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Sample records for adsorbed surfactant layers

  1. Coalescence behavior of oil droplets coated in irreversibly-adsorbed surfactant layers.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Matthew D; Walker, Lynn M

    2015-07-01

    Coalescence between oil caps with irreversibly adsorbed layers of nonionic surfactant is characterized in deionized water and electrolyte solution. The coalescence is characterized using a modified capillary tensiometer allowing for accurate measurement of the coalescence time. Results suggest two types of coalescence behavior, fast coalescence at low surface coverages that are independent of ionic strength and slow coalescence at high coverage. These slow coalescence events (orders of magnitude slower) are argued to be due to electric double layer forces or more complicated stabilization mechanisms arising from interfacial deformation and surface forces. A simple film drainage model is used in combination with measured values for interfacial properties to quantify the interaction potential between the two interfaces. Since this approach allows the two caps to have the same history, interfacial coverage and curvature, the results offer a tool to better understand a mechanism that is important to emulsion stability.

  2. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Baoliang; Tao, Shu; Chiou, Cary T

    2003-09-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insightto interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  3. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  4. Selection and evaluation of adsorbents for the removal of anionic surfactants from laundry rinsing water.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Natasja; van der Ham, Louis G J; Euverink, Gert-Jan W; de Haan, André B

    2007-10-01

    Low-cost adsorbents were tested to remove anionic surfactants from laundry rinsing water to allow re-use of water. Adsorbents were selected corresponding to the different surfactant adsorption mechanisms. Equilibrium adsorption studies of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) show that ionic interaction results in a high maximum adsorption capacity on positively charged adsorbents of 0.6-1.7 gLAS/g. Non-ionic interactions, such as hydrophobic interactions of LAS with non-ionic resins or activated carbons, result in a lower adsorption capacity of 0.02-0.6 gLAS/g. Negatively charged materials, such as cation exchange resins or bentonite clay, have negligible adsorption capacities for LAS. Similar results are obtained for alpha olefin sulfonate (AOS). Cost comparison of different adsorbents shows that an inorganic anion exchange material (layered double hydroxide) and activated carbons are the most cost-effective materials in terms of the amount of surfactant adsorbed per dollar worth of adsorbent.

  5. Synthetic high-charge organomica: effect of the layer charge and alkyl chain length on the structure of the adsorbed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Pazos, M Carolina; Castro, Miguel A; Orta, M Mar; Pavón, Esperanza; Valencia Rios, Jesús S; Alba, María D

    2012-05-15

    A family of organomicas was synthesized using synthetic swelling micas with high layer charge (Na(n)Si(8-n)Al(n)Mg(6)F(4)O(20)·XH(2)O, where n = 2, 3, and 4) exchanged with dodecylammonium and octadecylammonium cations. The molecular arrangement of the surfactant was elucidated on the basis on XRD patterns and DTA. The ordering conformation of the surfactant molecules into the interlayer space of micas was investigated by (13)C, (27)Al, and (29)Si MAS NMR. The arrangement of alkylammonium ions in these high-charge synthetic micas depends on the combined effects of the layer charge of the mica and the chain length of the cation. In the organomicas with dodecylammonium, a transition from a parallel layer to a bilayer-paraffin arrangement is observed when the layer charge of the mica increases. However, when octadecylammonium is the interlayer cation, the molecular arrangement of the surfactant was found to follow the bilayer-paraffin model for all values of layer charge. The amount of ordered conformation all-trans is directly proportional of layer charge.

  6. Interaction of sodium polyacrylate adsorbed on TiO2 with cationic and anionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Tripp, Carl P

    2004-11-23

    Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to identify the structures formed during the adsorption of sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) on charged TiO2 particles and to determine the subsequent interaction of the adsorbed polymer structure with cationic and anionic surfactants. The nature of the polymer structure was deduced from the adsorbed amount in tandem with the information obtained from monitoring the change in the relative intensity of the COO- and COOH infrared bands. In particular, it is found that the relative number of COO- and COOH groups on the polymer backbone for the adsorbed state differs from that of the same polymer in solution. This difference is due to a shift in the population of COO-/COOH groups on the polymer backbone that arises when the COO- groups bind to positively charged sites on the surface. A change in the number COO-/COOH groups on the polymer is thus related to a change in the bound fraction of polymer. It is shown that the initial NaPA approaching the bare surface adopts a flat conformation with high bound fraction. Once the bare sites on the surface are covered, the accommodation of additional polymer on the surface requires the existing adsorbed layer to adopt a conformation with a lower bound fraction. When the adsorbed NaPA is probed with a solution containing the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the SDS competes for surface sites and displaces some of the bound NaPA segments from the surface, giving rise to an polymer layer adsorbed with an even lower bound fraction. In contrast, addition of a solution containing the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) results in the binding of the surfactant directly to the free COO- sites on the adsorbed polymer backbone. Confirmation of a direct interaction of the CTAB headgroup with the free COO- groups of the polymer is provided by intensity changes in the headgroup IR bands of the CTAB.

  7. Contact interaction of double-chained surfactant layers on silica: bilayer rupture and capillary bridge formation.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Etienne; Roquigny, Renaud; Serreau, Laurence; Denoyel, Renaud; Clerc-Imperor, Marianne; Drummond, Carlos

    2013-11-26

    The contact between two layers of double-chained C18 surfactants adsorbed on silica has been investigated. Using a custom-made surface forces apparatus with high stiffness, we have studied the process of (1) compression and collapse of the layers and (2) surface separation after layer collapse. A continuum mechanics model accounts for the compression and collapse of the surfactant layers. The layer compressibility and molecular energy of rupture can be inferred directly. When the surfaces are rinsed in deionized water, an intriguing structural force is observed: the resulting attractive interaction induces the diffusion of surfactant to the contact area, with the gradual buildup of a capillary bridge of the pure smectic phase of the surfactant. Models are proposed to analyze the force profile.

  8. Dynamics of surfactants spreading on gel layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandagos, Constantine; Luckham, Paul; Matar, Omar

    2009-11-01

    Gel-like materials are of central importance to a large number of engineering, biological, biomedical and day-life applications. This work attempts to investigate the spreading of droplets of surfactant solutions on agar gels, which is accompanied by cracking of the gel layers. The cracking progresses via the formation of patterns that resemble ``starbursts,'' which have been reported recently in the literature by Daniels et al. Marangoni stresses generated by surface tension gradients between the surfactant droplet and the uncontaminated gel layer are identified to be the driving force behind these phenomena. The morphology and dynamics of the starburst patterns are investigated for droplets of different surfactant solutions, including sodiumdodecylsulphate, spreading on gel layers of different strengths. The instability is characterised in terms of the number of arms that form, and their mean width and length as a function of time. In addition, photoelasticity is used to provide information about the stress field of the material, which, combined with the results from our direct visualisation, can elucidate further the mechanisms underlying the pattern formation and the nature of the interactions between the liquid and the gel.

  9. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1980-08-20

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  10. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., James S.; Westmoreland, Clyde G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  11. Around a camphoric-acid boat, is the surfactant adsorbed on to the interface or dissolved in the bulk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandre, Shreyas; Akella, Sathish; Singh, Dhiraj; Singh, Ravi; Bandi, Mahesh

    2016-11-01

    A camphoric-acid boat (c-boat for short), a cylindrical gel tablet infused with camphoric acid, moves spontaneously when placed on an air-water interface. This system is a classic example of propulsion driven by Marangoni forces. Despite rich history on particles propelled by Marangoni forces, including contributions by figures such as Benjamin Franklin, Allesandro Volta, and Giovanni Venturi, the underlying fluid dynamics remains poorly understood. A key missing piece is the nature of the surfactant; in our case, the question is whether the camphoric acid is dissolved in the bulk or adsorbed on to the interface. We gain insight into this piece by holding the c-boat stationary and measuring the surrounding axisymmetric flow velocity to a precision needed to distinguish between the two possibilities. For soluble surfactants, it is known that the velocity field decays as r - 2 / 3, where r is the distance from the center of the c-boat. Whereas, for surfactant adsorbed on to the air-water interface, we derive that the surrounding velocity fields decays as r - 3 / 5. Based on our measurements we deduce that, even though soluble in water, the Marangoni flow results from a layer of camphoric acid adsorbed to the air-water interface.

  12. Miscibility of Hydrocarbon and Fluorocarbon Surfactants in Adsorbed Film and Micelle.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Masumi; Nomura, Teruko; Matsuki, Hitoshi; Kaneshina, Shoji; Aratono, Makoto

    2001-02-01

    We investigated the miscibility of nonionic hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants in the adsorbed film and the micelle by surface tension measurements of the aqueous solution. The combination of tetraethyleneglycol monodecyl ether (C10E4) and tetraethyleneglycol mono-1,1,7-trihydrododecafluoroheptyl ether (FC7E4) was chosen because they have the same hydrophilic groups and about the same surface activity. The extent of nonideal mixing was estimated quantitatively in terms of the excess Gibbs energy in the adsorbed film g(H,E) and that in the micelle g(M,E). The excess area per adsorbed molecule, A(H,E), was also evaluated and discussed. The ionic hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon mixed surfactant systems, lithium dodecyl sulfate (LiDS)/lithium perfluorooctane sulfonate (LiFOS) and lithium tetradecyl sulfate (LiTS)/LiFOS systems are also investigated from the standpoint of excess Gibbs energy and excess area. It is also clearly shown that the regular solution approach does not fit in the systems that contain ionic species. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Theory of surface light scattering from a fluid-fluid interface with adsorbed polymeric surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzza, D. M. A.; Jones, J. L.; McLeish, T. C. B.; Richards, R. W.

    1998-09-01

    We present a microscopic theory for the interfacial rheology of a fluid-fluid interface with adsorbed surfactant and calculate the effect of this on surface light scattering from the interface. We model the head and tail groups of the surfactant as polymer chains, a description that becomes increasingly accurate for large molecular weight surfactants, i.e., polymeric surfactants. Assuming high surface concentrations so that we have a double-sided polymer brush monolayer, we derive microscopic scaling expressions for the surface viscoelastic constants using the Alexander-deGennes model. Our results for the surface elastic constants agree with those in the literature, while the results for the viscous constants are new. We find that four elastic constants, i.e., γ (surface tension), ɛ (dilational elasticity), κ (bending modulus), λ (coupling constant), and three viscous constants, i.e., ɛ',κ',λ' (the viscous counterparts of ɛ, κ, and λ, respectively) are required for a general description of interfacial viscoelasticity (neglecting in-plane shear). In contrast to current phenomenological models, we find (1) there is no viscous counterpart to γ, i.e., γ'≡0; (2) there are two additional complex surface constants (i.e., λ+iωλ' and κ+iωκ') due to the finite thickness of the monolayer. Excellent agreement is found comparing our microscopic theory with measurements on diblock copolymer monolayers. We further derive the dispersion relation governing surface hydrodynamic modes and the power spectrum for surface quasielastic light scattering (SQELS) for a general interface parameterized by all the surface viscoelastic constants. Limiting results are presented for (1) liquid-air interfaces; (2) liquid-liquid interfaces with ultralow γ. The significant contribution of κ in the latter case opens up the possibility for a direct measurement of κ using SQELS for polymeric surfactant monolayers. Finally, we show that the coupling constant λ can lead to

  14. Tensiometry and dilational rheology of mixed β-lactoglobulin/ionic surfactant adsorption layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dan, Abhijit; Gochev, Georgi; Miller, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Oscillating drop tensiometry was applied to study adsorbed interfacial layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces formed from mixed solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG, 1 μM in 10 mM buffer, pH 7 - negative net charge) and the anionic surfactant SDS or the cationic DoTAB. The interfacial pressure Π and the dilational viscoelasticity modulus |E| of the mixed layers were measured for mixtures of varying surfactant concentrations. The double capillary technique was employed which enables exchange of the protein solution in the drop bulk by surfactant solution (sequential adsorption) or by pure buffer (washing out). The first protocol allows probing the influence of the surfactant on a pre-adsorbed protein layer thus studying the protein/surfactant interactions at the interface. The second protocol gives access to the residual values of Π and |E| measured after the washing out procedure thus bringing information about the process of protein desorption. The DoTAB/BLG complexes exhibit higher surface activity and higher resistance to desorption in comparison with those for the SDS/BLG complexes due to hydrophobization via electrostatic binding of surfactant molecules. The neutral DoTAB/BLG complexes achieve maximum elastic response of the mixed layer. Mixed BLG/surfactant layers at the water/oil interface are found to reach higher surface pressure and lower maximum dilational elasticity than those at the water/air surface. The sequential adsorption mode experiments and the desorption study reveal that binding of DoTAB to pre-adsorbed BLG globules is somehow restricted at the water/air surface in comparison with the case of complex formation in the solution bulk and subsequently adsorbed at the water/air surface. Maximum elasticity is achieved with washed out layers obtained after simultaneous adsorption, i.e. isolation of the most surface active DoTAB/BLG complex. These specific effects are much less pronounced at the W/H interface.

  15. Surfactant-modified alumina: an efficient adsorbent for malachite green removal from water environment.

    PubMed

    Das, Asit K; Saha, Sandip; Pal, Anjali; Maji, Sanjoy K

    2009-07-15

    Surface of alumina was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), an anionic surfactant. The surfactant-modified alumina (SMA) was characterized by FTIR and thermal analysis. The SMA was then used for the removal of malachite green (MG; Basic Green 4), a well-known toxic cationic dye from aqueous environment. The removal of MG takes place in the micellar structure formed on alumina surface, and the process is called adsolubilization. All the studies were carried out in batch mode. The kinetic studies showed that 1 h contact time was sufficient to attain equilibrium. SMA was very efficient to remove MG up to 99% under optimum conditions. The concentration range of MG was 20-100 mg/L. The isotherm studies showed that it follows Langmuir model better than the Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity was 185 mg/g. The effects of various parameters such as pH, presence of interfering ions (Cl-, NO3-, H2PO4-, SO4(2-), Fe2+, Ca2+) and organics (pesticides such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, endosulfan, and humic acid) are evaluated. It was observed that H2PO4-, Fe2+, endosulfan, and humic acid have maximum interference. Desorption of MG from exhausted SMA using acetone, and its reuse was studied. The regenerated adsorbent shows approximately 80% efficiency on the removal of MG. The usability of SMA for the removal of MG from real wastewater was also examined. The kinetic equilibrium was attained within 1 h and the removal could be achieved up to approximately 95% at a dose of 20 g/L. The adsorption followed Freundlich isotherm model better than the Langmuir model.

  16. Enhanced CO2 adsorptive performance of PEI/SBA-15 adsorbent using phosphate ester based surfactants as additives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dandan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Haiqiang; Weng, Xiaole; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a series of polyetherimide/SBA-15: 2-D hexagonal P6mm, Santa Barbara USA (PEI/SBA-15) adsorbents modified by phosphoric ester based surfactants (including tri(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (BEP) and trimethyl phosphonoacetate (TMPA)) were prepared for CO2 adsorption. Experimental results indicated that the addition of TEP and BEP had positive effects on CO2 adsorption capacity over PEI/SBA-15. In particular, the CO2 adsorption amount could be improved by around 20% for 45PEI-5TEP/SBA-15 compared to the additive-free adsorbent. This could be attributed to the decrease of CO2 diffusion resistance in the PEI bulk network due to the interactions between TEP and loaded PEI molecules, which was further confirmed by adsorption kinetics results. In addition, it was also found that the cyclic performance of the TEP-modified adsorbent was better than the surfactant-free one. This could be due to two main reasons, based on the results of in situ DRIFT and TG-DSC tests. First and more importantly, adsorbed CO2 species could be desorbed more rapidly over TEP-modified adsorbent during the thermal desorption process. Furthermore, the enhanced thermal stability after TEP addition ensured lower degradation of amine groups during adsorption/desorption cycles.

  17. Preparation and structural characterization of zwitterionic surfactant intercalated into NiZn-layered hydroxide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiexiang; Wang, Jianlong; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Fang, Binbin; Hu, Pan; Zhao, Xuyang

    2015-10-01

    Three zwitterionic surfactants, dodecyl dimethyl carboxylbetaine (DCB), dodecyl dimethyl sulfobetaine (DSB) and N-dodecyl-β-aminoprpionate (DAP), intercalated into NiZn-layered hydroxide salts (NZL-DCB, NZL-DSB and NZL-DAP) were synthesized by the coprecipitation method. The effect of surfactant content, pH, temperature and time of hydrothermal treatment on preparation was investigated and discussed. The NZL-DCB, NZL-DSB and NZL-DAP were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermogravimetry analysis and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). The results showed that basal spacings of NZL-DCB, NZL-DSB and NZL-DAP were around 3.45, 3.68 and 3.94 nm, respectively. DCB, DSB and DAP probably form an overlapped bilayer in the gallery. TGA/DTA data indicated that NZL-DCB, NZL-DSB and NZL-DAP displayed three loss weight stages: loss of adsorbed and structural water, dehydroxylation of matrix and decomposition of nitrate ions, decomposition and combustion of surfactants. Furthermore, chemical analysis data, BET surface area and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) were also measured and analyzed.

  18. Delamination behavior of silicate layers by adsorption of cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Soo Jin

    2002-04-15

    Smectite that has reacted for 48 h with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) cations equivalent to 0.01-3.0 times the cation exchange capacity (CEC) converts to HDTMA-smectite. The microstructure of this organoclay is observed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). When Na cations in the interlayer of clay are exchanged with HDTMA ions, the changes in internal and external surface configuration are augmented by the intercalation of organic surfactants, showing a heterogeneous increase of interlayer spacings. As HDTMA loading increases, the chance of delaminated layers being developed increases locally in the low-charge interlayer regions by the sufficient adsorption of organic surfactants beyond the CEC due to the tendency of alkyl chain interaction.

  19. Surfactant-modified montmorillonite as a nanosized adsorbent for removal of an insecticide: kinetic and isotherm studies.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Aydin; Khataee, Alireza; Karaca, Semra; Shirzad-Siboni, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant-modified montmorillonites (MMT) were prepared using trimethyloctylammonium bromide (TMOAB) and employed as a nanosized adsorbent to remove diazinon from aqueous solutions. The prepared adsorbent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The dependence of removal efficiency on initial diazinon concentration, amount of adsorbent, pH of the solution and ionic strength was investigated. The affinity sequence for ion adsorption on TMOAB/MMT was in the order: without anion> sodium carbonate> sodium bicarbonate> sodium sulphate> sodium chloride. The adsorption kinetic and isotherm were best fit by a pseudo-second-order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm models, respectively.

  20. Surfactant modified coir pith, an agricultural solid waste as adsorbent for phosphate removal and fertilizer carrier to control phosphate release.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Kumar, M V Suresh

    2005-10-01

    The surface of coir pith, an agricultural solid waste was modified using a cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA) and the modified coir pith was investigated to assess the capacity for the removal of phosphate from aqueous solution. Optimum pH for maximum phosphate adsorption was found to be 4.0. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to model the adsorption equilibrium data. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption obeyed second order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and the overall adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. Effect of coexisting anions has also been studied. The feasibility of using spent adsorbent as fertilizer carrier to control phosphate release was also investigated.

  1. Surfactant modified/mediated thin-layer chromatographic systems for the analysis of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bhawani, Showkat A; Albishri, Hassan M; Khan, Ziya Ahmad; Mohamad Ibrahim, Mohamad N; Mohammad, A

    2013-01-01

    This review incorporates a large number of chromatographic systems modified by the surfactants. A large number of solvent systems and stationary phases are summarized in this paper. Three different kinds of surfactants (anionic, cationic, and nonionic) are used as modifiers for stationary phases as well as solvent systems. Surfactants are used at all the three different concentration levels (below, above, and at critical micelle concentration) where surfactants behave differently. Modifications of both stationary phases and solvent systems by surfactants produced a new generation of chromatographic systems. Microemulsion solvent systems are also incorporated in this paper. Microemulsion thin-layer chromatography is a new approach in the field of chromatography.

  2. Surfactant Modified/Mediated Thin-Layer Chromatographic Systems for the Analysis of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Bhawani, Showkat A.; Albishri, Hassan M.; Mohamad Ibrahim, Mohamad N.; Mohammad, A.

    2013-01-01

    This review incorporates a large number of chromatographic systems modified by the surfactants. A large number of solvent systems and stationary phases are summarized in this paper. Three different kinds of surfactants (anionic, cationic, and nonionic) are used as modifiers for stationary phases as well as solvent systems. Surfactants are used at all the three different concentration levels (below, above, and at critical micelle concentration) where surfactants behave differently. Modifications of both stationary phases and solvent systems by surfactants produced a new generation of chromatographic systems. Microemulsion solvent systems are also incorporated in this paper. Microemulsion thin-layer chromatography is a new approach in the field of chromatography. PMID:24455427

  3. Method for removing strongly adsorbed surfactants and capping agents from metal to facilitate their catalytic applications

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Gong, Kuanping; Cai, Yun; Wong, Stanislaus; Koenigsmann, Christopher

    2016-11-08

    A method of synthesizing activated electrocatalyst, preferably having a morphology of a nanostructure, is disclosed. The method includes safely and efficiently removing surfactants and capping agents from the surface of the metal structures. With regard to metal nanoparticles, the method includes synthesis of nanoparticle(s) in polar or non-polar solution with surfactants or capping agents and subsequent activation by CO-adsorption-induced surfactant/capping agent desorption and electrochemical oxidation. The method produces activated macroparticle or nanoparticle electrocatalysts without damaging the surface of the electrocatalyst that includes breaking, increasing particle thickness or increasing the number of low coordination sites.

  4. Instability of a two-layer thin liquid film with surfactants: Dewetting waves.

    PubMed

    Fisher, L S; Golovin, A A

    2007-03-01

    Dewetting dynamics of a liquid film composed of two superposed ultra-thin layers of immiscible liquids resting on a solid substrate is investigated in the case when surfactants are present at the liquid-liquid interface. Two cases are considered: insoluble surfactant and surfactant soluble in the lower liquid. The dependence of Hamaker constants on the surfactant concentration is taken into account. A system of three strongly nonlinear evolution equations describing large (comparable to the layer thicknesses), long-wave perturbations of the liquid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces, as well as the surfactant concentration, is derived for each case in the lubrication approximation. The linear stability analysis shows that in the presence of surfactants, oscillatory dewetting instability can occur. Numerical simulations of this system of nonlinear evolution equations are performed. It is found that in the case of oscillatory instabilities, the system exhibits either standing or traveling "dewetting waves." The weakly nonlinear analysis explains this phenomenon.

  5. [Sorption of nitrobenzene to anionic surfactant modified layered double hydroxides].

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Zhu, Run-Liang; Tao, Qi; Liu, Han-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) modified MgAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were synthesized at different surfactant concentrations (0.5-2.0 TAEC) by the co-precipitation method. The LDH-DS samples obtained were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy. The results showed that SDS was successfully intercalated into the interlayer of the LDH, and the basal spacing was expanded from 0.80 nm to 3.98 nm. The intercalated SDS was considered consistent with a paraffin bilayers arrangement. The sorption of nitrobenzene on LDH-DS was examined, and the results showed that linear model could fit the sorption isotherms well (R2 > 0.99), which implied a partitioning sorption process. The sorption coefficient of nitrobenzene (K(d)) on LDH-DS was positively related to the DS - loading amount, but the organic carbon content normalized sorption coefficient of nitrobenzene (K(oc)) was shown to remain relatively constant. The sorption thermodynamics results showed that the sorption of nitrobenzene on LDH-DS was an endothermic process, and the increase of entropy was the driving force for the sorption process.

  6. VERUCLAY – a new type of photo-adsorbent active in the visible light range: modification of montmorillonite surface with organic surfactant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Montmorillonite K10 was treated with VeruSOL-3, a biodegradable and food-grade surfactant mixture of coconut oil, castor oil and citrus extracts, to manufacture a benign catalytic adsorbent that is active in the visible light. Veruclay was characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, UVDRS, a...

  7. Cellular Responses Modulated by FGF-2 Adsorbed on Albumin/Heparin Layer-by-Layer Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Kumorek, Marta; Kubies, Dana; Filová, Elena; Houska, Milan; Kasoju, Naresh; Mázl Chánová, Eliška; Matějka, Roman; Krýslová, Markéta; Bačáková, Lucie; Rypáček, František

    2015-01-01

    In a typical cell culture system, growth factors immobilized on the cell culture surfaces can serve as a reservoir of bio-signaling molecules, without the need to supplement them additionally into the culture medium. In this paper, we report on the fabrication of albumin/heparin (Alb/Hep) assemblies for controlled binding of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The surfaces were constructed by layer-by-layer adsorption of polyelectrolytes albumin and heparin and were subsequently stabilized by covalent crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. An analysis of the surface morphology by atomic force microscopy showed that two Alb/Hep bilayers are required to cover the surface of substrate. The formation of the Alb/Hep assemblies was monitored by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the infrared multiinternal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR MIRS) and UV/VIS spectroscopy. The adsorption of FGF-2 on the cross-linked Alb/Hep was followed by SPR. The results revealed that FGF-2 binds to the Alb/Hep assembly in a dose and time-dependent manner up to the surface concentration of 120 ng/cm2. The bioactivity of the adsorbed FGF-2 was assessed in experiments in vitro, using calf pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (CPAE). CPAE cells could attach and proliferate on Alb/Hep surfaces. The adsorbed FGF-2 was bioactive and stimulated both the proliferation and the differentiation of CPAE cells. The improvement was more pronounced at a lower FGF-2 surface concentration (30 ng/cm2) than on surfaces with a higher concentration of FGF-2 (120 ng/cm2). PMID:25945799

  8. Cellular Responses Modulated by FGF-2 Adsorbed on Albumin/Heparin Layer-by-Layer Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Kumorek, Marta; Kubies, Dana; Filová, Elena; Houska, Milan; Kasoju, Naresh; Mázl Chánová, Eliška; Matějka, Roman; Krýslová, Markéta; Bačáková, Lucie; Rypáček, František

    2015-01-01

    In a typical cell culture system, growth factors immobilized on the cell culture surfaces can serve as a reservoir of bio-signaling molecules, without the need to supplement them additionally into the culture medium. In this paper, we report on the fabrication of albumin/heparin (Alb/Hep) assemblies for controlled binding of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The surfaces were constructed by layer-by-layer adsorption of polyelectrolytes albumin and heparin and were subsequently stabilized by covalent crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. An analysis of the surface morphology by atomic force microscopy showed that two Alb/Hep bilayers are required to cover the surface of substrate. The formation of the Alb/Hep assemblies was monitored by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the infrared multiinternal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR MIRS) and UV/VIS spectroscopy. The adsorption of FGF-2 on the cross-linked Alb/Hep was followed by SPR. The results revealed that FGF-2 binds to the Alb/Hep assembly in a dose and time-dependent manner up to the surface concentration of 120 ng/cm(2). The bioactivity of the adsorbed FGF-2 was assessed in experiments in vitro, using calf pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (CPAE). CPAE cells could attach and proliferate on Alb/Hep surfaces. The adsorbed FGF-2 was bioactive and stimulated both the proliferation and the differentiation of CPAE cells. The improvement was more pronounced at a lower FGF-2 surface concentration (30 ng/cm(2)) than on surfaces with a higher concentration of FGF-2 (120 ng/cm(2)).

  9. Application of electron-stimulated desorption for studying adsorbed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, V. N.; Kuznetsov, Yu. A.; Potekhina, N. D.

    2013-06-01

    After a brief discussion of the main result of the research initiated by N.I. Ionov in his laboratory using electron-stimulated desorption for studying the surface layers of tungsten, we consider in greater detail recent results on layered coatings formed on the tungsten surface upon simultaneous adsorption of sodium (or cesium) and gold atoms on this surface, as well as the effect of sputtering of samarium atoms on the (Cs + Au)/W(100) surface that has already been formed at 300 K.

  10. Thermodynamics, interfacial pressure isotherms and dilational rheology of mixed protein-surfactant adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Krägel, J; Miller, R

    2016-07-01

    Proteins and their mixtures with surfactants are widely used in many applications. The knowledge of their solution bulk behavior and its impact on the properties of interfacial layers made great progress in the recent years. Different mechanisms apply to the formation process of protein/surfactant complexes for ionic and non-ionic surfactants, which are governed mainly by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The surface activity of these complexes is often remarkably different from that of the individual protein and has to be considered in respective theoretical models. At very low protein concentration, small amounts of added surfactants can change the surface activity of proteins remarkably, even though no strongly interfacial active complexes are observed. Also small added amounts of non-ionic surfactants change the surface activity of proteins in the range of small bulk concentrations or surface coverages. The modeling of the equilibrium adsorption behavior of proteins and their mixtures with surfactants has reached a rather high level. These models are suitable also to describe the high frequency limits of the dilational viscoelasticity of the interfacial layers. Depending on the nature of the protein/surfactant interactions and the changes in the interfacial layer composition rather complex dilational viscoelasticities can be observed and described by the available models. The differences in the interfacial behavior, often observed in literature for studies using different experimental methods, are at least partially explained by a depletion of proteins, surfactants and their complexes in the range of low concentrations. A correction of these depletion effects typically provides good agreement between the data obtained with different methods, such as drop and bubble profile tensiometry.

  11. Stability, structural and electronic properties of benzene molecule adsorbed on free standing Au layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoch, Neha; Kapoor, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    We report stability and electronic properties of benzene molecule adsorbed on the Au atomic layer within the framework of density function theory (DFT). Horizontal configuration of benzene on the top site of Au monolayer prefers energetically over other studied configurations. On the adsorption of benzene, the ballistic conductance of Au monolayer is found to decrease from 4G0 to 2G0 suggesting its applications for the fabrications of organic sensor devices based on the Au atomic layers.

  12. Surfactant-associated bacteria in the near-surface layer of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Naoko; Vella, Kate; Hamilton, Bryan; Shivji, Mahmood; Soloviev, Alexander; Matt, Silvia; Tartar, Aurélien; Perrie, William

    2016-01-12

    Certain marine bacteria found in the near-surface layer of the ocean are expected to play important roles in the production and decay of surface active materials; however, the details of these processes are still unclear. Here we provide evidence supporting connection between the presence of surfactant-associated bacteria in the near-surface layer of the ocean, slicks on the sea surface, and a distinctive feature in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery of the sea surface. From DNA analyses of the in situ samples using pyrosequencing technology, we found the highest abundance of surfactant-associated bacterial taxa in the near-surface layer below the slick. Our study suggests that production of surfactants by marine bacteria takes place in the organic-rich areas of the water column. Produced surfactants can then be transported to the sea surface and form slicks when certain physical conditions are met. This finding has potential applications in monitoring organic materials in the water column using remote sensing techniques. Identifying a connection between marine bacteria and production of natural surfactants may provide a better understanding of the global picture of biophysical processes at the boundary between the ocean and atmosphere, air-sea exchange of greenhouse gases, and production of climate-active marine aerosols.

  13. Surfactant-associated bacteria in the near-surface layer of the ocean

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Naoko; Vella, Kate; Hamilton, Bryan; Shivji, Mahmood; Soloviev, Alexander; Matt, Silvia; Tartar, Aurélien; Perrie, William

    2016-01-01

    Certain marine bacteria found in the near-surface layer of the ocean are expected to play important roles in the production and decay of surface active materials; however, the details of these processes are still unclear. Here we provide evidence supporting connection between the presence of surfactant-associated bacteria in the near-surface layer of the ocean, slicks on the sea surface, and a distinctive feature in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery of the sea surface. From DNA analyses of the in situ samples using pyrosequencing technology, we found the highest abundance of surfactant-associated bacterial taxa in the near-surface layer below the slick. Our study suggests that production of surfactants by marine bacteria takes place in the organic-rich areas of the water column. Produced surfactants can then be transported to the sea surface and form slicks when certain physical conditions are met. This finding has potential applications in monitoring organic materials in the water column using remote sensing techniques. Identifying a connection between marine bacteria and production of natural surfactants may provide a better understanding of the global picture of biophysical processes at the boundary between the ocean and atmosphere, air-sea exchange of greenhouse gases, and production of climate-active marine aerosols. PMID:26753514

  14. Application of 1H NMR spectroscopy method for determination of characteristics of thin layers of water adsorbed on the surface of dispersed and porous adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Turov, V V; Leboda, R

    1999-02-01

    The paper presents 1H NMR spectroscopy as a perspective method of the studies of the characteristics of water boundary layers in the hydrated powders and aqueous dispergated suspensions of the adsorbents. The method involves measurements of temperature dependence proton signals intensity in the adsorbed water at temperatures lower than 273 K. Free energy of water molecules at the adsorbent/water interface is diminished due to the adsorption interactions causing the water dosed to the adsorbent surface freezes at T < 273 K. Thickness of a non-freezing layer of water can be determined from the intensity of the water signal of 1H NMR during the freezing-thawing process. Due to a disturbing action of the adsorbent surface, water occurs in the quasi-liquid state. As a result, it is observed in the 1H NMR spectra as a relatively narrow signal. The signal of ice is not registered due to great differences in the transverse relaxation times of the adsorbed water and ice. The method of measuring the free surface energy of the adsorbents from the temperature dependence of the signal intensity of non-freezing water is based on the fact that the temperature of water freezing decreases by the quantity which depends on the surface energy and the distance of the adsorbed molecules from the solid surface. The water at the interface freezes when the free energies of the adsorbed water and ice are equal. To illustrate the applicability of the method under consideration the series of adsorption systems in which the absorbents used differed in the surface chemistry and porous structure. In particular, the behaviour of water on the surface of the following adsorbents is discussed: non-porous and porous silica (aerosils, silica gels); chemically and physically modified non-porous and porous silica (silanization, carbonization, biopolymer deposition); and pyrogeneous Al2O3 and aluminasilicas. The effect of preliminary treatment of the adsorbent (thermal, high pressure, wetting with polar

  15. Layer-by-layer growth of Ag on Ag(111) induced by enhanced nucleation: A model study for surfactant-mediated growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Georg; Servaty, Roland; Teichert, Christian; Poelsema, Bene; Comsa, George

    1993-08-01

    It has been reported that the growth mode of Ag on Ag(111), which is usually multilayer (3D), changes to layer-by-layer (2D) growth if Sb is used as a surfactant. In a model study on the clean system Ag/Ag(111) (without any surfactant) we find that two-dimensional layers do grow, if the substrate is prepared with an anomalously high density of Ag nuclei. As an enhanced density of nuclei is also observed in the presence of Sb, this effect may explain the mechanism for surfactant-induced layer-by-layer growth.

  16. Generation of transverse waves in a liquid layer with insoluble surfactant subjected to temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikishev, Alexander B.; Friedman, Barry A.; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A.

    2016-12-01

    The formation of Faraday waves (FWs) at the surfactant-covered free surface of a vertically vibrated liquid layer is considered. The layer is subjected to a vertical temperature gradient. The surfactant is insoluble. Linear stability analysis and the Floquet method are used for disturbances with arbitrary wave numbers to find the regions of critical vibration amplitude where FWs are generated. The problem is considered for the semi-infinite liquid layer, as well as for the layer of a finite depth. It is shown numerically, that in the semi-infinite case the critical tongue of a neutral stability curve corresponding to the lowest value of the forcing amplitude is related to the subharmonic instability mode. It changes to the harmonic one in the case of finite depth. The influence of thermocapillary Marangoni number on the critical amplitude of FWs is studied. The growth of that number stabilizes the system, however, this effect is very weak.

