that when interacting with the plasma-treated high-density polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid, the bovine serum albumin protein is grafted on the polymer surface. Since the proteins are bonded to the substrate surface, they can stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation.

  8. Plasma protein binding limits the blood brain barrier permeation of the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Amaraneni, Manoj; Sharma, Anshika; Pang, Jing; Muralidhara, Srinivasa; Cummings, Brian S; White, Catherine A; Bruckner, James V; Zastre, Jason

    2016-05-27

    Previous pharmacokinetic studies of deltamethrin (DLM) have revealed that brain levels of this highly lipophilic pyrethroid insecticide are only 15-20% of plasma levels. Experiments were performed to assess determinants limiting CNS access including plasma protein binding and the efflux transporter, P-gp. A human brain microvascular endothelial cell line, hCMEC/D3, was utilized as a model in vitro system to evaluate blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation. Incubation of DLM with a series of human serum albumin (HSA) concentrations showed that unbound (fu) DLM ranged from 80% with 0.01% HSA to ∼20% at the physiologically-relevant 4% HSA. A positive correlation (R=0.987) was seen between fu and cellular uptake. Concentration-dependent uptake of DLM in 0.01% HSA was non-linear and was reduced at 4°C and by the P-gp inhibitor cyclosporine (CSA), indicative of a specific transport process. Cellular accumulation of [(3)H]-paclitaxel, a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate, was increased by CSA but not by DLM, suggesting that DLM is neither a substrate nor an inhibitor of P-gp. The concentration-dependent uptake of DLM from 4% HSA was linear and not significantly impacted by temperature or CSA. In situ brain perfusion studies monitoring brain association of DLM at 0.01% and 4% HSA confirmed the aforementioned in vitro findings. This study demonstrates that brain uptake of DLM under normal physiological conditions appears to be a passive, non-saturable process, limited by the high protein binding of the pyrethroid. PMID:27016408

  9. Establishment of reference intervals for plasma protein electrophoresis in Indo-Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas.

    PubMed

    Flint, Mark; Matthews, Beren J; Limpus, Colin J; Mills, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and haematological parameters are increasingly used to diagnose disease in green sea turtles. Specific clinical pathology tools, such as plasma protein electrophoresis analysis, are now being used more frequently to improve our ability to diagnose disease in the live animal. Plasma protein reference intervals were calculated from 55 clinically healthy green sea turtles using pulsed field electrophoresis to determine pre-albumin, albumin, α-, β- and γ-globulin concentrations. The estimated reference intervals were then compared with data profiles from clinically unhealthy turtles admitted to a local wildlife hospital to assess the validity of the derived intervals and identify the clinically useful plasma protein fractions. Eighty-six per cent {19 of 22 [95% confidence interval (CI) 65-97]} of clinically unhealthy turtles had values outside the derived reference intervals, including the following: total protein [six of 22 turtles or 27% (95% CI 11-50%)], pre-albumin [two of five, 40% (95% CI 5-85%)], albumin [13 of 22, 59% (95% CI 36-79%)], total albumin [13 of 22, 59% (95% CI 36-79%)], α- [10 of 22, 45% (95% CI 24-68%)], β- [two of 10, 20% (95% CI 3-56%)], γ- [one of 10, 10% (95% CI 0.3-45%)] and β-γ-globulin [one of 12, 8% (95% CI 0.2-38%)] and total globulin [five of 22, 23% (8-45%)]. Plasma protein electrophoresis shows promise as an accurate adjunct tool to identify a disease state in marine turtles. This study presents the first reference interval for plasma protein electrophoresis in the Indo-Pacific green sea turtle. PMID:27293722

