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Sample records for adsorbed protein molecules

  1. Selective binding of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins onto DNA molecules adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nii, Daisuke; Hayashida, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Ikawa, Shukuko; Shibata, Takehiko; Umemura, Kazuo

    2014-09-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) proteins were treated with hybrids of DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to examine the biological function of the DNA molecules adsorbed on the SWNT surface. When single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was used for the hybridization, significant binding of the SSB molecules to the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids was observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and agarose gel electrophoresis. When double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was used, the SSB molecules did not bind to the dsDNA-SWNT hybrids in most of the conditions that we evaluated. A specifically modified electrophoresis procedure was used to monitor the locations of the DNA, SSB, and SWNT molecules. Our results clearly showed that ssDNA/dsDNA molecules on the SWNT surfaces retained their single-stranded/double-stranded structures.

  2. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  3. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  4. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  5. Imaging the wave functions of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F Stefan; Ramsey, Michael G; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-01-14

    The basis for a quantum-mechanical description of matter is electron wave functions. For atoms and molecules, their spatial distributions and phases are known as orbitals. Although orbitals are very powerful concepts, experimentally only the electron densities and -energy levels are directly observable. Regardless whether orbitals are observed in real space with scanning probe experiments, or in reciprocal space by photoemission, the phase information of the orbital is lost. Here, we show that the experimental momentum maps of angle-resolved photoemission from molecular orbitals can be transformed to real-space orbitals via an iterative procedure which also retrieves the lost phase information. This is demonstrated with images obtained of a number of orbitals of the molecules pentacene (C22H14) and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (C24H8O6), adsorbed on silver, which are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. The procedure requires no a priori knowledge of the orbitals and is shown to be simple and robust.

  6. SPR-MS: from identifying adsorbed molecules to image tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Jean-François; Breault-Turcot, Julien; Forest, Simon; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have become valuable analytical sensors for biomolecule detection. While SPR is heralded with high sensitivity, label-free and real-time detection, nonspecific adsorption and detection of ultralow concentrations remain issues. Nonspecific adsorption can be minimized using adequate surface chemistry. For example, we have employed peptide monolayers to reduce nonspecific adsorption of crude serum or cell lysate. It is important to uncover the nature of molecules nonspecifically adsorbing to surfaces in these biofluids, to further improve understanding of the nonspecific adsorption processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) provides a complementary tool to SPR to identify biomolecule adsorbed to surface. Trypsic digestion of the proteins adsorbed to surfaces led to identification of characteristic peptides from the proteins involved in nonspecific adsorption. Nonspecific adsorption in crude cell lysate results mainly from lipids, as confirmed with SPR and MS but proteins were observed on some surfaces. In another application of SPR and MS, imaging SPR can be used in combination to imaging MS to image tissue sections. Thin sections of mouse liver were inserted in the fluidic chamber of a SPRi instrument and proteins were transferred to the SPRi chip. The SPR chip was then imaged using MALDI imaging MS to identify the biomolecules that were transferred to the SPRi chip.

  7. Chiral switching by spontaneous conformational change in adsorbed organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Sigrid; Busse, Carsten; Petersen, Lars; Rauls, Eva; Hammer, Bjørk; Gothelf, Kurt V; Besenbacher, Flemming; Linderoth, Trolle R

    2006-02-01

    Self-assembly of adsorbed organic molecules is a promising route towards functional surface nano-architectures, and our understanding of associated dynamic processes has been significantly advanced by several scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) investigations. Intramolecular degrees of freedom are widely accepted to influence ordering of complex adsorbates, but although molecular conformation has been identified and even manipulated by STM, the detailed dynamics of spontaneous conformational change in adsorbed molecules has hitherto not been addressed. Molecular surface structures often show important stereochemical effects as, aside from truly chiral molecules, a large class of so-called prochiral molecules become chiral once confined on a surface with an associated loss of symmetry. Here, we investigate a model system in which adsorbed molecules surprisingly switch between enantiomeric forms as they undergo thermally induced conformational changes. The associated kinetic parameters are quantified from time-resolved STM data whereas mechanistic insight is obtained from theoretical modelling. The chiral switching is demonstrated to enable an efficient channel towards formation of extended homochiral surface domains. Our results imply that appropriate prochiral molecules may be induced (for example, by seeding) to assume only one enantiomeric form in surface assemblies, which is of relevance for chiral amplification and asymmetric heterogenous catalysis.

  8. Adsorbed molecules in external fields: Effect of confining potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Ashish; Silotia, Poonam; Maan, Anjali; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational excitation of a molecule adsorbed on a surface. As is well known the interaction potential between the surface and the molecule can be modeled in number of ways, depending on the molecular structure and the geometry under which the molecule is being adsorbed by the surface. We explore the effect of change of confining potential on the excitation, which is largely controlled by the static electric fields and continuous wave laser fields. We focus on dipolar molecules and hence we restrict ourselves to the first order interaction in field-molecule interaction potential either through permanent dipole moment or/and the molecular polarizability parameter. It is shown that confining potential shapes, strength of the confinement, strongly affect the excitation. We compare our results for different confining potentials.

  9. Adsorbed molecules in external fields: Effect of confining potential.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Ashish; Silotia, Poonam; Maan, Anjali; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-12-05

    We study the rotational excitation of a molecule adsorbed on a surface. As is well known the interaction potential between the surface and the molecule can be modeled in number of ways, depending on the molecular structure and the geometry under which the molecule is being adsorbed by the surface. We explore the effect of change of confining potential on the excitation, which is largely controlled by the static electric fields and continuous wave laser fields. We focus on dipolar molecules and hence we restrict ourselves to the first order interaction in field-molecule interaction potential either through permanent dipole moment or/and the molecular polarizability parameter. It is shown that confining potential shapes, strength of the confinement, strongly affect the excitation. We compare our results for different confining potentials.

  10. Forces from periodic charging of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, N.; Decurtins, S.; Liu, S.-X.; Repp, J.

    2017-03-01

    In a recent publication [Kocić et al., Nano Lett. 15, 4406 (2015)], it was shown that gating of molecular levels in the field of an oscillating tip of an atomic force microscope can enable a periodic charging of individual molecules synchronized to the tip's oscillatory motion. Here we discuss further implications of such measurements, namely, how the force difference associated with the single-electron charging manifests itself in atomic force microscopy images and how it can be detected as a function of tip-sample distance. Moreover, we discuss how the critical voltage for the charge-state transition depends on distance and how that relates to the local contact potential difference. These measurements allow also for an estimate of the absolute tip-sample distance.

  11. Conformation Distributions in Adsorbed Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuse, Curtis W.; Hubbard, Joseph B.; Vrettos, John S.; Smith, Jackson R.; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2007-03-01

    While the structural basis of protein function is well understood in the biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, few methods for the characterization and comparison of protein conformation distributions are available. New methods capable of measuring the stability of protein conformations and the integrity of protein-protein, protein-ligand and protein-surface interactions both in solution and on surfaces are needed to help the development of protein-based products. We are developing infrared spectroscopy methods for the characterization and comparison of molecular conformation distributions in monolayers and in solutions. We have extracted an order parameter describing the orientational and conformational variations of protein functional groups around the average molecular values from a single polarized spectrum. We will discuss the development of these methods and compare them to amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange methods for albumin in solution and on different polymer surfaces to show that our order parameter is related to protein stability.

  12. Controlling the magnetism of adsorbed metal-organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Kuch, Wolfgang; Bernien, Matthias

    2017-01-18

    Gaining control on the size or the direction of the magnetic moment of adsorbed metal-organic molecules constitutes an important step towards the realization of a surface-mounted molecular spin electronics. Such control can be gained by taking advantage of interactions of the molecule's magnetic moment with the environment. The paramagnetic moments of adsorbed metal-organic molecules, for example, can be controlled by the interaction with magnetically ordered substrates. Metalloporphyrins and -phthalocyanines display a quasi-planar geometry, allowing the central metal ion to interact with substrate electronic states. This can lead to magnetic coupling with a ferromagnetic or even antiferromagnetic substrate. The molecule-substrate coupling can be mediated and controlled by insertion layers such as oxygen atoms, graphene, or nonmagnetic metal layers. Control on the magnetic properties of adsorbed metalloporphyrins or -phthalocyanines can also be gained by on-surface chemical modification of the molecules. The magnetic moment or the magnetic coupling to ferromagnetic substrates can be changed by adsorption and thermal desorption of small molecules that interact with the fourfold-coordinated metal center via the remaining axial coordination site. Spin-crossover molecules, which possess a metastable spin state that can be switched by external stimuli such as temperature or light, are another promising class of candidates for control of magnetic properties. However, the immobilization of such molecules on a solid surface often results in a quench of the spin transition due to the interaction with the substrate. We present examples of Fe(II) spin-crossover complexes in direct contact with a solid surface that undergo a reversible spin-crossover transition as a function of temperature, by illumination with visible light, or can be switched by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

  13. Controlling the magnetism of adsorbed metal-organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuch, Wolfgang; Bernien, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Gaining control on the size or the direction of the magnetic moment of adsorbed metal-organic molecules constitutes an important step towards the realization of a surface-mounted molecular spin electronics. Such control can be gained by taking advantage of interactions of the molecule’s magnetic moment with the environment. The paramagnetic moments of adsorbed metal-organic molecules, for example, can be controlled by the interaction with magnetically ordered substrates. Metalloporphyrins and -phthalocyanines display a quasi-planar geometry, allowing the central metal ion to interact with substrate electronic states. This can lead to magnetic coupling with a ferromagnetic or even antiferromagnetic substrate. The molecule-substrate coupling can be mediated and controlled by insertion layers such as oxygen atoms, graphene, or nonmagnetic metal layers. Control on the magnetic properties of adsorbed metalloporphyrins or -phthalocyanines can also be gained by on-surface chemical modification of the molecules. The magnetic moment or the magnetic coupling to ferromagnetic substrates can be changed by adsorption and thermal desorption of small molecules that interact with the fourfold-coordinated metal center via the remaining axial coordination site. Spin-crossover molecules, which possess a metastable spin state that can be switched by external stimuli such as temperature or light, are another promising class of candidates for control of magnetic properties. However, the immobilization of such molecules on a solid surface often results in a quench of the spin transition due to the interaction with the substrate. We present examples of Fe(II) spin-crossover complexes in direct contact with a solid surface that undergo a reversible spin-crossover transition as a function of temperature, by illumination with visible light, or can be switched by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

  14. Candidate Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs: Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Chuntai; Hu, Jun; Han, Sungho; Yu, Clare C.; Wu, R. Q.

    2015-08-01

    A major obstacle to using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as qubits is flux noise. We propose that the heretofore mysterious spins producing flux noise could be O2 molecules adsorbed on the surface. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that an O2 molecule adsorbed on an α-alumina surface has a magnetic moment of ˜1.8 μB . The spin is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the O-O bond, the barrier to spin rotations is about 10 mK. Monte Carlo simulations of ferromagnetically coupled, anisotropic X Y spins on a square lattice find 1 /f magnetization noise, consistent with flux noise in Al SQUIDs.

  15. Resonant vibrational excitation of adsorbed molecules by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djamo, V.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1993-11-01

    The vibrational excitation of N2 molecules adsorbed on a silver surface by low energy electron impact is studied within the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The process involves the formation of a transient negative molecular ion. The results account well for the observations of Demuth and co-workers. They also reveal that most of the vibrational excitation corresponds to electrons scattered into the metal and thus unobservable in a scattering experiment.

  16. Multiple species of noninteracting molecules adsorbed on a Bethe lattice.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael; Harris, A B

    2008-10-01

    A simple method, previously used to calculate the equilibrium concentration of dimers adsorbed on a Bethe lattice as a function of the dimer activity, is generalized to solve the problem of a Bethe lattice in contact with a reservoir containing a mixture of molecules. The molecules may have arbitrary sizes and shapes consistent with the geometry of the lattice and the molecules do not interact with one another except for the hard-core restriction that two molecules cannot touch the same site. We obtain a set of simultaneous nonlinear equations, one equation for each species of molecule, which determines the equilibrium concentration of each type of molecule as a function of the (arbitrary) activities of the various species. Surprisingly, regardless of the number of species, the equilibrium concentrations are given explicitly in terms of the solution of a single equation in one unknown which can be solved numerically, if need be. Some numerical examples show that increasing the activity of one species need not necessarily decrease the equilibrium concentration of all other species. We also calculate the adsorption isotherm of an "annealed" Bethe lattice consisting of two types of sites which differently influence the activity of an adsorbed molecule. We prove that if the reservoir contains a finite number of molecular species, regions of two different polymer densities cannot simultaneously exist on the lattice. The widely used Guggenheim theory of mixtures, which can also be construed as a theory of adsorption, assumes for simplicity that the molecules in the mixture are composed of elementary units, which occupy sites of a lattice of coordination number q . Guggenheim's analysis relies on approximate combinatorial formulas which become exact on a Bethe lattice of the same coordination number, as we show in an appendix. Our analysis involves no combinatorics and relies only on recognizing the statistical independence of certain quantities. Despite the nominal

  17. Procedure for freeze-drying molecules adsorbed to mica flakes.

    PubMed

    Heuser, J E

    1983-09-05

    The quick-freeze, deep-etch, rotary-replication technique is useful for visualizing cells and cell fractions but does not work with suspensions of macromolecules. These inevitably clump or collapse during deep-etching, presumably due to surface tension forces that develop during their transfer from ice to vacuum. Previous protocols have attempted to overcome such forces by attaching macromolecules to freshly cleaved mica before drying and replication. I describe here an adaptation of this procedure to the deep-etch technique as otherwise practiced. My innovation is to mix the molecules with an aqueous suspension of tiny flakes of mica and then to quick-freeze and freeze-fracture the suspension exactly as if one were dealing with cells. The fracture inevitably strikes the surfaces of many mica flakes and thereby cleaves the adsorbed macromolecules cleanly enough to reveal interesting substructure within them. The subsequent step of deep-etching exposes large expanses of unfractured mica and thus reveals intact macromolecules. These macromolecules are not obscured by salt deposits, even if they were frozen in hypertonic solutions, apparently because the fracturing step removes nearly all of the overlying electrolyte. Moreover, these macromolecules are minimally freeze-dried (since exposure is sufficient after only 3 min of etching at -102 degrees C) so they retain their three-dimensional topology. I show that molluscan hemocyanin is a good internal standard for this new technique. It is available commercially in stable solutions, mixes well with all sizes of macromolecules, and consists of particles that display distinct five-start surface helices, which have been measured carefully in the past and which possess a known handedness, useful for determining the orientation of micrographs when examining the various helical patterns possessed by most types of extended macromolecules. The fractured hemocyanin particles also display characteristic internal structures, which

  18. Detection of individual gas molecules adsorbed on graphene.

    PubMed

    Schedin, F; Geim, A K; Morozov, S V; Hill, E W; Blake, P; Katsnelson, M I; Novoselov, K S

    2007-09-01

    The ultimate aim of any detection method is to achieve such a level of sensitivity that individual quanta of a measured entity can be resolved. In the case of chemical sensors, the quantum is one atom or molecule. Such resolution has so far been beyond the reach of any detection technique, including solid-state gas sensors hailed for their exceptional sensitivity. The fundamental reason limiting the resolution of such sensors is fluctuations due to thermal motion of charges and defects, which lead to intrinsic noise exceeding the sought-after signal from individual molecules, usually by many orders of magnitude. Here, we show that micrometre-size sensors made from graphene are capable of detecting individual events when a gas molecule attaches to or detaches from graphene's surface. The adsorbed molecules change the local carrier concentration in graphene one by one electron, which leads to step-like changes in resistance. The achieved sensitivity is due to the fact that graphene is an exceptionally low-noise material electronically, which makes it a promising candidate not only for chemical detectors but also for other applications where local probes sensitive to external charge, magnetic field or mechanical strain are required.

  19. Controlling spins in adsorbed molecules by a chemical switch

    PubMed Central

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Chylarecka, Dorota; Kleibert, Armin; Müller, Kathrin; Iacovita, Cristian; Nolting, Frithjof; Jung, Thomas A.; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2010-01-01

    The development of chemical systems with switchable molecular spins could lead to the architecture of materials with controllable magnetic or spintronic properties. Here, we present conclusive evidence that the spin of an organometallic molecule coupled to a ferromagnetic substrate can be switched between magnetic off and on states by a chemical stimulus. This is achieved by nitric oxide (NO) functioning as an axial ligand of cobalt(II)tetraphenylporphyrin (CoTPP) ferromagnetically coupled to nickel thin-film (Ni(001)). On NO addition, the coordination sphere of Co2+ is modified and a NO–CoTPP nitrosyl complex is formed, which corresponds to an off state of the Co spin. Thermal dissociation of NO from the nitrosyl complex restores the on state of the Co spin. The NO-induced reversible off–on switching of surface-adsorbed molecular spins observed here is attributed to a spin trans effect. PMID:20975713

  20. Molecule-specific interactions of diatomic adsorbates at metal-liquid interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Kaech, Andres; Hamm, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast vibrational dynamics of small molecules on platinum (Pt) layers in water are investigated using 2D attenuated total reflectance IR spectroscopy. Isotope combinations of carbon monoxide and cyanide are used to elucidate inter-adsorbate and substrate-adsorbate interactions. Despite observed cross-peaks in the CO spectra, we conclude that the molecules are not vibrationally coupled. Rather, strong substrate-adsorbate interactions evoke rapid (∼2 ps) vibrational relaxation from the adsorbate into the Pt layer, leading to thermal cross-peaks. In the case of CN, vibrational relaxation is significantly slower (∼10 ps) and dominated by adsorbate-solvent interactions, while the coupling to the substrate is negligible.

  1. Quantification of the Influence of Protein-Protein Interactions on Adsorbed Protein Structure and Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yang; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Latour, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    While protein-surface interactions have been widely studied, relatively little is understood at this time regarding how protein-surface interaction effects are influenced by protein-protein interactions and how these effects combine with the internal stability of a protein to influence its adsorbed-state structure and bioactivity. The objectives of this study were to develop a method to study these combined effects under widely varying protein-protein interaction conditions using hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) adsorbed on silica glass, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polyethylene as our model systems. In order to vary protein-protein interaction effects over a wide range, HEWL was first adsorbed to each surface type under widely varying protein solution concentrations for 2 h to saturate the surface, followed by immersion in pure buffer solution for 15 h to equilibrate the adsorbed protein layers in the absence of additionally adsorbing protein. Periodic measurements were made at selected time points of the areal density of the adsorbed protein layer as an indicator of the level of protein-protein interaction effects within the layer, and these values were then correlated with measurements of the adsorbed protein’s secondary structure and bioactivity. The results from these studies indicate that protein-protein interaction effects help stabilize the structure of HEWL adsorbed on silica glass, have little influence on the structural behavior of HEWL on HDPE, and actually serve to destabilize HEWL’s structure on PMMA. The bioactivity of HEWL on silica glass and HDPE was found to decrease in direct proportion to the degree of adsorption-induce protein unfolding. A direct correlation between bioactivity and the conformational state of adsorbed HEWL was less apparent on PMMA, thus suggesting that other factors influenced HEWL’s bioactivity on this surface, such as the accessibility of HEWL’s bioactive site being blocked by neighboring proteins or the surface

  2. Substrate-mediated interactions and intermolecular forces between molecules adsorbed on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sykes, E Charles H; Han, Patrick; Kandel, S Alex; Kelly, Kevin F; McCarty, Gregory S; Weiss, Paul S

    2003-12-01

    Adsorbate interactions and reactions on metal surfaces have been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy. The manners in which adsorbates perturb the surface electronic structure in their vicinity are discussed. The effects these perturbations have on other molecules are shown to be important in overlayer growth. Interactions of molecules with surface steps are addressed, and each molecule's electron affinity is shown to dictate its adsorption sites at step edges. Standing waves emanating from steps are demonstrated to effect transient molecular adsorption up to 40 A away from the step edge. Halobenzene derivatives are used to demonstrate how the surface is important in aligning reactive intermediates.

  3. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  4. Relaxation dynamics of surface-adsorbed water molecules in nanoporous silica probed by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Ru; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Relaxation dynamics of an exclusively adsorbed water molecule in mesoporous silica MCM-41-S was studied by using terahertz spectroscopy. With the temperature controlled from 0 to 50 °C, we observed strongly frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric relaxation responses, implying that, unlike ice, surface-adsorbed water molecules retained flourishing picosecond dynamics. Based on the Debye relaxation model, a relaxation time constant was found to increase from 1.77 to 4.83 ps when the water molecule was cooled from 50 to 0 °C. An activation energy of ˜15 kJ/mol, which was in close agreement with a hydrogen-bonding energy, was further extracted from the Arrhenius analysis. Combined with previous molecular dynamics simulations, our results indicate that the reorientation relaxation originated from the "flip-flop" rotation of a three hydrogen-bonded surface-adsorbed water molecule.

  5. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure–function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  6. Unconventional superconductivity induced in Nb films by adsorbed chiral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpern, H.; Katzir, E.; Yochelis, S.; Katz, N.; Paltiel, Y.; Millo, O.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by recent observations of chiral-induced magnetization and spin-selective transport we studied the effect of chiral molecules on conventional BCS superconductors. By applying scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the singlet-pairing s-wave order parameter of Nb is significantly altered upon adsorption of chiral polyalanine alpha-helix molecules on its surface. The tunneling spectra exhibit zero-bias conductance peaks embedded inside gaps or gap-like features, suggesting the emergence of unconventional triplet-pairing components with either d-wave or p-wave symmetry at the Nb organic-molecules interface, as corroborated by simulations. These results may open a way for realizing simple superconducting spintronics devices.

  7. Transient magnetization of core excited organic molecules adsorbed on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    This work presents a density functional theory based computational investigation of electronic and magnetic properties of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene in the ground state and core excited one at low molecular coverage. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, it is found that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the contrary, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state presenting two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. This project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement n∘ 607232 [THINFACE].

  8. Small Molecules Target Carcinogenic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradinaru, Claudiu

    2009-03-01

    An ingenious cellular mechanism of effecting protein localization is prenylation: the covalent attachment of a hydrophobic prenyl group to a protein that facilitates protein association with cell membranes. Fluorescence microscopy was used to investigate whether the oncogenic Stat3 protein can undergo artificial prenylation via high-affinity prenylated small-molecule binding agents and thus be rendered inactive by localization at the plasma membrane instead of nucleus. The measurements were performed on a home-built instrument capable of recording simultaneously several optical parameters (lifetime, polarization, color, etc) and with single-molecule sensitivity. A pH-invariant fluorescein derivative with double moiety was designed to bridge a prenyl group and a small peptide that binds Stat3 with high affinity. Confocal fluorescence images show effective localization of the ligand to the membrane of liposomes. Stat3 predominantly localizes at the membrane only in the presence of the prenylated ligand. Single-molecule FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) between donor-labeled prenylated agents and acceptor-labeled, surface tethered Stat3 protein is used to determine the dynamic heterogeneity of the protein-ligand interaction and follow individual binding-unbinding events in real time. The data indicates that molecules can effect protein localization, validating a therapeutic design that influences protein activity via induced localization.

  9. Resonant electron scattering by molecules adsorbed on a surface: N2-Ag system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet-Billy, D.; Djamo, V.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1992-05-01

    A model study of resonant electron scattering by static molecules adsorbed on a metal surface is presented, using the recently developed coupled angular mode (CAM) method. It is applied to the case of N2 molecules adsorbed on an Ag surface. The N2-2πg resonance characteristics (energy position and width) are determined and shown to be modified by the presence of the surface in qualitative agreement with the experimental results of Demuth et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 47 (1981) 1166].

  10. Rotational Spectromicroscopy: Imaging the Orbital Interaction between Molecular Hydrogen and an Adsorbed Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Yuan, Dingwang; Yu, Arthur; Czap, Gregory; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, W.

    2015-05-01

    A hydrogen molecule can diffuse freely on the surface and be trapped above an adsorbed molecule within the junction of a scanning tunneling microscope. The trapped dihydrogen exhibits the properties of a free rotor. Here we show that the intermolecular interaction between dihydrogen and Mg-porphyrin (MgP) can be visualized by imaging j =0 to 2 rotational excitation of dihydrogen. The interaction leads to a weakened H-H bond and modest electron donation from the dihydrogen to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of MgP, a process similarly observed for the interaction between dihydrogen and an adsorbed Au atom.

  11. Pattern Recognition of Adsorbing HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew S.; Shi, Guangjie; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.; Schmid, Friederike

    2015-03-01

    Protein adsorption is relevant in fields ranging from medicine to industry, and the qualitative behavior exhibited by course-grained models could shed insight for further research in such fields. Our study on the selective adsorption of lattice proteins utilizes the Wang-Landau algorithm to simulate the Hydrophobic-Polar (H-P) model with an efficient set of Monte Carlo moves. Each substrate is modeled as a square pattern of 9 lattice sites which attract either H or P monomers, and are located on an otherwise neutral surface. The fully enumerated set of 102 unique surfaces is simulated with each protein sequence. A collection of 27-monomer sequences is used- each of which is non-degenerate and protein-like. Thermodynamic quantities such as the specific heat and free energy are calculated from the density of states, and are used to investigate the adsorption of lattice proteins on patterned substrates. Research supported by NSF.

  12. Fast and efficient protein purification using membrane adsorber systems.

    PubMed

    Suck, Kirstin; Walter, Johanna; Menzel, Frauke; Tappe, Alexander; Kasper, Cornelia; Naumann, Claudia; Zeidler, Robert; Scheper, Thomas

    2006-02-10

    The purification of proteins from complex cell culture samples is an essential step in proteomic research. Traditional chromatographic methods often require several steps resulting in time consuming and costly procedures. In contrast, protein purification via membrane adsorbers offers the advantage of fast and gentle but still effective isolation. In this work, we present a new method for purification of proteins from crude cell extracts via membrane adsorber based devices. This isolation procedure utilises the membranes favourable pore structure allowing high flow rates without causing high back pressure. Therefore, shear stress to fragile structures is avoided. In addition, mass transfer takes place through convection rather than diffusion, thus allowing very rapid separation processes. Based on this membrane adsorber technology the separation of two model proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and immungluboline G (IgG) is shown. The isolation of human growth hormone (hGH) from chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture supernatant was performed using a cation exchange membrane. The isolation of the enzyme penicillin acylase from the crude Escherichia coli supernatant was achieved using an anion exchange spin column within one step at a considerable purity. In summary, the membrane adsorber devices have proven to be suitable tools for the purification of proteins from different complex cell culture samples.

  13. Dynamics of Molecules Adsorbed in Zeolitic Systems: Neutron Scattering and MD Simulation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Sharma, V. K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2011-07-01

    Zeolites represent a class of technologically important materials because of their characteristic properties of molecular sieving and catalysis, which makes them indispensable in the petroleum industries. While the catalytic properties depend upon many factors, a major role is played by the dynamics of hydrocarbon gases. In order to be able to tailor make these materials for use in industry for catalytic and sieving purposes, it is important to understand the dynamical properties of the guest molecules adsorbed in the zeolitic materials. It is of interest to study the effects of size and shape of guest molecules and also the host zeolitic structure, governing the diffusion mechanism of the adsorbed species. Here we report the results of Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of two hydrocarbons namely acetylene and propylene adsorbed in two structurally different zeolites Na-Y and ZSM-5.

  14. Spectroscopic observations of the displacement dynamics of physically adsorbed molecules-CO on C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Yates, John T.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we observed physically adsorbed CO molecules on C60 surface being displaced by impinging noble gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr), either through a dynamic displacement process or an exothermic replacement process, depending on their adsorption energies. This displacement mechanism could shift from one to the other depending on the surface coverage and temperature. Furthermore, rotational energy of the impinging molecules may also contribute to the dynamic displacement process by supplying additional energy.

  15. Vibrational excitation of adsorbed molecules by low-energy photon-emitted electrons: A dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Ureña, A.; Telle, H. H.; Tornero, J.

    2013-01-01

    A simple, inelastic electron-scattering dynamical model is presented to account for vibrational excitation in molecular adsorbates. The basic two ingredients of the theoretical model are: (i) the conservation of the total angular momentum, and (ii) the requirement of a critical time to allow for the intra-molecular energy re-arrangement of the transient negative-ion complex. The model is applied to the vibrational excitation dynamics of molecules chemisorbed at sub-monolayer conditions on ordered metal surfaces. This was exemplified for Acrylonitrile adsorbed on Cu(1 0 0), whose vibrational excitation was studied via energy loss spectra of low-energy two-photon photoemission (2PPE) electrons, and for ammonia (NH3 and ND3) adsorbed on Cu(1 0 0), being probed in a STM experiment. Fits of the model to the data allowed for deducing the energy threshold of the vibrational excitation of the Cdbnd C and Ctbnd N bonds of the ACN adsorbate molecules, and the threshold for the symmetric ν1-stretch mode excitation of adsorbed NH3/ND3. Also, information about the temporal dynamics underlying the inelastic electron scattering was gained.

  16. Effects of excluded surface area and adsorbate clustering on surface adsorption of proteins. II. Kinetic models.

    PubMed Central

    Minton, A P

    2001-01-01

    Models for equilibrium surface adsorption of proteins have been recently proposed (Minton, A. P., 2000. Biophys. Chem. 86:239-247) in which negative cooperativity due to area exclusion by adsorbate molecules is compensated to a variable extent by the formation of a heterogeneous population of monolayer surface clusters of adsorbed protein molecules. In the present work this concept is extended to treat the kinetics of protein adsorption. It is postulated that clusters may grow via two distinct kinetic pathways. The first pathway is the diffusion of adsorbed monomer to the edge of a preexisting cluster and subsequent accretion. The second pathway consists of direct deposition of a monomer in solution onto the upper (solution-facing) surface of a preexisting cluster ("piggyback" deposition) and subsequent incorporation into the cluster. Results of calculations of the time course of adsorption, carried out for two different limiting models of cluster structure and energetics, show that in the absence of piggyback deposition, enhancement of the tendency of adsorbate to cluster can reduce, but not eliminate, the negative kinetic cooperativity due to surface area exclusion by adsorbate. Apparently noncooperative (Langmuir-like) and positively cooperative adsorption progress curves, qualitatively similar to those reported in several published experimental studies, require a significant fraction of total adsorption flux through the piggyback deposition pathway. According to the model developed here and in the above-mentioned reference, the formation of surface clusters should be a common concomitant of non-site-specific surface adsorption of proteins, and may provide an important mechanism for assembly of organized "protein machines" in vivo. PMID:11259279

  17. Structure, Dynamics, and Thermodynamics of Small Molecules Adsorbed in Zeolite Micropores: Simulation and Statistical Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tassel, Paul Robert

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes a fully detailed molecular simulation and modeling effort aimed at understanding the fundamentals of adsorption and diffusion of small molecules in zeolite micropores. The primary emphasis is on determining the relationship between the structure and chemistry of the zeolite adsorbent and the structure, dynamics, and thermodynamics of the adsorbed phase. Further emphasis is on developing simple, predictive models of zeolite adsorption and diffusion. We begin by presenting a Monte Carlo simulation of single component adsorption of xenon, methane, and argon in zeolite NaA. The form of the adsorbate density distribution indicates the presence of discrete adsorption sites which arrange in polyhedra whose geometry depends on the number and position of zeolite framework ions. Isotherm plateaus are attributed to either (i) a low energy adsorbate configuration or (ii) the saturation of polyhedral sites. Viewing the adsorbed phase as an ordered arrangement differs from the conventional delocalized model, yet it helps explain certain experimental observations. Next, a study of binary mixtures of small molecules in zeolite NaA using the Monte Carlo method is presented. The mixing in the pore is determined to be highly nonideal by comparison to a simple pore volume filling model. Strong selectivity for a more polarizable molecule (xenon) is observed only at low pore loading. At higher pore loading, a smaller, less polarizable molecule (argon) adsorbs selectively at a significantly lower pressure than predicted by the model. This enhanced selectivity is due to the ability of the smaller molecule to pack more efficiently inside of the pore. Finally, we present two simple lattice models whose forms are arrived at following careful consideration of simulation results. The first describes the adsorption of small molecules in a zeolite. A polyhedral lattice is postulated whose neighboring sites interact energetically and entropically. The second model describes

  18. Rod-like cyanophenyl probe molecules nanoconfined to oxide particles: Density of adsorbed surface species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunza, Stefan; Frunza, Ligia; Ganea, Constantin Paul; Zgura, Irina; Brás, Ana Rita; Schönhals, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Surface layers have already been observed by broadband dielectric spectroscopy for composite systems formed by adsorption of rod-like cyanophenyl derivates as probe molecules on the surface of oxide particles. In this work, features of the surface layer are reported; samples with different amounts of the probe molecules adsorbed onto oxide (nano) particles were prepared in order to study their interactions with the surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to analyze the amount of loaded probe molecules. The density of the surface species ns was introduced and its values were estimated from quantitative Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with TGA. This parameter allows discriminating the composites into several groups assuming a similar interaction of the probe molecules with the hosts of a given group. An influence factor H is further proposed as the ratio of the number of molecules in the surface layer showing a glassy dynamics and the number of molecules adsorbed tightly on the surface of the support: It was found for aerosil composites and used for calculating the maximum filling degree of partially filled silica MCM-41 composites showing only one dielectric process characteristic for glass-forming liquids and a bulk behavior for higher filling degrees.

  19. Stability, structural and electronic properties of benzene molecule adsorbed on free standing Au layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoch, Neha; Kapoor, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    We report stability and electronic properties of benzene molecule adsorbed on the Au atomic layer within the framework of density function theory (DFT). Horizontal configuration of benzene on the top site of Au monolayer prefers energetically over other studied configurations. On the adsorption of benzene, the ballistic conductance of Au monolayer is found to decrease from 4G0 to 2G0 suggesting its applications for the fabrications of organic sensor devices based on the Au atomic layers.

  20. Chemical effects on vibrational properties of adsorbed molecules on metal surfaces: Coverage dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueba, H.

    1987-10-01

    Vibrational properties of chemisorbed molecules on metal surfaces are studied with a focus on the coverage dependent chemical shift of the frequencies. Available experimental data of a CO adsorption on transition metal and noble metal surfaces are analyzed in the light of the coverage dependent back-donation into the 2 π* orbitals of chemisorbed CO molecules. The vibrational frequency ωCO of the intramolecular stretching mode exhibits a downward shift of varying magnitude, depending on the amount of back-donation into the 2 π* orbitals of the chemisorbed CO. On increasing the coverage θ, ωCO usually increases due to the dipole-dipole interaction. On Cu surfaces, however, the shifts are relatively small, or in some cases, negative. So far, this anomalous frequency shift with θ is understood as a result of competitive effect between the upward dipole Ωdip and the downward chemical shift Ωchem associated with back-donation. The purpose of this paper is to establish the possible origin of the downward frequency shift through the electronic properties of an incomplete monolayer of adsorbates. The adsorbate density of states ρa is calculated by means of the coherent potential approximation, in which the electron hopping between the adsorbates (band formation effect) and the depolarization effect due to the proximity of ionized adsorbed molecules are taken into account. The change of the occupied portion of ρa and ρa ( ɛF) at the Fermi level ɛF with increasing θ then manifests itself in the coverage dependent Ωchem not only due to the static back-donation, but also due to the dynamical charge fluctuation during vibrational excitation. It is found that in a weakly chemisorbed system, such as CO/Cu, the negative Ωchem amounts to Ωdip at low θ. Consequently the apparent total frequency shift remains almost constant. As the coverage increases, Ωchem becomes larger than Ωdip due to the band effect. It is also shown that the variation of the back

  1. Adsorption and separation of proteins by collagen fiber adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liao, Xue-pin; Zhang, Qi-xian; Shi, Bi

    2013-06-01

    The separation of proteins is a key step in biomedical and pharmaceutical industries. In the present investigation, the collagen fiber adsorbent (CFA) was exploited as column packing material to separate proteins. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), bovine hemoglobin (Hb) and lysozyme (LYS) that have different isoelectric points (pIs) were selected as model proteins to investigate the separation ability of CFA to proteins. In batch adsorption, the adsorption behaviors of these proteins on CFA under different pHs and ionic strengths indicated that the electrostatic interaction plays a predominant role in the adsorption of proteins on CFA. CFA exhibited high adsorption capacity to Hb and LYS. In column separation, the proteins were completely separated by adjusting pH and ionic strength of the eluent. The increase of flow rate could reduce the separation time with no influence on the recovery of protein in the experimental range. The protein recovery was higher than 90% even when the CFA column was re-used for 4 times in separation of BSA and LYS, and the retention time of BSA or LYS was almost constant during the repeated applications. In addition, as a practical application, LYS was successfully separated from chicken egg white powder by CFA column.

  2. Formation of Adsorbed Oxygen Radicals on Minerals at the Martian Surface and the Decomposition of Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.; Kim, S. S.; Freeman, B. A.; Hecht, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    We present experimental evidence that superoxide ions form on mineral grains at the martian surface and show that these adsorbates can explain the unusual reactivity of the soil as well as the apparent absence of organic molecules.

  3. Homeotropic orientation of a nematic liquid crystal by bent-core molecules adsorbed on its surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jiyong; Yang, Seungbin; Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Jongyoon; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kang, Shin-Woong; Choi, E.-Joon

    2015-06-01

    We reported the promotion of a homeotropic alignment of a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) by bent-core liquid-crystal (BLC) Molecules adsorbed its surface. The BLC was mixed at various concentrations with the NLC, and the mixtures were injected into an empty cell with a cell gap of 13 μm. Although the pure NLC showed a heterogeneous orientation, the BLC-NLC mixture was gradually transformed to a homeotropic alignment with increasing concentration of the BLC. We investigated the surface topography of the samples by using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and found that the BLC molecules were segregated into a polyimide (PI) surface and formed protrusion domains with diameters of 50-100 nm. The BLC protrusions might promote the homeotropic orientation of the NLC molecules.

  4. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized.

  5. Structure formation in adsorbed overlayers comprising functional cross-shaped molecules: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasperski, Adam; Nieckarz, Damian; Szabelski, Paweł

    2015-11-01

    Surface confined self-assembly of functional star-shaped organic molecules is a promising method to create nanoporous networks with tailorable structure and functions. In this work we use the Monte Carlo simulation method to demonstrate how the morphology of these supramolecular assemblies can be tuned by manipulating intrinsic parameters of the building blocks and modified by the presence of co-adsorbed metal atoms. To that purpose we study the 2D self-assembly of planar cruciform molecules modeled as collections of interconnected segments, some of which were activated to represent discrete interaction centers. We consider a few exemplary adsorbed systems in which the molecules with different size, aspect ratio and intramolecular distribution of active centers form superstructures stabilized by short-range segment-segment interactions or by metal-segment interactions. These two situations correspond to supramolecular assemblies sustained by, for example, hydrogen bonding and metal-organic ligand coordination, respectively. The simulated results show that proper encoding of intramolecular interactions into the cruciform building bricks allows for directing the self-assembly towards largely diversified structures ranging from nanoclusters to porous grids. The obtained findings can facilitate designing and optimization of molecular networks comprising cross-shaped units including functionalized porphyrins and phthalocyanines and they can be helpful in preliminary selection of these building blocks.

  6. Effects of surface curvature and surface chemistry on the structure and activity of proteins adsorbed in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Sang, Lung-Ching; Coppens, Marc-Olivier

    2011-04-14

    The interactions of proteins with the surface of cylindrical nanopores are systematically investigated to elucidate how surface curvature and surface chemistry affect the conformation and activity of confined proteins in an aqueous, buffered environment. Two globular proteins, lysozyme and myoglobin, with different catalytic functions, were used as model proteins to analyze structural changes in proteins after adsorption on ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 and propyl-functionalized SBA-15 (C(3)SBA-15) with carefully controlled pore size. Liquid phase ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the amide I and II bands of the adsorbed proteins. The amide I bands showed that the secondary structures of free and adsorbed protein molecules differ, and that the secondary structure of the adsorbed protein is influenced by the local geometry as well as by the surface chemistry of the nanopores. The conformation of the adsorbed proteins inside the nanopores of SBA-15 and C(3)SBA-15 is strongly correlated with the local geometry and the surface properties of the nanoporous materials, which results in different catalytic activities. Adsorption by electrostatic interaction of proteins in nanopores of an optimal size provides a favorably confining and protecting environment, which may lead to considerably enhanced structural stability and catalytic activity.

  7. Long-term storage of surface-adsorbed protein machines.

    PubMed

    Albet-Torres, Nuria; Månsson, Alf

    2011-06-07

    The effective and simple long-term storage of complex functional proteins is critical in achieving commercially viable biosensors. This issue is particularly challenging in recently proposed types of nanobiosensors, where molecular-motor-driven transportation substitutes microfluidics and forms the basis for novel detection schemes. Importantly, therefore, we here describe that delicate heavy meromyosin (HMM)-based nanodevices (HMM motor fragments adsorbed to silanized surfaces and actin bound to HMM) fully maintain their function when stored at -20 °C for more than a month. The mechanisms for the excellent preservation of acto-HMM motor function upon repeated freeze-thaw cycles are discussed. The results are important to the future commercial implementation of motor-based nanodevices and are of more general value to the long-term storage of any protein-based bionanodevice.

  8. Molecular resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by plasmonic nanoscissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenglong; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zheng, Hairong; Xu, Hongxing; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-04-01

    The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis, photosynthesis and the degradation of plastic, it is hard to break individual molecular bonds for those molecules adsorbed on the surface because of the weak light-absorption in molecules and the redistribution of the resulting vibrational energy both inside the molecule and to its surrounding environment. Here we show how to overcome these obstacles with a plasmonic hot-electron mediated process and demonstrate a new method that allows the sensitive control of resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by `plasmonic' scissors. To that end, we used a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) setup to dissociate resonantly excited NC2H6 fragments from Malachite green. The surface plasmons (SPs) excited at the sharp metal tip not only enhance the local electric field to harvest the light incident from the laser, but crucially supply `hot electrons' whose energy can be transferred to individual bonds. These processes are resonant Raman, which result in some active chemical bonds and then weaken these bonds, followed by dumping in lots of indiscriminant energy and breaking the weakest bond. The method allows for sensitive control of both the rate and probability of dissociation through their dependence on the density of hot electrons, which can be manipulated by tuning the laser intensity or tunneling current/bias voltage in the HV-TERS setup, respectively. The concepts of plasmonic scissors open up new versatile avenues for the deep understanding of in situ surface-catalyzed chemistry.The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis

  9. Modeling colloid deposition on a protein layer adsorbed to iron-oxide-coated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Flynn, R.; von der Kammer, F.; Hofmann, T.

    2012-11-01

    Our recent study reported that conformation change of granule-associated Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) may influence the role of the protein controlling colloid deposition in porous media (Flynn et al., 2012). The present study conceptualized the observed phenomena with an ellipsoid morphology model, describing BSA as an ellipsoid taking a side-on or end-on conformation on granular surface, and identified the following processes: (1) at low adsorbed concentrations, BSA exhibited a side-on conformation blocking colloid deposition; (2) at high adsorbed concentrations, BSA adapted to an end-on conformation promoted colloid deposition; and (3) colloid deposition on the BSA layer may progressively generate end-on molecules (sites) by conformation change of side-on BSA, resulting in sustained increasing deposition rates. Generally, the protein layer lowered colloid attenuation by the porous medium, suggesting the overall effect of BSA was inhibitory at the experimental time scale. A mathematical model was developed to interpret the ripening curves. Modeling analysis identified the site generation efficiency of colloid as a control on the ripening rate (declining rate in colloid concentrations), and this efficiency was higher for BSA adsorbed from a more dilute BSA solution.

  10. Magnetization switching in ferromagnets by adsorbed chiral molecules without current or external magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Ben Dor, Oren; Yochelis, Shira; Radko, Anna; Vankayala, Kiran; Capua, Eyal; Capua, Amir; Yang, See-Hun; Baczewski, Lech Tomasz; Parkin, Stuart Stephen Papworth; Naaman, Ron; Paltiel, Yossi

    2017-01-01

    Ferromagnets are commonly magnetized by either external magnetic fields or spin polarized currents. The manipulation of magnetization by spin-current occurs through the spin-transfer-torque effect, which is applied, for example, in modern magnetoresistive random access memory. However, the current density required for the spin-transfer torque is of the order of 1 × 106 A·cm−2, or about 1 × 1025 electrons s−1 cm−2. This relatively high current density significantly affects the devices' structure and performance. Here we demonstrate magnetization switching of ferromagnetic thin layers that is induced solely by adsorption of chiral molecules. In this case, about 1013 electrons per cm2 are sufficient to induce magnetization reversal. The direction of the magnetization depends on the handedness of the adsorbed chiral molecules. Local magnetization switching is achieved by adsorbing a chiral self-assembled molecular monolayer on a gold-coated ferromagnetic layer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. These results present a simple low-power magnetization mechanism when operating at ambient conditions. PMID:28230054

  11. Magnetization switching in ferromagnets by adsorbed chiral molecules without current or external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ben Dor, Oren; Yochelis, Shira; Radko, Anna; Vankayala, Kiran; Capua, Eyal; Capua, Amir; Yang, See-Hun; Baczewski, Lech Tomasz; Parkin, Stuart Stephen Papworth; Naaman, Ron; Paltiel, Yossi

    2017-02-23

    Ferromagnets are commonly magnetized by either external magnetic fields or spin polarized currents. The manipulation of magnetization by spin-current occurs through the spin-transfer-torque effect, which is applied, for example, in modern magnetoresistive random access memory. However, the current density required for the spin-transfer torque is of the order of 1 × 10(6) A·cm(-2), or about 1 × 10(25) electrons s(-1) cm(-2). This relatively high current density significantly affects the devices' structure and performance. Here we demonstrate magnetization switching of ferromagnetic thin layers that is induced solely by adsorption of chiral molecules. In this case, about 10(13) electrons per cm(2) are sufficient to induce magnetization reversal. The direction of the magnetization depends on the handedness of the adsorbed chiral molecules. Local magnetization switching is achieved by adsorbing a chiral self-assembled molecular monolayer on a gold-coated ferromagnetic layer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. These results present a simple low-power magnetization mechanism when operating at ambient conditions.

  12. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution.

  13. Induced IR overtone and fundamental bands of isotopic H 2 molecules adsorbed in NaCaA zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, H.; Frede, W.

    1984-05-01

    NIR spectroscopy has been successfully applied to surface chemical problems, using the FT transmission technique. Vibrational spectra of H 2 and D 2, adsorbed in NaA and NaCaA zeolites, have been recorded in the fundamental regions of both adsorbates and, for the first time, in the overtone region of D 2. Useful information on the properties of the adsorbed molecules can be derived from the overtone spectra of D 2 and the fine structure of the H 2 fundamental. It turns out that the properties of the D 2 molecules, e.g. dissociation energy and anharmonicity, are hardly affected by adsorption. The fine structure of the H 2 fundamental, however, indicates the rotation to be strongly hindered. The ortho-para splitting is decreased with respect to the free molecule value and approaches that for planarly rotating molecules. Due to this hindrance, the corresponding D 2 splitting is not resolved.

  14. Spins of adsorbed molecules investigated by the detection of Kondo resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komeda, Tadahiro

    2014-12-01

    Surface magnetism has been one of the platforms to explore the magnetism in low dimensions. It is also a key component for the development of quantum information processes, which utilizes the spin degree of freedom. The Kondo resonance is a phenomenon that is caused by an interaction between an isolated spin and conduction electrons. First observed in the 1930s as an anomalous increase in the low-temperature resistance of metals embedded with magnetic atoms, the Kondo physics mainly studied the effects of bulk magnetic impurities in the resistivity. In the last 15 years it has undergone a revival by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) which enables the measurement of the Kondo resonance at surfaces using an atomic scale point contact. The detection of the Kondo resonance can be a powerful tool to explore surface magnetism. In this article, I review recent studies of the surface spin of adsorbed molecules by the detection of the Kondo resonance. Researches on metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and porphyrin molecules will be examined. In addition, the Kondo resonance for double-decker lanthanoide Pc molecules will be discussed. Some of the double-decker Pc molecules show single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior, which attracts attention as a material for electronic devices. For both classes, the ligand plays a crucial role in determining the parameters of the Kondo resonance, such as the Kondo temperature and the change of the shape from peak to Fano-dip. In addition, the spin in delocalized molecular orbital forms the Kondo resonance, which shows significant differences from the Kondo resonance formed by the metal spins. Since molecular orbital can be tuned in a flexible manner by the design of the molecule, the Kondo resonance formed by delocalized molecular orbital might expand the knowledge of this field.

  15. Density functional analysis of gaseous molecules adsorbed on metal ion/defective nano-sheet graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jin-Pei; Chuang, Wen-Hua; Tai, Chin-Kuen; Kao, Hsien-Chang; Pan, Jiunn-Hung; Wang, Bo-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory was applied to calculate the adsorption property of metal/hexa-vacancy defective graphene (denoted as HDG-M, M: Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+) with O- and N-dopants. We investigate the adsorption properties of these complexes between gaseous molecules and HDG-M. Our results show that HDG-Cu has a high selectivity for O2, but HDG-Fe has a good ability to capture many gases such as CO, NO and O2. Our calculations could provide useful information for designing new graphene-based adsorbents to remove undesired gases, which may poison the metal catalysts in reaction processes.

  16. Aggregated Gas Molecules: Toxic to Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zuo, Guanghong; Chen, Jixiu; Gao, Yi; Fang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    The biological toxicity of high levels of breathing gases has been known for centuries, but the mechanism remains elusive. Earlier work mainly focused on the influences of dispersed gas molecules dissolved in water on biomolecules. However, recent studies confirmed the existence of aggregated gas molecules at the water-solid interface. In this paper, we have investigated the binding preference of aggregated gas molecules on proteins with molecular dynamics simulations, using nitrogen (N2) gas and the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain as the model system. Aggregated N2 molecules were strongly bound by the active sites of the SH3 domain, which could impair the activity of the protein. In contrast, dispersed N2 molecules did not specifically interact with the SH3 domain. These observations extend our understanding of the possible toxicity of aggregates of gas molecules in the function of proteins. PMID:23588597

  17. Adsorption of globular proteins on locally planar surfaces. II. Models for the effect of multiple adsorbate conformations on adsorption equilibria and kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Minton, A P

    1999-01-01

    Equilibrium and kinetic models for nonspecific adsorption of proteins to planar surfaces are presented. These models allow for the possibility of multiple interconvertible surface conformations of adsorbed protein. Steric repulsion resulting in area exclusion by adsorbed molecules is taken into account by treating the adsorbate as a thermodynamically nonideal two-dimensional fluid. In the equilibrium model, the possibility of attractive interactions between adsorbed molecules is taken into account in a limited fashion by permitting one of the adsorbed species to self-associate. Calculated equilibrium adsorption isotherms exhibit apparent high-affinity and low-affinity binding regions, corresponding respectively to adsorption of ligand at low fractional area occupancy in an energetically favorable side-on conformation and conversion at higher fractional area occupancy of the side-on conformation to an entropically favored end-on conformation. Adsorbate self-association may lead to considerable steepening of the adsorption isotherm, compensating to a variable extent for the broadening effect of steric repulsion. Kinetic calculations suggest that in the absence of attractive interactions between adsorbate molecules, the process of adsorption may be highly "stretched" along the time axis, rendering the attainment of adsorption equilibrium in the context of conventional experiments problematic. PMID:9876132

  18. Electronic structure and binding geometry of tetraphenylporphyrin-derived molecules adsorbed on metal and metal oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Senia

    Tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP)-derived molecules have been studied extensively as efficient photosensitizers when chemisorbed on the metal oxide substrates in dye-sensitized solar cells. Still, many fundamental electronic properties of the dye/oxide interface are not understood and need careful consideration. In this thesis we present a comprehensive study of the electronic structure, energy level alignment and the adsorption geometry of the TPP-derived dye molecules adsorbed on TiO2(110), ZnO(1120) and Ag(100) single crystal surfaces using ultra-high vacuum (UHV) based surface sensitive techniques. The alignment of the molecular energy levels with respect to the TiO 2 and ZnO band edges for all TPP-derived molecules we studied was found to be insensitive to either the nature of the functional groups located on the phenyl rings, presence of zinc as a central metal ion and different binding geometry of the molecules. Binding geometry, molecule-molecule interaction and the aggregation effects in the adsorbed layer, that were observed in the UV-visible spectra of the molecules adsorbed on ZnO substrate were not observed in the ultraviolet photoemission (UPS) and inverse photoemission (IPS) spectra of the occupied and unoccupied molecular states. Using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), binding geometry of the two representative TPP-derivatives was directly determined to be upright, with the porphyrin ring under large angle with respect to the surface for the p-ZnTCPP molecules and with the porphyrin ring parallel to the surface for the m-ZnTCPP molecules. We observe that the energies and the energy level alignment of the ZnTPP molecular levels measured in UPS and IPS depend on the substrate on which the molecules are adsorbed (Ag(100) or TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces). The differences are attributed to different charge screening properties of these two materials. Image charges created in the substrates during

  19. Ro-vibrational Stark effect on H2 and D2 molecules adsorbed in NaA zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bras, N.

    1999-03-01

    In order to explain the induced infrared bands of H2 and D2 adsorbed in NaA zeolites the Stark effect on the ro-vibrational levels of these molecules is considered for electric fields created by various charge distributions. The shift and intensity of the induced ro-vibration transitions are calculated.

  20. Electrorheological crystallization of proteins and other molecules

    DOEpatents

    Craig, George D.; Rupp, Bernhard

    1996-01-01

    An electrorheological crystalline mass of a molecule is formed by dispersing the molecule in a dispersion fluid and subjecting the molecule dispersion to a uniform electrical field for a period of time during which time an electrorheological crystalline mass is formed. Molecules that may be used to form an electrorheological crystalline mass include any organic or inorganic molecule which has a permanent dipole and/or which is capable of becoming an induced dipole in the presence of an electric field. The molecules used to form the electrorheological crystalline mass are preferably macromolecules, such as biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipoproteins and viruses. Molecules are crystallized by a method in which an electric field is maintained for a period of time after the electrorheological crystalline mass has formed during which time at least some of the molecules making up the electrorheological crystalline mass form a crystal lattice. The three dimensional structure of a molecule is determined by a method in which an electrorheological crystalline mass of the molecule is formed, an x-ray diffraction pattern of the electrorheological crystalline mass is obtained and the three dimensional structure of the molecule is calculated from the x-ray diffraction pattern.

  1. Electrorheological crystallization of proteins and other molecules

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Rupp, B.

    1996-06-11

    An electrorheological crystalline mass of a molecule is formed by dispersing the molecule in a dispersion fluid and subjecting the molecule dispersion to a uniform electrical field for a period of time during which time an electrorheological crystalline mass is formed. Molecules that may be used to form an electrorheological crystalline mass include any organic or inorganic molecule which has a permanent dipole and/or which is capable of becoming an induced dipole in the presence of an electric field. The molecules used to form the electrorheological crystalline mass are preferably macromolecules, such as biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipoproteins and viruses. Molecules are crystallized by a method in which an electric field is maintained for a period of time after the electrorheological crystalline mass has formed during which time at least some of the molecules making up the electrorheological crystalline mass form a crystal lattice. The three dimensional structure of a molecule is determined by a method in which an electrorheological crystalline mass of the molecule is formed, an X-ray diffraction pattern of the electrorheological crystalline mass is obtained and the three dimensional structure of the molecule is calculated from the X-ray diffraction pattern. 4 figs.

  2. Micro-differential thermal analysis detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using microfabricated bridges.

    PubMed

    Senesac, Larry R; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders; Hales, Jan H; Davis, Zachary J; Nicholson, Don M; Boisen, Anja; Thundat, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate that this method is capable of differentiating explosive vapors from nonexplosives and is additionally capable of differentiating individual explosive vapors such as trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and cyclotrimethylenetrinitromine. This method, based on a microfabricated bridge with a programmable heating rate, produces unique and reproducible thermal response patterns within 50 ms that are characteristic to classes of adsorbed explosive molecules. We demonstrate that this micro-differential thermal analysis technique can selectively detect explosives, providing a method for fast direct detection with a limit of detection of 600x10(-12) g.

  3. Micro differential thermal analysis detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using microfabricated bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders; Hales, Jan; Davis, Zachary; Nicholson, Don M; Boisen, Anja; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Although micromechanical sensors enable chemical vapor sensing with unprecedented sensitivity using variations in mass and stress, obtaining chemical selectivity using the micromechanical response still remains as a crucial challenge. Chemoselectivity in vapor detection using immobilized selective layers that rely on weak chemical interactions provides only partial selectivity. Here we show that the very low thermal mass of micromechanical sensors can be used to produce unique responses that can be used for achieving chemical selectivity without losing sensitivity or reversibility. We demonstrate that this method is capable of differentiating explosive vapors from nonexplosives and is additionally capable of differentiating individual explosive vapors such as trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and cyclotrimethylenetrinitromine. This method, based on a microfabricated bridge with a programmable heating rate, produces unique and reproducible thermal response patterns within 50 ms that are characteristic to classes of adsorbed explosive molecules. We demonstrate that this micro-differential thermal analysis technique can selectively detect explosives, providing a method for fast direct detection with a limit of detection of 600 x 10{sup -12} g.

  4. Classical and quantum studies of the photodissociation of a HX (X=Cl,F) molecule adsorbed on ice.

    PubMed

    Woittequand, S; Duflot, D; Monnerville, M; Pouilly, B; Toubin, C; Briquez, S; Meyer, H-D

    2007-10-28

    The photodissociation dynamics of a HX (X = Cl,F) molecule adsorbed on a hexagonal ice surface at T = 0 K is studied using time-dependent quantum wave packets and quasiclassical trajectories. The relevant potential energy surfaces are calculated using high-level ab initio methods. We present here two dimensional calculations for the dynamics of the hydrogen photofragment for both HCl and HF molecules. The purpose of this paper is to compare the photodissociation dynamics of the two molecules which are adsorbed on the ice surface with different equilibrium geometries. The total photodissociation cross section and the angular distribution are calculated. The comparison with classical trajectory calculations provides evidence for typical quantum effects and reveals rainbow structures.

  5. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, David

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  6. Electric field effect observed on the infrared spectra of the N2O molecule adsorbed in NaA zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bras, N.; Cohen de Lara, E.