  17. Low-Friction Adsorbed Layers of a Triblock Copolymer Additive in Oil-Based Lubrication.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinji; Fujihara, Ami; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Tanabe, Tadao; Kurihara, Kazue

    2015-11-10

    The tribological properties of the dilute solution of an ABA triblock copolymer, poly(11-acrylamidoundecanoic acid)-block-poly(stearyl methacrylate)-block-poly(11-acrylamidoundecanoic acid (A5S992A5), in poly(α-olefin) (PAO) confined between mica surfaces were investigated using the surface forces apparatus (SFA). Friction force was measured as a function of applied load and sliding velocity, and the film thickness and contact geometry during sliding were analyzed using the fringes of equal chromatic order (FECO) in the SFA. The results were contrasted with those of confined PAO films; the effects of the addition of A5S992A5 on the tribological properties were discussed. The thickness of the A5S992A5/PAO system varied with time after surface preparation and with repetitive sliding motions. The thickness was within the range from 40 to 70 nm 1 day after preparation (the Day1 film), and was about 20 nm on the following day (the Day2 film). The thickness of the confined PAO film was thinner than 1.4 nm, indicating that the A5S992A5/PAO system formed thick adsorbed layers on mica surfaces. The friction coefficient was about 0.03 to 0.04 for the Day1 film and well below 0.01 for the Day2 film, which were 1 or 2 orders of magnitude lower than the values for the confined PAO films. The time dependent changes of the adsorbed layer thickness and friction properties should be caused by the relatively low solubility of A5S992A5 in PAO. The detailed analysis of the contact geometry and friction behaviors implies that the particularly low friction of the Day2 film originates from the following factors: (i) shrinkage of the A5S992A5 molecules (mainly the poly(stearyl methacrylate) blocks) that leads to a viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed layers; and (ii) the intervening PAO layer between the adsorbed polymer layers that constitutes a high-fluidity sliding interface. Our results suggest that the block copolymer having relatively low solubility in a lubricant base oil is

  18. Surfactant-free single-layer graphene in water.

    PubMed

    Bepete, George; Anglaret, Eric; Ortolani, Luca; Morandi, Vittorio; Huang, Kai; Pénicaud, Alain; Drummond, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Dispersing graphite in water to obtain true (single-layer) graphene in bulk quantity in a liquid has been an unreachable goal for materials scientists in the past decade. Similarly, a diagnostic tool to identify solubilized graphene in situ has been long awaited. Here we show that homogeneous stable dispersions of single-layer graphene (SLG) in water can be obtained by mixing graphenide (negatively charged graphene) solutions in tetrahydrofuran with degassed water and evaporating the organic solvent. In situ Raman spectroscopy of these aqueous dispersions shows all the expected characteristics of SLG. Transmission electron and atomic force microscopies on deposits confirm the single-layer character. The resulting additive-free stable water dispersions contain 400 m(2) l(-1) of developed graphene surface. Films prepared from these dispersions exhibit a conductivity of up to 32 kS m(-1).

  19. Surfactant-free single-layer graphene in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bepete, George; Anglaret, Eric; Ortolani, Luca; Morandi, Vittorio; Huang, Kai; Pénicaud, Alain; Drummond, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Dispersing graphite in water to obtain true (single-layer) graphene in bulk quantity in a liquid has been an unreachable goal for materials scientists in the past decade. Similarly, a diagnostic tool to identify solubilized graphene in situ has been long awaited. Here we show that homogeneous stable dispersions of single-layer graphene (SLG) in water can be obtained by mixing graphenide (negatively charged graphene) solutions in tetrahydrofuran with degassed water and evaporating the organic solvent. In situ Raman spectroscopy of these aqueous dispersions shows all the expected characteristics of SLG. Transmission electron and atomic force microscopies on deposits confirm the single-layer character. The resulting additive-free stable water dispersions contain 400 m2 l-1 of developed graphene surface. Films prepared from these dispersions exhibit a conductivity of up to 32 kS m-1.

  20. Modeling colloid deposition on a protein layer adsorbed to iron-oxide-coated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Flynn, R.; von der Kammer, F.; Hofmann, T.

    2012-11-01

    Our recent study reported that conformation change of granule-associated Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) may influence the role of the protein controlling colloid deposition in porous media (Flynn et al., 2012). The present study conceptualized the observed phenomena with an ellipsoid morphology model, describing BSA as an ellipsoid taking a side-on or end-on conformation on granular surface, and identified the following processes: (1) at low adsorbed concentrations, BSA exhibited a side-on conformation blocking colloid deposition; (2) at high adsorbed concentrations, BSA adapted to an end-on conformation promoted colloid deposition; and (3) colloid deposition on the BSA layer may progressively generate end-on molecules (sites) by conformation change of side-on BSA, resulting in sustained increasing deposition rates. Generally, the protein layer lowered colloid attenuation by the porous medium, suggesting the overall effect of BSA was inhibitory at the experimental time scale. A mathematical model was developed to interpret the ripening curves. Modeling analysis identified the site generation efficiency of colloid as a control on the ripening rate (declining rate in colloid concentrations), and this efficiency was higher for BSA adsorbed from a more dilute BSA solution.

  1. The role of adsorbed water on the friction of a layer of submicron particles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sammis, Charles G.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Ze’ev

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously low values of friction observed in layers of submicron particles deformed in simple shear at high slip velocities are explained as the consequence of a one nanometer thick layer of water adsorbed on the particles. The observed transition from normal friction with an apparent coefficient near μ = 0.6 at low slip speeds to a coefficient near μ = 0.3 at higher slip speeds is attributed to competition between the time required to extrude the water layer from between neighboring particles in a force chain and the average lifetime of the chain. At low slip speeds the time required for extrusion is less than the average lifetime of a chain so the particles make contact and lock. As slip speed increases, the average lifetime of a chain decreases until it is less than the extrusion time and the particles in a force chain never come into direct contact. If the adsorbed water layer enables the otherwise rough particles to rotate, the coefficient of friction will drop to μ = 0.3, appropriate for rotating spheres. At the highest slip speeds particle temperatures rise above 100°C, the water layer vaporizes, the particles contact and lock, and the coefficient of friction rises to μ = 0.6. The observed onset of weakening at slip speeds near 0.001 m/s is consistent with the measured viscosity of a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water, with a minimum particle radius of approximately 20 nm, and with reasonable assumptions about the distribution of force chains guided by experimental observation. The reduction of friction and the range of velocities over which it occurs decrease with increasing normal stress, as predicted by the model. Moreover, the analysis predicts that this high-speed weakening mechanism should operate only for particles with radii smaller than approximately 1 μm. For larger particles the slip speed required for weakening is so large that frictional heating will evaporate the adsorbed water and weakening will not occur.

  2. Stability of an unsupported multi-layer surfactant laden liquid curtain under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Dominic; Uddin, Jamal; Marston, Jeremy; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2014-11-01

    The industrial process of curtain coating has long been an important method in coating applications, by which a thin liquid curtain is formed to impinge upon a moving substrate, the highly lucrative advantage being able to coat multiple layers simultaneously. We investigate the linear stability of an unsupported two-layer liquid curtain, which has insoluble surfactants in both liquids. We formulate the governing equations, simplified by making a thin film approximation, from which we obtain equations describing the steady state profiles. We then examine the response of the curtain to small perturbations about this steady state to identify conditions under which the curtain is unstable, finding the addition of surfactants stabilizes the curtain. Our results are then compared to experimental data, showing a favourable trend and therefore extending the work of Brown. D.H. would like to thank EPSRC for their financial support and KAUST for funding the experimental work.

  3. Measurement of interactions between protein layers adsorbed on silica by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Delgado, J. J.; Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Galisteo-González, F.; Gálvez-Ruiz, M. J.; Feiler, A.; Rutland, M. W.

    2004-07-01

    The present work, using an atomic force microscope and the colloid probe technique, investigates the interaction forces between bovine serum albumin (BSA) layers and between apoferritin layers adsorbed on silica surfaces. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different pH values and NaCl concentrations. Similar behaviours have been found with both proteins. Electrostatic and steric forces dominate the interactions between the protein layers at low NaCl concentrations. However, a very strange behaviour is found as a function of pH at high NaCl concentrations. The results obtained under these conditions could be explained if the presence of hydration forces in these systems is assumed.

  4. The formation of standing cylinders in block copolymer films by irreversibly adsorbed polymer layers on substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jun; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya; Koga, Tadanori

    2013-03-01

    Block copolymers offer a simple and effective route to produce standing cylindrical nanostructures with regularity on the order of 10-100 nm, the length scale that is desirable for many advanced applications. However, these formations have been especially troublesome due to the fact that preferential interactions between one of the blocks and the surfaces will induce parallel alignment of the cylinders in order to minimize interfacial and surface energy. Here we introduce an alternative simple method utilizing an irreversibly adsorbed polymer layer (a ``Guiselin'' brush) as a neutral ``substrate'' formed on solid substrates for the arrangement of standing cylindrical nanostructures. The effect of polymer adsorbed layer on the long range ordering of asymmetric cylinder forming poly(styrene-block-ethylene/butylene-block-styrene) (SEBS) triblock copolymer thin films were investigated by using a combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy techniques. We found that the SEBS, which forms cylinders lying parallel to the surface when prepared on silicon substrates, show standing cylindrical structures on selected Guiselin brush layers after prolong thermal annealing. The details will be discussed in the presentation. We acknowledges the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-084626

  5. Adsorption of micelle-forming surfactants from aqueous solutions on disperse titanium boride

    SciTech Connect

    Grodskii, A.S.; Komleva, E.A.; Frolov, Yu.G.

    1988-08-10

    Adsorption studies showed that nonionogenic and cationic surfactants are adsorbed on the surface of disperse titanium boride. Anionic surfactants are virtually not adsorbed due to the negative charge of the particles. It was found that in the region of low concentrations of surfactants in the solution, adsorption of Sintanols takes place in lyophobic regions and the surface of the particles becomes hydrophilic. The Sintamid molecules are adsorbed on the entire interface, including both hydrophobic and hydrophilic sections, with subsequent formation of bimolecular layers by adsorption on hydrophobic sections. Catamine-AB is adsorbed on hydrophilic sections of the surface also with the formation of bimolecular layers. Developed polymolecular layers up to 10-15 nm thick are formed on titanium boride particles from micellar solutions of nonionigenic and cationic surfactants.

  6. Method for Controlling Electrical Properties of Single-Layer Graphene Nanoribbons via Adsorbed Planar Molecular Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Arima, Ryo; Fukumori, Minoru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Negishi, Ryota; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Seiya; Yamada, Toyo Kazu; Ogawa, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for fabricating single-layer graphene nanoribbons (sGNRs) from double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) was developed. A sonication treatment was employed to unzip the DWNTs by inducing defects in them through annealing at 500 °C. The unzipped DWNTs yielded double-layered GNRs (dGNRs). Further sonication allowed each dGNR to be unpeeled into two sGNRs. Purification performed using a high-speed centrifuge ensured that more than 99% of the formed GNRs were sGNRs. The changes induced in the electrical properties of the obtained sGNR by the absorption of nanoparticles of planar molecule, naphthalenediimide (NDI), were investigated. The shape of the I-V curve of the sGNRs varied with the number of NDI nanoparticles adsorbed. This was suggestive of the existence of a band gap at the narrow-necked part near the NDI-adsorbing area of the sGNRs. PMID:26205209

  7. Methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxides with the mediation of surfactants: Mechanism exploration and bioassay study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Tian, De-Ying; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-12-01

    Methotrexatum intercalated layered double hydroxides (MTX/LDHs) hybrids were synthesized by the co-precipitation method and three kinds of nonionic surfactants with different hydrocarbon chain lengths were used. The resulting hybrids were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD and FTIR investigations manifest the successful intercalation of MTX anions into the interlayer of LDHs. TEM graphs indicate that the morphology of the hybrids changes with the variation of the chain length of the surfactants, i.e., the particles synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG-7) present regular disc morphology with good monodispersity, while samples with the mediation of alkyl polyglycoside (APG-14) are heavily aggregated and samples with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-10) exhibit irregular branches. Furthermore, the release and bioassay experiments show that monodisperse MTX/LDHs present good controlled-release and are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells.

  8. REUSABLE ADSORBENTS FOR DILUTE SOLUTIONS SEPARATION. 5: PHOTODEGRADATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON SURFACTANT-MODIFIED TITANIA. (R828598C753)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semiconductor titania (TiO2) surface was modified by surfactant adsorption to make it more hydrophobic and to increase the adsorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) and their photodegradation rates under UV irradiation. Photocatalytic experiments using Ti...

  9. Free energy of electrical double layers: Entropy of adsorbed ions and the binding polynomial

    SciTech Connect

    Stigter, D.; Dill, K.A. )

    1989-09-07

    The authors adapt the method of binding polynomials to general problems of binding equilibria of ions to polybases, polyacids, and mixed polyelectrolytes, such as proteins and other colloids. For spherical particles with a smeared charge the interaction effects are taken into account using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, which is shown to differ little from the Debye-Hueckel approximation under conditions met in most protein solutions. Examples are given of the salt dependence of pH titration equilibria. Binding polynomials produce an extra term in the free energy of the electrical double layer, which arises from the entropy of the adsorbed ions. The maximum term method applied to the binding polynominal yields an expression which is similar to that derived by the charging process of Chan and Mitchell. Applications to monolayers and to polyelectrolyte gels are also discussed.

  10. Ultra-Thin Optically Transparent Carbon Electrodes Produced from Layers of Adsorbed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alharthi, Sarah A.; Benavidez, Tomas E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a simple, versatile, and inexpensive procedure to prepare optically transparent carbon electrodes, using proteins as precursors. Upon adsorption, the protein-coated substrates were pyrolyzed under reductive conditions (5% H2) to form ultra-thin, conductive electrodes. Because proteins spontaneously adsorb to interfaces forming uniform layers, the proposed method does not require a precise control of the preparation conditions, specialized instrumentation, or expensive precursors. The resulting electrodes were characterized by a combination of electrochemical, optical, and spectroscopic means. As a proof-of-concept, the optically-transparent electrodes were also used as substrate for the development of an electrochemical glucose biosensor. The proposed films represent a convenient alternative to more sophisticated, and less available, carbon-based nanomaterials. Furthermore, these films could be formed on a variety of substrates, without classical limitations of size or shape. PMID:23421732

  11. Investigations on humic acid removal from water using surfactant-modified zeolite as adsorbent in a fixed-bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsheikh, Awad F.; Ahmad, Umi Kalthom; Ramli, Zainab

    2016-12-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous in aquatic environments and has recently become an issue of worldwide concern in drinking water treatment. The major component of NOM is humic acids (HA). In this study, a natural zeolite (mordenite) was modified employing hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA) to enhance greater efficient sites for sorption of HA. The natural zeolite and surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), N2 Adsorption-desorption isotherms and BET-specific surface area, thermographic analysis, derivative thermographic analysis (TGA-DTA) and Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). A fixed-bed reactor was used for the removal of HA and the effects of different experimental parameters such as HDTMA loading levels, HA solution flow rate, solution pH and eluent concentration were investigated. The results indicated that the SMZ bed with HDTMA loading of 75% of external cation exchange capacity (ECEC) at a flow rate of 2 BV/h and pH of 10 showed the greatest enhanced removal efficiency of HA while ethanol solutions (25%v/v) with feed flow rate of 2 BV/h were sufficient for complete regeneration of SMZ and desorption of HA. Measurements of surface area of SMZ indicated that a monolayer formation of the surfactant at those conditions allowed the optimum removal of HA.

  12. Adsorption of cationic monomeric and gemini surfactants on montmorillonite and adsolubilization of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Nakajima, Erimi; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Sharma, Suraj C; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Yoshimura, Tomokazu; Esumi, Kunio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of a cationic gemini surfactant (1,2-bis(dodecyldimethylammonio) ethane dibromide, 12-2-12) and the corresponding monomeric surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, DTAB) on montmorillonite has been characterized with a combination of adsorption isotherm, interlayer spacing and FT-IR spectroscopic data. Adsolubilization of vitamin E into the adsorbed surfactant layers has also been studied. The adsorption isotherm data reveal that the adsorption of the two surfactants is driven by the two factors: one is the cation exchange that occurs on the interlayer basal planes and the other is the hydrophobic interaction between hydrocarbon chains of the surfactants. Although the adsorbed amount measured in the saturation region (in mol g(-1)) is almost identical for the two surfactants, the conformation of the intercalated surfactant molecules differs significantly from each other. The adsorption of DTAB results in a lateral bilayer arrangement in the limited interlayer space, whereas 12-2-12 gives a normal bilayer arrangement in the expanded interlayer space. Adsolubilization of vitamin E takes place into the adsorbed surfactant layers, and interestingly, all the vitamin E molecules added in the montmorillonite suspensions are hybridized at lower surfactant concentrations due to the great specific surface area of the clay material. Since the maximum adsolubilization amount is usually obtained just below the critical micelle concentration, the gemini surfactant is deemed to be more efficient than the corresponding monomeric one to achieve the great adsolubilization amount.

  13. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Near Surface Layer of the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Naoko; Vella, Katie; Soloviev, Alexander; Matt, Silvia; Tartar, Aurelien; Shivji, Mahmood; Perrie, William

    2013-04-01

    It has recently been realized that biogeochemical processes in the ocean are, to a large extent, the result of nanoscale processes in the microbial part of the pelagic food web. Bacteria found in thin near-surface layers of the ocean - bacterioneuston - are of special interest due to a number of practical applications, including air-sea gas exchange, production of climate-active marine aerosols and remote sensing of the ocean. In particular, bacteria involved in the production of the surface active materials resulting in slicks on the sea surface can potentially be observed from space using high-resolution remote sensing techniques. In this work done by a multidisciplinary team, we demonstrate a direct connection between surfactant-associated bacteria, identified with an advanced DNA analysis, and fine-scale features on the sea surface in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. Experiments were conducted in the Straits of Florida during RASRASAT 2 satellite overpasses. The sea surface microlayer sampling method was designed to enable aseptic bacterial sampling. A 47 mm polycarbonate membrane was utilized at each sampling site to obtain a snapshot of the bacteria community structure at a specific space and time. Microbial composition was determined using DNA analysis of 16S rRNA genes. A new generation high-throughput sequencing method (454) was employed to compensate for the small sample size. A total of 27,006 nucleotide sequences with an average 437.8 bp in length were analyzed. From in situ samples taken during satellite overpasses, we found a higher abundance of surfactant-associated bacteria in slick (visible in SAR from space) as compared to non-slick areas; furthermore, higher abundance of this type of bacteria was observed in subsurface samples than in those taken from the sea surface. These observations suggest that surfactants are produced by marine bacteria mostly in the water column and migrate up to the sea surface by diffusion, air bubbles, or

  14. In situ Fourier transform-infrared internal reflection spectroscopic analysis of hydrocarbon chain ordering of surfactants adsorbed at mineral oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, William Murray

    The adsorption of surfactants at mineral oxide surfaces was investigated by in situ Fourier transform infrared internal reflection spectroscopy (FT-IR/IRS), and contact angle goniometry. FT-IR/IRS was used to determine both adsorption isotherms and the enthalpy of adsorption. Furthermore, the conformation and orientation of the hydrocarbon chain of SDS adsorbed at a sapphire internal reflection element (IRE) were determined. Contact angle goniometry was used to measure the effect of the surface phase of the surfactant on the hydrophobic character of sapphire surfaces in aqueous solutions. For SDS adsorbed by sapphire, in situ FT-IR/IRS experiments indicate that a surface phase transition occurs at an adsorption density of 2 to 3 x 10-10 mol/cm2 for both pD 2.9 and 6.9. This transition is characterized by a two to four wavenumber shift in the position of the asymmetric -CH2 stretching band. Based on solution spectroscopy studies, the surface phase was found to be similar to solution phase micelles and liquid crystals for adsorption densities less than the adsorption density of the surface phase transition. Whereas for adsorption densities in excess of the adsorption density of the surface phase transition, the surface phase resembled a solution phase coagel species. It was also found that the contact angle of an air bubble at the sapphire surface exhibited a sharp decrease at the adsorption density corresponding to the surface phase transition The effect of temperature on adsorption and phase behavior of SDS at the sapphire IRE surface was also determined. It was shown that a surface phase transition similar to that discussed occurred at approximately 298 K. The adsorption reaction was found to be exothermic, with a heat of adsorption of --1.3 kcal/mole for adsorption densities less than the adsorption density of the surface phase transition at 298 K and --4.1 kcal/mole for adsorption densities greater than the adsorption density of the surface phase transition

  15. Effect of peptide secondary structure on adsorption and adsorbed film properties on end-grafted polyethylene oxide layers.

    PubMed

    Binazadeh, M; Zeng, H; Unsworth, L D

    2014-01-01

    Poly-l-lysine (PLL), in α-helix or β-sheet configuration, was used as a model peptide for investigating the effect of secondary structures on adsorption events to poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) modified surfaces formed using θ solvents. Circular dichroism results showed that the secondary structure of PLL persisted upon adsorption to Au and PEO modified Au surfaces. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to characterize the chemisorbed PEO layer in different solvents (θ and good solvents), as well as the sequential adsorption of PLL in different secondary structures (α-helix or β-sheet). QCM-D results suggest that chemisorption of PEO 750 and 2000 from θ solutions led to brushes 3.8 ± 0.1 and 4.5 ± 0.1 nm thick with layer viscosities of 9.2 ± 0.8 and 4.8 ± 0.5 cP, respectively. The average number of H2O per ethylene oxides, while in θ solvent, was determined as ~0.9 and ~1.2 for the PEO 750 and 2000 layers, respectively. Upon immersion in good solvent (as used for PLL adsorption experiments), the number of H2O per ethylene oxides increased to ~1.5 and ~2.0 for PEO 750 and 2000 films, respectively. PLL adsorbed masses for α-helix and β-sheet on Au sensors was 231 ± 5 and 1087 ± 14 ng cm(-2), with layer viscosities of 2.3 ± 0.1 and 1.2 ± 0.1 cP, respectively; suggesting that the α-helix layer was more rigid, despite a smaller adsorbed mass, than that of β-sheet layers. The PEO 750 layer reduced PLL adsorbed amounts to ~10 and 12% of that on Au for α-helices and β-sheets respectively. The PLL adsorbed mass to PEO 2000 layers dropped to ~12% and 4% of that on Au, for α-helix and β-sheet respectively. No significant differences existed for the viscosities of adsorbed α-helix and β-sheet PLL on PEO surfaces. These results provide new insights into the fundamental understanding of the effects of secondary structures of peptides and proteins on their surface adsorption.

  16. [Sorption and mechanism of surfactants on bentonite in combined pollution].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Hui; Lu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Shu-Guang; Li, Ling-Jian; Shen, Xue-You

    2007-04-01

    Sorption of cationic surfactant cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) and nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) on bentonite was studied. The influences of cation-exchange capacity (CEC), temperature and salinity on the sorption of CPC were also discussed. The results indicate that the sorption of CPC on Na-bentonite is greater than that of TX-100 and SDBS, and SDBS hardly shows any sorption. CPC is adsorbed to Na-bentonite through a combination of hydrophobic bonding and cation-exchange. While TX-100 is adsorbed to Na-bentonite via the formation of an adsorption layer of twain surfactant molecule and hydrogenolysis of silicon-oxygen surface of bentonite and TX-100. The amount of SDBS adsorbed on Ca-bentonite increases with increasing surfactant concentration, reaching a maximum at 1.5 critical micelle concentration (CMC), and then decreases with increasing surfactant loading. The mechanism of the retention appears to be formation of a sparingly soluble Ca-SDBS species, and dissolution in the micelle. The amount of CPC adsorbed on bentonite decreases with increasing temperature, and increases with increasing CEC. NaCl can enhance the sorption of CPC on bentonite.

  17. Structural characterization of irreversibly adsorbed polymer layers at the polymer/solid interface - In-situ grazing incidence angle x-ray scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Naisheng; Chen, Fen; Chen, Xiameng; Han, Zexi; Liang, Chen; Gin, Peter; Asada, Mitsunori; Endoh, Maya; Koga, Tad

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, great attention has been paid to irreversibly adsorbed polymer layers formed on solid substrates since they can modify various properties of polymeric materials confined at the nanometer scale. In this talk, by the combined use of in-situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray reflectivity techniques, we aim to characterize the detailed structures of the adsorbed layers composed of different homopolymers (polystyrene, polybutadiene, poly (ethylene oxide), and poly (methyl methacrylate)) prepared on silicon substrates. We will highlight the generality/differences in the structures, leading to a better understanding of the formation process of the adsorbed layers at the impenetrable solid interfaces.

  18. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering ability and some UV protection, all achieved using an environmentally friendly coating process, which is beneficial to retain the natural appearance of wood and improve indoor air quality and comfort.

  19. Adsorbate induced enhancement of secondary electron emission from the layered compound VSe 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starnberg, H. I.; Nilsson, P. O.; Hughes, H. P.

    1993-05-01

    It is demonstrated how adsorbates may drastically enhance the photoemission yield at low kinetic energies from VSe 2 surfaces. The reason for this enhancement seems to be that the adsorbate by reducing the work function φ creates a condition closely resembling negative electron affinity (NBA), i.e. the vacuum level is pulled down into an absolute band-gap. In contrast to true NBA systems, there are empty states (predominantly of V3d character) available below the vacuum level, but due to low probability for scattering into these states, the NEA-like behaviour prevails. Since the involved band minimum is located close to the K symmetry point of the Brillouin zone, adsorbate induced diffuse scattering is vital to the observed enhancement.

  20. Multi-layer graphene oxide alone and in a composite with nanosilica: Preparation and interactions with polar and nonpolar adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gun'ko, V. M.; Turov, V. V.; Zarko, V. I.; Goncharuk, O. V.; Matkovsky, A. K.; Prykhod'ko, G. P.; Nychiporuk, Yu. M.; Pakhlov, E. M.; Krupska, T. V.; Balakin, D. Yu.; Charmas, B.; Andriyko, L. S.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Marynin, A. I.; Ukrainets, A. I.; Kartel, M. T.

    2016-11-01

    Freeze-dried multi-layer graphene oxide (MLGO), produced from natural flake graphite using ionic hydration method, demonstrates strong interactions of functionalized carbon sheets with polar or nonpolar adsorbates or co-adsorbates depending on the characteristics of dispersion media. Interactions of MLGO with a mixture of water and n-decane in chloroform media provide specific surface area (Su) in contact with unfrozen liquids greater than 1000 m2/g corresponding to stacks with 3-5 carbon layers. Electrostatic interactions between functionalized carbon sheets in dried MLGO are very strong. Therefore, nonpolar molecules (benzene, decane, nitrogen) cannot penetrate between the sheets. Water molecules can effectively penetrate between the sheets, especially if MLGO is located in weakly polar CDCl3 medium. In this case, n-decane molecules (co-adsorbate) can also penetrate into the sheet stacks and locate around nonpolar fragments of the sheets. The Su value of MLGO being in contact with unfrozen water can reach 360 m2/g, but upon co-adsorption of water with decane Su = 930 m2/g, i.e., hydrophobic interactions of the mentioned fragments with decane are stronger that with co-adsorbed water. Water alone (0.25 or 0.5 g/g) bound to MLGO in a mixture with fumed silica A-300 in air or CDCl3 media can provide Su = 30-50 m2/g. Pores in wetted MLGO or MLGO/A-300 mainly correspond to mesopores. Nanosilica does not provide significant opening of the MLGO sheet stacks during their mechanical mixing.

  1. Hybrid magnetic amphiphilic composites based on carbon nanotube/nanofibers and layered silicates fragments as efficient adsorbent for ethynilestradiol.

    PubMed

    Purceno, Aluir D; Teixeira, Ana Paula C; de Souza, Nubia Janaína; Fernandez-Outon, Luis E; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2012-08-01

    In this work, hybrid magnetic amphiphilic composites were prepared by the catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers CNF on layered silicates fragments. SEM, TEM, Raman, XRD, Mössbauer, TG/DTA showed that CVD with CH(4) at 800°C produced CNF and magnetic Fe cores fixed on the surface of microfragments of silicates layers. Due to the amphiphilic character, the composites can be easily dispersed in water and efficiently adsorb hydrophobic contaminant molecules. For example, the composites showed remarkable adsorption capacities for the hormone ethinylestradiol, e.g. 2-4 mg m(-2), compared to ca. 0.1 mg m(-2) obtained for high surface area activated carbon and multiwall CNT. These results are discussed in terms of a high hydrophobic exposed surface area of the CNT and CNF fixed on the layered silicates fragments surface. Moreover, the composites can be easily removed from water by a simple magnetic separation process.

  2. 2D sandbox experiments of surfactant foams for mobility control and enhanced LNAPL recovery in layered soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longpré-Girard, Mélanie; Martel, Richard; Robert, Thomas; Lefebvre, René; Lauzon, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    The ability of surfactant foam to enhance mobility control and LNAPL recovery in a heterogeneous porous media was investigated through sandbox experiments with p-xylene used as LNAPL. A layered heterogeneous porous media was represented in a 2D sandbox filled with two layers of coarse and medium silica sand. Based on previous tests, the surfactant solution used was Ammonyx Lo at a concentration of 0.1% (w/w). The sandbox experimental program included tracer tests done under both uncontaminated and contaminated conditions, foam injection under uncontaminated conditions and surfactant solution and foam injection under contaminated conditions. Tracer tests indicated that the permeability contrast between sand layers was increased by LNAPL contamination. Foam injection under uncontaminated conditions presented a S-shaped front that indicated a better mobility control than the piston-shaped front obtained during tracer tests. During foam injection, complete sweep of the sandbox was achieved with 1.8 pore volume (PV) compared to 2.8 PV during tracer injection, thus indicating better mobility control with foam. Pre-flush of the contaminated sandbox with surfactant solution initiated p-xylene mobilization but no free phase was recovered at the effluent. A negligible p-xylene residual saturation was reached following foam injection in the contaminated sandbox. However, mass balance indicated a total recovery of only 48% of the initial p-xylene, thus indicating an underestimation of the recovery by volatilization. Recovery by volatilization was corrected, which gave the following proportions of LNAPL recovery mechanisms: 19% by mobilization, 16% by dissolution and 65% by volatilization. Results show the potential efficiency of foam remediation of LNAPL source zones in heterogeneous porous media. Still, further developments are needed prior to field scale application, which could benefit from in situ foam production that would simplify on-site operations.

  3. Control of the dipole layer of polar organic molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces via different charge-transfer channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Kai; Nakayama, Yasuo; Zhuang, Ying-Jie; Su, Kai-Jun; Wang, Chin-Yung; Pi, Tun-Wen; Metz, Sebastian; Papadopoulos, Theodoros A.; Chiang, T.-C.; Ishii, Hisao; Tang, S.-J.

    2017-02-01

    Organic molecules with a permanent electric dipole moment have been widely used as a template for further growth of molecular layers in device structures. Key properties of the resulting organic films such as energy level alignment (ELA), work function, and injection/collection barrier are linked to the magnitude and direction of the dipole moment at the interface. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we have systematically investigated the coverage-dependent work function and spectral line shapes of occupied molecular energy states (MESs) of chloroaluminium-phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) grown on Ag(111). We demonstrate that the dipole orientation of the first ClAlPc layer can be controlled by adjusting the deposition rate and postannealing conditions, and we find that the ELA at the interface differs by ˜0.4 eV between the Cl up and down configurations of the adsorbed ClAlPc molecules. These observations are rationalized by density functional theory (DFT) calculations based on a realistic model of the ClAlPc/Ag(111) interface, which reveal that the different orientations of the ClAlPc dipole layer lead to different charge-transfer channels between the adsorbed ClAlPc and Ag(111) substrate. Our findings provide a useful framework toward method development for ELA tuning.

  4. Rate of Molecular Transfer of Allyl Alcohol across an AOT Surfactant Layer Using Muon Spin Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jayasooriya, Upali A; Clayden, Nigel J; Steytler, David C; Oganesyan, Vasily S; Peck, Jamie N T; Khasanov, Rustem; Scheuermann, Robert; Stoykov, Alexey

    2016-01-26

    The transfer rate of a probe molecule across the interfacial layer of a water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsion was investigated using a combination of transverse field muon spin rotation (TF-μSR), avoided level crossing muon spin resonance (ALC-μSR), and Monte Carlo simulations. Reverse microemulsions consist of nanometer-sized water droplets dispersed in an apolar solvent separated by a surfactant monolayer. Although the thermodynamic, static model of these systems has been well described, our understanding of their dynamics is currently incomplete. For example, what is the rate of solute transfer between the aqueous and apolar solvents, and how this is influenced by the structure of the interface? With an appropriate choice of system and probe molecule, μSR offers a unique opportunity to directly probe these interfacial transfer dynamics. Here, we have employed a well characterized w/o microemulsion stabilized by bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT), with allyl alcohol (CH2═CH-CH2-OH, AA) as the probe. Resonances due to both muoniated radicals, CMuH2-C*H-CH2-OH and C*H2-CHMu-CH2-OH, were observed with the former being the dominant species. All resonances displayed solvent dependence, with those in the microemulsion observed as a single resonance located at intermediate magnetic fields to those present in either of the pure solvents. Observation of a single resonance is strong evidence for interfacial transfer being in the fast exchange limit. Monte Carlo calculations of the ΔM = 0 ALC resonances are consistent with the experimental data, indicating exchange rates greater than 10(9) s(-1), placing the rate of interfacial transfer at the diffusion limit.

  5. Remobilizing surfactant retarded fluid particle interfaces. I. Stress-free conditions at the interfaces of micellar solutions of surfactants with fast sorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebe, Kathleen J.; Lin, Shi-Yow; Maldarelli, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Surfactant molecules adsorb onto the interfaces of moving fluid particles and are convected to regions in which the surface flow converges. Accumulation of surfactant in these regions creates interfacial tension gradients that retard the surface flow. In this study it is argued theoretically and demonstrated experimentally that fluid movement on the surface of a drop or bubble can remain unhindered in the presence of a single adsorbed surfactant if, relative to the convective rate of transport of adsorbed surfactant along the surface, desorption is fast, and the bulk concentration is high enough so that diffusion away from the particle is fast. For this circumstance, a uniform surface concentration of surfactant is maintained, and no gradients in surface tension arise to retard the surface velocity. The fluid particle flow behaves as it would in the absence of surfactant save that it has a reduced, uniform surface tension. The remobilization of surfactant-laden interfaces of fluid particles is demonstrated experimentally in a three-phase periodic slug flow in a capillary tube in which a train of alternating air and aqueous slugs ride on an annular wetting film of fluorocarbon oil. Surfactant, dissolved in the aqueous slug phase, adsorbs onto and retards the aqueous-oil interface. The hydrodynamics of this flow is such that small changes in the mobility of this interface create large shear rates in the oil layer. This significantly increases the pressure drop required to drive the slug train at constant velocity. Three surface adsorbers are used to demonstrate surface remobilization: The polyethoxy, nonionic surfactants Triton X-100 and Brij-35, which have fast desorption kinetics and do not retard the surface flow at high concentrations and, as a counter example, the desorption hindered protein bovine serum albumin, which is shown to be unable to remobilize an interface even at high concentration.

  6. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1992--September 30 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Casteel, J.

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this research project was to investigate mechanisms governing adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effects of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, various inorganic and polymeric species, and solids mineralogy have been determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability is used in this study. The results obtained should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the three years contract period, adsorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures was studied at the solid-liquid and gas-liquid interfaces. Alkyl xylene sulfonates, polyethoxylated alkyl phenols, octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride were the surfactants studied. Adsorption of surfactant mixtures of varying composition was also investigated. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes in interfacial properties such as wettability, electrokinetics and stability of reservoir minerals were correlated with the amounts of reagent adsorbed. Strong effects of the structure of the surfactant and position of functional groups were revealed. Changes of microstructure upon dilution (desorption) were also studied. Presence of the nonionic surfactants in mixed aggregate leads to shielding of the charge of ionic surfactants which in turn promotes aggregation but reduced electrostatic attraction between the charged surfactant and the mineral surface. Strong consequences of surfactant interactions in solution on adsorption as well as correlations between monomer concentration in mixtures and adsorption were revealed.

  7. Photoinduced Reconfiguration Cycle in a Molecular Adsorbate Layer Studied by Femtosecond Inner-Shell Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dachraoui, H.; Michelswirth, M.; Bartz, P.; Pfeiffer, W.; Heinzmann, U.; Siffalovic, P.; Schaefer, C.; Schnatwinkel, B.; Mattay, J.; Drescher, M.

    2011-03-11

    A time-resolved study of core-level chemical shifts in a monolayer of aromatic molecules reveals complex photoinduced reaction dynamics. The combination of electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and ultrashort pulse excitation in the extreme ultraviolet allows performing time-correlated 4d-core-level spectroscopy of iodine atoms that probe the local chemical environment in the adsorbate molecule. The selectivity of the method unveils metastable molecular configurations that appear about 50 ps after the excitation and are efficiently quenched back to the ground state.