  10. Establishment of reference intervals for plasma protein electrophoresis in Indo-Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Mark; Matthews, Beren J.; Limpus, Colin J.; Mills, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and haematological parameters are increasingly used to diagnose disease in green sea turtles. Specific clinical pathology tools, such as plasma protein electrophoresis analysis, are now being used more frequently to improve our ability to diagnose disease in the live animal. Plasma protein reference intervals were calculated from 55 clinically healthy green sea turtles using pulsed field electrophoresis to determine pre-albumin, albumin, α-, β- and γ-globulin concentrations. The estimated reference intervals were then compared with data profiles from clinically unhealthy turtles admitted to a local wildlife hospital to assess the validity of the derived intervals and identify the clinically useful plasma protein fractions. Eighty-six per cent {19 of 22 [95% confidence interval (CI) 65–97]} of clinically unhealthy turtles had values outside the derived reference intervals, including the following: total protein [six of 22 turtles or 27% (95% CI 11–50%)], pre-albumin [two of five, 40% (95% CI 5–85%)], albumin [13 of 22, 59% (95% CI 36–79%)], total albumin [13 of 22, 59% (95% CI 36–79%)], α- [10 of 22, 45% (95% CI 24–68%)], β- [two of 10, 20% (95% CI 3–56%)], γ- [one of 10, 10% (95% CI 0.3–45%)] and β–γ-globulin [one of 12, 8% (95% CI 0.2–38%)] and total globulin [five of 22, 23% (8–45%)]. Plasma protein electrophoresis shows promise as an accurate adjunct tool to identify a disease state in marine turtles. This study presents the first reference interval for plasma protein electrophoresis in the Indo-Pacific green sea turtle.

  11. Interaction of Human Plasma Proteins with Thin Gelatin-Based Hydrogel Films: A QCM-D and ToF-SIMS Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the fields of surgery and regenerative medicine, it is crucial to understand the interactions of proteins with the biomaterials used as implants. Protein adsorption directly influences cell-material interactions in vivo and, as a result, regulates, for example, cell adhesion on the surface of the implant. Therefore, the development of suitable analytical techniques together with well-defined model systems allowing for the detection, characterization, and quantification of protein adsorbates is essential. In this study, a protocol for the deposition of highly stable, thin gelatin-based films on various substrates has been developed. The hydrogel films were characterized morphologically and chemically. Due to the obtained low thickness of the hydrogel layer, this setup allowed for a quantitative study on the interaction of human proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) with the hydrogel by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring (QCM-D). This technique enables the determination of adsorbant mass and changes in the shear modulus of the hydrogel layer upon adsorption of human proteins. Furthermore, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and principal component analysis was applied to monitor the changed composition of the topmost adsorbate layer. This approach opens interesting perspectives for a sensitive screening of viscoelastic biomaterials that could be used for regenerative medicine. PMID:24956040

  12. A Phospholipid-Protein Complex from Krill with Antioxidative and Immunomodulating Properties Reduced Plasma Triacylglycerol and Hepatic Lipogenesis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramsvik, Marie S.; Bjørndal, Bodil; Bruheim, Inge; Bohov, Pavol; Berge, Rolf K.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary intake of marine omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) can change the plasma profile from atherogenic to cardioprotective. In addition, there is growing evidence that proteins of marine origin may have health benefits. We investigated a phospholipid-protein complex (PPC) from krill that is hypothesized to influence lipid metabolism, inflammation, and redox status. Male Wistar rats were fed a control diet (2% soy oil, 8% lard, 20% casein), or diets where corresponding amounts of casein and lard were replaced with PPC at 3%, 6%, or 11% (wt %), for four weeks. Dietary supplementation with PPC resulted in significantly lower levels of plasma triacylglycerols in the 11% PPC-fed group, probably due to reduced hepatic lipogenesis. Plasma cholesterol levels were also reduced at the highest dose of PPC. In addition, the plasma and liver content of n-3 PUFAs increased while n-6 PUFAs decreased. This was associated with increased total antioxidant capacity in plasma and increased liver gene expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2). Finally, a reduced plasma level of the inflammatory mediator interleukin-2 (IL-2) was detected in the PPC-fed animals. The present data show that PPC has lipid-lowering effects in rats, and may modulate risk factors related to cardiovascular disease progression. PMID:26193284

  13. A Phospholipid-Protein Complex from Krill with Antioxidative and Immunomodulating Properties Reduced Plasma Triacylglycerol and Hepatic Lipogenesis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramsvik, Marie S; Bjørndal, Bodil; Bruheim, Inge; Bohov, Pavol; Berge, Rolf K