    1995-05-01

    The spectrum of the N2O molecule adsorbed in the cavity of NaA zeolite presents two main components for each of the stretching vibrational modes. It is assumed that they correspond to molecules parallel and antiparallel to the electric field of the inner surface of the zeolite cavity. In order to verify this assumption, the frequency shifts and the intensities of these components have been calculated for the two orientations of the molecule with respect to the field, by applying the model of Bishop for the vibrational Stark effect. These calculations require the knowledge of molecular quantities such as derivatives of permanent electric moments and polarizability.

  7. Direct comparison of the electronic coupling efficiency of sulfur and selenium anchoring groups for molecules adsorbed onto gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, L.; Palacin, S.; Bourgoin, J. P.; Lagoute, J.; Zambelli, T.; Gauthier, S.

    2002-08-01

    We performed air and ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy experiments in order to compare the electronic coupling provided by S and by Se used as alligator clips for bisthiol- and biselenol-terthiophene molecules adsorbed onto gold. The molecules were inserted in a dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer. Their apparent height above the dodecanethiol matrix was used as a measure of the electronic coupling strength corresponding to S and Se, respectively. We show that the insertion behaviors of the two molecules are qualitatively the same, and that Se provides systematically a better coupling link than S whatever the tunneling conditions.

  8. Direct comparison of the electronic coupling efficiency of sulfur and selenium alligator clips for molecules adsorbed onto gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, L.; Palacin, S.; Bourgoin, J. P.

    2003-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been performed to compare the electronic coupling provided by S and by Se used as alligator clips for bisthiol- and biselenol-terthiophene molecules adsorbed onto gold. The molecules were inserted in a dodecanethiol (DT) self-assembled monolayer. Their apparent height above the dodecanethiol matrix was used as a measure of the electronic coupling strength corresponding to S and Se, respectively. We show that the insertion behaviors of the two molecules are qualitatively the same, and that Se provides systematically a better coupling link than S, whatever the tunneling conditions.

  9. Targeted Protein Degradation by Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bondeson, Daniel P; Crews, Craig M

    2017-01-06

    Protein homeostasis networks are highly regulated systems responsible for maintaining the health and productivity of cells. Whereas therapeutics have been developed to disrupt protein homeostasis, more recently identified techniques have been used to repurpose homeostatic networks to effect degradation of disease-relevant proteins. Here, we review recent advances in the use of small molecules to degrade proteins in a selective manner. First, we highlight all-small-molecule techniques with direct clinical application. Second, we describe techniques that may find broader acceptance in the biomedical research community that require little or no synthetic chemistry. In addition to serving as innovative research tools, these new approaches to control intracellular protein levels offer the potential to develop novel therapeutics targeting proteins that are not currently pharmaceutically vulnerable.

  10. Tunneling Spectroscopy Studies of Urea, Thiourea, and Selected Phosphonate Molecules Adsorbed on Aluminum Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Charles D.

    Experimental and calculated inelastic electron tunneling intensities were compared for several of the vibrational modes of thiourea adsorbed on aluminum oxide. The partial charge model of Kirtley, Scalapino, and Hansma was used to compute the theoretical intensities of each mode. The required partial charges were determined using a method developed by Momany. Essentially, the Coulomb potential resulting from point charges located at atom sites was fitted to the quantum mechanical electrostatic potential of a molecule calculated from Hartree-Fock theory. The effect of a vibrational mode pattern on the electrostatic potential of a molecule was investigated. This effect could not be acceptably modeled with a single point charge located on each atom, so one charge was used to represent the positive nucleus of each atom and a second charge was used to represent the valence cloud. The valence charge was allowed to move independently of the nuclear charge during a molecular vibration, and the motions of the two charges were found to be very different for hydrogen atoms. This model gave very reasonable agreement between the theoretical and observed relative intensities for the in plane vibrational modes of thiourea. An acceptable set of out of plane force constants could not be found. This caused problems in the interpretation of the out of plane relative intensities. Based on the in plane modes, it was concluded that thiourea bonded to aluminum oxide with the sulfur atom near the oxide and the sulfur-carbon bond perpendicular to the aluminum oxide surface. Quantum mechanical electrostatic potentials were also calculated for urea, phosphoric acid (PA), methylphosphonic acid (MPA), hydroxymethylphosphonic acid (HMP), and nitrotrismethylphosphonic acid (NTMP). Electron tunneling spectra were taken for PA, HMP and NTMP, and the observed frequencies were compared to values obtained from Fourier transform infrared, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Upward shifts in the P=O and P

  11. Infrared-Laser Excitation of the Internal Vibrational Mode of a Diatomic Molecule Adsorbed on a Metal Surface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    Excitation of the Internal Vibrational Mode of a Diatomic Molecule Adsorbed on a Metal Surface m by ’ Andre Peremans, Jacques Darville , Jean-Marie...Andre Peremans, Jacques Darville , Jean-Marie Gilles and Thomas F. George 13. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Yr. Mo.. Dayl As...ON A METAL SURFACE h Andr& Peremans , Jacques Darville and Jean-Marie Gilles _ _ _ _ Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Mol6culaire de Surface Accesnion

  12. A discrete interaction model/quantum mechanical method for describing response properties of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Seth Michael; Jensen, Lasse

    2010-08-01

    A new polarizable quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method for the calculation of response properties of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles is presented. This method, which we denote the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanics (DIM/QM) method, represents the nanoparticle atomistically which enables the modeling of the influence of the local environment of a nanoparticle surface on the optical properties of a molecule. Using DIM/QM, we investigate the excitation energies of rhodamine-6G (R6G) and crystal violet (CV) adsorbed on silver and gold nanoparticles of different quasispherical shapes and sizes. The metal nanoparticle is characterized by its static total polarizability, a reasonable approximation for frequencies far from the plasmon resonance. We observe that for both R6G and CV, the presence of the nanoparticle shifts the strongest excitation to the red ˜40 nm and also increases the oscillator strength of that excitation. The shifts in excitation energies due to the nanoparticle surface are found to be comparable to those due to solvation. We find that these shifts decay quickly as the molecule is moved away from the surface. We also find that the wavelength shift is largest when the transition dipole moment is aligned with the edges of the nanoparticle surface where the electric field is expected to be the largest. These results show that the molecular excitations are sensitive to the local environment on the nanoparticle as well as the specific orientation of the molecule relative to the surface.

  13. Heat capacity measurements of atoms and molecules adsorbed on evaporated metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, T.W.

    1989-05-01

    Investigations of the properties of absorbed monolayers have received great experimental and theoretical attention recently, both because of the importance of surface processes in practical applications such as catalysis, and the importance of such systems to the understanding of the fundamentals of thermodynamics in two dimensions. We have adapted the composite bolometer technology to the construction of microcalorimeters. For these calorimeters, the adsorption substrate is an evaporated film deposited on one surface of an optically polished sapphire wafer. This approach has allowed us to make the first measurements of the heat capacity of submonolayer films of /sup 4/He adsorbed on metallic films. In contrast to measurements of /sup 4/He adsorbed on all other insulating substrates, we have shown that /sup 4/He on silver films occupies a two-dimensional gas phase over a broad range of coverages and temperatures. Our apparatus has been used to study the heat capacity of Indium flakes. CO multilayers, /sup 4/He adsorbed on sapphire and on Ag films and H/sub 2/ adsorbed on Ag films. The results are compared with appropriate theories. 68 refs., 19 figs.

  14. Small molecule regulators of protein arginine methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Donghang; Yadav, Neelu; King, Randall W; Swanson, Maurice S; Weinstein, Edward J; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-06-04

    Here we report the identification of small molecules that specifically inhibit protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) activity. PRMTs are a family of proteins that either monomethylate or dimethylate the guanidino nitrogen atoms of arginine side chains. This common post-translational modification is implicated in protein trafficking, signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation. Most methyltransferases use the methyl donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet), as a cofactor. Current methyltransferase inhibitors display limited specificity, indiscriminately targeting all enzymes that use AdoMet. In this screen we have identified a primary compound, AMI-1, that specifically inhibits arginine, but not lysine, methyltransferase activity in vitro and does not compete for the AdoMet binding site. Furthermore, AMI-1 prevents in vivo arginine methylation of cellular proteins and can modulate nuclear receptor-regulated transcription from estrogen and androgen response elements, thus operating as a brake on certain hormone actions.

  15. Sensitivity of photoelectron diffraction to conformational changes of adsorbed molecules: Tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene/Au(111)

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, A.; Greif, M.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Mette, G.; Castiglioni, L.; Osterwalder, J.; Hengsberger, M.

    2017-01-01

    Electron diffraction is a standard tool to investigate the atomic structure of surfaces, interfaces, and adsorbate systems. In particular, photoelectron diffraction is a promising candidate for real-time studies of structural dynamics combining the ultimate time resolution of optical pulses and the high scattering cross-sections for electrons. In view of future time-resolved experiments from molecular layers, we studied the sensitivity of photoelectron diffraction to conformational changes of only a small fraction of molecules in a monolayer adsorbed on a metallic substrate. 3,3′,5,5′-tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene served as test case. This molecule can be switched between two isomers, trans and cis, by absorption of ultraviolet light. X-ray photoelectron diffraction patterns were recorded from tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene/Au(111) in thermal equilibrium at room temperature and compared to patterns taken in the photostationary state obtained by exposing the surface to radiation from a high-intensity helium discharge lamp. Difference patterns were simulated by means of multiple-scattering calculations, which allowed us to determine the fraction of molecules that underwent isomerization. PMID:28217715

  16. Sensitivity of photoelectron diffraction to conformational changes of adsorbed molecules: Tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene/Au(111).

    PubMed

    Schuler, A; Greif, M; Seitsonen, A P; Mette, G; Castiglioni, L; Osterwalder, J; Hengsberger, M

    2017-01-01

    Electron diffraction is a standard tool to investigate the atomic structure of surfaces, interfaces, and adsorbate systems. In particular, photoelectron diffraction is a promising candidate for real-time studies of structural dynamics combining the ultimate time resolution of optical pulses and the high scattering cross-sections for electrons. In view of future time-resolved experiments from molecular layers, we studied the sensitivity of photoelectron diffraction to conformational changes of only a small fraction of molecules in a monolayer adsorbed on a metallic substrate. 3,3',5,5'-tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene served as test case. This molecule can be switched between two isomers, trans and cis, by absorption of ultraviolet light. X-ray photoelectron diffraction patterns were recorded from tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene/Au(111) in thermal equilibrium at room temperature and compared to patterns taken in the photostationary state obtained by exposing the surface to radiation from a high-intensity helium discharge lamp. Difference patterns were simulated by means of multiple-scattering calculations, which allowed us to determine the fraction of molecules that underwent isomerization.

  17. Wang-Landau Simulations of Adsorbed and Confined Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanasiri, Busara; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P.; Wüst, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    The hydrophobic-polar (HP) model has emerged as one of the standard approaches for simulating protein folding. In this work, we used this model together with Wang-Landau (WL) sampling and appropriate Monte Carlo trial moves to determine the density of states and thermodynamics for two cases: Protein adsorption and protein confinement, in the vicinity of attractive surfaces. The influence on the adsorption behavior of surface attractive strength in the adsorption case and volumetric spaces in the confinement case will be discussed.

  18. Sorption of organic molecules on surfaces of a microporous polymer adsorbent modified with different quantities of uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, V. Yu.; Ganieva, A. G.; Kudasheva, F. Kh.

    2016-11-01

    The sorption of organic molecules on the surfaces of a number of adsorbents based on a microporous copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene modified with different quantities of uracil is studied by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. Samples containing 10-6, 10-5, 10-4, 10-3, 10-2, and 0.5 × 10‒1 weight parts of uracil (the pC of uracil ranges from 1.3 to 6) are studied. The contributions from different intermolecular interactions to the Helmholtz energy of sorption are calculated via the linear free energy relationship. It is found that as the concentration of uracil on the surface of the polymer adsorbent grows, the contributions from different intermolecular interactions and the conventional polarity of the surface have a bend at pC = 3, due probably to the formation of a supramolecular structure of uracil. Based on the obtained results, it is concluded that the formation of the supramolecular structure of uracil on the surface of the polymer adsorbent starts when pC < 3.

  19. Microscopic resolution of the interplay of Kondo screening and superconducting pairing: Mn-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on superconducting Pb(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Johannes; Pascual, Jose I.; Franke, Katharina J.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic molecules adsorbed on a superconductor give rise to a local competition of Cooper pair and Kondo singlet formation inducing subgap bound states. For manganese-phthalocyanine molecules on a Pb(111) substrate, scanning tunneling spectroscopy resolves pairs of subgap bound states and two Kondo screening channels. We show in a combined approach of scaling and numerical renormalization group calculations that the intriguing relation between Kondo screening and superconducting pairing is solely determined by the hybridization strength with the substrate. We demonstrate that an effective one-channel Anderson impurity model with a sizable particle-hole asymmetry captures universal and nonuniversal observations in the system quantitatively. The model parameters and disentanglement of the two screening channels are elucidated by scaling arguments.

  20. Influence of gold nanoparticle size on the orientation and activity of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kanwarjeet; Forrest, James

    2010-03-01

    We used UV-visible extinction spectroscopy to study the orientation and activity of rabbit immunoglobulin G and Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus adsorbed onto gold nanoparticles of various sizes (10-60nm). There is a shift in the localised surface plasmon resonance peak due to the interaction of proteins with the nanoparticles. The proteins adopt different orientations on smaller spheres as compared to larger spheres. IgG adopts end-on orientation on bigger spheres with the Fc domain directed towards the spheres. It displays no activity towards Protein A. This study shows that the curvature of nanoparticles strongly influences the orientation of adsorbed proteins. This could be useful in the designing of colloidal drug carriers.

  1. Control of the dipole layer of polar organic molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces via different charge-transfer channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Kai; Nakayama, Yasuo; Zhuang, Ying-Jie; Su, Kai-Jun; Wang, Chin-Yung; Pi, Tun-Wen; Metz, Sebastian; Papadopoulos, Theodoros A.; Chiang, T.-C.; Ishii, Hisao; Tang, S.-J.

    2017-02-01

    Organic molecules with a permanent electric dipole moment have been widely used as a template for further growth of molecular layers in device structures. Key properties of the resulting organic films such as energy level alignment (ELA), work function, and injection/collection barrier are linked to the magnitude and direction of the dipole moment at the interface. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we have systematically investigated the coverage-dependent work function and spectral line shapes of occupied molecular energy states (MESs) of chloroaluminium-phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) grown on Ag(111). We demonstrate that the dipole orientation of the first ClAlPc layer can be controlled by adjusting the deposition rate and postannealing conditions, and we find that the ELA at the interface differs by ˜0.4 eV between the Cl up and down configurations of the adsorbed ClAlPc molecules. These observations are rationalized by density functional theory (DFT) calculations based on a realistic model of the ClAlPc/Ag(111) interface, which reveal that the different orientations of the ClAlPc dipole layer lead to different charge-transfer channels between the adsorbed ClAlPc and Ag(111) substrate. Our findings provide a useful framework toward method development for ELA tuning.

  2. The role of polymer nanolayer architecture on the separation performance of anion-exchange membrane adsorbers: I. Protein separations.

    PubMed

    Bhut, Bharat V; Weaver, Justin; Carter, Andrew R; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Husson, Scott M

    2011-11-01

    This contribution describes the preparation of strong anion-exchange membranes with higher protein binding capacities than the best commercial resins. Quaternary amine (Q-type) anion-exchange membranes were prepared by grafting polyelectrolyte nanolayers from the surfaces of macroporous membrane supports. A focus of this study was to better understand the role of polymer nanolayer architecture on protein binding. Membranes were prepared with different polymer chain graft densities using a newly developed surface-initiated polymerization protocol designed to provide uniform and variable chain spacing. Bovine serum albumin and immunoglobulin G were used to measure binding capacities of proteins with different size. Dynamic binding capacities of IgG were measured to evaluate the impact of polymer chain density on the accessibility of large size protein to binding sites within the polyelectrolyte nanolayer under flow conditions. The dynamic binding capacity of IgG increased nearly linearly with increasing polymer chain density, which suggests that the spacing between polymer chains is sufficient for IgG to access binding sites all along the grafted polymer chains. Furthermore, the high dynamic binding capacity of IgG (>130 mg/mL) was independent of linear flow velocity, which suggests that the mass transfer of IgG molecules to the binding sites occurs primarily via convection. Overall, this research provides clear evidence that the dynamic binding capacities of large biologics can be higher for well-designed macroporous membrane adsorbers than commercial membrane or resin ion-exchange products. Specifically, using controlled polymerization leads to anion-exchange membrane adsorbers with high binding capacities that are independent of flow rate, enabling high throughput. Results of this work should help to accelerate the broader implementation of membrane adsorbers in bioprocess purification steps.

  3. Charge-transfer photodissociation of adsorbed molecules via electron image states

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E. T.

    2008-01-28

    The 248 and 193 nm photodissociations of submonolayer quantities of CH{sub 3}Br and CH{sub 3}I adsorbed on thin layers of n-hexane indicate that the dissociation is caused by dissociative electron attachment from subvacuum level photoelectrons created in the copper substrate. The characteristics of this photodissociation-translation energy distributions and coverage dependences show that the dissociation is mediated by an image potential state which temporarily traps the photoelectrons near the n-hexane-vacuum interface, and then the charge transfers from this image state to the affinity level of a coadsorbed halomethane which then dissociates.

  4. Adsorbed Proteins Influence the Biological Activity and Molecular Targeting of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Debamitra; Sundaram, S. K.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Riley, Brian J.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Kaysen, George A.; Moudgil, Brij M.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2007-11-01

    The possible combination of unique physicochemical properties operating at unique sites of action within cells and tissues has led to considerable uncertainty surrounding nanomaterial toxic potential. Here we have investigated the relative importance of proteins adsorbed onto nanomaterial surfaces in guiding uptake and toxicity to determine whether a priori identification of adsorbed proteins will contribute to nanomaterial toxicity assessment. Albumin was identified as the major protein adsorbed onto single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) following incubation with fetal bovine or human serum/plasma, but not when plasma from the Nagase Analbuminemic Rat (NAR) was used, and precoating SWCNTs with a non-ionic surfactant (Pluronic F127) inhibited albumin adsorption. Damaged or structurally altered albumin is rapidly cleared by scavenger receptors. In the RAW 264.7 macrophage-like model, we observed that SWCNTs inhibited the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 ng/ml, 6 hr) and this anti-inflammatory response was inhibited by fucoidan (scavenger receptor antagonist) and by precoating SWCNTs with Pluronic F127. Fucoidan also reduced the uptake of fluorescent SWCNTs (Alexa647) in RAW 264.7 cells. Albumin-coated SWCNTs reduced LPS-mediated Cox-2 induction. SWCNTs did not appear to reduce binding of a fluorescent LPS (Alexa488) to RAW 264.7 cells. The profile of proteins adsorbed onto amorphous silica (50 – 1000 nm) was qualitatively different, relative to SWCNTs, and coating amorphous silica with Pluronic F127 dramatically reduced protein binding and toxicity. Collectively, these observations are consistent with an important role for adsorbed proteins in guiding nanomaterial disposition and toxicity.

  5. Cationized hydroxyethylcellulose as a novel, adsorbed coating for basic protein separation by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runmiao; Shi, Ronghua; Peng, Shuhua; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanmei

    2008-04-01

    We present cationized hydroxyethylcellulose (cat-HEC) synthesized in our laboratory as a novel physically adsorbed coating for CE. This capillary coating is simple and easy to obtain as it only requires flushing the capillary with polymer aqueous solution. A comparative study with and without polymers was performed. The adsorbed cat-HEC coating exhibited minimal interactions with basic proteins, providing efficient basic protein separations with excellent reproducibility. Under broad pHs, the amine groups are the main charged groups bringing about a global positive charge on the capillary wall. As a consequence, the cat-HEC coating produced an anodal EOF performance. A comparative study on the use of hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) and cat-HEC as physically adsorbed coatings for CE are also presented. The separation efficiency and analysis reproducibility proved that the cat-HEC polymer was efficient in suppressing the adsorption of basic proteins onto the silica capillary wall. The long-term stability of the cat-HEC coating in consecutive protein separation runs has demonstrated the suitability of the coating for high-throughput electrophoretic protein separations.

  6. Some features of raman scattering by molecules adsorbed on metal crystal faces and a fine light structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polubotko, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    The paper analyzes some experiments on Raman scattering by molecules adsorbed on the face (111) of silver monocrystals performed by A. Campion et al. From the existence of the forbidden line A 2 u of benzene, the conclusion about existence of the surface field, caused by atomic structure of the surface is made. The relatively large intensity of this line allows to make a conclusion about large influence of the electromagnetic field spatial inhomogeneity in crystals on their optical properties. The difference between this field and a regular plane wave, which usually describes propagation of electromagnetic field in solids is named as a fine light structure. The influence of this structure on optical properties of solids is pointed out.

  7. Effects of non-local exchange on core level shifts for gas-phase and adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bossche, M.; Martin, N. M.; Gustafson, J.; Hakanoglu, C.; Weaver, J. F.; Lundgren, E.; Grönbeck, H.

    2014-07-01

    Density functional theory calculations are often used to interpret experimental shifts in core level binding energies. Calculations based on gradient-corrected (GC) exchange-correlation functionals are known to reproduce measured core level shifts (CLS) of isolated molecules and metal surfaces with reasonable accuracy. In the present study, we discuss a series of examples where the shifts calculated within a GC-functional significantly deviate from the experimental values, namely the CLS of C 1s in ethyl trifluoroacetate, Pd 3d in PdO and the O 1s shift for CO adsorbed on PdO(101). The deviations are traced to effects of the electronic self-interaction error with GC-functionals and substantially better agreements between calculated and measured CLS are obtained when a fraction of exact exchange is used in the exchange-correlation functional.

  8. Enhanced Raman scattering by molecules adsorbed at the surface of colloidal spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.-S.; Kerker, M.

    1981-08-01

    Equations are derived and calculations are presented for the electrodynamic mechanism of enhanced Raman scattering by molecules at the surface of prolate and oblate spheroids in the small-particle limit. The molecules may be arbitrarily distributed; the particles may be arbitrarily oriented. Calculations are presented for a monolayer distributed over randomly oriented spheroids. The effects of particle shape are considered for Ag, Au, and Cu hydrosols. The peak enhancement moves to longer wavelengths, and in the case of Au and Cu the magnitude of the enhancement increases strikingly as the eccentricity increases. The relation between the dependence of the Raman enhancement upon excitation wavelength and the extinction spectra is discussed, including the precariousness of extrapolating such relations beyond the small-particle limit.

  9. Hindered and modulated rotational states and spectra of adsorbed diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.T.; Chuu, D.S.; Mei, W.N.

    1996-10-01

    Both vertical and horizontal adsorption configurations of a diatomic molecule were modeled as the rigid rotor with which the spatial motion was confined by a finite conical well. In addition to the polar hindering potential, a sinusoidal azimuthal modulation, which bears the local symmetry of the adsorption site, was incorporated. Eigenfunctions for different models were expressed analytically in terms of the hypergeometric functions, and eigenvalues were solved numerically. We found that the rotational energy levels exhibit oscillatory behavior when plotted as functions of the hindrance angle. This particular phenomenon was interpreted as the occurrence of resonance transmission of the rotor wave function at certain hindrance condition. We also found that the rotational levels were grouped into bands when the azimuthal modulation strength was increased. The solutions were used to calculate the rotational-state distribution of desorbed molecules, and agreement with the previous experiment was obtained. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. The effect of gold nanoparticle structure on the conformation and function of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagner, Jennifer E.

    Many applications of nanobiomaterials rely on or are enhanced by specific, protein-mediated interactions with biological systems. These interactions can be engineered by chemically modifying the surface of the material to affect protein adsorption, or by altering the topography of the nanoscale surface. The attachment or adsorption of proteins onto materials can greatly affect the structure and subsequent function of those proteins, giving rise to unpredictable and potentially undesirable effects. Thus, it is essential to develop a detailed understanding of how nanostructured surface characteristics, such as atomic-scale topography, surface energy, and chemical structure may affect protein adsorption, structure, function, and stability. The presented work on gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the forms of spheres (AuNS), rods (AuNR), cubes (AuNC) and octahedra (AuNO) will elucidate the effect of nanoparticle morphology on adsorbed model proteins lysozyme (Lyz) and α-chymotrypsin (ChT). It has been found that nanoparticle morphology does affect the structure of adsorbed proteins as well as the extent of the surface coverage; however, the final form of the nano-bio conjugate is protein specific. Lyz conjugates underwent loss of structure and rapid aggregation regardless of AuNP morphology; however, ChT conjugates exhibited no structure loss when immobilized on AuNS, and a significant, loading specific structure loss when adsorbed on AuNR. Further work will be presented on efforts to determine the role of crystal structure, surface energy, and ligand chemistry on adsorbed proteins. Wet chemical methods are used to synthesize AuNC with f100g facets and AuNO with f111g facets. Nanoparticles are characterized through electron microscopy, X-ray and electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Protein conjugation and changes in protein structure are monitored through a variety of physical and spectroscopic techniques

  11. Single and binary adsorption of proteins on ion-exchange adsorbent: The effectiveness of isothermal models.

    PubMed

    Liang, Juan; Fieg, Georg; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous and sequential adsorption equilibria of single and binary adsorption of bovine serum albumin and bovine hemoglobin on Q Sepharose FF were investigated in different buffer constituents and initial conditions. The results in simultaneous adsorption showed that both proteins underwent competitive adsorption onto the adsorbent following greatly by protein-surface interaction. Preferentially adsorbed albumin complied with the universal rule of ion-exchange adsorption whereas buffer had no marked influence on hemoglobin adsorption. Moreover, an increase in initial ratios of proteins was benefit to a growth of adsorption density. In sequential adsorption, hemoglobin had the same adsorption densities as single-component adsorption. It was attributed to the displacement of preadsorbed albumin and multiple layer adsorption of hemoglobin. Three isothermal models (i.e. extended Langmuir, steric mass-action, and statistical thermodynamic (ST) models) were introduced to describe the ion-exchange adsorption of albumin and hemoglobin mixtures. The results suggested that extended Langmuir model gave the lowest deviation in describing preferential adsorption of albumin at a given salt concentration while steric mass-action model could very well describe the salt effect in albumin adsorption. For weaker adsorbed hemoglobin, ST model was the preferred choice. In concert with breakthrough data, the research further revealed the complexity in ion-exchange adsorption of proteins.

  12. ToF-SIMS and XPS Characterization of Protein Films Adsorbed onto Bare and Sodium Styrenesulfonate-Grafted Gold Substrates.

    PubMed

    Foster, Rami N; Harrison, Elisa T; Castner, David G

    2016-04-05

    The adsorption of single-component bovine serum albumin (BSA), bovine fibrinogen (Fgn), and bovine immunoglobulin G (IgG) films as well as multicomponent bovine plasma films onto bare and sodium styrenesulfonate (NaSS)-grafted gold substrates was characterized. The adsorption isotherms, measured via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, showed that at low solution concentrations all three single-component proteins adsorb with higher affinity onto gold surfaces compared to NaSS surfaces. However, at higher concentrations, NaSS surfaces adsorb the same or more total protein than gold surfaces. This may be because proteins that adsorb onto NaSS undergo structural rearrangements, resulting in a larger fraction of irreversibly adsorbed species over time. Still, with the possible exception of BSA adsorbed onto gold, neither surface appeared to have saturated at the highest protein solution concentration studied. Principal component (PC) analysis of amino acid mass fragments from time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectra distinguished between the same protein adsorbed onto NaSS and gold surfaces, suggesting that proteins adsorb differently on NaSS and gold surfaces. Explored further using peak ratios for buried/surface amino acids for each protein, we found that proteins denature more on NaSS surfaces than on gold surfaces. Also, using peak ratios for asymmetrically distributed amino acids, potential structural differences were postulated for BSA and IgG adsorbed onto NaSS and gold surfaces. PC modeling, used to track changes in plasma adsorption with time, suggests that plasma films on NaSS and Au surfaces become more Fgn-like with increasing adsorption time. However, the PC models included only three proteins, where plasma is composed of hundreds of proteins. Therefore, while both gold and NaSS appear to adsorb more Fgn with time, further study is required to confirm that this is representative of the final state of the plasma films.

  13. Driving force behind adsorption-induced protein unfolding: a time-resolved X-ray reflectivity study on lysozyme adsorbed at an air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Uruga, Tomoya; Tanida, Hajime; Toyokawa, Hidenori; Terada, Yasuko; Takagaki, Masafumi; Yamada, Hironari

    2009-01-06

    Time-resolved X-ray reflectivity measurements for lysozyme (LSZ) adsorbed at an air/water interface were performed to study the mechanism of adsorption-induced protein unfolding. The time dependence of the density profile at the air/water interface revealed that the molecular conformation changed significantly during adsorption. Taking into account previous work using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, we propose that the LSZ molecules initially adsorbed on the air/water interface have a flat unfolded structure, forming antiparallel beta-sheets as a result of hydrophobic interactions with the gas phase. In contrast, as adsorption continues, a second layer forms in which the molecules have a very loose structure having random coils as a result of hydrophilic interactions with the hydrophilic groups that protrude from the first layer.

  14. In situ investigations of Fe3+ induced complexation of adsorbed Mefp-1 protein film on iron substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Sababi, Majid; Brinck, Tore; Persson, Dan; Pan, Jinshan; Claesson, Per M

    2013-08-15

    A range of in situ analytical techniques and theoretical calculations were applied to gain insights into the formation and properties of the Mefp-1 film on iron substrate, as well as the protein complexation with Fe(3+) ions. Adsorption kinetics of Mefp-1 and the complexation were investigated using QCM-D. The results suggest an initially fast adsorption, with the molecules oriented preferentially parallel to the surface, followed by a structural change within the film leading to molecules extending toward solution. Exposure to a diluted FeCl3 solution results in enhanced complexation within the adsorbed protein film, leading to water removal and film compaction. In situ Peak Force Tapping AFM was employed for determining morphology and nano-mechanical properties of the surface layer. The results, in agreement with the QCM-D observations, demonstrate that addition of Fe(3+) induces a transition from an extended and soft protein layer to a denser and stiffer one. Further, in situ ATR-FTIR and Confocal Raman Micro-spectroscopy (CRM) techniques were utilized to monitor compositional/structural changes in the surface layer due to addition of Fe(3+) ions. The spectroscopic analyses assisted by DFT calculations provide evidence for formation of tri-Fe(3+)/catechol complexes in the surface film, which is enhanced by Fe(3+) addition.

  15. Switching orientation of adsorbed molecules: Reverse domino on a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braatz, C. R.; Esat, T.; Wagner, C.; Temirov, R.; Tautz, F. S.; Jakob, P.

    2016-01-01

    A thus far unknown phase of 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (NTCDA) on Ag(111), characterized by an all perpendicular orientation of the planar molecules and bound to the Ag substrate through the carboxyl oxygen atoms has been identified using infrared absorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Its formation process requires second layer NTCDA to squeeze into empty spaces between relaxed monolayer NTCDA molecules. Remarkably, this process causes initially parallel oriented NTCDA to likewise adopt the new, highly inclined adsorption geometry. According to our SPA-LEED and STM findings, the new phase displays a distinct long range order and shows a pronounced tendency to form 1D rows or narrow islands. We suggest that extra NTCDA preferentially transforms into the upright configuration close to existing islands and attaches to them, i.e. the transformation process proceeds in a directed and recurrent manner (reverse domino scenario). Identical processing starting with a compressed NTCDA/Ag(111) monolayer leads to a purely parallel oriented bilayer, that is, the NTCDA monolayer phase is retained and merely acts as a passive template for bilayer NTCDA. The new vertical NTCDA phase represents an unusual molecular system with π-orbitals oriented parallel to a metal surface. A substantially reduced coupling of these orbitals to Ag(111) electronic levels is conjectured, which will have a major impact on intermolecular couplings and electronically excited state lifetimes.

  16. [Interactions between proteins and cation exchange adsorbents analyzed by NMR and hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Hao, Dongxia; Qi, Shuting; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    In silico acquirement of the accurate residue details of protein on chromatographic media is a bottleneck in protein chromatography separation and purification. Here we developed a novel approach by coupling with H/D exchange and nuclear magnetic resonance to observe hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) unfolding behavior adsorbed on cation exchange media (SP Sepharose FF). Analysis of 1D 1H-NMR shows that protein unfolding accelerated H/D exchange rate, leading to more loss of signal of amide hydrogen owing to exposure of residues and the more unfolding of protein. Analysis of two-dimensional hydrogen-hydrogen total correlation spectroscopy shows that lysozyme lost more signals and experienced great unfolding during its adsorption on media surface. However, for several distinct fragments, the protection degrees varied, the adsorbed lysozyme lost more signal intensity and was less protected at disorder structures (coil, bend, and turn), but was comparatively more protected against exchange at secondary structure domains (α-helix, β-sheet). Finally, the binding site was determined by electrostatic calculations using computer simulation methods in conjunction with hydrogen deuterium labeled protein and NMR. This study would help deeply understand the microscopic mechanism of protein chromatography and guide the purposely design of chromatographic process and media. Moreover, it also provide an effective tool to study the protein and biomaterials interaction in other applications.

  17. Tribochemical synthesis of nano-lubricant films from adsorbed molecules at sliding solid interface: Tribo-polymers from α-pinene, pinane, and n-decane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Barthel, Anthony J.; Kim, Seong H.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanochemical reactions of adsorbed molecules at sliding interfaces were studied for α-pinene (C10H16), pinane (C10H18), and n-decane (C10H22) on a stainless steel substrate surface. During vapor phase lubrication, molecules adsorbed at the sliding interface could be activated by mechanical shear. Under the equilibrium adsorption condition of these molecules, the friction coefficient of sliding steel surfaces was about 0.2 and a polymeric film was tribochemically produced. The synthesis yield of α-pinene tribo-polymers was about twice as much as pinane tribo-polymers. In contrast to these strained bicyclic hydrocarbons, n-decane showed much weaker activity for tribo-polymerization at the same mechanical shear condition. These results suggested that the mechanical shear at tribological interfaces could induce the opening of the strained ring structure of α-pinene and pinane, which leads to polymerization of adsorbed molecules at the sliding track. On a stainless steel surface, such polymerization reactions of adsorbed molecules do not occur under typical surface reaction conditions. The mechanical properties and boundary lubrication efficiency of the produced tribo-polymer films are discussed.

  18. Infrared spectroscopy of water clusters co-adsorbed with hydrogen molecules on a sodium chloride film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen gas containing a trace of water vapor was dosed on a vacuum-evaporated sodium chloride film at 13 K, and water clusters formed on the substrate were investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Absorption bands due to (H2O)n clusters with n = 3-6 and an induced absorption band due to hydrogen were clearly observed. With increasing gas dosage, the intensities of the cluster bands increased linearly while the intensity of the hydrogen band was constant. This suggests that the water clusters were formed in two-dimensional matrices of hydrogen. We found that the water clusters did exist on the surface upon heating even after the hydrogen molecules had desorbed. A further rise of the substrate temperature up to 27 K yielded the formation of larger clusters, (H2O)n with n > 6 . We also discuss the origins of the two bands of the trimer in terms of pseudorotation and a metastable isomer.

  19. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Li, Yiwei; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  20. AFM visualization at a single-molecule level of denaturated states of proteins on graphite.

    PubMed

    Barinov, Nikolay A; Prokhorov, Valery V; Dubrovin, Evgeniy V; Klinov, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Different graphitic materials are either already used or believed to be advantageous in biomedical and biotechnological applications, e.g., as biomaterials or substrates for sensors. Most of these applications or associated important issues, such as biocompatibility, address the problem of adsorption of protein molecules and, in particular the conformational state of the adsorbed protein molecule on graphite. High-resolution AFM demonstrates highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) induced denaturation of four proteins of blood plasma, such as ferritin, fibrinogen, human serum albumin (HSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), at a single molecule level. Protein denaturation is accompanied by the decrease of the heights of protein globules and spreading of the denatured protein fraction on the surface. In contrast, the modification of HOPG with the amphiphilic oligoglycine-hydrocarbon derivative monolayer preserves the native-like conformation and provides even more mild conditions for the protein adsorption than typically used mica. Protein unfolding on HOPG may have universal character for "soft" globular proteins.

  1. Study of IR laser photoacoustic spectra of organic molecules adsorbed on metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Huizong; Chen, Kaitai; Wang, Zhaoyong

    1987-06-01

    Using a branch-tuning CW CO2 laser in the range of 0.2 to 10.8 microns, the IR photoacoustic spectra of organic molecules absorbed on a silver surface were studied. The absorbed molecular spectra of four layers of arachidic acid and cellulose diacetate with different surface densities was studied. No peak shift was found in a comparison between IR photoacoustic spectra of solid arachidic acid near 944/cm and the corresponding IR Fourier spectra of solid archidic acid. The IR photoacoustic spectra of cellulose diacetate with sigma sub 1 = 14,000/sq cm and sigma sub 1 = 5.5 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm respectively was compared with the corresponding transmission spectra of solid cellulose diacetate. It was found that the peak of the former near 1054/cm had a red shift of about 5/cm while the peak of the latter had no obvious shift within the range of accuracy of the experiment.

  2. Effect of substrate thickness on ejection of phenylalanine molecules adsorbed on free-standing graphene bombarded by 10 keV C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golunski, M.; Verkhoturov, S. V.; Verkhoturov, D. S.; Schweikert, E. A.; Postawa, Z.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been employed to investigate the effect of substrate thickness on the ejection mechanism of phenylalanine molecules deposited on free-standing graphene. The system is bombarded from the graphene side by 10 keV C60 projectiles at normal incidence and the ejected particles are collected both in transmission and reflection directions. It has been found that the ejection mechanism depends on the substrate thickness. At thin substrates mostly organic fragments are ejected by direct collisions between projectile atoms and adsorbed molecules. At thicker substrates interaction between deforming topmost graphene sheet and adsorbed molecules becomes more important. As this process is gentle and directionally correlated, it leads predominantly to ejection of intact molecules. The implications of the results to a novel analytical approach in Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry based on ultrathin free-standing graphene substrates and a transmission geometry are discussed.

  3. Single-Molecule Protein Conformational Dynamics in Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H PETER.

    2004-08-22

    We have demonstrated the application of single-molecule imaging and ultrafast spectroscopy to probe protein conformational dynamics in solution and in lipid bilayers. Dynamic protein-protein interactions involve significant conformational motions that initiate chain reactions leading to specific cellular responses. We have carried out a single molecule study of dynamic protein-protein interactions in a GTPase intracellular signaling protein Cdc42 in complex with a downstream effector protein, WASP. We were able to probe hydrophobic interactions significant to Cdc42/WASP recognition. Single molecule fluorescence intensity and polarization measurements have revealed the dynamic and inhomogeneous nature of protein-protein interactions within the Cdc42/WASP complex that is characterized by structured distributions of conformational fluctuation rates. Conducting a single-molecule fluorescence anisotropy study of calmodulin (CaM), a regulatory protein for calcium-dependent cell signaling, we were able to probe CaM conformational dynamics at a wide time scale. In this study, CaM contains a site-specifically inserted tetra-cysteine motif that reacted with FlAsH, a biarsenic fluorescein derivative that can be rotationally locked to the host protein. The study provided direct characterization of the nanosecond motions of CaM tethered to a biologically compatible surface under physiological buffer solution. The unique technical approaches are applicable of studying single-molecule dynamics of protein conformational motions and protein-protein interactions at a wide time range without the signal convolution of probe-dye molecule motions

  4. Determination of protein surface excess on a liquid/solid interface by single-molecule counting.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Tang, Hui; Gai, Hongwei; Dong, Xiuling; Wang, Qi; Yeung, Edward S

    2009-08-01

    Determination of protein surface excess is an important way of evaluating the properties of biomaterials and the characteristics of biosensors. A single-molecule counting method is presented that uses a standard fluorescence microscope to measure coverage of a liquid/solid interface by adsorbed proteins. The extremely low surface excess of lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA), in a bulk concentration range from 0.3 nmol L(-1) (0.02 microg mL(-1)) to 3 nmol L(-1) (0.2 microg mL(-1)), were measured by recording the counts of spatially isolated single molecules on either hydrophilic (glass) or hydrophobic (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) surfaces at different pH. The differences observed in amounts of adsorbed proteins under different experimental conditions can be qualitatively explained by the combined interactions of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. This, in turn, implies that single-molecule counting is an effective way of measuring surface coverage at a liquid/solid interface.

  5. Differential analysis of "protein corona" profile adsorbed onto different nonviral gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caracciolo, Giulio; Caruso, Giuseppe; Foglia, Patrizia; Pozzi, Daniela; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2011-12-15

    A shotgun proteomics approach was used to characterize and compare the proteins that lead to the formation of a rich "protein corona" adsorbed onto the surfaces of cationic liposomes (CLs), lipoplexes, and lipid/polycation/DNA (LPD) complexes, when they come into contact with plasma. After separation of the nanoparticle-protein complex from plasma, the protein mixture was digested, and peptides were analyzed by nanoliquid chromatography-Orbitrap LTQ-XL mass spectrometry. The number of proteins bound to lipoplexes was double that of those identified in the corona of CLs (208 vs 105), while 77 proteins were common to both coronas. The number of proteins bound to the surface of the LPD complexes (158, 133 of which are common to lipoplexes) is intermediate between those found in the protein corona of both CLs and lipoplexes. About half of them were found in the protein corona of CLs. By overlapping the three formulations, it can be seen that only 12 proteins are peculiar to LPD complexes. These results may help in designing gene delivery systems capable of binding the minimum possible quantity of proteins that influence transfection negatively, binding selectively proteins capable of helping in steering in vivo the vector toward the target, and obtaining more efficient and effective gene therapy.

  6. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization.

  7. Photon-exposure-dependent photon-stimulated desorption for obtaining photolysis cross section of molecules adsorbed on surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons.

    PubMed

    Chou, L-C; Jang, C-Y; Wu, Y-H; Tsai, W-C; Wang, S-K; Chen, J; Chang, S-C; Liu, C-C; Shai, Y; Wen, C-R

    2008-12-07

    Photon-exposure-dependent positive- and negative-ion photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was proposed to study the photoreactions and obtain the photolysis cross sections of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons with energy near the core level of adsorbate. The changes in the F(+) and F(-) PSD ion yields were measured from CF(3)Cl molecules adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 at 30 K (CF(3)Cl dose=0.3x10(15) molecules/cm(2), approximately 0.75 monolayer) during irradiation of monochromatic soft x-ray photons near the F(1s) edge. The PSD ion yield data show the following characteristics: (a) The dissociation of adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules is due to a combination of direct photodissociation via excitation of F(1s) core level and substrate-mediated dissociation [dissociative attachment and dipolar dissociation induced by the photoelectrons emitting from the silicon substrate]. (b) the F(+) ion desorption is associated with the bond breaking of the surface CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, CFCl, and SiF species. (c) the F(-) yield is mainly due to DA and DD of the adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules. (d) The surface SiF is formed by reaction of the surface Si atom with the neutral fluorine atom, F(+), or F(-) ion produced by scission of C-F bond of CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, or CFCl species. A kinetic model was proposed for the explanation of the photolysis of this submonolayer CF(3)Cl-covered surface. Based on this model and the variation rates of the F(+)F(-) signals during fixed-energy monochromatic photon bombardment at 690.2 and 692.6 eV [near the F(1s) edge], the photolysis cross section was deduced as a function of energy.

  8. Determinants of Protein Elution Rates from Preparative Ion-Exchange Adsorbents

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, James M.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2016-01-01

    The rate processes involved in elution in preparative chromatography can affect both peak resolution and hence selectivity as well as practical factors such as facility fit. These processes depend on the physical structure of the adsorbent particles, the amount of bound solute, the solution conditions for operation or some combination of these factors. Ion-exchange adsorbents modified with covalently attached or grafted polymer layers have become widely used in preparative chromatography. Their often easily accessible microstructures offer substantial binding capacities for biomolecules, but elution has sometimes been observed to be undesirably slow. In order to determine which physicochemical phenomena control elution behavior, commercially available cellulosic, dextran-grafted and unmodified agarose materials were characterized here by their uptake and elution profiles at various conditions, including different degrees of loading. Elution data were analyzed under the assumption of purely diffusion-limited control, including the role of pore structure properties such as porosity and tortuosity. In general, effective elution rates decreased with the reduction of accessible pore volume, but differences among different proteins indicated the roles of additional factors. Additional measurements and analysis, including the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy to observe elution within single chromatographic particles, indicated the importance of protein association within the particle during elution. The use of protein stabilizing agents was explored in systems presenting atypical elution behavior, and L-arginine and disaccharide excipients were shown to alleviate the effects for one protein, lysozyme, in the presence of sodium chloride. Incorporation of these excipients into eluent buffer gave rise to faster elution and significantly lower pool volumes in elution from polymer-modified adsorbents. PMID:26948763

  9. Determinants of protein elution rates from preparative ion-exchange adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Angelo, James M; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-04-01

    The rate processes involved in elution in preparative chromatography can affect both peak resolution and hence selectivity as well as practical factors such as facility fit. These processes depend on the physical structure of the adsorbent particles, the amount of bound solute, the solution conditions for operation or some combination of these factors. Ion-exchange adsorbents modified with covalently attached or grafted polymer layers have become widely used in preparative chromatography. Their often easily accessible microstructures offer substantial binding capacities for biomolecules, but elution has sometimes been observed to be undesirably slow. In order to determine which physicochemical phenomena control elution behavior, commercially available cellulosic, dextran-grafted and unmodified agarose materials were characterized here by their elution profiles at various conditions, including different degrees of loading. Elution data were analyzed under the assumption of purely diffusion-limited control, including the role of pore structure properties such as porosity and tortuosity. In general, effective elution rates decreased with the reduction of accessible pore volume, but differences among different proteins indicated the roles of additional factors. Additional measurements and analysis, including the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy to observe elution within single chromatographic particles, indicated the importance of protein association within the particle during elution. The use of protein stabilizing agents was explored in systems presenting atypical elution behavior, and l-arginine and disaccharide excipients were shown to alleviate the effects for one protein, lysozyme, in the presence of sodium chloride. Incorporation of these excipients into eluent buffer gave rise to faster elution and significantly lower pool volumes in elution from polymer-modified adsorbents.

  10. Physical and chemical characterization of adsorbed protein onto gold electrode functionalized with Tunisian coral and nacre.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Samir; Bouchemi, Meryem; Slimane, Noureddine; Azari, Zitouni

    2013-01-01

    Bone substitutes are more and more used in bone surgery because of their biologic safety, clinic efficiency and facility to synthesize. Bone substitutes with active osteogenic properties, associating biomaterials with organic macromolecule components of the extracellular matrix (protein, GAG) are recommended. Nevertheless, we should have a simple technique to control interactions between proteins and the material. Natural coral and nacre have been found to be impressive bone graft substitutes. In this work, we characterize nacre and coral powder using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). We used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model protein, adsorbed to these biomaterial surfaces. In order to understand the nacre/coral-protein interfacial compatibility, it is necessary to investigate the wettability.

  11. Isolation of calcium-binding proteins on selective adsorbents. Application to purification of bovine calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Ersson, B; Porath, J O

    1996-05-03

    We report the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) with hard metal ions. Various hard metal ions (Mn2+, La3+, Nd3+, Eu(3 were immobilized on cross-linked agarose substituted with Tris(carboxymethyl)ethylenediamine (TED) and used as an adsorbent. After systematic studies, europium was selected for further work on the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins. It was found that the presence of Ca2+ in the sample and the solvent strongly promoted the adsorption and selectivity. Selective elution was accomplished in stepwise mode by the addition of calcium chelators such as malonate, citrate and phosphate. Calmodulin of high purity was isolated from a crude extract. Similar behavior of other calcium-binding proteins indicates that the reported chromatographic procedure can be generally applied to such proteins.

  12. Affibody molecules as engineered protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Frejd, Fredrik Y; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Affibody molecules can be used as tools for molecular recognition in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. There are several preclinical studies reported on diagnostic and therapeutic use of this molecular class of alternative scaffolds, and early clinical evidence is now beginning to accumulate that suggests the Affibody molecules to be efficacious and safe in man. The small size and ease of engineering make Affibody molecules suitable for use in multispecific constructs where AffiMabs is one such that offers the option to potentiate antibodies for use in complex disease. PMID:28336959

  13. The leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) adsorbs as monomers or dimers onto surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Lea, Alan S.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2010-03-15

    Amelogenin and amelogenin splice variants are believed to be involved in controlling the formation of the highly anisotropic and ordered hydroxyapatite crystallites that form enamel. The adsorption behavior of amelogenin proteins onto substrates is very important because protein-surface interactions are critical to it’s function. We have studied the adsorption of LRAP, a splice variant of amelogenin which may also contribute to enamel function, onto model self-assembled monolayers on gold containing of COOH, CH3, and NH2 end groups. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments indicated that LRAP in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and solutions at saturation with calcium phosphate contained aggregates of nanospheres. Null ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study protein adsorption amounts and structures. Relatively high amounts of adsorption occurred onto the CH3 and NH2 surfaces from both calcium phosphate and PBS solutions. Adsorption was also promoted onto COOH surfaces when calcium was present in the solutions suggesting an interaction that involves calcium bridging with the negatively charged C-terminus. The ellipsometry and AFM studies suggested that the protein adsorbed onto all surfaces as LRAP monomers. We propose that the monomers adsorb onto the surfaces by disassembling or “shedding” from the nanospheres that are present in solution. This work reveals the importance of small subnanosphere-sized structures of LRAP at interfaces, structures that may be important in the biomineralization of tooth enamel.

  14. Protein-Adsorbed Magnetic-Nanoparticle-Mediated Assay for Rapid Detection of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Cowger, Taku A; Yang, Yaping; Rink, David E; Todd, Trever; Chen, Hongmin; Shen, Ye; Yan, Yajun; Xie, Jin

    2017-02-17

    Antibiotic susceptibility tests have been used for years as a crucial diagnostic tool against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, due to a lack of biomarkers specific to resistant types, these approaches are often time-consuming, inaccurate, and inflexible in drug selections. Here, we present a novel susceptibility test method named protein-adsorbed nanoparticle-mediated matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry, or PANMS. Briefly, we adsorb five different proteins (β-casein, α-lactalbumin, human serum albumin, fibrinogen, and avidin) onto the surface of Fe3O4. Upon interaction with bacteria surface, proteins were displaced from the nanoparticle surface, the amounts of which were quantified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. We find that the protein displacement profile was different distinctive among different bacteria strains and, in particular, between wild-type and drug-resistant strains. More excitingly, we observe bacteria resistant to drugs of the same mechanisms share similar displacement profiles on a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) map. This suggests the possibility of using PANMS to identify the type of mechanism behind antibiotic resistance, which was confirmed in a blind test. Given that PANMS is free of drug incubation and the whole procedure takes less than 50 min, it holds great potential as a high-throughput, low-cost, and accurate drug susceptibility test in the clinic.

  15. Effect of side by side interactions on the thermodynamic properties of adsorbed CO molecules on the Ni(111) surface: a cluster model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamkhali, Amir N.; Parsafar, Gholamabbas

    2010-05-01

    The effect of electrostatic interactions on vibrational frequencies and thermodynamic properties of CO adsorbate on the Ni(111) surface is calculated by taking the first and second nearest-neighbour interactions into account. In order to obtain reasonable results, the cluster model of various surface adsorption sites with CO adsorbate is partially optimized, using Density Functional Theory and also the MP2 method for the hcp site. Comparison between DFT and MP2 results shows that DFT results are more reliable for this system. The stretching and bending frequencies of CO adsorbate are calculated using both Partial Hessian Analysis and Cluster-Adsorbate Coupling methods. Stretching and bending frequencies are both shifted by the side by side interactions. The coupling of surface phonons and adsorbate vibrations reduces the side effects. The largest side effects on the vibrational internal energy, isochoric heat capacity, entropy and total Helmholtz free energy of adsorbed CO molecule calculated using the CAC method are found for 0.5 ML coverage. The results of the CAC method are better, but the PHA method can be used as a simple upper bound estimation. The adsorptive phase acts as an intelligent material in such a way that it changes its configuration in order to reduce the side effects.

  16. Development of a rapid sanitization solution for silica-based protein A affinity adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marc; Hiraoka-Sutow, Martha; Mak, Polly; Mann, Fred; Lebreton, Bénédicte

    2009-05-22

    Protein A chromatography media require sanitization between batches as well as prior to long-term storage. While sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is probably one of the most widely used sanitants within the bioprocess industry, it cannot be used with silica- or controlled pore glass (CPG)-based adsorbents due to the instability of the base matrix at high pH. Benzyl alcohol is commonly used for sanitizing such adsorbents, though extended contact times may be required to meet desired microbial log reduction values, especially for fungal and bacterial spore formers. With the rising market need for monoclonal antibody therapeutics, higher manufacturing throughput may be required. In such cases, a shorter sanitization cycle would be extremely beneficial to maximize manufacturing throughput and productivity. This paper describes the development of a new synergistic sanitant solution, designated PAB (120 mM phosphoric acid, 167 mM acetic acid, 2.2% benzyl alcohol) that delivers improved microbial kill kinetics, enabling sanitization times of 2-3h at room temperature, while maintaining acceptable adsorbent stability. Both the approaches taken to establish the effectiveness of the improved solution as well as confirmation of its process compatibility are covered here.

  17. Method for the calculation of the vibrational frequency shift of physisorbed molecules. Application to H2 adsorbed in NaA zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, A. V.; Cohen De Lara, E.

    1994-11-01

    The vibrational frequency shift of physisorbed diatomic molecules is related to the interaction with the adsorbent expressed in terms of the internuclear distance ρ. It is calculated by the Schrödinger equation, the perturbation theory, and a simplified method. We show that it is sufficient to calculate the interaction potential for the values of ρ in the ground and first vibrational states in order to get a precision of 10% on the frequency shift. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental frequency shift of H2 adsorbed in NaA zeolite is used to adjust the interaction potential, especially in terms of the ionicity of the crystal.

  18. Application of immobilized metal ion chelate complexes as pseudocation exchange adsorbents for protein separation.

    PubMed

    Zachariou, M; Hearn, M T

    1996-01-09

    The interactions of horse muscle myoglobin (MYO), tuna heart cytochrome c (CYT), and hen egg white lysozyme (LYS) with three different immobilized metal ion affinity (IMAC) adsorbents involving the chelated complexes of the hard Lewis metal ions Al3+, Ca2+, Fe3+, and Yb3+ and the borderline Lewis metal ion Cu2+ have been investigated in the presence of low- and high-ionic strength buffers and at two different pH values. In contrast to the selectivity behavior noted with buffers of high ionic strength, with low-ionic strength buffers, these three proteins interact with the hard metal ion IMAC adsorbents in a manner more characteristic of cation exchange behavior, although in contrast to the cation exchange chromatography of these proteins, as the pH value of the elution buffer was increased, the retention also increased. The selectivity differences observed under these conditions appear to be due to the formation of hydrolytic complexes of these immobilized metal ion chelate systems involving a change in the coordination geometry of the im-M(n+)-chelate at higher pH values. The experimental observations have been evaluated in terms of the effective charge on the immobilized metal ion chelate complex and the charge characteristics of the specific proteins.

  19. Small-molecule control of protein function through Staudinger reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ji; Liu, Qingyang; Morihiro, Kunihiko; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Using small molecules to control the function of proteins in live cells with complete specificity is highly desirable, but challenging. Here we report a small-molecule switch that can be used to control protein activity. The approach uses a phosphine-mediated Staudinger reduction to activate protein function. Genetic encoding of an ortho-azidobenzyloxycarbonyl amino acid using a pyrrolysyl transfer RNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in mammalian cells enables the site-specific introduction of a small-molecule-removable protecting group into the protein of interest. Strategic placement of this group renders the protein inactive until deprotection through a bioorthogonal Staudinger reduction delivers the active wild-type protein. This developed methodology was applied to the conditional control of several cellular processes, including bioluminescence (luciferase), fluorescence (enhanced green fluorescent protein), protein translocation (nuclear localization sequence), DNA recombination (Cre) and gene editing (Cas9).

  20. SPLINTS: small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Eric S; Park, Eunyoung; Eck, Michael J; Thomä, Nicolas H

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory protein-protein interactions are ubiquitous in biology, and small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors are an important focus in drug discovery. Remarkably little attention has been given to the opposite strategy-stabilization of protein-protein interactions, despite the fact that several well-known therapeutics act through this mechanism. From a structural perspective, we consider representative examples of small molecules that induce or stabilize the association of protein domains to inhibit, or alter, signaling for nuclear hormone, GTPase, kinase, phosphatase, and ubiquitin ligase pathways. These SPLINTS (small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers) drive interactions that are in some cases physiologically relevant, and in others entirely adventitious. The diverse structural mechanisms employed suggest approaches for a broader and systematic search for such compounds in drug discovery.

  1. Ultra-Thin Optically Transparent Carbon Electrodes Produced from Layers of Adsorbed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alharthi, Sarah A.; Benavidez, Tomas E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a simple, versatile, and inexpensive procedure to prepare optically transparent carbon electrodes, using proteins as precursors. Upon adsorption, the protein-coated substrates were pyrolyzed under reductive conditions (5% H2) to form ultra-thin, conductive electrodes. Because proteins spontaneously adsorb to interfaces forming uniform layers, the proposed method does not require a precise control of the preparation conditions, specialized instrumentation, or expensive precursors. The resulting electrodes were characterized by a combination of electrochemical, optical, and spectroscopic means. As a proof-of-concept, the optically-transparent electrodes were also used as substrate for the development of an electrochemical glucose biosensor. The proposed films represent a convenient alternative to more sophisticated, and less available, carbon-based nanomaterials. Furthermore, these films could be formed on a variety of substrates, without classical limitations of size or shape. PMID:23421732

  2. Shotgun proteomic analytical approach for studying proteins adsorbed onto liposome surface.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caracciolo, Giulio; Cavaliere, Chiara; Crescenzi, Carlo; Pozzi, Daniela; Laganà, Aldo

    2011-09-01

    The knowledge about the interaction between plasma proteins and nanocarriers employed for in vivo delivery is fundamental to understand their biodistribution. Protein adsorption onto nanoparticle surface (protein corona) is strongly affected by vector surface characteristics. In general, the primary interaction is thought to be electrostatic, thus surface charge of carrier is supposed to play a central role in protein adsorption. Because protein corona composition can be critical in modifying the interactive surface that is recognized by cells, characterizing its formation onto lipid particles may serve as a fundamental predictive model for the in vivo efficiency of a lipidic vector. In the present work, protein coronas adsorbed onto three differently charged cationic liposome formulations were compared by a shotgun proteomic approach based on nano-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. About 130 proteins were identified in each corona, with only small differences between the different cationic liposome formulations. However, this study could be useful for the future controlled design of colloidal drug carriers and possibly in the controlled creation of biocompatible surfaces of other devices that come into contact with proteins into body fluids.