  8. Subharmonic excitation in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy in the presence of adsorbed water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Sergio; Barcons, Victor; Verdaguer, Albert; Chiesa, Matteo

    2011-12-01

    In ambient conditions, nanometric water layers form on hydrophilic surfaces covering them and significantly changing their properties and characteristics. Here we report the excitation of subharmonics in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy induced by intermittent water contacts. Our simulations show that there are several regimes of operation depending on whether there is perturbation of water layers. Single period orbitals, where subharmonics are never induced, follow only when the tip is either in permanent contact with the water layers or in pure noncontact where the water layers are never perturbed. When the water layers are perturbed subharmonic excitation increases with decreasing oscillation amplitude. We derive an analytical expression which establishes whether water perturbations compromise harmonic motion and show that the predictions are in agreement with numerical simulations. Empirical validation of our interpretation is provided by the observation of a range of values for apparent height of water layers when subharmonic excitation is predicted.

  9. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Fluorine-Free Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Complexes for the Fabrication of Self-Healing Superhydrophobic Films.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengchun; An, Ni; Li, Yang; Sun, Junqi

    2016-11-29

    Fluorine-free self-healing superhydrophobic films are of significance for practical applications because of their extended service life and cost-effective and eco-friendly preparation process. In this study, we report the fabrication of fluorine-free self-healing superhydrophobic films by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)-1-octadecylamine (ODA) complexes (PSS-ODA) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH)-sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) (PAH-SDS) complexes. The wettability of the LbL-assembled PSS-ODA/PAH-SDS films depends on the film structure and can be tailored by changing the NaCl concentration in aqueous dispersions of PSS-ODA complexes and the number of film deposition cycles. The freshly prepared PSS-ODA/PAH-SDS film with micro- and nanoscaled hierarchical structures is hydrophilic and gradually changes to superhydrophobic in air because the polyelectrolyte-complexed ODA and SDS surfactants tend to migrate to the film surface to cover the film with hydrophobic alkyl chains to lower its surface energy. The large amount of ODA and SDS surfactants loaded in the superhydrophobic PSS-ODA/PAH-SDS films and the autonomic migration of these surfactants to the film surface endow the resultant superhydrophobic films with an excellent self-healing ability to restore the damaged superhydrophobicity. The self-healing superhydrophobic PSS-ODA/PAH-SDS films are mechanically robust and can be deposited on various flat and nonflat substrates. The LbL assembly of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes provides a new way for the fabrication of fluorine-free self-healing superhydrophobic films with satisfactory mechanical stability, enhanced reliability, and extended service life.

  10. Hygroscopic Growth of Self-Assembled Layered Surfactant Molecules at the Interface between Air and Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Li Q.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2005-04-01

    We report here a self-assembly of surfactant molecules at the interface of air/hygroscopic quaternary ammonium salts, tetrabutylammonium acetate (TBAAc). Homogeneously dissolved surfactant molecules at 100 C self-assemble upon contacting air due to high moisture adsorption behavior of the organic salt when cooling down. Highly ordered lamellar phases with different lattice spacings have been observed when surfactants with various lengths of alkyl chains were used. CnTMAB/TBAAc systems showed all trans conformation of interior methylene carbons and interdigited bilayers with an average CH2 increment of 0.119nm, while CnNH2/TBAAc systems showed trans/gauche mixed conformations of interior methylene carbons and bilayers with an average CH2 increment of 0.247nm. CnNH2s in CnNH2/TBAAc formed bilayers through water-mediated intermolecular hydrogen bonds with a water layer thickness of 0.51-0.61nm. In CnTAB/TBAAc, as the head group of CnTAB is bigger, the interdigited bilayer thickness (d-spacing) is smaller because their bigger head groups accommodate enough space for alkyl tails to come in between them.

  11. Interrogating protonated/deuterated fibronectin fragment layers adsorbed to titania by neutron reflectivity and their concomitant control over cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Lisa; Whitelaw, Christine; Rekas, Agata; Holt, Stephen A.; van der Walle, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    The fibronectin fragment, 9th–10th-type III domains (FIII9–10), mediates cell attachment and spreading and is commonly investigated as a bioadhesive interface for implant materials such as titania (TiO2). How the extent of the cell attachment–spreading response is related to the nature of the adsorbed protein layer is largely unknown. Here, the layer thickness and surface fraction of two FIII9–10 mutants (both protonated and deuterated) adsorbed to TiO2 were determined over concentrations used in cell adhesion assays. Unexpectedly, the isotopic forms had different adsorption behaviours. At solution concentrations of 10 mg l−1, the surface fraction of the less conformationally stable mutant (FIII9′10) was 42% for the deuterated form and 19% for the protonated form (fitted to the same monolayer thickness). Similarly, the surface fraction of the more stable mutant (FIII9′10–H2P) was 34% and 18% for the deuterated and protonated forms, respectively. All proteins showed a transition from monolayer to bilayer between 30 and 100 mg l−1, with the protein longitudinal orientation moving away from the plane of the TiO2 surface at high concentrations. Baby hamster kidney cells adherent to TiO2 surfaces coated with the proteins (100 mg l−1) showed a strong spreading response, irrespective of protein conformational stability. After surface washing, FIII9′10 and FIII9′10–H2P bilayer surface fractions were 30/25% and 42/39% for the lower/upper layers, respectively, implying that the cell spreading response requires only a partial protein surface fraction. Thus, we can use neutron reflectivity to inform the coating process for generating bioadhesive TiO2 surfaces. PMID:25926699

  12. Photomanipulation of the anchoring strength using a spontaneously adsorbed layer of azo dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Nádasi, Hajnalka; Stannarius, Ralf; Eremin, Alexey; Ito, Atsuki; Ishikawa, Ken; Haba, Osamu; Yonetake, Koichiro; Takezoe, Hideo; Araoka, Fumito

    2017-03-15

    We systematically studied the photoinduced anchoring transition in a nematic liquid crystal containing azo dendrimers. Because the azo dendrimers in the trans-isomer state were spontaneously adsorbed at substrate surfaces, which was confirmed by optical second-harmonic generation (SHG), a homeotropic orientation was established at the first stage. Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation triggered a transition into a planar state which was accompanied by a suppression of the SH generation. The monotonic decrease of the effective scalar order parameter with increasing UV light intensity was determined by polarized attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The variation of anchoring strength and extrapolation length was evaluated by observing the Fréedericksz transition as a function of UV light intensity at a certain visible (VIS) light intensity. Such a photoinduced variation can be interpreted as a variation of the anchoring strength depending on the trans/cis ratio at the surfaces based on a modified Rapini-Papoular model. Thus, this system provides the opportunity for a controlled change in the anchoring strength.

  13. Melt crystallization/dewetting of ultrathin PEO films via carbon dioxide annealing: the effects of polymer adsorbed layers.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mitsunori; Jiang, Naisheng; Sendogdular, Levent; Sokolov, Jonathan; Endoh, Maya K; Koga, Tadanori; Fukuto, Masafumi; Yang, Lin; Akgun, Bulent; Dimitriou, Michael; Satija, Sushil

    2014-09-14

    The effects of CO2 annealing on the melting and subsequent melt crystallization processes of spin-cast poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) ultrathin films (20-100 nm in thickness) prepared on Si substrates were investigated. By using in situ neutron reflectivity, we found that all the PEO thin films show melting at a pressure as low as P = 2.9 MPa and at T = 48 °C which is below the bulk melting temperature (Tm). The films were then subjected to quick depressurization to atmospheric pressure, resulting in the non-equilibrium swollen state, and the melt crystallization (and/or dewetting) process was carried out in air via subsequent annealing at given temperatures below Tm. Detailed structural characterization using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and polarized optical microscopy revealed two unique aspects of the CO2-treated PEO films: (i) a flat-on lamellar orientation, where the molecular chains stand normal to the film surface, is formed within the entire film regardless of the original film thickness and the annealing temperature; and (ii) the dewetting kinetics for the 20 nm thick film is much slower than that for the thicker films. The key to these phenomena is the formation of irreversibly adsorbed layers on the substrates during the CO2 annealing: the limited plasticization effect of CO2 at the polymer-substrate interface promotes polymer adsorption rather than melting. Here we explain the mechanisms of the melt crystallization and dewetting processes where the adsorbed layers play vital roles.

  14. Physically adsorbed fullerene layer on positively charged sites on zinc oxide cathode affords efficiency enhancement in inverted polymer solar cell.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liao, Sih-Hao; Li, Yi-Lun; Chen, Show-An

    2013-07-24

    We present a novel idea for overcoming the drawback of poor contact between the ZnO cathode and active layer interface in an inverted polymer solar cell (i-PSC), simply by incorporating an electron-acceptor self-assembled monolayer (SAM)--tetrafluoroterephthalic acid (TFTPA)--on the ZnO cathode surface to create an electron-poor surface of TFTPA on ZnO. The TFTPA molecules on ZnO are anchored on the ZnO surface by reacting its carboxyl groups with hydroxyl groups on the ZnO surface, such that the tetrafluoroterephthalate moieties lay on the surface with plane-on electron-poor benzene rings acting as positive charge centers. Upon coating a layer of fullerenes on top of it, the fullerene molecules can be physically adsorbed by Coulombic interaction and facilitate a promoted electron collection from the bulk. The active layer is composed of the mid bandgap polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) or low bandgap polymer, poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl) carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  15. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  16. Fabrication of novel microstructures based on orientation-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules in a TMAH solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Prem; Sato, K.; Gosalvez, M. A.; Tang, B.; Hida, H.; Shikida, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the orientation-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules on the silicon surface during etching in surfactant-added tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) is investigated. Triton X-100 (C14H22O(C2H4O)n, n = 9-10) and 25 wt% TMAH are used as surfactant and main etchant, respectively. The crystallographic planes affected by the surfactant molecules are determined by analyzing the etching behavior of different mask patterns on Si{1 0 0} wafers and silicon hemispheres in pure and surfactant-added TMAH. Taken together, the shapes of the etched profiles and the analysis of the hemispherical etch rates confirm that thick and dense adsorbed surfactant layers are typically formed on both the exact and vicinal Si{1 1 0} surfaces. In addition, the results indicate that the adsorbed surfactant layer behaves as a permeable mask, partially slowing down the etch rate of the affected surface orientation/s and thus enforcing their appearance on the etching front. The peculiar etching properties of surfactant-added and surfactant-free TMAH are then utilized for the fabrication of advanced micromechanical structures with new shapes on Si{1 0 0} wafers and polydimethylsiloxane based on complex Si{1 0 0} molds.

  17. Influence of carboxylic ion-pairing reagents on retention of peptides in thin-layer chromatography systems with C18 silica-based adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Gwarda, Radosław Ł; Aletańska-Kozak, Monika; Klimek-Turek, Anna; Ziajko-Jankowska, Agnieszka; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Dzido, Tadeusz H

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems related to chromatography of peptides concerns adverse interactions of their strong basic groups with free silanol groups of the silica based stationary phase. Influence of type and concentration of ion-pairing regents on peptide retention in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) systems has been discussed before. Here we present influence of these mobile phase additives on retention of some peptide standards in high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) systems with C18 silica-based adsorbents. We prove, that due to different characteristic of adsorbents used in both techniques (RP HPLC and HPTLC), influence of ion-pairing reagents on retention of basic and/or amphoteric compounds also may be quite different. C18 silica-based HPTLC adsorbents provide more complex mechanism of retention and should be rather considered as mixed-mode adsorbents.

  18. Competitive surfactant adsorption of AOT and Tween 20 on gold measured using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation.

    PubMed

    Thavorn, Jakkrit; Hamon, Joshua J; Kitiyanan, Boonyarach; Striolo, Alberto; Grady, Brian P

    2014-09-23

    Competitive surfactant adsorption of anionic surfactant AOT and nonionic surfactant Tween 20 on gold was investigated by using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) at 25 °C. The adsorption isotherm of pure AOT did not reach a plateau at the CMC, but rather adsorption continued to increase gradually at concentrations higher than the CMC before reaching a plateau. This behavior is evidence of competitive adsorption between AOT and impurities. The adsorbed layer of AOT on gold became more viscoelastic as the concentration of AOT increased. Tween 20 reached the plateau adsorption on gold before its concentration reached the CMC, suggesting that the attraction between Tween 20 and gold is very strong. The Tween 20 adsorbed layer was rigid when compared to the AOT adsorbed layer, as indicated by low dissipation. The addition of Tween 20 to a surface covered by AOT resulted in an increase in adsorbed mass, suggestive of the insertion of Tween 20 into the AOT adsorbed layer as expected because Tween 20 is able to separate the repulsive headgroups of AOT. When AOT was added to a preformed Tween 20 layer, a drop in the adsorbed amount was found between 0 and 0.1 CMC, and then no change was observed until the CMC of AOT was reached; the adsorbed amount then increased, reaching a final adsorption greater than that of pure AOT. All data support the formation of mixed surfactant layers on the surface. Although a two-step model fit both AOT and Tween 20 adsorption kinetic data well, AOT was found to adsorb much more slowly than Tween 20.

  19. A theoretical study of surfactant action in the layer-by-layer homoepitaxial growth of metals: the case of In on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ming; Qiu, Min; Zhao, Yu-Jun; Cao, Pei-Lin

    1998-02-01

    A surfactant-mediated homoepitaxial metal system, Cu/In/Cu(111), is studied by using first-principles calculations and the kinetic Monte Carlo method. A new repulsion model is proposed for the Cu/In/Cu(111) system where surface-substitutional In atoms repel diffusing Cu adatoms and build a repulsion network. This repulsion network results in an average increase of terrace barriers for adatoms Cu and enhanced island density. The layer-by-layer growth for the Cu/In/Cu(111) system is achieved with a repulsion model in a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The importance of the additional barrier ΔE is confirmed in determining film morphology.

  20. Surfactant-mediated layer-by-layer homoepitaxial growth of Cu/In/Cu(100) and Ag/Sb/Ag(111) systems: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ming; Zhao, Yu-Jun; Cao, Pei-Lin

    1998-04-01

    Two typical surfactant-mediated homoepitaxial metal systems, Cu/In/Cu(100) and Ag/Sb/Ag(111), are studied by using first-principles calculations and a kinetic Monte Carlo method. Our results confirm the validity of the model that Zhang and Lagally suggested for Cu/In/Cu(100) system. A repulsion model is proposed for the Ag/Sb/Ag(111) system where surface-substitutional Sb atoms repel diffusing Ag adatoms. The layer-by-layer growth for Ag/Sb/Ag(111) system is achieved with a repulsion model in kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. By comparing the two different growth models, the importance of the additional barrier ΔE and effectiveness of two ways of reducing ΔE are confirmed in determining film morphology.

  1. Adsorption behavior of hydrophobin and hydrophobin/surfactant mixtures at the solid-solution interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli L; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Bent, Julian; Cox, Andrew

    2011-09-06

    The adsorption of surface-active protein hydrophobin, HFBII, and HFBII/surfactant mixtures at the solid-solution interface has been studied by neutron reflectivity, NR. At the hydrophilic silicon surface, HFBII adsorbs reversibly in the form of a bilayer at the interface. HFBII adsorption dominates the coadsorption of HFBII with cationic and anionic surfactants hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, CTAB, and sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, at concentrations below the critical micellar concentration, cmc, of conventional cosurfactants. For surfactant concentrations above the cmc, HFBII/surfactant solution complex formation dominates and there is little HFBII adsorption. Above the cmc, CTAB replaces HFBII at the interface, but for SDS, there is no affinity for the anionic silicon surface hence there is no resultant adsorption. HFBII adsorbs onto a hydrophobic surface (established by an octadecyl trimethyl silane, OTS, layer on silicon) irreversibly as a monolayer, similar to what is observed at the air-water interface but with a different orientation at the interface. Below the cmc, SDS and CTAB have little impact upon the adsorbed layer of HFBII. For concentrations above the cmc, conventional surfactants (CTAB and SDS) displace most of the HFBII at the interface. For nonionic surfactant C(12)E(6), the pattern of adsorption is slightly different, and although some coadsorption at the interface takes place, C(12)E(6) has little impact on the HFBII adsorption.

  2. Adsorption of naphthalene and ozone on atmospheric air/ice interfaces coated with surfactants: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; Hung, Francisco R

    2012-03-15

    The adsorption of gas-phase naphthalene and ozone molecules onto air/ice interfaces coated with different surfactant species (1-octanol, 1-hexadecanol, or 1-octanal) was investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Naphthalene and ozone exhibit a strong preference to be adsorbed at the surfactant-coated air/ice interfaces, as opposed to either being dissolved into the bulk of the quasi-liquid layer (QLL) or being incorporated into the ice crystals. The QLL becomes thinner when the air/ice interface is coated with surfactant molecules. The adsorption of both naphthalene and ozone onto surfactant-coated air/ice interfaces is enhanced when compared to bare air/ice interface. Both naphthalene and ozone tend to stay dissolved in the surfactant layer and close to the QLL, rather than adsorbing on top of the surfactant molecules and close to the air region of our systems. Surfactants prefer to orient at a tilted angle with respect to the air/ice interface; the angular distribution and the most preferred angle vary depending on the hydrophilic end group, the length of the hydrophobic tail, and the surfactant concentration at the air/ice interface. Naphthalene prefers to have a flat orientation on the surfactant coated air/ice interface, except at high concentrations of 1-hexadecanol at the air/ice interface; the angular distribution of naphthalene depends on the specific surfactant and its concentration at the air/ice interface. The dynamics of naphthalene molecules at the surfactant-coated air/ice interface slow down as compared to those observed at bare air/ice interfaces. The presence of surfactants does not seem to affect the self-association of naphthalene molecules at the air/ice interface, at least for the specific surfactants and the range of concentrations considered in this study.

  3. Influence of ionic strength changes on the structure of pre-adsorbed salivary films. A response of a natural multi-component layer.

    PubMed

    Macakova, Lubica; Yakubov, Gleb E; Plunkett, Mark A; Stokes, Jason R

    2010-05-01

    Salivary films coating oral surfaces are critically important for oral health. This study focuses on determining the underlying nature of this adsorbed film and how it responds to departures from physiological conditions due to changes in ionic strength. Under physiological conditions, it is found that pre-adsorbed in vitro salivary film on hydrophobic surfaces is present as a highly hydrated viscoelastic layer. We follow the evolution of this film in terms of its effective thickness, hydration and viscoelastic properties, as well as adsorbed mass of proteins, using complementary surface characterisation methods: a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring (QCM-D). Our results support a heterogeneous model for the structure of the salivary film with an inner dense anchoring layer and an outer highly extended hydrated layer. Further swelling of the film was observed upon decreasing the salt concentration down to 1mM NaCl. However, upon exposure to deionised water, a collapse of the film occurs that was associated with the loss of water contained within the adsorbed layer. We suggest that the collapse in deionised water is driven by an onset of electrostatic attraction between different parts of the multi-component salivary film. It is anticipated that such changes could also occur when the oral cavity is exposed to food, beverage, oral care and pharmaceutical formulations where drastic changes to the structural integrity of the film is likely to have implications on oral health, sensory perception and product performance.

  4. Interactions of structurally modified surfactants with reservoir minerals: Calorimetric, spectroscopic and electrokinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.; Sivakumar, A.; Xu, Q.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this project is to elucidate mechanisms of adsorption of structurally modified surfactants on reservoir minerals and to develop a full understanding of the effect of the surfactant structure on the nature of the adsorbed layers at the molecular level. An additional aim is to study the adsorption of surfactant mixtures on simple well-characterized minerals and on complex minerals representing real conditions. The practical goal of these studies is the identification of the optimum surfactant structures and their combinations for micellar flooding. In this work, the experiments on adsorption were focussed on the position of sulfonate and methyl groups on the aromatic ring of alkyl xylene sulfonates. A multi-pronged approach consisting of calorimetry, electrokinetics, wettability and spectroscopy is planned to elucidate the adsorption mechanism of surfactants and their mixtures on minerals such as alumina and kaolinite. 32 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Effect of surfactants on shear-induced gelation and gel morphology of soft strawberry-like particles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Delong; Arosio, Paolo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2011-06-07

    The role of surfactant type in the aggregation and gelation of strawberry-like particles induced by intense shear without any electrolyte addition is investigated. The particles are composed of a rubbery core, partially covered by a plastic shell, and well stabilized by fixed (sulfate) charges in the end group of the polymer chains originating from the initiator. In the absence of any surfactant, after the system passes through a microchannel at a Peclet number equal to 220 and a particle volume fraction equal to 0.15, not only shear-induced gelation but also partial coalescence among the particles occurs. The same shear-induced aggregation/gelation process has been carried out in the presence of an ionic (sulfonate) surfactant or a nonionic (Tween 20) steric surfactant. It is found that for both surfactants shear-induced gelation does occur at low surfactant surface density but the conversion of the primary particles to the clusters constituting the gel decreases as the surfactant surface density increases. When the surfactant surface density increases above certain critical values, shear-induced gelation and eventually even aggregation do not occur any longer. For the sulfonate surfactant, this was explained in the literature by the non-DLVO, short-range repulsive hydration forces generated by the adsorbed surfactant layer. In this work, it is shown that the steric repulsion generated by the adsorbed Tween 20 layer can also protect particles from aggregation under intense shear. Moreover, the nonionic steric surfactant can also protect the strawberry-like particles from coalescence. This implies a decrease in the fractal dimension of the clusters constituting the gel from 2.76 to 2.45, which cannot be achieved using the ionic sulfonate surfactant.

  6. Adsorbate-induced absorption redshift in an organic-inorganic cluster conjugate: Electronic effects of surfactants and organic adsorbates on the lowest excited states of a methanethiol-CdSe conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Christopher; Chung, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Sungyul; Weiss, Shimon; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Bioconjugated CdSe quantum dots are promising reagents for bioimaging applications. Experimentally, the binding of a short peptide has been found to redshift the optical absorption of nanoclusters [J. Tsay et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 1669 (2005)]. This study examines this issue by performing density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent-DFT calculations to study the ground state and low-lying excited states of (CdSe)6[SCH3]-, a transition metal complex built by binding methanethiolate to a CdSe molecular cluster. Natural bond orbital results show that the redshift is caused by ligand-inorganic cluster orbital interaction. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of (CdSe)6 is dominated by selenium 4p orbitals; in contrast, the HOMO of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- is dominated by sulfur 3p orbitals. This difference shows that [SCH3]- binding effectively introduces filled sulfur orbitals above the selenium 4p orbitals of (CdSe)6. The resulting smaller HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- indeed leads to redshifts in its excitation energies compared to (CdSe)6. In contrast, binding of multiple NH3 destabilizes cadmium 5p orbitals, which contribute significantly to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of (CdSe)6, while leaving the selenium 4p orbitals near the HOMO relatively unaffected. This has the effect of widening the HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)6ṡ6NH3 compared to (CdSe)6. As expected, the excitation energies of the passivated (CdSe)6ṡ6NH3 are also blueshifted compared to (CdSe)6. As far as NH3 is a faithful representation of a surfactant, the results clearly illustrate the differences between the electronic effects of an alkylthiolate versus those of surfactant molecules. Surface passivation of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- is then simulated by coating it with multiple NH3 molecules. The results suggest that the [SCH3]- adsorption induces a redshift in the excitation energies in a surfactant environment.

  7. Adsorbate-induced absorption redshift in an organic-inorganic cluster conjugate: Electronic effects of surfactants and organic adsorbates on the lowest excited states of a methanethiol-CdSe conjugate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Christopher; Chung, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Sungyul; Weiss, Shimon; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2009-11-07

    Bioconjugated CdSe quantum dots are promising reagents for bioimaging applications. Experimentally, the binding of a short peptide has been found to redshift the optical absorption of nanoclusters [J. Tsay et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 1669 (2005)]. This study examines this issue by performing density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent-DFT calculations to study the ground state and low-lying excited states of (CdSe)(6)[SCH(3)](-), a transition metal complex built by binding methanethiolate to a CdSe molecular cluster. Natural bond orbital results show that the redshift is caused by ligand-inorganic cluster orbital interaction. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of (CdSe)(6) is dominated by selenium 4p orbitals; in contrast, the HOMO of (CdSe)(6)[SCH(3)](-) is dominated by sulfur 3p orbitals. This difference shows that [SCH(3)](-) binding effectively introduces filled sulfur orbitals above the selenium 4p orbitals of (CdSe)(6). The resulting smaller HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)(6)[SCH(3)](-) indeed leads to redshifts in its excitation energies compared to (CdSe)(6). In contrast, binding of multiple NH(3) destabilizes cadmium 5p orbitals, which contribute significantly to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of (CdSe)(6), while leaving the selenium 4p orbitals near the HOMO relatively unaffected. This has the effect of widening the HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)(6)6NH(3) compared to (CdSe)(6). As expected, the excitation energies of the passivated (CdSe)(6)6NH(3) are also blueshifted compared to (CdSe)(6). As far as NH(3) is a faithful representation of a surfactant, the results clearly illustrate the differences between the electronic effects of an alkylthiolate versus those of surfactant molecules. Surface passivation of (CdSe)(6)[SCH(3)](-) is then simulated by coating it with multiple NH(3) molecules. The results suggest that the [SCH(3)](-) adsorption induces a redshift in the excitation energies in a surfactant environment.

  8. Soap opera : polymer-surfactant interactions on thin film surfaces /

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, B. H.; Johal, M. S.; Wang, H. L.; Robinson, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Surfactants are macromolecules with unique properties. They commonly contain a polar head group with a nonpolar hydrocarbon chain. These properties allow surfactants to solubilize greases and other nonpolar molecules. One particular way that this is accomplished is through the formation of micelles. Micelles are formed at the critical micelle concentration (cmc), which varies depending upon the nature of the surfactant and also the media in which the surfactant resides. These micelles can take a variety of shapes, but are generally characterized by surrounding the grease with the nonpolar hydrocarbon chains, exposing only the polarized head groups to the media, usually water. This property of easy solubilization has made surfactants a very attractive industrial agent, They are used most conventionally as industrial cleaning agents and detergents. However, they also have lesser-known applications in conjunction with polymers and other macromolecular mixtures, often creating a system with novel properties, such as increased solubilization and smoother mixture consistency. A recently developed field has investigated the self-assembly of polymers and polyelectrolytes onto thin film surfaces. There are many reasons for studying this process, such as for second harmonic generation purposes and bioassays. In this study, the interaction between the anionic polyelectrolyte poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) and two surfactants of opposite charge, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and Dodecyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (DTAB), in their assembly onto thin film surfaces was investigated. The kinetics of adsorbance onto the thin films was examined, followed by construction of 10-bilayer films using an alternating layer of the cationic polyelectrolyte poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) to provide the electrostatic means for the PAZO/surfactant combination to assemble onto the thin film. The kinetics of adsorption is being

  9. Changes in the adsorbate dipole layer with changing d-filling of the metal (II) (Co, Ni, Cu) phthalocyanines on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie; Dowben, Peter A

    2009-02-04

    In combined photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopy studies, we observe changes in the metal phthalocyanine molecular orbital offsets with respect to the conducting gold substrate Fermi level, with the changing d-electron filling of the metal (II) (Co, Ni, Cu) phthalocyanines. The implication is that the interfacial dipole layer depends upon the choice of metal (Co, Ni, Cu) centers within the metal (II) phthalocyanines adsorbed on Au(111).

  10. Ultrathin calcium silicate hydrate nanosheets with large specific surface areas: synthesis, crystallization, layered self-assembly and applications as excellent adsorbents for drug, protein, and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Feng

    2013-09-09

    A simple and low-cost solution synthesis is reported for low-crystalline 1.4 nm tobermorite-like calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) ultrathin nanosheets with a thickness of ~2.8 nm and with a large specific surface area (SSA), via a reaction-rate-controlled precipitation process. The BET SSA of the CSH ultrathin nanosheets can reach as high as 505 m(2) g(-1) . The CSH ultrathin nanosheets have little cytotoxicity and can be converted to anhydrous calcium silicate (ACS) ultrathin nanosheets with a well preserved morphology via a heat treatment process. The crystallinity of CSH ultrathin nanosheets can be improved by solvothermal treatment in water/ethanol binary solvents or a single solvent of water, producing well-crystalline 1.1 nm tobermorite-like CSH nanobelts or nanosheets. CSH ultrathin nanosheets acting as building blocks can self-assemble into layered nanostructures via three different routes. The CSH ultrathin nanosheets are investigated as promising adsorbents for protein (hemoglobin, Hb), drug (ibuprofen, IBU), and metal ions (Cr(3+) , Ni(2+) , Cu(2+) , Zn(2+) , Cd(2+) , Pb(2+) ). The highest adsorbed percentages of Hb and IBU are found to be 83% and 94%, respectively. The highest adsorption capacities of Hb and IBU are found to be as high as 878 milligram Hb per gram CSH and 2.2 gram IBU per gram CSH, respectively. The ppm level metal ions can be totally adsorbed from aqueous solution in just a few minutes. Thus, the CSH ultrathin nanosheets are a promising candidate as excellent adsorbents in the biomedical field and for waste water treatment. Several empirical laws are summarized based on the adsorption profiles of Hb and IBU using CSH ultrathin nanosheets as the adsorbent. Furthermore, the ACS ultrathin nanosheets as adsorbents for Hb protein and IBU drug are investigated.

  11. Hygroscopic Growth of Self-Assembled Layered Surfactant Molecules at the Interface between Air and Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Li Q.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Lu, Yunfeng

    2003-12-15

    In this paper, we report a self-assembly of surfactant molecules at the interface of air/hygroscopic quaternary ammonium salts such as tetrabutylammonium acetate (TBAAc), tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB), and tetrabutylammonium nitrate (TBAN), where they show different hygroscopicity, TBAAc > TBAB TBAN. Homogeneously dissolved surfactants rearrange themselves when they contact air due to high moisture adsorption behavior of such organic salts. Highly ordered lamellar phases with different lattice spacings have been observed when surfactants with long alkyl chains were used. Alkylammonium halides form monolayers, while neutral alkylamines forms bilayers based upon basal spacings of their X-ray diffraction patterns. The change in basal spacings in lamellar patterns, the alkyl chain conformation of surfactants, and H-bonding property of neutral amine surfactants are discussed in detail.

  12. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1994-07-01

    The aim of this research project is to investigate mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effects of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, various inorganic and polymeric species, and solids mineralogy will be determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability; is used in this study. The results obtained should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the first year of this three year contract, adsorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures was studied at the solid-liquid and gas-liquid interfaces. Surfactants studied include alkyl xylene sulfonates, polyethoxylated alkyl phenols, octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride. Adsorption of surfactant mixtures of varying composition was also investigated. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes interfacial properties such as wettability, electrokinetics and stability of reservoir minerals were correlated with the amount of reagent adsorbed. Strong effects of the structure of the surfactant and position of functional groups were revealed.

  13. Trilinear analysis of thin-layer chromatography retention of 35 model compounds chromatographed on nine adsorbents with 20 pure solvents.

    PubMed

    Komsta, Łukasz; Skibiński, Robert; Bezpalko, Natalia; Mielniczek, Aleksandra; Stępkowska, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    The RF value dataset of 35 model compounds, chromatographed with 20 pure solvents as the mobile phase each on nine adsorbents: RP2, RP8, RP18, alumina, cellulose, CN, DIOL, NH2 , and silica, was subjected to trilinear analysis with parallel factor analysis. The two-factor optimal model explained 87% of total information in this complex dataset. The first obtained score (trend) represents two features: the presence of hydrogen bonding and heteroatoms of solute and the mean elution force of the solvent. The second trend represents molecule size, aromaticity, and number of carbons, interconnected with presence of chlorine in mobile phase. The correlation between the scores and molecular descriptors were checked to interpret these trends quantitatively. The scores of adsorbents were slightly intercorrelated, showing NH2 , alumina, and cellulose as outliers from main adsorbents cloud. The obtained results suggest that molecular size and aromaticity, connected with chlorine atoms in mobile phase, is the second source of retention variability.

  14. Linking the Presence of Surfactant Associated Bacteria on the Sea Surface and in the Near Surface Layer of the Ocean to Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Bryan; Dean, Cayla; Kurata, Naoko; Soloviev, Alex; Tartar, Aurelien; Shivji, Mahmood; Perrie, William; Lehner, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Several genera of bacteria residing on the sea surface and in the near-surface layer of the ocean have been found to be involved in the production and decay of surfactants. Under low wind speed conditions, these surfactants can suppress short gravity capillary waves at the sea surface and form natural sea slicks. These features can be observed with both airborne and satellite-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR). We have developed a new method for sampling the sea surface microlayer that has reduced contamination from the boat and during lab handling of samples. Using this new method, a series of experiments have been conducted to establish a connection between the presence of surfactant-associated bacteria in the upper layer of the ocean and sea slicks. DNA analysis of in situ samples taken during a RADARSAT-2 satellite overpass in the Straits of Florida during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill showed a higher abundance of surfactant-associated bacterial genera in the slick area as compared to the non-slick area. These genera were found to be more abundant in the subsurface water samples collected as compared to samples taken from the sea surface. The experiment was repeated in the Straits of Florida in September 2013 and was coordinated with TerraSAR-X satellite overpasses. The observations suggest that the surfactants contributing to sea slick formation are produced by marine bacteria in the organic matter-rich water column and move to the sea surface by diffusion or advection. Thus, within a range of wind-wave conditions, the organic materials present in the water column (such as dissolved oil spills) can be monitored with SAR satellite imagery. In situ sampling was also performed in the Gulf of Mexico in December 2013 during RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X satellite overpasses. Areas near natural oil seeps identified from archived TerraSAR-X imagery were targeted for in situ sampling. A number of samples from this location have been analyzed to determine the

  15. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1995-06-01

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, other inorganic and polymeric species is being studied. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro and nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability is used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the second year of this three year contract, adsorption/desorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures on alumina and silica was studied. Surfactants studied include the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC), nonionic pentadecylethoxylated nonyl phenol (NP-15) and the nonionic octaethylene glycol n-dodecyl ether (C{sub 12}EO{sub 8}) of varying hydrocarbon chain length. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer in terms of micropolarity and aggregation numbers was probed using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes of microstructure upon dilution (desorption) were also studied. Presence of the nonionic surfactant in the mixed aggregate led to shielding of the charge of the ionic surfactant which in-turn promoted aggregation but reduced electrostatic attraction between the charged surfactant and the mineral surface. Strong consequences of surfactant interactions in solution upon adsorption as well as correlations between monomer concentrations in mixtures and adsorption were revealed.

  16. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report. October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1995-03-01

    The aim of this research is to elucidate the mechanisms underling adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. The adsorption and desorption behaviors of tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC) and pentadecylethoxylated nonylphenol (NP-15) mixtures as reported earlier were rather complex and to better understand the interactions involved fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrafiltration were used during this report period to probe the microstructure of the adsorbed layer and to determine individual surfactant monomer concentration respectively. It was observed that pyrene was solubilized in mixed aggregates (hemimicelles) of a 1:1 TTAC:NP-15 mixture at the alumina-water interface over a wider concentration range than for TTAC alone. It was also observed that the adsorbed aggregate of a 1:1 TTAC:NP-15 mixture is as hydrophobic as the mixed micelle in solution. This is contrary to what was observed for the adsorption of TTAC alone: pyrene was preferentially solubilized in the TTAC micelles rather than the adsorbed aggregate. The preference of pyrene for the mixed adsorbed aggregates over individual aggregates is relevant to the application of surfactant mixtures in enhanced oil recovery and solubilization. The adsorption/desorption behavior of surfactants is directly related to the monomer concentration of the surfactant, hence it is important to monitor changes in monomer concentration during the adsorption and desorption processes. Ultrafiltration techniques were used to monitor the monomer concentration in solution and at the interface to determine the partitioning of the surfactants to the solid-liquid interface.

  17. Towards unravelling surfactant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Mathieu; Panda, Satyananda

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant transport arises in many natural or industrial settings. Examples include lipid tear layers in the eye, pulmonary surfactant replacement therapy, or industrial coating flows. Flows driven by the surface tension gradient which arises as a consequence of surfactant concentration inhomogeneity, also known as Marangoni-driven flows, have attracted the attention of fluid dynamists for several decades and has led to the development of sophisticated models and the undeniable advancement of the understanding of such flows. Yet, experimental confirmation of these models has been hampered by the difficulty in reliably and accurately measuring the surfactant concentration and its temporal evolution. In this contribution, we propose a methodology which may help shed some light on surfactant transport at the surface of thin liquid films. The surface stress induced by surfactant concentration induces a flow at the free surface which is visible and measurable. In the context of thin film flows for which the lubrication approximation hold, we demonstrate how the knowledge of this free surface flow field provides sufficient information to reconstruct the surfactant tension field. From the surface tension and an assumed equation of state, the local surfactant concentration can also be calculated and other transport parameters such as the surfactant surface diffusivity indirectly inferred. In this contribution, the proposed methodology is tested with synthetic data generated by the forward solution of the governing partial differential equations in order to illustrate the feasibility of the algorithm and highlight numerical challenges.