    2015-07-01

    Dietary intake of marine omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) can change the plasma profile from atherogenic to cardioprotective. In addition, there is growing evidence that proteins of marine origin may have health benefits. We investigated a phospholipid-protein complex (PPC) from krill that is hypothesized to influence lipid metabolism, inflammation, and redox status. Male Wistar rats were fed a control diet (2% soy oil, 8% lard, 20% casein), or diets where corresponding amounts of casein and lard were replaced with PPC at 3%, 6%, or 11% (wt %), for four weeks. Dietary supplementation with PPC resulted in significantly lower levels of plasma triacylglycerols in the 11% PPC-fed group, probably due to reduced hepatic lipogenesis. Plasma cholesterol levels were also reduced at the highest dose of PPC. In addition, the plasma and liver content of n-3 PUFAs increased while n-6 PUFAs decreased. This was associated with increased total antioxidant capacity in plasma and increased liver gene expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2). Finally, a reduced plasma level of the inflammatory mediator interleukin-2 (IL-2) was detected in the PPC-fed animals. The present data show that PPC has lipid-lowering effects in rats, and may modulate risk factors related to cardiovascular disease progression. PMID:26193284

  14. Relation of plasma calcium to total protein and albumin in African grey (Psittacus erithacus) and Amazon (Amazona spp.) parrots.

    PubMed

    Lumeij, J T

    1990-10-01

    A significant correlation was found between total calcium and albumin concentration in the plasma of 70 African grey parrots (r=0.37; P<0.05). A correlation formula for plasma calcium concentration in the African grey parrot was derived on the basis of the concentration of albumin: Adjusted Ca (mmol/1) = Ca (mmol/1) - 0.015 Albumin (g/1) + 0.4. About 14% of the variability in calcium was attributable to the change in the concentration of plasma albumin concentration (R2=0.137). The correlation between calcium and total protein in African greys and between calcium and albumin and calcium and total protein in Amazons was not significant. PMID:18679980

  15. Detection of Antibodies in Blood Plasma Using Bioluminescent Sensor Proteins and a Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Arts, Remco; den Hartog, Ilona; Zijlema, Stefan E; Thijssen, Vito; van der Beelen, Stan H E; Merkx, Maarten

    2016-04-19

    Antibody detection is of fundamental importance in many diagnostic and bioanalytical assays, yet current detection techniques tend to be laborious and/or expensive. We present a new sensor platform (LUMABS) based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) that allows detection of antibodies directly in solution using a smartphone as the sole piece of equipment. LUMABS are single-protein sensors that consist of the blue-light emitting luciferase NanoLuc connected via a semiflexible linker to the green fluorescent acceptor protein mNeonGreen, which are kept close together using helper domains. Binding of an antibody to epitope sequences flanking the linker disrupts the interaction between the helper domains, resulting in a large decrease in BRET efficiency. The resulting change in color of the emitted light from green-blue to blue can be detected directly in blood plasma, even at picomolar concentrations of antibody. Moreover, the modular architecture of LUMABS allows changing of target specificity by simple exchange of epitope sequences, as demonstrated here for antibodies against HIV1-p17, hemagglutinin (HA), and dengue virus type I. The combination of sensitive ratiometric bioluminescent detection and the intrinsic modularity of the LUMABS design provides an attractive generic platform for point-of-care antibody detection that avoids the complex liquid handling steps associated with conventional immunoassays. PMID:27018236

  16. Anti-angiogenic action of plasma hyaluronan binding protein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ji Won; Song, Hyun Seok; Moon, Eun-Joung; Park, Shi-Young; Son, Myung Jin; Jung, Seung Youn; Kim, Ji Tae; Nam, Do-Hyun; Choi-Miura, Nam-Ho; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Yung-Jin

    2006-07-01

    The kringle domain is a triple loop structure present in angiostatin and endostatin. The disulfide bond-linked kringle architectures have been known to be essential for anti-angiogenic activity. Plasma hyaluronan binding protein (PHBP) is a novel serine protease which consists of three epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains, a kringle domain, and a serine protease domain. PHBP can be cleaved autocatalytically to generate activity and is highly expressed in the human blood and liver. To determine the anti-angiogenic activities of PHBP, we purified recombinant mouse PHBP from stable cell line overexpressing PHBP and used protein in vivo and in vitro angiogenesis assays. We found that recombinant PHBP inhibits not only angiogenesis in vivo in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay but also the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced proliferation, invasion and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependant manner. Moreover, we found that the kringle domain of PHBP was essential for the anti-angiogenic action of PHBP by the deletion mutants. These finding