  3. Conformational transition free energy profiles of an adsorbed, lattice model protein by multicanonical Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castells, Victoria; Van Tassel, Paul R.

    2005-02-01

    Proteins often undergo changes in internal conformation upon interacting with a surface. We investigate the thermodynamics of surface induced conformational change in a lattice model protein using a multicanonical Monte Carlo method. The protein is a linear heteropolymer of 27 segments (of types A and B) confined to a cubic lattice. The segmental order and nearest neighbor contact energies are chosen to yield, in the absence of an adsorbing surface, a unique 3×3×3 folded structure. The surface is a plane of sites interacting either equally with A and B segments (equal affinity surface) or more strongly with the A segments (A affinity surface). We use a multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm, with configuration bias and jump walking moves, featuring an iteratively updated sampling function that converges to the reciprocal of the density of states 1/Ω(E), E being the potential energy. We find inflection points in the configurational entropy, S(E)=klnΩ(E), for all but a strongly adsorbing equal affinity surface, indicating the presence of free energy barriers to transition. When protein-surface interactions are weak, the free energy profiles F(E)=E-TS(E) qualitatively resemble those of a protein in the absence of a surface: a free energy barrier separates a folded, lowest energy state from globular, higher energy states. The surface acts in this case to stabilize the globular states relative to the folded state. When the protein surface interactions are stronger, the situation differs markedly: the folded state no longer occurs at the lowest energy and free energy barriers may be absent altogether.

  4. Insights into the role of protein molecule size and structure on interfacial properties using designed sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Mirjana Dimitrijev; He, Lizhong; James, Michael; Nelson, Andrew; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of a large, structured protein with a smaller, unstructured component are inherently complex and hard to characterize at interfaces, leading to difficulties in understanding their interfacial behaviours and, therefore, formulation optimization. Here, we investigated interfacial properties of such a mixed system. Simplicity was achieved using designed sequences in which chemical differences had been eliminated to isolate the effect of molecular size and structure, namely a short unstructured peptide (DAMP1) and its longer structured protein concatamer (DAMP4). Interfacial tension measurements suggested that the size and bulk structuring of the larger molecule led to much slower adsorption kinetics. Neutron reflectometry at equilibrium revealed that both molecules adsorbed as a monolayer to the air–water interface (indicating unfolding of DAMP4 to give a chain of four connected DAMP1 molecules), with a concentration ratio equal to that in the bulk. This suggests the overall free energy of adsorption is equal despite differences in size and bulk structure. At small interfacial extensional strains, only molecule packing influenced the stress response. At larger strains, the effect of size became apparent, with DAMP4 registering a higher stress response and interfacial elasticity. When both components were present at the interface, most stress-dissipating movement was achieved by DAMP1. This work thus provides insights into the role of proteins' molecular size and structure on their interfacial properties, and the designed sequences introduced here can serve as effective tools for interfacial studies of proteins and polymers. PMID:23303222

  5. Quantitative time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry for the characterization of multicomponent adsorbed protein films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M. S.; Shen, M.; Horbett, T. A.; Castner, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is ideal for the characterization of adsorbed proteins due to its chemical specificity and surface sensitivity. We have employed ToF-SIMS and multivariate analysis to determine the surface composition of adsorbed protein films from binary mixtures, blood serum, and blood plasma. Good correlation between ToF-SIMS data and independent radiolabeling studies was achieved for binary mixtures, though these results depended on the substrate. Qualitative insight into the composition of the serum and plasma protein films was obtained via comparison to standard single protein film spectra. ToF-SIMS and multivariate analysis were able to measure the surface composition of multicomponent adsorbed protein films.

  6. In situ STM imaging of bis-3-sodiumsulfopropyl-disulfide molecules adsorbed on copper film electrodeposited on Pt(111) single crystal electrode.

    PubMed

    Tu, HsinLing; Yen, PoYu; Chen, Sihzih; Yau, ShuehLin; Dow, Wei-Ping; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2011-06-07

    The adsorption of bis-3-sodiumsulfopropyldi-sulfide (SPS) on metal electrodes in chloride-containing media has been intensively studied to unveil its accelerating effect on Cu electrodeposition. Molecular resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging technique was used in this study to explore the adsorption and decomposition of SPS molecules concurring with the electrodeposition of copper on an ordered Pt(111) electrode in 0.1 M HClO(4) + 1 mM Cu(ClO(4))(2) + 1 mM KCl. Depending on the potential of Pt(111), SPS molecules could react, adsorb, and decompose at chloride-capped Cu films. A submonolayer of Cu adatoms classified as the underpotential deposition (UPD) layer at 0.4 V (vs Ag/AgCl) was completely displaced by SPS molecules, possibly occurring via RSSR (SPS) + Cl-Cu-Pt → RS(-)-Pt(+) + RS(-) (MPS) + Cu(2+) + Cl(-), where MPS is 3-mercaptopropanesulfonate. By contrast, at 0.2 V, where a full monolayer of Cu was presumed to be deposited, SPS molecules were adsorbed in local (4 × 4) structures at the lower ends of step ledges. Bulk Cu deposition driven by a small overpotential (η < 50 mV) proceeded slowly to yield an atomically smooth Cu deposit at the very beginning (<5 layers). On a bilayer Cu deposit, the chloride adlayer was still adsorbed to afford SPS admolecules arranged in a unique 1D striped phase. SPS molecules could decompose into MPS upon further Cu deposition, as a (2 × 2)-MPS structure was observed with prolonged in situ STM imaging. It was possible to visualize either SPS admolecules in the upper plane or chloride adlayer sitting underneath upon switching the imaging conditions. Overall, this study established a MPS molecular film adsorbed to the chloride adlayer sitting atop the Cu deposit.

  7. Contribution of Adsorbed Protein Films to Nanoscopic Vibrations Exhibited by Bacteria Adhering through Ligand-Receptor Bonds.

    PubMed

    Song, Lei; Sjollema, Jelmer; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2015-09-29

    Bacteria adhering to surfaces exhibit nanoscopic vibrations that depend on the viscoelasticity of the bond. The quantification of the nanoscopic vibrations of bacteria adhering to surfaces provides new opportunities to better understand the properties of the bond through which bacteria adhere and the mechanisms by which they resist detachment. Often, however, bacteria do not adhere to bare surfaces but to adsorbed protein films, on which adhesion involves highly specific ligand-receptor binding next to nonspecific DLVO interaction forces. Here we determine the contribution of adsorbed salivary protein and fibronectin films to vibrations exhibited by adhering streptococci and staphylococci, respectively. The streptococcal strain used has the ability to adhere to adsorbed salivary proteins films through antigen I/II ligand-receptor binding, while the staphylococcal strain used adheres to adsorbed fibronectin films through a proteinaceous ligand-receptor bond. In the absence of ligand-receptor binding, electrostatic interactions had a large impact on vibration amplitudes of adhering bacteria on glass. On an adsorbed salivary protein film, vibration amplitudes of adhering streptococci depended on the film softness as determined by QCM-D and were reduced after film fixation using glutaraldehyde. On a relatively stiff fibronectin film, cross-linking the film in glutaraldehyde hardly reduced its softness, and accordingly fibronectin film softness did not contribute to vibration amplitudes of adhering staphylococci. However, fixation of the staphylococcus-fibronectin bond further decreased vibration amplitudes, while fixation of the streptococcus bond hardly impacted vibration amplitudes. Summarizing, this study shows that both the softness of adsorbed protein films and the properties of the bond between an adhering bacterium and an adsorbed protein film play an important role in bacterial vibration amplitudes. These nanoscopic vibrations reflect the viscoelasticity of the

  8. Electronic and molecular properties of an adsorbed protein monolayer probed by two-color sum-frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dreesen, L; Humbert, C; Sartenaer, Y; Caudano, Y; Volcke, C; Mani, A A; Peremans, A; Thiry, P A; Hanique, S; Frère, J-M

    2004-08-17

    Two-color sum-frequency generation spectroscopy (2C-SFG) is used to probe the molecular and electronic properties of an adsorbed layer of the green fluorescent protein mutant 2 (GFPmut2) on a platinum (111) substrate. First, the spectroscopic measurements, performed under different polarization combinations, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) show that the GFPmut2 proteins form a fairly ordered monolayer on the platinum surface. Next, the nonlinear spectroscopic data provide evidence of particular coupling phenomena between the GFPmut2 vibrational and electronic properties. This is revealed by the occurrence of two doubly resonant sum-frequency generation processes for molecules having both their Raman and infrared transition moments in a direction perpendicular to the sample plane. Finally, our 2C-SFG analysis reveals two electronic transitions corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence energy levels which are related to two different GFPmut2 conformations: the B (anionic) and I forms, respectively. Their observation and wavelength positions attest the keeping of the GFPmut2 electronic properties upon adsorption on the metallic surface.

  9. Measurement of interactions between protein layers adsorbed on silica by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Delgado, J. J.; Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Galisteo-González, F.; Gálvez-Ruiz, M. J.; Feiler, A.; Rutland, M. W.

    2004-07-01

    The present work, using an atomic force microscope and the colloid probe technique, investigates the interaction forces between bovine serum albumin (BSA) layers and between apoferritin layers adsorbed on silica surfaces. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different pH values and NaCl concentrations. Similar behaviours have been found with both proteins. Electrostatic and steric forces dominate the interactions between the protein layers at low NaCl concentrations. However, a very strange behaviour is found as a function of pH at high NaCl concentrations. The results obtained under these conditions could be explained if the presence of hydration forces in these systems is assumed.

  10. Characterization of cross-linked cellulosic ion-exchange adsorbents: 2. Protein sorption and transport.

    PubMed

    Angelo, James M; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Gantier, Rene; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-03-18

    Adsorption behavior in the HyperCel family of cellulosic ion-exchange materials (Pall Corporation) was characterized using methods to assess, quantitatively and qualitatively, the dynamics of protein uptake as well as static adsorption as a function of ionic strength and protein concentration using several model proteins. The three exchangers studied all presented relatively high adsorptive capacities under low ionic strength conditions, comparable to commercially available resins containing polymer functionalization aimed at increasing that particular characteristic. The strong cation- and anion-exchange moieties showed higher sensitivity to increasing salt concentrations, but protein affinity on the salt-tolerant STAR AX HyperCel exchanger remained strong at ionic strengths normally used in downstream processing to elute material fully during ion-exchange chromatography. Very high uptake rates were observed in both batch kinetics experiments and time-series confocal laser scanning microscopy, suggesting low intraparticle transport resistances relative to external film resistance, even at higher bulk protein concentrations where the opposite is typically observed. Electron microscopy imaging of protein adsorbed phases provided additional insight into particle structure that could not be resolved in previous work on the bare resins.

  11. Influence of fluoride-detergent combinations on the visco-elasticity of adsorbed salivary protein films.

    PubMed

    Veeregowda, Deepak H; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K

    2011-02-01

    The visco-elasticity of salivary-protein films is related to mouthfeel, lubrication, biofilm formation, and protection against erosion and is influenced by the adsorption of toothpaste components. The thickness and the visco-elasticity of hydrated films (determined using a quartz crystal microbalance) of 2-h-old in vitro-adsorbed salivary-protein films were 43.5 nm and 9.4 MHz, respectively, whereas the dehydrated thickness, measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, was 2.4 nm. Treatment with toothpaste slurries decreased the thickness of the film, depending on the fluoride-detergent combination involved. Secondary exposure to saliva resulted in a regained thickness of the film to a level similar to its original thickness; however, no association was found between the thickness of hydrated and dehydrated films, indicating differences in film structure. Treatment with stannous fluoride/sodium lauryl sulphate (SnF(2)/SLS)-containing toothpaste slurries yielded a strong, immediate two-fold increase in characteristic film frequency (f(c)) with respect to untreated films, indicating cross-linking in adsorbed salivary-protein films by Sn(2+) that was absent when SLS was replaced with sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP). Secondary exposure to saliva of films treated with SnF(2) caused a strong, six-fold increase in f(c) compared with primary salivary-protein films, regardless of whether SLS or NaHMP was the detergent. This suggests that ionized stannous is not directly available for cross-linking in combination with highly negatively charged NaHMP, but becomes slowly available after initial treatment to cause cross-linking during secondary exposure to saliva.

  12. Proteins Are the Body's Worker Molecules

    MedlinePlus

    ... broader scientific community. Back to Top The Genetic Code In addition to the protein folding code, which remains unbroken, there is another code, a genetic code, that scientists cracked in the ...

  13. The profile of adsorbed plasma and serum proteins on methacrylic acid copolymer beads: Effect on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Wells, Laura A; Guo, Hongbo; Emili, Andrew; Sefton, Michael V

    2017-02-01

    Polymer beads made of 45% methacrylic acid co methyl methacrylate (MAA beads) promote vascular regenerative responses in contrast to control materials without methacrylic acid (here polymethyl methacrylate beads, PMMA). In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that MAA copolymers induce differences in macrophage phenotype and polarization and inflammatory responses, presumably due to protein adsorption differences between the beads. To explore differences in protein adsorption in an unbiased manner, we used high resolution shotgun mass spectrometry to identify and compare proteins that adsorb from human plasma or serum onto MAA and PMMA beads. From plasma, MAA beads adsorbed many complement proteins, such as C1q, C4-related proteins and the complement inhibitor factor H, while PMMA adsorbed proteins, such as albumin, C3 and apolipoproteins. Because of the differences in complement protein adsorption, follow-up studies focused on using ELISA to assess complement activation. When incubated in serum, MAA beads generated significantly lower levels of soluble C5b9 and C3a/C3adesarg in comparison to PMMA beads, indicating a decrease in complement activation with MAA beads. The differences in adsorbed protein on the two materials likely alter subsequent cell-material interactions that ultimately result in different host responses and local vascularization.

  14. Targeted Mutagenesis and Combinatorial Library Screening Enables Control of Protein Orientation on Surfaces and Increased Activity of Adsorbed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Teran, Carlos A; Carlin, Kevin B; Efimenko, Kirill; Genzer, Jan; Rao, Balaji M

    2016-08-30

    While nonspecific adsorption is widely used for immobilizing proteins on solid surfaces, the random nature of protein adsorption may reduce the activity of immobilized proteins due to occlusion of the active site. We hypothesized that the orientation a protein assumes on a given surface can be controlled by systematically introducing mutations into a region distant from its active site, thereby retaining activity of the immobilized protein. To test this hypothesis, we generated a combinatorial protein library by randomizing six targeted residues in a binding protein derived from highly stable, nonimmunoglobulin Sso7d scaffold; mutations were targeted in a region that is distant from the binding site. This library was screened to isolate binders that retain binding to its cognate target (chicken immunoglobulin Y, cIgY) as well as exhibit adsorption on unmodified silica at pH 7.4 and high ionic strength conditions. A single mutant, Sso7d-2B5, was selected for further characterization. Sso7d-2B5 retained binding to cIgY with an apparent dissociation constant similar to that of the parent protein; both mutant and parent proteins saturated the surface of silica with similar densities. Strikingly, however, silica beads coated with Sso7d-2B5 could achieve up to 7-fold higher capture of cIgY than beads coated with the parent protein. These results strongly suggest that mutations introduced in Sso7d-2B5 alter its orientation relative to the parent protein, when adsorbed on silica surfaces. Our approach also provides a generalizable strategy for introducing mutations in proteins so as to improve their activity upon immobilization, and has direct relevance to development of protein-based biosensors and biocatalysts.

  15. The Single-Molecule Approach to Membrane Protein Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Michael G; Hallworth, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The advent of techniques for imaging solitary fluorescent molecules has made possible many new kinds of biological experiments. Here, we describe the application of single-molecule imaging to the problem of subunit stoichiometry in membrane proteins. A membrane protein of unknown stoichiometry, prestin, is coupled to the fluorescent enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and synthesized in the human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line. We prepare adherent membrane fragments containing prestin-eGFP by osmotic lysis. The molecules are then exposed to continuous low-level excitation until their fluorescence reaches background levels. Their fluorescence decreases in discrete equal-amplitude steps, consistent with the photobleaching of single fluorophores. We count the number of steps required to photobleach each molecule. The molecular stoichiometry is then deduced using a binomial model.

  16. Dependence of cellular activity at protein adsorbed biointerfaces with nano- to microscale dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Nune, C; Misra, R D K; Somani, M C; Karjalainen, L P

    2014-06-01

    Protein adsorption is one of the first-few events that occur when a biomedical device comes in contact with the physiological system. The adsorption process is subsequently followed by communication with cells and formation of tissue. Given the strong interest in nanostructured surfaces, we describe here the impact of grain structure from nanograined (NG) regime to coarse-grained (CG) regime on the self-assembly of proteins (bovine serum albumin) and consequent functional response of osteoblasts. The objective is accomplished using the innovative concept of "phase reversion" that enables a wide range of grain size (from NG to CG regime) to be obtained using an identical set of parameters, besides additional attributes of high strength/weight ratio and wear resistance. Depending on the grain structure a consistent and significant change in the adsorption characteristics of protein was observed at biointerface, such that the cell density was statistically different. The high surface coverage and leaf-like conformation of adsorbed protein on NG surface as compared to bare branch-like structure with low surface coverage on the CG surface, was beneficial in favorably modulating cellular activity (osteoblast functions: cell attachment, proliferation, actin, vinculin, and fibronectin expression). This is the first report that elucidates the impact of grain structure from NG to CG regime on cellular activity.

  17. Single-molecule choreography between telomere proteins and G quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2014-06-10

    Telomeric DNA binds proteins to protect chromosome ends, but it also adopts G quadruplex (GQ) structures. Two new studies by Hwang and colleagues (in this issue of Structure) and Ray and colleagues (published elsewhere) use single molecule imaging to reveal how GQs affect the binding of different telomere associated proteins. The data suggest that GQs play important roles in regulating accessibility of telomeres.

  18. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tung S; Dao, Thang D; Dang, Luu H; Vu, Lam D; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V

    2016-08-24

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes.

  19. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-01-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3′-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes. PMID:27555217

  20. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, Youngpak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-08-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3‧-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes.

  1. Silanization of polyelectrolyte-coated particles: an effective route to stabilize Raman tagging molecules adsorbed on micrometer-sized silver particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwan; Lee, Hyang Bong; Shin, Kuan Soo

    2008-06-03

    Micrometer-sized Ag (microAg) powders are very efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. To use microAg powders as a core material for molecular sensors operating via SERS, it is necessary to stabilize the tagging (i.e., SERS-marker) molecules adsorbed onto them. We demonstrate in this work that once the tagging molecules are coated with aliphatic polyelectrolytes such as poly(allylamine hydrochloride), the base-catalyzed silanization can be readily carried out to form stable silica shells around the polyelectrolyte layers by a biomimetic process; any particle can therefore be coated with silica since polyelectrolytes can be deposited beforehand via a layer-by-layer deposition method. Even after silanization, the SERS peaks of marker molecules on microAg particles are the only observable peaks since aliphatic polyelectrolytes, as well as silica shells, are intrinsically weak Raman scatterers, and more importantly, the SERS signals must be derived mostly from the first layer of the adsorbates (i.e., the marker molecules) in direct contact with the microAg particles. Silica shells, once fabricated, can further be derivatized to possess biofunctional groups; therefore, the modified microAg particles can be used as platforms of highly stable SERS-based biological sensors, as well as barcoding materials.

  2. Ratio of the surface-enhanced anti-Stokes scattering to the surface-enhanced Stokes-Raman scattering for molecules adsorbed on a silver electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolo, A. G.; Sanderson, A. C.; Smith, A. P.

    2004-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from oxazine 720 (oxa), rhodamine 6G (R6G), and pyridine (py) adsorbed on a rough silver surface was observed. The silver electrode was immersed in aqueous solutions permitting control of the potential bias applied to the surface. SERS spectra in the Stokes and anti-Stokes regions were obtained for several applied potentials and two laser excitation energies. Normalized ratios between the anti-Stokes and the Stokes intensities K were calculated from the SERS spectra. The K ratios differed from unity for all the systems investigated. A preferential enhancement of the (surface-enhanced) Stokes scattering was observed for oxa and py. In contrast, the K ratios were higher than unity for R6G, indicating an increase in the anti-Stokes signal. The K ratios measured in this work decreased with the excitation energy and showed a dependence on the energy of the vibrational modes. These results were satisfactorily explained using resonance models, based on the charge-transfer and electromagnetic theories for SERS. No evidence for a SERS-induced nonthermal population distribution among the vibrational states of the adsorbed molecules (vibrational optical pumping) was found. Therefore, we conclude that the main features of the preferential enhancement of the anti-Stokes scattering for an adsorbed molecule on rough silver can be fully understood in the context of current SERS theories.

  3. Development of small molecules designed to modulate protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Che, Ye; Brooks, Bernard R; Marshall, Garland R

    2006-02-01

    Protein-protein interactions are ubiquitous, essential to almost all known biological processes, and offer attractive opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Developing small molecules that modulate protein-protein interactions is challenging, owing to the large size of protein-complex interface, the lack of well-defined binding pockets, etc. We describe a general approach based on the "privileged-structure hypothesis" [Che, Ph.D. Thesis, Washington University, 2003] - that any organic templates capable of mimicking surfaces of protein-recognition motifs are potential privileged scaffolds as protein-complex antagonists--to address the challenges inherent in the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  4. Small molecule therapeutics targeting F-Box proteins in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays vital roles in maintaining protein equilibrium mainly through proteolytic degradation of targeted substrates. The archetypical SCF ubiquitin E3 ligase complex contains a substrate recognition subunit F-box protein that recruits substrates to the catalytic ligase core for its polyubiquitylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Several well characterized F-box proteins have been demonstrated that are tightly linked to neoplasia. There is mounting information characterizing F-box protein-substrate interactions with the rationale to develop unique therapeutics for cancer treatment. Here we review that how F-box proteins function in cancer and summarize potential small molecule inhibitors for cancer therapy. PMID:26427329

  5. Small molecule therapeutics targeting F-box proteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2016-02-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays vital roles in maintaining protein equilibrium mainly through proteolytic degradation of targeted substrates. The archetypical SCF ubiquitin E3 ligase complex contains a substrate recognition subunit F-box protein that recruits substrates to the catalytic ligase core for its polyubiquitylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Several well-characterized F-box proteins have been demonstrated that are tightly linked to neoplasia. There is mounting information characterizing F-box protein-substrate interactions with the rationale to develop unique therapeutics for cancer treatment. Here we review that how F-box proteins function in cancer and summarize potential small molecule inhibitors for cancer therapy.

  6. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Qian, Kun; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zheng, Y. George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arginine methylation is an abundant posttranslational modification occurring in mammalian cells and catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). Misregulation and aberrant expression of PRMTs are associated with various disease states, notably cancer. PRMTs are prominent therapeutic targets in drug discovery. Areas covered The authors provide an updated review of the research on the development of chemical modulators for PRMTs. Great efforts are seen in screening and designing potent and selective PRMT inhibitors, and a number of micromolar and submicromolar inhibitors have been obtained for key PRMT enzymes such as PRMT1, CARM1, and PRMT5. The authors provide a focus on their chemical structures, mechanism of action, and pharmacological activities. Pros and cons of each type of inhibitors are also discussed. Expert opinion Several key challenging issues exist in PRMT inhibitor discovery. Structural mechanisms of many PRMT inhibitors remain unclear. There lacks consistency in potency data due to divergence of assay methods and conditions. Physiologically relevant cellular assays are warranted. Substantial engagements are needed to investigate pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the new PRMT inhibitors in pertinent disease models. Discovery and evaluation of potent, isoform-selective, cell-permeable and in vivo-active PRMT modulators will continue to be an active arena of research in years ahead. PMID:26789238

  7. TIMBAL v2: update of a database holding small molecules modulating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Higueruelo, Alicia P; Jubb, Harry; Blundell, Tom L

    2013-01-01

    TIMBAL is a database holding molecules of molecular weight <1200 Daltons that modulate protein-protein interactions. Since its first release, the database has been extended to cover 50 known protein-protein interactions drug targets, including protein complexes that can be stabilized by small molecules with therapeutic effect. The resource contains 14 890 data points for 6896 distinct small molecules. UniProt codes and Protein Data Bank entries are also included. Database URL: http://www-cryst.bioc.cam.ac.uk/timbal

  8. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-01-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape. PMID:26151767

  9. Free enthalpies of replacing water molecules in protein binding pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riniker, Sereina; Barandun, Luzi J.; Diederich, François; Krämer, Oliver; Steffen, Andreas; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2012-12-01

    Water molecules in the binding pocket of a protein and their role in ligand binding have increasingly raised interest in recent years. Displacement of such water molecules by ligand atoms can be either favourable or unfavourable for ligand binding depending on the change in free enthalpy. In this study, we investigate the displacement of water molecules by an apolar probe in the binding pocket of two proteins, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, using the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to obtain free enthalpy differences. In both cases, a ligand core is placed inside the respective pocket and the remaining water molecules are converted to apolar probes, both individually and in pairs. The free enthalpy difference between a water molecule and a CH3 group at the same location in the pocket in comparison to their presence in bulk solution calculated from EDS molecular dynamics simulations corresponds to the binding free enthalpy of CH3 at this location. From the free enthalpy difference and the enthalpy difference, the entropic contribution of the displacement can be obtained too. The overlay of the resulting occupancy volumes of the water molecules with crystal structures of analogous ligands shows qualitative correlation between experimentally measured inhibition constants and the calculated free enthalpy differences. Thus, such an EDS analysis of the water molecules in the binding pocket may give valuable insight for potency optimization in drug design.

  10. Free enthalpies of replacing water molecules in protein binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Riniker, Sereina; Barandun, Luzi J; Diederich, François; Krämer, Oliver; Steffen, Andreas; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-12-01

    Water molecules in the binding pocket of a protein and their role in ligand binding have increasingly raised interest in recent years. Displacement of such water molecules by ligand atoms can be either favourable or unfavourable for ligand binding depending on the change in free enthalpy. In this study, we investigate the displacement of water molecules by an apolar probe in the binding pocket of two proteins, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, using the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to obtain free enthalpy differences. In both cases, a ligand core is placed inside the respective pocket and the remaining water molecules are converted to apolar probes, both individually and in pairs. The free enthalpy difference between a water molecule and a CH(3) group at the same location in the pocket in comparison to their presence in bulk solution calculated from EDS molecular dynamics simulations corresponds to the binding free enthalpy of CH(3) at this location. From the free enthalpy difference and the enthalpy difference, the entropic contribution of the displacement can be obtained too. The overlay of the resulting occupancy volumes of the water molecules with crystal structures of analogous ligands shows qualitative correlation between experimentally measured inhibition constants and the calculated free enthalpy differences. Thus, such an EDS analysis of the water molecules in the binding pocket may give valuable insight for potency optimization in drug design.

  11. A biomimetic Protein G affinity adsorbent: an Ugi ligand for immunoglobulins and Fab fragments based on the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Graziella; Lowe, Christopher R

    2013-04-01

    This work reports the development of a synthetic affinity adsorbent for immunoglobulins based on the Fab-binding domain of Streptococcal Protein G (SpG-domain III). The ligand (A2C7I1) was synthesized by the four-component Ugi reaction to generate a substituted peptoidal scaffold mimicking key amino acid residues of SpG. Computer-aided analysis suggests a putative binding site on the CH 1 domain of the Fab molecule. In silico studies, supported by affinity chromatography in comparison with immobilized SpG, as well as analytical characterization by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance of the ligand synthesized in solution, indicated the authenticity and suitability of the designed ligand for the purification of immunoglobulins. The immobilized ligand displayed an apparent static binding capacity of ~17 mg IgG ml(-1) and a dissociation constant of 5.34 × 10(-5)  M. Preparative chromatography demonstrated the ability of the immobilized ligand to purify IgG and Fab fragments from crude mammalian and yeast cell cultures, under near physiological ionic strength and pH, to yield proteins of 99% and 93% purity, respectively.

  12. Polymeric adsorbent for removing toxic proteins from blood of patients with kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Davankov, V; Pavlova, L; Tsyurupa, M; Brady, J; Balsamo, M; Yousha, E

    2000-02-28

    A hypercrosslinked styrenic polymer with an enhanced proportion of mesopores in the range 2-20 nm has been developed. The principle of the synthesis consists of the suspension polymerization of divinylbenzene (or copolymerization of styrene with divinylbenzene) in the presence of a porogen that is a theta-solvent for polystyrene. On the scale of thermodynamic affinity, theta-solvents occupy a border position between good solvents and precipitating media for the growing polymer chains. In this case, microphase separation takes place during the final stages of the polymerization process. The polymer was shown to adsorb 93-98% of beta2-microglobulin from the blood or plasma of patients with chronic kidney failure. At the same time, large essential proteins, like albumin, are not removed to a significant extent, obviously, due to the size-exclusion effect and the difference in the hydrophobicity of the proteins. By replacing surface exposed pendant vinyl groups of the polymer with hydrophilic functional groups, the material was made hemocompatible, according to the standard battery of biocompatibility tests required by ISO 10993 guidelines. No adverse effects such as fever or hypotension were noted in dogs in direct hemoperfusion experiments with the polymer.

  13. Relaxational dynamics of water molecules at protein surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellerue, S.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    2000-08-01

    Relaxational dynamics of water molecules at the surface of a C-phycocyanin protein is studied by high resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The neutron quasi-elastic spectra are well described by the α-relaxation process of mode coupling theory of supercooled liquids. The relaxation times of interfacial water exhibit a power law dependence on the wave vector Q. The average diffusion coefficient is 10 times lower than that of bulk water. This confirms that there is a retardation of water molecules at the protein surface which is in good agreement with the results of water at the surface of hydrophilic model systems.

  14. Single-Molecule Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas; Janovjak, Harald; Fotiadis, Dimtrios; Kedrov, Alexej; Cisneros, David; Müller, Daniel J.

    Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides novel ways to characterize the structure-function relationship of native membrane proteins. High-resolution AFM topographs allow observing the structure of single proteins at sub-nanometer resolution as well as their conformational changes, oligomeric state, molecular dynamics and assembly. We will review these feasibilities illustrating examples of membrane proteins in native and reconstituted membranes. Classification of individual topographs of single proteins allows understanding the principles of motions of their extrinsic domains, to learn about their local structural flexibilities and to find the entropy minima of certain conformations. Combined with the visualization of functionally related conformational changes these insights allow understanding why certain flexibilities are required for the protein to function and how structurally flexible regions allow certain conformational changes. Complementary to AFM imaging, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) experiments detect molecular interactions established within and between membrane proteins. The sensitivity of this method makes it possible to measure interactions that stabilize secondary structures such as transmembrane α-helices, polypeptide loops and segments within. Changes in temperature or protein-protein assembly do not change the locations of stable structural segments, but influence their stability established by collective molecular interactions. Such changes alter the probability of proteins to choose a certain unfolding pathway. Recent examples have elucidated unfolding and refolding pathways of membrane proteins as well as their energy landscapes.

  15. Multi-technique Characterization of Adsorbed Peptide and Protein Orientation: LK310 and Protein G B1

    SciTech Connect

    Baio, J.; Weidner, T; Samuel, N; McCrea, K; Baugh, L; Stayton, P; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The ability to orient biologically active proteins on surfaces is a major challenge in the design, construction, and successful deployment of many medical technologies. As methods to orient biomolecules are developed, it is also essential to develop techniques that can accurately determine the orientation and structure of these materials. In this study, two model protein and peptide systems are presented to highlight the strengths of three surface analysis techniques for characterizing protein films: time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. First, the orientation of Protein G B1, a rigid 6 kDa domain covalently attached to a maleimide-functionalized self-assembled monolayer, was examined using ToF-SIMS. Although the thickness of the Protein G layer was similar to the ToF-SIMS sampling depth, orientation of Protein G was successfully determined by analyzing the C{sub 2}H{sub 5}S{sup +} intensity, a secondary-ion derived from a methionine residue located at one end of the protein. Next, the secondary structure of a 13-mer leucine-lysine peptide (LK{sub 310}) adsorbed onto hydrophilic quartz and hydrophobic fluorocarbon surfaces was examined. SFG spectra indicated that the peptide's lysine side chains were ordered on the quartz surface, while the peptide's leucine side chains were ordered on the fluorocarbon surface. NEXAFS results provided complementary information about the structure of the LK{sub 310} film and the orientations of amide bonds within the LK{sub 310} peptide.

  16. Slide Agglutination Method for the Serological Identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with Anti-Gonococcal Antibodies Adsorbed to Protein A-Containing Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Dan; Kronvall, Göran

    1974-01-01

    A rapid slide agglutination test has been developed for the identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae that are primarily detected as oxidase-positive colonies in gonococcal cultures. The technique is based on the specific nonimmune reactivity between the Fc portion of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and staphylococcal protein A. IgG molecules adsorbed to stabilized staphylococci will thereby become oriented with their antigen-reactive sites that are directed outwards. Protein A-containing staphylococci with unabsorbed anti-gonococcal antibodies gave positive co-agglutination reactions with gonococci but also with meningococci, some Moraxella, Haemophilus, and Pseudomonas strains. These crossreactions were eliminated by absorption of the anti-gonococcal antiserum with meningococcal and Moraxella organisms prior to the coating of reagent staphylococci. In the routine culture diagnosis of N. gonorrhoeae the use of specific gonococcal reagent staphylococci gave concordant results with fermentation procedures and immunofluorescent techniques. Images PMID:4207280

  17. Isolation and characterization of chimeric human Fc-expressing proteins using protein a membrane adsorbers and a streamlined workflow.

    PubMed

    Burdick, Monica M; Reynolds, Nathan M; Martin, Eric W; Hawes, Jacquelyn V; Carlson, Grady E; Cuckler, Chaz M; Bates, Michael C; Barthel, Steven R; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2014-01-08

    Laboratory scale to industrial scale purification of biomolecules from cell culture supernatants and lysed cell solutions can be accomplished using affinity chromatography. While affinity chromatography using porous protein A agarose beads packed in columns is arguably the most common method of laboratory scale isolation of antibodies and recombinant proteins expressing Fc fragments of IgG, it can be a time consuming and expensive process. Time and financial constraints are especially daunting in small basic science labs that must recover hundreds of micrograms to milligram quantities of protein from dilute solutions, yet lack access to high pressure liquid delivery systems and/or personnel with expertise in bioseparations. Moreover, product quantification and characterization may also excessively lengthen processing time over several workdays and inflate expenses (consumables, wages, etc.). Therefore, a fast, inexpensive, yet effective protocol is needed for laboratory scale isolation and characterization of antibodies and other proteins possessing an Fc fragment. To this end, we have devised a protocol that can be completed by limited-experience technical staff in less than 9 hr (roughly one workday) and as quickly as 4 hr, as opposed to traditional methods that demand 20+ work hours. Most required equipment is readily available in standard biomedical science, biochemistry, and (bio)chemical engineering labs, and all reagents are commercially available. To demonstrate this protocol, representative results are presented in which chimeric murine galectin-1 fused to human Fc (Gal-1hFc) from cell culture supernatant was isolated using a protein A membrane adsorber. Purified Gal-1hFc was quantified using an expedited Western blotting analysis procedure and characterized using flow cytometry. The streamlined workflow can be modified for other Fc-expressing proteins, such as antibodies, and/or altered to incorporate alternative quantification and characterization

  18. Engineered kinesin motor proteins amenable to small-molecule inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, Martin F.; Winding, Michael; Yue, Yang; Shastry, Shankar; Teloni, Federico; Reddy, Sanjay; Blasius, T. Lynne; Soppina, Pushpanjali; Hancock, William O.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Verhey, Kristen J.

    2016-01-01

    The human genome encodes 45 kinesin motor proteins that drive cell division, cell motility, intracellular trafficking and ciliary function. Determining the cellular function of each kinesin would benefit from specific small-molecule inhibitors. However, screens have yielded only a few specific inhibitors. Here we present a novel chemical-genetic approach to engineer kinesin motors that can carry out the function of the wild-type motor yet can also be efficiently inhibited by small, cell-permeable molecules. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we develop two independent strategies to generate inhibitable motors, and characterize the resulting inhibition in single-molecule assays and in cells. We further apply these two strategies to create analogously inhibitable kinesin-3 motors. These inhibitable motors will be of great utility to study the functions of specific kinesins in a dynamic manner in cells and animals. Furthermore, these strategies can be used to generate inhibitable versions of any motor protein of interest. PMID:27045608

  19. Zeta potential, contact angles, and AFM imaging of protein conformation adsorbed on hybrid nanocomposite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ana C; Piedade, Ana P

    2013-08-28

    The sputtering deposition of gold (Au) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) was used to prepare a nanocomposite hybrid thin film suitable for protein adsorption while maintaining the native conformation of the biological material. The monolithic PTFE and the nanocomposite PTFE/Au thin films, with Au content up to 1 at %, were co-deposited by r.f. magnetron sputtering using argon as a discharge gas and deposited onto 316L stainless steel substrates, the most commonly used steel in biomaterials. The deposited thin films, before and after bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, were thoroughly characterized with special emphasis on the surface properties/characteristics by atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential, and static and dynamic contact angle measurements, in order to assess the relationship between structure and conformational changes. The influence of a pre-adsorbed peptide (RGD) was also evaluated. The nanotopographic and chemical changes induced by the presence of gold in the nanocomposite thin films enable RGD bonding, which is critical for the maintenance of the BSA native conformation after adsorption.

  20. How mobile are dye adsorbates and acetonitrile molecules on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles? A quasi-elastic neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaissier, Valerie; Sakai, Victoria Garcia; Li, Xiaoe; Cabral, João T.; Nelson, Jenny; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-12-01

    Motions of molecules adsorbed to surfaces may control the rate of charge transport within monolayers in systems such as dye sensitized solar cells. We used quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) to evaluate the possible dynamics of two small dye moieties, isonicotinic acid (INA) and bis-isonicotinic acid (BINA), attached to TiO2 nanoparticles via carboxylate groups. The scattering data indicate that moieties are immobile and do not rotate around the anchoring groups on timescales between around 10 ps and a few ns (corresponding to the instrumental range). This gives an upper limit for the rate at which conformational fluctuations can assist charge transport between anchored molecules. Our observations suggest that if the conformation of larger dye molecules varies with time, it does so on longer timescales and/or in parts of the molecule which are not directly connected to the anchoring group. The QENS measurements also indicate that several layers of acetonitrile solvent molecules are immobilized at the interface with the TiO2 on the measurement time scale, in reasonable agreement with recent classical molecular dynamics results.

  1. How mobile are dye adsorbates and acetonitrile molecules on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles? A quasi-elastic neutron scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Vaissier, Valerie; Sakai, Victoria Garcia; Li, Xiaoe; Cabral, João T.; Nelson, Jenny; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-01-01

    Motions of molecules adsorbed to surfaces may control the rate of charge transport within monolayers in systems such as dye sensitized solar cells. We used quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) to evaluate the possible dynamics of two small dye moieties, isonicotinic acid (INA) and bis-isonicotinic acid (BINA), attached to TiO2 nanoparticles via carboxylate groups. The scattering data indicate that moieties are immobile and do not rotate around the anchoring groups on timescales between around 10 ps and a few ns (corresponding to the instrumental range). This gives an upper limit for the rate at which conformational fluctuations can assist charge transport between anchored molecules. Our observations suggest that if the conformation of larger dye molecules varies with time, it does so on longer timescales and/or in parts of the molecule which are not directly connected to the anchoring group. The QENS measurements also indicate that several layers of acetonitrile solvent molecules are immobilized at the interface with the TiO2 on the measurement time scale, in reasonable agreement with recent classical molecular dynamics results. PMID:27991538

  2. Regulation of protein multipoint adsorption on ion-exchange adsorbent and its application to the purification of macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongdong; Bi, Jingxiu; Zhao, Lan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2010-12-01

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) using commercial ionic absorbents is a widely used technique for protein purification. Protein adsorption onto ion-exchange adsorbents often involves a multipoint adsorption. In IEC of multimeric proteins or "soft" proteins, the intense multipoint binding would make the further desorption difficult, even lead to the destruction of protein structure and the loss of its biological activity. In this paper, DEAE Sepharose FF adsorbents with controllable ligand densities from 0.020 to 0.183 mmol/ml were synthesized, and then the effect of ligand density on the static ion-exchange adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto DEAE Sepharose FF was studied by batch adsorption technique. Steric mass-action (SMA) model was employed to analyze the static adsorption behavior. The results showed that the SMA model parameters, equilibrium constant (K(a)), characteristic number of binding sites (υ) and steric factor (σ), increased gradually with ligand density. Thus, it was feasible to regulate BSA multipoint adsorption by modulating the ligand density of ion-exchange adsorbent. Furthermore, IEC of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using DEAE Sepharose FF adsorbents with different ligand densities was carried out, and the activity recovery of HBsAg was improved from 42% to 67% when the ligand density was decreased from 0.183 to 0.020 mmol/ml. Taking the activity recovery of HBsAg, the purification factor and the binding capacity into account, DEAE Sepharose FF with a ligand density of 0.041 mmol/ml was most effective for the purification of HBsAg. Such a strategy may also be beneficial for the purification of macromolecules and multimeric proteins.

  3. Single-Molecule Study of Protein-Protein Interaction Dynamics in a Cell Signaling System

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xin; Nalbant, Perihan; Toutchkine, Alexei; Hu, Dehong; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Hahn, Klaus M.; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-01-15

    We report a combined single-molecule fluorescence and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of protein-protein interactions in a GTP-binding intracellular signaling protein Cdc42 in complex with a downstream effector protein WASP. A 13- kDa WASP fragment which binds only the activated GTP-loaded Cdc42 was labeled with a novel solvatochromic dye and used to probe hydrophobic interactions significant to Cdc42/WASP recognition. Our single-molecule fluorescence measurements have shown conformational fluctuations of the protein complex and suggested multiple conformational states at a wide range of time scales might be involved in protein interaction dynamics. Single-molecule experiments have revealed the dynamic disorder or protein-protein interactions within the Cdc42/WASP complex, which may be important for regulating downstream signaling events.

  4. Single-molecule protein sequencing through fingerprinting: computational assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Docter, Margreet; van Ginkel, Jetty; de Ridder, Dick; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-10-01

    Proteins are vital in all biological systems as they constitute the main structural and functional components of cells. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have brought the promise of complete proteomics by helping draft the human proteome. Yet, this commonly used protein sequencing technique has fundamental limitations in sensitivity. Here we propose a method for single-molecule (SM) protein sequencing. A major challenge lies in the fact that proteins are composed of 20 different amino acids, which demands 20 molecular reporters. We computationally demonstrate that it suffices to measure only two types of amino acids to identify proteins and suggest an experimental scheme using SM fluorescence. When achieved, this highly sensitive approach will result in a paradigm shift in proteomics, with major impact in the biological and medical sciences.

  5. Small-Molecule PROTACS: New Approaches to Protein Degradation.

    PubMed

    Toure, Momar; Crews, Craig M

    2016-02-05

    The current inhibitor-based approach to therapeutics has inherent limitations owing to its occupancy-based model: 1) there is a need to maintain high systemic exposure to ensure sufficient in vivo inhibition, 2) high in vivo concentrations bring potential for off-target side effects, and 3) there is a need to bind to an active site, thus limiting the drug target space. As an alternative, induced protein degradation lacks these limitations. Based on an event-driven model, this approach offers a novel catalytic mechanism to irreversibly inhibit protein function by targeting protein destruction through recruitment to the cellular quality control machinery. Prior protein degrading strategies have lacked therapeutic potential. However, recent reports of small-molecule-based proteolysis-targeting chimeras (PROTACs) have demonstrated that this technology can effectively decrease the cellular levels of several protein classes.

  6. Can the state of platinum species be unambiguously determined by the stretching frequency of an adsorbed CO probe molecule?

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Neyman, Konstantin M; Hadjiivanov, Konstantin I; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2016-08-10

    The paper addresses possible ambiguities in the determination of the state of platinum species by the stretching frequency of a CO probe, which is a common technique for characterization of platinum-containing catalytic systems. We present a comprehensive comparison of the available experimental data with our theoretical modeling (density functional) results of pertinent systems - platinum surfaces, nanoparticles and clusters as well as reduced or oxidized platinum moieties on a ceria support. Our results for CO adsorbed on-top on metallic Pt(0), with C-O vibrational frequencies in the region 2018-2077 cm(-1), suggest that a decrease of the coordination number of the platinum atom, to which CO is bound, by one lowers the CO frequency by about 7 cm(-1). This trend corroborates the Kappers-van der Maas correlation derived from the analysis of the experimental stretching frequency of CO adsorbed on platinum-containing samples on different supports. We also analyzed the effect of the charge of platinum species on the CO frequency. Based on the calculated vibrational frequencies of CO in various model systems, we concluded that the actual state of the platinum species may be mistaken based only on the measured value of the C-O vibrational frequency due to overlapping regions of frequencies corresponding to different types of species. In order to identify the actual state of platinum species one has to combine this powerful technique with other approaches.

  7. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging SM advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display6 or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide (PAA) thin film to construct a random SM array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies)7 and analyzed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimeter. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured based on the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and antibody binding profiling, were demonstrated. SMI-Seq enables “library vs. library” screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity. PMID:25252978

  8. Visualizing Water Molecules in Transmembrane Proteins Using Radiolytic Labeling Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, T.; Gupta, S; Palczewski, K; Chance, M

    2010-01-01

    Essential to cells and their organelles, water is both shuttled to where it is needed and trapped within cellular compartments and structures. Moreover, ordered waters within protein structures often colocalize with strategically placed polar or charged groups critical for protein function, yet it is unclear if these ordered water molecules provide structural stabilization, mediate conformational changes in signaling, neutralize charged residues, or carry out a combination of all these functions. Structures of many integral membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), reveal the presence of ordered water molecules that may act like prosthetic groups in a manner quite unlike bulk water. Identification of 'ordered' waters within a crystalline protein structure requires sufficient occupancy of water to enable its detection in the protein's X-ray diffraction pattern, and thus, the observed waters likely represent a subset of tightly bound functional waters. In this review, we highlight recent studies that suggest the structures of ordered waters within GPCRs are as conserved (and thus as important) as conserved side chains. In addition, methods of radiolysis, coupled to structural mass spectrometry (protein footprinting), reveal dynamic changes in water structure that mediate transmembrane signaling. The idea of water as a prosthetic group mediating chemical reaction dynamics is not new in fields such as catalysis. However, the concept of water as a mediator of conformational dynamics in signaling is just emerging, because of advances in both crystallographic structure determination and new methods of protein footprinting. Although oil and water do not mix, understanding the roles of water is essential to understanding the function of membrane proteins.

  9. Density functional theory study the effects of oxygen-containing functional groups on oxygen molecules and oxygen atoms adsorbed on carbonaceous materials.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xuejun; Song, Wenwu; Shi, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to study the effects of different types of oxygen-containing functional groups on the adsorption of oxygen molecules and single active oxygen atoms on carbonaceous materials. During gasification or combustion reactions of carbonaceous materials, oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl(-OH), carbonyl(-CO), quinone(-O), and carboxyl(-COOH) are often present on the edge of graphite and can affect graphite's chemical properties. When oxygen-containing functional groups appear on a graphite surface, the oxygen molecules are strongly adsorbed onto the surface to form a four-member ring structure. At the same time, the O-O bond is greatly weakened and easily broken. The adsorption energy value indicates that the adsorption of oxygen molecules changes from physisorption to chemisorption for oxygen-containing functional groups on the edge of a graphite surface. In addition, our results indicate that the adsorption energy depends on the type of oxygen-containing functional group. When a single active oxygen atom is adsorbed on the bridge site of graphite, it gives rise to a stable epoxy structure. Epoxy can cause deformation of the graphite lattice due to the transition of graphite from sp2 to sp3 after the addition of an oxygen atom. For quinone group on the edge of graphite, oxygen atoms react with carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. Similarly, the single active oxygen atoms of carbonyl groups can interact with edge carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. The results show that oxygen-containing functional groups on graphite surfaces enhance the activity of graphite, which promotes adsorption on the graphite surface.

  10. Density functional theory study the effects of oxygen-containing functional groups on oxygen molecules and oxygen atoms adsorbed on carbonaceous materials

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenwu; Shi, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to study the effects of different types of oxygen-containing functional groups on the adsorption of oxygen molecules and single active oxygen atoms on carbonaceous materials. During gasification or combustion reactions of carbonaceous materials, oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl(-OH), carbonyl(-CO), quinone(-O), and carboxyl(-COOH) are often present on the edge of graphite and can affect graphite’s chemical properties. When oxygen-containing functional groups appear on a graphite surface, the oxygen molecules are strongly adsorbed onto the surface to form a four-member ring structure. At the same time, the O-O bond is greatly weakened and easily broken. The adsorption energy value indicates that the adsorption of oxygen molecules changes from physisorption to chemisorption for oxygen-containing functional groups on the edge of a graphite surface. In addition, our results indicate that the adsorption energy depends on the type of oxygen-containing functional group. When a single active oxygen atom is adsorbed on the bridge site of graphite, it gives rise to a stable epoxy structure. Epoxy can cause deformation of the graphite lattice due to the transition of graphite from sp2 to sp3 after the addition of an oxygen atom. For quinone group on the edge of graphite, oxygen atoms react with carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. Similarly, the single active oxygen atoms of carbonyl groups can interact with edge carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. The results show that oxygen-containing functional groups on graphite surfaces enhance the activity of graphite, which promotes adsorption on the graphite surface. PMID:28301544

  11. Proteins and Small Molecules for Cellular Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine seeks to understand tissue development and homeostasis and build on that knowledge to enhance regeneration of injured tissues. By replenishing lost functional tissues and cells, regenerative medicine could change the treatment paradigm for a broad range of degenerative and ischemic diseases. Multipotent cells hold promise as potential building blocks for regenerating lost tissues, but successful tissue regeneration will depend on comprehensive control of multipotent cells–differentiation into a target cell type, delivery to a desired tissue, and integration into a durable functional structure. At each step of this process, proteins and small molecules provide essential signals and, in some cases, may themselves act as effective therapies. Identifying these signals is thus a fundamental goal of regenerative medicine. In this review we discuss current progress using proteins and small molecules to regulate tissue regeneration, both in combination with cellular therapies and as monotherapy. PMID:23303911

  12. Light-assisted small molecule screening against protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Inglés-Prieto, Álvaro; Reichhart, Eva; Muellner, Markus K.; Nowak, Matthias; Nijman, Sebastian M.; Grusch, Michael; Janovjak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput live-cell screens are intricate elements of systems biology studies and drug discovery pipelines. Here, we demonstrate an optogenetics-assisted method that obviates the addition of chemical activators and reporters, reduces the number of operational steps and increases information content in a cell-based small molecule screen against human protein kinases including an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase. This blueprint for all-optical screening can be adapted to many drug targets and cellular processes. PMID:26457372

  13. Single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins from membranes freely spanning across nanoscopic pores.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Rafayel; Bippes, Christian A; Walheim, Stefan; Harder, Daniel; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Schimmel, Thomas; Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-05-13

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) provides detailed insight into the mechanical (un)folding pathways and structural stability of membrane proteins. So far, SMFS could only be applied to membrane proteins embedded in native or synthetic membranes adsorbed to solid supports. This adsorption causes experimental limitations and raises the question to what extent the support influences the results obtained by SMFS. Therefore, we introduce here SMFS from native purple membrane freely spanning across nanopores. We show that correct analysis of the SMFS data requires extending the worm-like chain model, which describes the mechanical stretching of a polypeptide, by the cubic extension model, which describes the bending of a purple membrane exposed to mechanical stress. This new experimental and theoretical approach allows to characterize the stepwise (un)folding of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin and to assign the stability of single and grouped secondary structures. The (un)folding and stability of bacteriorhodopsin shows no significant difference between freely spanning and directly supported purple membranes. Importantly, the novel experimental SMFS setup opens an avenue to characterize any protein from freely spanning cellular or synthetic membranes.

  14. Nonequilibrium single molecule protein folding in a coaxial mixer.

    PubMed

    Hamadani, Kambiz M; Weiss, Shimon

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a continuous-flow mixing device suitable for monitoring bioconformational reactions at the single-molecule level with a response time of approximately 10 ms under single-molecule flow conditions. Its coaxial geometry allows three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing of sample fluids to diffraction-limited dimensions where diffusional mixing is rapid and efficient. The capillary-based design enables rapid in-lab construction of mixers without the need for expensive lithography-based microfabrication facilities. In-line filtering of sample fluids using granulated silica particles virtually eliminates clogging and extends the lifetime of each device to many months. In this article, to determine both the distance-to-time transfer function and the instrument response function of the device we characterize its fluid flow and mixing properties using both fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy velocimetry and finite element fluid dynamics simulations. We then apply the mixer to single molecule FRET protein folding studies of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor protein 2. By transiently populating the unfolded state of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor Protein 2 (CI2) under nonequilibrium in vitro refolding conditions, we spatially and temporally resolve the denaturant-dependent nonspecific collapse of the unfolded state from the barrier-limited folding transition of CI2. Our results are consistent with previous CI2 mixing results that found evidence for a heterogeneous unfolded state consisting of cis- and trans-proline conformers.

  15. Metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc) molecule adsorbed on the Au(111) surface: formation of a wide domain along a single lattice direction

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Tadahiro; Isshiki, Hironari; Liu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we observed the bonding configuration of the metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc) molecule adsorbed on the Au(111) surface. A local lattice formation started from a quasi-square lattice aligned to the close-packed directions of the Au(111) surface. Although we expected the lattice alignment to be equally distributed along the three crystallographically equivalent directions, the domain aligned normal to the ridge of the herringbone structure was missing in the STM images. We attribute this effect to the uniaxial contraction of the reconstructed Au(111) surface that can account for the formation of a large lattice domain along a single crystallographical direction. PMID:27877365

  16. David Adler Lectureship Award Talk: Friction and energy dissipation mechanisms in adsorbed molecules and molecularly thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krim, Jacqueline

    2015-03-01

    Studies of the fundamental origins of friction have undergone rapid progress in recent years, with the development of new experimental and computational techniques for measuring and simulating friction at atomic length and time scales. The increased interest has sparked a variety of discussions and debates concerning the nature of the atomic-scale and quantum mechanisms that dominate the dissipative process by which mechanical energy is transformed into heat. Measurements of the sliding friction of physisorbed monolayers and bilayers can provide information on the relative contributions of these various dissipative mechanisms. Adsorbed films, whether intentionally applied or present as trace levels of physisorbed contaminants, moreover are ubiquitous at virtually all surfaces. As such, they impact a wide range of applications whose progress depends on precise control and/or knowledge of surface diffusion processes. Examples include nanoscale assembly, directed transport of Brownian particles, material flow through restricted geometries such as graphene membranes and molecular sieves, passivation and edge effects in carbon-based lubricants, and the stability of granular materials associated with frictional and frictionless contacts. Work supported by NSFDMR1310456.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Single-Molecule RNA-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Schoening, Jan C.; Anselmetti, Dario; Staiger, Dorothee; Ros, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Abstract RNA-binding proteins impact gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by interacting with cognate cis elements within the transcripts. Here, we apply dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the interaction of the Arabidopsis glycine-rich RNA-binding protein AtGRP8 with its RNA target. A dwell-time-dependent analysis of the single-molecule data in combination with competition assays and site-directed mutagenesis of both the RNA target and the RNA-binding domain of the protein allowed us to distinguish and quantify two different binding modes. For dwell times <0.21 s an unspecific complex with a lifetime of 0.56 s is observed, whereas dwell times >0.33 s result in a specific interaction with a lifetime of 208 s. The corresponding reaction lengths are 0.28 nm for the unspecific and 0.55 nm for the specific AtGRP8-RNA interactions, indicating formation of a tighter complex with increasing dwell time. These two binding modes cannot be dissected in ensemble experiments. Quantitative titration in RNA bandshift experiments yields an ensemble-averaged equilibrium constant of dissociation of KD = 2 × 10−7 M. Assuming comparable on-rates for the specific and nonspecific binding modes allows us to estimate their free energies as ΔG0 = −42 kJ/mol and ΔG0 = −28 kJ/mol for the specific and nonspecific binding modes, respectively. Thus, we show that single-molecule force spectroscopy with a refined statistical analysis is a potent tool for the analysis of protein-RNA interactions without the drawback of ensemble averaging. This makes it possible to discriminate between different binding modes or sites and to analyze them quantitatively. We propose that this method could be applied to complex interactions of biomolecules in general, and be of particular interest for the investigation of multivalent binding reactions. PMID:19527663

  18. On the widths of Stokes lines in Raman scattering from molecules adsorbed at metal surfaces and in molecular conduction junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Within a generic model we analyze the Stokes linewidth in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from molecules embedded as bridges in molecular junctions. We identify four main contributions to the off-resonant Stokes signal and show that under zero voltage bias (a situation pertaining also to standard SERS experiments) and at low bias junctions only one of these contributions is pronounced. The linewidth of this component is determined by the molecular vibrational relaxation rate, which is dominated by interactions with the essentially bosonic thermal environment when the relevant molecular electronic energy is far from the metal(s) Fermi energy(ies). It increases when the molecular electronic level is close to the metal Fermi level so that an additional vibrational relaxation channel due to electron-hole (eh) exciton in the molecule opens. Other contributions to the Raman signal, of considerably broader linewidths, can become important at larger junction bias.