  18. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  19. Adsorption and adsolubilization of polymerizable surfactants on aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Attaphong, Chodchanok; Asnachinda, Emma; Charoensaeng, Ampira; Sabatini, David A; Khaodhiar, Sutha

    2010-04-01

    Surfactant-based adsorption processes have been widely investigated for environmental applications. A major problem facing surfactant-modified adsorbents is surfactant loss from the adsorbent due to loss of monomers from solution and subsequent surfactant desorption. For this study, a bilayer of anionic polymerizable surfactant (Hitenol BC 05, Hitenol BC 10 and Hitenol BC 20) and non-polymerizable surfactant (Hitenol N 08) was adsorbed onto alumina. The results of adsorption studies showed that as the number of ethylene oxide (EO) groups of the surfactants increased, the area per molecule increased and the maximum adsorption decreased. The lowest maximum adsorption onto alumina was for Hitenol BC 20 (20 EO groups) corresponding to 0.08 mmol/g or 0.34 molecule/nm(2) while the highest level of adsorption was 0.30 mmol/g or 1.28 molecule/nm(2) for Hitenol BC 05 (5 EO groups). This variation in adsorption was attributed to the increased bulkiness of the head group with increasing number of EO groups. Relative to the adsolubilization capacity of organic solutes, ethylcyclohexane adsolubilizes more than styrene. Styrene and ethylcyclohexane adsolubilization were both independent of the number of EO groups of the surfactant. For surfactant desorption studies, the polymerization of polymerizable surfactants increased the stability of surfactants adsorbed onto the alumina surface and reduced surfactant desorption from the alumina surface. These results provide useful information on surfactant-based surface modification to enhance contaminant remediation and industrial applications.

  20. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  1. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldarelli, Charles; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    disks can form a space filling mat on the surface which removes a significant amount of the surface water. The water adjacent to the hydrophobic solid surface is of high energy due to incomplete hydrogen bonding; its removal significantly lowers the tension and reduces the contact angle. Hydrocarbon surfactants cannot remove as much surface water because their large polar groups prevent the chains from cohering lengthwise. In our report last year we presented a poster describing the preparation of model very hydrophobic surfaces which are homogeneous and atomically smooth using self assembled monolayers of octadecyl trichlorosilane (OTS). In this poster we will use these surfaces as test substrates in developing hydrocarbon based surfactant systems which superspread. We studied a binary hydrocarbon surfactant systems consisting of a very soluble large polar group polyethylene oxide surfactant (C12E6 (CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)6OH) and a long chain alcohol dodecanol. By mixing the alcohol with this soluble surfactant we have found that the contact angle of the mixed system on our test hydrophobic surfaces is very low. We hypothesize that the alcohol fills in the gaps between adjacent adsorbed chains of the large polar group surfactant. This filling in removes the surface water and effects the decrease in contact angle. We confirm this hypothesis by demonstrating that at the air/water interface the mixed layer forms condensed phases while the soluble large polar group surfactant by itself does not. We present drop impact experiments which demonstrate that the dodecanol/C12E6 mixture is effective in causing impacting drops to spread on the very hydrophobic model OTS surfaces.

  2. Three-dimensional hierarchical flower-like Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides: highly efficient adsorbents for As(v) and Cr(vi) removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin-Yao; Luo, Tao; Jia, Yong; Xu, Ren-Xia; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yong-Xing; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2012-05-01

    3D hierarchical flower-like Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides (Mg-Al-LDHs) were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method in a mixed solution of ethylene glycol (EG) and water. The formation mechanism of the flower-like Mg-Al-LDHs was proposed. After calcination, the flower-like morphology could be completely preserved. With relatively high specific surface areas, Mg-Al-LDHs and calcined Mg-Al-LDHs with 3D hierarchical nanostructures were tested for their application in water purification. When tested as adsorbents in As(v) and Cr(vi) removal, the as-prepared calcined Mg-Al-LDHs showed excellent performance, and the adsorption capacities of calcined Mg-Al-LDHs for As(v) and Cr(vi) were better than those of Mg-Al-LDHs. The adsorption isotherms, kinetics and mechanisms for As(v) and Cr(vi) onto calcined Mg-Al-LDHs were also investigated. The high uptake capability of the as-prepared novel 3D hierarchical calcined Mg-Al-LDHs make it a potentially attractive adsorbent in water purification. Also, this facile strategy may be extended to synthesize other LDHs with 3D hierarchical nanostructures, which may find many other applications due to their novel structural features.3D hierarchical flower-like Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides (Mg-Al-LDHs) were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method in a mixed solution of ethylene glycol (EG) and water. The formation mechanism of the flower-like Mg-Al-LDHs was proposed. After calcination, the flower-like morphology could be completely preserved. With relatively high specific surface areas, Mg-Al-LDHs and calcined Mg-Al-LDHs with 3D hierarchical nanostructures were tested for their application in water purification. When tested as adsorbents in As(v) and Cr(vi) removal, the as-prepared calcined Mg-Al-LDHs showed excellent performance, and the adsorption capacities of calcined Mg-Al-LDHs for As(v) and Cr(vi) were better than those of Mg-Al-LDHs. The adsorption isotherms, kinetics and mechanisms for As(v) and Cr(vi) onto calcined

  3. Molecular mobility in the monolayers of foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lalchev, Z I; Todorov, R K; Christova, Y T; Wilde, P J; Mackie, A R; Clark, D C

    1996-01-01

    Certain physical properties of a range of foam film types that are believed to exist in vivo in the lung have been investigated. The contribution of different lung surfactant components found in porcine lung surfactant to molecular surface diffusion in the plane of foam films has been investigated for the first time. The influence of the type and thickness of black foam films, temperature, electrolyte concentration, and extract composition on surface diffusion has been studied using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Fluorescent phospholipid probe molecules in foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant samples or their hydrophobic extracts consisting of surfactant lipids and hydrophobic lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, exhibited more rapid diffusion than observed in films of its principal lipid component alone, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl. This effect appears to be due to contributions from minor lipid components present in the total surfactant lipid extracts. The minor lipid components influence the surface diffusion in foam films both by their negative charge and by lowering the phase transition temperature of lung surfactant samples. In contrast, the presence of high concentrations of the hydrophillic surfactant protein A (SP-A) and non-lung-surfactant proteins in the sample reduced the diffusion coefficient (D) of the lipid analog in the adsorbed layer of the films. Hysteresis behavior of D was observed during temperature cycling, with the cooling curve lying above the heating curve. However, in cases where some surface molecular aggregation and surface heterogeneity were observed during cooling, the films became more rigid and molecules at the interfaces became immobilized. The thickness, size, capillary pressure, configuration, and composition of foam films of lung surfactant prepared in vitro support their investigation as realistic structural analogs of the surface films that exist in vivo in the lung

  4. Magnetized graphene layers synthesized on the carbon nanofibers as novel adsorbent for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Rezvani-Eivari, Mostafa; Amiri, Amirhassan; Baghayeri, Mehdi; Ghaemi, Ferial

    2016-09-23

    The application of magnetized graphene (G) layers synthesized on the carbon nanofibers (CNFs) (m-G/CNF) was investigated as novel adsorbent for the magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Six important parameters, affecting the extraction efficiency of PAHs, including: amount of adsorbent, adsorption and desorption times, type and volume of the eluent solvent and salt content of the sample were evaluated. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained as: 5min for extraction time, 20mg for sorbent amount, dichloromethane as desorption solvent, 1mL for desorption solvent volume, 5min for desorption time and 15% (w/v) for NaCl concentration. Good performance data were obtained at the optimized conditions. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges from 0.012 to 100ngmL(-1) with correlation coefficients (r) between 0.9950 and 0.9967 for all the analytes. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) of the proposed method for the studied PAHs were 0.004-0.03ngmL(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for five replicates at two concentration levels (0.1 and 50ngmL(-1)) of PAHs were ranged from 3.4 to 5.7%. Appropriate relative recovery values, in the range of 95.5-99.9%, were also obtained for the real water sample analysis.

  5. Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2008-09-20

    /conformation of the adsorbed layers), as well as precipitation/abstraction characteristics. (3) Investigation of the role of dissolved species, especially multivalent ions, on interactions between reservoir minerals and surfactants and/or polymers leading to surfactant precipitation or activated adsorption. (4) Solution behavior tests--surface tension, interaction, ultra filtration, and other tests. (5) Surfactant-mineral interactions relative to adsorption, wettability, and electrophoresis. (6) Work on the effects of multivalent ions, pH, temperature, salinity, and mixing ratio on the adsorption. Developments of adsorption models to explain interactions between surfactants/polymers/minerals. (7) General guidelines for the use of certain surfactants, polymers and their mixtures in micelle flooding processes.

  6. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  7. Accessing the structural and thermodynamic properties of ultra-thin layers of C32 adsorbed on a SiO2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Maldonado, Sebastian E.; Garate, Jose Antonio; Retamal, Maria Jose; Cisternas, Marcelo A.; Volkmann, Ulrich G.; Perez-Acle, Tomas

    2017-04-01

    Medium-chain alkanes are important molecules with applications in biology and industry. Notably, their structural properties are scarcely understood. To assess structural and thermodynamic properties of dotriacontane (C32) molecules adsorbed on a SiO2 surface, we conducted all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By analyzing potentials of mean force, order parameters and self-diffusion, we compared the stability and preferential orientation between ordered and disordered systems. Our data confirm the presence of one parallel layer of C32 followed by a mixture of disordered C32 segments exhibiting no thermodynamic preference. This semi-ordered structural model shed light to the interactions between C32 and a SiO2 surface.

  8. Stabilization of aqueous nanoscale zerovalent iron dispersions by anionic polyelectrolytes: adsorbed anionic polyelectrolyte layer properties and their effect on aggregation and sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Saleh, Navid; Sirk, Kevin; Kim, Hye-Jin; Tilton, Robert D.; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2008-05-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles are 5-40 nm sized Fe0/Fe-oxide particles that rapidly transform many environmental contaminants to benign products and are a promising in situ remediation agent. Rapid aggregation and limited mobility in water-saturated porous media limits the ability to deliver NZVI dispersions in the subsurface. This study prepares stable NZVI dispersions through physisorption of commercially available anionic polyelectrolytes, characterizes the adsorbed polymer layer, and correlates the polymer coating properties with the ability to prevent rapid aggregation and sedimentation of NZVI dispersions. Poly(styrene sulfonate) with molecular weights of 70 k and 1,000 k g/mol (PSS70K and PSS1M), carboxymethyl cellulose with molecular weights of 90 k and 700 k g/mol (CMC90K and CMC700K), and polyaspartate with molecular weights of 2.5 k and 10 k g/mol (PAP2.5K and 10K) were compared. Particle size distributions were determined by dynamic light scattering during aggregation. The order of effectiveness to prevent rapid aggregation and stabilize the dispersions was PSS70K(83%) > ≈PAP10K(82%) > PAP2.5K(72%) > CMC700K(52%), where stability is defined operationally as the volume percent of particles that do not aggregate after 1 h. CMC90K and PSS1M could not stabilize RNIP relative to bare RNIP. A similar trend was observed for their ability to prevent sedimentation, with 40, 34, 32, 20, and 5 wt%, of the PSS70K, PAP10K, PAP2.5K, CMC700K, and CMC90K modified NZVI remaining suspended after 7 h of quiescent settling, respectively. The stable fractions with respect to both aggregation and sedimentation correlate well with the adsorbed polyelectrolyte mass and thickness of the adsorbed polyelectrolyte layers as determined by Oshima's soft particle theory. A fraction of the particles cannot be stabilized by any modifier and rapidly agglomerates to micron sized aggregates, as is also observed for unmodified NZVI. This non-dispersible fraction is

  9. Electrokinetic investigation of surfactant adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, C; Synytska, A; Caspari, A; Drechsler, A; Grundke, K

    2007-05-15

    Fuerstenau [D.W. Fuerstenau, in: M.L. Hair (Ed.), Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 143] has already discussed the role of hydrocarbon chain of surfactants, the effect of alkyl chain length, chain structure and the pH of the solution on the adsorption process of surfactants. Later Kosmulski [M. Kosmulski, Chemical Properties of Material Surfaces, Surfactant Science Series, vol. 102, Dekker, New York, Basel, 2001] included the effect of surfactant concentration, equilibration time, temperature and electrolyte in his approaches. Certainly, the character of the head groups of the surfactant and the properties of the adsorbent surface are the basis for the adsorption process. Different surfactants and adsorbents cause different adsorption mechanisms described firstly by Rosen [M.J. Rosen, Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1989]. These adsorption mechanisms and their influencing factors were studied by electrokinetic investigations. Here only changes of the charges at the surfaces could be detected. To control the results of electrokinetic investigations they were compared with results from ellipsometric measurements. In the case of surfactant adsorption the chain length was vitally important. It could be shown by the adsorption of alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromides onto polymer films spin coated at wafer surfaces. The influence of the chain length depending on surface properties of the polymer film was studied. Streaming potential measurements were applied for these investigations. The obtained results enabled us to calculate the molar cohesive free energy per mol of CH2-group in the alkaline chain of the surfactant if all other specific adsorption effects were neglected.

  10. Hydrogen-surfactant-mediated epitaxy of Ge1- x Sn x layer and its effects on crystalline quality and photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Osamu; Fujinami, Shunsuke; Asano, Takanori; Koyama, Takeshi; Kurosawa, Masashi; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Kishida, Hideo; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2017-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen-surfactant-mediated molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of Ge1- x Sn x layer on Ge(001) substrate on crystalline quality and photoluminescence (PL) property has been investigated. The effect of irradiation of atomic hydrogen (H) generated by dissociating molecular hydrogen (H2) were examined during the MBE growth. H irradiation significantly improves the surface morphology with the enhancement of the two-dimensional growth of the Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer. Enhanced diffuse scattering is observed in the X-ray diffraction profile, indicating a high density of point defects. In the PL spectrum of the H2-irradiated Ge1- x Sn x layer, two components are observed, suggesting the radiative recombination with both indirect and direct transitions, while one component related to the direct transition is observable in the H-irradiated sample. The postdeposition annealing in nitrogen ambient at as low as 220 °C decreases the PL intensity of the H-irradiated Ge1- x Sn x layer, although the intensity is recovered after annealing at 300 °C, suggesting the annihilation of point defects in the Ge1- x Sn x layer.

  11. Effect of surfactant sucrose ester on physical properties of dairy whipped emulsions in relation to those of O/W interfacial layers.

    PubMed

    Tual, A; Bourles, E; Barey, P; Houdoux, A; Desprairies, M; Courthaudon, J-L

    2006-03-15

    Dairy foams were manufactured on a pilot plant with various sucrose ester contents. Oil-in-water emulsions were produced by high-pressure homogenisation of anhydrous milk fat (20 wt%) with an aqueous phase containing skim milk powder (6.5 wt%), sucrose (15 wt%), hydrocolloids (2 wt%), and sucrose esters. Sucrose ester content was varied from 0 to 0.35 wt%. Firmness and stability of dairy foams were determined. The fraction of protein associated with emulsion fat droplets and the compression isotherms of those droplets were determined as a function of sucrose ester content. With less than 0.1 wt% sucrose ester, no foam could be produced. The most firm and stable foams were obtained with ca. 0.1 wt% sucrose ester. The fraction of protein associated with emulsion droplets suddenly falls from 60% at a sucrose ester content lower than 0.1125% down to ca. 10-20% for higher surfactant content. Compression isotherms of emulsion droplets at the air-water interface show that, in the presence of surfactant, emulsion droplets disrupt and spread at the interface whilst without surfactant they become dispersed. This means that the presence of sucrose ester causes some destabilisation of fat droplet interfacial layers. There is hence an optimal sucrose ester content that allows some destabilisation of the oil-water interface without concomitant protein displacement from that interface. Consequently, with the recipe and manufacturing process used to produce dairy foams, there exists a compromise in sucrose ester content with regards to manufacture and shelf-life of dairy foams.

  12. Kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF): Reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants and surfactant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakey, Pascale; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Oxidants cause damage to biosurfaces such as the lung epithelium unless they are effectively scavenged. The respiratory tract is covered in a thin layer of fluid which extends from the nasal cavity to the alveoli and contain species that scavenge ozone and other incoming oxidants. The kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF) has been developed in order to investigate the reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants (ascorbate, uric acid, glutathione and α-tocopherol) and surfactant lipids and proteins within the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The model incorporates different processes: gas phase diffusion, adsorption and desorption from the surface, bulk phase diffusion and known reactions at the surface and in the bulk. The ELF is split into many layers: a sorption layer, a surfactant layer, a near surface bulk layer and several bulk layers. Initial results using KM-ELF indicate that at ELF thicknesses of 80 nm and 1 × 10-4cm the ELF would become rapidly saturated with ozone with saturation occurring in less than a second. However, at an ELF thickness of 1 × 10-3cm concentration gradients were observed throughout the ELF and the presence of antioxidants reduced the O3 reaching the lung cells and tissues by 40% after 1 hour of exposure. In contrast, the antioxidants were efficient scavengers of OH radicals, although the large rate constants of OH reacting with the antioxidants resulted in the antioxidants decaying away rapidly. The chemical half-lives of the antioxidants and surface species were also calculated using KM-ELF as a function of O3 and OH concentration and ELF thickness. Finally, the pH dependence of the products of reactions between antioxidants and O3 were investigated. The KM-ELF model predicted that a harmful ascorbate ozonide product would increase from 1.4 × 1011cm-3at pH 7.4 to 1.1 × 1014 cm-3 at pH 4after 1 hour although a uric acid ozonide product would decrease from 2.0 × 1015cm-3to 5.9 × 1012cm-3.

  13. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    DOE PAGES

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; ...

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge-induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  14. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  15. Effect of surfactant on temperature stability of solid lipid nanoparticles studied by dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sacheen; Kaur, Jaspreet

    2013-06-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles are new paradigm of drug delivery system of water insoluble active pharmaceutical ingredient. Paliperidone, an antipsychotic used in treatment of schizophrenia is a water insoluble molecule with low bioavailability was studied. Macrogol glyceride surfactant, bile salt based surfactant and sodium dodecyl sulphate were used to stabilize the solid lipid as dispersed nanoparticles form by adsorbing on the surface of the nanoparticles. Anionic surfactants bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate were found to stabilize forming a monomolecular layer of surfactants on the surface of nanoparticles; whereas macrogol glyceride based surfactant have intrusion in the matrix of lipid nanoparticles. So intrusion of macrogol glyceride in matrix was observed by studying the change in size of nanoparticles with respect to temperature with the help of dynamic light scattering. In case of macrogol glyceride size decrease start form 50°C, for bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate size deacrease start at 60°C. So that structural disturbance of nanoparticles by the macrogol glyceride on the surface was found maximum as compared to anionic surfactant.

  16. Adsorption of polyoxyethylenic surfactants on quartz, kaolin, and dolomite: A correlation between surfactant structure and solid surface nature

    SciTech Connect

    Nevskaia, D.M.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Lopez-Gonzalez, J.deD.

    1996-08-10

    Adsorption of a surfactant at a liquid-solid interface makes up the basis of many technological processes such as detergency, flotation, water treatment, and enhanced oil recovery. The influence of variables such as adsorption temperature, polar chain length, and nature of functional groups on the adsorption, from aqueous solutions, of various surfactants (TX-114, TX-100, TX-165, TX-305, NP1P4E, NP4P1E, NP4S, NP10S, and NP25S) has been investigated. Several nonporous solids, including various samples of quartz, kaolin, and dolomite, were studied. Conformational changes of adsorbed surfactant molecules on one quartz, when the oxyethylenic length of Tritons increases, have been detected. For all the other solid samples the surface is not completely covered by Tritons. On quartz, the surfactants are adsorbed by hydrogen bonds between the surfactant`s ether groups and the silanol groups of the solid surface. These hydroxyl groups must be free and sufficiently separated from other hydroxyls of the solid surface. When the number of propoxy groups increases (from NP1P4E to NP4P1E) the adsorbed amount of surfactant on the solid studied decreases. Anionic surfactants are adsorbed on quartz in lower amounts than the corresponding nonionic surfactants. However, the adsorbed amounts of Tritons and sulfated Tritons on kaolin are similar, probably due to the positive charges on the edges of this material.

  17. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer.

    PubMed

    Dell'Angela, M; Anniyev, T; Beye, M; Coffee, R; Föhlisch, A; Gladh, J; Kaya, S; Katayama, T; Krupin, O; Nilsson, A; Nordlund, D; Schlotter, W F; Sellberg, J A; Sorgenfrei, F; Turner, J J; Öström, H; Ogasawara, H; Wolf, M; Wurth, W

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  18. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; Coffee, R.; Föhlisch, A.; Gladh, J.; Kaya, S.; Katayama, T.; Krupin, O.; Nilsson, A.; Nordlund, D.; Schlotter, W. F.; Sellberg, J. A.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Turner, J. J.; Öström, H.; Ogasawara, H.; Wolf, M.; Wurth, W.

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse. PMID:26798795

  19. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  20. Two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography with adsorbent gradient as a method of chromatographic fingerprinting of furanocoumarins for distinguishing selected varieties and forms of Heracleum spp.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Lukasz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Hajnos, Michał; Petruczynik, Anna; Waksmundzka-Hajnos, Monika

    2008-10-17

    There are a lot of taxonomic classifications of the genus Heracleum, and many authors indicate they need revision. Morphological identification is difficult to perform, as there are only few characteristic differences between each Heracleum species, varieties and forms. Furanocoumarins are characteristic compounds for the Apiaceae family, and they can be found in the whole genus in large quantities. Despite this fact, it is difficult to use the furanocoumarin profiles of plants, for their discrimination, as furanocoumarins are difficult to separate, due to their similar chemical structures and physicochemical properties. In this paper, a new, simple method is proposed for the discrimination of selected species, varieties and forms of the genus Heracleum. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with an adsorbent gradient (unmodified silica gel+octadecylsilica wettable with water) enables complete separation of the structural analogues. The proposed method gives the possibility to distinguish selected species, varieties and forms of the Heracleum genus, as they produce distinctive furanocoumarin fingerprints. The method is characterised by high specificity, precision, reproducibility and stability values. It is for the first time that graft TLC is used for constructing fingerprints of herbs. The complete separation of ten structural analogues, by combining gradient TLC with the unidimensional multiple development technique, has not been reported yet.

  1. Behavior of cationic surfactants and short chain alcohols in mixed surface layers at water-air and polymer-water interfaces with regard to polymer wettability. I. Adsorption at water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2010-09-01

    concentration of cationic surfactant was assumed equal to Gibbs surface excess concentration. For determination of the composition of the surface layer, its proper thickness was assumed. The composition of the surface mixed monolayer was discussed with regard to the standard free energy of cationic surfactant and alcohol adsorption at water-air interface determined in different ways. The standard free energy of adsorption of "pure" cationic surfactants determined from the Langmuir and Aronson and Rosen equations was compared to that deduced on the basis of Cp(20), and the surface tension of the cationic surfactant tail and tail-water interface tension.

  2. Wettability of polytetrafluoroethylene by aqueous solutions of two anionic surfactant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław; Wójcik, Wiesław

    2003-12-01

    Advancing contact angle (theta) measurements were carried out on mixtures of aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDDS) and sodium hexadecyl sulfonate (SHDSs) on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The obtained results indicate that there were only small contact angle changes over the range of surfactant concentrations in the solution, corresponding to the unsaturated surfactant layer at the aqueous solution-air interface. However, when saturation of the surfactant layer was achieved a considerable decrease in the contact angle (increase in costheta) as a function of concentration was observed. The dependence of costheta on the monomer mole fraction of SHDSs in the mixture of the surfactants (alpha) for aqueous solutions of mixtures at concentrations corresponding to the critical micelle concentration (CMC) had a maximum at alpha=0.2. From the results of these measurements and application of the Gibbs and Young equations the ratio of the excess concentration of surfactants at the solid-aqueous solution interface to the excess of their concentration at the aqueous solution-air interface was calculated. On the basis of the measurements and calculations it was found that there was a straight linear relationship between the adhesion tension and surface tension of aqueous solutions of surfactant mixtures at a given alpha, and that the slope of the obtained straight lines was equal to -1, which suggests that the surface excess of the surfactant concentrations at the PTFE-solution interface is the same as that at the solution-air interface for a given bulk concentration of the surfactant mixtures. The dependence of the surface concentration excess at the PTFE-solution interface on the monomer mole fraction of SHDSs in the mixture of the surfactants for the concentration region of the mixture of aqueous solutions, corresponding to a saturated monolayer, had a maximum at alpha=0.4, probably resulting from increased degree of binding between adsorbed surface-active ions

  3. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2004-10-30

    Significant surfactant loss by adsorption or precipitation on reservoir minerals can cause chemical flooding processes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. This project is aimed towards an understanding of the role of reservoir minerals and their dissolved species in chemical loss by precipitation or adsorption of surfactants/polymers in enhanced oil recovery. Emphasis will be on the type and nature of different minerals in the oil reservoirs. Macroscopic adsorption, precipitation, wettability and nanoscopic orientation/conformation studies for aggregates of various surfactant/polymer mixtures on reservoir rocks systems is planned for exploring the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this reporting period, the minerals proposed in this study: sandstone, limestone, gypsum, kaolinite and pyrite, have been characterized to obtain their particle size distribution and surface area, which will be used in the analysis of adsorption and wettability data. The effect of surfactant mixing ratio on the adsorption of mixture of C{sub 12}-C{sub 4}-C{sub 12} Gemini surfactant (synthesized during last period) and sugar-based nonionic surfactant n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) has been studied. It was discovered that even trace amounts of Gemini in the mixture is sufficient to force significant adsorption of DM. DM adsorption on silica increased from relatively negligible levels to very high levels. It is clear form analysis of the results that desired adsorption of either surfactant component in the mixtures can be obtained by controlling the mixing ratio, the total mixture concentration, pH etc. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of Gemini/DM mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. With increasing total surfactant adsorption, the silica mineral

  4. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2005-04-30

    The aim of this project is to delineate the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions between reservoir minerals and externally added reagents (surfactants/polymers) and its effect on critical solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Previous studies have suggested that significant surfactant loss by precipitation or adsorption on reservoir minerals can cause chemical schemes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. Both macroscopic adsorption, wettability and microscopic orientation and conformation studies for various surfactant/polymer mixtures/reservoir rocks systems were conducted to explore the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) has been studied. The effects of solution pH, surfactant mixing ratio and different salts on surfactant adsorption on alumina have been investigated in detail. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of the mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. Solution properties of C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na/DM mixtures were also studied to identify surfactant interactions that affect the mixed aggregate formation in solution. Adsorption of SDS on gypsum and limestone suggested stronger surfactant/mineral interaction than on alumina, due to the precipitation of surfactant by dissolved calcium ions. The effects of different salts such as sodium nitrate, sodium sulfite and sodium chloride on DM adsorption on alumina have also been determined. As surfactant hemimicelles at interface and micelles in solution have drastic effects on oil recovery processes, their microstructures in

  5. Interaction of Moringa oleifera seed protein with a mineral surface and the influence of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kwaambwa, Habauka M; Hellsing, Maja S; Rennie, Adrian R; Barker, Robert

    2015-06-15

    The paper describes the adsorption of purified protein from seeds of Moringa oleifera to a sapphire interface and the effects of addition of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Neutron reflection was used to determine the structure and composition of interfacial layers adsorbed at the solid/solution interface. The maximum surface excess of protein was found to be about 5.3 mg m(-2). The protein does not desorb from the solid/liquid interface when rinsed with water. Addition of SDS increases the reflectivity indicating co-adsorption. It was observed that CTAB is able to remove the protein from the interface. The distinct differences to the behavior observed previously for the protein at the silica/water interface are identified. The adsorption of the protein to alumina in addition to other surfaces has shown why it is an effective flocculating agent for the range of impurities found in water supplies. The ability to tailor different surface layers in combination with various surfactants also offers the potential for adsorbed protein to be used in separation technologies.

  6. Dendritic saccharide surfactant polymers as antifouling interface materials to reduce platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junmin; Marchant, Roger E

    2006-04-01

    Here, we report on the synthesis of dendritic saccharide surfactant polymers as antifouling interface materials to reduce platelet adhesion. An acetal-protected poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendron (5, G = 2) was first synthesized by using aminoacetaldehyde dimethyl acetal (1) as the starting material to provide a monovalent focal structure with dimethyl acetal-protected aldehyde functionality. Maltose dendron (M4, 6) was obtained by reacting the peripheral amine groups of acetal-dendron (5) with maltonolactone. The dendritic surfactant polymers (9) were then synthesized via a two-step method by sequential addition of maltose dendron and hexanal to react with the amine groups on the poly(vinylamine) (PVAm) backbone. Surface activity of the amphiphilic glycopolymers at the air/water interface was demonstrated by reduction in water surface tension. Adsorption of the amphiphilic glycopolymers at the solid/water interface was examined on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated coverslips by water contact angle measurements. A nanoscale understanding of surface-induced self-assembly of the dendritic surfactant polymer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was gained using AFM operated in fluid tapping mode. A lateral ordering of adsorbing surfactant polymer was visualized with a pattern in strands 60 degrees out of alignment. The static platelet adhesion tests show that the hexyl side chains can facilitate adsorption of the surfactant polymers onto hydrophobic substrates, while the maltose dendron side chains can provide a dense canopy of protective glycocalyx-like layer as an antifouling interface to reduce platelet adhesion.

  7. Heat transfer to the adsorbent in solar adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Papucik, Stefan; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with design and construction of solar adsorption cooling device and with heat transfer problem in adsorber. The most important part of adsorption cooling system is adsorber/desorber containing adsorbent. Zeolith (adsorbent) type was chosen for its high adsorption capacity, like a coolant was used water. In adsorber/desorber occur, at heating of adsorbent, to heat transfer from heat change medium to the adsorbent. The time required for heating of adsorber filling is very important, because on it depend flexibility of cooling system. Zeolith has a large thermal resistance, therefore it had to be adapted the design and construction of adsorber. As the best shows the tube type of adsorber with double coat construction. By this construction is ensured thin layer of adsorbent and heating is quick in all volume of adsorbent. The process of heat transfer was experimentally measured, but for comparison simulated in ANSYS, too.

  8. Effect of surfactants on surface activity and rheological properties of type I collagen at air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Kezwoń, Aleksandra; Góral, Ilona; Frączyk, Tomasz; Wojciechowski, Kamil

    2016-12-01

    We describe the effect of three synthetic surfactants (anionic - sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic - cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and nonionic - Triton X-100 (TX-100)) on surface properties of the type I calf skin collagen at the air/water interface in acidic solutions (pH 1.8). The protein concentration was fixed at 5×10(-6)molL(-1) and the surfactant concentration was varied in the range 5×10(-6)molL(-1)-1×10(-4)molL(-1), producing the protein/surfactant mixtures with molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20. An Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA) method was used to determine the dynamic surface tension and surface dilatational moduli of the mixed adsorption layers. Two spectroscopic techniques: UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorimetry allowed us to determine the effect of the surfactants on the protein structure. The thermodynamic characteristic of the mixtures was studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Modification of the collagen structure by SDS at low surfactant/protein ratios has a positive effect on the mixture's surface activity with only minor deterioration of the rheological properties of the adsorbed layers. The collagen/CTAB mixtures do not show that pronounced improvement in surface activity, while rheological properties are significantly deteriorated. The mixtures with non-ionic TX-100 do not show any synergistic effects in surface activity.

  9. The effect of shear on the adsorption of non-ionic surfactants at the liquid-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penfold, J.; Staples, E.; Tucker, I.; Fragnetto, G.

    1996-02-01

    The structure of surfactant micellar solutions subjected to shear is of much current interest. Neutron reflection can provide information about the distribution of surfactant in the vicinity of the wall of the shear cell, and complement other scattering techniques, such as small angle neutron scattering. The construction of a shear cell for neutron reflectivity measurements is described, and some recent preliminary results on the effect of shear on the adsorption of the non-ionic surfactant, hexaethylene glycol monohexadecyl ether (C 16E 6) at the planar silicon/solution interface are discussed. The results provide direct evidence of shear-induced structures in the vicinity of the cell wall. At a low surfactant concentration ordered layering of the surfactant separated by solvent-rich regions, and extending into the bulk solution is observed, in addition to the adsorbed layer on the solid surface. The application of Poiseuille shear flow appears to induce a more ordered and well-defined structure at the interface.

  10. Foams stabilised by mixtures of nanoparticles and oppositely charged surfactants: relationship between bubble shrinkage and foam coarsening.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Armando; Rio, Emmanuelle; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Langevin, Dominique; Salonen, Anniina

    2014-09-28

    We have studied foams stabilised by surfactant-decorated nanoparticles adsorbed at the bubble surfaces. We show that the controlled compression of a single bubble allows one to understand the coarsening behavior of these foams. When bubbles are compressed, the particles become tightly packed in the surface layer. They lose their mobility, and the interface becomes solid-like when the jammed state is reached. Further compression leads to interfacial buckling characterised by crumpled surfaces. We find that the surface concentration of particles at which the jamming and the buckling transitions occur are independent of the surfactant concentration. This is a surprising feature. It suggests that the surfactants are mandatory to help the particles adsorb at the interface and that they change the equilibrium surface concentration of the decorated particles. But they do not affect the surface properties once the particles are adsorbed. We measured the compression elastic modulus of the surface in the jammed state and found it to be compatible with the Gibbs condition for which the spontaneous dissolution of bubbles is arrested. Due to this effect, the coarsening process of a foam composed of many close-packed bubbles occurs in two steps. In the first step, coarsening is slow and coalescence of the bigger bubbles is observed. In the second step, a number of very small bubbles remains, which exhibit crumpled surfaces and are stable over long times. This suggests that foam coarsening is arrested once the smallest bubbles become fully covered after the initial shrinking step.

  11. Adsorption Kinetics in Micellar Solutions of Nonionic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colegate, Daniel M.; Bain, Colin D.

    2005-11-01

    Standard models of the adsorption kinetics of surfactants at the air-water surface assume that micelles break down into monomers in the bulk solution and that only monomers adsorb. We show here that micelles of the nonionic surfactant C14E8 adsorb to the surface of a liquid jet at a diffusion-controlled rate. Micellar adsorption can be switched off by incorporation of a small amount of ionic surfactant into the micelle and switched on again by addition of salt. More sophisticated models of adsorption processes in micellar solutions are required that permit a kinetic flux of micelles to the air-water interface.

  12. Synthesis and surfactant modification of clinoptilolite and montmorillonite for the removal of nitrate and preparation of slow release nitrogen fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Deepesh; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Pankaj; Tomar, Radha

    2012-08-15

    This article introduces the synthesis of clinoptilolite and montmorillonite, and their surfactant modification by using solutions of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CH(3)(CH(2))(15)N(Br)(CH(3))(3), HDTMAB) and dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide ((CH(3)(CH(2))(17))(2)N(Br)(CH(3))(2), DODMAB). The feasibility of using surfactant modified silicates (SMSs) as a potential adsorbent for nitrate and for slow release of nutrient has been investigated. Adsorption isotherms of NO(3)(-) on SMSs have been measured at aqueous concentration of 160-280 mg L(-1). The SMSs show much higher adsorption capacity than the unmodified materials as determined by Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The surfactant modification and increased surfactant loading concentration enhance the nitrate anion retaining capacity of silicates (montmorillonite (16.05 mg g(-1))layers-funnel analytical test and soil column percolating system. The obtained results indicate that SMSs are very good adsorbent for NO(3)(-) and a slow release of nitrogen is achievable as it releases NO(3)(-) still after 15-20 days of leaching study.