  19. Small Molecule Ligands of Methyl-Lysine Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herold, J. Martin; Wigle, Tim J.; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Lam, Robert; Korboukh, Victoria K.; Gao, Cen; Ingerman, Lindsey A.; Kireev, Dmitri B.; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins which bind methylated lysines (“readers” of the histone code) are important components in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and can also modulate other proteins that contain methyl-lysine such as p53 and Rb. Recognition of methyl-lysine marks by MBT domains leads to compaction of chromatin and a repressed transcriptional state. Antagonists of MBT domains would serve as probes to interrogate the functional role of these proteins and initiate the chemical biology of methyl-lysine readers as a target class. Small molecule MBT antagonists were designed based on the structure of histone peptide-MBT complexes and their interaction with MBT domains determined using a chemiluminescent assay and ITC. The ligands discovered antagonize native histone peptide binding, exhibiting 5-fold stronger binding affinity to L3MBTL1 than its preferred histone peptide. The first co-crystal structure of a small molecule bound to L3MBTL1 was determined and provides new insights into binding requirements for further ligand design. PMID:21417280

  20. Small-molecule ligands of methyl-lysine binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Herold, J Martin; Wigle, Tim J; Norris, Jacqueline L; Lam, Robert; Korboukh, Victoria K; Gao, Cen; Ingerman, Lindsey A; Kireev, Dmitri B; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V

    2011-04-14

    Proteins which bind methylated lysines ("readers" of the histone code) are important components in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and can also modulate other proteins that contain methyl-lysine such as p53 and Rb. Recognition of methyl-lysine marks by MBT domains leads to compaction of chromatin and a repressed transcriptional state. Antagonists of MBT domains would serve as probes to interrogate the functional role of these proteins and initiate the chemical biology of methyl-lysine readers as a target class. Small-molecule MBT antagonists were designed based on the structure of histone peptide-MBT complexes and their interaction with MBT domains determined using a chemiluminescent assay and ITC. The ligands discovered antagonize native histone peptide binding, exhibiting 5-fold stronger binding affinity to L3MBTL1 than its preferred histone peptide. The first cocrystal structure of a small molecule bound to L3MBTL1 was determined and provides new insights into binding requirements for further ligand design.

  1. Orbital tomography: Molecular band maps, momentum maps and the imaging of real space orbitals of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, Hannes; Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Puschnig, Peter; Ramsey, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    The frontier orbitals of molecules are the prime determinants of their chemical, optical and electronic properties. Arguably, the most direct method of addressing the (filled) frontier orbitals is ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Although UPS is a mature technique from the early 1970s on, the angular distribution of the photoemitted electrons was thought to be too complex to be analysed quantitatively. Recently angle resolved UPS (ARUPS) work on conjugated molecules both, in ordered thick films and chemisorbed monolayers, has shown that the angular (momentum) distribution of the photocurrent from orbital emissions can be simply understood. The approach, based on the assumption of a plane wave final state is becoming known as orbital tomography. Here we will demonstrate, with selected examples of pentacene (5A) and sexiphenyl (6P), the potential of orbital tomography. First it will be shown how the full angular distribution of the photocurrent (momentum map) from a specific orbital is related to the real space orbital by a Fourier transform. Examples of the reconstruction of 5A orbitals will be given and the procedure for recovering the lost phase information will be outlined. We then move to examples of sexiphenyl where we interrogate the original band maps of thick sexiphenyl in the light of our understanding of orbital tomography that has developed since then. With comparison to theoretical simulations of the molecular band maps, the molecular conformation and orientation will be concluded. New results for the sexiphenyl monolayer on Al(1 1 0) will then be presented. From the band maps it will be concluded that the molecule is planarised and adopts a tilted geometry. Finally the momentum maps down to HOMO-11 will be analysed and real space orbitals reconstructed.

  2. Follistatin-like protein-1 is a novel proinflammatory molecule.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Takako; Marinov, Anthony D; Sowders, Dawn; Wilson, David C; Devlin, Jason; Boudreau, Robert; Robbins, Paul; Hirsch, Raphael

    2006-10-01

    While analyzing gene expression in collagen-induced arthritis, we discovered that a poorly characterized gene, follistatin-like protein 1 (FSTL-1), is highly overexpressed in mouse paws during early arthritis, especially at the interface of synovial pannus and eroding bone. In this study, we show that FSTL-1 is a novel proinflammatory molecule with a previously unrecognized role in inflammation. Transfection of FSTL-1 into macrophages and fibroblasts leads to up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-6. Overexpression of FSTL-1 in mouse paws by gene transfer results in severe paw swelling and arthritis.

  3. Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions and Signaling by Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the core of cell signaling pathways as well as many bacterial and viral infection processes. As such, they define critical targets for drug development against diseases such as cancer, arthritis, obesity, AIDS and many others. Until now, the clinical inhibition of protein-protein interactions and signaling has been accomplished with the use of antibodies or soluble versions of receptor molecules. Small molecule replacements of these therapeutic agents have been extremely difficult to develop; either the necessary potency has been hard to achieve or the expected biological effect has not been obtained. In this presentation, we show that a rigorous thermodynamic approach that combines differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a unique platform for the identification and optimization of small molecular weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Recent advances in the development of cell entry inhibitors of HIV-1 using this approach will be discussed.

  4. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including Elastin-like peptides for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics,Heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery,Carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery,Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future. PMID:25138695

  5. The Overlap of Small Molecule and Protein Binding Sites within Families of Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Fred P.; Sali, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are challenging targets for modulation by small molecules. Here, we propose an approach that harnesses the increasing structural coverage of protein complexes to identify small molecules that may target protein interactions. Specifically, we identify ligand and protein binding sites that overlap upon alignment of homologous proteins. Of the 2,619 protein structure families observed to bind proteins, 1,028 also bind small molecules (250–1000 Da), and 197 exhibit a statistically significant (p<0.01) overlap between ligand and protein binding positions. These “bi-functional positions”, which bind both ligands and proteins, are particularly enriched in tyrosine and tryptophan residues, similar to “energetic hotspots” described previously, and are significantly less conserved than mono-functional and solvent exposed positions. Homology transfer identifies ligands whose binding sites overlap at least 20% of the protein interface for 35% of domain–domain and 45% of domain–peptide mediated interactions. The analysis recovered known small-molecule modulators of protein interactions as well as predicted new interaction targets based on the sequence similarity of ligand binding sites. We illustrate the predictive utility of the method by suggesting structural mechanisms for the effects of sanglifehrin A on HIV virion production, bepridil on the cellular entry of anthrax edema factor, and fusicoccin on vertebrate developmental pathways. The results, available at http://pibase.janelia.org, represent a comprehensive collection of structurally characterized modulators of protein interactions, and suggest that homologous structures are a useful resource for the rational design of interaction modulators. PMID:20140189

  6. Excited-state potential-energy surfaces of metal-adsorbed organic molecules from linear expansion Δ-self-consistent field density-functional theory (ΔSCF-DFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Reinhard J.; Reuter, Karsten

    2013-07-01

    Accurate and efficient simulation of excited state properties is an important and much aspired cornerstone in the study of adsorbate dynamics on metal surfaces. To this end, the recently proposed linear expansion Δ-self-consistent field method by Gavnholt et al. [Phys. Rev. B 78, 075441 (2008)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.78.075441 presents an efficient alternative to time consuming quasi-particle calculations. In this method, the standard Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory are solved with the constraint of a non-equilibrium occupation in a region of Hilbert-space resembling gas-phase orbitals of the adsorbate. In this work, we discuss the applicability of this method for the excited-state dynamics of metal-surface mounted organic adsorbates, specifically in the context of molecular switching. We present necessary advancements to allow for a consistent quality description of excited-state potential-energy surfaces (PESs), and illustrate the concept with the application to Azobenzene adsorbed on Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces. We find that the explicit inclusion of substrate electronic states modifies the topologies of intra-molecular excited-state PESs of the molecule due to image charge and hybridization effects. While the molecule in gas phase shows a clear energetic separation of resonances that induce isomerization and backreaction, the surface-adsorbed molecule does not. The concomitant possibly simultaneous induction of both processes would lead to a significantly reduced switching efficiency of such a mechanism.

  7. A theoretical study of the XP and NEXAFS spectra of alanine: gas phase molecule, crystal, and adsorbate at the ZnO(10 ̅10) surface.

    PubMed

    Gao, You Kun; Traeger, Franziska; Kotsis, Konstantinos; Staemmler, Volker

    2011-06-14

    The adsorption of alanine on the mixed-terminated ZnO(10 ̅10) surface is studied by means of quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. Using a finite cluster model and the adsorption geometry as obtained both by periodic CPMD and embedded cluster calculations, the C1s, N1s and O1s X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra are calculated for single alanine molecules on ZnO(10 ̅10). These spectra are compared with the spectra calculated for alanine in the gas phase and in its crystalline form and with experimental XPS and NEXAFS data for the isolated alanine molecule and for alanine adsorbed on ZnO(10 ̅10) at multilayer and monolayer coverage. The excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated XP and NEXAFS spectra confirms the calculated adsorption geometry: A single alanine molecule is bound to ZnO(10 ̅10) in a dissociated bidentate form with the two O atoms of the acid group bound to two Zn atoms of the surface and the proton transferred to one O atom of the surface. Other possible structures, such as adsorption of alanine in one of its neutral or zwitterionic forms in which the proton of the -COOH group remains at this group or is transferred to the amino group, can be excluded since they would give rise to quite different XP spectra. In the multilayer coverage regime, on the other hand, alanine is in its crystalline form as is also shown by the analysis of the XP spectra.

  8. System-wide detection of protein-small molecule complexes suggests extensive metabolite regulation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Veyel, Daniel; Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Kosmacz, Monika; Sokolowska, Ewelina Maria; Michaelis, Aenne; Luzarowski, Marcin; Szlachetko, Jagoda; Willmitzer, Lothar; Skirycz, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Protein small molecule interactions are at the core of cell regulation controlling metabolism and development. We reasoned that due to the lack of system wide approaches only a minority of those regulatory molecules are known. In order to see whether or not this assumption is true we developed an effective approach for the identification of small molecules having potential regulatory role that obviates the need of protein or small molecule baits. At the core of this approach is a simple biochemical co-fractionation taking advantage of size differences between proteins and small molecules. Metabolomics based analysis of small molecules co-fractionating with proteins identified a multitude of small molecules in Arabidopsis suggesting the existence of numerous, small molecules/metabolites bound to proteins representing potential regulatory molecules. The approach presented here uses Arabidopsis cell cultures, but is generic and hence applicable to all biological systems. PMID:28205532

  9. Single-Molecule Study of Protein-Protein Interaction Dynamics in a Cell Signaling System

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xin; Nalbant, Perihan; Toutchkine, Alexei; Hu, Dehong; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Hahn, Klaus M.; Lu, H. Peter

    2004-01-01

    We report a study on protein-protein noncovalent interactions in an intracellular signaling protein complex, using single-molecule spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP) fragment that binds only the activated intracellular signaling protein Cdc42 was labeled with a novel solvatochromic dye and used to probe hydrophobic interactions significant to Cdc42/WASP recognition. The study shows static and dynamic inhomogeneous conformational fluctuations of the protein complex that involve bound and loosely bound states. A two-coupled, two-state Markovian kinetic model is proposed for the conformational dynamics. Finally, the MD simulations explore the origin of these conformational states and associated conformational fluctuations in this protein-protein interaction system.

  10. Controlling Protein Conformations to Explore Unprecedented Material Properties by Single-Molecule Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-17

    Molecule Protein Conformational Dynamics in Enzymatic Reactions,” Single-Molecule Biophysics Meeting, Aspen , CO, Jan. 4-10, 2009. H. P. Lu, “Single...Donor-Acceptor: Cy3-Cy5) pair labeled HPPK molecule tethered between a glass cover-slip surface and a handle (biotin group plus streptavidin), and a...5, 2008. H. P. Lu, “Probing Single-Molecule Protein Conformational Dynamics in Enzymatic Reactions,” Single-Molecule Biophysics Meeting, Aspen

  11. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  12. Analysis and Interpretation of Single Molecule Protein Unfolding Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannon, Herbert; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of protein unfolding under a stretching force has been extensively studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) over the past decade [1]. Experimental artifacts at the single molecule level introduce uncertainties in the data analysis that have led to several competing physical models for the unfolding process. For example, the unfolding dynamics of the protein ubiquitin under constant force has been described by probability distributions as diverse as exponential [2,3], a sum of exponentials, log-normal [4], and more recently a function describing static disorder in the Arrhenius model [5]. A new method for data analysis is presented that utilizes maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) combined with other traditional statistical tests to unambiguously rank the consistency of these and other models with the experimental data. These techniques applied to the ubiquitin unfolding data shows that the probability of unfolding is best fit with a stretched exponential distribution, with important implications on the complexity of the mechanism of protein unfolding. [4pt] [1] Carrion-Vazquez, et. al. Springer Series in Biophys. 2006 [0pt] [2] Fernandez et. al. Science 2004 [0pt] [3] Brujic et. al. Nat. Phys 2006 [0pt] [4] Garcia-Manyes et. al. Biophys. J. 2007 [0pt] [5] Kuo et. al. PNAS 2010

  13. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  14. Small molecule inhibitors targeting activator protein 1 (AP-1).

    PubMed

    Ye, Na; Ding, Ye; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-08-28

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases.

  15. High ionic strength narrows the population of sites participating in protein ion-exchange adsorption: a single-molecule study.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kulla, Eliona; Kang, Marci K; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-05-23

    The retention and elution of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography is routinely controlled by adjusting the mobile phase salt concentration. It has repeatedly been observed, as judged from adsorption isotherms, that the apparent heterogeneity of adsorption is lower at more-eluting, higher ionic strength. Here, we present an investigation into the mechanism of this phenomenon using a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique called motion-blur Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (mbPAINT). We observed that the number of functional adsorption sites was smaller at high ionic strength and that these sites had reduced desorption kinetic heterogeneity, and thus narrower predicted elution profiles, for the anion-exchange adsorption of α-lactalbumin on an agarose-supported, clustered-charge ligand stationary phase. Explanations for the narrowing of the functional population such as inter-protein interactions and protein or support structural changes were investigated through kinetic analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and microscopy of agarose microbeads, respectively. The results suggest the reduction of heterogeneity is due to both electrostatic screening between the protein and ligand and tuning the steric availability within the agarose support. Overall, we have shown that single molecule spectroscopy can aid in understanding the influence of ionic strength on the population of functional adsorbent sites participating in the ion-exchange chromatographic separation of proteins.

  16. High ionic strength narrows the population of sites participating in protein ion-exchange adsorption: A single-molecule study

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kulla, Eliona; Kang, Marci; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    The retention and elution of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography is routinely controlled by adjusting the mobile phase salt concentration. It has repeatedly been observed, as judged from adsorption isotherms, that the apparent heterogeneity of adsorption is lower at more-eluting, higher ionic strength. Here, we present an investigation into the mechanism of this phenomenon using a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique called motion-blur Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (mbPAINT). We observed that the number of functional adsorption sites was smaller at high ionic strength and that these sites had reduced desorption kinetic heterogeneity, and thus narrower predicted elution profiles, for the anion-exchange adsorption of α-lactalbumin on an agarose-supported, clustered-charge ligand stationary phase. Explanations for the narrowing of the functional population such as inter-protein interactions and protein or support structural changes were investigated through kinetic analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and microscopy of agarose microbeads, respectively. The results suggest the reduction of heterogeneity is due to both electrostatic screening between the protein and ligand and tuning the steric availability within the agarose support. Overall, we have shown that single molecule spectroscopy can aid in understanding the influence of ionic strength on the population of functional adsorbent sites participating in the ion-exchange chromatographic separation of proteins. PMID:24751557

  17. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  18. Study of protein adsorption on indigo particles confirms the existence of enzyme--indigo interaction sites in cellulase molecules.

    PubMed

    Gusakov, A V; Sinitsyn, A P; Markov, A V; Sinitsyna, O A; Ankudimova, N V; Berlin, A G

    2001-04-27

    Adsorption of several crude and purified cellulases (from Trichoderma reesei, Penicillium verruculosum and Chrysosporium lucknowense) on indigo particles and Avicel cellulose was studied. Much higher amounts of protein were bound to indigo than to cellulose under similar conditions. For different purified enzymes, the quantity of bound protein per mg of adsorbent (indigo or cellulose) varied in the range of 57-111 and 0-62 microg x mg(-1), respectively. However, in general, the enzyme adsorption on indigo was less specific than the adsorption on cellulose. Three endoglucanases, having the highest indigo-binding ability, demonstrated the best washing performance in the process of enzymatic denim treatment. These data confirmed our previous findings that certain cellulases, which have indigo-binding sites (clusters of closely located aromatic and other non-polar residues) on the surface of their molecules, may remove indigo from the denim fabric better than cellulases with lower content of hydrophobic residues exposed to solvent.

  19. Electrostatically-controlled protein adsorption onto lipid bilayer: modeling adsorbate aggregation behavior.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P

    2008-03-01

    Using adsorption models based on scaled particle (SPT) and double layer theories the electrostatically-controlled protein adsorption onto membrane surface has been simulated for non-associating and self-associating ligands. The binding isotherms of monomeric and oligomeric protein species have been calculated over a range of variable parameters including lipid and protein concentrations, protein and membrane charges, pH and ionic strength. Adsorption behavior of monomers appeared to be the most sensitive to the changes in the protein aggregation state. The hallmarks of the protein oligomerization are identified. The practical guides for optimal design of binding experiments focused on obtaining proofs of protein self-association are suggested.

  20. Targeting at the Nanoscale: A Novel S-Layer Fusion Protein Enabling Controlled Immobilization of Biotinylated Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of constructing an S-layer fusion protein that combines both excellent self-assembly and specific ligand i.e., biotin binding ability, streptavidin (aa 16-133) was fused to the S-layer protein of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 (SslA) devoid of its N-terminal 341 and C-terminal 172 amino acids. The genetically engineered chimeric protein could be successfully produced in E. coli, isolated, and purified via Ni affinity chromatography. In vitro recrystallisation experiments performed with the purified chimeric protein in solution and on a silicon wafer have demonstrated that fusion of the streptavidin domain does not interfere with the self-assembling properties of the S-layer part. The chimeric protein self-assembled into multilayers. More importantly, the streptavidin domain retained its full biotin-binding ability, a fact evidenced by experiments in which biotinylated quantum dots were coupled to the fusion protein monomers and adsorbed onto the in vitro recrystallised fusion protein template. In this way, this S-layer fusion protein can serve as a functional template for the controlled immobilization of biotinylated and biologically active molecules. PMID:28335327

  1. IgG adsorption on a new protein A adsorbent based on macroporous hydrophilic polymers. I. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Perez-Almodovar, Ernie X; Carta, Giorgio

    2009-11-20

    Experimental determination and modeling of IgG binding on a new protein A adsorbent based on a macroporous resin were performed. The new adsorbent consists of polymeric beads based on hydrophilic acrylamido and vinyl monomers with a pore structure optimized to allow favorable interactions of IgG with recombinant protein A coupled to the resin. The particles have average diameter of 57 microm and a narrow particle size distribution. The IgG adsorption equilibrium capacity is 46 mg/cm(3) and the effective pore diffusivity determined from pulse response experiments for non-binding conditions is 8.0 x 10(-8) cm(2)/s. The IgG adsorption kinetics can be described with the same effective diffusivity by taking into account a heterogeneous binding mechanism with fast binding sites, for which adsorption is completely diffusion controlled, and slow binding sites for which adsorption is controlled by the binding kinetics. As a result of this mechanism, the breakthrough curve exhibits a tailing behavior, which appears to be associated with the slow binding sites. A detailed rate model taking into account intraparticle diffusion and binding kinetics is developed and is found capable of predicting both batch adsorption and breakthrough behavior over an ample range of experimental conditions. The corresponding effective diffusivity is independent of protein concentration in solution over the range 0.2-2 mg/cm(3) and of protein binding as a result of the large pore size of the support matrix. Overall, the small particle size and low diffusional hindrance allow capture of IgG with short residence times while attaining substantial dynamic binding capacities.

  2. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  3. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2015-10-28

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  4. Adsorption of proteins at physiological concentrations on pegylated surfaces and the compatibilizing role of adsorbed albumin with respect to other proteins according to optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS).

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Laurent; Modena, Enrico; Vert, Michel

    2013-01-01

    In literature, contacts between pegylated compounds and blood proteins are generally discussed in terms of excluded volume-related repulsions although adsorption and compatibility have been reported for some of these proteins occasionally. The major problem to investigate the behavior of blood in contact with pegylated surfaces is the complexity of the medium and especially the presence of albumin in large excess. In a model approach, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) was used to monitor the fate of albumin, fibrinogen, and γ-globulins at physiological concentrations in pH = 7.4 isotonic HEPES buffer after contact with SiTiO2 chips coated with diblock poly(DL-lactic acid)-block-poly(ethylene oxide)s and triblock poly(DL-lactic acid)-block-poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(DL-lactic acid) copolymers. Corresponding homopolymers were used as controls. The three protein systems were investigated separately, as a mixture and when added successively according to different orders of addition. OWLS gave access to the mass and the thickness of adhering protein layers that resist washing with HEPES buffer. Protein depositions were detected regardless of the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) segments on surfaces. Adsorption depended on the protein, on the surface and also on the presence of the other proteins. Unexpectedly any surface coated with a layer of adsorbed albumin prevented deposition of other proteins, including albumin itself. This outstanding finding suggests that it was the presence of albumin adsorbed on a surface, pegylated or not, that made that surface compatible with other proteins. As a consequence, dipping a device to be in contact with the blood of a patient in a solution of albumin could be a very simple means to avoid further protein deposition and maybe platelets adhesion after in vivo implantation.

  5. Measurement of laser activated electron tunneling from semiconductor zinc oxide to adsorbed organic molecules by a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hongying; Fu, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shi

    2012-06-04

    Measurement of light induced heterogeneous electron transfer is important for understanding of fundamental processes involved in chemistry, physics and biology, which is still challenging by current techniques. Laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) from semiconductor metal oxides was observed and characterized by a MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) mass spectrometer in this work. Nanoparticles of ZnO were placed on a MALDI sample plate. Free fatty acids and derivatives were used as models of organic compounds and directly deposited on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. Irradiation of UV laser (λ=355 nm) with energy more than the band gap of ZnO produces ions that can be detected in negative mode. When TiO(2) nanoparticles with similar band gap but much lower electron mobility were used, these ions were not observed unless the voltage on the sample plate was increased. The experimental results indicate that laser induced electron tunneling is dependent on the electron mobility and the strength of the electric field. Capture of low energy electrons by charge-deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules causes unpaired electron-directed cleavages of chemical bonds in a nonergodic pathway. In positive detection mode, electron tunneling cannot be observed due to the reverse moving direction of electrons. It should be able to expect that laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is a new technique capable of probing the dynamics of electron tunneling. LAET offers advantages as a new ionization dissociation method for mass spectrometry.

  6. Molecular modeling of the inhibition of protein-protein interactions with small molecules: The IL2-IL2Rα case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieraccini, Stefano; De Gonda, Riccardo; Sironi, Maurizio

    2011-12-01

    Developing drug like molecules targeting protein-protein interactions is one of the main goals of current medicinal chemistry. To drive the design process it is fundamental to locate those sites on the protein-protein contact surface that are more critical for protein binding, which are the most eligible targets to affect the protein complex formation. In this work we show how computational alanine scanning can be used to identify such critical sites and evaluate their interactions with small molecules designed to inhibit the complex formation. Complex of protein IL2 with IL2Rα and with some small molecule inhibitors are used as an example.

  7. The importance of individual protein molecule dynamics in developing and assessing solid state protein preparations.

    PubMed

    Hill, John J; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y; Zografi, George

    2014-09-01

    Processing protein solutions into the solid state is a common approach for generating stable amorphous protein mixtures that are suitable for long-term storage. Great care is typically given to protecting the protein native structure during the various drying steps that render it into the amorphous solid state. However, many studies illustrate that chemical and physical degradations still occur in spite of this amorphous material having good glassy properties and it being stored at temperatures below its glass transition temperature (Tg). Because of these persistent issues and recent biophysical studies that have refined the debate ascribing meaning to the molecular dynamical transition temperature and Tg of protein molecules, we provide an updated discussion on the impact of assessing and managing localized, individual protein molecule nondiffusive motions in the context of proteins being prepared into bulk amorphous mixtures. Our aim is to bridge the pharmaceutical studies addressing bulk amorphous preparations and their glassy behavior, with the biophysical studies historically focused on the nondiffusive internal protein dynamics and a protein's activity, along with their combined efforts in assessing the impact of solvent hydrogen-bonding networks on local stability. We also provide recommendations for future research efforts in solid-state formulation approaches.

  8. Theory and applications of refractive index-based optical microscopy to measure protein mass transfer in spherical adsorbent particles.

    PubMed

    Bankston, Theresa E; Stone, Melani C; Carta, Giorgio

    2008-04-25

    This work provides the theoretical foundation and a range of practical application examples of a recently developed method to measure protein mass transfer in adsorbent particles using refractive index-based optical microscopy. A ray-theoretic approach is first used to predict the behavior of light traveling through a particle during transient protein adsorption. When the protein concentration gradient in the particle is sharp, resulting in a steep refractive index gradient, the rays bend and intersect, thereby concentrating light in a sharp ring that marks the position of the adsorption front. This behavior is observed when mass transfer is dominated by pore diffusion and the adsorption isotherm is highly favorable. Applications to protein cation-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and affinity adsorption are then considered using, as examples, the three commercial, agarose-based stationary phases SP-Sepharose-FF, Butyl Sepharose 4FF, and MabSelect. In all three cases, the method provides results that are consistent with measurements based on batch adsorption and previously published data confirming its utility for the determination of protein mass transfer kinetics under a broad range of practically relevant conditions.

  9. Heavy metal-binding proteins from metal-stimulated bacteria as a novel adsorbent for metal removal technology.

    PubMed

    Sano, D; Myojo, K; Omura, T

    2006-01-01

    Water pollution with toxic heavy metals is of growing concern because heavy metals could bring about serious problems for not only ecosystems in the water environment but also human health. Some metal removal technologies have been in practical use, but much energy and troublesome treatments for chemical wastes are required to operate these conventional technologies. In this study, heavy metal-binding proteins (HMBPs) were obtained from metal-stimulated activated sludge culture with affinity chromatography using copper ion as a ligand. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that a number of proteins in activated sludge culture were recovered as HMBPs for copper ion. N-termini of five HMBPs were determined, and two of them were found to be newly discovered proteins for which no amino acid sequences in protein databases were retrieved at more than 80% identities. Metal-coordinating amino acids occupied 38% of residues in one of the N-terminal sequences of the newly discovered HMBPs. Since these HMBPs were expected to be stable under conditions of water and wastewater treatments, it would be possible to utilize HMBPs as novel adsorbents for heavy metal removal if mass volume of HMBPs can be obtained with protein cloning techniques.

  10. Protein frustratometer: a tool to localize energetic frustration in protein molecules

    PubMed Central

    Jenik, Michael; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Radusky, Leandro G.; Turjanski, Adrian; Wolynes, Peter G.; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2012-01-01

    The frustratometer is an energy landscape theory-inspired algorithm that aims at quantifying the location of frustration manifested in protein molecules. Frustration is a useful concept for gaining insight to the proteins biological behavior by analyzing how the energy is distributed in protein structures and how mutations or conformational changes shift the energetics. Sites of high local frustration often indicate biologically important regions involved in binding or allostery. In contrast, minimally frustrated linkages comprise a stable folding core of the molecule that is conserved in conformational changes. Here, we describe the implementation of these ideas in a webserver freely available at the National EMBNet node—Argentina, at URL: http://lfp.qb.fcen.uba.ar/embnet/. PMID:22645321

  11. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Holinga IV, George Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  12. Small Molecules Engage Hot Spots through Cooperative Binding To Inhibit a Tight Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degang; Xu, David; Liu, Min; Knabe, William Eric; Yuan, Cai; Zhou, Donghui; Huang, Mingdong; Meroueh, Samy O

    2017-03-28

    Protein-protein interactions drive every aspect of cell signaling, yet only a few small-molecule inhibitors of these interactions exist. Despite our ability to identify critical residues known as hot spots, little is known about how to effectively engage them to disrupt protein-protein interactions. Here, we take advantage of the ease of preparation and stability of pyrrolinone 1, a small-molecule inhibitor of the tight interaction between the urokinase receptor (uPAR) and its binding partner, the urokinase-type plasminogen activator uPA, to synthesize more than 40 derivatives and explore their effect on the protein-protein interaction. We report the crystal structure of uPAR bound to previously discovered pyrazole 3 and to pyrrolinone 12. While both 3 and 12 bind to uPAR and compete with a fluorescently labeled peptide probe, only 12 and its derivatives inhibit the full uPAR·uPA interaction. Compounds 3 and 12 mimic and engage different hot-spot residues on uPA and uPAR, respectively. Interestingly, 12 is involved in a π-cation interaction with Arg-53, which is not considered a hot spot. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations reveal that 3 and 12 exhibit dramatically different correlations of motion with residues on uPAR. Free energy calculations for the wild-type and mutant uPAR bound to uPA or 12 show that Arg-53 interacts with uPA or with 12 in a highly cooperative manner, thereby altering the contributions of hot spots to uPAR binding. The direct engagement of peripheral residues not considered hot spots through π-cation or salt-bridge interactions could provide new opportunities for enhanced small-molecule engagement of hot spots to disrupt challenging protein-protein interactions.

  13. Probing the binding affinity of plasma proteins adsorbed on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Fan; Yu, Shaoning

    2017-04-06

    Nanoparticle (NP) surfaces are modified immediately by the adsorption of proteins when exposed to human blood, leading to the formation of a protein corona. The adsorption of serum proteins is the key process for exploring the bioapplication and biosafety of NPs. In this study, NP-protein binding affinity (Ka) was investigated. Some serum proteins, such as human serum albumin (HSA), trypsin (TRP), hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (MB), immunoglobulin G (IgG), carbonic anhydrase (CA), fibrinogen (FIB), chymotrypsin and r-globulin, were used with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to address binding affinity according to isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) combined with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence quenching. The NP protein binding affinities determined by the two methods were in agreement, and depended on the protein properties and size of the NPs. The two methods are convenient, and the results are highly comparable. These methods can be extended to determine the binding affinity of NP protein interactions. The adsorption of proteins upon the AuNP surface is a complex process and depends on several factors, but the binding affinities are higher for proteins with more cysteine residues located on the surface.

  14. Assessment of fibronectin conformation adsorbed to polytetrafluoroethylene surfaces from serum protein mixtures and correlation to support of cell attachment in culture.

    PubMed

    Grainger, David W; Pavon-Djavid, Graciella; Migonney, Veronique; Josefowicz, Marcel

    2003-01-01

    Surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were exposed to buffered aqueous solutions containing radio-labeled human fibronectin ([125I]Fn), Fn/bovine serum albumin (BSA) binary mixtures of various ratios or whole human plasma dilutions for 1 h. Total adsorbed Fn and albumin adsorption following rinsing was quantified on this surface. 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies against either the tenth type-III Fn repeat unit (containing the cell-binding RGDS integrin recognition motif) or the Fn amino-terminal domain were used to probe the accessibility of each of these respective Fn regions post-adsorption. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured on PTFE surfaces pre-exposed to each of these protein adsorption conditions and compared to identical conditions on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). Fn adsorption to PTFE is dependent upon the concentration of albumin co-adsorbing from solution: albumin out-competes Fn for PTFE surface sites even at non-physiological Fn/HSA ratios 10-100-fold biased in Fn. Antibodies against Fn do not readily recognize Fn adsorbed on PTFE as the HSA co-adsorption concentration in either binary mixtures or in plasma increases, indicating albumin masking of adsorbed Fn. At Fn/HSA ratios rich in Fn (1:1, 1:100), albumin co-adsorption actually improves anti-Fn antibody recognition of adsorbed Fn. HUVEC attachment efficiency to PTFE after protein adsorption correlates with amounts of Fn adsorbed and levels of anti-Fn antibody recognition of Fn on PTFE, linking cell attachment to integrin recognition of both adsorbed Fn density and Fn adsorbed conformation on PTFE surfaces.

  15. Adsorption and trace detection of pharmacologically significant 5-methylthio-1, 3, 4-thiadiazole-2-thiol molecule adsorbed on silver nanocolloids and understanding the role of Albrecht's “A” and Herzberg-Teller contributions in the SERS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Joydeep; Chandra, Subhendu; Ghosh, Manash

    2015-01-01

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of biologically and industrially significant 5-methylthio-1, 3, 4-thiadiazole 2-thiol molecule have been investigated. The SERS spectra at various concentrations of the adsorbate are compared with the Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) and normal Raman spectra (NRS) of the probe molecule recorded in different environmental conditions. The optimized molecular structures of the most probable thione and the thiol forms of the molecule have been estimated from the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The vibrational signatures of the molecule have been assigned from the potential energy distributions (PEDs). The detail vibrational analyses reveal that ∼54% of the thione form of the molecule is prevalent in the solid state and its population increases to ∼65% in ACN solvent medium. Concentration dependent SERS, together with the 2-dimensional correlation spectra (2D-COS), corroborate the presence of both the thione and the thiol forms of the molecule even in the surface adsorbed state. The orientations of the thione and the thiol forms of the molecule on the nanocolloidal silver surface have been predicted from the surface selection rule. The selective enhancement of Raman bands in the SERS spectra have been explored from the view of the Albrecht's "A" and Herzberg-Teller (HT) charge transfer (CT) contribution.

  16. Unintended consequences? Water molecules at biological and crystallographic protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mostafa H; Habtemariam, Mesay; Safo, Martin K; Scarsdale, J Neel; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Kellogg, Glen E

    2013-12-01

    The importance of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly appreciated, as these interactions lie at the core of virtually every biological process. Small molecule modulators that target PPIs are under exploration as new therapies. One of the greatest obstacles faced in crystallographically determining the 3D structures of proteins is coaxing the proteins to form "artificial" PPIs that lead to uniform crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction. This work compares interactions formed naturally, i.e., "biological", with those artificially formed under crystallization conditions or "non-biological". In particular, a detailed analysis of water molecules at the interfaces of high-resolution (≤2.30 Å) X-ray crystal structures of protein-protein complexes, where 140 are biological protein-protein complex structures and 112 include non-biological protein-protein interfaces, was carried out using modeling tools based on the HINT forcefield. Surprisingly few and relatively subtle differences were observed between the two types of interfaces: (i) non-biological interfaces are more polar than biological interfaces, yet there is better organized hydrogen bonding at the latter; (ii) biological associations rely more on water-mediated interactions with backbone atoms compared to non-biological associations; (iii) aromatic/planar residues play a larger role in biological associations with respect to water, and (iv) Lys has a particularly large role at non-biological interfaces. A support vector machines (SVMs) classifier using descriptors from this study was devised that was able to correctly classify 84% of the two interface types.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of macroporous epichlorohydrin cross-linked alginate beads as protein adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weican; Ji, Xiaofei; Sun, Caiyun; Lu, Xuemei

    2013-01-01

    Porous epichlorohydrin cross-linked alginate beads (ECAB) were prepared by the following method. Na-alginate solution containing Na2SO4 was introduced dropwise into CaCl2 solution to simultaneously form CaSO4 precipitate and Ca-alginate gel beads. The resultant beads were cross-linked with epichlorohydrin and then thoroughly washed with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution to remove CaSO4. The structural features of porous ECAB were assessed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and experiments on water content and adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results showed that macroporous ECAB can be obtained when the mass ratio of sodium sulfate to sodium alginate is 4:1. The adsorption behavior of the macroporous ECAB was well described by the Langmuir isotherm with maximum adsorption capacity equal to 740 mg BSA/g dry weight in 50 mM Na2HPO4-citric acid buffer (pH 4.0). BSA was more effectively adsorbed by macroporous ECAB at around pH 3 and the mechanism of the adsorption of BSA to the ECAB was ion exchange. Finally, experiments of a concentration of 1 mg/mL BSA using macroporous ECAB were performed.

  18. Plant nuclear hormone receptors: a role for small molecules in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Lumba, Shelley; Cutler, Sean; McCourt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Plant hormones are a group of chemically diverse small molecules that direct processes ranging from growth and development to biotic and abiotic stress responses. Surprisingly, genome analyses suggest that classic animal nuclear hormone receptor homologs do not exist in plants. It now appears that plants have co-opted several protein families to perceive hormones within the nucleus. In one solution to the problem, the hormones auxin and jasmonate (JA) act as “molecular glue” that promotes protein-protein interactions between receptor F-boxes and downstream corepressor targets. In another solution, gibberellins (GAs) bind and elicit a conformational change in a novel soluble receptor family related to hormone-sensitive lipases. Abscisic acid (ABA), like GA, also acts through an allosteric mechanism involving a START-domain protein. The molecular identification of plant nuclear hormone receptors will allow comparisons with animal nuclear receptors and testing of fundamental questions about hormone function in plant development and evolution.

  19. A theoretical and experimental approach toward the development of affinity adsorbents for GFP and GFP-fusion proteins purification.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Pina, Ana Sofia; Dias, Ana M G C; Branco, Ricardo J F; Roque, Ana Cecília Afonso

    2014-09-30

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is widely employed to report on a variety of molecular phenomena, but its selective recovery is hampered by the lack of a low-cost and robust purification alternative. This work reports an integrated approach combining rational design and experimental validation toward the optimization of a small fully-synthetic ligand for GFP purification. A total of 56 affinity ligands based on a first-generation lead structure were rationally designed through molecular modeling protocols. The library of ligands was further synthesized by solid-phase combinatorial methods based on the Ugi reaction and screened against Escherichia coli extracts containing GFP. Ligands A4C2, A5C5 and A5C6 emerged as the new lead structures based on the high estimated theoretical affinity constants and the high GFP binding percentages and enrichment factors. The elution of GFP from these adsorbents was further characterized, where the best compromise between mild elution conditions, yield and purity was found for ligands A5C5 and A5C6. These were tested for purifying a model GFP-fusion protein, where ligand A5C5 yielded higher protein recovery and purity. The molecular interactions between the lead ligands and GFP were further assessed by molecular dynamics simulations, showing a wide range of potential hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond interactions.

  20. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry of basic proteins using a new physically adsorbed polymer coating. Some applications in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Elvira, Carlos; González, Nieves; San Román, J; Barbas, Coral; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2004-07-01

    A new physically adsorbed capillary coating for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) of basic proteins is presented, which is easily obtained by flushing the capillary with a polymer aqueous solution for two min. This coating significantly reduces the electrostatic adsorption of a group of basic proteins (i.e., cytochrome c, lysozyme, and ribonuclease A) onto the capillary wall allowing their analysis by CE-MS. The coating protocol is compatible with electrospray inonization (ESI)-MS via the reproducible separation of the standard basic proteins (%RSD values (n = 5) < 1% for analysis time reproducibility and < 5% for peak heights, measured from the total ion electropherograms (TIEs) within the same day). The LODs determined using cytochrome c with total ion current and extracted ion current defection were 24.5 and 2.9 fmol, respectively. Using this new coating lysozymes from chicken and turkey egg white could be easily distinguished by CE-MS, demonstrating the usefulness of this method to differentiate animal species. Even after sterilization at 120 degrees C for 30 min, lysozyme could be detected, as well as in wines at concentrations much lower than the limit marked by the EC Commission Regulation. Adulteration of minced meat with 5% of egg-white could also be analysed by our CE-MS protocol.

  1. Analysis of diffusion models for protein adsorption to porous anion-exchange adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Dong; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2002-07-12

    The ion-exchange adsorption kinetics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and gamma-globulin to an anion exchanger, DEAE Spherodex M, has been studied by batch adsorption experiments. Various diffusion models, that is, pore diffusion, surface diffusion, homogeneous diffusion and parallel diffusion models, are analyzed for their suitabilities to depict the adsorption kinetics. Protein diffusivities are estimated by matching the models with the experimental data. The dependence of the diffusivities on initial protein concentration is observed and discussed. The adsorption isotherm of BSA is nearly rectangular, so there is little surface diffusion. As a result, the surface and homogeneous diffusion models do not fit to the kinetic data of BSA adsorption. The adsorption isotherm of gamma-globulin is less favorable, and the surface diffusion contributes greatly to the mass transport. Consequently, both the surface and homogeneous diffusion models fit to the kinetic data of gamma-globulin well. The adsorption kinetics of BSA and gamma-globulin can be very well fitted by parallel diffusion model, because the model reflects correctly the intraparticle mass transfer mechanism. In addition, for both the favorably bound proteins, the pore diffusion model fits the adsorption kinetics reasonably well. The results here indicate that the pore diffusion model can be used as a good approximate to depict protein adsorption kinetics for protein adsorption systems from rectangular to linear isotherms.

  2. Effect of an electric field on a methane molecule. I. Infrared analysis of methane (CH4-CD4) adsorbed in NaA zeolite in the temperature range 150-20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lara, E. Cohen; Kahn, R.; Seloudoux, R.

    1985-09-01

    The spectra of methane adsorbed at low temperature in NaA zeolite show two strong effects of the field existing in the cavities: (i) the appearance of the ν1 forbidden band which increases when decreasing the temperature and (ii) the splitting of the ν3 degenerate band. The variation with T of its components lead to the conclusion that the molecule progressively is oriented in a C3V configuration with respect to the field.

  3. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  4. Inhibition of Antiapoptotic BCL-XL, BCL-2, and MCL-1 Proteins by Small Molecule Mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Dalafave, D.S.; Prisco, G.

    2010-01-01

    Informatics and computational design methods were used to create new molecules that could potentially bind antiapoptotic proteins, thus promoting death of cancer cells. Apoptosis is a cellular process that leads to the death of damaged cells. Its malfunction can cause cancer and poor response to conventional chemotherapy. After being activated by cellular stress signals, proapoptotic proteins bind antiapoptotic proteins, thus allowing apoptosis to go forward. An excess of antiapoptotic proteins can prevent apoptosis. Designed molecules that mimic the roles of proapoptotic proteins can promote the death of cancer cells. The goal of our study was to create new putative mimetics that could simultaneously bind several antiapoptotic proteins. Five new small molecules were designed that formed stable complexes with BCL-2, BCL-XL, and MCL-1 antiapoptotic proteins. These results are novel because, to our knowledge, there are not many, if any, small molecules known to bind all three proteins. Drug-likeness studies performed on the designed molecules, as well as previous experimental and preclinical studies on similar agents, strongly suggest that the designed molecules may indeed be promising drug candidates. All five molecules showed “drug-like” properties and had overall drug-likeness scores between 81% and 96%. A single drug based on these mimetics should cost less and cause fewer side effects than a combination of drugs each aimed at a single protein. Computer-based molecular design promises to accelerate drug research by predicting potential effectiveness of designed molecules prior to laborious experiments and costly preclinical trials. PMID:20838611

  5. Small-Molecule Stabilization of 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions Stimulates Axon Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Andrew; Morquette, Barbara; Kroner, Antje; Leong, SooYuen; Madwar, Carolin; Sanz, Ricardo; Banerjee, Sara L; Antel, Jack; Bisson, Nicolas; David, Samuel; Fournier, Alyson E

    2017-03-08

    Damaged central nervous system (CNS) neurons have a poor ability to spontaneously regenerate, causing persistent functional deficits after injury. Therapies that stimulate axon growth are needed to repair CNS damage. 14-3-3 adaptors are hub proteins that are attractive targets to manipulate cell signaling. We identify a positive role for 14-3-3s in axon growth and uncover a developmental regulation of the phosphorylation and function of 14-3-3s. We show that fusicoccin-A (FC-A), a small-molecule stabilizer of 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions, stimulates axon growth in vitro and regeneration in vivo. We show that FC-A stabilizes a complex between 14-3-3 and the stress response regulator GCN1, inducing GCN1 turnover and neurite outgrowth. These findings show that 14-3-3 adaptor protein complexes are druggable targets and identify a new class of small molecules that may be further optimized for the repair of CNS damage.

  6. Vibrational frequency shifts of diatomic molecules in interaction with a Na + cation by ab initio calculations. Comparison with experiment on H 2 and N 2 adsorbed in NaA zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koubi, Laure; Blain, Monique; de Lara, Evelyne Cohen; Leclerq, Jean-Marie

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations on H 2 and N 2 and on the same molecules in the presence of a Na + cation are presented. The equilibrium configuration and the vibrational frequency shift due to the interaction are calculated. The potential energy surfaces are obtained by local osculatory interpolations and extrapolations. The vibrational frequencies are calculated by the Numerov—Cooley method. The direction of the frequency shift is found to be related to the orientation of the diatomic molecule with respect to the cation. The results are compared with experimental data on induced infrared bands of H 2 and N 2 adsorbed in NaA zeolite.

  7. Water-mediated influence of a crowded environment on internal vibrations of a protein molecule.

    PubMed

    Kuffel, Anna; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2016-02-14

    The influence of crowding on the protein inner dynamics is examined by putting a single protein molecule close to one or two neighboring protein molecules. The presence of additional molecules influences the amplitudes of protein fluctuations. Also, a weak dynamical coupling of collective velocities of surface atoms of proteins separated by a layer of water is detected. The possible mechanisms of these phenomena are described. The cross-correlation function of the collective velocities of surface atoms of two proteins was decomposed into the Fourier series. The amplitude spectrum displays a peak at low frequencies. Also, the results of principal component analysis suggest that the close presence of an additional protein molecule influences the high-amplitude, low-frequency modes in the most prominent way. This part of the spectrum covers biologically important protein motions. The neighbor-induced changes in the inner dynamics of the protein may be connected with the changes in the velocity power spectrum of interfacial water. The additional protein molecule changes the properties of solvation water and in this way it can influence the dynamics of the second protein. It is suggested that this phenomenon may be described, at first approximation, by a damped oscillator driven by an external random force. This model was successfully applied to conformationally rigid Choristoneura fumiferana antifreeze protein molecules.

  8. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  9. Improved direct electrochemistry for proteins adsorbed on a UV/ozone-treated carbon nanofiber electrode.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qiang; Kato, Dai; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Guo, Qiaohui; You, Tianyan; Niwa, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    We studied the direct electron transfer (DET) of proteins on a carbon nanofiber (CNF) modified carbon film electrode by employing the one-step UV/ozone treatment of CNF. This treatment changed the CNF surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic because a sufficient quantity of oxygen functional groups was introduced onto the CNF surface. Furthermore, this simple approach increased both the effective surface area and the number of edge-plane defect sites. As a result, the reversibility of redox species, such as ferrocyanide and dopamine, was greatly improved on the treated electrode surface. We obtained on efficient DET of bilirubin oxidase (BOD) and cytochrome c (cyt c) at the treated CNF electrode, which exhibited 38 (for BOD) and 6 (for cyt c) times higher than that at untreated CNF modified electrode. These results indicate that the combination of nanostructured carbon and this UV/ozone treatment process can efficiently create a functionalized surface for the electron transfer of proteins.

  10. A synthetic Protein G adsorbent based on the multi-component Ugi reaction for the purification of mammalian immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jianing; El Khoury, Graziella; Issa, Hamzah; Al-Qaoud, Khaled; Shihab, Penelope; Lowe, Christopher R

    2012-06-01

    Numerous efforts have been devoted to develop synthetic affinity ligands mimicking natural immunoglobulin-binding proteins, such as Proteins A and L, in order to overcome intrinsic drawbacks involving their high cost and acidic pH elution. However, few reports have focused on a Protein G mimic. This work describes the use of the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction to generate a low cost, rationally designed, affinity ligand to mimic Protein G for the purification of mammalian immunoglobulins, including the heavy-chain only camelid IgGs, with effective elution at neutral pH. An aldehyde-functionalised Sepharose™ resin constituted one component (aldehyde) of the four-component Ugi reaction, whilst the other three components (a primary or secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isonitrile) were varied to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold, with a wide range of functionality, suitable for mimicking peptides for immunoglobulin purification. Ligand A2C11I1 was designed to mimic Asn35 and Trp43 of Protein G (PDB: 1FCC) and in silico docking into the Fc domain showed a key binding interface closely resembling native Protein G. This candidate ligand demonstrated affinity towards IgGs derived from human, cow, goat, mouse, sheep, pig, rabbit and rat serum, chicken IgY and recombinant camelid Fc domain, out of which cow and sheep IgG demonstrated 100% binding under the conditions selected. Preparative chromatography of IgG from human serum under a standardised buffer regime eluted IgG of ∼65% purity, compared to ∼62% with Protein G. This adsorbent achieved highest elution of IgG at neutral pH (0.1M sodium phosphate pH 7.0, 30%, v/v, ethylene glycol), an advantage for purifying antibodies sensitive to extremes of pH. The ligand demonstrated a static binding capacity of 24.6 mg Ig G ml⁻¹ resin and a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 4.78 × 10⁻⁶ M. The solid phase Ugi scaffold provides a strategy to develop pseudo-biospecific ligands to purify

  11. ToF-SIMS Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: Principal Component Analysis of the Primary Ion Species Effect on the Protein Fragmentation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Graham, Daniel J; Wagner, Matthew S; Lee, Tae Geol; Moon, Dae Won; Castner, David G

    2011-12-15

    In time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), the choice of primary ion used for analysis can influence the resulting mass spectrum. This is because different primary ion types can produce different fragmentation pathways. In this study, analysis of single-component protein monolayers were performed using monatomic, tri-atomic, and polyatomic primary ion sources. Eight primary ions (Cs(+), Au(+), Au(3) (+), Bi(+), Bi(3) (+), Bi(3) (++), C(60) (+)) were used to examine to the low mass (m/z < 200) fragmentation patterns from five different proteins (bovine serum albumin, bovine serum fibrinogen, bovine immunoglobulin G and chicken egg white lysozyme) adsorbed onto mica surfaces. Principal component analysis (PCA) processing of the ToF-SIMS data showed that variation in peak intensity caused by the primary ions was greater than differences in protein composition. The spectra generated by Cs(+), Au(+) and Bi(+) primary ions were similar, but the spectra generated by monatomic, tri-atomic and polyatomic primary ion ions varied significantly. C(60) primary ions increased fragmentation of the adsorbed proteins in the m/z < 200 region, resulting in more intense low m/z peaks. Thus, comparison of data obtained by one primary ion species with that obtained by another primary ion species should be done with caution. However, for the spectra generated using a given primary ion beam, discrimination between the spectra of different proteins followed similar trends. Therefore, a PCA model of proteins created with a given ion source should only be applied to datasets obtained using the same ion source. The type of information obtained from PCA depended on the peak set used. When only amino acid peaks were used, PCA was able to identify the relationship between proteins by their amino acid composition. When all peaks from m/z 12-200 were used, PCA separated proteins based on a ratio of C(4)H(8)N(+) to K(+) peak intensities. This ratio correlated with the thickness

  12. Extending the range of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) surface structure determination: Co-adsorbed molecules, incommensurate overlayers and alloy surface order studied by new video and electron counting LEED techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.

    1986-11-01

    LEED multiple scattering theory is briefly summarized, and aspects of electron scattering with particular significance to experimental measurements such as electron beam coherence, instrument response and phonon scattering are analyzed. Diffuse LEED experiments are discussed. New techniques that enhance the power of LEED are described, including a real-time video image digitizer applied to LEED intensity measurements, along with computer programs to generate I-V curves. The first electron counting LEED detector using a ''wedge and strip'' position sensitive anode and digital electronics is described. This instrument uses picoampere incident beam currents, and its sensitivity is limited only by statistics and counting times. Structural results on new classes of surface systems are presented. The structure of the c(4 x 2) phase of carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pt(111) has been determined, showing that carbon monoxide molecules adsorb in both top and bridge sites, 1.85 +- 0.10 A and 1.55 +- 0.10 A above the metal surface, respectively. The structure of an incommensurate graphite overlayer on Pt(111) is analyzed. The graphite layer is 3.70 +- 0.05 A above the metal surface, with intercalated carbon atoms located 1.25 +- 0.10 A above hollow sites supporting it. The (2..sqrt..3 x 4)-rectangular phase of benzene and carbon monoxide coadsorbed on Pt(111) is analyzed. Benzene molecules adsorb in bridge sites parallel to and 2.10 +- 0.10 A above the surface. The carbon ring is expanded, with an average C-C bond length of 1.72 +- 0.15 A. The carbon monoxide molecules also adsorb in bridge sites. The structure of the (..sqrt..3 x ..sqrt..3) reconstruction on the (111) face of the ..cap alpha..-CuAl alloy has been determined.

  13. Adsorption of peptides and small proteins with control access polymer permeation to affinity binding sites. Part II: Polymer permeation-ion exchange separation adsorbents with polyethylene glycol and strong anion exchange groups.

    PubMed

    González-Ortega, Omar; Porath, Jerker; Guzmán, Roberto

    2012-03-02

    In chromatographic separations, the most general problem in small biomolecule isolation and purification is that such biomolecules are usually found in extremely low concentrations together with high concentrations of large molecular weight proteins. In the first part of this work, adsorption and size exclusion chromatography (AdSEC) controlled access media, using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a semi-permeable barrier on a polysaccharide Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography (IMAC) matrix was synthesized and used to develop chromatographic adsorbents that preferentially adsorb and separate low molecular weight biomolecules while rejecting large molecular weight proteins. In this second part, we expand the concept of controlled access polymer permeation adsorption (CAPPA) media by grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG) on a high capacity polysaccharide ion exchange (IEX) chromatographic resin where PEG acts as a semi-permeable barrier that preferentially allows the permeation of small molecules while rejecting large ones. The IEX resin bearing quaternary ammonium groups binds permeated biomolecules according to their ion exchange affinity while excluding large biomolecules by the PEG barrier and thus cannot compete for the binding sites. This new AdSEC media was used to study the retention of peptides and proteins covering a wide range of molecular weights from 1 to 150 kDa. The effect of protein molecular weight towards retention by ion exchange was performed using pure protein solutions. Recovery of insulin from insulin-spiked human serum and insulin-spiked human urine was evaluated under polymer controlled permeation conditions. The CAPPA media consisted of agarose beads modified with amino-PEG-methoxy and with trimethyl ammonium groups, having chloride capacities between 20 and 40 μeq/mL and were effective in rejecting high molecular weight proteins while allowing the preferential adsorption of small proteins and peptides.

  14. Quantifying the entropy of binding for water molecules in protein cavities by computing correlations.

    PubMed

    Huggins, David J

    2015-02-17

    Protein structural analysis demonstrates that water molecules are commonly found in the internal cavities of proteins. Analysis of experimental data on the entropies of inorganic crystals suggests that the entropic cost of transferring such a water molecule to a protein cavity will not typically be greater than 7.0 cal/mol/K per water molecule, corresponding to a contribution of approximately +2.0 kcal/mol to the free energy. In this study, we employ the statistical mechanical method of inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory to quantify the enthalpic and entropic contributions of individual water molecules in 19 protein cavities across five different proteins. We utilize information theory to develop a rigorous estimate of the total two-particle entropy, yielding a complete framework to calculate hydration free energies. We show that predictions from inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory are in excellent agreement with predictions from free energy perturbation (FEP) and that these predictions are consistent with experimental estimates. However, the results suggest that water molecules in protein cavities containing charged residues may be subject to entropy changes that contribute more than +2.0 kcal/mol to the free energy. In all cases, these unfavorable entropy changes are predicted to be dominated by highly favorable enthalpy changes. These findings are relevant to the study of bridging water molecules at protein-protein interfaces as well as in complexes with cognate ligands and small-molecule inhibitors.

  15. Quantifying the Entropy of Binding for Water Molecules in Protein Cavities by Computing Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein structural analysis demonstrates that water molecules are commonly found in the internal cavities of proteins. Analysis of experimental data on the entropies of inorganic crystals suggests that the entropic cost of transferring such a water molecule to a protein cavity will not typically be greater than 7.0 cal/mol/K per water molecule, corresponding to a contribution of approximately +2.0 kcal/mol to the free energy. In this study, we employ the statistical mechanical method of inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory to quantify the enthalpic and entropic contributions of individual water molecules in 19 protein cavities across five different proteins. We utilize information theory to develop a rigorous estimate of the total two-particle entropy, yielding a complete framework to calculate hydration free energies. We show that predictions from inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory are in excellent agreement with predictions from free energy perturbation (FEP) and that these predictions are consistent with experimental estimates. However, the results suggest that water molecules in protein cavities containing charged residues may be subject to entropy changes that contribute more than +2.0 kcal/mol to the free energy. In all cases, these unfavorable entropy changes are predicted to be dominated by highly favorable enthalpy changes. These findings are relevant to the study of bridging water molecules at protein-protein interfaces as well as in complexes with cognate ligands and small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:25692597

  16. Imaging proteins at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Abb, Sabine; Escher, Conrad; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Kern, Klaus; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2017-01-01

    Imaging single proteins has been a long-standing ambition for advancing various fields in natural science, as for instance structural biology, biophysics, and molecular nanotechnology. In particular, revealing the distinct conformations of an individual protein is of utmost importance. Here, we show the imaging of individual proteins and protein complexes by low-energy electron holography. Samples of individual proteins and protein complexes on ultraclean freestanding graphene were prepared by soft-landing electrospray ion beam deposition, which allows chemical- and conformational-specific selection and gentle deposition. Low-energy electrons do not induce radiation damage, which enables acquiring subnanometer resolution images of individual proteins (cytochrome C and BSA) as well as of protein complexes (hemoglobin), which are not the result of an averaging process. PMID:28087691

  17. Ultrathin calcium silicate hydrate nanosheets with large specific surface areas: synthesis, crystallization, layered self-assembly and applications as excellent adsorbents for drug, protein, and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Feng

    2013-09-09

    A simple and low-cost solution synthesis is reported for low-crystalline 1.4 nm tobermorite-like calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) ultrathin nanosheets with a thickness of ~2.8 nm and with a large specific surface area (SSA), via a reaction-rate-controlled precipitation process. The BET SSA of the CSH ultrathin nanosheets can reach as high as 505 m(2) g(-1) . The CSH ultrathin nanosheets have little cytotoxicity and can be converted to anhydrous calcium silicate (ACS) ultrathin nanosheets with a well preserved morphology via a heat treatment process. The crystallinity of CSH ultrathin nanosheets can be improved by solvothermal treatment in water/ethanol binary solvents or a single solvent of water, producing well-crystalline 1.1 nm tobermorite-like CSH nanobelts or nanosheets. CSH ultrathin nanosheets acting as building blocks can self-assemble into layered nanostructures via three different routes. The CSH ultrathin nanosheets are investigated as promising adsorbents for protein (hemoglobin, Hb), drug (ibuprofen, IBU), and metal ions (Cr(3+) , Ni(2+) , Cu(2+) , Zn(2+) , Cd(2+) , Pb(2+) ). The highest adsorbed percentages of Hb and IBU are found to be 83% and 94%, respectively. The highest adsorption capacities of Hb and IBU are found to be as high as 878 milligram Hb per gram CSH and 2.2 gram IBU per gram CSH, respectively. The ppm level metal ions can be totally adsorbed from aqueous solution in just a few minutes. Thus, the CSH ultrathin nanosheets are a promising candidate as excellent adsorbents in the biomedical field and for waste water treatment. Several empirical laws are summarized based on the adsorption profiles of Hb and IBU using CSH ultrathin nanosheets as the adsorbent. Furthermore, the ACS ultrathin nanosheets as adsorbents for Hb protein and IBU drug are investigated.

  18. Small molecule inhibitors of PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions as novel analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wan-Hung; Xu, Zhili; Ashpole, Nicole M.; Hudmon, Andy; Kulkarni, Pushkar M.; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Lai, Yvonne Y.; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant increases in NMDA receptor (NMDAR) signaling contributes to central nervous system sensitization and chronic pain by activating neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and generating nitric oxide (NO). Because the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95kDA (PSD95) tethers nNOS to NMDARs, the PSD95-nNOS complex represents a therapeutic target. Small molecule inhibitors IC87201 (EC5O: 23.94 µM) and ZL006 (EC50: 12.88 µM) directly inhibited binding of purified PSD95 and nNOS proteins in AlphaScreen without altering binding of PSD95 to ErbB4. Both PSD95-nNOS inhibitors suppressed glutamate-induced cell death with efficacy comparable to MK-801. IC87201 and ZL006 preferentially suppressed phase 2A pain behavior in the formalin test and suppressed allodynia induced by intraplantar complete Freund’s adjuvant administration. IC87201 and ZL006 suppressed mechanical and cold allodynia induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel (ED50s: 2.47 and 0.93 mg/kg i.p. for IC87201 and ZL006, respectively). Efficacy of PSD95-nNOS disruptors was similar to MK-801. Motor ataxic effects were induced by MK-801 but not by ZL006 or IC87201. Finally, MK-801 produced hyperalgesia in the tail-flick test whereas IC87201 and ZL006 did not alter basal nociceptive thresholds. Our studies establish the utility of using AlphaScreen and purified protein pairs to establish and quantify disruption of protein-protein interactions. Our results demonstrate previously unrecognized antinociceptive efficacy of ZL006 and establish, using two small molecules, a broad application for PSD95-nNOS inhibitors in treating neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Collectively, our results demonstrate that disrupting PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions is effective in attenuating pathological pain without producing unwanted side effects (i.e. motor ataxia) associated with NMDAR antagonists. PMID:26071110

  19. Ultralow protein adsorbing coatings from clickable PEG nanogel solutions: Benefits of attachment under salt-induced phase separation conditions and comparison with PEG/albumin nanogel coatings

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Casey D.; Cohen, Thomas L.; Li, Wenlu; Nguyen, Peter K.; Fortner, John D.; Mitra, Robi D.; Elbert, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Clickable nanogel solutions were synthesized by using the copper catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to partially polymerize solutions of azide and alkyne functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) monomers. Coatings were fabricated using a second click reaction: a UV thiol-yne attachment of the nanogel solutions to mercaptosilanated glass. Because the CuAAC reaction was effectively halted by the addition of a copper-chelator, we were able to prevent bulk gelation and limit the coating thickness to a single monolayer of nanogels in the absence of the solution reaction. This enabled the inclusion of kosmotropic salts, which caused the PEG to phase-separate and nearly double the nanogel packing density, as confirmed by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D). Protein adsorption was analyzed by single molecule counting with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and cell adhesion assays. Coatings formed from the phase-separated clickable nanogel solutions attached with salt adsorbed significantly less fibrinogen than other 100% PEG coatings tested, as well as poly-L-lysine-g-PEG (PLL-g-PEG) coatings. However, PEG/albumin nanogel coatings still outperformed the best 100% PEG clickable nanogel coatings. Additional surface crosslinking of the clickable nanogel coating in the presence of copper further reduced levels of fibrinogen adsorption closer to those of PEG/albumin nanogel coatings. However, this step negatively impacted long-term resistance to cell adhesion and dramatically altered the morphology of the coating by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The main benefit of the click strategy is that the partially polymerized solutions are stable almost indefinitely, allowing attachment in the phase-separated state without danger of bulk gelation, and thus, producing the best performing 100% PEG coating that we have studied to date. PMID:23441808

  20. Ultralow protein adsorbing coatings from clickable PEG nanogel solutions: benefits of attachment under salt-induced phase separation conditions and comparison with PEG/albumin nanogel coatings.

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Casey D; Cohen, Thomas L; Li, Wenlu; Nguyen, Peter K; Fortner, John D; Mitra, Robi D; Elbert, Donald L

    2013-03-26

    Clickable nanogel solutions were synthesized by using the copper catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to partially polymerize solutions of azide and alkyne functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) monomers. Coatings were fabricated using a second click reaction: a UV thiol-yne attachment of the nanogel solutions to mercaptosilanated glass. Because the CuAAC reaction was effectively halted by the addition of a copper-chelator, we were able to prevent bulk gelation and limit the coating thickness to a single monolayer of nanogels in the absence of the solution reaction. This enabled the inclusion of kosmotropic salts, which caused the PEG to phase-separate and nearly double the nanogel packing density, as confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Protein adsorption was analyzed by single molecule counting with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and cell adhesion assays. Coatings formed from the phase-separated clickable nanogel solutions attached with salt adsorbed significantly less fibrinogen than other 100% PEG coatings tested, as well as poly(L-lysine)-g-PEG (PLL-g-PEG) coatings. However, PEG/albumin nanogel coatings still outperformed the best 100% PEG clickable nanogel coatings. Additional surface cross-linking of the clickable nanogel coating in the presence of copper further reduced levels of fibrinogen adsorption closer to those of PEG/albumin nanogel coatings. However, this step negatively impacted long-term resistance to cell adhesion and dramatically altered the morphology of the coating by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The main benefit of the click strategy is that the partially polymerized solutions are stable almost indefinitely, allowing attachment in the phase-separated state without danger of bulk gelation, and thus producing the best performing 100% PEG coating that we have studied to date.

  1. Functionalization of metallic magnesium with protein layers via linker molecules.

    PubMed

    Killian, Manuela S; Wagener, Victoria; Schmuki, Patrik; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2010-07-20

    We present an innovative method to cover pure magnesium with protein monolayers by utilizing the OH termination of the oxide surface and silane coupling chemistry. The protein of interest was albumin. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to monitor the success of the treatment. The attachment of proteins via linker groups yielded smoother and more homogeneous surfaces than coatings produced by steeping magnesium in protein solution. A positive effect on the corrosion behavior of pure magnesium was also observed.

  2. A scanning probe microscopy study of the physisorption and chemisorption of protein molecules onto carboxylate terminated self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, N.; Davies, M. C.; Heaton, R. J.; Roberts, C. J.; Tendler, S. J. B.; Williams, P. M.

    Scanning probe microscopy offers the possibility of investigating biomolecular structure and function. However, successful imaging is technically limited by interactions between the probe and the sample. A strong attachment of the biomolecule to the substrate is often required. Here, we investigate the binding of the protein catalase to gold surfaces modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The chemical and physical adsorption of the protein molecules onto SAMs of 3-mercaptopropanoic acid (3-MPA), 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA) and a mixture of the two acid thiols (Mixed) was investigated utilizing tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The surface concentration of catalase adsorbed on the SAMs decreased in the order: Mixed>11-MUA>3-MPA. Utilizing the terminal carboxylic acid functionalities, catalase was immobilized with a water soluble carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Immobilization resulted in increased coverage of the protein. SPR studies on silver surfaces modified by these SAMs indicate immobilization of carbodiimide and NHS decreased in the order: Mixed>11-MUA>3-MPA.

  3. Direct observation of intraparticle equilibration and the rate-limiting step in adsorption of proteins in chromatographic adsorbents with confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kasche, Volker; de Boer, Michael; Lazo, Cesar; Gad, Moustafa

    2003-06-25

    The adsorption of different proteins in a single biospecific and hydrophobic adsorbent particle for preparative protein chromatography has been observed directly by confocal laser scanning microscopy as a function of time at a constant bulk concentration c(b). The bulk concentration was in the non-linear part of the adsorption isotherm. At all times the concentration of free protein at the particle surface was almost equal to the bulk content indicating that external mass transfer resistance is not rate limiting for the adsorption under these conditions. Inside the particles a distinct maximum in adsorbed and free protein concentration that moved inside to a distance of approximately 0.2 R (R particle radius) from the particle surface, was observed. This is due to a decreasing solid-phase density and adsorptive capacity in the particle between 0.8 R and R indicating that the fraction of macropores (or void space) is larger in the outer than in the inner part of the adsorbent particles. By increasing the bulk concentration by a factor of 10 the equilibration time was reduced by about the same magnitude. This is in agreement with the concentration dependence of the effective pore diffusion coefficient D(p,eff)=D(p)/[epsilon(p)[1+nK/(K +c)(2)

  4. Single-molecule measurements of proteins using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) provide a promising platform for investigating proteins at the single-molecule level. Recently, we have demonstrated that SWCNT FETs have sufficient sensitivity and bandwidth to monitor the conformational motions and processivity of an individual T4 lysozyme molecule. This is accomplished by functionalizing a SWCNT FET device with a single protein and measuring the conductance versus time through the device as it is submerged in an electrolyte solution. To generalize this approach for the study of a wide variety of proteins at the single-molecule level, this dissertation investigates the conjugation process to determine and isolate the key parameters involved in functionalizing a SWCNT with a single protein, the physical basis for transducing conformational motion of a protein into an electrical signal, and finally, the general application of the technique to monitor the binary and ternary complex formation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA).

  5. Getting Across the Cell Membrane: An Overview for Small Molecules, Peptides, and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nicole J.; Hinner, Marlon J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to efficiently access cytosolic proteins is desired in both biological research and medicine. However, targeting intracellular proteins is often challenging, because to reach the cytosol, exogenous molecules must first traverse the cell membrane. This review provides a broad overview of how certain molecules are thought to cross this barrier, and what kinds of approaches are being made to enhance the intracellular delivery of those that are impermeable. We first discuss rules that govern the passive permeability of small molecules across the lipid membrane, and mechanisms of membrane transport that have evolved in nature for certain metabolites, peptides, and proteins. Then, we introduce design strategies that have emerged in the development of small molecules and peptides with improved permeability. Finally, intracellular delivery systems that have been engineered for protein payloads are surveyed. Viewpoints from varying disciplines have been brought together to provide a cohesive overview of how the membrane barrier is being overcome. PMID:25560066

  6. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  7. Residue-specific immobilization of protein molecules by size-selected clusters

    PubMed Central

    Prisco, Umberto; Leung, Carl; Xirouchaki, Chrisa; Jones, Celine H; Heath, John K; Palmer, Richard E

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), operating in contact mode, has been employed in buffer solution to study two proteins; (i) green fluorescent protein (GFP), from the hydromedusan jellyfish Aequorea victoria; and (ii) human oncostatin M (OSM), in the presence of size-selected gold nanoclusters pinned on to a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate. The AFM images have revealed immobilization of single molecules of OSM, which are strongly bound to the gold nanoclusters. Conversely, no strong immobilization has been observed for the GFP, as these molecules were easily displaced by the scanning tip. The contrasting behaviour of the two proteins can be explained by the exposed molecular surface area of their cysteine residues as modelled on the basis of their respective X-ray crystallographic data structures. GFP contains two cysteine residues, but neither is readily available to chemisorb on the gold clusters, because the cysteines are largely inaccessible from the surface of the protein. In contrast, OSM has a total of five cysteine residues, with different degrees of accessibility, which make the protein amenable to anchoring on the nanoclusters. Statistical analysis of the height of the OSM molecules bound to the nanoclusters is in accordance with crystallographic data, and suggests various configurations of the proteins on the clusters, associated with the presence of different cysteine anchoring sites. These results suggest that the three-dimensional conformation of protein molecules is preserved when they are chemisorbed to size-selected gold clusters, thus opening a new route towards oriented immobilization of individual protein molecules. PMID:16849177

  8. Atomic force microscopy study of the adsorption of protein molecules on transferred Langmuir monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Gainutdinov, R. V. Tolstikhina, A. L.; Stepina, N. D.; Novikova, N. N.; Yur'eva, E. A.; Khripunov, A. K.

    2010-09-15

    Ordered protein films have been obtained by the adsorption of protein molecules on a Langmuir monolayer, which had previously formed on a silicon substrate, using the Langmuir-Blodgett and molecular self-organization methods. A mixture of cholesterol with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and a polymer-cellulose acetopivalinate-were used as immobilization materials. Protein molecules (catalase and alkaline phosphatase) immobilized on solid substrates have been investigated by atomic force micros-copy. It was shown that the developed combined technique provides a deposition of homogeneous ultrathin protein films with a high degree of filling.

  9. Atomic force microscopy study of the adsorption of protein molecules on transferred Langmuir monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaĭnutdinov, R. V.; Tolstikhina, A. L.; Stepina, N. D.; Novikova, N. N.; Yur'eva, E. A.; Khripunov, A. K.

    2010-09-01

    Ordered protein films have been obtained by the adsorption of protein molecules on a Langmuir monolayer, which had previously formed on a silicon substrate, using the Langmuir-Blodgett and molecular self-organization methods. A mixture of cholesterol with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and a polymer—cellulose acetopivalinate—were used as immobilization materials. Protein molecules (catalase and alkaline phosphatase) immobilized on solid substrates have been investigated by atomic force micros-copy. It was shown that the developed combined technique provides a deposition of homogeneous ultrathin protein films with a high degree of filling.

  10. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  11. Single-Molecule Manipulation Studies of a Mechanically Activated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botello, Eric; Harris, Nolan; Choi, Huiwan; Bergeron, Angela; Dong, Jing-Fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2009-10-01

    Plasma von Willebrand factor (pVWF) is the largest multimeric adhesion ligand found in human blood and must be adhesively activated by exposure to shear stress, like at sites of vascular injury, to initiate blood clotting. Sheared pVWF (sVWF) will undergo a conformational change from a loose tangled coil to elongated strings forming adhesive fibers by binding with other sVWF. VWF's adhesion activity is also related to its length, with the ultra-large form of VWF (ULVWF) being hyper-actively adhesive without exposure to shear stress; it has also been shown to spontaneously form fibers. We used single molecule manipulation techniques with the AFM to stretch pVWF, sVWF and ULVWF and monitor the forces as a function of molecular extension. We showed a similar increase in resistance to unfolding for sVWF and ULVWF when compared to pVWF. This mechanical resistance to forced unfolding is reduced when other molecules known to disrupt their fibril formation are present. Our results show that sVWF and ULVWF domains unfold at higher forces than pVWF, which is consistent with the hypothesis that shear stress induces lateral association that alters adhesion activity of pVWF.

  12. Allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent for removing endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-10-04

    In this study we present a simple and robust method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions by using crystals of the small-molecule compound 2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl urea (allantoin) as a solid phase adsorbent. Allantoin crystalline powder is added to a protein solution at supersaturated concentrations, endotoxins bind and undissolved allantoin crystals with bound endotoxins are removed by filtration or centrifugation. This method removes an average of 99.98% endotoxin for 20 test proteins. The average protein recovery is ∼80%. Endotoxin binding is largely independent of pH, conductivity, reducing agent and various organic solvents. This is consistent with a hydrogen-bond based binding mechanism. Allantoin does not affect protein activity and stability, and the use of allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent provides better endotoxin removal than anion exchange, polymixin affinity and biological affinity methods for endotoxin clearance.

  13. Real-time single-molecule observations of proteins at the solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, Blake Brianna

    Non-specific protein adsorption to solid surfaces is pervasive and observed across a broad spectrum of applications including biomaterials, separations, pharmaceuticals, and biosensing. Despite great interest in and considerable literature dedicated to the phenomena, a mechanistic understanding of this complex phenomena is lacking and remains controversial, partially due to the limits of ensemble-averaging techniques used to study it. Single-molecule tracking (SMT) methods allow us to study distinct protein dynamics (e.g. adsorption, desorption, diffusion, and intermolecular associations) on a molecule-by-molecule basis revealing the protein population and spatial heterogeneity inherent in protein interfacial behavior. By employing single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (SM-TIRFM), we have developed SMT methods to directly observe protein interfacial dynamics at the solid-liquid interface to build a better mechanistic understanding of protein adsorption. First, we examined the effects of surface chemistry (e.g. hydrophobicity, hydrogen-bonding capacity), temperature, and electrostatics on isolated protein desorption and interfacial diffusion for fibrinogen (Fg) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Next, we directly and indirectly probed the effects of protein-protein interactions on interfacial desorption, diffusion, aggregation, and surface spatial heterogeneity on model and polymeric thin films. These studies provided many useful insights into interfacial protein dynamics including the following observations. First, protein adsorption was reversible, with the majority of proteins desorbing from all surface chemistries within seconds. Isolated protein-surface interactions were relatively weak on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces (apparent desorption activation energies of only a few kBT). However, proteins could dynamically and reversibly associate at the interface, and these interfacial associations led to proteins remaining on the

  14. Immobilization of oriented protein molecules on poly(ethylene glycol)-coated Si(111).

    PubMed

    Cha, Taewoon; Guo, Athena; Jun, Yongseok; Pei, Duanqing; Pei, Duanquing; Zhu, Xiao-Yang

    2004-07-01

    A high-density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coated Si(111) surface is used for the immobilization of polyhistidine-tagged protein molecules. This process features a number of properties that are highly desirable for protein microarray technology: (i) minimal nonspecific protein adsorption; (ii) highly uniform surface functionality; (iii) controlled protein orientation; and (iv) highly specific immobilization reaction without the need of protein purification. The high-density PEG-coated silicon surface is obtained from the reaction of a multi-arm PEG (mPEG) molecule with a chlorine terminated Si(111) surface to give a mPEG film with thickness of 5.2 nm. Four out of the eight arms on each immobilized mPEG molecule are accessible for linking to the chelating iminodiacetic acid (IDA) groups for the binding of Cu(2+) ions. The resulting Cu(2+)-IDA-mPEG-Si(111) surface is shown to specifically bind 6x histidine-tagged protein molecules, including green fluorescent protein (GFP) and sulfotransferase (ST), but otherwise retains its inertness towards nonspecific protein adsorption. We demonstrate a particular advantage of this strategy: the possibility of protein immobilization without the need of prepurification. Surface concentrations of relevant chemical species are quantitatively characterized at each reaction step by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This kind of quantitative analysis is essential in tuning surface concentration and chemical environment for optimal sensitivity in probe-target interaction.

  15. Rheumatoid Rescue of Misfolded Cellular Proteins by MHC Class II Molecules: A New Hypothesis for Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arase, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins localized in the endoplasmic reticulum are degraded promptly and thus are not transported outside cells. However, misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum are rescued from protein degradation upon association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without being processed to peptides. Studies on the misfolded proteins rescued by MHC class II molecules have revealed that misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules are specific targets for autoantibodies produced in autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, a strong correlation has been observed between autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules and the autoimmune disease susceptibility conferred by each MHC class II allele. These new insights into MHC class II molecules suggest that misfolded proteins rescued from protein degradation by MHC class II molecules are recognized as "neo-self" antigens by immune system and are involved in autoimmune diseases as autoantibody targets.

  16. A Multi-technique Characterization of Adsorbed Protein Films: Orientation and Structure by ToF-SIMS, NEXAFS, SFG, and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baio, Joseph E.

    There are many techniques that allow surface scientists to study interfaces. However, few are routinely applied to probe biological surfaces. The work presented here demonstrates how detailed information about the conformation, orientation, chemical state, and molecular structure of biological molecules immobilized onto a surface can be assessed by electron spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy techniques. This investigation began with the development of simple model systems (small proteins, and peptides) and evolved into a study of more complex --- real world systems. Initially, two model systems based on the chemical and electrostatic immobilization of a small rigid protein (Protein G B1 domain, 6kDa) were built to develop the capabilities of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToFSIMS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy as tools to probe the structure of surface immobilized proteins. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to measure the amount of immobilized protein and ToF-SIMS sampled the amino acid composition of the exposed surface of the protein film. Within the ToF-SIMS spectra, an enrichment of secondary ions from amino acids located at opposite ends of the proteins were used to describe protein orientation. SFG spectral peaks characteristic of ordered alpha-helix and beta-sheet elements were observed for both systems and the phase of the peaks indicated a predominantly upright orientation for both the covalent and electrostatic configurations. Polarization dependence of the NEXAFS signal from the N 1s to pi* transition of the peptide bonds that make up the beta-sheets also indicated protein ordering at the surface. Building upon the Protein G B1 studies, the orientation and structure of a surface immobilized antibody (HuLys Fv: variant of humanized anti-lysozyme variable fragment, 26kDa) was characterized across two

  17. Lotus-leaf-like topography predominates over adsorbed ECM proteins in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) surface/cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Dan; Yuan, Lin; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Hong

    2013-06-26

    It is well-known that extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins mediate cell/surface interactions. However, introduction of a specific surface topography may disturb the correlation between ECM proteins adsorption and cells adhesion on a given surface. In present study, lotus-leaf-like topography was introduced on the surface of a biodegradable material, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx). Protein adsorption and cell interactions with this lotus-leaf-like surface (designated PHBHHx-L) were investigated. Water contact angle data indicated that the hydrophobicity of PHBHHx was enhanced by the introduction of lotus-leaf-like topography. The adsorption of extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin and vitronectin) on PHBHHx-L was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with flat PHBHHx, adsorption on the PHBHHx-L surface increased by ~260% for fibronectin and ~40% for vitronectin. In contrast, fibroblast and endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation were reduced on the PHBHHx-L compared to the flat polymer surface. These results suggest that the inhibition of cell adhesion and proliferation caused by the lotus-leaf-like topography dominates over the effect of the adsorbed adhesive proteins in promoting adhesion and proliferation. It can be concluded that the lotus-leaf-like topography plays a dominant role in cell/PHBHHx-L interactions. The present findings indicate the complexity of the interplay among surface topography, adsorbed proteins, and cell-surface interactions.

  18. Terminal supraparticle assemblies from similarly charged protein molecules and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jai Il; Nguyen, Trung Dac; de Queirós Silveira, Gleiciani; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Srivastava, Sudhanshu; Zhao, Gongpu; Sun, Kai; Zhang, Peijun; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2014-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and inorganic nanoparticles into terminal assemblies makes possible a large family of uniformly sized hybrid colloids. These particles can be compared in terms of utility, versatility and multifunctionality to other known types of terminal assemblies. They are simple to make and offer theoretical tools for designing their structure and function. To demonstrate such assemblies, we combine cadmium telluride nanoparticles with cytochrome C protein and observe spontaneous formation of spherical supraparticles with a narrow size distribution. Such self-limiting behaviour originates from the competition between electrostatic repulsion and non-covalent attractive interactions. Experimental variation of supraparticle diameters for several assembly conditions matches predictions obtained in simulations. Similar to micelles, supraparticles can incorporate other biological components as exemplified by incorporation of nitrate reductase. Tight packing of nanoscale components enables effective charge and exciton transport in supraparticles and bionic combination of properties as demonstrated by enzymatic nitrate reduction initiated by light absorption in the nanoparticle.

  19. Terminal Supraparticle Assemblies from Similarly Charged Protein Molecules and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jai Il; Nguyen, Trung Dac; de Queirós Silveira, Gleiciani; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Srivastava, Sudhanshu; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Gongpu; Zhang, Peijun; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and inorganic nanoparticles into terminal assemblies makes possible a large family of uniformly sized hybrid colloids. These particles can be compared in terms of utility, versatility and multifunctionality to other known types of terminal assemblies. They are simple to make and offer theoretical tools for designing their structure and function. To demonstrate such assemblies, we combine cadmium telluride nanoparticles with cytochrome C protein and observe spontaneous formation of spherical supraparticles with a narrow size distribution. Such self-limiting behaviour originates from the competition between electrostatic repulsion and non-covalent attractive interactions. Experimental variation of supraparticle diameters for several assembly conditions matches predictions obtained in simulations. Similar to micelles, supraparticles can incorporate other biological components as exemplified by incorporation of nitrate reductase. Tight packing of nanoscale components enables effective charge and exciton transport in supraparticles as demonstrated by enzymatic nitrate reduction initiated by light absorption in the nanoparticle. PMID:24845400

  20. Single-molecule studies of high-mobility group B architectural DNA bending proteins.

    PubMed

    Murugesapillai, Divakaran; McCauley, Micah J; Maher, L James; Williams, Mark C

    2017-02-01

    Protein-DNA interactions can be characterized and quantified using single molecule methods such as optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence imaging. In this review, we discuss studies that characterize the binding of high-mobility group B (HMGB) architectural proteins to single DNA molecules. We show how these studies are able to extract quantitative information regarding equilibrium binding as well as non-equilibrium binding kinetics. HMGB proteins play critical but poorly understood roles in cellular function. These roles vary from the maintenance of chromatin structure and facilitation of ribosomal RNA transcription (yeast high-mobility group 1 protein) to regulatory and packaging roles (human mitochondrial transcription factor A). We describe how these HMGB proteins bind, bend, bridge, loop and compact DNA to perform these functions. We also describe how single molecule experiments observe multiple rates for dissociation of HMGB proteins from DNA, while only one rate is observed in bulk experiments. The measured single-molecule kinetics reveals a local, microscopic mechanism by which HMGB proteins alter DNA flexibility, along with a second, much slower macroscopic rate that describes the complete dissociation of the protein from DNA.

  1. Partial high-resolution structure of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated leucine-rich amelogenin protein adsorbed to hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Masica, David L.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2011-07-21

    The formation of biogenic materials requires the interaction of organic molecules with the mineral phase. In forming enamel, the amelogenin proteins contribute to the mineralization of hydroxyapatite (HAp). Leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) is a naturally occurring splice variant of amelogenin that comprises amelogenin’s predicted HAp binding domains. We determined the partial structure of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated LRAP variants bound to HAp using combined solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. The ssNMR measurements indicate a largely extended structure for both variants, though some measurements are consistent with a partially helical N-terminal segment. Structure prediction was biased using 21 ssNMR measurements at five HAp crystal faces. The predicted fold of LRAP is similar at all HAp faces studied, regardless of phosphorylation. LRAP’s predicted structure is relatively extended with a helix-turn-helix motif in the N-terminal domain and some helix in the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain of the phosphorylated variant binds HAp more tightly than the N-terminal domain of the non-phosphorylated variant. Both variants are predicted to preferentially bind the {010} HAp crystal face providing further evidence that amelogenins block crystal growth on the a and b faces to allow elongated crystals in the c-axis. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  2. Force measurements on myelin basic protein adsorbed to mica and lipid bilayer surfaces done with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, H; Butt, H J; Bamberg, E

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical and adhesion properties of myelin basic protein (MBP) are important for its function, namely the compaction of the myelin sheath. To get more information about these properties we used atomic force microscopy to study tip-sample interaction of mica and mixed dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) (20%)/egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) (80%) lipid bilayer surfaces in the absence and presence of bovine MBP. On mica or DOPS/EPC bilayers a short-range repulsive force (decay length 1.0-1.3 nm) was observed during the approach. The presence of MBP always led to an attractive force between tip and sample. When retracting the tip again, force curves on mica and on lipid layers were different. While attached to the mica surface, the MBP molecules exhibited elastic stretching behavior that agreed with the worm-like chain model, yielding a persistence length of 0.5 +/- 0.25 nm and an average contour length of 53 +/- 19 nm. MBP attached to a lipid bilayer did not show elastic stretching behavior. This shows that the protein adopts a different conformation when in contact with lipids. The lipid bilayer is strongly modified by MBP attachment, indicating formation of MBP-lipid complexes and possibly disruption of the original bilayer structure. PMID:9916039

  3. A Materiomics Approach to Spider Silk: Protein Molecules to Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarakanova, Anna; Buehler, Markus J.

    2012-02-01

    The exceptional mechanical properties of hierarchical self-assembling silk biopolymers have been extensively studied experimentally and in computational investigations. A series of recent studies has been conducted to examine structure-function relationships across different length scales in silk, ranging from atomistic models of protein constituents to the spider web architecture. Silk is an exemplary natural material because its superior properties stem intrinsically from the synergistic cooperativity of hierarchically organized components, rather than from the superior properties of the building blocks themselves. It is composed of beta-sheet nanocrystals interspersed within less orderly amorphous domains, where the underlying molecular structure is dominated by weak hydrogen bonding. Protein chains are organized into fibrils, which pack together to form threads of a spider web. In this article we survey multiscale studies spanning length scales from angstroms to centimeters, from the amino acid sequence defining silk components to an atomistically derived spider web model, with the aim to bridge varying levels of hierarchy to elucidate the mechanisms by which structure at each composite level contributes to organization and material phenomena at subsequent levels. The work demonstrates that the web is a highly adapted system where both material and hierarchical structure across all length scales is critical for its functional properties.

  4. Enamel matrix proteins; old molecules for new applications.

    PubMed

    Lyngstadaas, S P; Wohlfahrt, J C; Brookes, S J; Paine, M L; Snead, M L; Reseland, J E

    2009-08-01

    Emdogain (enamel matrix derivative, EMD) is well recognized in periodontology, where it is used as a local adjunct to periodontal surgery to stimulate regeneration of periodontal tissues lost to periodontal disease. The biological effect of EMD is through stimulation of local growth factor secretion and cytokine expression in the treated tissues, inducing a regenerative process that mimics odontogenesis. The major (>95%) component of EMD is Amelogenins (Amel). No other active components have so far been isolated from EMD, and several studies have shown that purified amelogenins can induce the same effect as the complete EMD. Amelogenins comprise a family of highly conserved extracellular matrix proteins derived from one gene. Amelogenin structure and function is evolutionary well conserved, suggesting a profound role in biomineralization and hard tissue formation. A special feature of amelogenins is that under physiological conditions the proteins self-assembles into nanospheres that constitute an extracellular matrix. In the body, this matrix is slowly digested by specific extracellular proteolytic enzymes (matrix metalloproteinase) in a controlled process, releasing bioactive peptides to the surrounding tissues for weeks after application. Based on clinical and experimental observations in periodontology indicating that amelogenins can have a significant positive influence on wound healing, bone formation and root resorption, several new applications for amelogenins have been suggested. New experiments now confirm that amelogenins have potential for being used also in the fields of endodontics, bone regeneration, implantology, traumatology, and wound care.

  5. Screening of the Binding of Small Molecules to Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with Protein Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins.

  6. Scanning a DNA Molecule for Bound Proteins Using Hybrid Magnetic and Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    van Loenhout, Marijn T. J.; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Flebus, Benedetta; den Blanken, Johan F.; Zweifel, Ludovit P.; Hooning, Koen M.; Kerssemakers, Jacob W. J.; Dekker, Cees

    2013-01-01

    The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ∼17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33±5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions. PMID:23755219

  7. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be reduced using small-molecule compounds?

    PubMed Central

    Kmetko, Jan; Warkentin, Matthew; Englich, Ulrich; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have defined a data-collection protocol and a metric that provide a robust measure of global radiation damage to protein crystals. Using this protocol and metric, 19 small-molecule compounds (introduced either by cocrystalliz­ation or soaking) were evaluated for their ability to protect lysozyme crystals from radiation damage. The compounds were selected based upon their ability to interact with radiolytic products (e.g. hydrated electrons, hydrogen, hydroxyl and perhydroxyl radicals) and/or their efficacy in protecting biological molecules from radiation damage in dilute aqueous solutions. At room temperature, 12 compounds had no effect and six had a sensitizing effect on global damage. Only one compound, sodium nitrate, appeared to extend crystal lifetimes, but not in all proteins and only by a factor of two or less. No compound provided protection at T = 100 K. Scavengers are ineffective in protecting protein crystals from global damage because a large fraction of primary X-ray-induced excitations are generated in and/or directly attack the protein and because the ratio of scavenger molecules to protein molecules is too small to provide appreciable competitive protection. The same reactivity that makes some scavengers effective radioprotectors in protein solutions may explain their sensitizing effect in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. A more productive focus for future efforts may be to identify and eliminate sensitizing compounds from crystallization solutions. PMID:21931220

  8. Discovery of Small Molecules that Inhibit the Disordered Protein, p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Iconaru, Luigi I.; Ban, David; Bharatham, Kavitha; Ramanathan, Arvind; Zhang, Weixing; Shelat, Anang A.; Zuo, Jian; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Disordered proteins are highly prevalent in biological systems, they control myriad signaling and regulatory processes, and their levels and/or cellular localization are often altered in human disease. In contrast to folded proteins, disordered proteins, due to conformational heterogeneity and dynamics, are not considered viable drug targets. We challenged this paradigm by identifying through NMR-based screening small molecules that bound specifically, albeit weakly, to the disordered cell cycle regulator, p27Kip1 (p27). Two groups of molecules bound to sites created by transient clusters of aromatic residues within p27. Conserved chemical features within these two groups of small molecules exhibited complementarity to their binding sites within p27, establishing structure-activity relationships for small molecule:disordered protein interactions. Finally, one compound counteracted the Cdk2/cyclin A inhibitory function of p27 in vitro, providing proof-of-principle that small molecules can inhibit the function of a disordered protein (p27) through sequestration in a conformation incapable of folding and binding to a natural regulatory target (Cdk2/cyclin A). PMID:26507530

  9. Discovery of Small Molecules that Inhibit the Disordered Protein, p27Kip1

    SciTech Connect

    Iconaru, Luigi I.; Ban, David; Bharatham, Kavitha; Ramanathan, Arvind; Zhang, Weixing; Shelat, Anang A.; Zuo, Jian; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2015-10-28

    In disordered proteins we see that they are highly prevalent in biological systems. They control myriad signaling and regulatory processes, and their levels and/or cellular localization are often altered in human disease. In contrast to folded proteins, disordered proteins, due to conformational heterogeneity and dynamics, are not considered viable drug targets. We challenged this paradigm by identifying through NMR-based screening small molecules that bound specifically, albeit weakly, to the disordered cell cycle regulator, p27Kip1 (p27). Moreover, two groups of molecules bound to sites created by transient clusters of aromatic residues within p27. Conserved chemical features within these two groups of small molecules exhibited complementarity to their binding sites within p27, establishing structure-activity relationships for small molecule: disordered protein interactions. Finally, one compound counteracted the Cdk2/cyclin A inhibitory function of p27 in vitro, providing proof-of- principle that small molecules can inhibit the function of a disordered protein (p27) through sequestration in a conformation incapable of folding and binding to a natural regulatory target (Cdk2/cyclin A).

  10. Discovery of Small Molecules that Inhibit the Disordered Protein, p27Kip1

    DOE PAGES

    Iconaru, Luigi I.; Ban, David; Bharatham, Kavitha; ...

    2015-10-28

    In disordered proteins we see that they are highly prevalent in biological systems. They control myriad signaling and regulatory processes, and their levels and/or cellular localization are often altered in human disease. In contrast to folded proteins, disordered proteins, due to conformational heterogeneity and dynamics, are not considered viable drug targets. We challenged this paradigm by identifying through NMR-based screening small molecules that bound specifically, albeit weakly, to the disordered cell cycle regulator, p27Kip1 (p27). Moreover, two groups of molecules bound to sites created by transient clusters of aromatic residues within p27. Conserved chemical features within these two groups ofmore » small molecules exhibited complementarity to their binding sites within p27, establishing structure-activity relationships for small molecule: disordered protein interactions. Finally, one compound counteracted the Cdk2/cyclin A inhibitory function of p27 in vitro, providing proof-of- principle that small molecules can inhibit the function of a disordered protein (p27) through sequestration in a conformation incapable of folding and binding to a natural regulatory target (Cdk2/cyclin A).« less

  11. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA-barcoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M

    2014-11-27

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing, high-throughput protein analyses are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule protein detection using optical methods is limited by the number of spectrally non-overlapping chromophores. Here we introduce a single-molecular-interaction sequencing (SMI-seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging single-molecule advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide thin film to construct a random single-molecule array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies) and analysed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimetre. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured on the basis of the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor and antibody-binding profiling, are demonstrated. SMI-seq enables 'library versus library' screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity.

  12. All-optical switching in Pharaonis phoborhodopsin protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sukhdev; Kikukawa, Takashi; Sharma, Parag; Kamo, Naoki

    2006-09-01

    Low-power all-optical switching with pharaonis phoborhodopsin (ppR) protein is demonstrated based on nonlinear excited-state absorption at different wavelengths. A modulating pulsed 532-nm laser beam is shown to switch the transmission of a continuous-wave signal light beam at: 1) 390 nm; 2) 500 nm; 3) 560 nm; and 4) 600 nm, respectively. Simulations based on the rate equation approach considering all seven states in the ppR photocycle are in good agreement with experimental results. It is shown that the switching characteristics at 560 and 600 nm, respectively, can exhibit negative to positive switching. The switching characteristics at 500 nm can be inverted by increasing the signal beam intensity. The profile of switched signal beam is also sensitive to the modulating pulse frequency and signal beam intensity and wavelength. The switching characteristics are also shown to be sensitive to the lifetimes of ppR(M) and ppR(O) intermediates. The results show the applicability of ppR as a low-power wavelength tunable all-optical switch.

  13. Integrated system for temperature-controlled fast protein liquid chromatography comprising improved copolymer modified beaded agarose adsorbents and a travelling cooling zone reactor arrangement.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tobias K H; Cao, Ping; Ewert, Stephanie; Wohlgemuth, Jonas; Liu, Haiyang; Willett, Thomas C; Theodosiou, Eirini; Thomas, Owen R T; Franzreb, Matthias

    2013-04-12

    An integrated approach to temperature-controlled chromatography, involving copolymer modified agarose adsorbents and a novel travelling cooling zone reactor (TCZR) arrangement, is described. Sepharose CL6B was transformed into a thermoresponsive cation exchange adsorbent (thermoCEX) in four synthetic steps: (i) epichlorohydrin activation; (ii) amine capping; (iii) 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid) immobilization; and 'graft from' polymerization of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-tert-butylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid-co-N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide). FT-IR, (1)H NMR, gravimetry and chemical assays allowed precise determination of the adsorbent's copolymer composition and loading, and identified the initial epoxy activation step as a critical determinant of 'on-support' copolymer loading, and in turn, protein binding performance. In batch binding studies with lactoferrin, thermoCEX's binding affinity and maximum adsorption capacity rose smoothly with temperature increase from 20 to 50 °C. In temperature shifting chromatography experiments employing thermoCEX in thermally jacketed columns, 44-51% of the lactoferrin adsorbed at 42 °C could be desorbed under binding conditions by cooling the column to 22 °C, but the elution peaks exhibited strong tailing. To more fully exploit the potential of thermoresponsive chromatography adsorbents, a new column arrangement, the TCZR, was developed. In TCZR chromatography, a narrow discrete cooling zone (special assembly of copper blocks and Peltier elements) is moved along a bespoke fixed-bed separation columnfilled with stationary phase. In tests with thermoCEX, it was possible to recover 65% of the lactoferrin bound at 35 °C using 8 successive movements of the cooling zone at a velocity of 0.1mm/s; over half of the recovered protein was eluted in the first peak in more concentrated form than in the feed. Intra-particle diffusion of desorbed protein out of the support pores, and the ratio between the velocities of the cooling

  14. Protein stability in stored decellularized heart valve scaffolds and diffusion kinetics of protective molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shangping; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Dai, Xiaolei; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres; Harder, Michael; Wolkers, Willem F

    2014-02-01

    Decellularized tissues can be used as matrix implants. The aims of this study were to investigate protein stability and solvent accessibility in decellularized pulmonary heart valve tissues. Protein denaturation profiles of tissues were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Protein solvent accessibility of tissue exposed to D2O, and diffusion kinetics of various protective molecules were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Little changes were observed in the protein denaturation temperature during storage, at either 5 or 40°C. Glycerol was found to stabilize proteins; it increased the protein denaturation temperature. The stabilizing effect of glycerol disappeared after washing the sample with saline solution. Hydrogen-to-deuterium exchange rates of protein amide groups were fastest in leaflet tissue, followed by artery and muscle tissue. Diffusion of glycerol was found to be fastest in muscle tissue, followed by artery and leaflet tissue. Diffusion coefficients were derived and used to estimate the time needed to reach saturation. Fixation of tissue with glutaraldehyde had little effects on exchange and diffusion rates. Diffusion rates decreased with increasing molecular size. Proteins in decellularized heart valve tissue are stable during storage. Glycerol increases protein stability in a reversible manner. Solvent accessibility studies of protein amide groups provide an additional tool to study proteins in tissues. Diffusion coefficients can be derived to simulate diffusion kinetics of protective molecules in tissues. This study provides novel tools to evaluate protein stability and solvent accessibility in tissues, which can be used to develop biopreservation strategies.

  15. Chemocavity: specific concavity in protein reserved for the binding of biologically functional small molecules.

    PubMed

    Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kobori, Masato; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2008-08-01

    The idea that there should be a specific site on a protein for a particular functional small molecule is widespread. It is, however, usually not so easy to understand what characteristics of the site determine the binding ability of the functional small molecule. We have focused on the concurrence rate of the 20 standard amino acids at such binding sites. In order to correlate the concurrence rate and the specific binding site, we have analyzed high-quality X-ray structures of complexes between proteins and small molecules. A novel index characterizing the binding site based on the concurrency rate has been introduced. Using this index we have identified that there is a specific concavity designated as a chemocavity where a specific group of small molecules, i.e., canonical molecular group, is highly inclined to be bound. This study has demonstrated that a chemocavity is reserved for a specific canonical molecular group, and the prevalent idea has been confirmed.

  16. TNF Superfamily Protein–Protein Interactions: Feasibility of Small-Molecule Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yun; Buchwald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily (TNFSF) contains about thirty structurally related receptors (TNFSFRs) and about twenty protein ligands that bind to one or more of these receptors. Almost all of these cell surface protein-protein interactions (PPIs) represent high-value therapeutic targets for inflammatory or immune modulation in autoimmune diseases, transplant recipients, or cancers, and there are several biologics including antibodies and fusion proteins targeting them that are in various phases of clinical development. Small-molecule inhibitors or activators could represent possible alternatives if the difficulties related to the targeting of protein-protein interactions by small molecules can be addressed. Compounds proving the feasibility of such approaches have been identified through different drug discovery approaches for a number of these TNFSFR-TNFSF type PPIs including CD40-CD40L, BAFFR-BAFF, TRAIL-DR5, and OX40-OX40L. Corresponding structural, signaling, and medicinal chemistry aspects are briefly reviewed here. While none of these small-molecule modulators identified so far seems promising enough to be pursued for clinical development, they provide proof-of-principle evidence that these interactions are susceptible to small-molecule modulation and can serve as starting points toward the identification of more potent and selective candidates. PMID:25706111

  17. Investigation of Properties of Infrared Absorption of α-HELIX Protein Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Huai-Wu

    2006-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of infrared absorption of α-helix protein molecules are studied by a theory of bio-energy transport established on the basis of molecular structure. From the vibrational energy-spectra of molecules obtained from this theory we know that the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 µm -7 µm can be absorbed by α-helix protein molecules. This is basically consistent with experimental data of infrared absorption of collagen and hemoglobin and bivine serum albumen (BSA) proteins with α-helix structure. From these results we account further for the mechanism and properties of biological effect of infrared lights absorbed by the living systems, i.e., the energy of infrared lights is directly absorbed by the amide-Is in amino acid residues in the protein molecules, which results in vibration of amide-1 and change of conformation of proteins and transport of bio-energy from one place to other along the protein molecular chains in human beings and animals. This is a kind of non-thermally biological effect.

  18. Enhancement of spin polarization in transport through protein-like single-helical molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hai-Na; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Ya-Jing; Yi, Guang-Yu; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the spin-polarized electron transport through the single-helical molecules connected with two normal metallic leads. On the basis of an effective model Hamiltonian, influences of the structural parameters on the conductance and the spin polarization are calculated by using the Landauer-Büttiker formula. The optimal structural parameters for the maximal spin polarization are analyzed. Our results show that the dephasing term is an important factor to enhance the spin polarization, in addition to the intrinsic parameters of the single-helical molecule. This work can be helpful in optimizing the spin polarization in the protein-like single-helical molecules.

  19. Energetics of displacing water molecules from protein binding sites: consequences for ligand optimization.

    PubMed

    Michel, Julien; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2009-10-28

    A strategy in drug design is to consider enhancing the affinity of lead molecules with structural modifications that displace water molecules from a protein binding site. Because success of the approach is uncertain, clarification of the associated energetics was sought in cases where similar structural modifications yield qualitatively different outcomes. Specifically, free-energy perturbation calculations were carried out in the context of Monte Carlo statistical mechanics simulations to investigate ligand series that feature displacement of ordered water molecules in the binding sites of scytalone dehydratase, p38-alphaMAP kinase, and EGFR kinase. The change in affinity for a ligand modification is found to correlate with the ease of displacement of the ordered water molecule. However, as in the EGFR example, the binding affinity may diminish if the free-energy increase due to the removal of the bound water molecule is not more than compensated by the additional interactions of the water-displacing moiety. For accurate computation of the effects of ligand modifications, a complete thermodynamic analysis is shown to be needed. It requires identification of the location of water molecules in the protein-ligand interface and evaluation of the free-energy changes associated with their removal and with the introduction of the ligand modification. Direct modification of the ligand in free-energy calculations is likely to trap the ordered molecule and provide misleading guidance for lead optimization.

  20. Small Molecule-Induced Domain Swapping as a Mechanism for Controlling Protein Function and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Karchin, Joshua M.; Ha, Jeung-Hoi; Namitz, Kevin E.; Cosgrove, Michael S.; Loh, Stewart N.

    2017-01-01

    Domain swapping is the process by which identical proteins exchange reciprocal segments to generate dimers. Here we introduce induced domain swapping (INDOS) as a mechanism for regulating protein function. INDOS employs a modular design consisting of the fusion of two proteins: a recognition protein that binds a triggering molecule, and a target protein that undergoes a domain swap in response to binding of the triggering ligand. The recognition protein (FK506 binding protein) is inserted into functionally-inactivated point mutants of two target proteins (staphylococcal nuclease and ribose binding protein). Binding of FK506 to the FKBP domain causes the target domain to first unfold, then refold via domain swap. The inactivating mutations become ‘swapped out’ in the dimer, increasing nuclease and ribose binding activities by 100-fold and 15-fold, respectively, restoring them to near wild-type values. INDOS is intended to convert an arbitrary protein into a functional switch, and is the first example of rational design in which a small molecule is used to trigger protein domain swapping and subsequent activation of biological function. PMID:28287617

  1. DEPTH: a web server to compute depth and predict small-molecule binding cavities in proteins.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kuan Pern; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Madhusudhan, M S

    2011-07-01

    Depth measures the extent of atom/residue burial within a protein. It correlates with properties such as protein stability, hydrogen exchange rate, protein-protein interaction hot spots, post-translational modification sites and sequence variability. Our server, DEPTH, accurately computes depth and solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) values. We show that depth can be used to predict small molecule ligand binding cavities in proteins. Often, some of the residues lining a ligand binding cavity are both deep and solvent exposed. Using the depth-SASA pair values for a residue, its likelihood to form part of a small molecule binding cavity is estimated. The parameters of the method were calibrated over a training set of 900 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of single-domain proteins bound to small molecules (molecular weight <1.5  KDa). The prediction accuracy of DEPTH is comparable to that of other geometry-based prediction methods including LIGSITE, SURFNET and Pocket-Finder (all with Matthew's correlation coefficient of ∼0.4) over a testing set of 225 single and multi-chain protein structures. Users have the option of tuning several parameters to detect cavities of different sizes, for example, geometrically flat binding sites. The input to the server is a protein 3D structure in PDB format. The users have the option of tuning the values of four parameters associated with the computation of residue depth and the prediction of binding cavities. The computed depths, SASA and binding cavity predictions are displayed in 2D plots and mapped onto 3D representations of the protein structure using Jmol. Links are provided to download the outputs. Our server is useful for all structural analysis based on residue depth and SASA, such as guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments and small molecule docking exercises, in the context of protein functional annotation and drug discovery.

  2. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be reduced using small-molecule compounds?

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetko, Jan; Warkentin, Matthew; Englich, Ulrich; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-10-01

    Free-radical scavengers that are known to be effective protectors of proteins in solution are found to increase global radiation damage to protein crystals. Protective mechanisms may become deleterious in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. Recent studies have defined a data-collection protocol and a metric that provide a robust measure of global radiation damage to protein crystals. Using this protocol and metric, 19 small-molecule compounds (introduced either by cocrystallization or soaking) were evaluated for their ability to protect lysozyme crystals from radiation damage. The compounds were selected based upon their ability to interact with radiolytic products (e.g. hydrated electrons, hydrogen, hydroxyl and perhydroxyl radicals) and/or their efficacy in protecting biological molecules from radiation damage in dilute aqueous solutions. At room temperature, 12 compounds had no effect and six had a sensitizing effect on global damage. Only one compound, sodium nitrate, appeared to extend crystal lifetimes, but not in all proteins and only by a factor of two or less. No compound provided protection at T = 100 K. Scavengers are ineffective in protecting protein crystals from global damage because a large fraction of primary X-ray-induced excitations are generated in and/or directly attack the protein and because the ratio of scavenger molecules to protein molecules is too small to provide appreciable competitive protection. The same reactivity that makes some scavengers effective radioprotectors in protein solutions may explain their sensitizing effect in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. A more productive focus for future efforts may be to identify and eliminate sensitizing compounds from crystallization solutions.

  3. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-05

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Patterning protein molecules on poly(ethylene glycol) coated Si(111).

    PubMed

    Jun, Yongseok; Cha, Taewoon; Guo, Athena; Zhu, X-Y

    2004-08-01

    We demonstrate spatially localized immobilization of protein molecules on high-density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coated Si(111). Patterns of HO- and CH3O-terminated PEG regions are formed on silicon surfaces based on soft lithography techniques and an efficient reaction between alcohol functional groups and chlorine-terminated silicon. Activation of the HO-terminated PEG brush is achieved via either partial oxidation to form aldehyde groups or via attachment of efficient leaving groups. Protein molecules are covalently immobilized to these activated regions on the PEG/Si surface.

  5. Morphological changes in adsorbed protein films at the air-water interface subjected to large area variations, as observed by brewster angle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Dickinson, Eric; Murray, Brent S

    2007-04-24

    Adsorbed films of proteins at the air-water interface have been imaged using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). The proteins beta-lactoglobulin (beta-L) and ovalbumin (OA) were studied at a range of protein concentrations and surface ages at 25.0 degrees C and two pH values (7 and 5) in a Langmuir trough. The adsorbed films were periodically subjected to compression and expansion cycles such that the film area was typically varied between 125% and 50% of the original film area. With beta-L on its own, no structural changes were observable at pH 7. When a low-area fraction (less than 0.01%) of 20 mum polystyrene latex particles was spread at the interface before adsorption of beta-L, the particles became randomly distributed throughout the interface, but after protein adsorption and compression/expansion, the particles highlighted notable structural features not visible in their absence. Such features included the appearance of long (several hundred micrometers or more) folds and cracks in the films, generally oriented at right angles to the direction of compression, and also aggregates of protein and/or particles. Such structuring was more visible the longer the film was aged or at higher initial protein concentrations for shorter adsorption times. At pH 5, close to the isoelectric pH of beta-L, such features were just noticeable in the absence of particles but were much more pronounced than at pH 7 in the presence of particles. Similar experiments with OA revealed even more pronounced structural features, both in the absence and presence of particles, particularly at pH 5 (close to the isoelectric pH of OA also), producing striking stripelike and meshlike domains. Changes in the dilatational elasticity of the films could be correlated with the variations in the structural integrity of the films as observed via BAM. The results indicate that interfacial area changes of this type, typical of those that occur in food colloid processing, will lead to highly

  6. Mapping protein pockets through their potential small-molecule binding volumes: QSCD applied to biological protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Keith; Patel, Nehal M.; Ledel, Aric; Moallemi, Ciamac C.; Wintner, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated a method, Quantized Surface Complementarity Diversity (QSCD), of defining molecular diversity by measuring shape and functional complementarity of molecules to a basis set of theoretical target surfaces [Wintner E.A. and Moallemi C.C., J. Med. Chem., 43 (2000) 1993]. In this paper we demonstrate a method of mapping actual protein pockets to the same basis set of theoretical target surfaces, thereby allowing categorization of protein pockets by their properties of shape and functionality. The key step in the mapping is a `dissection' algorithm that breaks any protein pocket into a set of potential small molecule binding volumes. It is these binding volumes that are mapped to the basis set of theoretical target surfaces, thus measuring a protein pocket not as a single surface but as a collection of molecular recognition environments.

  7. Highly Precise Quantification of Protein Molecules per Cell During Stress and Starvation Responses in Bacillus subtilis *

    PubMed Central

    Maaβ, Sandra; Wachlin, Gerhild; Bernhardt, Jörg; Eymann, Christine; Fromion, Vincent; Riedel, Katharina; Becher, Dörte; Hecker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology based on high quality absolute quantification data, which are mandatory for the simulation of biological processes, successively becomes important for life sciences. We provide protein concentrations on the level of molecules per cell for more than 700 cytosolic proteins of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis during adaptation to changing growth conditions. As glucose starvation and heat stress are typical challenges in B. subtilis' natural environment and induce both, specific and general stress and starvation proteins, these conditions were selected as models for starvation and stress responses. Analyzing samples from numerous time points along the bacterial growth curve yielded reliable and physiologically relevant data suitable for modeling of cellular regulation under altered growth conditions. The analysis of the adaptational processes based on protein molecules per cell revealed stress-specific modulation of general adaptive responses in terms of protein amount and proteome composition. Furthermore, analysis of protein repartition during glucose starvation showed that biomass seems to be redistributed from proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis to enzymes of the central carbon metabolism. In contrast, during heat stress most resources of the cell, namely those from amino acid synthetic pathways, are used to increase the amount of chaperones and proteases. Analysis of dynamical aspects of protein synthesis during heat stress adaptation revealed, that these proteins make up almost 30% of the protein mass accumulated during early phases of this stress. PMID:24878497

  8. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  9. OPLS3: A Force Field Providing Broad Coverage of Drug-like Small Molecules and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Harder, Edward; Damm, Wolfgang; Maple, Jon; Wu, Chuanjie; Reboul, Mark; Xiang, Jin Yu; Wang, Lingle; Lupyan, Dmitry; Dahlgren, Markus K; Knight, Jennifer L; Kaus, Joseph W; Cerutti, David S; Krilov, Goran; Jorgensen, William L; Abel, Robert; Friesner, Richard A

    2016-01-12

    The parametrization and validation of the OPLS3 force field for small molecules and proteins are reported. Enhancements with respect to the previous version (OPLS2.1) include the addition of off-atom charge sites to represent halogen bonding and aryl nitrogen lone pairs as well as a complete refit of peptide dihedral parameters to better model the native structure of proteins. To adequately cover medicinal chemical space, OPLS3 employs over an order of magnitude more reference data and associated parameter types relative to other commonly used small molecule force fields (e.g., MMFF and OPLS_2005). As a consequence, OPLS3 achieves a high level of accuracy across performance benchmarks that assess small molecule conformational propensities and solvation. The newly fitted peptide dihedrals lead to significant improvements in the representation of secondary structure elements in simulated peptides and native structure stability over a number of proteins. Together, the improvements made to both the small molecule and protein force field lead to a high level of accuracy in predicting protein-ligand binding measured over a wide range of targets and ligands (less than 1 kcal/mol RMS error) representing a 30% improvement over earlier variants of the OPLS force field.

  10. Small molecule proteostasis regulators that reprogram the ER to reduce extracellular protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Plate, Lars; Cooley, Christina B; Chen, John J; Paxman, Ryan J; Gallagher, Ciara M; Madoux, Franck; Genereux, Joseph C; Dobbs, Wesley; Garza, Dan; Spicer, Timothy P; Scampavia, Louis; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Powers, Evan T; Walter, Peter; Hodder, Peter; Wiseman, R Luke; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-01-01

    Imbalances in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis are associated with etiologically-diverse degenerative diseases linked to excessive extracellular protein misfolding and aggregation. Reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment through genetic activation of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR)-associated transcription factor ATF6 attenuates secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. Here, we employed a screening approach that included complementary arm-specific UPR reporters and medium-throughput transcriptional profiling to identify non-toxic small molecules that phenocopy the ATF6-mediated reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment. The ER reprogramming afforded by our molecules requires activation of endogenous ATF6 and occurs independent of global ER stress. Furthermore, our molecules phenocopy the ability of genetic ATF6 activation to selectively reduce secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. These results show that small molecule-dependent ER reprogramming, achieved through preferential activation of the ATF6 transcriptional program, is a promising strategy to ameliorate imbalances in ER function associated with degenerative protein aggregation diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15550.001 PMID:27435961

  11. A Bidirectional System for the Dynamic Small Molecule Control of Intracellular Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kuzin, Alexander P.; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Acton, Thomas B.; Kornhaber, Gregory J.; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano Thomas; Tong, Liang; Crews, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Small molecule control of intracellular protein levels allows temporal and dose-dependent regulation of protein function. Recently, we developed a method to degrade proteins fused to a mutant dehalogenase (HaloTag2) using small molecule hydrophobic tags (HyTs). Here, we introduce a complementary method to stabilize the same HaloTag2 fusion proteins, resulting in a unified system allowing bidirectional control of cellular protein levels in a temporal and dose-dependent manner. From a small molecule screen, we identified N-(3,5-dichloro-2-ethoxybenzyl)-2H-tetrazol-5-amine as a nanomolar HALoTag2 Stabilizer (HALTS1) that reduces the Hsp70:HaloTag2 interaction, thereby preventing HaloTag2 ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the HyT/HALTS system in probing the physiological role of therapeutic targets by modulating HaloTag2-fused oncogenic H-Ras, which resulted in either the cessation (HyT) or acceleration (HALTS) of cellular transformation. In sum, we present a general platform to study protein function, whereby any protein of interest fused to HaloTag2 can be either degraded 10-fold or stabilized 5-fold using two corresponding compounds. PMID:23978068

  12. A bidirectional system for the dynamic small molecule control of intracellular fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Neklesa, Taavi K; Noblin, Devin J; Kuzin, Alexander; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Acton, Thomas B; Kornhaber, Gregory; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T; Tong, Liang; Crews, Craig M

    2013-10-18

    Small molecule control of intracellular protein levels allows temporal and dose-dependent regulation of protein function. Recently, we developed a method to degrade proteins fused to a mutant dehalogenase (HaloTag2) using small molecule hydrophobic tags (HyTs). Here, we introduce a complementary method to stabilize the same HaloTag2 fusion proteins, resulting in a unified system allowing bidirectional control of cellular protein levels in a temporal and dose-dependent manner. From a small molecule screen, we identified N-(3,5-dichloro-2-ethoxybenzyl)-2H-tetrazol-5-amine as a nanomolar HALoTag2 Stabilizer (HALTS1) that reduces the Hsp70:HaloTag2 interaction, thereby preventing HaloTag2 ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the HyT/HALTS system in probing the physiological role of therapeutic targets by modulating HaloTag2-fused oncogenic H-Ras, which resulted in either the cessation (HyT) or acceleration (HALTS) of cellular transformation. In sum, we present a general platform to study protein function, whereby any protein of interest fused to HaloTag2 can be either degraded 10-fold or stabilized 5-fold using two corresponding compounds.