  13. Interfacial Adsorption of Silk Fibroin Peptides and Their Interaction with Surfactants at the Solid-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Jayawardane, Dharana; Pan, Fang; Lu, Jian R; Zhao, Xiubo

    2016-08-16

    Regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) is a Food and Drug Administration-approved material and has been widely used in many biomedical and cosmetic applications. Because of the amphiphilic nature of the primary repeat amino acid sequence (e.g., AGAGAS), RSF peptides can significantly reduce the water surface tension and therefore have the potential to be used as a surface active component for many applications, particularly in the biomedical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and food industries. In this paper, the adsorption of RSF peptides separated into molecular fractions of 5-30, 30-300, and >300 kDa has been studied at the solid-water interface by neutron reflection and spectroscopic ellipsometry to assess its surface active behavior. A stable layer of RSF was found to be irreversibly adsorbed at the hydrophilic SiO2-water interface. Changes in solution concentration, pH, and ionic strength all had an impact on the final adsorbed amount found at the interface. There were no significant differences between the final adsorbed amounts or layer structure among the three RSF molecular fractions studied; however, >300 kDa RSF was more stable to changes in solution ionic strength. Adsorption of conventional anionic and cationic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (C12TAB), to the preadsorbed 5-30 kDa RSF revealed penetration of the surfactant into the RSF layer, at concentrations below the critical micellar concentration (CMC). SDS was found in the preadsorbed RSF layer and gradually removed RSF from the surface with an increase in SDS concentration. At concentrations above the CMC, there is near complete removal of RSF by SDS at the interface. C12TAB adsorbed into the preadsorbed RSF layer with considerably less removal of RSF from the interface compared to SDS. At concentrations above the CMC, both C12Tab and RSF were found to coexist at the interface, forming a less thick layer but with a considerable amount of RSF still present.

  14. Proteomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Nanoparticle Corona upon Contact with Lung Surfactant Reveals Differences in Protein, but Not Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Raesch, Simon Sebastian; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Rurainski, Alexander; Selzer, Dominik; Ruge, Christian Arnold; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Schaefer, Ulrich Friedrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-22

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) constitutes the first line of host defense in the deep lung. Because of its high content of phospholipids and surfactant specific proteins, the interaction of inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) with the pulmonary surfactant layer is likely to form a corona that is different to the one formed in plasma. Here we present a detailed lipidomic and proteomic analysis of NP corona formation using native porcine surfactant as a model. We analyzed the adsorbed biomolecules in the corona of three NP with different surface properties (PEG-, PLGA-, and Lipid-NP) after incubation with native porcine surfactant. Using label-free shotgun analysis for protein and LC-MS for lipid analysis, we quantitatively determined the corona composition. Our results show a conserved lipid composition in the coronas of all investigated NPs regardless of their surface properties, with only hydrophilic PEG-NPs adsorbing fewer lipids in total. In contrast, the analyzed NP displayed a marked difference in the protein corona, consisting of up to 417 different proteins. Among the proteins showing significant differences between the NP coronas, there was a striking prevalence of molecules with a notoriously high lipid and surface binding, such as, e.g., SP-A, SP-D, DMBT1. Our data indicate that the selective adsorption of proteins mediates the relatively similar lipid pattern in the coronas of different NPs. On the basis of our lipidomic and proteomic analysis, we provide a detailed set of quantitative data on the composition of the surfactant corona formed upon NP inhalation, which is unique and markedly different to the plasma corona.

  15. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  16. Molecularly Imprinted Filtering Adsorbents for Odor Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Sho; Chiyomaru, You; Sassa, Fumihiro; Liu, Chuanjun; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    Versatile odor sensors that can discriminate among huge numbers of environmental odorants are desired in many fields, including robotics, environmental monitoring, and food production. However, odor sensors comparable to an animal’s nose have not yet been developed. An animal’s olfactory system recognizes odor clusters with specific molecular properties and uses this combinatorial information in odor discrimination. This suggests that measurement and clustering of odor molecular properties (e.g., polarity, size) using an artificial sensor is a promising approach to odor sensing. Here, adsorbents composed of composite materials with molecular recognition properties were developed for odor sensing. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the adsorbent materials, so specific polymeric materials with particular solubility parameters were chosen to adsorb odorants with various properties. The adsorption properties of the adsorbents could be modified by mixing adsorbent materials. Moreover, a novel molecularly imprinted filtering adsorbent (MIFA), composed of an adsorbent substrate covered with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer, was developed to improve the odor molecular recognition ability. The combination of the adsorbent and MIP layer provided a higher specificity toward target molecules. The MIFA thus provides a useful technique for the design and control of adsorbents with adsorption properties specific to particular odor molecules. PMID:27886070

  17. Surfactant-laden drops rising in a stratified ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchette, Francois; Martin, David

    2015-11-01

    We present results of a numerical study of the dynamics of rising drops in the presence of both surfactants and stratification. Our simulations model oil drops rising in the oceans, where naturally occurring or man-made surfactants are present. We study surfactant covered drops in uniform and density-stratified ambients, as well as clean drops entering a dissolved surfactant layer. We quantify the effects of entrainment for various Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. We also report a brief acceleration followed by a significant deceleration as a clean drop enters a surfactant layer, and describe how the adsorption rate affects those dynamics.

  18. Remobilizing the Interfaces of Thermocapillary Driven Bubbles Retarded by the Adsorption of a Surfactant Impurity on the Bubble Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaparthi, Ravi; Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    concentrations than the impurity, it adsorbs to the bubble much faster than the impurity when the bubble is formed, and thereby prevents the impurity from adsorbing onto the surface. In addition the rapid kinetic exchange and high bulk concentration maintain a saturated surface with a uniform surface concentrations. This prevents retarding surface tension gradients and keeps the velocity high. In our first report last year, we detailed experimental results which verified the theory of remobilization in ground based experiments in which the steady velocity of rising bubbles was measured in a continuous phase consisting of a glycerol/water mixture containing a polyethylene glycol surfactant C12E6 (CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)6OH). In our report this year, we detail our efforts to describe theoretically the remobilization observed. We construct a model in which a bubble rises steadily by buoyancy in a continuous (Newtonian) viscous fluid containing surfactant with a uniform far field bulk concentration. We account for the effects of inertia as well as viscosity in the flow in the continuous phase caused by the bubble motion (order one Reynolds number), and we assume that the bubble shape remains spherical (viscous and inertial forces are smaller than capillary forces, i e. small Weber and capillary numbers). The surfactant distribution is calculated by solving the mass transfer equations including convection and diffusion in the bulk, and finite kinetic exchange the bulk and the surface. Convective effects dominate diffusive mass transfer in the bulk of the liquid (high Peclet numbers) except in a thin boundary layer near the surface. A finite volume method is used to numerically solve the hydrodynamic and mass transfer equations on a staggered grid which accounts specifically for the thin boundary layer. We present the results of the nondimensional drag as a function of the bulk concentration of surfactant for different rates of kinetic exchange, from which we develop criteria for the

  19. A theoretical study of bubble motion in surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanping

    1999-08-01

    We examine the effect of surfactants on a spherical gas bubble rising steadily in an infinite fluid at low and order one Reynolds number with order one and larger Peclet numbers. Our mathematical model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a convection- diffusion equation together with appropriate interfacial conditions. The nonlinearity of the equations and boundary conditions, and the coupling between hydrodynamics and surfactant transport make the problem very challenging. When a bubble rises in a fluid containing surface-active agents, surfactant adsorbs onto the bubble surface at the leading edge, convects to the trailing edge by the surface flow and desorbs into the bulk along the interface. This adsorption develops a surface concentration gradient on the interface that makes the surface tension at the back end relatively lower than that at the front end, and thus retards the bubble velocity. Because of surfactant impurities unavoidably present in materials, this retardation can cause a problem in materials processing in space and glass processing when bubbles are created during chemical reactions. Thus the study of how to remobilize (remove the surfactant gradient on the surface) the bubble surface becomes necessary. Many studies have been done on this retarding effects of the surfactant on a moving bubble. However, most were focused on the retarding effect due to a trace amount of surfactant, in which case the bubble velocity monotonically decreases as the bulk concentration increases. The question of how to remobilize the bubble surface remains unanswered. In this work, we will show that the bubble velocity can be controlled by remobilizing the bubble interface using the surfactant concentration. This technique not only can be used to maximize the bubble velocity, but also can be used to maximize mass transfer on purifying materials and extracting materials from mixtures. In the first part of the work, we illustrate numerically that the

  20. Yielding and flow of solutions of thermoresponsive surfactant tubes: tuning macroscopic rheology by supramolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Fameau, Anne-Laure; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud

    2014-05-28

    In this article, we show that stimuli-induced microscopic transformations of self-assembled surfactant structures can be used to tune the macroscopic bulk and interfacial rheological properties. Previously, we had described the formation of micron-sized 12-hydroxystearic acid tubes having a temperature-tunable diameter in the bulk, and also adsorbing at the air-water interface. We report now a detailed study of the bulk and interfacial rheological properties of this solution of thermoresponsive tubes as a function of temperature. In the bulk, the structural modifications of tubes with temperature lead to sharp and non-monotonous changes of rheological behavior. As well, at the air-water interface, the interfacial layer is shifted several times from rigid-like to fluid-like as the temperature is increased, due to morphological changes of the adsorbed interfacial layer. The temperature-induced variations in the fatty acid supramolecular organization and the richness in structural transitions at this microscopic level lead to unique rheological responses in comparison with conventional surfactant systems. Also, this study provides new insights into the required packing conditions for the jamming of anisotropic soft objects and highlights the fact that this system becomes glassy under heating. Due to these unique macroscopic properties both in the bulk and at the interface, this simple system with stimuli-responsive viscoelasticity is of interest for their potential applications in pharmacology or cosmetic formulations.

  1. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium kinetics of self-assembled surfactant monolayers: a vibrational sum-frequency study of dodecanoate at the fluorite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Schrödle, Simon; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2008-04-16

    The adsorption, desorption, and equilibrium monomer exchange processes of sodium dodecanoate at the fluorite(CaF 2)-water interface have been studied. For the first time, we use in situ vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) to gain insights into the mechanism and kinetics of monolayer self-assembly at the mineral-water interface. By exploiting the nonlinear optical response of the adsorbate, the temporal correlation of headgroup adsorption and alignment of the surfactant's alkyl chain was monitored. Because of the unique surface-specificity of VSFS, changes in the interfacial water structure were also tracked experimentally. The spectra clearly reveal that the structure of interfacial water molecules is severely disturbed at the start of the adsorption process. With the formation of a well-ordered adsorbate layer, it is partially reestablished; however, the molecular orientation and state of coordination is significantly altered. Even at very low surfactant concentrations, overcharging of the mineral surface (i.e., the adsorption of adsorbates past the point of electrostatic equilibrium) was observed. This points out the importance of effects other than electrostatic interactions and it is proposed that cooperative effects of both water structure and surfactant hemimicelle formation at the interface are key factors. The present study also investigates desorption kinetics of partially and fully established monolayers and a statistical model for data analysis is proposed. Additional experiments were performed in the presence of electrolytes and showed that uni- and divalent anions affect the nonequilibrium kinetics of self-assembled monolayers in strikingly different ways.

  2. The Dispersion Properties of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate Suspensions Adsorbed with Alkyl Polyglycoside in Aqueous Medium.

    PubMed

    Song, Myung-Geun; Kim, Jong-Yun; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2000-06-01

    The zeta potentials and dispersion properties of precipitated calcium carbonate suspensions adsorbed with alkyl polyglycosides in aqueous medium were investigated. Within the investigated pH ranges, the adsorption curves of alkyl polyglycosides on calcium carbonates show sigmoidal shapes, and the zeta potential decreases as the amount of adsorption increases. At positively charged surfaces of low pH, the adsorption amounts were greater than those at negatively charged surfaces, indicating that alkyl polyglycosides were negatively charged in aqueous solutions. At low concentrations of alkyl polyglycosides, the dispersion stabilities of suspensions were very poor and showed no linearity with zeta potentials over the entire range of pHs, which may be attributed to the onset of hydrophobic interaction between particles due to the adsorption of surfactant molecules. This destabilization continued until monolayer coverage by the surfactant layer was complete. Based on the classical DLVO theory, there may be a strong hydrophobic interaction between particles. Beyond monolayer adsorption, the dispersion stability increases, probably by the formation of hemimicelle or admicelle. Therefore, it is believed that ionization of alkyl polyglycosides and admicelles of surfactants on particle surface plays a key role in the stability of dispersions and the abrupt increase in adsorption. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Adsorption of Gemini surfactants onto clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Salako, O; Lo, C; Couzis, A; Somasundaran, P; Lee, J W

    2013-12-15

    This work addresses the adsorption of two Gemini surfactants at the cyclopentane (CP) hydrate-water interface. The Gemini surfactants investigated here are Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 that have two anionic head groups and one hydrophobic tail group. The adsorption of these surfactants was quantified using adsorption isotherms and the adsorption isotherms were determined using liquid-liquid titrations. Even if the Gemini surfactant adsorption isotherms show multi-layer adsorption, they possess the first Langmuir layer with the second adsorption layer only evident in the 2A1 adsorption isotherm. Zeta potentials of CP hydrate particles in the surfactant solution of various concentrations of Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were measured to further explain their adsorption behavior at the CP hydrate-water interface. Zeta potentials of alumina particles as a model particle system in different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were also measured to confirm the configuration of all the surfactants at the interface. The determination of the isotherms and zeta-potentials provides an understanding framework for the adsorption behavior of the two Gemini surfactants at the hydrate-water interface.

  4. Cooperative Jahn-Teller effect in a 2D mesoscopic C{60/n-} system with D5d symmetry adsorbed on buffer layers using Ising EFT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Ghantous, M.; Moujaes, E. A.; Dunn, J. L.; Khater, A.

    2012-06-01

    Fullerene molecules adsorbed on surfaces often show macroscopic average distortions. As charged ions C60n- are known to be Jahn-Teller (JT) active, it is suggested that these distortions could be a manifestation of cooperative JT effects (CJTE) due to interactions between neighbouring fullerene ions. In order to understand the distortion properties it is necessary to take correlations between different distortions into account. However, this can't easily be done in the mean field approximation usually used to describe the CJTE. We therefore propose an alternative procedure to describe 2D mesoscopic islands of C60 ions in which a pseudo vector spin overrightarrow{S} is evoked to represent degenerate JT-distorted states when the quadratic JT coupling is considered. This approach is analogous to methods used for 2D magnetic systems. We then use the differential operator technique in effective field theory within the Ising approach. We include the effects of weak surface interactions and dynamic motion between equivalent distortions via terms equivalent to anisotropy and a transverse field in magnetism respectively. For distortions to D5d symmetry, we determine single site correlations as a function of temperature, the macroscopic average distortion describing a structural phase transition, and the isothermal response function. Phase diagrams are presented for relevant cases of the system parameters.

  5. Surfactant-mediated control of colloid pattern assembly and attachment strength in evaporating droplets.

    PubMed

    Morales, Verónica L; Parlange, Jean-Yves; Wu, Mingming; Pérez-Reche, Francisco J; Zhang, Wei; Sang, Wenjing; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2013-02-12

    This study demonstrates that the pattern assembly and attachment strength of colloids in an evaporating sessile droplet resting on a smooth substrate can be controlled by adding nonionic solutes (surfactant) to the solution. As expected, increasing the surfactant concentration leads to a decrease in initial surface tension of the drop, σ(0). For the range of initial surface tensions investigated (39-72 mN m(-1)), three distinct deposition patterns were produced: amorphous stains (σ(0) = 63-72 mN m(-1)), coffee-ring stains (σ(0) = 48-53 mN m(-1)), and concentric rings (σ(0) = 39-45 mN m(-1)). A flow-displacement system was used to measure the attachment strength of the dried colloids. Characteristic drying regimes associated with the three unique pattern formations are attributed to abrupt transitions of contact line dynamics during evaporation. The first transition from slipping- to pinned-contact line was found to be a direct result of the competition between mechanical instability of the droplet and the friction generated by pinned colloids at the contact line. The second transition from pinned- to recurrent-stick-rip-slip-contact line was caused by repeated liquid film rupturing from evaporation-intensified surfactant concentration. Data from flow-displacement tests indicate that attachment strength of dried particles is strongest for amorphous stains (lowest surfactant concentration) and weakest for concentric rings (highest surfactant concentration). The mechanism behind these observations was ascribed to the formation and adsorption of micelles onto colloid and substrate surfaces as the droplet solution evaporates. The range of attachment forces observed between the colloids and the solid substrate were well captured by extended-DLVO interactions accounting for van der Waals attraction, electric double layer repulsion, and micelle-protrusion repulsion. Both empirical and theoretical results suggest that an increasingly dense layer of adsorbed micellar

  6. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  7. Capillary zone electrophoretic separation of neutral species of chloro-s-triazines in the presence of cationic surfactant monomers.

    PubMed

    Lin, C E; Wang, T Z; Huang, H C; Hsueh, C C; Liu, Y C

    2000-05-05

    Chloro-s-triazines are difficult to separate by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), due to their low pKa values. However, these analytes can be effectively separated by CZE in the presence of cationic surfactant monomers, such as tetradecylammonium bromide (TTAB) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). The separation mechanism based on a 1:1 binding of analytes to cationic surfactant monomers is proposed. The binding constants of chloro-s-triazines to cationic surfactant monomers are estimated. The results show that the strength of the interactions of these analytes with TTAB monomers is considerably strong, whereas that of the corresponding analyte with DTAB monomers is about 12- to 14-fold weaker. A linear correlation of binding constants with log P(ow) (the logarithm of the partition coefficient of analytes between 1-octanol and aqueous phases) indicates that the migration order of these chloro-s-triazines depends primarily on their hydrophobicity. Moreover, the skewed peaks of chloro-s-triazines observed may reveal the occurrence of adsolubilization of these analytes in the adsorbed cationic surfactant layer on the capillary surface.

  8. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  9. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  10. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  11. Adsorption of mixed cationic-nonionic surfactant and its effect on bentonite structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxin; Zhao, Yan; Zhu, Yong; Wu, Huayong; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of cationic-nonionic mixed surfactant onto bentonite and its effect on bentonite structure were investigated. The objective was to improve the understanding of surfactant behavior on clay mineral for its possible use in remediation technologies of soil and groundwater contaminated by toxic organic compounds. The cationic surfactant used was hexadecylpyridinium bromide (HDPB), and the nonionic surfactant was Triton X-100 (TX100). Adsorption of TX100 was enhanced significantly by the addition of HDPB, but this enhancement decreased with an increase in the fraction of the cationic surfactant. Part of HDPB was replaced by TX100 which decreased the adsorption of HDPB. However, the total adsorbed amount of the mixed surfactant was still increased substantially, indicating the synergistic effect between the cationic and nonionic surfactants. The surfactant-modified bentonite was characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric-derivative thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses. Surfactant intercalation was found to decrease the bentonite specific surface area, pore volume, and surface roughness and irregularities, as calculated by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The co-adsorption of the cationic and nonionic surfactants increased the ordering conformation of the adsorbed surfactants on bentonite, but decreased the thermal stability of the organobentonite system.

  12. The effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant. An experimental program was conducted to screen various types of commercially available nonionic and anionic surfactants for solubilizing adsorbed naphthalene from one type of aquifer material. Two additional types of aquifer materials were obtained, and the surfactant mixture, Tween 20 and Aerosol AY-65, selected during the screening process was used at various concentrations for equilibrium desorption studies to quantify surfactant effects on naphthalene desorption. Column studies subsequently were conducted to determine surfactant effects in a flow through system. Equilibrium desorption studies showed that a 0.125% surfactant solution decreased the partition coefficient 65% compared with water alone for one soil type, while greater surfactant concentrations resulted in less effective mobilization. However, the same surfactant mixture markedly increased the partition coefficient when used with another soil type, and had negligible effects for the third soil type. It was shown that the clay mineralogy significantly influenced the effect of the surfactant solution. Column studies showed that mass removal efficiencies were increased by approximately 40 to 60% using the surfactant solution as compared with water alone. Varying flow rates did not influence the effectiveness of either the surfactant or water solutions.

  13. Lung Surfactant Levels are Regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by Monitoring Surfactant Protein D

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta+/+ and Ig-Hepta−/− mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space. PMID:23922714

  14. A small angle neutron scattering study of the adsorbed asphaltene layer in water-in-hydrocarbon emulsions: structural description related to stability.

    PubMed

    Jestin, Jacques; Simon, Sébastien; Zupancic, Lina; Barré, Loïc

    2007-10-09

    We have developed a specific protocol to study with SANS measurements, the structure of the interfacial film layer in water-in-oil emulsions stabilized by asphaltene. Using the contrast matching technique available for neutron scattering, we have access to both the composition and the quantity of interface. The results obtained give us a view of the asphaltene aggregates in the interfacial film, which are structured as a monolayer and show a direct correlation between the size of asphaltene aggregates in solution and the thickness of the film layer. The organization of the interface has been studied as a function of several parameters such as the quantity of resins, i.e., the size of aggregates, the pH of the aqueous phase, and the aging time of the emulsions and the consequences of these variations on the macroscopic stability of these emulsions. We show that the key parameter for the stability is the inter-asphaltene aggregate interaction inside the film layer. Changing the attractive/repulsive balance between the aggregates in the film at the microscopic scale, by changing the aggregate's size or the aggregate's ionization, has a direct incidence on the quantity of water recovered after centrifugation: the stronger the attraction between aggregates in the film, the more stable the emulsion is.

  15. Charge transfer from an adsorbed ruthenium-based photosensitizer through an ultra-thin aluminium oxide layer and into a metallic substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Andrew J.; Temperton, Robert H.; Handrup, Karsten; Weston, Matthew; Mayor, Louise C.; O’Shea, James N.

    2014-06-21

    The interaction of the dye molecule N3 (cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2-bipyridyl-4,4′-dicarbo-xylato) -ruthenium(II)) with the ultra-thin oxide layer on a AlNi(110) substrate, has been studied using synchrotron radiation based photoelectron spectroscopy, resonant photoemission spectroscopy, and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Calibrated X-ray absorption and valence band spectra of the monolayer and multilayer coverages reveal that charge transfer is possible from the molecule to the AlNi(110) substrate via tunnelling through the ultra-thin oxide layer and into the conduction band edge of the substrate. This charge transfer mechanism is possible from the LUMO+2 and 3 in the excited state but not from the LUMO, therefore enabling core-hole clock analysis, which gives an upper limit of 6.0 ± 2.5 fs for the transfer time. This indicates that ultra-thin oxide layers are a viable material for use in dye-sensitized solar cells, which may lead to reduced recombination effects and improved efficiencies of future devices.

  16. Cu electrodeposition in the presence of organic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliadis, Elias D.

    In situ atomic force microscopy combined with traditional electrochemical and surface analysis techniques has been used to study the role of organic adsorbates on the electrodeposition of Cu from acidified sulfate solutions on Au and Cu electrodes. The galvanostatic deposition of Cu from sulphuric acid solutions onto evaporated Au(111) electrodes bearing alkanethiol monolayers (SAMs) was studied with a combination of cyclic voltammetry, in situ AFM, and XPS. The morphology of the electrodeposit was found to depend on the chain length of the alkanethiol used to form the SAM and the applied current density. It was found that short chain length (n = 4) thiols and high current densities (j ≥ 1.67 mA/cmsp2) promote the formation of smooth deposits. We attribute this effect to the overpotential-driven activation of numerous monolayer defects that play the role of nucleation centers. XPS analysis showed that deposition occurred on top of the monolayer in a completely reversible manner. The effect of quaternary ammonium salts on electrodeposition of Cu from acidified sulfate solutions on Au(111) single crystal electrodes was studied. Cyclic voltammetry showed that hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTA(Brsp-)) adsorbs strongly on the Au substrate thus inhibiting Cu deposition both in the upd and bulk deposition region. Cu electrodeposits formed in the presence of CTA(Brsp-) were found to consist of regularly shaped triangular crystallites, whose orientation was influenced by the topographical characteristics of the Au substrate. The Cu crystallites were observed to form in a layer-by-layer fashion and the frequency of layer formation and lateral growth rate were found to depend on the applied overpotential. A one-dimensional transport model was used in order to assess the adatom concentration on the growing crystallites and to provide qualitative insight into the deposit growth habit. The organic surfactants CTA(Brsp-) and CTA(HSOsb4sp-) were found to influence the

  17. Interfacial aggregation of a nonionic surfactant: Effect on the stability of silica suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano-Palmino, F.; Denoyel, R.; Rouquerol, J. . Centre de thermodynamique et Microcalorimetrie)

    1994-06-01

    Nonionic surfactants are in widespread use in technological applications such as flotation, detergency, suspension stabilization (paints, ceramic preparation, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics), and enhanced oil recovery. The adsorption of the nonionic surfactant TX 100 in two silica suspensions (Ludox HS40 and Syton W30) has been studied with the aim of relating the structure of the adsorbed layer to the stability of the suspension. First, a thermodynamic study based on the determination of adsorption isotherms and displacement enthalpies as a function of pH and solid/liquid ratio was carried out and lead to the conclusion that such a surfactant forms micelle-like aggregates on the silica surface. Then, a stability study based on visual observation, turbidimetry, and particle size determination (by photon correlation spectroscopy) was performed in order to determine the TX 100 concentration range in which flocculation occurs. Considering that the surface is covered with micelle-like aggregates in the flocculation range and that the [zeta]-potential (determined by microelectrophoresis) has varied only slightly at the onset of flocculation, it is concluded that the flocculation mechanism is a bridging of particles by surface micelles. This bridging of particles by aggregates similar in size and shape could be an explanation of the presence, in such systems, of optimum flocculation at half surface coverage.

  18. Surfactant Effects on Particle Generation in Antibody Formulations in Pre-filled Syringes

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Alana; McUmber, Aaron C.; Nguyen, Bao H.; Lewus, Rachael; Schwartz, Daniel K.; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation and particle formation have been observed when protein solutions contact hydrophobic interfaces, and it has been suggested that this undesirable phenomenon may be initiated by interfacial adsorption and subsequent gelation of the protein. The addition of surfactants, such as polysorbate 20, to protein formulations has been proposed as a way to reduce protein adsorption at silicone oil-water interfaces and mitigate the production of aggregates and particles. In an accelerated stability study, monoclonal antibody formulations containing varying concentrations of polysorbate 20 were incubated and agitated in pre-filled glass syringes (PFS), exposing the protein to silicone oil-water interfaces at the siliconized syringe walls, air-water interfaces, and agitation stress. Following agitation in siliconized syringes that contained an air bubble, lower particle concentrations were measured in the surfactant-containing antibody formulations than in surfactant-free formulations. Polysorbate 20 reduced particle formation when added at concentrations above or below the critical micelle concentration (CMC). The ability of polysorbate 20 to decrease particle generation in PFS corresponded with its ability to inhibit gelation of the adsorbed protein layer, which was assessed by measuring the interfacial diffusion of individual antibody molecules at the silicone oil-water interface using total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy with single-molecule tracking. PMID:26413998

  19. Model for surfactant-mediated growth of Ge on Pb-covered Si(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bȩben, Janusz; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Chang, Tien-Chih; Tsong, Tien T.

    2001-01-01

    A model of surfactant-mediated epitaxy is investigated using the kinetic Monte Carlo method. This model assumes that (1) adatom-adatom interaction on the surfactant layer is weakly repulsive for dimers, and (2) a concerted atomic exchange of adatoms with surfactant atoms occurs when adatom clusters above the surfactant layer reach a threshold size. All essential features observed in a recent study of Ge/Pb/Si(111) reported by Hwang, Chang, and Tsong can be satisfactorily explained with this model.

  20. Extended delivery of an anionic drug by contact lens loaded with a cationic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Bengani, Lokendrakumar C; Chauhan, Anuj

    2013-04-01

    Drug eluding contact lenses can be very effective vehicles for ophthalmic drug delivery, but are incapable of releasing drug for more than a few hours. We propose to optimize the interactions of the polymer matrix of the contact lens with the hydrophobic tails of ionic surfactants to adsorb the surfactant molecules on the polymer with high packing and thus create a high surface charge. Ionic drugs can then adsorb on the charged surfactant coated surfaces with high affinity to reduce the transport rates, leading to extended release. Specifically, we show control release of an anionic drug dexamethasone 21-disodium phosphate from poly-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (p-HEMA) contact lenses by utilizing cationic surfactant (cetalkonium chloride). The partition coefficient of the drug increase exponentially with surfactant loading in the gel in at least qualitative agreement with the Debye-Hückel theory. The drug adsorbs on the surfactant covered polymer, and can also diffuse along the surface with diffusivity lower than that for the free drug, leading to a reduction in the effective diffusivity, which is the weighted combination of the free and surface diffusivities. The addition of surfactant did not impact transparency of lenses, and had additional benefits of increase in wettability and significant reduction in protein absorption. With a surfactant loading of about 10%, the drug release duration was increased from about 2 h to 50 h in 1-day ACUVUE(®) contact lenses, proving the viability of using surfactant for increasing drug release durations.

  1. Adsorption of anionic and non-ionic surfactants on carbon nanotubes in water with dissipative particle dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Minh D.; Shiau, Benjamin; Harwell, Jeffrey H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of surfactants physically adsorbed on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has a significant impact on the dispersion of CNTs in the solution. The adsorption of the surfactants alfoterra 123-8s (AF) and tergitol 15-s-40 (TG) on CNTs was investigated with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, as well as the behavior of the binary surfactant system with CNTs. Properties of surfactants (i.e., critical micelle concentration, aggregation number, shape and size of micelle, and diffusivity) in water were determined to validate the simulation model. Results indicated that the assembly of surfactants (AF and TG) on CNTs depends on the interaction of the surfactant tail and the CNT surface, where surfactants formed mainly hemimicellar structures. For surfactants in solution, most micelles had spherical shape. The particles formed by the CNT and the adsorbed surfactant became hydrophilic, due to the outward orientation of the head groups of the surfactants that formed monolayer adsorption. In the binary surfactant system, the presence of TG on the CNT surface provided a considerable hydrophilic steric effect, due to the EO groups of TG molecules. It was also seen that the adsorption of AF was more favorable than TG on the CNT surface. Diffusion coefficients for the surfactants in the bulk and surface diffusion on the CNT were calculated. These results are applicable, in a qualitative sense, to the more general case of adsorption of surfactants on the hydrophobic surface of cylindrically shaped nanoscale objects.

  2. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1994-02-22

    The aim of this contract is to elucidate the mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations and other inorganic and polymeric species and solids of relevant mineralogy will also be determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability win be used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. Adsorption/desorption of tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether (C{sub 12}EO{sub 8}) surfactant mixtures at the kaolinite-water and alumina-water interfaces was studied during this quarter. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Effect of the hydrocarbon chain length of octaethylene glycol mono n-alkyl ether (C{sub n}EO{sub 8}) type nonionic surfactants on the adsorption of 1:1 mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/C{sub n}EO{sub 8} at the kaolinite/water interface was studied. The adsorption of SDS was enhanced by the presence of C{sub 10}EO{sub 8} but this effect was not as significant as those by C{sub 12--16}EO{sub 8}. Interestingly, once the hydrocarbon chain length of the nonionic surfactant exceeded that of the SDS (12) there was no further enhancement of SDS adsorption.

  3. Numerical simulation of drop and bubble dynamics with soluble surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Siegel, Michael; Booty, Michael R.

    2014-05-01

    Numerical computations are presented to study the effect of soluble surfactant on the deformation and breakup of an axisymmetric drop or bubble stretched by an imposed linear strain flow in a viscous fluid. At the high values of bulk Peclet number Pe in typical fluid-surfactant systems, there is a thin transition layer near the interface in which the surfactant concentration varies rapidly. The large surfactant gradients are resolved using a fast and accurate "hybrid" numerical method that incorporates a separate, singular perturbation analysis of the dynamics in the transition layer into a full numerical solution of the free boundary problem. The method is used to investigate the dependence of drop deformation on parameters that characterize surfactant solubility. We also compute resolved examples of tipstreaming, and investigate its dependence on parameters such as flow rate and bulk surfactant concentration.

  4. Rheology of Natural Lung Surfactant Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zsadzinski, Joseph

    2004-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) is a lipoprotein mixture lining the inside of the pulmonary alveoli which has the ability to lower the surface tension of the air-liquid hypophase interface to value near zero thus reducing the work of breathing and which also prevents the alveolar collapse. A lack or malfunction of lung surfactant, as it is often the case for premature infants, leads to respiratory distress syndrome. RDS can be treated by supplying replacement LS to the infants and several medications derived from natural sources, are now widely used. The lung surfactant is adsorbed at the air-liquid interface and is subjected to incessant compression expansion cycles therefore Langmuir monolayers provide a suitable model to investigate the physical properties of lung surfactant films. Using a magnetic needle rheometer, we measured the shear viscosity of natural lung surfactant spread at the air-liquid interface upon compression and expansion cycles for three different formulations. The shear viscosity of Survanta changes by orders of magnitude along one cycle while for Curosurf samples it changes only slightly and for Infasurf films it remains constant. These different behaviors can be explained by differences in composition between the three formulations leading to different organizations on the molecular scale.

  5. The relationship between the adhesion work, the wettability and composition of the surface layer in the systems polymer/aqueous solution of anionic surfactants and alcohol mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2010-11-01

    Measurements of advancing contact angle ( θ) were carried out on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDDS) mixtures with methanol, ethanol and propanol in the range of SDDS concentration from 10 -5 to 10 -2 M, and for sodium hexadecyl sulfonate (SHS) with the same alcohols at the SHS concentration ranging from 10 -5 to 8 × 10 -4 M at 293 K. The concentration of methanol, ethanol and propanol used for measurements varied from 0 to 21.1, 11.97 and 6.67 M, respectively. On the basis of the contact angles the critical surface tension of PTFE and PMMA wetting was determined by using for this purpose the relationship between the adhesion and the surface tension and cos θ and surface tension both at constant alcohol and surfactant concentration, respectively. The obtained contact angles were also used in the Young Dupre' equation for calculations of the adhesion work of aqueous solution of mixtures of anionic surfactants and short chain alcohols to PTFE and PMMA surface. The adhesion work calculated in this way was compared to that of the particular components of aqueous solution to these surfaces determined on the basis of the surface tension components and parameters of the surface tension of the surface active agents, water, PTFE and PMMA from van Oss et al. equation. The calculated adhesion work was discussed in the light of the concentration of surface active agents at polymer-water and water-air interface determined from Lucassen-Reynders, Gibbs and Guggenheim-Adam equations.

  6. Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water.

    PubMed

    Paria, Santanu

    2008-04-21

    Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous

  7. Improvement of Absorber's Performance by a Surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Nomura, Tomohiro; Iyota, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Ryuichiro

    Effects of an addition of surfactant to a lithium bromide aqueous solution have been investigated experimentally. N-octanol was used as a surfactant. The Marangoni convection occurred at/beneath the solution surface in the very beginning of steam absorption was observed both by a real-time type laser holographic visualization and by temperature measurements with extremely fine gauge thermocouples. Generation and growth of the Marangoni convection were both observed and evaluated quantitatively by the flow visualization. Furthermore, solution's surface temperatures with and without addition of the surfactant were measured minutely. Cell's formation pattern and migration speed at the surface were measured varying the initial surfactant's concentration ranging from 0 to 50000 ppm and the shallow liquid layer thickness ranging from 2 to 5 mm. And spacio-temporal scales of the Marangoni convection were determined. Also solution temperature changes at the surface were compared. Temperature increases when the surfactant was added to its solubility limit became almost double than that case of no surfactant. From these temperature differences, effects of the surfactant on absorber's performances were estimated by a calculation quantitatively with diffusion coefficient as an evaluation value.

  8. Droplet impact on liquid films in the presence of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jais, Khadijah; Yip, Natalie; Che, Zhizhao; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    In this study of droplet impact on liquid films, surfactants are added to the droplet, the liquid film or both, and the effects of different surfactant concentrations are investigated using high-speed imaging. The results show that surfactants suppress partial coalescence, due to damping of the capillary waves. Rebounding occurs more frequently when surfactants are added, as the surfactant molecules resist the drainage of the intervening air layer. When the droplet deforms the surfactant film, there is an uneven distribution of surfactant molecules along the interface, resulting in a surface tension gradient and a Marangoni stress. The Marangoni stress acts to even out the surface tension gradient and to aid rebounding. Surfactant droplet ruptures the film with a much lower surfactant concentration, leaving an apparent dry region on the substrate at the impact point. This is likely due to Marangoni stresses where the film pulls the droplet apart. As the film thickness is increased, a Worthington jet is formed, with secondary droplet(s) ejected from the jet only when surfactants are present. This study reveals that the presence of surfactants can significantly alter the impact process of droplets on liquid films. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  9. Competitive adsorption of surfactants and hydrophilic silica particles at the oil-water interface: interfacial tension and contact angle studies.