  13. Influence of Electrostatics on Small Molecule Flux through a Protein Nanoreactor.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Jeff E; Asensio, Michael A; Jakobson, Christopher M; Francis, Matthew B; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-09-18

    Nature uses protein compartmentalization to great effect for control over enzymatic pathways, and the strategy has great promise for synthetic biology. In particular, encapsulation in nanometer-sized containers to create nanoreactors has the potential to elicit interesting, unexplored effects resulting from deviations from well-understood bulk processes. Self-assembled protein shells for encapsulation are especially desirable for their uniform structures and ease of perturbation through genetic mutation. Here, we use the MS2 capsid, a well-defined porous 27 nm protein shell, as an enzymatic nanoreactor to explore pore-structure effects on substrate and product flux during the catalyzed reaction. Our results suggest that the shell can influence the enzymatic reaction based on charge repulsion between small molecules and point mutations around the pore structure. These findings also lend support to the hypothesis that protein compartments modulate the transport of small molecules and thus influence metabolic reactions and catalysis in vitro.

  14. Enhanced Raman spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on carbon-doped TiO₂ obtained from titanium carbide: a visible-light-assisted renewable substrate.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Vankayala; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2012-08-01

    Titanium carbide (TiC) is an electrically conducting material with favorable electrochemical properties. In the present studies, carbon-doped TiO(2) (C-TiO(2)) has been synthesized from TiC particles, as well as TiC films coated on stainless steel substrate via thermal annealing under various conditions. Several C-TiO(2) substrates are synthesized by varying experimental conditions and characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic techniques. C-TiO(2) in the dry state (in powder form as well as in film form) is subsequently used as a substrate for enhancing Raman signals corresponding to 4-mercaptobenzoic acid and 4-nitrothiophenol by utilizing chemical enhancement based on charge-transfer interactions. Carbon, a nonmetal dopant in TiO(2), improves the intensities of Raman signals, compared to undoped TiO(2). Significant dependence of Raman intensity on carbon doping is observed. Ameliorated performance obtained using C-TiO(2) is attributed to the presence of surface defects that originate due to carbon as a dopant, which, in turn, triggers charge transfer between TiO(2) and analyte. The C-TiO(2) substrates are subsequently regenerated for repetitive use by illuminating an analyte-adsorbed substrate with visible light for a period of 5 h.

  15. Impact of temperature and electrical potentials on the stability and structure of collagen adsorbed on the gold electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, Frank; Ahlers, Michael; Brand, Izabella; Wittstock, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    The morphology and structure of collagen type I adsorbed on gold electrodes were studied as a function of electrode potential and temperature by means of capacitance measurements, polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and scanning force microscopy at temperatures of 37 °C, 43 °C and 50 °C. The selected temperatures corresponded to the normal body temperature, temperature of denaturation of collagen molecules and denaturation of collagen fibrils, respectively. Independently of the solution temperature, collagen was adsorbed on gold electrodes in the potential range - 0.7 V < E < 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl, where the protein film was very stable. Fragments of collagen molecules made a direct contact to the gold surface and water was present in the film. Protein molecules were oriented preferentially with their long axis towards the gold surface. Collagen molecules in the adsorbed state preserved their native triple helical structure even at temperatures corresponding to collagen denaturation in aqueous solutions. Application of E < - 0.75 V vs. Ag/AgCl leads to the swelling of the protein film by water and desorption from the electrode surface. IR spectra provided no evidence of the thermal denaturation of adsorbed collagen molecules. A temperature increase to 50 °C leads to a distortion of the collagen film. The processes of aggregation and fibrilization were preferred over thermal denaturation for collagen adsorbed on the electrode surface and exposed to changing potentials.

  16. Predicting metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes based on interaction information of chemicals and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Chen, Lei; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathway analysis, one of the most important fields in biochemistry, is pivotal to understanding the maintenance and modulation of the functions of an organism. Good comprehension of metabolic pathways is critical to understanding the mechanisms of some fundamental biological processes. Given a small molecule or an enzyme, how may one identify the metabolic pathways in which it may participate? Answering such a question is a first important step in understanding a metabolic pathway system. By utilizing the information provided by chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions, a novel method was proposed by which to allocate small molecules and enzymes to 11 major classes of metabolic pathways. A benchmark dataset consisting of 3,348 small molecules and 654 enzymes of yeast was constructed to test the method. It was observed that the first order prediction accuracy evaluated by the jackknife test was 79.56% in identifying the small molecules and enzymes in a benchmark dataset. Our method may become a useful vehicle in predicting the metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes, providing a basis for some further analysis of the pathway systems.

  17. Proteomic analysis of egg white heparin-binding proteins: towards the identification of natural antibacterial molecules

    PubMed Central

    Guyot, Nicolas; Labas, Valérie; Harichaux, Grégoire; Chessé, Magali; Poirier, Jean-Claude; Nys, Yves; Réhault-Godbert, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The chicken egg resists most environmental microbes suggesting that it potentially contains efficient antimicrobial molecules. Considering that some heparin-binding proteins in mammals are antibacterial, we investigated the presence and the antimicrobial activity of heparin-binding proteins from chicken egg white. Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins recovered after heparin-affinity chromatography, revealed 20 proteins, including known antimicrobial proteins (avidin, lysozyme, TENP, ovalbumin-related protein X and avian bêta-defensin 11). The antibacterial activity of three new egg candidates (vitelline membrane outer layer protein 1, beta-microseminoprotein-like (LOC101750704) and pleiotrophin) was demonstrated against Listeria monocytogenes and/or Salmonella enterica Enteritidis. We showed that all these molecules share the property to inhibit bacterial growth through their heparin-binding domains. However, vitelline membrane outer layer 1 has additional specific structural features that can contribute to its antimicrobial potential. Moreover, we identified potential supplementary effectors of innate immunity including mucin 5B, E-selectin ligand 1, whey acidic protein 3, peptidyl prolyl isomerase B and retinoic acid receptor responder protein 2. These data support the concept of using heparin affinity combined to mass spectrometry to obtain an overview of the various effectors of innate immunity composing biological milieus, and to identify novel antimicrobial candidates of interest in the race for alternatives to antibiotics. PMID:27294500

  18. Incorporation and thermal evolution of rhodamine 6G dye molecules adsorbed in porous columnar optical SiO2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valencia, Juan R; Blaszczyk-Lezak, Iwona; Espinós, Juan P; Hamad, Said; González-Elipe, Agustín R; Barranco, Angel

    2009-08-18

    Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) dye molecules have been incorporated into transparent and porous SiO2 thin films prepared by evaporation at glancing angles. The porosity of these films has been assessed by analyzing their water adsorption isotherms measured for the films deposited on a quartz crystal monitor. Composite Rh6G/SiO2 thin films were prepared by immersion of a SiO2 thin film into a solution of the dye at a given pH. It is found that the amount of Rh6G molecules incorporated into the film is directly dependent on the pH of the solution and can be accounted for by a model based on the point of zero charge (PZC) concepts originally developed for colloidal oxides. At low pHs, the dye molecules incorporate in the form of monomers, while dimers or higher aggregates are formed if the pH increases. Depending on the actual preparation and treatment conditions, they also exhibit high relative fluorescence efficiency. The thermal stability of the composite films has been also investigated by characterizing their optical behavior after heating in an Ar atmosphere at increasing temperatures up to 275 degrees C. Heating induces a progressive loss of active dye molecules, a change in their agglomeration state, and an increment in their relative fluorescence efficiency. The obtained Rh6G/SiO2 composite thin films did not disperse the light and therefore can be used for integration into optical and photonic devices.

  19. Fabrication and Control of Two-Dimensional Crystalline Arrays of Protein Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Kuniaki; Takeda, Shigeki; Endo, Shigeru; Yoshimura, Hideyuki

    1995-07-01

    Fabrication methods to produce two-dimensional (2D) crystalline arrays of protein particles are reported. The key innovation in this fabrication is the spreading wetting process which uses the deformable substrate surface such as mercury surface (mercury method) or the air-water interface (subphase method), where protein solution spread to yield a thin liquid film. The thin film of protein solution leaves a monolayer state of protein molecules, for example 2D crystalline films, after the condensation of solute protein molecules by solvent removal by evaporation. The significance of the film fabrication lies in its active natures to harness the directional transport of particles driven by spreading or convective flow of the solution. Wild type and mutant ferritins were employed to spread their solution on substrates and align them to 2D arrays. The control of crystal forms, say hexagonal or tetragonal, has been pursued by changing the interprotein interaction through mutagenic replacements of amino acids at specific sites on the protein surface. With recombinant ferritins, conversion of crystal forms from hexagonal to oblique is observed by eliminating strong interaction of salt bridge kind between adjacent molecules in the crystal.

  20. Computational analysis of protein-protein interfaces involving an alpha helix: insights for terphenyl–like molecules binding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) are key for many cellular processes. The characterization of PPI interfaces and the prediction of putative ligand binding sites and hot spot residues are essential to design efficient small-molecule modulators of PPI. Terphenyl and its derivatives are small organic molecules known to mimic one face of protein-binding alpha-helical peptides. In this work we focus on several PPIs mediated by alpha-helical peptides. Method We performed computational sequence- and structure-based analyses in order to evaluate several key physicochemical and surface properties of proteins known to interact with alpha-helical peptides and/or terphenyl and its derivatives. Results Sequence-based analysis revealed low sequence identity between some of the analyzed proteins binding alpha-helical peptides. Structure-based analysis was performed to calculate the volume, the fractal dimension roughness and the hydrophobicity of the binding regions. Besides the overall hydrophobic character of the binding pockets, some specificities were detected. We showed that the hydrophobicity is not uniformly distributed in different alpha-helix binding pockets that can help to identify key hydrophobic hot spots. Conclusions The presence of hydrophobic cavities at the protein surface with a more complex shape than the entire protein surface seems to be an important property related to the ability of proteins to bind alpha-helical peptides and low molecular weight mimetics. Characterization of similarities and specificities of PPI binding sites can be helpful for further development of small molecules targeting alpha-helix binding proteins. PMID:23768251

  1. Adsorbate Diffusion on Transition Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    systematically studied adsorption and diffusion of atomic and diatomic species (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) on nanometer-sized Pt and Cu nanoparticles with...species and two diatomic molecules (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) as adsorbates and study the adsorption and diffusion of these adsorbates across the edges

  2. Single Molecule Effects of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Mutations in Tropocollagen Protein Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-02

    associated symptoms, including short stature, loose joints, blue sclearae, dentinogenesis imperfecta , hearing loss , and neurological and pulmo- nary...Single molecule effects of osteogenesis imperfecta mutations in tropocollagen protein domains Alfonso Gautieri,1,2 Simone Vesentini,2 Alberto...2008 proteinscience.org Abstract: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disease characterized by fragile bones, skeletal deformities and, in severe

  3. Targeted Degradation of Proteins Localized in Subcellular Compartments by Hybrid Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Okuhira, Keiichiro; Shoda, Takuji; Omura, Risa; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Hattori, Takayuki; Shibata, Norihito; Demizu, Yosuke; Sugihara, Ryo; Ichino, Asato; Kawahara, Haruka; Itoh, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Minoru; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Kurihara, Masaaki; Itoh, Susumu; Saito, Hiroyuki; Naito, Mikihiko

    2017-03-01

    Development of novel small molecules that selectively degrade pathogenic proteins would provide an important advance in targeted therapy. Recently, we have devised a series of hybrid small molecules named SNIPER (specific and nongenetic IAP-dependent protein ERaser) that induces the degradation of target proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. To understand the localization of proteins that can be targeted by this protein knockdown technology, we examined whether SNIPER molecules are able to induce degradation of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II) proteins localized in subcellular compartments of cells. CRABP-II is genetically fused with subcellular localization signals, and they are expressed in the cells. SNIPER(CRABP) with different IAP-ligands, SNIPER(CRABP)-4 with bestatin and SNIPER(CRABP)-11 with MV1 compound, induce the proteasomal degradation of wild-type (WT), cytosolic, nuclear, and membrane-localized CRABP-II proteins, whereas only SNIPER(CRABP)-11 displayed degradation activity toward the mitochondrial CRABP-II protein. The small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of cIAP1 expression attenuated the knockdown activity of SNIPER(CRABP) against WT and cytosolic CRABP-II proteins, indicating that cIAP1 is the E3 ligase responsible for degradation of these proteins. Against membrane-localized CRABP-II protein, cIAP1 is also a primary E3 ligase in the cells, but another E3 ligase distinct from cIAP2 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) could also be involved in the SNIPER(CRABP)-11-induced degradation. However, for the degradation of nuclear and mitochondrial CRABP-II proteins, E3 ligases other than cIAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP play a role in the SNIPER-mediated protein knockdown. These results indicate that SNIPER can target cytosolic, nuclear, membrane-localized, and mitochondrial proteins for degradation, but the responsible E3 ligase is different, depending on the localization of the target protein.

  4. Single-Molecule FRET Spectroscopy and the Polymer Physics of Unfolded and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Benjamin; Soranno, Andrea; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel

    2016-07-05

    The properties of unfolded proteins have long been of interest because of their importance to the protein folding process. Recently, the surprising prevalence of unstructured regions or entirely disordered proteins under physiological conditions has led to the realization that such intrinsically disordered proteins can be functional even in the absence of a folded structure. However, owing to their broad conformational distributions, many of the properties of unstructured proteins are difficult to describe with the established concepts of structural biology. We have thus seen a reemergence of polymer physics as a versatile framework for understanding their structure and dynamics. An important driving force for these developments has been single-molecule spectroscopy, as it allows structural heterogeneity, intramolecular distance distributions, and dynamics to be quantified over a wide range of timescales and solution conditions. Polymer concepts provide an important basis for relating the physical properties of unstructured proteins to folding and function.

  5. Extension of in vivo half-life of biologically active molecules by XTEN protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Podust, Vladimir N; Balan, Sibu; Sim, Bee-Cheng; Coyle, Michael P; Ernst, Ulrich; Peters, Robert T; Schellenberger, Volker

    2016-10-28

    XTEN™ is a class of unstructured hydrophilic, biodegradable protein polymers designed to increase the half-lives of therapeutic peptides and proteins. XTEN polymers and XTEN fusion proteins are typically expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by conventional protein chromatography as monodisperse polypeptides of exact length and sequence. Unstructured XTEN polypeptides have hydrodynamic volumes significantly larger than typical globular proteins of similar mass, thus imparting a bulking effect to the therapeutic payloads attached to them. Since their invention, XTEN polypeptides have been utilized to extend the half-lives of a variety of peptide- and protein-based therapeutics. Multiple clinical and preclinical studies and related drug discovery and development efforts are in progress. This review details the most current understanding of physicochemical properties and biological behavior of XTEN and XTENylated molecules. Additionally, the development path and status of several advanced drug discovery and development efforts are highlighted.

  6. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  7. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  8. Specific transport of target molecules by motor proteins in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, Mehmet C; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Morin, Fabrice O; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-03

    Direct transport powered by motor proteins can alleviate the challenges presented by miniaturization of microfluidic systems. There have been several recent attempts to build motor-protein-driven transport systems based on simple capturing or transport mechanisms. However, to achieve a multifunctional device for practical applications, a more complex sorting/transport system should be realized. Herein, the proof of concept of a sorting device employing selective capture of distinct target molecules and transport of the sorted molecules to different predefined directions is presented. By combining the bottom-up functionality of biological systems with the top-down handling capabilities of micro-electromechanical systems technology, highly selective molecular recognition and motor-protein-based transport is integrated in a microfluidic channel network.

  9. Ambient DESI and LESA-MS Analysis of Proteins Adsorbed to a Biomaterial Surface Using In-Situ Surface Tryptic Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Wei; Celiz, Adam D.; Scurr, David J.; Alexander, Morgan R.; Barrett, David A.

    2013-12-01

    The detection and identification of proteins adsorbed onto biomaterial surfaces under ambient conditions has significant experimental advantages but has proven to be difficult to achieve with conventional measuring technologies. In this study, we present an adaptation of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry (MS) coupled with in-situ surface tryptic digestion to identify protein species from a biomaterial surface. Cytochrome c, myoglobin, and BSA in a combination of single and mixture spots were printed in an array format onto Permanox slides, followed by in-situ surface digestion and detection via MS. Automated tandem MS performed on surface peptides was able to identify the proteins via MASCOT. Limits of detection were determined for DESI-MS and a comparison of DESI and LESA-MS peptide spectra characteristics and sensitivity was made. DESI-MS images of the arrays were produced and analyzed with imaging multivariate analysis to automatically separate peptide peaks for each of the proteins within a mixture into distinct components. This is the first time that DESI and LESA-MS have been used for the in-situ detection of surface digested proteins on biomaterial surfaces and presents a promising proof of concept for the use of ambient MS in the rapid and automated analysis of surface proteins.

  10. Combining single-molecule manipulation and imaging for the study of protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Monico, Carina; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S; Capitanio, Marco

    2014-08-27

    The paper describes the combination of optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence detection for the study of protein-DNA interaction. The method offers the opportunity of investigating interactions occurring in solution (thus avoiding problems due to closeby surfaces as in other single molecule methods), controlling the DNA extension and tracking interaction dynamics as a function of both mechanical parameters and DNA sequence. The methods for establishing successful optical trapping and nanometer localization of single molecules are illustrated. We illustrate the experimental conditions allowing the study of interaction of lactose repressor (lacI), labeled with Atto532, with a DNA molecule containing specific target sequences (operators) for LacI binding. The method allows the observation of specific interactions at the operators, as well as one-dimensional diffusion of the protein during the process of target search. The method is broadly applicable to the study of protein-DNA interactions but also to molecular motors, where control of the tension applied to the partner track polymer (for example actin or microtubules) is desirable.

  11. Combining Single-molecule Manipulation and Imaging for the Study of Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Monico, Carina; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.; Capitanio, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the combination of optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence detection for the study of protein-DNA interaction. The method offers the opportunity of investigating interactions occurring in solution (thus avoiding problems due to closeby surfaces as in other single molecule methods), controlling the DNA extension and tracking interaction dynamics as a function of both mechanical parameters and DNA sequence. The methods for establishing successful optical trapping and nanometer localization of single molecules are illustrated. We illustrate the experimental conditions allowing the study of interaction of lactose repressor (lacI), labeled with Atto532, with a DNA molecule containing specific target sequences (operators) for LacI binding. The method allows the observation of specific interactions at the operators, as well as one-dimensional diffusion of the protein during the process of target search. The method is broadly applicable to the study of protein-DNA interactions but also to molecular motors, where control of the tension applied to the partner track polymer (for example actin or microtubules) is desirable. PMID:25226304

  12. Small-Molecule Stabilization of the 14-3-3/Gab2 Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Interface.

    PubMed

    Bier, David; Bartel, Maria; Sies, Katharina; Halbach, Sebastian; Higuchi, Yusuke; Haranosono, Yu; Brummer, Tilman; Kato, Nobuo; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-04-19

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most promising new areas in drug discovery. In the vast majority of cases only inhibition or disruption of PPIs is realized, whereas the complementary strategy of targeted stabilization of PPIs is clearly under-represented. Here, we report the example of a semi-synthetic natural product derivative--ISIR-005--that stabilizes the cancer-relevant interaction of the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and Gab2. The crystal structure of ISIR-005 in complex with 14-3-3 and the binding motif of Gab2 comprising two phosphorylation sites (Gab2pS210pT391) showed how the stabilizing molecule binds to the rim-of-the-interface of the protein complex. Only in the direct vicinity of 14-3-3/Gab2pT391 site is a pre-formed pocket occupied by ISIR-005; binding of the Gab2pS210 motif to 14-3-3 does not create an interface pocket suitable for the molecule. Accordingly, ISIR-005 only stabilizes the binding of the Gab2pT391 but not the Gab2pS210 site. This study represents structural and biochemical proof of the druggability of the 14-3-3/Gab2 PPI interface with important implications for the development of PPI stabilizers.

  13. The role of water molecules in stereoselectivity of glucose/galactose-binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsup; Cho, Art E.

    2016-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods, we attempted to explain the experimental results on ligand specificity of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GGBP) to β-D-glucose and β-D-galactose. For the simulation, a three-dimensional structure of GGBP was prepared, and homology modeling was performed to generate variant structures of GGBP with mutations at Asp14. Then, docking was carried out to find a reasonable β-D-glucose and β-D-galactose binding conformations with GGBP. Subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of β-D-glucose–GGBP and β-D-galactose–GGBP complexes and estimation of the orientation and stability of water molecules at the binding site revealed how water molecules influence ligand specificity. In our simulation, water molecules mediated interactions of β-D-glucose or β-D-galactose with residue 14 of GGBP. In this mechanism, the Phe16Ala mutant leaves both sugar molecules free to move, and the specific role of water molecules were eliminated, while the wild type, Asp14Asn mutant, and Asp14Glu mutant make hydrogen bond interactions with β-D-glucose more favorable. Our results demonstrate that bound water molecules at the binding site of GGBP are related to localized conformational change, contributing to ligand specificity of GGBP for β-D-glucose over β-D-galactose.

  14. Rational design of crystal contact-free space in protein crystals for analyzing spatial distribution of motions within protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Rei; Shimada, Atsushi; Komuro, Yasuaki; Sugita, Yuji; Kohda, Daisuke

    2016-03-01

    Contacts with neighboring molecules in protein crystals inevitably restrict the internal motions of intrinsically flexible proteins. The resultant clear electron densities permit model building, as crystallographic snapshot structures. Although these still images are informative, they could provide biased pictures of the protein motions. If the mobile parts are located at a site lacking direct contacts in rationally designed crystals, then the amplitude of the movements can be experimentally analyzed. We propose a fusion protein method, to create crystal contact-free space (CCFS) in protein crystals and to place the mobile parts in the CCFS. Conventional model building fails when large amplitude motions exist. In this study, the mobile parts appear as smeared electron densities in the CCFS, by suitable processing of the X-ray diffraction data. We applied the CCFS method to a highly mobile presequence peptide bound to the mitochondrial import receptor, Tom20, and a catalytically relevant flexible segment in the oligosaccharyltransferase, AglB. These two examples demonstrated the general applicability of the CCFS method to the analysis of the spatial distribution of motions within protein molecules.

  15. Measuring Membrane Protein Dimerization Equilibrium in Lipid Bilayers by Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chadda, R; Robertson, J L

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of membrane protein interfaces occurs during membrane protein folding and cell receptor signaling. Here, we summarize a method that allows for measurement of equilibrium dimerization reactions of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, by measuring the Poisson distribution of subunit capture into liposomes by single-molecule photobleaching analysis. This strategy is grounded in the fact that given a comparable labeling efficiency, monomeric or dimeric forms of a membrane protein will give rise to distinctly different photobleaching probability distributions. These methods have been used to verify the dimer stoichiometry of the Fluc F(-) ion channel and the dimerization equilibrium constant of the ClC-ec1 Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter in lipid bilayers. This approach can be applied to any membrane protein system provided it can be purified, fluorescently labeled in a quantitative manner, and verified to be correctly folded by functional assays, even if the structure is not yet known.

  16. Screening of the binding of small molecules to proteins by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  18. Molecularly Imprinted Filtering Adsorbents for Odor Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Sho; Chiyomaru, You; Sassa, Fumihiro; Liu, Chuanjun; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    Versatile odor sensors that can discriminate among huge numbers of environmental odorants are desired in many fields, including robotics, environmental monitoring, and food production. However, odor sensors comparable to an animal’s nose have not yet been developed. An animal’s olfactory system recognizes odor clusters with specific molecular properties and uses this combinatorial information in odor discrimination. This suggests that measurement and clustering of odor molecular properties (e.g., polarity, size) using an artificial sensor is a promising approach to odor sensing. Here, adsorbents composed of composite materials with molecular recognition properties were developed for odor sensing. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the adsorbent materials, so specific polymeric materials with particular solubility parameters were chosen to adsorb odorants with various properties. The adsorption properties of the adsorbents could be modified by mixing adsorbent materials. Moreover, a novel molecularly imprinted filtering adsorbent (MIFA), composed of an adsorbent substrate covered with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer, was developed to improve the odor molecular recognition ability. The combination of the adsorbent and MIP layer provided a higher specificity toward target molecules. The MIFA thus provides a useful technique for the design and control of adsorbents with adsorption properties specific to particular odor molecules. PMID:27886070

  19. Molecular Mechanics of Single Protein Molecules Measured with the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Paul K.

    2000-03-01

    After a short history of AFM development in our lab, including recent developments with small cantilevers, this talk will focus on 1) pulling single protein molecules to explore the forces involved in unfolding and 2) watching single protein molecules in action to learn how they function mechanically. 1) Pulling experiments on proteins used as marine adhesives in abalone shells and other biological composite materials reveal modules bound together by sacrificial bonds that are weaker than the backbone bonds in the polypeptide chain.1 These self-healing modules provide effective energy absorption and appear to be a real key to understanding the impressive fracture resistance of biological composite materials. For example, the abalone shell is 3000 times more fracture resistant than a single crystal of calcium carbonate, despite the fact that 97% of the mass of the shell is crystalline calcium carbonate. 2) It is becoming possible, again with AFMs, to learn how some enzymes, nature's nanomachines, do their exquisite materials synthesis and processing. The talk will focus on the chaperonin system of GroEL and GroES that processes incorrectly folded proteins and assists them in refolding correctly. It is becoming possible not only to see single molecule events such as the association and disassociation of the GroEL-Gro-ES complex, but also to measure potential energy functions for the molecules in various conformational states. These new measurements, together with detailed structural measurements from other techniques, give new clues about how these proteins use the energy of ATP to do their work. Since the AFMs of today are very far from fundamental limits, this is only the beginning. 1. B. L. Smith, T. E. Schaffer, M. Viani, J. B. Thompson, N. A. Frederick, J. Kindt, A. Belcher, G. D. Stucky, D. E. Morse and P. K. Hansma, Nature 399, 761 (1999)

  20. Cellular misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules are possible targets for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Arase, Noriko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    The major function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is the presentation of peptide antigens to helper T cells. However, when misfolded proteins are associated with MHC class II molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum, they are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without processing to peptides. Of note, misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules are specifically recognized by autoantibodies produced in patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and antiphospholipid syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules is associated with the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases conferred by each MHC class II allele. Therefore, misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules may be recognized as 'neo-self' antigens by the immune system and be involved in the pathogenicity of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  2. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  3. MALDI- or ESI? Pros and cons for protein and small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a very popular technique in the analytical characterization of elements and molecules that range from inorganic, organic, and biological species. This popularity has soared in the past 15 years primarily through the development of ionization sources that can easily ionize large organic and biological molecules, intact and/or with controlled fragmentation. The two primary ionization mechanisms responsible for this capability are Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) and Electrospray Ionization (ESI). The development of the latter resulted in the 2002 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Engineering for John Fenn. This capability has presented a new paradigm allowing the field of proteomics to break through, with the characterization of major fractions of the proteins in a biological cell. The sensitivity, specificity, and structural characterization of available today using these techniques will be discussed with some examples in the characterization of both large and small molecules and relative merits of each technology.

  4. Measuring interactions of FERM domain-containing sorting Nexin proteins with endosomal lipids and cargo molecules.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Rajesh; Mobli, Mehdi; Collins, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    Endosomal recycling pathways regulate cellular homeostasis via the transport of internalized material back to the plasma membrane. Phox homology (PX) and band 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin (FERM) domain-containing proteins are a recently identified subfamily of PX proteins that are critical for the recycling of numerous transmembrane cargo molecules. The PX-FERM subfamily includes three endosome-associated proteins called sorting nexin (SNX) 17, SNX27, and SNX31. These are modular peripheral membrane proteins that act as central scaffolds mediating protein-lipid interactions, cargo binding, and regulatory protein recruitment. This chapter outlines the methodology employed to classify the PX-FERM family using combined bioinformatics and structure prediction tools. It further details the application of isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to understand the mechanisms that underpin their endosomal membrane recruitment and subsequent recognition of NPxY/NxxY peptide sorting motifs, present in many cargo receptors and required for their trafficking. It is now increasingly recognized that the formation of a stable trafficking complex is dictated by a multitude of coordinated protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions, and the approaches highlighted here will be useful for future studies aimed at understanding these biomolecular interactions in greater detail.

  5. Chemokines, costimulatory molecules and fusion proteins for the immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Russell, Sarah M; Bass, Rikki S; Epstein, Alan L

    2011-11-01

    In this article, the role of chemokines and costimulatory molecules in the immunotherapy of experimental murine solid tumors and immunotherapy used in ongoing clinical trials are presented. Chemokine networks regulate physiologic cell migration that may be disrupted to inhibit antitumor immune responses or co-opted to promote tumor growth and metastasis in cancer. Recent studies highlight the potential use of chemokines in cancer immunotherapy to improve innate and adaptive cell interactions and to recruit immune effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Another critical component of antitumor immune responses is antigen priming and activation of effector cells. Reciprocal expression and binding of costimulatory molecules and their ligands by antigen-presenting cells and naive lymphocytes ensures robust expansion, activity and survival of tumor-specific effector cells in vivo. Immunotherapy approaches using agonist antibodies or fusion proteins of immunomodulatory molecules significantly inhibit tumor growth and boost cell-mediated immunity. To localize immune stimulation to the tumor site, a series of fusion proteins consisting of a tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis and chemokines or costimulatory molecules were generated and tested in tumor-bearing mice. While several of these reagents were initially shown to have therapeutic value, combination therapies with methods to delete suppressor cells had the greatest effect on tumor growth. In conclusion, a key conclusion that has emerged from these studies is that successful immunotherapy will require both advanced methods of immunostimulation and the removal of immunosuppression in the host.

  6. Simple horizontal magnetic tweezers for micromanipulation of single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Christopher P; Tyson, Christopher; Zischkau, Joseph; Mehl, Patrick; Tuma, Pamela L; Pegg, Ian L; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a simple-to-implement magnetic force transducer that can apply a wide range of piconewton (pN) scale forces on single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes in the horizontal plane. The resulting low-noise force-extension data enable very high-resolution detection of changes in the DNA tether's extension: ~0.05 pN in force and <10 nm change in extension. We have also verified that we can manipulate DNA in near equilibrium conditions through the wide range of forces by ramping the force from low to high and back again, and observing minimal hysteresis in the molecule's force response. Using a calibration technique based on Stokes' drag law, we have confirmed our force measurements from DNA force-extension experiments obtained using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem applied to transverse fluctuations of the magnetic microsphere. We present data on the force-distance characteristics of a DNA molecule complexed with histones. The results illustrate how the tweezers can be used to study DNA binding proteins at the single molecule level.

  7. Contribution of water molecules in the spontaneous release of protein by graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li-Jun; Wang, Qi; Wu, Tao; Sun, Tian-Yang; Kang, Yu

    2013-09-16

    Applications of graphene sheets in the fields of biosensors and biomedical devices are limited by the aqueous solubility of graphene. Consequently, understanding the role of water molecules in the aggregation or dispersion of graphene in aqueous solution with a biomolecule is of vital importance to its application. Herein, protein is spontaneously released by the layer-to-layer aggregation of two single-layer graphene sheets due to van der Waals force between the sheets. The properties of water molecules, including density and dynamics, are discussed in detail. The dynamic behavior of aggregation of graphene sheets is triggered by the dynamics of water molecules. To stabilize dispersed graphene sheets in aqueous solution, the density of water molecules between the graphene sheets should be larger than 0.83 g cm(-3), and graphene modified by hydroxyl groups could be a good choice. The stability of a model protein on the graphene sheet is studied to investigate the biological compatibility of graphene sheets. To be a material with good biocompatibility, graphene should be functionalized by hydrophilic groups. The results presented herein could be helpful in the research and application of graphene sheets in the fields of biomaterials, biosensors, and biomedical devices.

  8. Ab Initio Calculations of the Electronic Structures and Biological Functions of Protein Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haoping

    The self-consistent cluster-embedding (SCCE) calculation method reduces the computational effort from M3 to about M1 (M is the number of atoms in the system) with precise calculations. Thus the ab initio, all-electron calculation of the electronic structure and biological function of protein molecule has become a reality, which will promote new proteomics considerably. The calculated results of two real protein molecules, the trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of squash Cucurbita maxima (CMTI-I, 436 atoms) and the ascaris trypsin inhibitor (912 atoms, two three-dimensional structures), will be presented in this paper. The reactive sites of the inhibitors are determined and explained. The accuracy of structure determination of the inhibitors are tested theoretically.

  9. Ab Initio Calculations of the Electronic Structures and Biological Functions of Protein Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haoping

    2003-04-01

    The self-consistent cluster-embedding (SCCE) calculation method reduces the computational effort from M3 to about M1 (M is the number of atoms in the system) with unchanged calculation precision. So the ab initio, all-electron calculation of the electronic structure and biological function of protein molecule becomes a reality, which will promote new proteomics considerably. The calculated results of two real protein molecules, the trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of squash Cucurbita maxima (CMTI-I, 436 atoms) and the Ascaris trypsin inhibitor (912 atoms, two three-dimensional structures), are presented. The reactive sites of the inhibitors are determined and explained. The precision of structure determination of inhibitors are tested theoretically.

  10. Identification of small molecule binding sites within proteins using phage display technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Agoston, G. E.; Manon, R.; Lapcevich, R.; Green, S. J.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; EntreMed Inc.; Florida State Univ.

    2001-11-01

    Affinity selection of peptides displayed on phage particles was used as the basis for mapping molecular contacts between small molecule ligands and their protein targets. Analysis of the crystal structures of complexes between proteins and small molecule ligands revealed that virtually all ligands of molecular weight 300 Da or greater have a continuous binding epitope of 5 residues or more. This observation led to the development of a technique for binding site identification which involves statistical analysis of an affinity-selected set of peptides obtained by screening of libraries of random, phage-displayed peptides against small molecules attached to solid surfaces. A random sample of the selected peptides is sequenced and used as input for a similarity scanning program which calculates cumulative similarity scores along the length of the putative receptor. Regions of the protein sequence exhibiting the highest similarity with the selected peptides proved to have a high probability of being involved in ligand binding. This technique has been employed successfully to map the contact residues in multiple known targets of the anticancer drugs paclitaxel (Taxol), docetaxel (Taxotere) and 2-methoxyestradiol and the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and to identify a novel paclitaxel receptor [1]. These data corroborate the observation that the binding properties of peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles can mimic the binding properties of peptides in naturally occurring proteins. It follows directly that structural context is relatively unimportant for determining the binding properties of these disordered peptides. This technique represents a novel, rapid, high resolution method for identifying potential ligand binding sites in the absence of three-dimensional information and has the potential to greatly enhance the speed of development of novel small molecule pharmaceuticals.

  11. Single molecule photobleaching (SMPB) technology for counting of RNA, DNA, protein and other molecules in nanoparticles and biological complexes by TIRF instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-05-15

    Direct counting of biomolecules within biological complexes or nanomachines is demanding. Single molecule counting using optical microscopy is challenging due to the diffraction limit. The single molecule photobleaching (SMPB) technology for direct counting developed by our team (Shu et al., 2007 [18]; Zhang et al., 2007 [19]) offers a simple and straightforward method to determine the stoichiometry of molecules or subunits within biocomplexes or nanomachines at nanometer scales. Stoichiometry is determined by real-time observation of the number of descending steps resulted from the photobleaching of individual fluorophore. This technology has now been used extensively for single molecule counting of protein, RNA, and other macromolecules in a variety of complexes or nanostructures. Here, we elucidate the SMPB technology, using the counting of RNA molecules within a bacteriophage phi29 DNA-packaging biomotor as an example. The method described here can be applied to the single molecule counting of other molecules in other systems. The construction of a concise, simple and economical single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope combining prism-type and objective-type TIRF is described. The imaging system contains a deep-cooled sensitive EMCCD camera with single fluorophore detection sensitivity, a laser combiner for simultaneous dual-color excitation, and a Dual-View™ imager to split the multiple outcome signals to different detector channels based on their wavelengths. Methodology of the single molecule photobleaching assay used to elucidate the stoichiometry of RNA on phi29 DNA packaging motor and the mechanism of protein/RNA interaction are described. Different methods for single fluorophore labeling of RNA molecules are reviewed. The process of statistical modeling to reveal the true copy number of the biomolecules based on binomial distribution is also described.

  12. Single-molecule spectroscopy of protein folding in a chaperonin cage

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Hagen; Hillger, Frank; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Hoffmann, Armin; Streich, Daniel; Haenni, Dominik; Nettels, Daniel; Lipman, Everett A.; Schuler, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are known to be essential for avoiding protein aggregation in vivo, but it is still unclear how they affect protein folding mechanisms. We use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to follow the folding of a protein inside the GroEL/GroES chaperonin cavity over a time range from milliseconds to hours. Our results show that confinement in the chaperonin decelerates the folding of the C-terminal domain in the substrate protein rhodanese, but leaves the folding rate of the N-terminal domain unaffected. Microfluidic mixing experiments indicate that strong interactions of the substrate with the cavity walls impede the folding process, but the folding hierarchy is preserved. Our results imply that no universal chaperonin mechanism exists. Rather, a competition between intra- and intermolecular interactions determines the folding rates and mechanisms of a substrate inside the GroEL/GroES cage. PMID:20547872

  13. Understanding disordered and unfolded proteins using single-molecule FRET and polymer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Hagen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding protein folding and the functional properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) requires detailed knowledge of the forces that act in polypeptide chains. These forces determine the dimensions and dynamics of unfolded and disordered proteins and have been suggested to impact processes such as the coupled binding and folding of IDPs, or the rate of protein folding reactions. Much of the progress in understanding the physical and chemical properties of unfolded and intrinsically disordered polypeptide chains has been made possible by the recent developments in single-molecule fluorescence techniques. However, the interpretation of the experimental results requires concepts from polymer physics in order to be understood. Here, I review some of the theories used to describe the dimensions of unfolded polypeptide chains under varying solvent conditions together with their more recent application to experimental data.

  14. The theory of bio-energy transport in the protein molecules and its properties.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2011-10-01

    The bio-energy transport is a basic problem in life science and related to many biological processes. Therefore to establish the mechanism of bio-energy transport and its theory have an important significance. Based on different properties of structure of α-helical protein molecules some theories of bio-energy transport along the molecular chains have been proposed and established, where the energy is released by hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). A brief survey of past researches on different models and theories of bio-energy, including Davydov's, Takeno's, Yomosa's, Brown et al.'s, Schweitzer's, Cruzeiro-Hansson's, Forner's and Pang's models were first stated in this paper. Subsequently we studied and reviewed mainly and systematically the properties, thermal stability and lifetimes of the carriers (solitons) transporting the bio-energy at physiological temperature 300 K in Pang's and Davydov's theories. From these investigations we know that the carrier (soliton) of bio-energy transport in the α-helical protein molecules in Pang's model has a higher binding energy, higher thermal stability and larger lifetime at 300 K relative to those of Davydov's model, in which the lifetime of the new soliton at 300 K is enough large and belongs to the order of 10(-10) s or τ/τ(0)≥700. Thus we can conclude that the soliton in Pang's model is exactly the carrier of the bio-energy transport, Pang's theory is appropriate to α-helical protein molecules.

  15. The theory of bio-energy transport in the protein molecules and its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2011-10-01

    The bio-energy transport is a basic problem in life science and related to many biological processes. Therefore to establish the mechanism of bio-energy transport and its theory have an important significance. Based on different properties of structure of α-helical protein molecules some theories of bio-energy transport along the molecular chains have been proposed and established, where the energy is released by hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). A brief survey of past researches on different models and theories of bio-energy, including Davydov's, Takeno's, Yomosa's, Brown et al.'s, Schweitzer's, Cruzeiro-Hansson's, Forner's and Pang's models were first stated in this paper. Subsequently we studied and reviewed mainly and systematically the properties, thermal stability and lifetimes of the carriers (solitons) transporting the bio-energy at physiological temperature 300 K in Pang's and Davydov's theories. From these investigations we know that the carrier (soliton) of bio-energy transport in the α-helical protein molecules in Pang's model has a higher binding energy, higher thermal stability and larger lifetime at 300 K relative to those of Davydov's model, in which the lifetime of the new soliton at 300 K is enough large and belongs to the order of 10 -10 s or τ/τ⩾700. Thus we can conclude that the soliton in Pang's model is exactly the carrier of the bio-energy transport, Pang's theory is appropriate to α-helical protein molecules.

  16. Single-molecule protein unfolding and translocation by an ATP-fueled proteolytic machine.

    PubMed

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Olivares, Adrian O; Sauer, Robert T; Baker, Tania A; Lang, Matthew J

    2011-04-15

    All cells employ ATP-powered proteases for protein-quality control and regulation. In the ClpXP protease, ClpX is a AAA+ machine that recognizes specific protein substrates, unfolds these molecules, and then translocates the denatured polypeptide through a central pore and into ClpP for degradation. Here, we use optical-trapping nanometry to probe the mechanics of enzymatic unfolding and translocation of single molecules of a multidomain substrate. Our experiments demonstrate the capacity of ClpXP and ClpX to perform mechanical work under load, reveal very fast and highly cooperative unfolding of individual substrate domains, suggest a translocation step size of 5-8 amino acids, and support a power-stroke model of denaturation in which successful enzyme-mediated unfolding of stable domains requires coincidence between mechanical pulling by the enzyme and a transient stochastic reduction in protein stability. We anticipate that single-molecule studies of the mechanical properties of other AAA+ proteolytic machines will reveal many shared features with ClpXP.

  17. A protein transistor made of an antibody molecule and two gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hong, Meng-Yen; Huang, G. Steven

    2012-03-01

    A major challenge in molecular electronics is to attach electrodes to single molecules in a reproducible manner to make molecular junctions that can be operated as transistors. Several attempts have been made to attach electrodes to proteins, but these devices have been unstable. Here, we show that self-assembly can be used to fabricate, in a highly reproducible manner, molecular junctions in which an antibody molecule (immunoglobulin G) binds to two gold nanoparticles, which in turn are connected to source and drain electrodes. We also demonstrate effective gating of the devices with an applied voltage, and show that the charge transport characteristics of these protein transistors are caused by conformational changes in the antibody. Moreover, by attaching CdSe quantum dots to the antibody, we show that the protein transistor can also be gated by an applied optical field. This approach offers a versatile platform for investigations of single-molecule-based biological functions and might also lead to the large-scale manufacture of integrated bioelectronic circuits.

  18. Multiple molecule effects on the cooperativity of protein folding transitions in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jacob I.; Moss, Devin J.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2012-06-01

    Though molecular simulation of proteins has made notable contributions to the study of protein folding and kinetics, disagreement between simulation and experiment still exists. One of the criticisms levied against simulation is its failure to reproduce cooperative protein folding transitions. This weakness has been attributed to many factors such as a lack of polarizability and adequate capturing of solvent effects. This work, however, investigates how increasing the number of proteins simulated simultaneously can affect the cooperativity of folding transitions — a topic that has received little attention previously. Two proteins are studied in this work: phage T4 lysozyme (Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID: 7LZM) and phage 434 repressor (PDB ID: 1R69). The results show that increasing the number of proteins molecules simulated simultaneously leads to an increase in the macroscopic cooperativity for transitions that are inherently cooperative on the molecular level but has little effect on the cooperativity of other transitions. Taken as a whole, the results identify one area of consideration to improving simulations of protein folding.

  19. Multiple molecule effects on the cooperativity of protein folding transitions in simulations.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jacob I; Moss, Devin J; Knotts, Thomas A

    2012-06-28

    Though molecular simulation of proteins has made notable contributions to the study of protein folding and kinetics, disagreement between simulation and experiment still exists. One of the criticisms levied against simulation is its failure to reproduce cooperative protein folding transitions. This weakness has been attributed to many factors such as a lack of polarizability and adequate capturing of solvent effects. This work, however, investigates how increasing the number of proteins simulated simultaneously can affect the cooperativity of folding transitions--a topic that has received little attention previously. Two proteins are studied in this work: phage T4 lysozyme (Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID: 7LZM) and phage 434 repressor (PDB ID: 1R69). The results show that increasing the number of proteins molecules simulated simultaneously leads to an increase in the macroscopic cooperativity for transitions that are inherently cooperative on the molecular level but has little effect on the cooperativity of other transitions. Taken as a whole, the results identify one area of consideration to improving simulations of protein folding.

  20. Influence of the water molecules near surface of viral protein on virus activation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelenko, S. O.; Salnikov, A. S.; Rak, S. V.; Goncharova, E. P.; Ryzhikov, A. B.

    2009-06-01

    The infection of a cell with influenza virus comprises the stages of receptor binding to the cell membrane, endocytosis of virus particle, and fusion of the virus envelope and cell endosome membrane, which is determined by the conformational changes in hemagglutinin, a virus envelope protein, caused by pH decrease within the endosome. The pH value that induces conformation rearrangements of hemagglutinin molecule considerably varies for different influenza virus strains, first and foremost, due to the differences in amino acid structure of the corresponding proteins. The main goal of this study was to construct a model making it possible to assess the critical pH value characterizing the fusogenic activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin from the data on hemagglutinin structure and experimental verification of this model. Under this model, we assume that when the electrostatic force between interacting hemagglutinin molecules in the virus envelop exceeds a certain value, the hemagglutinin HA1 subunits are arranged so that they form a cavity sufficient for penetration of water molecules. This event leads to an irreversible hydration of the inner fragments of hemagglutinin molecule in a trimer and to the completion of conformational changes. The geometry of electrostatic field in hemagglutinin trimer was calculated taking into account the polarization effects near the interface of two dielectrics, aqueous medium and protein macromolecule. The critical pH values for the conformational changes in hemagglutinin were measured by the erythrocyte hemolysis induced by influenza virus particles when decreasing pH. The critical pH value conditionally separating the pH range into the regions with and without the conformational changes was calculated for several influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2 strains based on the data on the amino acid structure of the corresponding hemagglutinin molecules. Comparison of the theoretical and experimental values of critical pH values for

  1. Protein-resistant polymer coatings based on surface-adsorbed poly(aminoethyl methacrylate)/poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ionov, Leonid; Synytska, Alla; Kaul, Elisabeth; Diez, Stefan

    2010-01-11

    We report on the protein-resistant properties of glass substrates coated with novel copolymers of 2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (AEM-PEG). In comparison to currently available protein-blocking polymer systems, such as poly-l-lysine-poly(ethylene glycol), silane-based poly(ethylene glycol), and poly(ethylene glycol) brushes prepared by surface-initiated polymerization, the proposed AEM-PEG offers the combined advantages of low cost, simplicity of use, and applicability in aqueous solutions. We demonstrate the capability of AEM-PEG to block the surface binding of globular proteins (tubulin), their assemblies (microtubules), and functional motor proteins (kinesin-1). Moreover, we demonstrate the applicability of AEM-PEG for surface patterning of proteins in microfluidic devices.

  2. Specific Interactions of Neutral Side Chains of an Adsorbed Protein with the Surface of α-Quartz and Silica Gel.

    PubMed

    Odinokov, Alexey V; Bagaturyants, Alexander A

    2015-07-16

    Many key features of the protein adsorption on the silica surfaces still remain unraveled. One of the open questions is the interaction of nonpolar side chains with siloxane cavities. Here, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for the detailed investigation of the binding of several hydrophobic and amphiphilic protein side chains with silica surface. These interactions were found to be a possible driving force for protein adsorption. The free energy gain was larger for the disordered surface of amorphous silica gel as compared to α-quartz, but the impact depended on the type of amino acid. The dependence was analyzed from the structural point of view. For every amino acid an enthalpy-entropy compensation behavior was observed. These results confirm a hypothesis of an essential role of hydrophobic interactions in protein unfolding and irreversible adsorption on the silica surface.

  3. Influence of protein corona on the transport of molecules into cells by mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paula, Amauri J; Araujo Júnior, Roberto T; Martinez, Diego Stéfani T; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Nader, Helena B; Durán, Nelson; Justo, Giselle Z; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz

    2013-09-11

    Although there are several studies reporting the promising biological efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (loaded with antitumoral drugs) against cancer cells and tumors, there are no reports on the influence of the bio-nano interface interactions on the molecular diffusion process occurring along their pores. In this context, we show here that the protein coating formed on multifunctionalized colloidal mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) dispersed in a cell culture medium decreases the release of camptothecin (CPT, a hydrophobic antitumoral drug) from the pores of MSNs. This effect is related to the adsorption of biomolecules on the nanoparticle surface, which partially blocks the pores. Parallely, the hydrophobic functionalization inside the pores can offer suitable sites for the adsorption of other molecules present in the cell culture medium depending on the hydrophobicity, size, and conformation aspects of these molecules and adsorption sites of MSNs. Thus, the molecular cargo loaded in the pores (i.e. CPT) can be replaced by specific molecules present in the dispersion medium. As a consequence, we show that a non-permeable cellular staining molecule such as SYTOX green can be incorporated in MSNs through this mechanism and internalized by cells in an artificial fashion. By extrapolating this phenomenon for applications in vivo, one has to consider now the possible manifestation of unpredicted biological effects from the use of porous silica nanoparticles and others with similar structure due to these internalization aspects.

  4. On/off blinking and switching behaviour of single molecules of green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Robert M.; Cubitt, Andrew B.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Moerner, W. E.

    1997-07-01

    Optical studies of individual molecules at low and room temperature can provide information about the dynamics of local environments in solids, liquids and biological systems unobscured by ensemble averaging. Here we present a study of the photophysical behaviour of single molecules of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) derived from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. Wild-type GFP and its mutant have attracted interest as fluorescent biological labels because the fluorophore may be formed in vivo. GFP mutants immobilized in aereated aqueous polymer gels and excited by 488-nm light undergo repeated cycles of fluorescent emission (`blinking') on a timescale of several seconds-behaviour that would be unobservable in bulk studies. Eventually the individual GFP molecules reach a long-lasting dark state, from which they can be switched back to the original emissive state by irradiation at 405 nm. This suggests the possibility of using these GFPs as fluorescent markers for time-dependent cell processes, and as molecular photonic switches or optical storage elements, addressable on the single-molecule level.

  5. Highly sensitive immunoassay of protein molecules based on single nanoparticle fluorescence detection in a nanowell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joo; Lakshmana, Sudheendra; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2011-03-01

    A nanoarray based-single molecule detection system was developed for detecting proteins with extremely high sensitivity. The nanoarray was able to effectively trap nanoparticles conjugated with biological sample into nanowells by integrating with an electrophoretic particle entrapment system (EPES). The nanoarray/EPES is superior to other biosensor using immunoassays in terms of saving the amounts of biological solution and enhancing kinetics of antibody binding due to reduced steric hindrance from the neighboring biological molecules. The nanoarray patterned onto a layer of PMMA and LOL on conductive and transparent indium tin oxide (ITO)-glass slide by using e-beam lithography. The suspension of 500 nm-fluorescent (green emission)-carboxylated polystyrene (PS) particles coated with protein-A followed by BDE 47 polyclonal antibody was added to the chip that was connected to the positive voltage. The droplet was covered by another ITO-coated-glass slide and connected to a ground terminal. After trapping the particles into the nanowells, the solution of different concentrations of anti-rabbit- IgG labeled with Alexa 532 was added for an immunoassay. A single molecule detection system could quantify the anti-rabbit IgG down to atto-mole level by counting photons emitted from the fluorescent dye bound to a single nanoparticle in a nanowell.

  6. Influences of Quantum and Disorder Effects on Solitons Excited in Protein Molecules in Improved Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Yu, Jia-Feng; Luo, Yu-Hui

    2005-02-01

    Utilizing the improved model with quasi-coherent two-quantum state and new Hamiltonian containing an additional interaction term [Phys. Rev. E62 (2000) 6989 and Euro. Phys. J. B19 (2001) 297] we study numerically the influences of the quantum and disorder effects including distortion of the sequences of masses of amino acid molecules and fluctuations of force constant of molecular chains, and of exciton-phonon coupled constants and of the dipole-dipole interaction constant and of the ground state energy on the properties of the solitons transported the bio-energy in the protein molecules by Runge-Kutta method. The results obtained show that the new soliton is robust against these structure disorders, especially for stronger disorders in the sequence of masses spring constants and coupling constants, except for quite larger fluctuations of the ground state energy and dipole-dipole interaction constant. This means that the new soliton in the improved model is very stable in normal cases and is possibly a carrier of bio-energy transport in the protein molecules.

  7. An anchor-dependent molecular docking process for docking small flexible molecules into rigid protein receptors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Thy-Hou; Lin, Guan-Liang

    2008-08-01

    A molecular docking method designated as ADDock, anchor-dependent molecular docking process for docking small flexible molecules into rigid protein receptors, is presented in this article. ADDock makes the bond connection lists for atoms based on anchors chosen for building molecular structures for docking small flexible molecules or ligands into rigid active sites of protein receptors. ADDock employs an extended version of piecewise linear potential for scoring the docked structures. Since no translational motion for small molecules is implemented during the docking process, ADDock searches the best docking result by systematically changing the anchors chosen, which are usually the single-edge connected nodes or terminal hydrogen atoms of ligands. ADDock takes intact ligand structures generated during the docking process for computing the docked scores; therefore, no energy minimization is required in the evaluation phase of docking. The docking accuracy by ADDock for 92 receptor-ligand complexes docked is 91.3%. All these complexes have been docked by other groups using other docking methods. The receptor-ligand steric interaction energies computed by ADDock for some sets of active and inactive compounds selected and docked into the same receptor active sites are apparently separated. These results show that based on the steric interaction energies computed between the docked structures and receptor active sites, ADDock is able to separate active from inactive compounds for both being docked into the same receptor.

  8. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  9. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-01-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding. PMID:24886825

  10. Probing protein multidimensional conformational fluctuations by single-molecule multiparameter photon stamping spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Maolin; Lu, H Peter

    2014-10-16

    Conformational motions of proteins are highly dynamic and intrinsically complex. To capture the temporal and spatial complexity of conformational motions and further to understand their roles in protein functions, an attempt is made to probe multidimensional conformational dynamics of proteins besides the typical one-dimensional FRET coordinate or the projected conformational motions on the one-dimensional FRET coordinate. T4 lysozyme hinge-bending motions between two domains along α-helix have been probed by single-molecule FRET. Nevertheless, the domain motions of T4 lysozyme are rather complex involving multiple coupled nuclear coordinates and most likely contain motions besides hinge-bending. It is highly likely that the multiple dimensional protein conformational motions beyond the typical enzymatic hinged-bending motions have profound impact on overall enzymatic functions. In this report, we have developed a single-molecule multiparameter photon stamping spectroscopy integrating fluorescence anisotropy, FRET, and fluorescence lifetime. This spectroscopic approach enables simultaneous observations of both FRET-related site-to-site conformational dynamics and molecular rotational (or orientational) motions of individual Cy3-Cy5 labeled T4 lysozyme molecules. We have further observed wide-distributed rotational flexibility along orientation coordinates by recording fluorescence anisotropy and simultaneously identified multiple intermediate conformational states along FRET coordinate by monitoring time-dependent donor lifetime, presenting a whole picture of multidimensional conformational dynamics in the process of T4 lysozyme open-close hinge-bending enzymatic turnover motions under enzymatic reaction conditions. By analyzing the autocorrelation functions of both lifetime and anisotropy trajectories, we have also observed the dynamic and static inhomogeneity of T4 lysozyme multidimensional conformational fluctuation dynamics, providing a fundamental

  11. Polymer-drug conjugates for intracellar molecule-targeted photoinduced inactivation of protein and growth inhibition of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Yuan, Huanxiang; Zhu, Chunlei; Yang, Qiong; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2012-10-01

    For most molecule-targeted anticancer systems, intracellular protein targets are very difficult to be accessed by antibodies, and also most efforts are made to inhibit protein activity temporarily rather than inactivate them permanently. In this work we firstly designed and synthesized multifunctional polymer-drug conjugates (polythiophene-tamoxifen) for intracellular molecule-targeted binding and inactivation of protein (estrogen receptor α, ERα) for growth inhibition of MCF-7 cancer cells. Small molecule drug was conjugated to polymer side chain for intracellular signal protein targeting, and simultaneously the fluorescent characteristic of polymer for tracing the cellular uptake and localization of polythiophene-drug conjugates by cell imaging. Under light irradiation, the conjugated polymer can sensitize oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that specifically inactivate the targeted protein, and thus inhibit the growth of tumor cells. The conjugates showed selective growth inhibition of ERα positive cancer cells, which exhibits low side effect for our intracellular molecule-targeted therapy system.

  12. Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors of BRCA1 Discovered Using Small Molecule Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Na, Zhenkun; Pan, Sijun; Uttamchandani, Mahesh; Yao, Shao Q

    2017-01-01

    Microarray screening technology has transformed the life sciences arena over the last decade. The platform is widely used in the area of mapping interaction networks, to molecular fingerprinting and small molecular inhibitor discovery. The technique has significantly impacted both basic and applied research. The microarray platform can likewise enable high-throughput screening and discovery of protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors. Herein we demonstrate the application of microarray-guided PPI inhibitor discovery, using human BRCA1 as an example. Mutations in BRCA1 have been implicated in ~50 % of hereditary breast cancers. By targeting the (BRCT)2 domain, we showed compound 15a and its prodrug 15b inhibited BRCA1 activities in tumor cells. Unlike previously reported peptide-based PPI inhibitors of BRCA1, the compounds identified could be directly administered to tumor cells, thus making them useful in targeting BRCA1/PARP-related pathways involved in DNA damage and repair response, for cancer therapy.

  13. Chick neural retina adhesion and survival molecule is a retinol-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, D.; LaCorbiere, M.; Esch, F.

    1986-01-01

    A 20,000-D protein called purpurin has recently been isolated from the growth-conditioned medium of cultured embryonic chick neural retina cells. Purpurin is a constituent of adherons and promotes cell-adheron adhesion by interacting with a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It also prolongs the survival of cultured neural retina cells. This paper shows that purpurin is a secretory protein that has sequence homology with a human protein synthesized in the liver that transports retinol in the blood, the serum retinol-binding protein (RBP). Purpurin binds (/sup 3/H)retinol, and both purpurin and chick serum RBP stimulate the adhesion of neural retina cells, although the serum protein is less active than purpurin. Purpurin and the serum RBP are, however, different molecules, for the serum protein is approx.3.000 D larger than purpurin and has different silver-staining characteristics. Finally, purpurin supports the survival of dissociated ciliary ganglion cells, indicating that RBPs can act as ciliary neurotrophic factors.

  14. Novel protein kinase signaling systems regulating lifespan identified by small molecule library screening using Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Stephen R; Li, Rui; Dhahbi, Joseph M; Yamakawa, Amy; Sauer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase signaling cascades control most aspects of cellular function. The ATP binding domains of signaling protein kinases are the targets of most available inhibitors. These domains are highly conserved from mammals to flies. Herein we describe screening of a library of small molecule inhibitors of protein kinases for their ability to increase Drosophila lifespan. We developed an assay system which allowed screening using the small amounts of materials normally present in commercial chemical libraries. The studies identified 17 inhibitors, the majority of which targeted tyrosine kinases associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGFI) receptors. Comparison of the protein kinase signaling effects of the inhibitors in vitro defined a consensus intracellular signaling profile which included decreased signaling by p38MAPK (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and protein kinase C (PKC). If confirmed, many of these kinases will be novel additions to the signaling cascades known to regulate metazoan longevity.

  15. Single-molecule observation of DNA compaction by meiotic protein SYCP3

    PubMed Central

    Syrjänen, Johanna L; Heller, Iddo; Candelli, Andrea; Davies, Owen R; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L; Pellegrini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper (Syrjänen et al., 2014), we reported the first structural characterisation of a synaptonemal complex (SC) protein, SYCP3, which led us to propose a model for its role in chromosome compaction during meiosis. As a component of the SC lateral element, SYCP3 has a critical role in defining the specific chromosome architecture required for correct meiotic progression. In the model, the reported compaction of chromosomal DNA caused by SYCP3 would result from its ability to bridge distant sites on a DNA molecule with the DNA-binding domains located at each end of its strut-like structure. Here, we describe a single-molecule assay based on optical tweezers, fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics that, in combination with bulk biochemical data, provides direct visual evidence for our proposed mechanism of SYCP3-mediated chromosome organisation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22582.001 PMID:28287952

  16. Ultrasensitive protein detection in blood serum using gold nanoparticle probes by single molecule spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiji; Wang, Chungang; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2009-07-01

    A one-step rapid and ultrasensitive immunoassay capable of detecting proteins in blood serum is developed using gold nanoprobes and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In this approach we take advantage of the inherent photoluminescence property of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to develop a fluorophore-free assay to observe binding entities by monitoring the diffusion of bound versus unbound molecules in a limited confocal volume. 40-nm GNPs conjugated separately with rabbit anti-IgG (Fc) and goat anti-IgG (Fab) when incubated in blood serum containing IgG forms a sandwich structure constituting dimers and oligomers that can be differentiated by to detect IgG in blood serum at a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 pg/ml. The novelty of integrating GNPs with FCS to develop a sensitive blood immunoassay brings single molecule methods one step closer to the clinic.

  17. MARCKS-Like Protein is an Initiating Molecule in Axolotl Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Takuji; Wang, Heng; Barsacchi, Rico; Simon, Andras; Tanaka, Elly M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying key molecules that launch regeneration has been a long sought goal. Multiple regenerative animals show an initial wound-associated proliferative response that transits into sustained proliferation if a significant portion of the body part has been removed 1-3. In the axolotl, appendage amputation initiates a round of wound-associated cell cycle induction followed by continued proliferation that is dependent on nerve-derived signals 4,5. A wound-associated molecule that triggers the initial proliferative response to launch regeneration has remained obscure. Using an expression cloning strategy followed by in vivo gain- and loss-of-function assays, we identified axolotl MARCKS like Protein (MLP) as an extracellularly released factor that induces the initial cell cycle response during axolotl appendage regeneration. PMID:26934225

  18. The physics of pulling polyproteins: a review of single molecule force spectroscopy using the AFM to study protein unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Megan L.; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of biological physics in recent years is the ability to manipulate single molecules and probe their properties and function. Since its emergence over two decades ago, single molecule force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to explore the response of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA and their complexes, to the application of an applied force. The force versus extension response of molecules can provide valuable insight into its mechanical stability, as well as details of the underlying energy landscape. In this review we will introduce the technique of single molecule force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope (AFM), with particular focus on its application to study proteins. We will review the models which have been developed and employed to extract information from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we will end with a discussion of future directions in this field.

  19. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction.

  20. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Hidden Complexity in a Protein Energy Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Tsytlonok, Maksym; Ibrahim, Shehu M.; Rowling, Pamela J.E.; Xu, Wenshu; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here, using single-molecule FRET, we reveal previously hidden conformations of the ankyrin-repeat domain of AnkyrinR, a giant adaptor molecule that anchors integral membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton through simultaneous binding of multiple partner proteins. We show that the ankyrin repeats switch between high-FRET and low-FRET states, controlled by an unstructured “safety pin” or “staple” from the adjacent domain of AnkyrinR. Opening of the safety pin leads to unravelling of the ankyrin repeat stack, a process that will dramatically affect the relative orientations of AnkyrinR binding partners and, hence, the anchoring of the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the membrane. Ankyrin repeats are one of the most ubiquitous molecular recognition platforms in nature, and it is therefore important to understand how their structures are adapted for function. Our results point to a striking mechanism by which the order-disorder transition and, thereby, the activity of repeat proteins can be regulated. PMID:25565106

  1. Single-molecule FRET reveals hidden complexity in a protein energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Tsytlonok, Maksym; Ibrahim, Shehu M; Rowling, Pamela J E; Xu, Wenshu; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2015-01-06

    Here, using single-molecule FRET, we reveal previously hidden conformations of the ankyrin-repeat domain of AnkyrinR, a giant adaptor molecule that anchors integral membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton through simultaneous binding of multiple partner proteins. We show that the ankyrin repeats switch between high-FRET and low-FRET states, controlled by an unstructured "safety pin" or "staple" from the adjacent domain of AnkyrinR. Opening of the safety pin leads to unravelling of the ankyrin repeat stack, a process that will dramatically affect the relative orientations of AnkyrinR binding partners and, hence, the anchoring of the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the membrane. Ankyrin repeats are one of the most ubiquitous molecular recognition platforms in nature, and it is therefore important to understand how their structures are adapted for function. Our results point to a striking mechanism by which the order-disorder transition and, thereby, the activity of repeat proteins can be regulated.

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction. PMID:27641076

  3. Small‐Molecule and Peptide Inhibitors of the Pro‐Survival Protein Mcl‐1

    PubMed Central

    Beekman, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ability of protein–protein interactions to regulate cellular processes in both beneficial and detrimental ways has made them obvious drug targets. The Bcl‐2 family of proteins undergo a series of protein–protein interactions which regulate the intrinsic cell‐death pathway. The pro‐survival members of the Bcl‐2 family, including Bcl‐2, Bcl‐xL, and Mcl‐1, are commonly overexpressed in a number of human cancers. Effective modulators of members of the Bcl‐2 family have been developed and are undergoing clinical trials, but the efficient modulation of Mcl‐1 is still not represented in the clinic. In addition, Mcl‐1 is a major cause of resistance to radio‐ and chemotherapies, including inhibitors that target other Bcl‐2 family members. Subsequently, the inhibition of Mcl‐1 has become of significant interest to the scientific community. This review covers the progress made to date in modulating the activity of Mcl‐1, by both stapled peptides and small molecules. The development of peptides as drug candidates, and the advancement of experimental and computational techniques used to discover small molecules are also highlighted. PMID:26696548

  4. Small molecule modulators of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinases, the key regulators of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manali; Kulkarni, Abhijeet; Pal, Jayanta K

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha kinases (eIF-2α kinases) are key mediators of stress response in cells. In mammalian cells, there are four eIF-2α kinases, namely HRI (Heme-Regulated Inhibitor), PKR (RNA-dependent Protein Kinase), PERK (PKR-like ER Kinase) and GCN2 (General Control Non-derepressible 2). These kinases get activated during diverse cytoplasmic stress conditions and phosphorylate the alpha-subunit of eIF2, leading to global protein synthesis inhibition. Therefore, eIF-2α kinases play a vital role in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and cell signaling. Deregulation of eIF-2α kinases and protein synthesis has been linked to numerous pathological conditions such as certain cancers, anemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, modulation of these kinases by small molecules holds a great therapeutic promise. In this review we have compiled the available information on inhibitors and activators of these four eIF-2α kinases. The review concludes with a note on the selectivity issue of currently available modulators and future perspectives for the design of specific small molecule probes.

  5. A protein molecule in an aqueous mixed solvent: fluctuation theory outlook.

    PubMed

    Shulgin, Ivan L; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2005-08-01

    In the present paper a procedure to calculate the properties of proteins in aqueous mixed solvents, particularly the excesses of the constituents of the mixed solvent near the protein molecule and the preferential binding parameters, is suggested. Expressions for the Kirkwood-Buff integrals in ternary mixtures and for the preferential binding parameter were derived and used to calculate various properties of infinitely dilute proteins in aqueous mixed solvents. The derived expressions and experimental information regarding the partial molar volumes and the preferential binding parameters were used to calculate the excesses (deficits) of water and cosolvent (in comparison with the bulk concentrations of protein-free mixed solvent) in the vicinity of ribonuclease A, ribonuclease T1, and lysozyme molecules. The calculations showed that water was in excess in the vicinity of ribonuclease A for water/glycerol and water/trehalose mixtures, and the cosolvent urea was in excess in the vicinity of ribonuclease T1 and lysozyme. The derivative of the activity coefficient of the protein with respect to the mole fraction of water was also calculated. This derivative was negative for the water/glycerol and water/trehalose mixed solvents and positive for the water/urea mixture. The mixture of lysozyme in the water/urea solvent is of particular interest, because the lysozyme at pH 7.0 is in its native state up to 9.3M urea, while at pH 2.0 it is denaturated between 2.5 and 5M and higher concentrations of urea. Our results demonstrated a striking similarity in the hydration of lysozyme at both pHs. It is worthwhile to note that the excesses of urea were only weakly composition dependent on both cases.

  6. A protein molecule in an aqueous mixed solvent: Fluctuation theory outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Ivan L.; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2005-08-01

    In the present paper a procedure to calculate the properties of proteins in aqueous mixed solvents, particularly the excesses of the constituents of the mixed solvent near the protein molecule and the preferential binding parameters, is suggested. Expressions for the Kirkwood-Buff integrals in ternary mixtures and for the preferential binding parameter were derived and used to calculate various properties of infinitely dilute proteins in aqueous mixed solvents. The derived expressions and experimental information regarding the partial molar volumes and the preferential binding parameters were used to calculate the excesses (deficits) of water and cosolvent (in comparison with the bulk concentrations of protein-free mixed solvent) in the vicinity of ribonuclease A, ribonuclease T1, and lysozyme molecules. The calculations showed that water was in excess in the vicinity of ribonuclease A for water/glycerol and water/trehalose mixtures, and the cosolvent urea was in excess in the vicinity of ribonuclease T1 and lysozyme. The derivative of the activity coefficient of the protein with respect to the mole fraction of water was also calculated. This derivative was negative for the water/glycerol and water/trehalose mixed solvents and positive for the water/urea mixture. The mixture of lysozyme in the water/urea solvent is of particular interest, because the lysozyme at pH 7.0 is in its native state up to 9.3M urea, while at pH 2.0 it is denaturated between 2.5 and 5M and higher concentrations of urea. Our results demonstrated a striking similarity in the hydration of lysozyme at both pHs. It is worthwhile to note that the excesses of urea were only weakly composition dependent on both cases.

  7. Direct observation of ultrafast folding and denatured state dynamics in single protein molecules

    PubMed Central

    Neuweiler, Hannes; Johnson, Christopher M.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments are extremely useful in studying protein folding but are generally limited to time scales of greater than ≈100 μs and distances greater than ≈2 nm. We used single-molecule fluorescence quenching by photoinduced electron transfer, detecting short-range events, in combination with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (PET-FCS) to investigate folding dynamics of the small binding domain BBL with nanosecond time resolution. The kinetics of folding appeared as a 10-μs decay in the autocorrelation function, resulting from stochastic fluctuations between denatured and native conformations of individual molecules. The observed rate constants were probe independent and in excellent agreement with values derived from conventional temperature-jump (T-jump) measurements. A submicrosecond relaxation was detected in PET-FCS data that reported on the kinetics of intrachain contact formation within the thermally denatured state. We engineered a mutant of BBL that was denatured under the reaction conditions that favored folding of the parent wild type (“Dphys”). Dphys had the same kinetic signature as the thermally denatured state and revealed segmental diffusion with a time constant of intrachain contact formation of 500 ns. This time constant was more than 10 times faster than folding and in the range estimated to be the “speed limit” of folding. Dphys exhibited significant deviations from a random coil. The solvent viscosity and temperature dependence of intrachain diffusion showed that chain motions were slaved by the presence of intramolecular interactions. PET-FCS in combination with protein engineering is a powerful approach to study the early events and mechanism of ultrafast protein folding. PMID:19841261

  8. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Picosecond adsorbate dynamics at condensed phase interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, T.W.; Chang, Y.J.; Martorell, J.

    1993-12-31

    Picosecond surface second harmonic generation has been used to probe a variety of elementary adsorbate reactions at liquid-solid interfaces. Electron transfer reactions at semiconductor-liquid junctions, geminate recombination of photogenerated free radical pairs and the orientational dynamics of dipolar adsorbates have all been explored in varying degrees of detail. These kinetic studies have led to a detailed analysis of adsorbate detection on the surface of non-centrosymmetric substrates as well as the use of total internal reflection geometries for signal enhancement from optically absorbing liquids. Particular emphasis has been placed on the static and dynamic characterization of adsorbate orientational distribution functions and how these are determined from the torque exerted on adsorbates by the angular part of the molecule-surface interaction potential.

  10. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications.

  11. Single-point single-molecule FRAP distinguishes inner and outer nuclear membrane protein distribution

    PubMed Central

    Mudumbi, Krishna C; Schirmer, Eric C; Yang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The normal distribution of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) is disrupted in several human diseases. NETs are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum and then transported from the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Quantitative determination of the distribution of NETs on the ONM and INM is limited in available approaches, which moreover provide no information about translocation rates in the two membranes. Here we demonstrate a single-point single-molecule FRAP microscopy technique that enables determination of distribution and translocation rates for NETs in vivo. PMID:27558844

  12. Compact halo-ligand-conjugated quantum dots for multicolored single-molecule imaging of overcrowding GPCR proteins on cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Komatsuzaki, Akihito; Ohyanagi, Tatsuya; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Ueda, Masahiro; Jin, Takashi

    2015-03-25

    To detect single molecules within the optical diffraction limit (< ca. 200 nm), a multicolored imaging technique is developed using Halo-ligand conjugated quantum dots (Halo-QDs; <6 nm in diameter). Using three types of Halo-QDs, multicolored single-molecule fluorescence imaging of GPCR proteins in Dictyostelium cells is achieved.

  13. Probing and Manipulating Protein Conformation Changes by Time-Resolved Single-Molecule Spectroscopy and Site-Specific Ultramicroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Biomolecular Recognition with Single Molecule Dynamics,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 128105 (2007). 4. V. Biju, D. Pan, Yuri A. Gorby , Jim Fredrickson, J. Mclean, D...Protein Interactions of Calmodulin by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy," J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 10034-10042 ( 2006 ).

  14. The origins of life -- the 'protein interaction world' hypothesis: protein interactions were the first form of self-reproducing life and nucleic acids evolved later as memory molecules.

    PubMed

    Andras, Peter; Andras, Csaba

    2005-01-01

    The 'protein interaction world' (PIW) hypothesis of the origins of life assumes that life emerged as a self-reproducing and expanding system of protein interactions. In mainstream molecular biology, 'replication' refers to the material copying of molecules such as nucleic acids. However, PIW is conceptualized as an abstract communication system constituted by the interactions between proteins, in which 'replication' happens at the level of self-reproduction of these interactions between proteins. Densely concentrated peptide interaction systems may have reproduced and expanded as 'protocell' vesicles surrounded by lipid bi-layer membranes. Protocells led to the emergence of proto-RNA molecules of greater chemical stability which served as chemically differentiated 'memories' of peptide interaction states, thereby facilitating the reproduction and expansion of protocells. Simplification-driven expansion led to the selection of biotic amino acids and the reduction of the typical RNA alphabet to the four usual bases (A, C, G and U). Dense interactions between RNA molecules led to the emergence of the RNA interaction subsystem of the cell, and to the emergence of 'memories' of RNA interactions in the form of DNA molecules with greater chemical stability. The expansion of DNA molecule interactions led to the dense clustering and encapsulation of DNA molecules within the cell nucleus. RNA molecules therefore serve as memories of protein interactions and DNA molecules are memories of RNA interactions. We believe that the PIW hypothesis is more evolutionarily plausible than the mainstream RNA world hypothesis, and has greater explanatory power.

  15. Uremic toxins and oral adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shunsuke; Yoshiya, Kunihiko; Kita, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Hideki; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2011-04-01

    Uremic toxins are associated with various disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease and it is difficult to remove some of these toxins by dialysis. Since some uremic toxins are generated by bacterial metabolites in the colon, oral adsorbents that interfere with the absorption of uremic toxins or their precursors are believed to prevent their accumulation in the body. AST-120 adsorbs various uremic retention solutes in the gastrointestinal system and has potential for providing clinical benefit. Sevelamer hydrochloride binds some harmful compounds in addition to phosphate and seems to have pleiotropic effects that include lowering serum LDL cholesterol levels and reduction of inflammation. The effect of sevelamer hydrochloride on indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol has been shown in an in vitro study; however, in vivo studies in mice or humans did not demonstrate this effect on protein-binding uremic toxins. Oral adsorbents are thus one of the important modalities in the treatment of uremic syndrome.

  16. Production of a bifunctional hybrid molecule B72.3/metallothionein-1 by protein engineering.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, J; Koropatnick, J; Qi, Y; Luo, X; Moyana, T; Li, K; Chen, Y

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid anti-tumour B72.3 antibody/metallothionein protein B72.3MT-1 was produced by the construction of the expression vector mpSV2neo-EP1-B72.3MT-1. This vector contained the neo gene as a selection marker, the murine immunoglobulin promoter and enhancer, and the hybrid B72.3 heavy chain gene fragment with mouse metallothionein-1 cDNA gene ligated into its CH2 domain. The expression vector was transfected to the heavy chain loss mutant B72.3Mut(K) cell line. The hybrid protein B72.3MT-1 was purified from transfectant supernates using a Protein G column. We showed that the hybrid protein retained the binding reactivity for the TAG72 antigen as the original B72.3 antibody, and the metal-binding capacity of the native metallothionein molecule. Therefore, the bifunctional hybrid protein B72.3MT-1 may be very useful in cancer imaging when labelled with radionuclides such as 99mTc. Images Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8495976

  17. Titantium Dioxide Nanoparticles Assembled by DNA Molecules Hybridization and Loading of DNA Interacting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aiguo; Paunesku, Tatjana; Brown, Eric M B; Babbo, Angela; Cruz, Cecille; Aslam, Mohamed; Dravid, Vinayak; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2008-02-01

    This work demonstrates the assembly of TiO(2) nanoparticles with attached DNA oligonucleotides into a 3D mesh structure by allowing base pairing between oligonucleotides. A change of the ratio of DNA oligonucleotide molecules and TiO(2) nanoparticles regulates the size of the mesh as characterized by UV-visible light spectra, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. This type of 3D mesh, based on TiO(2)-DNA oligonucleotide nanoconjugates, can be used for studies of nanoparticle assemblies in material science, energy science related to dye-sensitized solar cells, environmental science as well as characterization of DNA interacting proteins in the field of molecular biology. As an example of one such assembly, proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein (PCNA) was cloned, its activity verified, and the protein was purified, loaded onto double strand DNA oligonucleotide-TiO(2) nanoconjugates, and imaged by atomic force microscopy. This type of approach may be used to sample and perhaps quantify and/or extract specific cellular proteins from complex cellular protein mixtures affinity based on their affinity for chosen DNA segments assembled into the 3D matrix.

  18. Sizing of colloidal particle and protein molecules in a hanging fluid drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.

    1995-01-01

    We report non-invasive particle size measurements of polystyrene latex colloidal particles and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein molecules suspended in tiny hanging fluid drops of 30 micro-Liter volume using a newly designed fiber optic probe. The probe is based upon the principles of the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The motivation for this work comes from growing protein crystals in outer space. Protein crystals have been grown previously in hanging drops in microgravity experiments on-board the space shuttle orbiter. However, obtaining quantitative information on nucleation and growth of the protein crystals in real time has always been a desired goal, but hitherto not achieved. Several protein researchers have shown interest in using DLS to monitor crystal growth process in a droplet, but elaborate instrumentation and optical alignment problems have made in-situ applications difficult. We demonstrate that such an experiment is now possible. Our system offers fast (5 seconds) determination of particle size, utilize safe levels of very low laser power (less than or equal to 0.2 mW), a small scattering volume (approximately 2 x 10(exp -5) cu mm) and high spatial coherence (Beta) values. This is a major step forward when compared to currently available DLS systems.

  19. Mathematical simulation of interactions of protein molecules and prediction of their reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, K. G.; Koshlan, T. V.

    2016-10-01

    A physical model of interactions of protein molecules has been developed. The regularities of their reactivity have been studied using electrostatics methods for two histone dimers H2A-H2B and H3-H4 assembled from monomers. The formation of histone dimers from different monomers has been simulated and their ability to the formation of stable compounds has been investigated by analyzing the potential energy matrix using the condition number. The results of a simulation of the electrostatic interaction in the formation of dimers from complete amino acid sequences of selected proteins and their truncated analogs have been considered. The calculations have been performed taking into account the screening of the electrostatic charge of charged amino acids for different concentrations of the monovalent salt using the Gouy-Chapman theory.

  20. RIM - binding proteins (RBPs) couple Rab3 - interacting molecules (RIMs) to voltage - gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, H.; Pironkova, R.; Onwumere, O.; Vologodskaia, M.; Hudspeth, A. J.; Lesage, F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated channels initiates the exocytotic fusion of synaptic vesicles to the plasma membrane. Here we show that RIM-binding proteins (RBPs), which associate with Ca2+ channels in hair cells, photoreceptors, and neurons, interact with α1D (L-type) and α1B (N-type) Ca2+-channel subunits. RBPs contain three Src homology 3 domains that bind to proline-rich motifs in α1 subunits and Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs). Overexpression in PC12 cells of fusion proteins that suppress the interactions of RBPs with RIMs and α1 augments the exocytosis triggered by depolarization. RBPs may regulate the strength of synaptic transmission by creating a functional link between the synaptic-vesicle tethering apparatus, which includes RIMs and Rab3, and the fusion machinery, which includes Ca2+ channels and the SNARE complex. PMID:11988172

  1. Signal transducing molecules and glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked proteins form a caveolin-rich insoluble complex in MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    GPI-linked protein molecules become Triton-insoluble during polarized sorting to the apical cell surface of epithelial cells. These insoluble complexes, enriched in cholesterol, glycolipids, and GPI-linked proteins, have been isolated by flotation on sucrose density gradients and are thought to contain the putative GPI-sorting machinery. As the cellular origin and molecular protein components of this complex remain unknown, we have begun to characterize these low-density insoluble complexes isolated from MDCK cells. We find that these complexes, which represent 0.4-0.8% of the plasma membrane, ultrastructurally resemble caveolae and are over 150-fold enriched in a model GPI-anchored protein and caveolin, a caveolar marker protein. However, they exclude many other plasma membrane associated molecules and organelle-specific marker enzymes, suggesting that they represent microdomains of the plasma membrane. In addition to caveolin, these insoluble complexes contain a subset of hydrophobic plasma membrane proteins and cytoplasmically-oriented signaling molecules, including: (a) GTP- binding proteins--both small and heterotrimeric; (b) annex II--an apical calcium-regulated phospholipid binding protein with a demonstrated role in exocytic fusion events; (c) c-Yes--an apically localized member of the Src family of non-receptor type protein- tyrosine kinases; and (d) an unidentified serine-kinase activity. As we demonstrate that caveolin is both a transmembrane molecule and a major phospho-acceptor component of these complexes, we propose that caveolin could function as a transmembrane adaptor molecule that couples luminal GPI-linked proteins with cytoplasmically oriented signaling molecules during GPI-membrane trafficking or GPI-mediated signal transduction events. In addition, our results have implications for understanding v- Src transformation and the actions of cholera and pertussis toxins on hetero-trimeric G proteins. PMID:8349730

  2. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  3. Single Molecule Science for Personalized Nanomedicine: Atomic Force Microscopy of Biopolymer-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Carlin

    Nanotechnology has a unique and relatively untapped utility in the fields of medicine and dentistry at the level of single-biopolymer and -molecule diagnostics. In recent years atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest due to its ability to obtain atomic-resolution of molecular structures and probe biophysical behaviors of biopolymers and proteins in a variety of biologically significant environments. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the nanoscale manipulation and observation of biopolymers to develop an innovative technology for personalized medicine while understanding complex biological systems. These studies described here primarily use AFM to observe biopolymer interactions with proteins and its surroundings with unprecedented resolution, providing a better understanding of these systems and interactions at the nanoscale. Transcriptional profiling, the measure of messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance in a single cell, is a powerful technique that detects "behavior" or "symptoms" at the tissue and cellular level. We have sought to develop an alternative approach, using our expertise in AFM and single molecule nanotechnology, to achieve a cost-effective high throughput method for sensitive detection and profiling of subtle changes in transcript abundance. The technique does not require amplification of the mRNA sample because the AFM provides three-dimensional views of molecules with unprecedented resolution, requires minimal sample preparation, and utilizes a simple tagging chemistry on cDNA molecules. AFM images showed collagen polymers in teeth and of Drebrin-A remodeling of filamentous actin structure and mechanics. AFM was used to image collagen on exposed dentine tubules and confirmed tubule occlusion with a desensitizing prophylaxis paste by Colgate-Palmolive. The AFM also superseded other microscopy tools in resolving F-actin helix remodeling and possible cooperative binding by a neuronal actin binding protein---Drebrin-A, an

  4. Positioning protein molecules on surfaces: A nanoengineering approach to supramolecular chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang-Yu; Amro, Nabil A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss a nanoengineering approach for supramolecular chemistry and self assembly. The collective properties and biofunctionalities of molecular ensembles depend not only on individual molecular building blocks but also on organization at the molecular or nanoscopic level. Complementary to “bottom-up” approaches, which construct supramolecular ensembles by the design and synthesis of functionalized small molecular units or large molecular motifs, nanofabrication explores whether individual units, such as small molecular ligands, or large molecules, such as proteins, can be positioned with nanometer precision. The separation and local environment can be engineered to control subsequent intermolecular interactions. Feature sizes as small as 2 × 4 nm2 (32 alkanethiol molecules) are produced. Proteins may be aligned along a 10-nm-wide line or within two-dimensional islands of desired geometry. These high-resolution engineering and imaging studies provide new and molecular-level insight into supramolecular chemistry and self-assembly processes in bioscience that are otherwise unobtainable, e.g., the influence of size, separation, orientation, and local environment of reaction sites. This nanofabrication methodology also offers a new strategy in construction of two- and three-dimensional supramolecular structures for cell, virus, and bacterial adhesion, as well as biomaterial and biodevice engineering. PMID:11959965

  5. SCNT versus iPSCs: proteins and small molecules in reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Li, Xia; Song, Dandan; Jiang, Shaoshuai; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yunhai

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transplantation (SCNT) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technologies can be employed to change cell fate by reprogramming. The discoveries of SCNT and iPSCs were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine in 2012, which reaffirmed the importance of cell fate plasticity. However, the low cloning efficiency of SCNT and differences between iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are great barriers and may be caused by incomplete or aberrant reprogramming. Additionally, the well characterized reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc (OSKM) are not simultaneously expressed at high levels in enucleated or early embryonic oocytes, suggesting reprogramming may be different in the above two methods. Recent studies have demonstrated that small molecules and specific proteins expressed in oocytes and in early embryonic development play important roles in reprogramming by replacing transcription factors, erasing reprogramming memory and accelerating the speed and extent of reprogramming. In this review, we summarize the current state of SCNT and iPSCs technologies and discuss the latest advances in the research of proteins and small molecules affecting SCNT and iPSCs. This is an area of research in which chemical biology and proteomics are combining to facilitate improving cellular reprogramming and production of clinical grade iPSCs.

  6. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  7. Bacteroidales Secreted Antimicrobial Proteins Target Surface Molecules Necessary for Gut Colonization and Mediate Competition In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, Kevin G.; Coyne, Michael J.; Gentyala, Rahul R.; Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently showed that human gut Bacteroidales species secrete antimicrobial proteins (BSAPs), and we characterized in vitro the first such BSAP produced by Bacteroides fragilis. In this study, we identified a second potent BSAP produced by the ubiquitous and abundant human gut species Bacteroides uniformis. The two BSAPs contain a membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain but share very little sequence similarity. We identified the target molecules of BSAP-sensitive cells and showed that each BSAP targets a different class of surface molecule: BSAP-1 targets an outer membrane protein of sensitive B. fragilis strains, and BSAP-2 targets the O-antigen glycan of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of sensitive B. uniformis strains. Species-wide genomic and phenotypic analyses of B. fragilis and B. uniformis showed that BSAP-producing strains circumvent killing by synthesizing an orthologous nontargeted surface molecule. The BSAP genes are adjacent to the gene(s) encoding their target replacements, suggesting coacquisition. Using a gnotobiotic mouse competitive-colonization model, we found that the BSAP surface targets are important for colonization of the mammalian gut, thereby explaining why they are maintained in sensitive strains and why they were replaced rather than deleted in BSAP-producing strains. Using isogenic BSAP-producing, -sensitive, and -resistant strains, we show that a BSAP-producing strain outcompetes a sensitive strain but not a resistant strain in the mammalian gut. Human gut metagenomic datasets reveal that BSAP-1-sensitive strains do not cooccur with BSAP-1-producing strains in human gut microbiotas, further supporting the idea that BSAPs are important competitive factors with relevance to the strain-level composition of the human gut microbiota. PMID:27555309

  8. Surveying protein structure and function using bis-arsenical small molecules.

    PubMed

    Scheck, Rebecca A; Schepartz, Alanna

    2011-09-20

    Exploration across the fields of biology, chemical biology, and medicine has led to an increasingly complex, albeit incomplete, view of the interactions that drive life's processes. The ability to monitor and track the movement, activity, and interactions of biomolecules in living cells is an essential part of this investigation. In our laboratory, we have endeavored to develop tools that are capable not only of monitoring protein localization but also reporting on protein structure and function. Central to our efforts is a new strategy, bipartite tetracysteine display, that relies on the specific and high-affinity interaction between a fluorogenic, bis-arsenical small molecule and a unique protein sequence, conformation, or assembly. In 1998, a small-molecule analogue of fluorescein with two arsenic atoms, FlAsH, was shown by Tsien and coworkers to fluoresce upon binding to a linear amino acid sequence, Cys-Cys-Arg-Glu-Cys-Cys. Later work demonstrated that substituting Pro-Gly for Arg-Glu optimized both binding and fluorescence yield. Our strategy of bipartite tetracysteine display emanated from the idea that it would be possible to replace the intervening Pro-Gly dipeptide in this sequence with a protein or protein partnership, provided the assembled protein fold successfully reproduced the approximate placement of the two Cys-Cys pairs. In this Account, we describe our recent progress in this area, with an emphasis on the fundamental concepts that underlie the successful use of bis-arsenicals such as FlAsH and the related ReAsH for bipartite display experiments. In particular, we highlight studies that have explored how broadly bipartite tetracysteine display can be employed and that have navigated the conformational boundary conditions favoring success. To emphasize the utility of these principles, we outline two recently reported applications of bipartite tetracysteine display. The first is a novel, encodable, selective, Src kinase sensor that lacks

  9. Small-molecule tools for dissecting the roles of SSB/protein interactions in genome maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Duo; Bernstein, Douglas A.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.

    2010-09-03

    Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) help to recruit a diverse array of genome maintenance enzymes to their sites of action through direct protein interactions. For all cases examined to date, these interactions are mediated by the evolutionarily conserved C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct). The essential nature of SSB protein interactions makes inhibitors that block SSB complex formation valuable biochemical tools and attractive potential antibacterial agents. Here, we identify four small molecules that disrupt complexes formed between Escherichia coli SSB and Exonuclease I (ExoI), a well-studied SSB-interacting enzyme. Each compound disrupts ExoI/SSB-Ct peptide complexes and abrogates SSB stimulation of ExoI nuclease activity. Structural and biochemical studies support a model for three of the compounds in which they compete with SSB for binding to ExoI. The fourth appears to rely on an allosteric mechanism to disrupt ExoI/SSB complexes. Subsets of the inhibitors block SSB-Ct complex formation with two other SSB-interaction partners as well, which highlights their utility as reagents for investigating the roles of SSB/protein interactions in diverse DNA replication, recombination, and repair reactions.

  10. Molecular insights into the stabilization of protein-protein interactions with small molecule: The FKBP12-rapamycin-FRB case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, Shilpi; Pieraccini, Stefano; De Gonda, Riccardo; Conti, Simone; Sironi, Maurizio

    2013-11-01

    Targetting protein-protein interactions is a challenging task in drug discovery process. Despite the challenges, several studies provided evidences for the development of small molecules modulating protein-protein interactions. Here we consider a typical case of protein-protein interaction stabilization: the complex between FKBP12 and FRB with rapamycin. We have analyzed the stability of the complex and characterized its interactions at the atomic level by performing free energy calculations and computational alanine scanning. It is shown that rapamycin stabilizes the complex by acting as a bridge between the two proteins; and the complex is stable only in the presence of rapamycin.

  11. Identification of polymer surface adsorbed proteins implicated in pluripotent human embryonic stem cell expansion† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6bm00214e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Moamen; Rao, Wei; Smith, James G. W.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert; Young, Lorraine E.; Barrett, David A.; Davies, Martyn C.; Denning, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Improved biomaterials are required for application in regenerative medicine, biosensing, and as medical devices. The response of cells to the chemistry of polymers cultured in media is generally regarded as being dominated by proteins adsorbed to the surface. Here we use mass spectrometry to identify proteins adsorbed from a complex mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) conditioned medium found to support pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) expansion on a plasma etched tissue culture polystyrene surface. A total of 71 proteins were identified, of which 14 uniquely correlated with the surface on which pluripotent stem cell expansion was achieved. We have developed a microarray combinatorial protein spotting approach to test the potential of these 14 proteins to support expansion of a hESC cell line (HUES-7) and a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (ReBl-PAT) on a novel polymer (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) methacrylamide). These proteins were spotted to form a primary array yielding several protein mixture ‘hits’ that enhanced cell attachment to the polymer. A second array was generated to test the function of a refined set of protein mixtures. We found that a combination of heat shock protein 90 and heat shock protein-1 encourage elevated adherence of pluripotent stem cells at a level comparable to fibronectin pre-treatment. PMID:27466628

  12. Discovery and structural characterization of a small molecule 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jing; Du, Yuhong; Horton, John R.; Upadhyay, Anup K.; Lou, Bin; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe; Zhang, Lixin; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Cheng, Xiaodong; Fu, Haian

    2013-02-14

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/threonine-recognition proteins engage multiple nodes in signaling networks that control diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions and have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for such diseases as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, small molecule modulators of 14-3-3 are much needed agents for chemical biology investigations and therapeutic development. To analyze 14-3-3 function and modulate its activity, we conducted a chemical screen and identified 4-[(2Z)-2-[4-formyl-6-methyl-5-oxo-3-(phosphonatooxymethyl)pyridin-2-ylidene]hydrazinyl]benzoate as a 14-3-3 inhibitor, which we termed FOBISIN (FOurteen-three-three BInding Small molecule INhibitor) 101. FOBISIN101 effectively blocked the binding of 14-3-3 with Raf-1 and proline-rich AKT substrate, 40 kD{sub a} and neutralized the ability of 14-3-3 to activate exoenzyme S ADP-ribosyltransferase. To provide a mechanistic basis for 14-3-3 inhibition, the crystal structure of 14-3-3{zeta} in complex with FOBISIN101 was solved. Unexpectedly, the double bond linking the pyridoxal-phosphate and benzoate moieties was reduced by X-rays to create a covalent linkage of the pyridoxal-phosphate moiety to lysine 120 in the binding groove of 14-3-3, leading to persistent 14-3-3 inactivation. We suggest that FOBISIN101-like molecules could be developed as an entirely unique class of 14-3-3 inhibitors, which may serve as radiation-triggered therapeutic agents for the treatment of 14-3-3-mediated diseases, such as cancer.

  13. Mammalian eyes and associated tissues contain molecules that are immunologically related to cartilage proteoglycan and link protein

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Monospecific antibodies to bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan monomer and link protein were used to demonstrate that immunologically related molecules are present in the bovine eye and associated tissues. With immunofluorescence microscopy, reactions for both proteoglycan and link protein were observed in the sclera, the anterior uveal tract, and the endoneurium of the optic nerve of the central nervous system. Antibody to bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan also reacted with some connective tissue sheaths of rectus muscle and the perineurium of the optic nerve of the central nervous system. Antibody to proteoglycan purified from rat brain cross-reacted with bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan, indicating structural similarities between these proteoglycans. ELISA studies and crossed immunoelectrophoresis demonstrated that purified dermatan sulphate proteoglycans isolated from bovine sclera did not react with these antibodies but that the antibody to cartilage proteoglycan reacted with other molecules extracted from sclera. Two molecular species resembling bovine nasal link protein in size and reactivity with antibody were also demonstrated in scleral extracts: the larger molecule was more common. Antibody to link protein reacted with the media of arterial vessels demonstrating the localization of arterial link protein described earlier. Tissues that were unstained for either molecule included the connective tissue stroma of the iris, retina, vitreous body, cornea, and the remainder of the uveal tract. These observations clearly demonstrate that tissues other than cartilage contain molecules that are immunologically related to cartilage-derived proteoglycans and link proteins. PMID:7119004

  14. Evaluation of Fluorophores to Label SNAP-Tag Fused Proteins for Multicolor Single-Molecule Tracking Microscopy in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Peter J.; Corrêa, Ivan R.; Sonntag, Michael H.; Ibach, Jenny; Brunsveld, Luc; Kanger, Johannes S.; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule tracking has become a widely used technique for studying protein dynamics and their organization in the complex environment of the cell. In particular, the spatiotemporal distribution of membrane receptors is an active field of study due to its putative role in the regulation of signal transduction. The SNAP-tag is an intrinsically monovalent and highly specific genetic tag for attaching a fluorescent label to a protein of interest. Little information is currently available on the choice of optimal fluorescent dyes for single-molecule microscopy utilizing the SNAP-tag labeling system. We surveyed 6 green and 16 red excitable dyes for their suitability in single-molecule microscopy of SNAP-tag fusion proteins in live cells. We determined the nonspecific binding levels and photostability of these dye conjugates when bound to a SNAP-tag fused membrane protein in live cells. We found that only a limited subset of the dyes tested is suitable for single-molecule tracking microscopy. The results show that a careful choice of the dye to conjugate to the SNAP-substrate to label SNAP-tag fusion proteins is very important, as many dyes suffer from either rapid photobleaching or high nonspecific staining. These characteristics appear to be unpredictable, which motivated the need to perform the systematic survey presented here. We have developed a protocol for evaluating the best dyes, and for the conditions that we evaluated, we find that Dy 549 and CF 640 are the best choices tested for single-molecule tracking. Using an optimal dye pair, we also demonstrate the possibility of dual-color single-molecule imaging of SNAP-tag fusion proteins. This survey provides an overview of the photophysical and imaging properties of a range of SNAP-tag fluorescent substrates, enabling the selection of optimal dyes and conditions for single-molecule imaging of SNAP-tagged fusion proteins in eukaryotic cell lines. PMID:25140415

  15. Mechanical Folding and Unfolding of Protein Barnase at the Single-Molecule Level

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, Anna; Rey-Serra, Blanca; Frutos, Silvia; Cecconi, Ciro; Ritort, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The unfolding and folding of protein barnase has been extensively investigated in bulk conditions under the effect of denaturant and temperature. These experiments provided information about structural and kinetic features of both the native and the unfolded states of the protein, and debates about the possible existence of an intermediate state in the folding pathway have arisen. Here, we investigate the folding/unfolding reaction of protein barnase under the action of mechanical force at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers. We measure unfolding and folding force-dependent kinetic rates from pulling and passive experiments, respectively, and using Kramers-based theories (e.g., Bell-Evans and Dudko-Hummer-Szabo models), we extract the position of the transition state and the height of the kinetic barrier mediating unfolding and folding transitions, finding good agreement with previous bulk measurements. Measurements of the force-dependent kinetic barrier using the continuous effective barrier analysis show that protein barnase verifies the Leffler-Hammond postulate under applied force and allow us to extract its free energy of folding, ΔG0. The estimated value of ΔG0 is in agreement with our predictions obtained using fluctuation relations and previous bulk studies. To address the possible existence of an intermediate state on the folding pathway, we measure the power spectrum of force fluctuations at high temporal resolution (50 kHz) when the protein is either folded or unfolded and, additionally, we study the folding transition-path time at different forces. The finite bandwidth of our experimental setup sets the lifetime of potential intermediate states upon barnase folding/unfolding in the submillisecond timescale. PMID:26745410

  16. Nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins revealed by single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chamma, Ingrid; Levet, Florian; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    The advent of superresolution imaging has created a strong need for both optimized labeling strategies and analysis methods to probe the nanoscale organization of complex biological structures. We present a thorough description of the distribution of synaptic adhesion proteins at the nanoscopic scale, namely presynaptic neurexin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]), and its two postsynaptic binding partners neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2). We monitored these proteins in the membrane of neurons by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, after live surface labeling with Alexa647-conjugated monomeric streptavidin. The small probe ([Formula: see text]) efficiently penetrates into crowded synaptic junctions and reduces the distance to target. We quantified the organization of the single-molecule localization data using a tesselation-based analysis technique. We show that Nlg1 exhibits a fairly disperse organization within dendritic spines, while LRRTM2 is organized in compact domains, and [Formula: see text] in presynaptic terminals displays a dual-organization pattern intermediate between that of Nlg1 and LRRTM2. These results suggest that part of [Formula: see text] interacts transsynaptically with Nlg1 and the other part with LRRTM2.

  17. An icosahedral virus as a fluorescent calibration standard: a method for counting protein molecules in cells by fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M

    2017-03-22

    The ability to replace genes coding for cellular proteins with DNA that codes for fluorescent protein-tagged versions opens the way to counting the number of molecules of each protein component of macromolecular assemblies in vivo by measuring fluorescence microscopically. Converting fluorescence to absolute numbers of molecules requires a fluorescent standard whose molecular composition is known precisely. In this report, the construction, properties and mode of using a set of fluorescence calibration standards are described. The standards are based on an icosahedral virus engineered to contain exactly 240 copies of one of seven different fluorescent proteins. Two applications of the fluorescent standards to counting molecules in the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii are described. Methods for improving the preciseness of the measurements and minimizing potential inaccuracies are emphasized.

  18. Force microscopy imaging of individual protein molecules with sub-pico Newton force sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shivprasad; Martinez, Nicolas F; Lozano, Jose R; Garcia, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    The capability of atomic force microscopes (AFM) to generate atomic or nanoscale resolution images of surfaces has deeply transformed the study of materials. However, high resolution imaging of biological systems has proved more difficult than obtaining atomic resolution images of crystalline surfaces. In many cases, the forces exerted by the tip on the molecules (1-10 nN) either displace them laterally or break the noncovalent bonds that hold the biomolecules together. Here, we apply a force microscope concept based on the simultaneous excitation of the first two flexural modes of the cantilever. The coupling of the modes generated by the tip-molecule forces enables imaging under the application of forces ( approximately 35 pN) which are smaller than those needed to break noncovalent bonds. With this instrument we have resolved the intramolecular structure of antibodies in monomer and pentameric forms. Furthermore, the instrument has a force sensitivity of 0.2 pN which enables the identification of compositional changes along the protein fragments.

  19. Quantitative single-molecule detection of protein based on DNA tetrahedron fluorescent nanolabels.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongshun; Liu, Xingti; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    A highly sensitive method for single-molecule quantitative detection of human IgG is presented by the employment of a new fluorescent nanolabel. In this method, fluorescent nanolabels were assembled by inserting SYBR Green I into DNA tetrahedron nanostructure. The bio-nanolabels were attached to the streptavidin-antihuman antibody by a specific reaction between biotin and streptavidin. The antibody was combined with the target antigen, human IgG, which was immobilized on the silanized glass subtrate surface. Finally, epi-fluorescence microscopy (EFM) coupled with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device was employed for fluorescence imaging. The fluorescent spots corresponding to single protein molecule on images were counted and further used for the quantitative detection. It was found that the new nanolabel shows good photostability, biocompatiblity and exhibits no blinking compared to traditional labels like fluorescence dyes and quantum dot (QDs). In addition, the number of fluorescence spots on the images has a linear relationship with the concentration of human IgG in the range of 3.0×10(-14) to 1.0×10(-12)mol L(-1). What is more, this method showed an excellent specificity and a low matrix effect.

  20. Direct and Propagated Effects of Small Molecules on Protein–Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cesa, Laura C.; Mapp, Anna K.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Networks of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) link all aspects of cellular biology. Dysfunction in the assembly or dynamics of PPI networks is a hallmark of human disease, and as such, there is growing interest in the discovery of small molecules that either promote or inhibit PPIs. PPIs were once considered undruggable because of their relatively large buried surface areas and difficult topologies. Despite these challenges, recent advances in chemical screening methodologies, combined with improvements in structural and computational biology have made some of these targets more tractable. In this review, we highlight developments that have opened the door to potent chemical modulators. We focus on how allostery is being used to produce surprisingly robust changes in PPIs, even for the most challenging targets. We also discuss how interfering with one PPI can propagate changes through the broader web of interactions. Through this analysis, it is becoming clear that a combination of direct and propagated effects on PPI networks is ultimately how small molecules re-shape biology. PMID:26380257

  1. Localization of a molecule immunochemically similar to eosinophil major basic protein in human placenta

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We have recently reported that human pregnancy is characterized by a 10- to 20-fold elevation of eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) immunoreactivity in maternal blood. Here we show, by immunofluorescence, that placental tissue specifically binds antibody to MBP in and around the placental X cells and placental-site giant cells and, using thin plastic sections, that placenta has no infiltrating eosinophils. The X cells line the inner aspects of placental septal cysts, and the cyst fluid, obtained by aspiration, contains immunoreactive MBP at concentrations of 100 micrograms/ml, a sixfold greater concentration than the highest levels measured in maternal blood. The soluble MBP immunoreactivities in placental homogenates and in maternal serum chromatograph identically on Sephadex G-50, and both these gestational MBP molecules migrate as though substantially larger than the MBP found in serum from patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome or purified from the eosinophil granule. Our inability to demonstrate eosinophils in maternal blood or placental tissue, coupled with the large quantities of immunoreactive MBP highly localized in placental cysts and the chromatographic behavior of this molecule, suggest that the MBP detected in human gestation is produced by placenta. PMID:6376683

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging of Individual Amyloid Protein Aggregates in Human Biofluids.

    PubMed

    Horrocks, Mathew H; Lee, Steven F; Gandhi, Sonia; Magdalinou, Nadia K; Chen, Serene W; Devine, Michael J; Tosatto, Laura; Kjaergaard, Magnus; Beckwith, Joseph S; Zetterberg, Henrik; Iljina, Marija; Cremades, Nunilo; Dobson, Christopher M; Wood, Nicholas W; Klenerman, David

    2016-03-16

    The misfolding and aggregation of proteins into amyloid fibrils characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. We report here a method, termed SAVE (single aggregate visualization by enhancement) imaging, for the ultrasensitive detection of individual amyloid fibrils and oligomers using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that this method is able to detect the presence of amyloid aggregates of α-synuclein, tau, and amyloid-β. In addition, we show that aggregates can also be identified in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Significantly, we see a twofold increase in the average aggregate concentration in CSF from Parkinson's disease patients compared to age-matched controls. Taken together, we conclude that this method provides an opportunity to characterize the structural nature of amyloid aggregates in a key biofluid, and therefore has the potential to study disease progression in both animal models and humans to enhance our understanding of neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Single-Molecule Imaging of Individual Amyloid Protein Aggregates in Human Biofluids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of proteins into amyloid fibrils characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. We report here a method, termed SAVE (single aggregate visualization by enhancement) imaging, for the ultrasensitive detection of individual amyloid fibrils and oligomers using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that this method is able to detect the presence of amyloid aggregates of α-synuclein, tau, and amyloid-β. In addition, we show that aggregates can also be identified in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Significantly, we see a twofold increase in the average aggregate concentration in CSF from Parkinson’s disease patients compared to age-matched controls. Taken together, we conclude that this method provides an opportunity to characterize the structural nature of amyloid aggregates in a key biofluid, and therefore has the potential to study disease progression in both animal models and humans to enhance our understanding of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26800462

  4. Discovery of a Structurally Unique Small Molecule that Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Durga; Tae, Hyun Seop

    2017-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing natural products and synthetic small molecules that inhibit biochemical processes such as ribosomal translation can lead to novel sources of molecular probes and therapeutics. The search for new antibiotics has been invigorated by the increasing burden of drug-resistant bacteria and has identified many clinically essential prokaryote-specific ribosome inhibitors. However, the current cohort of antibiotics is limited with regards to bacterial resistance mechanisms because of structural similarity within classes. From a high-throughput screen for translation inhibitors, we discovered a new compound, T6102, which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis in vitro, inhibits bacterial growth of Bacillus subtilis in vivo, and has a chemical structure that appears to be unique among known classes of translation-inhibiting antibiotics. T6102’s unique structure compared to current clinically-utilized antibiotics makes it an exciting new candidate for the development of next-generation antibiotics. PMID:28356892

  5. Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru; Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Jae-won, Chang; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku; Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Yagi, Naoto

    2013-10-15

    Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10–20 keV (△E/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

  6. Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Jae-won, Chang; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku; Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2013-10-01

    Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10-20 keV (△E/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

  7. Interactions of DNA binding proteins with G-Quadruplex structures at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sujay

    Guanine-rich nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences can form non-canonical secondary structures, known as G-quadruplex (GQ). Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated formation of these structures in telomeric and non-telomeric regions of the genome. Telomeric GQs protect the chromosome ends whereas non-telomeric GQs either act as road blocks or recognition sites for DNA metabolic machinery. These observations suggest the significance of these structures in regulation of different metabolic processes, such as replication and repair. GQs are typically thermodynamically more stable than the corresponding Watson-Crick base pairing formed by G-rich and C-rich strands, making protein activity a crucial factor for their destabilization. Inside the cell, GQs interact with different proteins and their enzymatic activity is the determining factor for their stability. We studied interactions of several proteins with GQs to understand the underlying principles of protein-GQ interactions using single-molecule FRET and other biophysical techniques. Replication Protein-A (RPA), a single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is known to posses GQ unfolding activity. First, we compared the thermal stability of three potentially GQ-forming DNA sequences (PQS) to their stability against RPA-mediated unfolding. One of these sequences is the human telomeric repeat and the other two, located in the promoter region of tyrosine hydroxylase gene, are highly heterogeneous sequences that better represent PQS in the genome. The thermal stability of these structures do not necessarily correlate with their stability against protein-mediated unfolding. We conclude that thermal stability is not necessarily an adequate criterion for predicting the physiological viability of GQ structures. To determine the critical structural factors that influence protein-GQ interactions we studied two groups of GQ structures that have systematically varying loop lengths and number of G-tetrad layers. We

  8. Resistance exercise volume affects myofibrillar protein synthesis and anabolic signalling molecule phosphorylation in young men

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Nicholas A; Holwerda, Andrew M; Selby, Keegan C; West, Daniel W D; Staples, Aaron W; Cain, Nathan E; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Potvin, James R; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to determine if any mechanistic differences exist between a single set (1SET) and multiple sets (i.e. 3 sets; 3SET) of resistance exercise by utilizing a primed constant infusion of [ring-13C6]phenylalanine to determine myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and Western blot analysis to examine anabolic signalling molecule phosphorylation following an acute bout of resistance exercise. Eight resistance-trained men (24 ± 5 years, BMI = 25 ± 4 kg m−2) were randomly assigned to perform unilateral leg extension exercise at 70% concentric one repetition maximum (1RM) until volitional fatigue for 1SET or 3SET. Biopsies from the vastus lateralis were taken in the fasted state (Fast) and fed state (Fed; 20 g of whey protein isolate) at rest, 5 h Fed, 24 h Fast and 29 h Fed post-exercise. Fed-state MPS was transiently elevated above rest at 5 h for 1SET (2.3-fold) and returned to resting levels by 29 h post-exercise. However, the exercise induced increase in MPS following 3SET was superior in amplitude and duration as compared to 1SET at both 5 h (3.1-fold above rest) and 29 h post-exercise (2.3-fold above rest). Phosphorylation of 70 kDa S6 protein kinase (p70S6K) demonstrated a coordinated increase with MPS at 5 h and 29 h post-exercise such that the extent of p70S6K phosphorylation was related to the MPS response (r = 0.338, P = 0.033). Phosphorylation of 90 kDa ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p90RSK) and ribosomal protein S6 (rps6) was similar for 1SET and 3SET at 24 h Fast and 29 h Fed, respectively. However, 3SET induced a greater activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2Bɛ (eIF2Bɛ) and rpS6 at 5 h Fed. These data suggest that 3SET of resistance exercise is more anabolic than 1SET and may lead to greater increases in myofibrillar protein accretion over time. PMID:20581041

  9. A proactive role of water molecules in acceptor recognition by protein O-fucosyltransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Valero-González, Jessika; Leonhard-Melief, Christina; Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Hernández-Ruiz, Cristina; Pallarés, María Carmen; Yruela, Inmaculada; Vasudevan, Deepika; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    Protein O-fucosyltransferase 2 (POFUT2) is an essential enzyme that fucosylates serine and threonine residues of folded thrombospondin type 1 repeats (TSRs). To date, the mechanism by which this enzyme recognizes very dissimilar TSRs has been unclear. By engineering a fusion protein, we report the crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans POFUT2 (CePOFUT2) in complex with GDP and human TSR1 that suggests an inverting mechanism for fucose transfer assisted by a catalytic base and shows that nearly half of the TSR1 is embraced by CePOFUT2. A small number of direct interactions and a large network of water molecules maintain the complex. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that POFUT2 fucosylates threonine preferentially over serine and relies on folded TSRs containing the minimal consensus sequence C-X-X-S/T-C. Crystallographic and mutagenesis data, together with atomic-level simulations, uncover a binding mechanism by which POFUT2 promiscuously recognizes the structural fingerprint of poorly homologous TSRs through a dynamic network of water-mediated interactions.

  10. A curated census of autophagy-modulating proteins and small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Philip L; Claerhout, Sofie; Mills, Gordon B; Weinstein, John N

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a programmed process in which cell contents are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, appears to have both tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting functions; both stimulation and inhibition of autophagy have been reported to induce cancer cell death, and particular genes and proteins have been associated both positively and negatively with autophagy. To provide a basis for incisive analysis of those complexities and ambiguities and to guide development of new autophagy-targeted treatments for cancer, we have compiled a comprehensive, curated inventory of autophagy modulators by integrating information from published siRNA screens, multiple pathway analysis algorithms, and extensive, manually curated text-mining of the literature. The resulting inventory includes 739 proteins and 385 chemicals (including drugs, small molecules, and metabolites). Because autophagy is still at an early stage of investigation, we provide extensive analysis of our sources of information and their complex relationships with each other. We conclude with a discussion of novel strategies that could potentially be used to target autophagy for cancer therapy. PMID:24906121

  11. Myelin Basic Protein Cleaves Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 and Promotes Neuritogenesis and Cell Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, David; Loers, Gabriele; Kleene, Ralf; Oezen, Iris; Kataria, Hardeep; Katagihallimath, Nainesh; Braren, Ingke; Harauz, George; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    The cell adhesion molecule L1 is a Lewisx-carrying glycoprotein that plays important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Here we show that myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to L1 in a Lewisx-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MBP is released by murine cerebellar neurons as a sumoylated dynamin-containing protein upon L1 stimulation and that this MBP cleaves L1 as a serine protease in the L1 extracellular domain at Arg687 yielding a transmembrane fragment that promotes neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cell culture. L1-induced neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival are reduced in MBP-deficient cerebellar neurons and in wild-type cerebellar neurons in the presence of an MBP antibody or L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site. Genetic ablation of MBP in shiverer mice and mutagenesis of the proteolytically active site in MBP or of the MBP cleavage site within L1 as well as serine protease inhibitors and an L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site abolish generation of the L1 fragment. Our findings provide evidence for novel functions of MBP in the nervous system. PMID:24671420

  12. Single molecule compression reveals intra-protein forces drive cytotoxin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Sun, Jielin; Shen, Yi; Shao, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a prototypical member of a large family of pore-forming proteins that undergo a significant reduction in height during the transition from the membrane-assembled prepore to the membrane-inserted pore. Here, we show that targeted application of compressive forces can catalyze this conformational change in individual PFO complexes trapped at the prepore stage, recapitulating this critical step of the spontaneous process. The free energy landscape determined from these measurements is in good agreement with that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations showing that an equivalent internal force is generated by the interaction of the exposed hydrophobic residues with the membrane. This hydrophobic force is transmitted across the entire structure to produce a compressive stress across a distant, otherwise stable domain, catalyzing its transition from an extended to compact conformation. Single molecule compression is likely to become an important tool to investigate conformational transitions in membrane proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08421.001 PMID:26652734

  13. A proactive role of water molecules in acceptor recognition by Protein-O-fucosyltransferase 2

    PubMed Central

    Valero-González, Jessika; Leonhard-Melief, Christina; Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Hernández-Ruiz, Cristina; Pallarés, María Carmen; Yruela, Inmaculada; Vasudevan, Deepika; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Haltiwanger, Robert S.; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Protein O-fucosyltransferase 2 (POFUT2) is an essential enzyme that fucosylates serine/threonine residues of folded thrombospondin type 1 repeats (TSRs). To date, the mechanism by which this enzyme recognizes very dissimilar TSRs remained unclear. By engineering of a fusion protein, we report the crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans POFUT2 (CePOFUT2) in complex with GDP and human TSR1 that suggests an inverting mechanism for fucose transfer assisted by a catalytic base, and shows that nearly half of the TSR1 is embraced by CePOFUT2. A small number of direct interactions and a large network of water molecules maintain the complex. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that POFUT2 fucosylates threonine preferentially over serine and relies on folded TSRs containing the minimal consensus sequence CXX(S/T)C. Crystallographic and mutagenesis data together with atomic-level simulations uncover an unprecedented binding mechanism by which POFUT2 promiscuously recognizes the structural fingerprint of poorly homologous TSRs through a dynamic network of water-mediated interactions. PMID:26854667

  14. Mechanism of amyloid β-protein dimerization determined using single-molecule AFM force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhengjian; Roychaudhuri, Robin; Condron, Margaret M.; Teplow, David B.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-10-01

    Aβ42 and Aβ40 are the two primary alloforms of human amyloid β-protein (Aβ). The two additional C-terminal residues of Aβ42 result in elevated neurotoxicity compared with Aβ40, but the molecular mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule force microscopy to characterize interpeptide interactions for Aβ42 and Aβ40 and corresponding mutants. We discovered a dramatic difference in the interaction patterns of Aβ42 and Aβ40 monomers within dimers. Although the sequence difference between the two peptides is at the C-termini, the N-terminal segment plays a key role in the peptide interaction in the dimers. This is an unexpected finding as N-terminal was considered as disordered segment with no effect on the Aβ peptide aggregation. These novel properties of Aβ proteins suggests that the stabilization of N-terminal interactions is a switch in redirecting of amyloids form the neurotoxic aggregation pathway, opening a novel avenue for the disease preventions and treatments.