    PubMed

    Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2012-07-01

    The effect of surfactants' type and concentration on the interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of hydrophilic silica particles was investigated. Silica particles have been shown to have an antagonistic effect on interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of both W/O and O/W surfactants. Silica particles, combined with W/O surfactant, have no effect on interfacial tension, which is only dictated by the surfactant concentration, while they strongly affect interfacial tension when combined with O/W surfactants. At low O/W surfactant, both particles and surfactant are adsorbed at the interface, modifying the interface structure. At higher concentration, interfacial tension is only dictated by the surfactant. By increasing the surfactant concentration, the contact angle that a drop of aqueous phase assumes on a glass substrate placed in oil media decreases or increases depending on whether the surfactant is of W/O or O/W type, respectively. This is due to the modification of the wettability of the glass by the oil or water induced by the surfactants. Regardless of the surfactant's type, the contact angle profile was dictated by both particles and surfactant at low surfactant concentration, whereas it is dictated by the surfactant only at high concentration.

  10. Influence of clay mineral structure and surfactant nature on the adsorption capacity of surfactants by clays.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, M J; Dorado, M C; del Hoyo, C; Rodríguez-Cruz, M S

    2008-01-15

    Adsorption of three surfactants of different nature, Triton X-100 (TX100) (non-ionic), sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) (anionic) and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ODTMA) (cationic) by four layered (montmorillonite, illite, muscovite and kaolinite) and two non-layered (sepiolite and palygorskite) clay minerals was studied. The objective was to improve the understanding of surfactant behaviour in soils for the possible use of these compounds in remediation technologies of contaminated soils by toxic organic compounds. Adsorption isotherms were obtained using surfactant concentrations higher and lower than the critical micelle concentration (cmc). These isotherms showed different adsorption stages of the surfactants by the clay minerals, and were classified in different subgroups of the L-, S- or H-types. An increase in the adsorption of SDS and ODTMA by all clay minerals is observed up to the cmc of the surfactant in the equilibrium solution is reached. However, there was further TX100 adsorption when the equilibrium concentration was well above the cmc. Adsorption constants from Langmuir and Freundlich equations (TX100 and ODTMA) or Freundlich equation (SDS) were used to compare adsorption of different surfactants by clay minerals studied. These constants indicated the surfactant adsorption by clay minerals followed this order ODTMA>TX100>SDS. The adsorption of TX100 and ODTMA was higher by montmorillonite and illite, and the adsorption of SDS was found to be higher by kaolinite and sepiolite. Results obtained show the influence of clay mineral structure and surfactant nature on the adsorption capacity of surfactants by clays, and they indicate the interest to consider the soil mineralogical composition when one surfactant have to be selected in order to establish more efficient strategies for the remediation of soils and water contaminated by toxic organic pollutants.

  11. Ultra-fast photo-patterning of hydroxamic acid layers adsorbed on TiAlN: The challenge of modeling thermally induced desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemgesberg, Maximilian; Schütz, Simon; Müller, Christine; Schlörholz, Matthias; Latzel, Harald; Sun, Yu; Ziegler, Christiane; Thiel, Werner R.

    2012-10-01

    Long-chain n-alkyl terminated hydroxamic acids (HA) are used for the modification of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) surfaces. HA coatings improve the hydrophobicity of this wear resistant and industrially relevant ceramic. Therefore, HAs with different structural properties are evaluated with respect to their wear resistance and their thermal desorption properties. In order to find new coatings for rewritable offset printing plates, the changes in the surface polarity, composition, and morphology are analyzed by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning force microscopy (SFM), respectively. The results are referenced to the strongly bonding molecule n-dodecyl phosphonate (PO11M), which has been used for surface hydrophobization before but proved difficult to remove due to the high laser outputs required for thermal desorption. It is found that for certain HAs, an equally good hydrophobization compared to PO11M can be achieved. Contact angles obtained for different hydroxamic acid coatings can be correlated to their modes of adsorption. Only for selected HA species, resistance to mechanical wear is sufficient for further investigations. Photo-patterning of these hydroxamic acid layers is achieved using a high energy IR laser beam at different energy inputs. Fitting of the obtained data and further evaluation using finite element analysis (FEM) calculations reveal significantly reduced energy consumption of about 20% for the removal of a specific hydroxamic acid coating from the ceramic surface compared to PO11M.

  12. Entropy of adsorption of mixed surfactants from solutions onto the air/water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, L.-W.; Chen, J.-H.; Zhou, N.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The partial molar entropy change for mixed surfactant molecules adsorbed from solution at the air/water interface has been investigated by surface thermodynamics based upon the experimental surface tension isotherms at various temperatures. Results for different surfactant mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate, decylpyridinium chloride and sodium alkylsulfonates have shown that the partial molar entropy changes for adsorption of the mixed surfactants were generally negative and decreased with increasing adsorption to a minimum near the maximum adsorption and then increased abruptly. The entropy decrease can be explained by the adsorption-orientation of surfactant molecules in the adsorbed monolayer and the abrupt entropy increase at the maximum adsorption is possible due to the strong repulsion between the adsorbed molecules.

  13. Films made of cellulose nanofibrils: surface modification by adsorption of a cationic surfactant and characterization by computer-assisted electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syverud, K.; Xhanari, K.; Chinga-Carrasco, G.; Yu, Y.; Stenius, P.

    2011-02-01

    Films made of nanofibrils were modified by adsorption of a cationic surfactant directly on the film surfaces. The nanofibrils were prepared by 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation and mechanical fibrillation, and were relatively homogeneous in size. The average nanofibril diameter and surface porosity was quantified based on computer-assisted field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The cationic surfactant used in the adsorption was n-hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB). The adsorption of CTAB was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analyses. It was shown that the adsorbed layer of CTAB increased the hydrophobicity, without affecting the tensile index significantly. This capability, combined with the antiseptic properties of CTAB, may be a major advantage for several applications.

  14. Hyperbranched hydrocarbon surfactants give fluorocarbon-like low surface energies.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, Masanobu; Narumi, Tsuyoshi; Niwase, Misaki; Narita, Shioki; Ohata, Atsushi; James, Craig; Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frédéric; Alexander, Shirin; Eastoe, Julian

    2014-06-03

    Two series of Aerosol-OT-analogue surfactants (sulfosuccinate-type di-BCnSS and sulfoglutarate-type di-BCnSG) with hyperbranched alkyl double tails (so-called "hedgehog" groups, carbon number n = 6, 9, 12, and 18) have been synthesized and shown to demonstrate interfacial properties comparable to those seen for related fluorocarbon (FC) systems. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), surface tension at the CMC (γCMC), and minimum area per molecule (Amin) were obtained from surface tension measurements of aqueous surfactant solutions. The results were examined for relationships between the structure of the hedgehog group and packing density at the interface. To evaluate A and B values in the Klevens equation for these hedgehog surfactants, log(CMC) was plotted as a function of the total carbon number in the surfactant double tail. A linear relationship was observed, producing B values of 0.20-0.25 for di-BCnSS and di-BCnSG, compared to a value of 0.31 for standard double-straight-tail sulfosuccinate surfactants. The lower B values of these hedgehog surfactants highlight their lower hydrophobicity compared to double-straight-tail surfactants. To clarify how hydrocarbon density in the surfactant-tail layer (ρ(layer)) affects γCMC, the ρ(layer) of each double-tail surfactant was calculated and the relationship between γCMC and ρ(layer) examined. As expected for the design of low surface energy surfactant layers, ρ(layer) was identified as an important property for controlling γCMC with higher ρ(layer), leading to a lower γCMC. Interestingly, surfactants with BC9 and BC12 tails achieved much lower γCMC, even at low ρ(layer) values of <0.55 g cm(-3). The lowest surface energy surfactant studied here was di-BC6SS, which had a γCMC of only 23.8 mN m(-1). Such a low γCMC is comparable to those obtained with short FC-tail surfactants (e.g., 22.0 mN m(-1) for the sulfosuccinate-type FC-surfactant with R = F(CF2)6CH2CH2-).

  15. Surfactant transport on viscous bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Omar; Craster, Richard; Warner, Mark

    2001-11-01

    We model the external delivery of surfactant to pulmonary airways, an integral part of Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT), a method of treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in neonates. We examine the spreading dynamics of insoluble surfactant by Marangoni stresses along the mucus-perciliary liquid bilayers that line the inside of airways. The bilayer is modelled as a thin highly viscous mucus surface film (mucus) overlying a much less viscous perciliary liquid layer (PCL); this is appropriate for small airways. By exploiting this large viscosity constrast, a variant of standard lubrication theory is adopted wherein terms, which would have otherwise been neglected in the lubrication approximation, are promoted in order to model correctly the presence of the mucus. Inclusion of van der Waals forces in the model permit the study of the effect of this mucus 'skin' on the possibility of bilayer rupture, a potential cause of failure of SRT. We find that increasing the viscosity contrast and initial mucus layer thickness delays the onset of rupture, while increasing the relative significance of Marangoni stresses leads to more marked thinning and rapid bilayer rupture [1]. [1] O. K. Matar, R. V. Craster and M. R. Warner, submitted to J. Fluid Mech. (2001).

  16. Biodegradation of phenanthrene in soils in the presence of surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, K.

    1993-01-01

    This research addresses the effect of low surfactant concentrations on the biodegradation of slightly soluble organic compounds in the presence and absence of soil. Biodegradation of phenanthrene in excess of its aqueous solubility by an acclimated mixed culture was studied in the presence of nonionic surfactants. Nonionic surfactants were selected over other types of surfactants because of their higher hydrocarbon solubilizing power, weaker adsorption to charged sites, less toxicity to bacteria, and poor foaming properties. Surfactants were tested to measure their effectiveness for increasing the solubility of phenanthrene, their adsorption on the soil matrix, their biodegradability, their effect on the adsorption of phenanthrene and on the rates of biodegradation of phenanthrene. Solubility enhancement studies of phenanthrene by the surfactants indicated relatively small effects at sub-micellar surfactant concentrations. Batch biodegradation studies in which phenanthrene was available as particulates and as a surface coating on sand were carried out in closed BOD bottles in the Hach manometric system. Addition of surfactants at 25 mg/L enhanced biodegradation rates as measured by oxygen uptake, protein production and disappearance of phenanthrene. A dynamic model which couples dissolution and biodegradation processes could adequately represent the experimental batch data. Modelling studies suggest that biodegradation was accelerated because the dissolution rates of phenanthrene increased in presence of the surfactants. Continuous flow column studies with phenanthrene coated Jordan sand was carried out to simulate groundwater flow conditions. Sorption studies on Jordan aquifer sand indicated that this low-carbon aquifer material adsorbs small amounts of phenanthrene as well as surfactants. The tests show that low surfactant concentrations were marginally beneficial in washing phenanthrene from precoated sand.

  17. Surfactant role of Ag atoms in the growth of Si layers on Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Tsuyoshi; Sone, Junki; Nakatsuji, Kan; Hirayama, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-13

    The growth of Si layers on Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates was studied for coverages of up to a few mono-layers. Atomically flat islands were observed to nucleate in the growth at 570 K. The top surfaces of the islands were covered in Ag atoms and exhibited a √3×√3 reconstruction with the same surface state dispersions as Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates. These results indicate that the Ag atoms on the substrate always hop up to the top of the Si layers.

  18. Impact of a surfactant on the electroactivity of proteins at an aqueous-organogel microinterface array.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2013-02-05

    The impact of surfactant addition to the organic phase on the electroactivity of proteins at the aqueous-organogel interface was examined by voltammetry. The presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) in the organogel phase, as the sodium salt, caused marked changes in the peak currents for myoglobin detection. The protein desorption voltammetric peak exhibited a 6-fold increase in the current compared to the corresponding experiment without surfactant. Interfacial coverage showed a 17-fold increase in the adsorbed protein at the interface, from 50 pmol cm(-2), in the absence of surfactant, to 850 pmol cm(-2), in the presence of 10 mM surfactant. Additionally, the presence of the surfactant resulted in a second pair of adsorption/desorption peaks at lower potentials and in a change in the capacitance of the system. The formation of surfactant-protein and surfactant-protein-organic anion deposits is proposed on the basis of these features, leading to increased voltammetric signals for myoglobin, hemoglobin, and cytochrome c. The mechanism of protein-surfactant interaction was probed by using the surfactant as the anion in the organic phase electrolyte salt. Repetitive cyclic voltammetry of cytochrome c showed that in the presence of surfactant there was an enhancement of the signal, caused by a buildup of the protein-surfactant-electrolyte anion assembly at the interface. These findings provide the basis for surfactant-modified interfaces to enhance the electroanalytical performance for protein detection.

  19. Cu sbnd Al sbnd Fe layered double hydroxides with CO32- and anionic surfactants with different alkyl chains in the interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillano, Raquel; Holgado, María Jesús; González, José Luis; Rives, Vicente

    2005-08-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), with the hydrotalcite-like structure containing Cu(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) in the layers, and different alkyl sulfonates in the interlayer, have been prepared and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Pure crystalline phases have been obtained in all cases. Upon heating, combustion of the organic chain takes place at lower temperature than the corresponding sodium salts.

  20. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  1. Visualizing the Analogy between Competitive Adsorption and Colloid Stability to Restore Lung Surfactant Function

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Ian C.; Waring, Alan J.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated a model of acute respiratory distress syndrome in which the serum protein albumin adsorbs to an air-liquid interface and prevents the thermodynamically preferable adsorption of the clinical lung surfactant Survanta by inducing steric and electrostatic energy barriers analogous to those that prevent colloidal aggregation. Chitosan and polyethylene glycol (PEG), two polymers that traditionally have been used to aggregate colloids, both allow Survanta to quantitatively displace albumin from the interface, but through two distinct mechanisms. Direct visualization with confocal microscopy shows that the polycation chitosan coadsorbs to interfacial layers of both Survanta and albumin, and also colocalizes with the anionic domains of Survanta at the air-liquid interface, consistent with it eliminating the electrostatic repulsion by neutralizing the surface charges on albumin and Survanta. In contrast, the PEG distribution does not change during the displacement of albumin by Survanta, consistent with PEG inducing a depletion attraction sufficient to overcome the repulsive energy barrier toward adsorption. PMID:22385848

  2. [Study of novel artificial lung surfactants incorporating partially fluorinated amphiphiles].

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    Lung surfactants (LS), a complex of ∼90 wt% lipids (mainly dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine or DPPC) and ∼10 wt% surfactant proteins (SP-A, -B, -C, and -D), adsorb to an air-alveolar fluid interface and then lower its surface tension down to near zero during expiration. Intratracheal instillation of exogenous LS preparations can effectively compensate for surfactant deficiency in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Surfacten® (Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Osaka, Japan), a modified bovine lung extract and an effective surfactant replacement in treatment for RDS patients, is supplemented with DPPC, palmitic acid, and tripalmitin. For the premature infants suffering from RDS, instillation of Surfacten® leads to a dramatic improvement in lung function and compliance. Herein, the author reviews potential use of newly designed preparations containing a mimicking peptide of SP-B and also introduces the current research on the preparations incorporated with partially fluorinated amphiphiles to improve their efficacy.

  3. The role of surfactants in drop formation and thread breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Pritish; Wagoner, Brayden; Thete, Sumeet; Basaran, Osman

    2016-11-01

    The ability of surfactants to adsorb onto and lower the surface tension of water-air and water-oil interfaces is exploited in industrial applications, nature, and everyday life. An important example is provided by drop formation where a thinning liquid thread connects an about-to-form globular, primary drop to the rest of the liquid that remains on the nozzle when the primary drop falls from it. Surfactants can affect pinch-off in two ways: first, by lowering surface tension they lower capillary pressure (which equals, to highest order, surface tension divided by thread radius), and second, as surfactant concentration along the interface can be non-uniform, they cause the interface to be subjected to a gradient of surface tension, or Marangoni stress. By means of high-accuracy simulations and supporting experiments, we clarify the role played by surfactants on drop formation and thread breakup.

  4. High-efficiency exfoliation of layered materials into 2D nanosheets in switchable CO2/Surfactant/H2O system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Xu, Qun; Xu, Shanshan; Qi, Yuhang; Chen, Meng; Li, Hongxiang; Han, Buxing

    2015-11-16

    Layered materials present attractive and important properties due to their two-dimensional (2D) structure, allowing potential applications including electronics, optoelectronics, and catalysis. However, fully exploiting the outstanding properties will require a method for their efficient exfoliation. Here we present that a series of layered materials can be successfully exfoliated into single- and few-layer nanosheets using the driving forces coming from the phase inversion, i.e., from micelles to reverse micelles in the emulsion microenvironment built by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2). The effect of variable experimental parameters including CO2 pressure, ethanol/water ratio, and initial concentration of bulk materials on the exfoliation yield have been investigated. Moreover, we demonstrate that the exfoliated 2D nanosheets have their worthwhile applications, for example, graphene can be used to prepare conductive paper, MoS2 can be used as fluorescent label to perform cellular labelling, and BN can effectively reinforce polymers leading to the promising mechanical properties.

  5. High-efficiency exfoliation of layered materials into 2D nanosheets in switchable CO2/Surfactant/H2O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Xu, Qun; Xu, Shanshan; Qi, Yuhang; Chen, Meng; Li, Hongxiang; Han, Buxing

    2015-11-01

    Layered materials present attractive and important properties due to their two-dimensional (2D) structure, allowing potential applications including electronics, optoelectronics, and catalysis. However, fully exploiting the outstanding properties will require a method for their efficient exfoliation. Here we present that a series of layered materials can be successfully exfoliated into single- and few-layer nanosheets using the driving forces coming from the phase inversion, i.e., from micelles to reverse micelles in the emulsion microenvironment built by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2). The effect of variable experimental parameters including CO2 pressure, ethanol/water ratio, and initial concentration of bulk materials on the exfoliation yield have been investigated. Moreover, we demonstrate that the exfoliated 2D nanosheets have their worthwhile applications, for example, graphene can be used to prepare conductive paper, MoS2 can be used as fluorescent label to perform cellular labelling, and BN can effectively reinforce polymers leading to the promising mechanical properties.

  6. Spinel type CoFe oxide porous nanosheets as magnetic adsorbents with fast removal ability and facile separation.

    PubMed

    Ge, X; Gu, C D; Wang, X L; Tu, J P

    2015-09-15

    Adsorption is often time consuming due to slow diffusion kinetic. Sizing he adsorbent down might help to accelerate adsorption. For CoFe spinel oxide, a magnetically separable adsorbent, the preparation of nanosheets faces many challenges including phase separation, grain growth and difficulty in preparing two-dimensional materials. In this work, we prepared porous CoFe oxide nanosheet with chemical formula of Co2.698Fe0.302O4 through topochemical transformation of a CoFe precursor, which has a layered double hydroxide (LDH) analogue structure and a large interlayer spacing. The LDH precursor was synthesized from a cheap deep eutectic solvent (DES) system. The calcined Co2.698Fe0.302O4 has small grain size (10-20nm), nanosheet morphology, and porous structure, which contribute to a large specific surface area of 79.5m(2)g(-1). The Co2.698Fe0.302O4 nanosheets show fast removal ability and good adsorption capacity for both organic waste (305mgg(-1) in 5min for Congo red) and toxic heavy metal ion (5.27mgg(-1) in 30min for Cr (VI)). Furthermore, the Co2.698Fe0.302O4 can be separated magnetically. Considering the precursor can be prepared through a fast, simple, surfactant-free and high-yield synthetic strategy, this work should have practical significance in fabricating adsorbents.

  7. Surfactant Enhanced DNAPL Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    or the permeability contrast (i.e., degree of heterogeneity) that is present in the DNAPL zone. To solubilize DNAPL with surfactants, a sufficient...with respect to the effects of permeability and heterogeneity upon the costs of SEAR: as permeability decreases and/or the degree of heterogeneity...not be an issue for surfactant recovery at all sites. The degree to which MEUF will concentrate the calcium is a function of the surfactant itself

  8. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. PMID:23026158

  9. Use of micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration at low surfactant concentrations and with anionic-nonionic surfactant mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fillipi, B.R.; Brant, L.W.; Scamehorn, J.F.; Christian, S.D.

    1999-05-01

    Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration is a separation technique which can be used to remove metal ions or dissolved organics from water. Metal ions bind to the surface of negatively charged micelles of an anionic surfactant while organic solutes tend to dissolve or solubilized within the micelles. The mixture is then forced through an ultrafiltration membrane with pore sizes small enough to block passage of the micelles and associated metal ions and/or dissolved organics. Monomeric or unassociated surfactant passes through the membrane and does not contribute to the separation. This paper considers advantages of addition of small concentrations of nonionic surfactant to an anionic surfactant; the resulting anionic-nonionic mixed micelles exhibit negative deviation from ideality of mixing which leads to a smaller fraction of the surfactant being present as monomer and a subsequently larger fraction present in the micellar form. The addition of nonionic surfactant improved the separation of divalent zinc substantially at total concentrations above the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the anionic surfactant. Both zinc and tert-butylphenol (a nonionic organic solute) show unexpected rejection at surfactant concentrations moderately below the cmc, where micelles are absent. This is considered as due to a higher surfactant concentration in the gel layer adjacent to the membrane where micelles are present. Reduction of this rejection at lower transmembrane pressure drops supports this mechanism. Some rejection of zinc was observed in the absence of surfactant but not of tert-butylphenol, indicating an additional effect of membrane charge for ionic solutes.

  10. High-efficiency exfoliation of layered materials into 2D nanosheets in switchable CO2/Surfactant/H2O system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Xu, Qun; Xu, Shanshan; Qi, Yuhang; Chen, Meng; Li, Hongxiang; Han, Buxing

    2015-01-01

    Layered materials present attractive and important properties due to their two-dimensional (2D) structure, allowing potential applications including electronics, optoelectronics, and catalysis. However, fully exploiting the outstanding properties will require a method for their efficient exfoliation. Here we present that a series of layered materials can be successfully exfoliated into single- and few-layer nanosheets using the driving forces coming from the phase inversion, i.e., from micelles to reverse micelles in the emulsion microenvironment built by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2). The effect of variable experimental parameters including CO2 pressure, ethanol/water ratio, and initial concentration of bulk materials on the exfoliation yield have been investigated. Moreover, we demonstrate that the exfoliated 2D nanosheets have their worthwhile applications, for example, graphene can be used to prepare conductive paper, MoS2 can be used as fluorescent label to perform cellular labelling, and BN can effectively reinforce polymers leading to the promising mechanical properties. PMID:26568039

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF PHASE AND EMULSION BEHAVIOR, SURFACTANT RETENTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FOR NOVEL ALCOHOL ETHOXYCARBOXYLATE SURFACTANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lebone T. Moeti; Ramanathan Sampath

    2001-09-28

    this project. The M/B and B/M morphologies and their inversion hysteresis lines conformed to the previously postulated dispersion morphology diagram; that is, within experimental uncertainties, the two emulsion inversion lines in phase volume-temperature space met at a critical point that coincided with the upper critical end point for the phases. Coreflooding measurements were performed by our industrial partner in this project, Surtek, Golden, CO which showed poor hydrocarbon recovery (38.1%) for NEODOX 23-4. It was also found that NEODOX 23-4 surfactant adsorbed too much to the rock (97.1% surfactant loss to the core), a characteristic of the non-ionic part of the surfactant.

  12. Dewetting transition induced by surfactants in sessile droplets at the early evaporation stage.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2016-01-14

    As surfactants are employed to control the wettability of solutions, we observe that the sessile droplet dewetting induced by autophobing exhibits a unique relation with the surfactant concentration. Below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the surfactant, the autophobic effect makes the droplet go through a rapid depinning at first (Phase 1) and then a relatively slower shrinkage (Phase 2). Unexpectedly, the rapid velocity of the three-phase contact line in Phase 1 shows a transition as the surfactant concentration increases above 0.043 cmc, while such a transition is absent for the velocity in Phase 2. The spreading of the sessile droplets as they form before retraction, the maximum contact angle led by dewetting, and the droplet lifetime are regularly sensitive to the surfactant concentration as well. These phenomena are correlated with the assembling structure and the adsorbed amount at different interfaces with the loading of surfactant inventory.

  13. Effects of adsorbed pyridine derivatives and ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited alumina coatings on the conduction band-edge energy of TiO2 and on redox-shuttle-derived dark currents.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael J; Vermeer, Michael J D; Farha, Omar K; Pellin, Michael J; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-01-15

    Both the adsorption of t-butylpyridine and the atomic-layer deposition of ultrathin conformal coatings of insulators (such as alumina) are known to boost open-circuit photovoltages substantially for dye-sensitized solar cells. One attractive interpretation is that these modifiers significantly shift the conduction-edge energy of the electrode, thereby shifting the onset potential for dark current arising from the interception of injected electrons by solution-phase redox shuttle components such as Co(phenanthroline)(3)(3+) and triiodide. For standard, high-area, nanoporous photoelectrodes, band-edge energies are difficult to measure directly. In contrast, for flat electrodes they are readily accessible from Mott-Schottky analyses of impedance data. Using such electrodes (specifically TiO(2)), we find that neither organic nor inorganic electrode-surface modifiers shift the conduction-band-edge energy sufficiently to account fully for the beneficial effects on electrode behavior (i.e., the suppression of dark current). Additional experiments reveal that the efficacy of ultrathin coatings of Al(2)O(3) arises chiefly from the passivation of redox-catalytic surface states. In contrast, adsorbed t-butylpyridine appears to suppress dark currents mainly by physically blocking access of shuttle molecules to the electrode surface. Studies with other derivatives of pyridine, including sterically and/or electronically diverse derivatives, show that heterocycle adsorption and the concomitant suppression of dark current does not require the coordination of surface Ti(IV) or Al(III) atoms. Notably, the favorable (i.e., negative) shifts in onset potential for the flow of dark current engendered by organic and inorganic surface modifiers are additive. Furthermore, they appear to be largely insensitive to the identity of shuttle molecules.

  14. Structure of water adsorbed on a single graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, M. C.; Martí, J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the result of molecular-dynamics simulations of water adsorbed on top of a single graphene layer at temperatures between 25 and 50°C . The analysis of the energy per particle and the density profiles indicate that the behavior of the adsorbed liquid is similar to the case of multiple graphene layers (graphite) with the only difference being the values of configurational energy. Other structural properties, such as stability ranges, hydrogen bond distributions, and molecular orientations are also presented.

  15. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  16. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  17. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  18. Self-assembled surfactants on patterned surfaces: confinement and cooperative effects on aggregate morphology.

    PubMed

    Suttipong, Manaswee; Grady, Brian P; Striolo, Alberto

    2014-08-21

    The adsorption and self-assembly of surfactants are ubiquitous processes in several technological applications, including the manufacture of nano-structured materials using bottom-up strategies. Although much is known about the adsorption of surfactants on homogeneous flat surfaces from experiments, theory, and simulations, limited information is available, in quantifiable terms, regarding the adsorption of surfactants on surfaces with chemical and/or morphological heterogeneity. In an effort to fill this knowledge gap, we report here results obtained using equilibrium dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations for the adsorption of model surfactants onto patterned flat surfaces (i.e., flat surfaces with chemical heterogeneity). The patterns consist of one or two stripes of variable width on which the surfactants could adsorb. The adsorbing stripes are surrounded by a surface that effectively repels the surfactants. This repelling surface, perhaps not realistic, allows us to quantify the effect of lateral confinement on the morphology of surfactant aggregates. When the stripe width is large (effectively providing a homogeneous flat surface), the surfactants yield a flat monolayer. Our simulations suggest that the flat monolayers become hemi-cylinders, hemi-spheres, and individual surfactants as the stripe width decreases, a consequence of lateral confinement. In some cases our simulations show evidence of cooperative effects when two adsorbing stripes are present on the surface. If the distance between the stripes and the widths of the stripes are both less than about one surfactant length, hemi-cylindrical shells and irregular structures are observed because of cooperativity; otherwise the results match those found for a single isolated stripe. Our predictions could be useful for the design of new nano-structured materials and coatings, for applications ranging from nano-fluidic devices to nano-reactors.

  19. Self Assembly of Biogenic Surfactants at Mineral Surfaces and Their Effect on Biological Iron Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    Microorganisms exude biogenic surfactants to modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral-water interfaces. Surfactants with negatively charged hydrophilic head groups interact strongly with oppositely charged mineral surfaces such as iron or aluminum oxides. Surfactant self assembly at mineral surfaces can result in the formation of admicelles that have a significant effect on the surface charge and hydrophobicity. These effects are exploited by microorganisms to facilitate attachment to mineral surfaces. Similarly, plants exude surfactants into the rhizosphere and change the surface tension and flow of soil water. Other surface active compounds that are typically found in soils and surface waters are humic substances and fatty acids that are produced by degradation of biomass. In general, surface active compounds are ubiquitous in natural systems. In this study we investigated how surfactants influence bio-mineral interactions using the example of siderophore promoted iron acquisition. Siderophore promoted iron acquisition involves the adsorption of a biogenic iron specific ligand (i.e. the siderophore) to iron oxides and the subsequent siderophore promoted iron oxide dissolution. The hypothesis of this project is that the modification of the iron oxide surface charge and hydrophobicity by adsorbed surfactants will have an important effect on siderophore adsorption and dissolution kinetics. We approached this subject by investigating the adsorption of a natural surfactant (rhamnolipids: RhL) and the synthetic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate: SDS) on goethite (α-FeOOH, a common pedogenic iron oxide) and observing the effect of surfactant self assembly on the properties of the mineral water interface. We observed fast adsorption kinetics at pH 3 and slow adsorption at pH 6. The adsorbed surfactants reversed the surface potential of goethite (as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility measurements) at soluble surfactant concentrations below 10 μM (SDS

  20. Interfacial reactions of ozone with surfactant protein B in a model lung surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hugh I; Kim, Hyungjun; Shin, Young Shik; Beegle, Luther W; Jang, Seung Soon; Neidholdt, Evan L; Goddard, William A; Heath, James R; Kanik, Isik; Beauchamp, J L

    2010-02-24

    Oxidative stresses from irritants such as hydrogen peroxide and ozone (O(3)) can cause dysfunction of the pulmonary surfactant (PS) layer in the human lung, resulting in chronic diseases of the respiratory tract. For identification of structural changes of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) due to the heterogeneous reaction with O(3), field-induced droplet ionization (FIDI) mass spectrometry has been utilized. FIDI is a soft ionization method in which ions are extracted from the surface of microliter-volume droplets. We report structurally specific oxidative changes of SP-B(1-25) (a shortened version of human SP-B) at the air-liquid interface. We also present studies of the interfacial oxidation of SP-B(1-25) in a nonionizable 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol (POG) surfactant layer as a model PS system, where competitive oxidation of the two components is observed. Our results indicate that the heterogeneous reaction of SP-B(1-25) at the interface is quite different from that in the solution phase. In comparison with the nearly complete homogeneous oxidation of SP-B(1-25), only a subset of the amino acids known to react with ozone are oxidized by direct ozonolysis in the hydrophobic interfacial environment, both with and without the lipid surfactant layer. Combining these experimental observations with the results of molecular dynamics simulations provides an improved understanding of the interfacial structure and chemistry of a model lung surfactant system subjected to oxidative stress.

  1. Gemini ester quat surfactants and their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Łuczyński, Jacek; Frąckowiak, Renata; Włoch, Aleksandra; Kleszczyńska, Halina; Witek, Stanisław

    2013-03-01

    Cationic gemini surfactants are an important class of surface-active compounds that exhibit much higher surface activity than their monomeric counterparts. This type of compound architecture lends itself to the compound being easily adsorbed at interfaces and interacting with the cellular membranes of microorganisms. Conventional cationic surfactants have high chemical stability but poor chemical and biological degradability. One of the main approaches to the design of readily biodegradable and environmentally friendly surfactants involves inserting a bond with limited stability into the surfactant molecule to give a cleavable surfactant. The best-known example of such a compound is the family of ester quats, which are cationic surfactants with a labile ester bond inserted into the molecule. As part of this study, a series of gemini ester quat surfactants were synthesized and assayed for their biological activity. Their hemolytic activity and changes in the fluidity and packing order of the lipid polar heads were used as the measures of their biological activity. A clear correlation between the hemolytic activity of the tested compounds and their alkyl chain length was established. It was found that the compounds with a long hydrocarbon chain showed higher activity. Moreover, the compounds with greater spacing between their alkyl chains were more active. This proves that they incorporate more easily into the lipid bilayer of the erythrocyte membrane and affect its properties to a greater extent. A better understanding of the process of cell lysis by surfactants and of their biological activity may assist in developing surfactants with enhanced selectivity and in widening their range of application.

  2. Coacervation with surfactants: From single-chain surfactants to gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Yilin

    2017-01-01

    Coacervation is a spontaneous process during which a colloidal dispersion separates into two immiscible liquid phases: a colloid-rich liquid phase in equilibrium with a diluted phase. Coacervation is usually divided into simple coacervation and complex coacervation according to the number of components. Surfactant-based coacervation normally contains traditional single-chain surfactants. With the development of surfactants, gemini surfactants with two amphiphilic moieties have been applied to form coacervation. This review summarizes the development of simple coacervation and complex coacervation in the systems of single-chain surfactants and gemini surfactants. Simple coacervation in surfactant solutions with additives or at elevated temperature and complex coacervation in surfactant/polymer mixtures by changing charge densities, molecular weight, ionic strength, pH, or temperature are reviewed. The comparison between gemini surfactants and corresponding monomeric single-chain surfactants reveals that the unique structures of gemini surfactants endow them with higher propensity to generate coacervation.

  3. Surfactant effect on functionalized carbon nanotube coated snowman-like particles and their electro-responsive characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ke; Liu, Ying Dan; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2012-10-15

    The core–shell structured snowman-like (SL) microparticles coated by functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) were prepared in the presence of different surfactants including cationic surfactant-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and anionic surfactant-sodium lauryl sulfate (SDS). The effect of surfactants on adsorption onto SL particles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and conductivity. The cationic surfactant is found to be more effective than anionic surfactant for helping nanotube adsorbed onto microparticle due to the presence of electrostatic interaction between the functionalized MWNT and the surfactant. Furthermore, the MWNT/SL particles dispersed in silicone oil exhibited a typical fibril structure of the electrorheological characteristics under an applied electric field observed by an optical microscope (OM), in which the state of nanotubes wrapped on the particles strongly affects their electro-responsive characteristics.

  4. Surfactants in the environment.

    PubMed

    Ivanković, Tomislav; Hrenović, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Surfactants are a diverse group of chemicals that are best known for their wide use in detergents and other cleaning products. After use, residual surfactants are discharged into sewage systems or directly into surface waters, and most of them end up dispersed in different environmental compartments such as soil, water or sediment. The toxic effects of surfactants on various aquatic organisms are well known. In general, surfactants are present in the environment at levels below toxicity and in Croatia below the national limit. Most surfactants are readily biodegradable and their amount is greatly reduced with secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants. The highest concern is the release of untreated wastewater or wastewater that has undergone primary treatment alone. The discharge of wastewater polluted with massive quantities of surfactants could have serious effects on the ecosystem. Future studies of surfactant toxicities and biodegradation are necessary to withdraw highly toxic and non-biodegradable compounds from commercial use and replace them with more environmentally friendly ones.

  5. Removal of adsorbed gases with CO2 snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    1991-09-01

    During the outgassing of orbiting astronomical observatories, the condensation of molecular species on optical surfaces can create difficulties for astronomers. The problem is particularly severe in ultraviolet astronomy where the adsorption of only a few atomic layers of some substances can be very damaging. In this paper the removal of adsorbed atomic layers using carbon dioxide snow is discussed. The rate of removal of adsorbed layers of isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF, and deionized distilled water on Teflon substrates was experimentally determined. The removal of fingerprints (containing fatty acids such as stearic acid) from optical surfaces is also demonstrated. The presence and rate of removal of the multilayers was monitored by detecting the molecular dipole field of adsorbed molecular species. For isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF (trichlorotrifluoroethane), and water adsorbed multilayers were removed in under 1.5 seconds. Fingerprint removal was much more difficult and required 20 seconds of spraying with a mixture of carbon dioxide snow flakes and atomized microdroplets of isopropyl alcohol.