  15. Latent membrane protein 1 of Epstein-Barr virus mimics a constitutively active receptor molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Gires, O; Zimber-Strobl, U; Gonnella, R; Ueffing, M; Marschall, G; Zeidler, R; Pich, D; Hammerschmidt, W

    1997-01-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an integral membrane protein which has transforming potential and is necessary but not sufficient for B-cell immortalization by EBV. LMP1 molecules aggregate in the plasma membrane and recruit tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R) -associated factors (TRAFs) which are presumably involved in the signalling cascade leading to NF-kappaB activation by LMP1. Comparable activities are mediated by CD40 and other members of the TNF-R family, which implies that LMP1 could function as a receptor. LMP1 lacks extended extracellular domains similar to beta-adrenergic receptors but, in contrast, it also lacks any motifs involved in ligand binding. By using LMP1 mutants which can be oligomerized at will, we show that the function of LMP1 in 293 cells and B cells is solely dependent on oligomerization of its carboxy-terminus. Biochemically, oligomerization is an intrinsic property of the transmembrane domain of wild-type LMP1 and causes a constitutive phenotype which can be conferred to the signalling domains of CD40 or the TNF-2 receptor. In EBV, immortalized B cells cross-linking in conjunction with membrane targeting of the carboxy-terminal signalling domain of LMP1 is sufficient for its biological activities. Thus, LMP1 acts like a constitutively activated receptor whose biological activities are ligand-independent. PMID:9359753

  16. Repulsive Guidance Molecule is a structural bridge between Neogenin and Bone Morphogenetic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Eleanor G.; Bishop, Benjamin; Elegheert, Jonathan; Bell, Christian H.; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Siebold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) control crucial processes spanning cell motility, adhesion, immune cell regulation and systemic iron metabolism. RGMs signal via two fundamental signaling cascades: the Neogenin (NEO1) and the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathways. Here, we report crystal structures of the N-terminal domains of all human RGM family members in complex with the BMP ligand BMP2, revealing a novel protein fold and a conserved BMP-binding mode. Our structural and functional data suggest a pH-linked mechanism for RGM-activated BMP signaling and offer a rationale for RGM mutations causing juvenile hemochromatosis. We also determined the ternary BMP2–RGM–NEO1 complex crystal structure, which combined with solution scattering and live-cell super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, indicates BMP-induced clustering of the RGM–NEO1 complex. Our results show how RGM acts as the central hub linking BMP and NEO1 and physically connecting these fundamental signaling pathways. PMID:25938661

  17. Fluorescence response profiling for small molecule sensors utilizing the green fluorescent protein chromophore and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Baldridge, Anthony; Feng, Suihan; SiQiang, Yang; Kim, Yun Kyung; Tolbert, Laren M; Chang, Young-Tae

    2011-01-10

    Using a fluorescence response profile, a systematic examination was performed for synthetic chromophores of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to discover new small molecule sensors. A group of 41 benzylideneimidazolinone compounds (BDI) was prepared and screened toward 94 biologically relevant analytes to generate fluorescence response profiles. From the response pattern, compounds containing aminobenzyl and heteroaromatic cyclic substructures revealed a pH dependent emission decrease effect, and unlike other fluorescence scaffolds, most BDIs showed fluorescence quenching when mixed with proteins. On the basis of the primary response profile, we obtained three selective fluorescence turn-on sensors for pH, human serum albumin (HSA), and total ribonucleic acid (RNA). Following analysis, a fluorescence response profile testing four nucleic acids revealed the alkyloxy (Ph-OR) functional group in the para position of benzyl analogues contributes to RNA selectivity. Among the primary hit compounds, BDI 2 showed outstanding selectivity toward total RNA with 5-fold emission enhancement. Finally, BDI 24 showed selective fluorescence increase to HSA (K(d) = 3.57 μM) with a blue-shifted emission max wavelength (Δλ(em) = 15 nm). These examples of fluorescence sensor discovery by large-scale fluorescence response profiling demonstrate the general applicability of this approach and the usefulness of the response profiles.

  18. A noncanonical function of sortase enables site-specific conjugation of small molecules to lysine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Joseph J; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-07

    We provide the first demonstration that isopeptide ligation, a noncanonical activity of the enzyme sortase A, can be used to modify recombinant proteins. This reaction was used in vitro to conjugate small molecules to a peptide, an engineered targeting protein, and a full-length monoclonal antibody with an exquisite level of control over the site of conjugation. Attachment to the protein substrate occurred exclusively through isopeptide bonds at a lysine ε-amino group within a specific amino acid sequence. This reaction allows more than one molecule to be site-specifically conjugated to a protein at internal sites, thereby overcoming significant limitations of the canonical native peptide ligation reaction catalyzed by sortase A. Our method provides a unique chemical ligation procedure that is orthogonal to existing methods, supplying a new method to site-specifically modify lysine residues that will be a valuable addition to the protein conjugation toolbox.

  19. Anion exchange membrane adsorbers for flow-through polishing steps: Part II. Virus, host cell protein, DNA clearance, and antibody recovery.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Justin; Husson, Scott M; Murphy, Louise; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil

    2013-02-01

    Anion exchange membrane adsorbers are used for contaminant removal in flow-through polishing steps in the manufacture of biopharmaceuticals. This contribution describes the clearance of minute virus of mice, DNA, and host cell proteins by three commercially available anion-exchange membranes: Sartobind Q, Mustang Q, and ChromaSorb. The Sartobind Q and Mustang Q products contain quaternary amine ligands; whereas, ChromaSorb contains primary amine based ligands. Performance was evaluated over a range of solution conditions: 0-200 mM NaCl, pH 6.0-9.0, and flow rates of 4-20 membrane volumes/min in the presence and absence of up to 50 mM phosphate and acetate. In addition contaminant clearance was determined in the presence and absence of 5 g/L monoclonal antibody. The quaternary amine based ligands depend mainly on Coulombic interactions for removal of negatively charged contaminants. Consequently, performance of Sartobind Q and Mustang Q was compromised at high ionic strength. Primary amine based ligands in ChromaSorb enable high capacities at high ionic strength due to the presence of secondary, hydrogen bonding interactions. However, the presence of hydrogen phosphate ions leads to reduced capacity. Monoclonal antibody recovery using primary amine based anion-exchange ligands may be lower if significant binding occurs due to secondary interactions. The removal of a specific contaminant is affected by the level of removal of the other contaminants. The results of this study may be used to help guide selection of commercially available membrane absorbers for flow-through polishing steps.

  20. Probing ion-molecule structure and dynamics in isolated molecular clusters and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Yohannes

    Ion-molecule interactions in isolated molecular clusters and proteins are studied in this work using experimental and theoretical methods. Photodissociation spectroscopy and chemical dynamics of several metal ion-molecule clusters are studied. The experimental tool used for these studies is an Angular Reflectron Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometer (ARTOFMS). The experimental work is supported by ab initio electronic structure calculations on the Gaussian and GAMESS platforms. This work also describes a computational study of the interaction of protonated histidine with other aromatic residues in proteins. We have studied the photodissociation spectroscopy of weakly bound Zn +(H2O) and Zn+(D2O) bimolecular complexes. We assign two molecular absorption bands in the near UV correlating to Zn+ (4s-4p)-metal centered transitions, and identify vibrational progressions associated with both intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational modes of the cluster. Partially resolved rotational structure is consistent with a C2 V equilibrium complex geometry. The photodissociation spectroscopy and chemical dynamics of Zn +-formaldehyde and Zn+-acetaldehyde clusters are investigated in the near UV spectral range. The work is also supported by ab initio electronic structure calculations to study the ground-state bonding and interactions in the low-lying doublet excited states. We identify absorption bands corresponding to photoinduced charge transfer, Zn+(4s-4p)-based transitions, and aldehyde-based excitations. We propose a reaction mechanism for the reactive dissociation that proceeds via H-atom abstraction on the charge-transfer surface. This work shows important differences with results from earlier experiments on Mg+- and Ca+-aldehyde complexes despite the similar valence character for these metal ions. In the study of Mg+-acetic acid we observe three distinct absorption bands, two red-shifted and one blue-shifted from the Mg +(3s ← 3p) resonance at 280 nm (35714 cm-1). We

  1. Label-free detection of protein molecules secreted from an organ-on-a-chip model for drug toxicity assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Andres W.; Zhang, Yu S.; Aleman, Julio; Alerasool, Parissa; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ye, Jing Yong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical attrition is about 30% from failure of drug candidates due to toxic side effects, increasing the drug development costs significantly and slowing down the drug discovery process. This partly originates from the fact that the animal models do not accurately represent human physiology. Hence there is a clear unmet need for developing drug toxicity assays using human-based models that are complementary to traditional animal models before starting expensive clinical trials. Organ-on-a-chip techniques developed in recent years have generated a variety of human organ models mimicking different human physiological conditions. However, it is extremely challenging to monitor the transient and long-term response of the organ models to drug treatments during drug toxicity tests. First, when an organ-on-a-chip model interacts with drugs, a certain amount of protein molecules may be released into the medium due to certain drug effects, but the amount of the protein molecules is limited, since the organ tissue grown inside microfluidic bioreactors have minimum volume. Second, traditional fluorescence techniques cannot be utilized for real-time monitoring of the concentration of the protein molecules, because the protein molecules are continuously secreted from the tissue and it is practically impossible to achieve fluorescence labeling in the dynamically changing environment. Therefore, direct measurements of the secreted protein molecules with a label-free approach is strongly desired for organs-on-a-chip applications. In this paper, we report the development of a photonic crystal-based biosensor for label-free assays of secreted protein molecules from a liver-on-a-chip model. Ultrahigh detection sensitivity and specificity have been demonstrated.

  2. Antiviral Activity of a Small Molecule Deubiquitinase Inhibitor Occurs via Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jeffrey W.; Ahmed, Mohammad; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Donato, Nicholas J.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Wobus, Christiane E.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub) cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs). However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR). WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies. PMID:22792064

  3. Antiviral activity of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor occurs via induction of the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jeffrey W; Ahmed, Mohammad; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub) cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs). However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR). WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies.

  4. Single-Molecule Dynamics Reveals Cooperative Binding-Folding in Protein Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jin; Lu, Qiang N.; Lu, H PETER.

    2006-07-01

    The study of associations between two biomolecules is the key to understand molecular recognition and function. Molecular function is often thought to be determined by the underlying structures. Here, combining single molecule study of protein binding with an energy landscape inspired microscopic model, we found strong evidences that bio-molecular recognition is determined by flexibilities in addition to structures. Our model is based on coarse grained molecular dynamics performed on the residue level with the energy function biased towards the native binding structure (Go model). With our model, the underlying free energy landscape of the binding can be explored. Two distinct conformational states as free energy minimum, one with partially folding of CBD and significant binding of CBD to CDC42, and another with native folding of CBD and native binding of CBD to CDC42, are clearly seen. This shows the binding process proceeds with significant interface binding of CBD with CDC42 first without complete folding of CBD. Finally binding and folding are coupled with each other cooperatively to reach the native binding state. The single molecule experimental finding of the dynamic fluctuations between the loosely bound and closely bound conformational states can be identified with theoretically calculated free energy minimum and quantitatively explained in our model as a result of binding associated with large conformational changes. Theoretical predictions have identified certain key residues for binding which are consistent with mutational experiments. The combined study provides a test ground for fundamental mechanisms as well as insights into design and further explorations on biomolecular recognition with large conformational changes.

  5. Distribution patterns of small-molecule ligands in the protein universe and implications for origin of life and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong-Fang; Kong, De-Xin; Shen, Liang; Chen, Ling-Ling; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Background Extant life depends greatly on the binding of small molecules (such as ligands) with macromolecules (such as proteins), and one ligand can bind multiple proteins. However, little is known about the global patterns of ligand-protein mapping. Results By examining 2,186 well-defined small-molecule ligands and thousands of protein domains derived from a database of druggable binding sites, we show that a few ligands bind tens of protein domains or folds, whereas most ligands bind only one, which indicates that ligand-protein mapping follows a power law. Through assigning the protein-binding orders (early or late) for bio-ligands, we demonstrate that the preferential attachment principle still holds for the power-law relation between ligands and proteins. We also found that polar molecular surface area, H-bond acceptor counts, H-bond donor counts and partition coefficient are potential factors to discriminate ligands from ordinary molecules and to differentiate super ligands (shared by three or more folds) from others. Conclusion These findings have significant implications for evolution and drug discovery. First, the chronology of ligand-protein binding can be inferred by the power-law feature of ligand-protein mapping. Some nucleotide-containing ligands, such as ATP, ADP, GDP, NAD, FAD, dihydro-nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide phosphate (NDP), nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide phosphate (NAP), flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and AMP, are found to be the earliest cofactors bound to proteins, agreeing with the current understanding of evolutionary history. Second, the finding that about 30% of ligands are shared by two or more domains will help with drug discovery, such as in finding new functions from old drugs, developing promiscuous drugs and depending more on natural products. PMID:17727706

  6. Single molecule spectroscopic characterization of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed) from the Anthozoa coral Heteractis crispa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi; Whitier, Jennifer E.; Werner, James H.; De Schryver, Frans C.; Hofkens, Johan; Goodwin, Peter M.

    2006-02-01

    We report on the photophysical properties of a far-red intrinsic fluorescent protein by means of single molecule and ensemble spectroscopic methods. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria is a popular fluorescent marker with genetically encoded fluorescence and which can be fused to any biological structure without affecting its function. GFP and its variants provide emission colors from blue to yellowish green. Red intrinsic fluorescent proteins from Anthozoa species represent a recent addition to the emission color palette provided by GFPs. Red intrinsic fluorescent markers are on high demand in protein-protein interaction studies based on fluorescence-resonance energy transfer or in multicolor tracking studies or in cellular investigations where autofluorescence possesses a problem. Here we address the photophysical properties of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed), a mutant engineered from a chromoprotein cloned from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa, by using a combination of ensemble and single molecule spectroscopic methods. We show evidence for the presence of HcRed protein as an oligomer and for incomplete maturation of its chromophore. Incomplete maturation results in the presence of an immature (yellow) species absorbing/fluorescing at 490/530-nm. This yellow chromophore is involved in a fast resonance-energy transfer with the mature (purple) chromophore. The mature chromophore of HcRed is found to adopt two conformations, a Transoriented form absorbing and 565-nm and non-fluorescent in solution and a Cis-oriented form absorbing at 590-nm and emitting at 645-nm. These two forms co-exist in solution in thermal equilibrium. Excitation-power dependence fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of HcRed shows evidence for singlet-triplet transitions in the microseconds time scale and for cis-trans isomerization occurring in a time scale of tens of microseconds. Single molecule fluorescence data recorded from immobilized HcRed proteins, all

  7. Roadmap to cellular reprogramming--manipulating transcriptional networks with DNA, RNA, proteins and small molecules.

    PubMed

    Wörsdörfer, P; Thier, M; Kadari, A; Edenhofer, F

    2013-06-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that the plasticity of mammalian somatic cells is much higher than previously assumed and that ectopic expression of transcription factors may have the potential to induce the conversion of any cell type into another. Fibroblast cells can be converted into embryonic stem cell-like cells, neural cells, cardiomyocytes, macrophage-like cells as well as blood progenitors. Additionally, the conversion of astrocytes into neurons or neural stem cells into monocytes has been demonstrated. Nowadays, in the era of systems biology, continuously growing holistic data sets are providing increasing insights into core transcriptional networks and cellular signaling pathways. This knowledge enables cell biologists to understand how cellular fate is determined and how it could be manipulated. As a consequence for biomedical applications, it might be soon possible to convert patient specific somatic cells directly into desired transplantable other cell types. The clinical value, however, of such reprogrammed cells is currently limited due to the invasiveness of methods applied to induce reprogramming factor activity. This review will focus on experimental strategies to ectopically induce cell fate modulators. We will emphasize those strategies that enable efficient and robust overexpression of transcription factors by minimal genetic alterations of the host genome. Furthermore, we will discuss procedures devoid of any genomic manipulation, such as the direct delivery of mRNA, proteins, or the use of small molecules. By this, we aim to give a comprehensive overview on state of the art techniques that harbor the potential to generate safe reprogrammed cells for clinical applications.

  8. The Prion Protein Controls Polysialylation of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 during Cellular Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Wang, Hansen; Xi, Zhengrui; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    Despite its multi-faceted role in neurodegenerative diseases, the physiological function of the prion protein (PrP) has remained elusive. On the basis of its evolutionary relationship to ZIP metal ion transporters, we considered that PrP may contribute to the morphogenetic reprogramming of cells underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT). Consistent with this hypothesis, PrP transcription increased more than tenfold during EMT, and stable PrP-deficient cells failed to complete EMT in a mammalian cell model. A global comparative proteomics analysis identified the neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) as a candidate mediator of this impairment, which led to the observation that PrP-deficient cells fail to undergo NCAM1 polysialylation during EMT. Surprisingly, this defect was caused by a perturbed transcription of the polysialyltransferase ST8SIA2 gene. Proteomics data pointed toward β-catenin as a transcriptional regulator affected in PrP-deficient cells. Indeed, pharmacological blockade or siRNA-based knockdown of β-catenin mimicked PrP-deficiency in regards to NCAM1 polysialylation. Our data established the existence of a PrP-ST8SIA2-NCAM signaling loop, merged two mature fields of investigation and offer a simple model for explaining phenotypes linked to PrP. PMID:26288071

  9. The Prion Protein Controls Polysialylation of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 during Cellular Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Wang, Hansen; Xi, Zhengrui; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    Despite its multi-faceted role in neurodegenerative diseases, the physiological function of the prion protein (PrP) has remained elusive. On the basis of its evolutionary relationship to ZIP metal ion transporters, we considered that PrP may contribute to the morphogenetic reprogramming of cells underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT). Consistent with this hypothesis, PrP transcription increased more than tenfold during EMT, and stable PrP-deficient cells failed to complete EMT in a mammalian cell model. A global comparative proteomics analysis identified the neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) as a candidate mediator of this impairment, which led to the observation that PrP-deficient cells fail to undergo NCAM1 polysialylation during EMT. Surprisingly, this defect was caused by a perturbed transcription of the polysialyltransferase ST8SIA2 gene. Proteomics data pointed toward β-catenin as a transcriptional regulator affected in PrP-deficient cells. Indeed, pharmacological blockade or siRNA-based knockdown of β-catenin mimicked PrP-deficiency in regards to NCAM1 polysialylation. Our data established the existence of a PrP-ST8SIA2-NCAM signaling loop, merged two mature fields of investigation and offer a simple model for explaining phenotypes linked to PrP.

  10. Single-molecule detection of proteins with antigen-antibody interaction using resistive-pulse sensing of submicron latex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakura, T.; Yanagi, I.; Goto, Y.; Ishige, Y.; Kohara, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a resistive-pulse sensor with a solid-state pore and measured the latex agglutination of submicron particles induced by antigen-antibody interaction for single-molecule detection of proteins. We fabricated the pore based on numerical simulation to clearly distinguish between monomer and dimer latex particles. By measuring single dimers agglutinated in the single-molecule regime, we detected single human alpha-fetoprotein molecules. Adjusting the initial particle concentration improves the limit of detection (LOD) to 95 fmol/l. We established a theoretical model of the LOD by combining the reaction kinetics and the counting statistics to explain the effect of initial particle concentration on the LOD. The theoretical model shows how to improve the LOD quantitatively. The single-molecule detection studied here indicates the feasibility of implementing a highly sensitive immunoassay by a simple measurement method using resistive-pulse sensing.

  11. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2015-01-01

    Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE) proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) (CRISPR/Cas) system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing. PMID:26404236

  12. A comparison of the fluorescence dynamics of single molecules of a green fluorescent protein: one- versus two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Cotlet, Mircea; Goodwin, Peter M; Waldo, Geoffrey S; Werner, James H

    2006-01-16

    We report on the dynamics of fluorescence from individual molecules of a mutant of the wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria, super folder GFP (SFGFP). SFGFP is a novel and robust variant designed for in vivo high-throughput screening of protein expression levels. It shows increased thermal stability and is able to retain its fluorescence when fused to poorly folding proteins. We use a recently developed single-molecule technique which combines fluorescence-fluctuation spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting in order to characterize the photophysical properties of SFGFP under one- (OPE) and two- (TPE) photon excitation conditions. We use Rhodamine 110 as a model chromophore to validate the methodology and to explain the single-molecule results of SFGFP. Under OPE, single SFGFP molecules undergo fluorescence flickering on the time scale of micros and tens of micros due to triplet formation and ground-state protonation-deprotonation, respectively, as demonstrated by excitation intensity- and pH-dependent experiments. OPE single-molecule fluorescence lifetimes indicate heterogeneity in the population of SFGFP, indicating the presence of the deprotonated I and B forms of the SFGFP chromophore. TPE of single SFGFP molecules results in the photoconversion of the chromophore. TPE of single SFGFP molecules show fluorescence flickering on the time scale of micros due to triplet formation. A flicker connected with protonation-deprotonation of the SFGFP chromophore is detected only at low pH. Our results show that SFGFP is a promising fusion reporter for intracellular applications using OPE and TPE microscopy.

  13. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of <3 μm and 5-7 μm, consistent with the energy level transitions of the excitons. These results were consistent with the experimental data; this consisted of infrared absorption data from collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  14. Human Perivascular Stem Cells Show Enhanced Osteogenesis and Vasculogenesis with Nel-Like Molecule I Protein

    PubMed Central

    Askarinam, Asal; James, Aaron W.; Zara, Janette N.; Goyal, Raghav; Corselli, Mirko; Pan, Angel; Liang, Pei; Chang, Le; Rackohn, Todd; Stoker, David; Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Péault, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    An ideal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) source for bone tissue engineering has yet to be identified. Such an MSC population would be easily harvested in abundance, with minimal morbidity and with high purity. Our laboratories have identified perivascular stem cells (PSCs) as a candidate cell source. PSCs are readily isolatable through fluorescent-activated cell sorting from adipose tissue and have been previously shown to be indistinguishable from MSCs in the phenotype and differentiation potential. PSCs consist of two distinct cell populations: (1) pericytes (CD146+, CD34−, and CD45−), which surround capillaries and microvessels, and (2) adventitial cells (CD146−, CD34+, and CD45−), found within the tunica adventitia of large arteries and veins. We previously demonstrated the osteogenic potential of pericytes by examining pericytes derived from the human fetal pancreas, and illustrated their in vivo trophic and angiogenic effects. In the present study, we used an intramuscular ectopic bone model to develop the translational potential of our original findings using PSCs (as a combination of pericytes and adventitial cells) from human white adipose tissue. We evaluated human PSC (hPSC)-mediated bone formation and vascularization in vivo. We also examined the effects of hPSCs when combined with the novel craniosynostosis-associated protein, Nel-like molecule I (NELL-1). Implants consisting of the demineralized bone matrix putty combined with NELL-1 (3 μg/μL), hPSC (2.5×105 cells), or hPSC+NELL-1, were inserted in the bicep femoris of SCID mice. Bone growth was evaluated using microcomputed tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry over 4 weeks. Results demonstrated the osteogenic potential of hPSCs and the additive effect of hPSC+NELL-1 on bone formation and vasculogenesis. Comparable osteogenesis was observed with NELL-1 as compared to the more commonly used bone morphogenetic protein-2. Next, hPSCs induced greater implant vascularization than the

  15. Cancer cell death induced by novel small molecules degrading the TACC3 protein via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohoka, N; Nagai, K; Hattori, T; Okuhira, K; Shibata, N; Cho, N; Naito, M

    2014-11-06

    The selective degradation of target proteins with small molecules is a novel approach to the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. We have developed a protein knockdown system with a series of hybrid small compounds that induce the selective degradation of target proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In this study, we designed and synthesized novel small molecules called SNIPER(TACC3)s, which target the spindle regulatory protein transforming acidic coiled-coil-3 (TACC3). SNIPER(TACC3)s induce poly-ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of TACC3 and reduce the TACC3 protein level in cells. Mechanistic analysis indicated that the ubiquitin ligase APC/C(CDH1) mediates the SNIPER(TACC3)-induced degradation of TACC3. Intriguingly, SNIPER(TACC3) selectively induced cell death in cancer cells expressing a larger amount of TACC3 protein than normal cells. These results suggest that protein knockdown of TACC3 by SNIPER(TACC3) is a potential strategy for treating cancers overexpressing the TACC3 protein.

  16. Recent Developments in the Use of Differential Scanning Fluorometry in Protein and Small Molecule Discovery and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Simeonov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite tremendous advances in the application of biophysical methods in drug discovery, the preponderance of instruments and techniques still require sophisticated analyses by dedicated personnel and/or large amounts of frequently hard-to-produce proteins. A technique which carries the promise of simplicity and relatively low protein consumption is the differential scanning fluorometry (DSF), wherein protein denaturation is monitored, through the use of environmentally sensitive fluorescent dye, in a temperature-ramp regime by observing the gradual exposure to the solvent of otherwise buried hydrophobic faces of protein domains. Areas covered This review describes recent developments in the field, with a special emphasis on advances published during the 2010–2013 period. Expert Opinion There has been a significant diversification of DSF applications beyond initial small molecule discovery into areas such as protein therapeutic development, formulation studies, and various mechanistic investigations, serving as a further indication of the broad penetration of the technique. In the small molecule arena, DSF has expanded towards sophisticated co-dependency MOA tests, demonstrating the wealth of information which the technique can provide. Importantly, the first public deposition of a large screening dataset may enable the use of thermal stabilization data in refining in silico models for small molecule binding. PMID:23738712

  17. A novel lumazine synthase molecule from Brucella significantly promotes the immune-stimulation effects of antigenic protein.

    PubMed

    Du, Z Q; Wang, J Y

    2015-10-27

    Brucella, an intracellular parasite that infects some livestock and humans, can damage or destroy the reproductive system of livestock. The syndrome is referred to as brucellosis and often occurs in pastoral areas; it is contagious from livestock to humans. In this study, the intact Brucella suis outer membrane protein 31 (omp31) gene was cloned, recombinantly expressed, and examined as a subunit vaccine candidate. The intact Brucella lumazine synthase (bls) gene was cloned and recombinantly expressed to study polymerization function in vitro. Non-reducing gel electrophoresis showed that rBs-BLS existed in different forms in vitro, including as a dimer and a pentamer. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay result showed that rOmp31 protein could induce production of an antibody in rabbits. However, the rOmp31-BLS fusion protein could elicit a much higher antibody titer in rabbits; this construct involved fusion of the Omp31 molecule with the BLS molecule. Our results indicate that Omp31 is involved in immune stimulation, while BLS has a polymerizing function based on rOmp31-BLS fusion protein immunogenicity. These data suggest that Omp31 is an ideal subunit vaccine candidate and that the BLS molecule is a favorable transport vector for antigenic proteins.

  18. The lifetime of the soliton in the improved Davydov model at the biological temperature 300 K for protein molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-feng, Pang

    We study the effects of quantum fluctuations and thermal perturbations on the lifetime of the soliton in the improved Davydov model proposed by us with two-quanta and with an added interaction. By using quantum perturbation theory, we compute the soliton lifetime for a wide ranges of parameter values relevant for protein molecules. The lifetime of the new soliton at the biological temperature 300 K is of the order of 10-10 second or τ/τ>= 500 for parameters appropriate to α-helical protein molecules. This shows clearly that the new soliton in the improved model is a viable mechanism for the bio-energy transport in the α-helix region of proteins.

  19. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  20. The in silico identification of small molecules for protein-protein interaction inhibition in AKAP-Lbc-RhoA signaling complex.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asifullah; Munir, Mehwish; Aiman, Sara; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Arif-Ullah

    2017-04-01

    The rational design of small molecules that mimic key residues at the interface of interacting proteins can be a successful approach to target certain biological signaling cascades causing pathophysiological outcome. The A-Kinase Anchoring Protein, i.e. AKAP-Lbc, catalyses nucleotide exchange on RhoA and is involved in cardiac repolarization. The oncogenic AKAP-Lbc induces the RhoA GTPase hyperactivity and aberrantly amplifies the signaling pathway leading to hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. We took advantage of the AKAP-Lbc-RhoA complex crystal structure to design in silico small molecules predicted to inhibit the associated pathological signaling cascade. We adopted the strategies of pharmacophore building, virtual screening and molecular docking to identify the small molecules capable to target AKAP-Lbc and RhoA interactions. The pharmacophore model based virtual screening unveils two lead compounds from the TIMBAL database of small molecules modulating the targeted protein-protein interactions. The molecular docking analysis revealed the lead compounds' potentialities to establish the essential chemical interactions with the key interactive residues of the complex. These features provided a road map for designing additional potent chemical derivatives and fragments of the original lead compounds to perturb the AKAP-Lbc and RhoA interactions. Experimental validations may elucidate the therapeutic potential of these lead chemical scaffolds to deal with aberrant AKAP-Lbc signaling based cardiac hypertrophy.

  1. Participation of a novel 88-kD protein in the biogenesis of murine class I histocompatibility molecules

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking and gel permeation chromatography were used to examine early events in the biogenesis of class I histocompatibility molecules. We show that newly synthesized class I heavy chains associate rapidly and quantitatively with an 88-kD protein in three murine tumor cell lines. This protein (p88) does not appear to possess Asn-linked glycans and it is not the abundant ER protein, GRP94. The class I-p88 complex exists transiently (t1/2 = 20-45 min depending on the specific class I heavy chain) and several lines of evidence suggest that p88 dissociates from the complex while still in the ER. Dissociation is not triggered upon binding of beta 2-microglobulin to the heavy chain (t1/2 = 2-5 min). However, the rate of dissociation does correlate with the characteristic rate of ER to Golgi transport for the particular class I molecule studied. Consequently, dissociation of p88 may be rate limiting for ER to Golgi transport. Class I molecules bind antigenic peptides, apparently in the ER, for subsequent presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes at the cell surface. p88 could promote peptide binding or it may retain class I molecules in the ER during formation of the ternary complex of heavy chain, beta 2- microglobulin, and peptide. PMID:1999467

  2. A New Direct Single-Molecule Observation Method for DNA Synthesis Reaction Using Fluorescent Replication Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shunsuke; Kawasaki, Shohei; Miyata, Hidefumi; Kurita, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Takeshi; Matsuura, Shun-ichi; Mizuno, Akira; Oshige, Masahiko; Katsura, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Using a single-stranded region tracing system, single-molecule DNA synthesis reactions were directly observed in microflow channels. The direct single-molecule observations of DNA synthesis were labeled with a fusion protein consisting of the ssDNA-binding domain of a 70-kDa subunit of replication protein A and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (RPA-YFP). Our method was suitable for measurement of DNA synthesis reaction rates with control of the ssλDNA form as stretched ssλDNA (+flow) and random coiled ssλDNA (−flow) via buffer flow. Sequentially captured photographs demonstrated that the synthesized region of an ssλDNA molecule monotonously increased with the reaction time. The DNA synthesis reaction rate of random coiled ssλDNA (−flow) was nearly the same as that measured in a previous ensemble molecule experiment (52 vs. 50 bases/s). This suggested that the random coiled form of DNA (−flow) reflected the DNA form in the bulk experiment in the case of DNA synthesis reactions. In addition, the DNA synthesis reaction rate of stretched ssλDNA (+flow) was approximately 75% higher than that of random coiled ssλDNA (−flow) (91 vs. 52 bases/s). The DNA synthesis reaction rate of the Klenow fragment (3′-5′exo–) was promoted by DNA stretching with buffer flow. PMID:24625741

  3. High-field Solution NMR Spectroscopy as a Tool for Assessing Protein Interactions with Small Molecule Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andria L.; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of a small molecule to bind and modify the activity of a protein target at a specific site greatly impacts the success of drugs in the pharmaceutical industry. One of the most important tools for evaluating these interactions has been high-field solution NMR because of its unique ability to examine even weak protein-drug interactions at high resolution. NMR can be used to evaluate the structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of a binding reaction. The basis of NMR screening experiments is that binding causes a perturbation in the physical properties of both molecules. Unique properties of small and macromolecules allow selective detection of either the protein target or ligand, even in a mixture of compounds. This review outlines current methodologies for assessing protein-ligand interactions from the perspectives of the protein target and ligand and delineates the fundamental principles for understanding NMR approaches in drug research. Advances in instrumentation, pulse sequences, isotopic labeling strategies, and the development of competition experiments support the study of higher molecular weight protein targets, facilitate higher-throughput and expand the range of binding affinities that can be evaluated, enhancing the utility of NMR for identifying and characterizing potential therapeutics to druggable protein targets. PMID:18351634

  4. Preparation of core-shell structure Fe3 O4 @SiO2 superparamagnetic microspheres immoblized with iminodiacetic acid as immobilized metal ion affinity adsorbents for His-tag protein purification.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qian; Chen, Bing; Dong, Shaohua; Tian, Lei; Bai, Quan

    2016-04-01

    The core-shell structure Fe3 O4 /SiO2 magnetic microspheres were prepared by a sol-gel method, and immobiled with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) as metal ion affinity ligands for protein adsorption. The size, morphology, magnetic properties and surface modification of magnetic silica nanospheres were characterized by various modern analytical instruments. It was shown that the magnetic silica nanospheres exhibited superparamagnetism with saturation magnetization values of up to 58.1 emu/g. Three divalent metal ions, Cu(2+) , Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) , were chelated on the Fe3 O4 @SiO2 -IDA magnetic microspheres to adsorb lysozyme. The results indicated that Ni(2+) -chelating magnetic microspheres had the maximum adsorption capacity for lysozyme of 51.0 mg/g, adsorption equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min and the adsorbed protein could be easily eluted. Furthermore, the synthesized Fe3 O4 @SiO2 -IDA-Ni(2+) magnetic microspheres were successfully applied for selective enrichment lysozyme from egg white and His-tag recombinant Homer 1a from the inclusion extraction expressed in Escherichia coli. The result indicated that the magnetic microspheres showed unique characteristics of high selective separation behavior of protein mixture, low nonspecific adsorption, and easy handling. This demonstrates that the magnetic silica microspheres can be used efficiently in protein separation or purification and show great potential in the pretreatment of the biological sample.

  5. Properties of competitively adsorbed BSA and fibrinogen from their mixture on mixed and hybrid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Lalit M.; Pattanayek, Sudip K.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption of BSA and fibrinogen from their mixture onto surfaces with mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of amine and octyl (ratio 1:1) and hybrid SAM. The properties of adsorbed proteins obtained from individual protein solution differ considerably from the properties of the adsorbed proteins obtained from mixture of proteins at same total concentration. The adsorbed amount of proteins is lesser and the adsorbed protein is more elastic if it is adsorbing from mixture of proteins. It is found that with increasing total protein concentration, adsorbed amount increases and elasticity of the adsorbed proteins decreases. The apparent displacements of BSA with Fb are observed on the graphs of change in frequency with time, which are obtained from quartz crystal microbalance.

  6. Control of Transmembrane Protein Diffusion within the Postsynaptic Density Assessed by Simultaneous Single-Molecule Tracking and Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tuo P.; Blanpied, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Postsynaptic transmembrane proteins are critical elements of synapses, mediating trans-cellular contact, sensitivity to neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules, and flux of Ca and other ions. Positioning and mobility of each member of this large class of proteins is critical to their individual function at the synapse. One critical example is that the position of glutamate receptors within the postsynaptic density (PSD) strongly modulates their function by aligning or misaligning them with sites of presynaptic vesicle fusion. In addition, the regulated ability of receptors to move in or out of the synapse is critical for activity-dependent plasticity. However, factors that control receptor mobility within the boundaries of the synapse are not well understood. Notably, PSD scaffold molecules accumulate in domains much smaller than the synapse. Within these nanodomains, the density of proteins is considerably higher than that of the synapse as a whole, so high that steric hindrance is expected to reduce receptor mobility substantially. However, while numerical modeling has demonstrated several features of how the varying protein density across the face of a single PSD may modulate receptor motion, there is little experimental information about the extent of this influence. To address this critical aspect of synaptic organizational dynamics, we performed single-molecule tracking of transmembrane proteins using universal point accumulation-for-imaging-in-nanoscale-topography (uPAINT) over PSDs whose internal structure was simultaneously resolved using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). The results provide important experimental confirmation that PSD scaffold protein density strongly influences the mobility of transmembrane proteins. A protein with a cytosolic domain that does not bind PSD-95 was still slowed in regions of high PSD-95 density, suggesting that crowding by scaffold molecules and perhaps other proteins is sufficient to stabilize

  7. Mobility of adsorbed Cry1Aa insecticidal toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) on montmorillonite measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helassa, Nordine; Daudin, Gabrielle; Noinville, Sylvie; Janot, Jean-Marc; Déjardin, Philippe; Staunton, Siobhán; Quiquampoix, Hervé

    2010-06-01

    The insecticidal toxins produced by genetically modified Bt crops are introduced into soil through root exudates and tissue decomposition and adsorb readily on soil components, especially on clays. This immobilisation and the consequent concentration of the toxins in "hot spots" could increase the exposure of soil organisms. Whereas the effects on non-target organisms are well documented, few studies consider the migration of the toxin in soil. In this study, the residual mobility of Bt Cry1Aa insecticidal toxin adsorbed on montmorillonite was assessed using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). This technique, which is usually used to study dynamics of cytoplasmic and membrane molecules in live cells, was applied for the first time to a protein adsorbed on a finely divided swelling clay mineral, montmorillonite. No mobility of adsorbed toxin was observed at any pH and at different degrees of surface saturation.

  8. Controlling multi-function of biomaterials interfaces based on multiple and competing adsorption of functional proteins.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhen-Yu; Huang, Chao-Wei; Huang, Mei-Ching; Wu, Chih-Yu; Liu, Hui-Yu; Ding, Shih-Torng; Chen, Hsien-Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Multifunctional biomaterial surfaces can be created by controlling the competing adsorption of multiple proteins. To demonstrate this concept, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) and fibronectin were adsorbed to the hydrophobic surface of polychloro-para-xylylene. The resulting adsorption properties on the surface depended on the dimensional and steric characteristics of the selected protein molecule, the degree of denaturation of the adsorbed proteins, the associated adsorption of interphase water molecules within the protein layers, and the aggregation of proteins in a planar direction with respect to the adsorbent surface. Additionally, a defined surface composition was formed by the competing adsorption of multiple proteins, and this surface composition was directly linked to the composition of the protein mixture in the solution phase. Although the mechanism of this complex competing adsorption process is not fully understood, the adsorbed proteins were irreversibly adsorbed and were unaffected by the further adsorption of homologous or heterologous proteins. Moreover, synergistic biological activities, including cell osteogenesis and proliferation independently and specifically induced by BMP-2 or fibronectin, were observed on the modified surface, and these biological activities were positively correlated with the surface composition of the multiple adsorbed proteins. These results provide insights and important design parameters for prospective biomaterials and biointerfaces for (multi)functional modifications. The ability to control protein/interface properties will be beneficial for the processing of biomaterials for clinical applications and industrial products.

  9. Determination of anesthetic molecule environments by infrared spectroscopy. II. Multiple sites for nitrous oxide in proteins, lipids, and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hazzard, J H; Gorga, J C; Caughey, W S

    1985-08-01

    The presence of molecules of the general anesthetic nitrous oxide (N2O) in oils, esters, proteins, red cells, cream, lipid vesicles, and brain tissue upon exposure to the gas was observed by infrared spectroscopy. Analysis of the N-N-O antisymmetric stretch band reveals a distribution of N2O molecules among several sites of differing polarity in these solutions and tissues. The sensitivity of the band intensity and frequency to the number and strength of the dipoles in the solvating molecules is demonstrated by the resolution of N2O-ester and N2O-alkane interactions in acetic acid ethyl ester and oleic acid methyl ester. In all aqueous solutions and in all tissues a population of N2O molecules in water is observed. At least two sites of N2O-protein interaction are observed in purified hemoglobin A and packed red cells; multiple N2O sites may also be present in bovine serum albumin. Two sites of N2O-lipid interaction are observed in whipping cream and in an aqueous suspension of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The sites providing the least polar immediate environment to N2O in hemoglobin, cream, and vesicles give similar band frequencies to those found in pure alkane solvents. Infrared spectra of bovine brain tissue, upon exposure to N2O, show N2O molecules present in water and in two less-polar environments. Analysis of spectra of N2O in cerebellum tissue removed from a dog under halothane-N2O anesthesia reveals, in addition to N2O in water, a single population of N2O molecules in an alkane-like environment. Infrared spectroscopy provides a unique means of probing the structure of the environment of N2O and should prove useful in correlating anesthetic potency with anesthetic environment under physiological conditions.

  10. Why are proteins charged molecules? The role of electrostatics in the stability, activity and processing of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbeck, Jeffrey

    2004-03-01

    Why do proteins typically have a large number of charged (titratable) groups on their surface? What role do these groups play in regulating the strength and specificity of molecular recognition events in biology? Why are many of these groups weakly acidic or basic? Can current models of electrostatics and electrokinetics -- necessary for predictive modeling and rational design -- accurately describe the role of charged groups on the properties and interactions of proteins? In this talk I will address these questions using studies of the physics and physical chemistry of proteins. Specifically, I will describe the combination of protein charge ladders -- collections of protein derivatives that differ incrementally in net charge -- and capillary electrophoresis (CE) as a biophysical tool that measures directly the effects of interactions between charged groups on the properties and interactions of proteins. This approach shows that the combination of a large number of relatively weak electrostatic interactions can play an important role in the energetics of receptor ligand binding, protein folding, and in bio-processing. I will then develop a picture that shows how changes in proton binding between two states of a protein -- native vs. denatured, bound vs. free -- can play a significant role in regulating the energetics of molecular recognition events involving proteins. I will describe a theoretical framework that quantifies the thermodynamic linkage of proton binding to protein folding and protein -- protein interactions. I will show how CE and protein charge ladders measure this thermodynamic linkage for the case of protein folding. Finally, I will describe how we have used Poisson-Boltzmann theory of electrostatics, in combination with statistical mechanical models of proton binding, to predict linkage events in protein folding and protein -- protein interactions.

  11. Features of Motion of Soliton Transported Bio-energy in Aperiodic α-Helix Protein Molecules with Three Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Mei-Jie

    2009-01-01

    The structure aperiodicities can influence seriously the features of motion of soliton excited in the α-helix protein molecules with three channels. We study the influence of structure aperiodicities on the features of the soliton in the improved model by numerical simulation and Runge-Kulta method. The results obtained show that the new soliton is very robust against the structure aperiodicities including large disorder in the sequence of mass of the amino acids and fluctuations of spring constant, coupling constant, dipole-dipole interactional constant, ground state energy and chain-chain interaction. However, very strong structure aperiodicities can also destroy the stability of the soliton in the α-helix protein molecules.

  12. Real-time, step-wise, electrical detection of protein molecules using dielectrophoretically aligned SWNT-film FET aptasensors.

    PubMed

    An, Taechang; Kim, Ki Su; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Lim, Geunbae

    2010-08-21

    Aptamer functionalized addressable SWNT-film arrays between cantilever electrodes were successfully developed for biosensor applications. Dielectrophoretically aligned SWNT suspended films made possible highly specific and rapid detection of target proteins with a large binding surface area. Thrombin aptamer immobilized SWNT-film FET biosensor resulted in a real-time, label-free, and electrical detection of thrombin molecules down to a concentration of ca. 7 pM with a step-wise rapid response time of several seconds.

  13. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  14. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  15. Influences of Electromagnetic Energy on Bio-Energy Transport through Protein Molecules in Living Systems and Its Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Shude; Wang, Xianghui; Zhong, Lisheng

    2016-07-25

    The influences of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on bio-energy transport and its mechanism of changes are investigated through analytic and numerical simulation and experimentation. Bio-energy transport along protein molecules is performed by soliton movement caused by the dipole-dipole electric interactions between neighboring amino acid residues. As such, EMFs can affect the structure of protein molecules and change the properties of the bio-energy transported in living systems. This mechanism of biological effect from EMFs involves the amino acid residues in protein molecules. To study and reveal this mechanism, we simulated numerically the features of the movement of solitons along protein molecules with both a single chain and with three channels by using the Runge-Kutta method and Pang's soliton model under the action of EMFs with the strengths of 25,500, 51,000, 76,500, and 102,000 V/m in the single-chain protein, as well as 17,000, 25,500, and 34,000 V/m in the three-chain protein, respectively. Results indicate that electric fields (EFs) depress the binding energy of the soliton, decrease its amplitude, and change its wave form. Also, the soliton disperses at 102,000 V/m in a single-chain protein and at 25,500 and 34,000 V/m in three-chain proteins. These findings signify that the influence of EMFs on the bio-energy transport cannot be neglected; however, these variations depend on both the strength and the direction of the EF in the EMF. This direction influences the biological effects of EMF, which decrease with increases in the angle between the direction of the EF and that of the dipole moment of amino acid residues; however, randomness at the macroscopic level remains. Lastly, we experimentally confirm the existence of a soliton and the validity of our conclusion by using the infrared spectra of absorption of the collagens, which is activated by another type of EF. Thus, we can affirm that both the described mechanism and the corresponding theory are

  16. Influences of Electromagnetic Energy on Bio-Energy Transport through Protein Molecules in Living Systems and Its Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Shude; Wang, Xianghui; Zhong, Lisheng

    2016-01-01

    The influences of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on bio-energy transport and its mechanism of changes are investigated through analytic and numerical simulation and experimentation. Bio-energy transport along protein molecules is performed by soliton movement caused by the dipole–dipole electric interactions between neighboring amino acid residues. As such, EMFs can affect the structure of protein molecules and change the properties of the bio-energy transported in living systems. This mechanism of biological effect from EMFs involves the amino acid residues in protein molecules. To study and reveal this mechanism, we simulated numerically the features of the movement of solitons along protein molecules with both a single chain and with three channels by using the Runge–Kutta method and Pang’s soliton model under the action of EMFs with the strengths of 25,500, 51,000, 76,500, and 102,000 V/m in the single-chain protein, as well as 17,000, 25,500, and 34,000 V/m in the three-chain protein, respectively. Results indicate that electric fields (EFs) depress the binding energy of the soliton, decrease its amplitude, and change its wave form. Also, the soliton disperses at 102,000 V/m in a single-chain protein and at 25,500 and 34,000 V/m in three-chain proteins. These findings signify that the influence of EMFs on the bio-energy transport cannot be neglected; however, these variations depend on both the strength and the direction of the EF in the EMF. This direction influences the biological effects of EMF, which decrease with increases in the angle between the direction of the EF and that of the dipole moment of amino acid residues; however, randomness at the macroscopic level remains. Lastly, we experimentally confirm the existence of a soliton and the validity of our conclusion by using the infrared spectra of absorption of the collagens, which is activated by another type of EF. Thus, we can affirm that both the described mechanism and the corresponding theory

  17. RecBCD-Dependent Joint Molecule Formation Promoted by the Escherichia coli RecA and SSB Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Linda J.; Dixon, Dan A.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    1991-04-01

    We describe the formation of homologously paired joint molecules in an in vitro reaction that is dependent on the concerted actions of purified RecA and RecBCD proteins and is stimulated by single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), RecBCD enzyme initiates the process by unwinding the linear double-stranded DNA to produce single-stranded DNA, which is trapped by SSB and RecA. RecA uses this single-stranded DNA to catalyze the invasion of a supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule, forming a homologously paired joint molecule. At low RecBCD enzyme concentrations, the rate-limiting step is the unwinding of duplex DNA by RecBCD, whereas at higher RecBCD concentrations, the rate-limiting step is RecA-catalyzed strand invasion. The behavior of mutant RecA proteins in this in vitro reaction parallels their in vivo phenotypes, suggesting that this reaction may define biochemical steps that occur during homologous recombination by the RecBCD pathway in vivo.

  18. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  19. Bacterial Surface-Displayed GII.4 Human Norovirus Capsid Proteins Bound to HBGA-Like Molecules in Romaine Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming; Rong, Shaofeng; Tian, Peng; Zhou, Yue; Guan, Shimin; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein on bacterial surface and used it as a new strategy to explore interaction between HuNoV protein and receptor candidates from romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins were confirmed on the surface of the transformed bacteria by an immunofluorescence assay. The distribution patterns of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins in romaine lettuce were identified through a confocal immunofluorescence assay. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be found in the stomata, and the surfaces of vein and leaf of romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be captured by an ELISA assay utilizing extract from leaf (LE) or vein (VE). The binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could be competitively blocked by histo-blood group antigens from human saliva. In addition, the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could also be attenuated by heat denaturation of lettuce proteins, and abolished by oxidation of lettuce carbohydrates. The results indicated that histo-blood group antigen-like molecules in LE or VE were involved in the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to romaine lettuce. All data demonstrated that the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be utilized in a new and simple system for investigation of the interaction between the HuNoVs and their candidate ligands. PMID:28265267

  20. Bacterial Surface-Displayed GII.4 Human Norovirus Capsid Proteins Bound to HBGA-Like Molecules in Romaine Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Rong, Shaofeng; Tian, Peng; Zhou, Yue; Guan, Shimin; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein on bacterial surface and used it as a new strategy to explore interaction between HuNoV protein and receptor candidates from romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins were confirmed on the surface of the transformed bacteria by an immunofluorescence assay. The distribution patterns of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins in romaine lettuce were identified through a confocal immunofluorescence assay. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be found in the stomata, and the surfaces of vein and leaf of romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be captured by an ELISA assay utilizing extract from leaf (LE) or vein (VE). The binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could be competitively blocked by histo-blood group antigens from human saliva. In addition, the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could also be attenuated by heat denaturation of lettuce proteins, and abolished by oxidation of lettuce carbohydrates. The results indicated that histo-blood group antigen-like molecules in LE or VE were involved in the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to romaine lettuce. All data demonstrated that the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be utilized in a new and simple system for investigation of the interaction between the HuNoVs and their candidate ligands.

  1. Adherence of platelets to in situ albumin-binding surfaces under flow conditions: role of surface-adsorbed albumin.

    PubMed

    Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta; Miller, Robert; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-08-01

    Surfaces that preferentially bind human serum albumin (HSA) were generated by grafting albumin-binding linear peptide (LP1) onto silicon surfaces. The research aim was to evaluate the adsorption pattern of proteins and the adhesion of platelets from platelet-poor plasma and platelet-rich plasma, respectively, by albumin-binding surfaces under physiological shear rate (96 and 319 s(-1)) conditions. Bound proteins were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A ratio of ∼1000:100:1 of adsorbed HSA, human immunoglobulin (HIgG) and human fibrinogen (HFib) was noted, respectively, on LP1-functionalized surfaces, and a ratio of ∼5:2:1 of the same was noted on control surfaces, as confirmed by ELISAs. The surface-adsorbed von Willebrand factor was undetectable by sensitive ELISAs. The amount of adhered platelets correlated with the ratio of adsorbed HSA/HFib. Platelet morphology was more rounded on LP1-functionalized surfaces when compared to control surfaces. The platelet adhesion response on albumin-binding surfaces can be explained by the reduction in the co-adsorption of other plasma proteins in a surface environment where there is an excess of albumin molecules, coupled with restrictions in the conformational transitions of other surface-adsorbed proteins into hemostatically active forms.

  2. Large molecule protein feeding during the suckling period is required for the development of pancreatic digestive functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Kinouchi, Toshi; Koyama, Satomi; Harada, Etsumori; Yajima, Takaji

    2012-12-15

    We examined if large molecule protein feeding during the suckling period is prerequisite for the proper development of pancreatic digestive functions. Most amino acids in breast milk exist as the constituent of large proteins and not as oligopeptides or free amino acids. Accumulating evidence indicates the nutritional importance of large protein feeding for suckling infants; however, evidence on the physiological significance remains small. We thus artificially reared rat pups on a standard rat formula with milk protein or a formula with milk protein hydrolysate from 7 to 21 days of age, and thereafter, fed a standard solid diet until 42 days of age. Pancreas weight and the stock of pancreatic digestive enzymes in the hydrolysate-fed rats were significantly lower than those in the protein-fed rats during and also after the suckling period. Plasma insulin, a stimulator of amylase synthesis, was also significantly low in the hydrolysate-fed rats compared with the protein-fed rats. At 28 days of age, we evaluated the pancreatic secretory ability in response to dietary protein and cholecystokinin (CCK) by means of pancreatic duct cannulation. Pancreatic secretion stimulated by dietary protein in the hydrolysate-fed rats was significantly weaker than that in the protein-fed rats. No significant difference was observed in the increasing rate of pancreatic enzyme secretion in response to CCK between the two groups. These results suggest that the presence of large proteins in breast milk is significant for the development of pancreatic digestive functions and the outcomes could remain even later on in life.

  3. Small-Molecule Ligands of Methyl-Lysine Binding Proteins: Optimization of Selectivity for L3MBTL3

    PubMed Central

    James, Lindsey I.; Korboukh, Victoria K.; Krichevsky, Liubov; Baughman, Brandi M.; Herold, J. Martin; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Jin, Jian; Kireev, Dmitri B.; Janzen, William P.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Frye, Stephen V.

    2013-01-01

    Lysine methylation is a key epigenetic mark, the dysregulation of which is linked to many diseases. Small molecule antagonism of methyl-lysine (Kme) binding proteins that recognize such epigenetic marks can improve our understanding of these regulatory mechanisms and potentially validate Kme binding proteins as drug discovery targets. We previously reported the discovery of 1 (UNC1215), the first potent and selective small molecule chemical probe of a methyl-lysine reader protein, L3MBTL3, which antagonizes the mono- and dimethyl-lysine reading function of L3MBTL3. The design, synthesis, and structure activity relationship studies that led to the discovery of 1 are described herein. These efforts established the requirements for potent L3MBTL3 binding and enabled the design of novel antagonists, such as compound 2 (UNC1679), that maintain in vitro and cellular potency with improved selectivity against other MBT-containing proteins. The antagonists described were also found to effectively interact with unlabeled endogenous L3MBTL3 in cells. PMID:24040942

  4. Small-molecule ligands of methyl-lysine binding proteins: optimization of selectivity for L3MBTL3.

    PubMed

    James, Lindsey I; Korboukh, Victoria K; Krichevsky, Liubov; Baughman, Brandi M; Herold, J Martin; Norris, Jacqueline L; Jin, Jian; Kireev, Dmitri B; Janzen, William P; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Frye, Stephen V

    2013-09-26

    Lysine methylation is a key epigenetic mark, the dysregulation of which is linked to many diseases. Small-molecule antagonism of methyl-lysine (Kme) binding proteins that recognize such epigenetic marks can improve our understanding of these regulatory mechanisms and potentially validate Kme binding proteins as drug-discovery targets. We previously reported the discovery of 1 (UNC1215), the first potent and selective small-molecule chemical probe of a methyl-lysine reader protein, L3MBTL3, which antagonizes the mono- and dimethyl-lysine reading function of L3MBTL3. The design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship studies that led to the discovery of 1 are described herein. These efforts established the requirements for potent L3MBTL3 binding and enabled the design of novel antagonists, such as compound 2 (UNC1679), that maintain in vitro and cellular potency with improved selectivity against other MBT-containing proteins. The antagonists described were also found to effectively interact with unlabeled endogenous L3MBTL3 in cells.

  5. The dynamics of single protein molecules is non-equilibrium and self-similar over thirteen decades in time

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohu; Hong, Liang; Smith, Micholas Dean; Neusius, Thomas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2015-11-23

    Here, internal motions of proteins are essential to their function. The time dependence of protein structural fluctuations is highly complex, manifesting subdiffusive, non-exponential behavior with effective relaxation times existing over many decades in time, from ps up to ~102s (refs 1-4). Here, using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that, on timescales from 10–12 to 10–5s, motions in single proteins are self-similar, non-equilibrium and exhibit ageing. The characteristic relaxation time for a distance fluctuation, such as inter-domain motion, is observation-time-dependent, increasing in a simple, power-law fashion, arising from the fractal nature of the topology and geometry of the energy landscape explored. Diffusion over the energy landscape follows a non-ergodic continuous time random walk. Comparison with single-molecule experiments suggests that the non-equilibrium self-similar dynamical behavior persists up to timescales approaching the in vivo lifespan of individual protein molecules.