  6. A computer modelling study of the interaction of organic adsorbates with fluorapatite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhonto, Donald; Ngoepe, Phuti E.; Cooper, Timothy G.; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2006-08-01

    Computer modelling techniques were employed to investigate the adsorption of a selection of organic surfactant molecules to a range of fluorapatite surfaces, and new interatomic potential models for the apatite/adsorbate interactions are presented. The adsorbates coordinate mainly to the surfaces through interaction between their oxygen (or nitrogen) atoms to surface calcium ions, followed by hydrogen-bonded interactions to surface oxygen ions and, to a much lesser extent, surface fluorides. Bridging between two surface calcium ions is the preferred mode of adsorption, when the geometry of the adsorbates allows it, and multiple interactions between surfaces and adsorbate molecules lead to the largest adsorption energies. All adsorbates containing carbonyl and hydroxy groups interact strongly with the surfaces, releasing energies between approximately 100 and 215 kJ mol-1, but methylamine containing only the NH2 functional group adsorbs to the surfaces to a much lesser extent (25 95 kJ mol-1). Both hydroxy methanamide and hydroxy ethanal prefer to adsorb to some surfaces in an eclipsed conformation, which is a requisite for these functional groups. Sorption of the organic material by replacement of pre-adsorbed water at different surface features is calculated to be mainly exothermic for methanoic acid, hydroxy methanamide and hydroxy ethanal molecules, whereas methyl amine would not replace pre-adsorbed water at the fluorapatite surfaces. The efficacy of the surfactant molecules is calculated to be hydroxy aldehydes > alkyl hydroxamates > carboxylic acids ≫ alkyl amines. The results from this study suggest that computer simulations may provide a route to the identification or even design of particular organic surfactants for use in mineral separation by flotation.

  7. Viscosity and sedimentation behaviors of the magnetorheological suspensions with oleic acid/dimer acid as surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianjian; Yan, Hua; Hu, Zhide; Ding, Ding

    2016-11-01

    This work deals with the role of polar interactions on the viscosity and sedimentation behaviors of magnetorheological suspensions with micro-sized magnetic particles dispersed in oil carriers. The oleic acid and dimer acid were employed to make an adjustment of the hydrophobicity of iron particles, in the interest of performing a comparative evaluation of the contributions of the surface polarity. The viscosity tests show that the adsorbed surfactant layer may impose a hindrance to the movement of iron particles in the oil medium. The polar attractions between dimer acid covered particles gave rise to a considerable increase in viscosity, indicating flocculation structure developed in the suspensions. The observed plateau-like region in the vicinity of 0.1 s-1 for MRF containing dimer acid is possibly due to the flocculation provoked by the carboxylic polar attraction, in which the structure is stable against fragmentation. Moreover, a quick recovery of the viscosity and a higher viscosity-temperature index also suggest the existence of particle-particle polar interaction in the suspensions containing dimer acid. The sedimentation measurements reveal that the steric repulsion of oleic acid plays a limited role in the stability of suspensions only if a large quantity of surfactant was used. The sedimentation results observed in the dimer acid covered particles confirm that loose and open flocculation was formed and enhanced sedimentation stability.

  8. Ionic Nature of a Gemini Surfactant at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chi M; Nguyen, Cuong V; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu; Nguyen, Thanh V

    2016-12-06

    The ionic state of an adsorbed gemini surfactant at the air/water interface was investigated using a combination of surface potential and surface tension data. The combined model was developed and successfully described the experimental data. The results verified the existence of three ionic states of the gemini surfactant in the interfacial zone. Furthermore, the model can quantify the adsorbed concentrations of these species. At low concentrations, the fully dissociated state dominates the adsorption. At high concentrations, the fully associated state dominates, accounting for up to 80% of the total adsorption. In the middle range, the adsorption is dominated by the partially associated state, which has a maximum percentage of 80% at a critical micelle concentration of 0.5. The variation in the ionic state is a unique characteristic of gemini surfactants, which can be the underlying mechanism for their advantages over conventional surfactants.

  9. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  10. A new high-performance thin layer chromatography-based assay of detergents and surfactants commonly used in membrane protein studies.

    PubMed

    Barret, Laurie-Anne; Polidori, Ange; Bonneté, Françoise; Bernard-Savary, Pierre; Jungas, Colette

    2013-03-15

    The hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins (MPs) necessitates the use of detergents for their extraction, solubilization and purification. Because the concentration of amphiphiles is crucial in the crystallization process, detergent quantification is essential to routine analysis. Here we describe a quantitative high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) method we developed for the detection of small quantities of detergent bound to solubilized MPs. After optimization of aqueous deposit conditions, we show that most detergents widely used in membrane protein crystallography display distinctive mobilities in a mixture of dichloromethane, methanol and acetic acid 32:7.6:0.4 (v/v/v). Migration and derivatization conditions were optimized with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (DDM), the most popular detergent for membrane protein crystallization. A linear calibration curve very well fits our data from 0.1 to 1.6 μg of DDM in water with a limit of detection of 0.05 μg. This limit of detection is the best achieved to date for a routine detergent assay, being not modified by the addition of NaCl, commonly used in protein buffers. With these chromatographic conditions, no prior treatment is required to assess the quantities of detergent bound to purified MPs, thus enabling the quantification of close structure detergents via a single procedure. This HPTLC method, which is fast and requires low sample volume, is fully suitable for routine measurements.

  11. Enhanced solubilization of curcumin in mixed surfactant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S K; Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Mehta, S K

    2016-05-15

    Self-assemblies of equimolar double and single chain mixed ionic surfactants, with increasing numbers of carbon atoms of double chain surfactant, were analyzed on the basis of fluorescence and conductivity results. Attempts were also made to enhance the solubilization of curcumin in aqueous equimolar mixed surfactant systems. Mixed surfactant assembly was successful in retarding the degradation of curcumin in alkaline media (only 25-28 40% degraded in 10h at pH 13). Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching methods were employed to predict the binding position and mechanism of curcumin with self-assemblies. Results indicate that the interactions take place according to both dynamic and static quenching mechanisms and curcumin was distributed in a palisade layer of mixed aggregates. Antioxidant activity (using DPPH radical) and biocompatibility (using calf-thymus DNA) of curcumin-loaded mixed surfactant formulations were also evaluated. The prepared systems improved the stability, solubility and antioxidant activity of curcumin and additionally are biocompatible.

  12. Recent advances in gemini surfactants: oleic Acid-based gemini surfactants and polymerizable gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Gemini surfactants recently developed by our research group are introduced from the standpoints of their syntheses, aqueous solution properties, and potential applications. Two series of gemini surfactants are introduced in this short review, the first of which is the oleic acid-based gemini surfactants, and the second is the polymerizable gemini surfactants. These gemini surfactants have been developed not only as environmentally friendly materials (the use of gemini surfactants enables the reduction of the total consumption of surfactants in chemical products owing to their excellent adsorption and micellization capabilities at low concentrations) but also as functional organic materials.

  13. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties.

  14. General hydrophobic interaction potential for surfactant/lipid bilayers from direct force measurements between light-modulated bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Stephen H.; Lee, C. Ted; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2011-01-01

    We establish and quantify correlations among the molecular structures, interaction forces, and physical processes associated with light-responsive self-assembled surfactant monolayers or bilayers at interfaces. Using the surface forces apparatus (SFA), the interaction forces between adsorbed monolayers and bilayers of an azobenzene-functionalized surfactant can be drastically and controllably altered by light-induced conversion of trans and cis molecular conformations. These reversible conformation changes affect significantly the shape of the molecules, especially in the hydrophobic region, which induces dramatic transformations of molecular packing in self-assembled structures, causing corresponding modulation of electrostatic double layer, steric hydration, and hydrophobic interactions. For bilayers, the isomerization from trans to cis exposes more hydrophobic groups, making the cis bilayers more hydrophobic, which lowers the activation energy barrier for (hemi)fusion. A quantitative and general model is derived for the interaction potential of charged bilayers that includes the electrostatic double-layer force of the Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek theory, attractive hydrophobic interactions, and repulsive steric-hydration forces. The model quantitatively accounts for the elastic strains, deformations, long-range forces, energy maxima, adhesion minima, as well as the instability (when it exists) as two bilayers breakthrough and (hemi)fuse. These results have several important implications, including quantitative and qualitative understanding of the hydrophobic interaction, which is furthermore shown to be a nonadditive interaction. PMID:21896718

  15. Modification of Wyoming montmorillonite surfaces using a cationic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L; He, Hongping; Kloprogge, Theo; Bostrom, Thor

    2005-09-13

    Surfaces of Wyoming SWy-2-Na-montmorillonite were modified using ultrasonic and hydrothermal methods through the intercalation and adsorption of the cationic surfactant octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ODTMA). Changes in the surfaces and structure were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis (TG), and electron microscopy. The ultrasonic preparation method results in a higher surfactant concentration within the montmorillonite interlayer when compared with that from the hydrothermal method. Three different molecular environments for surfactants within the surface-modified montmorillonite are proposed upon the basis of their different decomposition temperatures. Both XRD patterns and TEM images demonstrate that SWy-2-Na-montmorillonite contains superlayers. TEM images of organoclays prepared at high surfactant concentrations show alternate basal spacings between neighboring layers. SEM images show that modification with surfactant reduces the clay particle size and aggregation. Organoclays prepared at low surfactant concentration display curved flakes, whereas they become flat with increasing intercalated surfactant. Novel surfactant-modified montmorillonite results in the formation of new nanophases with the potential for the removal of organic impurities from aqueous media.

  16. Changes in the surfaces on DDOAB organoclays adsorbed with paranitrophenol-An XRD, TEM and TG study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qin; He Hongping; Frost, Ray L. Xi Yunfei

    2008-12-01

    The adsorption of paranitrophenol on organoclays synthesised by the ion exchange of the surfactant molecule dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDOAB) of formula (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 17}){sub 2}NBr(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis. The expansion of the montmorillonite depends on the loading of the montmorillonite with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide and is related to the arrangement of the surfactant molecules within the clay interlayer. This expansion is altered by the adsorbed paranitrophenol and is observed in the transmission electron microscopic images of the organoclay with adsorbed paranitrophenol. Changes in the surfactant molecular arrangements were analysed by thermogravimetry. The paranitrophenol is sublimed simultaneously with the loss of surfactant. The dehydroxylation temperature of the montmorillonite is decreased upon adsorption of the paranitrophenol indicating a bonding between the paranitrophenol and the hydroxyl units of the montmorillonite.

  17. Protein binding onto surfactant-based synthetic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Letizia, Caterina; Andreozzi, Patrizia; Scipioni, Anita; La Mesa, Camillo; Bonincontro, Adalberto; Spigone, Elisabetta

    2007-02-01

    Synthetic vesicles were prepared by mixing anionic and cationic surfactants, aqueous sodium dodecylsulfate with didodecyltrimethylammonium or cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The overall surfactant content and the (anionic/cationic) mole ratios allow one to obtain negatively charged vesicles. In the phase diagram, the vesicular region is located between a solution phase, a lamellar liquid crystalline dispersion, and a precipitate area. Characterization of the vesicles was performed by electrophoretic mobility, NMR, TEM, and DLS and we determined their uni-lamellar character, size, stability, and charge density. Negatively charged vesicular dispersions, made of sodium dodecylsulfate/didodecyltrimethylammonium bromide or sodium dodecylsulfate/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, were mixed with lysozyme, to form lipoplexes. Depending on the protein/vesicle charge ratio, binding, surface saturation, and lipoplexes flocculation, or precipitation, occurs. The free protein in excess remains in solution, after binding saturation. The systems were investigated by thermodynamic (surface tension and solution calorimetry), DLS, CD, TEM, 1H NMR, transport properties, electrophoretic mobility, and dielectric relaxation. The latter two methods give information on the vesicle charge neutralization by adsorbed protein. Binding is concomitant to modifications in the double layer thickness of vesicles and in the surface charge density of the resulting lipoplexes. This is also confirmed by developing the electrophoretic mobility results in terms of a Langmuir-like adsorption isotherm. Charges in excess with respect to the amount required to neutralize the vesicle surface promote lipoplexes clustering and/or flocculation. Protein-vesicle interactions were observed by DLS, indicating changes in particle size (and in their distribution functions) upon addition of LYSO. According to CD, the bound protein retains its native conformation, at least in the SDS/CTAB vesicular system. In fact

  18. Theory of surfactant-mediated growth on semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaxiras, Efthimios; Kandel, Daniel

    1996-08-01

    The surfactant effect, first demonstrated by Copel et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 (1989) 632] by using As to promote epitaxial growth of Ge on Si(100), has now been studied in a wide variety of systems, thus making systematic studies possible. We present theoretical models that account for the observed behavior of various surfactants on semiconductor surfaces, including homo-epitaxial and hetero-epitaxial growth. The theoretical models include first-principles calculations of the relative energy of different structures associated with surfactant layers and the activation energies for diffusion and exchange mechanisms, as well as solid-on-solid Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Novel adhesive properties of poly(ethylene-oxide) adsorbed nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wenduo

    Solid-polymer interfaces play crucial roles in the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology and are the confluence of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. There is now growing evidence that polymer chains irreversibly adsorb even onto weakly attractive solid surfaces, forming a nanometer-thick adsorbed polymer layer ("adsorbed polymer nanolayers"). It has also been reported that the adsorbed layers greatly impact on local structures and properties of supported polymer thin films. In this thesis, I aim to clarify adhesive and tribological properties of adsorbed poly(ethylene-oxide) (PEO) nanolayers onto silicon (Si) substrates, which remain unsolved so far. The adsorbed nanolayers were prepared by the established protocol: one has to equilibrate the melt or dense solution against a solid surface; the unadsorbed chains can be then removed by a good solvent, while the adsorbed chains are assumed to maintain the same conformation due to the irreversible freezing through many physical solid-segment contacts. I firstly characterized the formation process and the surface/film structures of the adsorbed nanolayers by using X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Secondly, to compare the surface energy of the adsorbed layers with the bulk, static contact angle measurements with two liquids (water and glycerol) were carried out using a optical contact angle meter equipped with a video camera. Thirdly, I designed and constructed a custom-built adhesion-testing device to quantify the adhesive property. The experimental results provide new insight into the microscopic structure - macroscopic property relationship at the solid-polymer interface.

  20. Mobility and surfactant migration in EA/MAA latex films; ATR FT-IR spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thorstenson, T.A.; Tebelius, L.K.; Urban, M.W.

    1993-12-31

    Although numerous factors such as compatibility, mechanical deformation, and the nature of the substrate have been addressed with respect to surfactant migration and distribution within latex films, latex suspension stability and the effects of particle flocculation are also key issues. In this paper, surfactant behavior in an ethyl acrylate/methacrylic acid/sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (EA/MAA/SDOSS) latex system is monitored as a function of stability of the liquid latex suspensions. Particle size data obtained using light scattering reveals an appreciable degree of flocculation over the period of study. It is found that flocculation is paralleled by a significantly increased degree of interfacial surfactant enrichment, a monitored by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR). It is concluded that the enhanced surfactant exudation observed for flocculated latexes is due to displacement of adsorbed surfactant during the course of flocculation.

  1. Emulsification at the Liquid/Liquid Interface: Effects of Potential, Electrolytes and Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Mehrin; Kataky, Ritu

    2016-01-04

    Emulsification of oils at liquid/liquid interfaces is of fundamental importance across a range of applications, including detergency. Adsorption and partitioning of the anionic surface active ions at the interface between two immiscible solutions is known to cause predictable chaos at the transfer potential region of the surfactant. In this work, the phenomenon that leads to the chaotic behaviour shown by sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) at the water/1,2-dichloroethane interface is applied to commercial surfactants and aqueous/glyceryl trioleate interface. Electrochemical methods, electrocapillary curves, optical microscopy and conductivity measurements demonstrated that at 1.5 mm of SDBS, surfactants are adsorbed at the interface and assemble into micelles, leading to interfacial instability. As the concentration of the anionic surfactant was enhanced to 8 and 13.4 mm, the Marangoni effect and the interfacial emulsification became more prominent. The chaotic behaviour was found to be dependent on the surfactant concentration and the electrolytes present.

  2. Group methods of determining surfactants in water (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Subbotina, E.I.; Dedkov, Yu.M.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years new and promising methods for the determination of industrial surfactant waste migration and concentration in the hydrosphere have been developed. These methods include different forms of chromatography, ion selective electrode analysis, titration, and solvent extraction. This article reviews the application and usefulness of each of these methods in the analysis of various surfactants. The methods of chromatography reviewed include liquid column, thin layer, and ion exchange.

  3. An embedded boundary method for soluble surfactants with interface tracking for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Shilpa; Tornberg, Anna-Karin

    2014-01-01

    Surfactants, surface reacting agents, lower the surface tension of the interface between fluids in multiphase flow. This capability of surfactants makes them ideal for many applications, including wetting, foaming, and dispersing. Due to their molecular composition, surfactants are adsorbed from the bulk fluid to the interface between the fluids, leading to different concentrations on the interface and in the fluid. In a previous paper [21], we introduced a new second order method using uniform grids to simulate insoluble surfactants in multiphase flow. This method used Strang splitting allowing for a fully second order treatment in time. Here, we use the same numerical methods to explicitly represent the singular interface, treat the interfacial surfactant concentration, and couple with the Navier-Stokes equations. Now, we introduce a second order method for the surfactants in the bulk that continues to allow the use of regular grids for the full problem. Difficulties arise since the boundary condition for the bulk concentration, which handles the flux of surfactant between the interface and bulk fluid, is applied at the interface which cuts arbitrarily through the regular grid. We extend the embedded boundary method, introduced in [22], to handle this challenge. Through our results, we present the effect of the solubility of the surfactants. We show results of drop dynamics due to resulting Marangoni stresses and of drop deformations in shear flow in the presence of soluble surfactants. There is a large nondimensional parameter space over which we try to understand the drop dynamics.

  4. Remobilizing the Interfaces of Thermocapillary Driven Bubbles Retarded by the Adsorption of a Surfactant Impurity on the Bubble Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaparthi, Ravi; Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    concentrations than the impurity, it adsorbs to the bubble much faster than the impurity when the bubble is formed, and thereby prevents the impurity from adsorbing onto the surface. In addition the rapid kinetic exchange and high bulk concentration maintain a saturated surface with a uniform surface concentrations. This prevents retarding surface tension gradients and keeps the velocity high. In our first report last year, we detailed experimental results which verified the theory of remobilization in ground based experiments in which the steady velocity of rising bubbles was measured in a continuous phase consisting of a glycerol/water mixture containing a polyethylene glycol surfactant C12E6 (CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)6OH). In our report this year, we detail our efforts to describe theoretically the remobilization observed. We construct a model in which a bubble rises steadily by buoyancy in a continuous (Newtonian) viscous fluid containing surfactant with a uniform far field bulk concentration. We account for the effects of inertia as well as viscosity in the flow in the continuous phase caused by the bubble motion (order one Reynolds number), and we assume that the bubble shape remains spherical (viscous and inertial forces are smaller than capillary forces, i e. small Weber and capillary numbers). The surfactant distribution is calculated by solving the mass transfer equations including convection and diffusion in the bulk, and finite kinetic exchange the bulk and the surface. Convective effects dominate diffusive mass transfer in the bulk of the liquid (high Peclet numbers) except in a thin boundary layer near the surface. A finite volume method is used to numerically solve the hydrodynamic and mass transfer equations on a staggered grid which accounts specifically for the thin boundary layer. We present the results of the nondimensional drag as a function of the bulk concentration of surfactant for different rates of kinetic exchange, from which we develop criteria for the

  5. Ionic liquids as surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, N. A.; Safonova, E. A.

    2010-10-01

    Problems of self-assembling in systems containing ionic liquids (ILs) are discussed. Main attention is paid to micellization in aqueous solutions of dialkylimidazolium ILs and their mixtures with classical surfactants. Literature data are reviewed, the results obtained by the authors and co-workers are presented. Thermodynamic aspects of the studies and problems of molecular-thermodynamic modeling receive special emphasis. It is shown that the aggregation behavior of dialkylimidazolium ILs is close to that of alkyltrimethylammonium salts (cationic surfactants) though ILs have a higher ability to self-organize, especially as it concerns long-range ordering. Some aspects of ILs applications are outlined where their common features with classical surfactants and definite specificity are of value.

  6. Characterization on the precipitate sample of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide adsorbed onto nanocube CaCO3 particles from aqueous-ammonia-rich solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtudazo, Raymond V. Rivera; Fuji, Masayoshi; Takai, Chika; Shirai, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    Physicochemical analysis on the precipitate samples of the cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) adsorbed onto nanocube CaCO3 particles (NcCP) in aqueous ammonia rich (NH4 +) solution was initially examined. The amount of CTAB added to the (<100 nm) NcCP ranging from 0.04 to 88.5 mM was prepared under room temperature aqueous alkaline condition and characterized by thermogravimetry/differential thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTA), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), gas chromatograph combined with mass spectrometer analysis (GC-MS), and powder X-ray diffraction pattern. RS, GC-MS, and TGA/DTA analyses indicate that only layer of CTAB molecules were present on the surface of the NcCP. Moreover, this thin sheet layer was morphologically observed by the TEM image (particularly at 88 mM concentration of CTAB). In general, adsorption of CTAB molecules onto NcCP under aqueous alkaline medium had no effect on the cubic crystal structure and particle morphology. The present study confirms the adsorption mechanism of cationic surfactant onto NcCP colloids model and contributes to the better understanding of the possible structural arrangement of the sorbed surfactant molecules onto the NcCP-aqueous alkaline interface by simple characterization method. This investigation is expected to create new, low-cost route to produce promising nanopowders and conversion to hollow particles with multi-component porous surface shell wall.

  7. Arsenic retention and transport behavior in the presence of typical anionic and nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuan; Wang, Xianliang; Peng, Xianjia

    2016-01-01

    The massive production and wide use of surfactants have resulted in a large amount of surfactant residuals being discharged into the environment, which could have an impact on arsenic behavior. In the present study, the influence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) and nonionic surfactant polyethylene glycol octylphenyl ether (Triton X-100) on arsenic behavior was investigated in batch and column tests. The presence of SDBS and Triton X-100 reduced arsenic retention onto ferrihydrite (FH), enhanced arsenic transport through FH coated sand (FH-sand) columns and promoted arsenic release from the FH surface. With coexisting surfactants in solution, the equilibrium adsorbed amount of arsenic on FH decreased by up to 29.7% and the adsorption rate decreased by up to 52.3%. Pre-coating with surfactants caused a decrease in the adsorbed amount and adsorption rate of arsenic by up to 15.1% and 58.3%, respectively. Because of the adsorption attenuation caused by surfactants, breakthrough of As(V) and As(III) with SDBS in columns packed with FH-sand was 23.8% and 14.3% faster than that in those without SDBS, respectively. In columns packed with SDBS-coated FH-sand, transport of arsenic was enhanced to a greater extent. Breakthrough of As(V) and As(III) was 52.4% and 43.8% faster and the cumulative retention amount was 44.5% and 57.3% less than that in pure FH-sand column systems, respectively. Mobilization of arsenic by surfactants increased with the increase of the initial adsorbed amount of arsenic. The cumulative release amount of As(V) and As(III) from the packed column reached 10.8% and 36.0%, respectively.

  8. Direct suppression of phagocytosis by amphipathic polymeric surfactants.

    PubMed

    Watrous-Peltier, N; Uhl, J; Steel, V; Brophy, L; Merisko-Liversidge, E

    1992-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that phagocytosis of colloidal particles by the mononuclear phagocytes of the liver and spleen can be controlled by either coating or stabilizing particulate carriers with the amphipathic polymeric surfactants, F108 and T908. These surfactants consist of copolymers of polypropylene oxide (PPO) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) and, when adsorbed to particulate surfaces, significantly decrease sequestration of particulates by the mononuclear phagocytes (MPS) of the liver. To evaluate these observations further, murine peritoneal macrophages were incubated for varying periods with surfactant-coated and noncoated polystyrene particles (PSPs). Phagocytosis was monitored using gamma counting and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data show that phagocytosis is decreased when PSPs are coated with F108 and T908. In addition, suppression of phagocytic activity was observed when cells were pretreated with the surfactant and then challenged with noncoated particles. The data confirm previous observations that polymeric surfactants consisting of PEO and PPO protect particulate carriers from rapid uptake by the MPS of the liver. Further, F108 and T908 suppress phagocytosis directly without affecting the integrity, viability, or functional state of the cell.

  9. Layered double hydroxides as adsorbents and carriers of the herbicide (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA): systems Mg-Al, Mg-Fe and Mg-Al-Fe.

    PubMed

    Bruna, F; Celis, R; Pavlovic, I; Barriga, C; Cornejo, J; Ulibarri, M A

    2009-09-15

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds [Mg(3)Al(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O; [Mg(3)Fe(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O; [Mg(3)Al(0.5)Fe(0.5)(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O (LDHs) and calcined product of [Mg(3)Al(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O, Mg(3)AlO(4.5) (HT500), were studied as potential adsorbents of the herbicide MCPA [(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid] as a function of pH, contact time and pesticide concentration, and also as support for the slow release of this pesticide, with the aim to reduce the hazardous effects that it can pose to the environment. The information obtained in the adsorption study was used for the preparation of LDH-MCPA complexes. The results showed high and rapid adsorption of MCPA on the adsorbents as well as that MCPA formulations based on LDHs and HT500 as pesticide supports displayed controlled release properties and reduced herbicide leaching in soil columns compared to a standard commercial MCPA formulation. Thereby, we conclude that the LDHs employed in this study can be used not only as adsorbents to remove MCPA from aqueous solutions, but also as supports for the slow release of this highly mobile herbicide, thus controlling its immediate availability and leaching.

  10. Development of glucose sensor using two-photon adsorbed photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Min; Park, Jung-Jin; Lee, Haeng-Ja; Kim, Woo-Sik; Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Chang, Sang-Mok

    2010-01-01

    A novel glucose sensor was constructed, and its analytical potential examined. A chip-type three-electrode system for use in a flow-type electrochemical glucose sensor was fabricated using a UV lithography technique on a glass slide. An Ag/AgCl reference electrode was made by electroplating silver onto a Pt electrode and dipping in a saturated KCl solution for 30 min. In addition, a glucose-sensing electrode was fabricated using a two-photon adsorbed photopolymerization technique with a photo-reactive resin containing a glucose oxidase enzyme, ferrocene mediator, non-ionic surfactant, and carbon nanotubes. The cyclic voltammetry of the potassium ferrocyanide in the Pt sensor system showed a stable electrode condition. The response of the modified Pt sensor confirms the feasibility of using a two-photon adsorbed photopolymerization technique for the easy fabrication of functional biosensors.

  11. Nanoparticle interaction with model lung surfactant monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Saleem, Mohammed; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important functions of the lung surfactant monolayer is to form the first line of defence against inhaled aerosols such as nanoparticles (NPs), which remains largely unexplored. We report here, for the first time, the interaction of polyorganosiloxane NPs (AmorSil20: 22 nm in diameter) with lipid monolayers characteristic of alveolar surfactant. To enable a better understanding, the current knowledge about an established model surface film that mimics the surface properties of the lung is reviewed and major results originating from our group are summarized. The pure lipid components dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol have been used to study the biophysical behaviour of their monolayer films spread at the air–water interface in the presence of NPs. Film balance measurements combined with video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy have been used to investigate the formation of domain structures and the changes in the surface pattern induced by NPs. We are able to show that NPs are incorporated into lipid monolayers with a clear preference for defect structures at the fluid–crystalline interface leading to a considerable monolayer expansion and fluidization. NPs remain at the air–water interface probably by coating themselves with lipids in a self-assembly process, thereby exhibiting hydrophobic surface properties. We also show that the domain structure in lipid layers containing surfactant protein C, which is potentially responsible for the proper functioning of surfactant material, is considerably affected by NPs. PMID:19846443

  12. Surfactant mixing rules applied to surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses surfactant mixing rules which have been used to describe crude oil/alkali/surfactant phase behavior, using David Lloydminster crude oil and the surfactant Neodol 25-3S. It was found that at a fixed salinity and alkali concentration, a specific mole fraction of synthetic surfactant to petroleum soap was required to produce optimal phase behavior as the water-to-oil ratio varied. This methodology is useful in understanding the relationship between the variables of water-to-oil ratio and synthetic surfactant concentration in phase behavior systems that produce a petroleum soap.

  13. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2012-03-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less surfactant than unstretched cells; however, stretched cells secreted significantly more surfactant than unstretched cells after an extended lag period. We developed a model based on the hypothesis that stretching leads to jamming of surfactant traffic escaping the cell, similar to vehicular traffic jams. In the model, stretch increases surfactant transport from the interior to the exterior of the cell. This transport is mediated by a surface layer with a finite capacity due to the limited number of fusion pores through which secretion occurs. When the amount of surfactant in the surface layer approaches this capacity, interference among lamellar bodies carrying surfactant reduces the rate of secretion, effectively creating a jam. When the stretch stops, the jam takes an extended time to clear, and subsequently the amount of secreted surfactant increases. We solved the model analytically and show that its dynamics are consistent with experimental observations, implying that surfactant secretion is a fundamentally nonlinear process with memory representing collective behavior at the level of single cells. Our results thus highlight the importance of a jamming dynamics in stretch-induced cellular secretory processes.

  14. 1H NMR relaxation of water: a probe for surfactant adsorption on kaolin.

    PubMed

    Totland, Christian; Lewis, Rhiannon T; Nerdal, Willy

    2011-11-01

    In this study, (1)H NMR is used to investigate properties of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), and dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) adsorbed on kaolin by NMR T(1) and T(2) measurements of the water proton resonance. The results show that adsorbed surfactants form a barrier between sample water and the paramagnetic species present on the clay surface, thus significantly increasing the proton T(1) values of water. This effect is attributed to the amount of adsorbed surfactants and the arrangement of the surfactant aggregates. The total surface area covered by the cationic (DTAB and TTAB) and anionic (SDS) surfactants could be estimated from the water T(1) data and found to correspond to the fractions of negatively and positively charged surface area, respectively. For selected samples, the amount of paramagnetic species on the clay surface was reduced by treatment with hydrofluoric (HF) acid. For these samples, T(1) and T(2) measurements were taken in the temperature range 278-338 K, revealing detailed information on molecular mobility and nuclear exchange for the sample water that is related to surfactant behavior both on the surface and in the aqueous phase.

  15. Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-08-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

  16. Mechanistic study of wettability alteration using surfactants with applications in naturally fractured reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Mehdi; Johnson, Stephen J; Liang, Jenn-Tai

    2008-12-16

    In naturally fractured reservoirs, oil recovery from waterflooding relies on the spontaneous imbibition of water to expel oil from the matrix into the fracture system. The spontaneous imbibition process is most efficient in strongly water-wet rock where the capillary driving force is strong. In oil- or mixed-wet fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, the capillary driving force for the spontaneous imbibition process is weak, and therefore the waterflooding oil recoveries are low. The recovery efficiency can be improved by dissolving low concentrations of surfactants in the injected water to alter the wettability of the reservoir rock to a more water-wet state. This wettability alteration accelerates the spontaneous imbibition of water into matrix blocks, thereby increasing the oil recovery during waterflooding. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the wettability alteration by surfactants, but none have been verified experimentally. Understanding of the mechanisms behind wettability alteration could help to improve the performance of the process and aid in identification of alternative surfactants for use in field applications. Results from this study revealed that ion-pair formation and adsorption of surfactant molecules through interactions with the adsorbed crude oil components on the rock surface are the two main mechanisms responsible for the wettability alteration. Previous researchers observed that, for a given rock type, the effectiveness of wettability alteration is highly dependent upon the ionic nature of the surfactant involved. Our experimental results demonstrated that ion-pair formation between the charged head groups of surfactant molecules and the adsorbed crude oil components on rock surface was more effective in changing the rock wettability toward a more water-wet state than the adsorption of surfactant molecules as a monolayer on the rock surface through hydrophobic interaction with the adsorbed crude oil components. By comparing

  17. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  18. Behavior of cationic surfactants and short-chain alcohols in mixed surface layers at water-air and polymer-water interfaces with regard to polymer wettability II. Wettability of polymers.

    PubMed

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2010-10-15

    The wettability of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) mixtures with short-chain alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol, as well as for 1-hexadecylpyridinium bromide (CPyB) with the same alcohols, was studied on the basis of advancing contact-angle measurements by the sessile drop method over a wide range of alcohol and cationic surfactant concentrations where they can be present in solution in monomeric or aggregated form. It should be noted that the contact angles for aqueous solution mixtures of cationic surfactants with propanol on PTFE surfaces were measured earlier and presented in our previous paper. From the obtained contact-angle values the relationships between cos theta and surface tension of the solutions (gamma(LV)) and that between adhesion tension and gamma(LV) were considered. The relationship between the cos theta and the reciprocal of gamma(LV) was also discussed. From these relationships the critical surface tension of PTFE and PMMA wetting and the correlation between the adsorption of cationic surfactant and alcohol mixtures at water-air and polymer-water interfaces were deduced. On the basis of the contact angles and components and parameters of the surface tension of surfactants, alcohols, and polymers also the Gibbs and Guggenheim-Adam isotherm of adsorption and the effective concentration of alcohols and surfactants at polymer-water interfaces were calculated. Next, the work of adhesion of solution to polymer surface with regard to the surface monolayer composition was discussed. The analysis of the contact angles with regard to adsorption of surfactants and alcohols at polymer-water and water-air interfaces allowed us to conclude that the PTFE wetting depends only on the contribution of the acid-base interactions to the surface tension of aqueous solutions of cationic surfactant and alcohol mixtures, and the adhesion work of solution to its

  19. Interaction of a cationic gemini surfactant with DNA and with sodium poly(styrene sulphonate) at the air/water interface: a neutron reflectometry study.

    PubMed

    Vongsetskul, T; Taylor, D J F; Zhang, J; Li, P X; Thomas, R K; Penfold, J

    2009-04-07

    The interactions between a dicationic gemini surfactant with a six-hydrocarbon spacer (1,2-bis(dodecyldimethyl-ammonio)hexane dibromide, C12C6C12Br2) and anionic polyelectrolyte DNA or sodium (polystyrene sulfonate) (NaPSS) at the air/solution interface have been studied and compared using neutron reflectometry together with surface tension. In the presence of the dichained cationic gemini surfactant, DNA and NaPSS display very different adsorption behaviors. The DNA/gemini mixtures show adsorption behavior very similar to that of DNA/C12TAB mixtures, with enhanced surfactant adsorption at low concentrations and thick structured layers at higher concentrations. However, for the NaPSS/gemini mixtures the amount of gemini at the surface is reduced relative to that in the absence of NaPSS at concentrations below the cmc. These differences in adsorption behavior are attributed to differences in the molecular structure and flexibility of the two polyanions. NaPSS is relatively hydrophobic and flexible enough to form bulk-phase polymer-micelle complexes with the gemini surfactant at low surfactant concentrations, whereas the adsorption of surface complexes is much less favorable because the dications on the gemini would require adjacent bulky pendant charges on the NaPSS to be oriented toward the surface. This would force the NaPSS to bend significantly whereas it is more favorable for the NaPSS to adopt an extended conformation at the surface. Thus, surfactant is actually removed from the surface to form bulk-phase complexes. In contrast with NaPSS, DNA has a far more rigid structure, and the charges on the backbone are at fixed intervals, factors that make the formation of surface DNA-monomer complexes much more favorable than bulk-phase DNA-micelle complexes. Finally, a short-chain sample of NaPSS consisting of only five to six segments adsorbs very strongly at the surface with the gemini to form more extensive layered structures than have previously been observed

  20. Adsorption of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate on a C18 column under micellar and high submicellar conditions in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bolsico, C; Ruiz-Angel, M J; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2015-02-01

    Micellar liquid chromatography makes use of aqueous solutions or aqueous-organic solutions containing a surfactant, at a concentration above its critical micelle concentration. In the mobile phase, the surfactant monomers aggregate to form micelles, whereas on the surface of the nonpolar alkyl-bonded stationary phases they are significantly adsorbed. If the mobile phase contains a high concentration of organic solvent, micelles break down, and the amount of surfactant adsorbed on the stationary phase is reduced, giving rise to another chromatographic mode named high submicellar liquid chromatography. The presence of a thinner coating of surfactant enhances the selectivity and peak shape, especially for basic compounds. However, the risk of full desorption of surfactant is the main limitation in the high submicellar mode. This study examines the adsorption of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate under micellar and high submicellar conditions on a C18 column, applying two methods. One of them uses a refractive index detector to obtain direct measurements of the adsorbed amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate, whereas the second method is based on the retention and peak shape for a set of cationic basic compounds that indirectly reveal the presence of adsorbed monomers of surfactant on the stationary phase.

  1. Marangoni Effects of a Drop in an Extensional Flow: The Role of Surfactant Physical Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebe, Kathleen J.; Balasubramaniam, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    While the changes in stresses caused by surfactant adsorption on non-deforming interfaces have been fairly well established, prior to this work, there were few studies addressing how surfactants alter stresses on strongly deforming interfaces. We chose the model problem of a drop in a uniaxial extensional flow to study these stress conditions To model surfactant effects at fluid interfaces, a proper description of the dependence of the surface tension on surface concentration, the surface equation of state, is required. We have adopted a surface equation of state that accounts for the maximum coverage limit; that is, because surfactants have a finite cross sectional area, there is an upper bound to the amount of surfactant that can adsorb in a monolayer. The surface tension reduces strongly only when this maximum coverage is approached. Since the Marangoni stresses go as the derivative of the surface equation of state times the surface concentration gradient, the non-linear equation of state determines both the effect of surfactants in the normal stress jump, (which is balanced by the product of the mean curvature of the interface times the surface tension), and the tangential stress jump, which is balanced by Marangoni stresses. First, the effects of surface coverage and intermolecular interactions among surfactants which drive aggregation of surfactants in the interface were studied. (see Pawar and Stebe, Physics of Fluids).

  2. Adsorption and corrosion inhibition behavior of hydroxyethyl cellulose and synergistic surfactants additives for carbon steel in 1M HCl.

    PubMed

    Mobin, Mohammad; Rizvi, Marziya

    2017-01-20

    The inhibitory effect of hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) on A1020 carbon steel corrosion in 1M HCl solution was evaluated at different concentrations and temperatures using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), UV-vis spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantum chemical analysis. Inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increase in concentration of HEC but decreased with increasing temperature. Inhibitory effect of HEC mixed with minimal concentration of surfactants, triton X 100 (TX), cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was also evaluated. HEC gets adsorbed onto the mild steel surface via mixed type adsorption. Ea, ΔH, ΔS and ΔG⁰ads, the thermodynamic and activation parameters, were calculated and discussed. Adsorption of inhibitor on the steel/solution interface follows Langmuir adsorption isotherm. EIS suggests formation of protective layer over the carbon steel surface. Results of different experimental techniques pertaining to the inhibitory effect of HEC and HEC mixed with surfactants are in good agreement with theoretical quantum chemical investigation.

  3. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  4. Non-covalent bonding interaction of surfactants with functionalized carbon nanotubes in proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Sayeed, M Abu; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Younjin; Gopalan, A I; Lee, Kwang-Pill; Choi, Sang-June

    2013-11-01

    Dispersion of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) was conducted via non-covalent bonding between benzene rings of various surfactants and functionalized MWCNTs. In the solution casting method, dispersion of functionalized MWCNTs in PEMs such as Nafion membranes is a critical issue. In this study, 1 wt.% pristine MWCNTs (p-MWCNTs) and oxidized MWCNTs (ox-MWCNTs) were reinforced in Nafion membranes by adding 0.1-0.5 wt.% of a surfactant such as benzalkonium chloride (BKC) as a cationic surfactant with a benzene ring, Tween-80 as a nonanionic surfactant without a benzene ring, sodium dodecylsulfonate (SDS) as an anionic surfactant without a benzene ring, or sodium dodecylben-zenesulfonate (SDBS) as an anionic surfactant with a benzene ring and their effects on the dispersion of nanocomposites were then observed. Among these surfactants, those with benzene rings such as BKC and SDBS produced enhanced dispersion via non-covalent bonding interaction between CNTs and surfactants. Specifically, the surfactants were adsorbed onto the surface of functionalized MWCNTs, where they prevented re-aggregation of MWCNTs in the nanocomposites. Furthermore, the prepared CNTs reinforced nanocomposite membranes showed reduced methanol uptake values while the ion exchange capacity values were maintained. The enhanced properties, including thermal property of the CNTs reinforced PEMs with surfactants, could be applicable to fuel cell applications.

  5. Tunable Oleo-Furan Surfactants by Acylation of Renewable Furans

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An important advance in fluid surface control was the amphiphilic surfactant composed of coupled molecular structures (i.e., hydrophilic and hydrophobic) to reduce surface tension between two distinct fluid phases. However, implementation of simple surfactants has been hindered by the broad range of applications in water containing alkaline earth metals (i.e., hard water), which disrupt surfactant function and require extensive use of undesirable and expensive chelating additives. Here we show that sugar-derived furans can be linked with triglyceride-derived fatty acid chains via Friedel–Crafts acylation within single layer (SPP) zeolite catalysts. These alkylfuran surfactants independently suppress the effects of hard water while simultaneously permitting broad tunability of size, structure, and function, which can be optimized for superior capability for forming micelles and solubilizing in water. PMID:27924310

  6. Surfactant treatments alter endogenous surfactant metabolism in rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Oetomo, S.B.; Lewis, J.; Ikegami, M.; Jobe, A.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of exogenous surfactant on endogenous surfactant metabolism was evaluated using a single-lobe treatment strategy to compare effects of treated with untreated lung within the same rabbit. Natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, or 0.45% NaCl was injected into the left main stem bronchus by use of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Radiolabeled palmitic acid was then given by intravascular injection at two times after surfactant treatment, and the ratios of label incorporation and secretion in the left lower lobe to label incorporation and secretion in the right lung were compared. The treatment procedure resulted in a reasonably uniform surfactant distribution and did not disrupt lobar pulmonary blood flow. Natural rabbit surfactant increased incorporation of palmitate into saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC) approximately 2-fold (P less than 0.01), and secretion of labeled Sat PC increased approximately 2.5-fold in the surfactant-treated left lower lobe relative to the right lung (P less than 0.01). Although Survanta did not alter incorporation, it did increase secretion but not to the same extent as rabbit surfactant (P less than 0.01). Alteration of endogenous surfactant Sat PC metabolism in vivo by surfactant treatments was different from that which would have been predicted by previous in vitro studies.

  7. Method of coating aluminum substrates with solid adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.R.; McKeon, M.J.; Cohen, A.P.; Behan, A.S.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a method of coating a surface of an aluminum substrate with a layer of solid adsorbent selected from the group consisting of crystalline molecular sieves, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof. It comprises heating the surface in an oxygen containing atmosphere to a temperature of at least about 200{degrees} C and sufficient to enable bonding of the solid adsorbent to the surface, contacting the heated surface with a slurry comprising the adsorbent and a binder selected from the group consisting of volclay, kaolin, sepiolite, attapulgite, silicates, aluminates, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof in a suspending liquid to form a slurry-coated surface, and removing sufficient liquid to form an adsorbent coating thereon.

  8. Friction Control of a Gel by Electric Field in Ionic Surfactant Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masakazu Takata,; Tetsuo Yamaguchi,; Masao Doi,

    2010-06-01

    We observed that the frictional force between acrylamide gel and silicon dioxide substrate is reduced upon application of electric voltage if the gel is swollen with anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate). The effect was not seen in cationic surfactant. We conjecture that the reduction is due to formation of a lubrication layer by electric field at the gel/solid interface.

  9. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy.

    PubMed

    Raza, Md Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-08

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications.

  11. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Md. Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications. PMID:26743179

  12. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Md. Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications.

  13. Polymer enrichment decelerates surfactant membranes near interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipfert, F.; Frielinghaus, H.; Holderer, O.; Mattauch, S.; Monkenbusch, M.; Arend, N.; Richter, D.

    2014-04-01

    Close to a planar surface, lamellar structures are imposed upon otherwise bulk bicontinuous microemulsions. Thermally induced membrane undulations are modified by the presence of the rigid interface. While it has been shown that a pure membrane's dynamics are accelerated close to the interface, we observed nearly unchanged relaxation rates for membranes spiked with large amphiphilic diblock copolymers. An increase of the polymer concentration by a factor of 2-3 for the first and second surfactant membrane layers was observed. We interpret the reduced relaxation times as the result of an interplay between the bending rigidity and the characteristic distance of the first surfactant membrane to the rigid interface, which causes the hydrodynamic and steric interface effects described in Seifert's theory. The influence of these effects on decorated membranes yields a reduction of the frequencies and an amplification of the amplitudes of long-wavelength undulations, which are in accordance to our experimental findings.

  14. High-capacity hydrogen storage in Al-adsorbed graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Z. M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    A high-capacity hydrogen storage medium—Al-adsorbed graphene—is proposed based on density-functional theory calculations. We find that a graphene layer with Al adsorbed on both sides can store hydrogen up to 13.79wt% with average adsorption energy -0.193eV/H2 . Its hydrogen storage capacity is in excess of 6wt% , surpassing U. S. Department of Energy (DOE’s) target. Based on the binding-energy criterion and molecular-dynamics calculations, we find that hydrogen storage can be recycled at near ambient conditions. This high-capacity hydrogen storage is due to the adsorbed Al atoms that act as bridges to link the electron clouds of the H2 molecules and the graphene layer. As a consequence, a two-layer arrangement of H2 molecules is formed on each side of the Al-adsorbed graphene layer. The H2 concentration in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the change in the conductivity of the graphene layer.

  15. Droplet Deformation in an Extensional Flow: The Role of Surfactant Physical Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebe, Kathleen J.

    1996-01-01

    Surfactant-induced Marangoni effects strongly alter the stresses exerted along fluid particle interfaces. In low gravity processes, these stresses can dictate the system behavior. The dependence of Marangoni effects on surfactant physical chemistry is not understood, severely impacting our ability to predict and control fluid particle flows. A droplet in an extensional flow allows the controlled study of stretching and deforming interfaces. The deformations of the drop allow both Marangoni stresses, which resist tangential shear, and Marangoni elasticities, which resist surface dilatation, to develop. This flow presents an ideal model system for studying these effects. Prior surfactant-related work in this flow considered a linear dependence of the surface tension on the surface concentration, valid only at dilute surface concentrations, or a non-linear framework at concentrations sufficiently dilute that the linear approximation was valid. The linear framework becomes inadequate for several reasons. The finite dimensions of surfactant molecules must be taken into account with a model that includes surfaces saturation. Nonideal interactions between adsorbed surfactant molecules alter the partitioning of surfactant between the bulk and the interface, the dynamics of surfactant adsorptive/desorptive exchange, and the sensitivity of the surface tension to adsorbed surfactant. For example, cohesion between hydrocarbon chains favors strong adsorption. Cohesion also slows the rate of desorption from interfaces, and decreases the sensitivity of the surface tension to adsorbed surfactant. Strong cohesive interactions result in first order surface phase changes with a plateau in the surface tension vs surface concentration. Within this surface concentration range, the surface tension is decoupled from surface concentration gradients. We are engaged in the study of the role of surfactant physical chemistry in determining the Marangoni stresses on a drop in an extensional

  16. Mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Noll, L.A.

    1990-12-01

    The results of an evaluation of mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several surfactant combinations have been studied. These include alkyl aryl sulfonates as primary surfactants and carboxymethylated ethoxylated (CME) surfactants and ethoxylated sulfonates (ES) as secondary surfactants. The ethoxylated surfactants increase the salinity tolerance of the primary surfactants and, in theory, allow tailoring of the surfactant system to match selected reservoir conditions. The experiments conducted included interfacial tension (IFT) measurements, phase behavior measurements, adsorption and/or chromatographic separation of mixed surfactant systems, measurements of solution properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant mixtures, and crude oil displacement experiments. The effects of temperature, surfactant concentration, salinity, presence of divalent ions, hydrocarbon type, and component proportions in the mixed surfactant combinations, and injection strategies on the performance potential of the targeted surfactant/hydrocarbon systems were studied. 40 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Synthesis of polymer nanostructures via the use of surfactant surface aggregates as templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Maricel

    method for the formation of nanometer-scale polymer structures on solid surfaces via template assisted admicellar polymerization (TAAP) is described. Admicellar polymerization uses a surfactant layer adsorbed on a surface to localize monomer to the surface prior to polymerization of the monomer. TAAP refers to nanostructures that form by restricting adsorption to the uncovered sites of an already-templated surface. In this case, the interstitial sites between adsorbed latex spheres were used as the template. Unlike most other process that form polymer nanostructures, polymer dimensions can be significantly smaller than the interstitial size because of sphere-surfactant-monomer interactions. As a proof of concept, nanostructures formed via TAAP were compared to structures prepared by others via adsorption of three different proteins (Bovine serum albumin, fibrinogen, and anti-mouse IgG) in the interstitial sites of colloidal monolayers. The size and shape of the nanostructures formed (honeycomb vs. pillars) was dependent upon the size of the spheres utilized and the method of polymer deposition (i.e. admicellar polymerization vs. polymer adsorption). Thinner honeycomb walls, and larger separation distances between the template and the nanostructures were consistently found for TAAP. In chapter 4, an in-depth study of the factors affecting TAAP is presented for three different monomers: aniline, pyrrole and methyl methacrylate; and three different surfaces: highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), gold, and SiO2. Among the parameters discussed are the effect of monomer and surfactant concentration, surfactant chain length, polymerization time and temperature, solution ionic strength, substrate choice and surface treatment. Control over these parameters allowed the synthesis of polymer nanopillars, nanorings, honeycombs, and "honeytubes." Experimental results showed that the nanostructures' morphology can be effectively modified by changing the length of the hydrophobic

  18. Separation of surfactant functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes via free solution electrophoresis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, Blazej; Rümmeli, Mark; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa; Kalenczuk, Ryszard

    2011-04-01

    This work presents the application of the free solution electrophoresis method (FSE) in the metallic / semiconductive (M/S) separation process of the surfactant functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The SWCNTs synthesized via laser ablation were purified through high vacuum annealing and subsequent refluxing processes in aqua regia solution. The purified and annealed material was divided into six batches. First three batches were dispersed in anionic surfactants: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium cholate (SC) and sodium deoxycholate (DOC). The next three batches were dispersed in cationic surfactants: cetrimonium bromide (CTAB), benzalkonium chloride (BKC) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). All the prepared SWCNTs samples were subjected to FSE separation process. The fractionated samples were recovered from control and electrode areas and annealed in order to remove the adsorbed surfactants on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) surface. The changes of the van Hove singularities (vHS) present in SWCNTs spectra were investigated via UV-Vis-NIR optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS).

  19. MTBE adsorption on alternative adsorbents and packed bed adsorber performance.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Alfred; Knappe, Detlef R U

    2008-04-01

    Widespread use of the fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) has led to frequent MTBE detections in North American and European drinking water sources. The overall objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a silicalite zeolite, a carbonaceous resin, and a coconut-shell-based granular activated carbon (GAC) for the removal of MTBE from water. Isotherm and short bed adsorber tests were conducted in ultrapure water and river water to obtain parameters describing MTBE adsorption equilibria and kinetics and to quantify the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on MTBE adsorption. Both the silicalite zeolite and the carbonaceous resin exhibited larger MTBE adsorption uptakes than the tested GAC. Surface diffusion coefficients describing intraparticle MTBE mass transfer rates were largest for the GAC and smallest for the carbonaceous resin. Pilot tests were conducted to verify MTBE breakthrough curve predictions obtained with the homogeneous surface diffusion model and to evaluate the effect of NOM preloading on packed bed adsorber performance. Results showed that GAC was the most cost-competitive adsorbent when considering adsorbent usage rate only; however, the useful life of an adsorber containing silicalite zeolite was predicted to be approximately 5-6 times longer than that of an equally sized adsorber containing GAC. Pilot column results also showed that NOM preloading did not impair the MTBE removal efficiency of the silicalite zeolite. Thus, it may be possible to regenerate spent silicalite with less energy-intensive methods than those required to regenerate GAC.

  20. Evaporation of Sessile Droplets Laden with Particles and Insoluble Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Karapetsas, George; Chandra Sahu, Kirti; Matar, Omar K

    2016-07-12

    We consider the flow dynamics of a thin evaporating droplet in the presence of an insoluble surfactant and noninteracting particles in the bulk. On the basis of lubrication theory, we derive a set of evolution equations for the film height, the interfacial surfactant, and bulk particle concentrations, taking into account the dependence of liquid viscosity on the local particle concentration. An important ingredient of our model is that it takes into account the fact that the surfactant adsorbed at the interface hinders evaporation. We perform a parametric study to investigate how the presence of surfactants affects the evaporation process as well as the flow dynamics with and without the presence of particles in the bulk. Our numerical calculations show that the droplet lifetime is affected significantly by the balance between the ability of the surfactant to enhance spreading, suppressing the effect of thermal Marangoni stresses-induced motion, and to hinder the evaporation flux through the reduction of the effective interfacial area of evaporation, which tend to accelerate and decelerate the evaporation process, respectively. For particle-laden droplets and in the case of dilute solutions, the droplet lifetime is found to be weakly dependent on the initial particle concentration. We also show that the particle deposition patterns are influenced strongly by the direct effect of the surfactant on the evaporative flux; in certain cases, the "coffee-stain" effect is enhanced significantly. A discussion of the delicate interplay between the effects of capillary pressure and solutal and thermal Marangoni stresses, which drive the liquid flow inside of the evaporating droplet giving rise to the observed results, is provided herein.

  1. Binding of Alkyl Polyglucoside Surfactants to Bacteriorhodopsin and its Relation to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Santonicola, M. Gabriella; Lenhoff, Abraham M.; Kaler, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    The binding of alkyl polyglucoside surfactants to the integral membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the formation of protein-surfactant complexes are investigated by sedimentation equilibrium via analytical ultracentrifugation and by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Contrast variation techniques in SANS enable measurement of the composition of the protein-surfactant complexes and determination of the thickness of the surfactant shell bound to the protein. The results indicate that alkyl polyglucosides can bind to BR as single surfactant layers or as a thicker shell. The thickness of the surfactant shell increases with increasing surfactant tail length, and it is generally unrelated to the aggregation number of the micelles even for a small and predominantly hydrophobic membrane protein such as BR. The aggregation numbers determined by sedimentation equilibrium methods match those measured by SANS, which also allows reconstruction of the shape of the protein-detergent complex. When the surfactant is present as a single layer, the BR loses activity, as measured by absorption spectroscopy, more quickly than it does when the surfactant forms a thicker shell. PMID:18234822

  2. Binding of alkyl polyglucoside surfactants to bacteriorhodopsin and its relation to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Santonicola, M Gabriella; Lenhoff, Abraham M; Kaler, Eric W

    2008-05-01

    The binding of alkyl polyglucoside surfactants to the integral membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the formation of protein-surfactant complexes are investigated by sedimentation equilibrium via analytical ultracentrifugation and by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Contrast variation techniques in SANS enable measurement of the composition of the protein-surfactant complexes and determination of the thickness of the surfactant shell bound to the protein. The results indicate that alkyl polyglucosides can bind to BR as single surfactant layers or as a thicker shell. The thickness of the surfactant shell increases with increasing surfactant tail length, and it is generally unrelated to the aggregation number of the micelles even for a small and predominantly hydrophobic membrane protein such as BR. The aggregation numbers determined by sedimentation equilibrium methods match those measured by SANS, which also allows reconstruction of the shape of the protein-detergent complex. When the surfactant is present as a single layer, the BR loses activity, as measured by absorption spectroscopy, more quickly than it does when the surfactant forms a thicker shell.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Study of Surfactant Self-Assembly on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Frederick, Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNCTs) are materials with structural, electronic and optical properties that make them attractive for a myriad of advanced technology applications. Increased adaptation of these materials requires advancement in separation techniques which enables them to be sorted with increased reliability into monodisperse fractions with respect to length and chirality. Most separation techniques currently in use rely on dispersion of tubes in aqueous solution using surfactants. This results in a colloidal mixture in which tubes are packed and individually dispersed in a surfactant shell. Understanding the structure and properties of the SWCNT-surfactant complex at the molecular level, and how this is affected by chirality, will help to improve separations processes. In this work, we study the structure and properties of SWCNT-surfactant colloidal complexes using all-atom molecular dynamics. Self-assembled structures are computed for a number of combinations SWCNT/surfactant, and also, co-surfactant mixtures for the bile salt surfactant sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). From the radial distribution function we estimate the size of the SWCNT hydration layer, and use that information to compute the buoyant densities of unfilled tubes for a number of concentrations. Estimates of the change in hydrodynamic radius with increased surfactant packing and the binding energies of the individual surfactants are also obtained.

  4. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-04

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  5. Structure and dynamics of highly adsorbed semiflexible polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Cheng, Shiwang; Kumar, Rajeev; Goswami, Monojoy; Sokolov, Alexie; Sumpter, Bobby

    2015-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of melts of semi-flexible polymer chains in the presence of an adsorbing substrate. For polymer chains located far from the substrate the chain conformations follow the worm-like chain model, in contrast to the reflected Gaussian conformation near the substrate. This is demonstrated in the chain center-of-mass distribution normal to the substrate and the probability of a polymer chain ends to be the closest to the substrate. Both quantities agree with Silberberg's derivation for an ideal chain in the presence of a reflecting wall. We characterized the adsorbed chains and counted the number of loops and tails. For stiff chains, a tail and an adsorbed segment dominate the chain conformation of the adsorbed layer. Also, the mean-square end-to-end distance normal to the substrate is proportional to the normal component of the mean-square end-to-end distance of the tails. The tails do not follow the worm-like chain model and exhibit a stretched conformation. This picture for the adsorbed layer is akin to the ``polydisperse pseudobrush'' envisioned by Guiselin. We probe the dynamics of the segments by calculating the layer (z-)resolved intermediate coherent collective dynamics structure factor, S(q,t,z), for q values equivalent to the bond length. The segment dynamics is slower for stiffer chains. In the adsorbed layer, dynamics is slowed down and can be described by two relaxation times. Department of Energy, Office of Science DE-AC05-00OR227.

  6. Poly(ethylene oxide) Mushrooms Adsorbed at Silica-Ionic Liquid Interfaces Reduce Friction.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, James; Webber, Grant B; Atkin, Rob

    2016-03-01

    The adsorbed layer conformation and lubricity of 35, 100, and 300 kDa PEO adsorbed to ionic liquid (IL)-silica interfaces from 0.01 wt % solutions have been investigated using colloid probe atomic force microscopy. The ILs used were propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]), which are protic and aprotic ILs, respectively. Normal force curves reveal steric interactions consistent with adsorbed polymer layers which are best fit using the mushroom model. Friction measurements show that the adsorbed polymer layer markedly reduces friction compared to surfaces sliding in the pure ILs and that lubricity increases with polymer length. When polymer is adsorbed to the sliding surfaces, friction is controlled by the creation and disruption of intermolecular interactions between entangled chains and the dragging of polymer chains through the interpenetration region. These experiments show that added polymer can reduce friction while maintaining the useful properties of ILs as lubricants.

  7. Control of stain geometry by drop evaporation of surfactant containing dispersions.

    PubMed

    Erbil, H Yildirim

    2015-08-01

    Control of stain geometry by drop evaporation of surfactant containing dispersions is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many applications such as forming templates on solid surfaces, in ink-jet printing, spraying of pesticides, micro/nano material fabrication, thin film coatings, biochemical assays, deposition of DNA/RNA micro-arrays, and manufacture of novel optical and electronic materials. This paper presents a review of the published articles on the diffusive drop evaporation of pure liquids (water), the surfactant stains obtained from evaporating drops that do not contain dispersed particles and deposits obtained from drops containing polymer colloids and carbon based particles such as carbon nanotubes, graphite and fullerenes. Experimental results of specific systems and modeling attempts are discussed. This review also has some special subtopics such as suppression of coffee-rings by surfactant addition and "stick-slip" behavior of evaporating nanosuspension drops. In general, the drop evaporation process of a surfactant/particle/substrate system is very complex since dissolved surfactants adsorb on both the insoluble organic/inorganic micro/nanoparticles in the drop, on the air/solution interface and on the substrate surface in different extends. Meanwhile, surfactant adsorbed particles interact with the substrate giving a specific contact angle, and free surfactants create a solutal Marangoni flow in the drop which controls the location of the particle deposition together with the rate of evaporation. In some cases, the presence of a surfactant monolayer at the air/solution interface alters the rate of evaporation. At present, the magnitude of each effect cannot be predicted adequately in advance and consequently they should be carefully studied for any system in order to control the shape and size of the final deposit.

  8. Surfactant adsorption and interfacial tension investigations on cyclopentane hydrate.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Olcott, Kyle; Pfeiffer, Kristopher; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2013-02-26

    Gas hydrates represent an unconventional methane resource and a production/safety risk to traditional oil and gas flowlines. In both systems, hydrate may share interfaces with both aqueous and hydrocarbon fluids. To accurately model macroscopic properties, such as relative permeability in unconventional systems or dispersion viscosity in traditional systems, knowledge of hydrate interfacial properties is required. This work presents hydrate cohesive force results measured on a micromechanical force apparatus, and complementary water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension data. By combining a revised cohesive force model with experimental data, two interfacial properties of cyclopentane hydrate were estimated: hydrate-water and hydrate-cyclopentane interfacial tension values at 0.32 ± 0.05 mN/m and 47 ± 5 mN/m, respectively. These fundamental physiochemical properties have not been estimated or measured for cyclopentane hydrate to date. The addition of surfactants in the cyclopentane phase significantly reduced the cyclopentane hydrate cohesive force; we hypothesize this behavior to be the result of surfactant adsorption on the hydrate-oil interface. Surface excess quantities were estimated for hydrate-oil and water-oil interfaces using four carboxylic and sulfonic acids. The results suggest the density of adsorbed surfactant may be 2× larger for the hydrate-oil interface than the water-oil interface. Additionally, hydrate-oil interfacial tension was observed to begin decreasing from the baseline value at significantly lower surfactant concentrations (1-3 orders of magnitude) than those for the water-oil interfacial tension.

  9. Dynamic surface tension of surfactant TA: experiments and theory.

    PubMed

    Otis, D R; Ingenito, E P; Kamm, R D; Johnson, M

    1994-12-01

    A bubble surfactometer was used to measure the surface tension of an aqueous suspension of surfactant TA as a function of bubble area over a range of cycling rates and surfactant bulk concentrations. Results of the surface tension-interfacial area loops exhibited a rich variety of phenomena, the character of which varied systematically with frequency and bulk concentration. A model was developed to interpret and explain these data and for use in describing the dynamics of surface layers under more general circumstances. Surfactant was modeled as a single component with surface tension taken to depend on only the interfacial surfactant concentration. Two distinct mechanisms were considered for the exchange of surfactant between the bulk phase and interface. The first is described by a simple kinetic relationship for adsorption and desorption that pertains only when the interfacial concentration is below its maximum equilibrium value. The second mechanism is "squeeze-out" by which surfactant molecules are expelled from an interface compressed past a maximum packing state. The model provided good agreement with experimental measurements for cycling rates from 1 to 100 cycles/min and for bulk concentrations between 0.0073 and 7.3 mg/ml.

  10. Highly stable surfactant assisted polyaniline nanostructures with enhanced electroactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdegni, Monika; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2016-05-01

    Different nanostructures of Polyaniline(PANI) i.e. nanospheres, nanorods, nanofibers and layered structures have been successfully synthesized using varied concentration of anionic sodium dodecyl sulphate(SDS) and cationic Hexamethyltriammonium bromide (HTAB) by electrochemical method. Surfactant assisted morphology has been studied using FESEM. Incorporation of surfactants to the polymer matrix has been confirmed using FTIR spectroscopy. Electro activity and stability towards reversible redox activity was studied using cyclic voltammatry and chronoamperometry.The anionic surfactant severely enhances electroactivity and areal capacitance (3 Fcm-2) which was found to be two order higher than PANI film prepared without surfactant (0.039 Fcm-2), attributable to its additional doping effect. Immobilization of large surfactant molecule to polymer matrix inhibits its degradation due to nuleophilic attack ascribed to hydrophobic effect of surfactant. For PANI-SDS redox behavior remained almost same after 1000 reverse redox cycles while for PANI-HTAB we got only marginal changes.Our PANI-SDS samples are promising candidates for electro chromic applications.

  11. Nisin adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces coated with the PEO–PPO–PEO triblock surfactant Pluronic® F108

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Yuan-Ching; Joshi, Pranav; McGuire, Joseph; Neff, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and elution of the antimicrobial peptide nisin at hydrophobic, silanized silica surfaces coated with the poly(ethylene oxide)–poly(propylene oxide)–poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant Pluronic® F108 were measured in situ, with ellipsometry. While such layers are known to inhibit protein adsorption, nisin was observed to adsorb in multilayer quantities, to an extent similar to its adsorption at uncoated, hydrophobic surfaces. The rates of nisin adsorption and elution were generally slower at F108-coated surfaces. And, the sequential adsorption of nisin, including two adsorption–elution cycles at each surface, showed greater differences in adsorption rates between the first and second adsorption cycles, when evaluated at identical mass density, for uncoated relative to F108-coated surfaces. These results indicate that nisin adsorption occurs via “entrapment” within the PEO brush layer at F108-coated surfaces, in this way slowing adsorption and spontaneous elution, and inhibiting post-adsorptive molecular rearrangements by reducing the lateral mobility of nisin. While F108-coated layers rejected adsorption of serum albumin, sequential adsorption experiments carried out with nisin and albumin showed a low level of albumin adsorption when nisin was present at the interface. PMID:18359037

  12. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  13. Nanoparticle decoration with surfactants: Molecular interactions, assembly, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Pramanik, Chandrani; Heinz, Ozge; Ding, Yifu; Mishra, Ratan K.; Marchon, Delphine; Flatt, Robert J.; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Llop, Jordi; Moya, Sergio; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2017-02-01

    Nanostructures of diverse chemical nature are used as biomarkers, therapeutics, catalysts, and structural reinforcements. The decoration with surfactants has a long history and is essential to introduce specific functions. The definition of surfactants in this review is very broad, following its lexical meaning ;surface active agents;, and therefore includes traditional alkyl modifiers, biological ligands, polymers, and other surface active molecules. The review systematically covers covalent and non-covalent interactions of such surfactants with various types of nanomaterials, including metals, oxides, layered materials, and polymers as well as their applications. The major themes are (i) molecular recognition and noncovalent assembly mechanisms of surfactants on the nanoparticle and nanocrystal surfaces, (ii) covalent grafting techniques and multi-step surface modification, (iii) dispersion properties and surface reactions, (iv) the use of surfactants to influence crystal growth, as well as (v) the incorporation of biorecognition and other material-targeting functionality. For the diverse materials classes, similarities and differences in surfactant assembly, function, as well as materials performance in specific applications are described in a comparative way. Major factors that lead to differentiation are the surface energy, surface chemistry and pH sensitivity, as well as the degree of surface regularity and defects in the nanoparticle cores and in the surfactant shell. The review covers a broad range of surface modifications and applications in biological recognition and therapeutics, sensors, nanomaterials for catalysis, energy conversion and storage, the dispersion properties of nanoparticles in structural composites and cement, as well as purification systems and classical detergents. Design principles for surfactants to optimize the performance of specific nanostructures are discussed. The review concludes with challenges and opportunities.

  14. R&D for graft adsorbents by radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao

    Fibrous adsorbent for removal and recovery of metal ions have been synthesized by graft polymerization. In the grafting, the functional groups which have high selectivity against for target metal ions such as Fe, Sc, As, and U are introduced onto nonwoven fabric. When the monomer has a chelate group which makes selective coordination bond to specific these ions, it was directly grafted on the trunk polymer. In the case of precursor monomer having functional groups such as epoxy ring, the grafted trunk fabric is chemically modified. The resultant fibrous adsorbent leads the swift adsorption of metal ions. This property by using fibrous material can reduce the column size of adsorbent in the purification of waste water. The size of purification equipment becomes quite compact and that implies total volume of equipment can reduce. Instead of organic solvent, emulsion system which disperses monomer micelles in water with assistance of surfactant was found to accelerate the graft polymerization. This means the air pollution from organic solvent can be avoided by water system grafting. Furthermore, since the emulsion grafting was highly efficient, the required irradiation dose was considerably lower compared to general organic solvent system. As a result, the emulsion grafting has enormous potential for natural polymer to use as a trunk material for grafting. If a natural polymer such as cellulose can be used, the dependence on petroleum resources, the amount of industrial waste and the generation of carbon dioxide will be reduced to some extent.

  15. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dods, Stewart R; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2015-01-09

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000CV/h (2s and 0.3s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12mgBSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21mglysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20mgBSA/mL and 27mglysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000CV/h. For compression loads of 5MPa and 10MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an uncompressed adsorbent, compressions of 1, 5

  16. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Stewart R.; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10 MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000 CV/h (2 s and 0.3 s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12 mg BSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21 mg lysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1 MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20 mg BSA/mL and 27 mg lysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1 MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000 CV/h. For compression loads of 5 MPa and 10 MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1 MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an

  17. Recovery of cadmium from waste of scallop processing with amidoxime adsorbent synthesized by graft-polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Tomoyuki; Tamada, Masao; Saito, Kyouichi; Sugo, Takanobu

    2003-01-01

    Fabric adsorbent having amidoxime function was synthesized by radiation-induced graft-polymerization. This adsorbent was applied to the removal of Cd from the scallop waste. The scallop waste was homogenized as a pre-treatment. The obtained top layer was used for the Cd absorption experiment at various pH conditions. At pH 6, the adsorbent showed the highest performance in Cd adsorption. The concentration factor was thousand for Cd. Preliminary column experiment was also carried out. The amidoxime adsorbent recovered 96.1% of Cd in the waste solution.

  18. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  19. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  20. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  1. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  2. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  3. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  4. Mass transport of adsorbates near a discontinuous structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, E.; Ying, S. C.; Elder, K. R.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study the mass transport dynamics of an adsorbed layer near a discontinuous incommensurate striped-honeycomb phase transition via numerical simulations of a coarse-grained model focusing on the motion of domain walls rather than individual atoms. Following an initial step profile created in the incommensurate striped phase, an intermediate hexagonal incommensurate phase nucleates and grows, leading to a bifurcation into two sharp profiles propagating in opposite directions as opposed to broad profiles induced by atomic diffusive motion. Our results are in agreement with recent numerical simulations of a microscopic model as well as experimental observations for the Pb/Si(111) adsorbate system.

  5. On-line surfactant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, K.I.; Neal, E.E.; Soran, P.D.; Smith, B.

    1995-04-01

    This group has developed a process to extract metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The process uses water soluble polymers to complex metal ions. The metal/polymer complex is concentrated by ultrafiltration and the metals are recovered by a pH adjustment that frees the metal ions. The metal ions pass through the ultrafiltration membrane and are recovered in a concentrated form suitable for reuse. Surfactants are present in one of the target waste streams. Surfactants foul the costly ultrafiltration membranes. It was necessary to remove the surfactants before processing the waste stream. This paper discusses an on-line device the authors fabricated to monitor the process stream to assure that all the surfactant had been removed. The device is inexpensive and sensitive to very low levels of surfactants.

  6. Spreading, evaporation, and contact line dynamics of surfactant-laden microdrops.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Shripad J; Plawsky, Joel L; Wayner, Peter C

    2005-08-30

    An optical technique based on the reflectivity measurements of a thin film was used to experimentally study the spreading, evaporation, contact line motion, and thin film characteristics of drops consisting of a water-surfactant (polyalkyleneoxide-modified heptamethyltrisiloxane, called superspreader) solution on a fused silica surface. On the basis of the experimental observations, we concluded that the surfactant adsorbs primarily at the solid-liquid and liquid-vapor interfaces near the contact line region. At equilibrium, the completely wetting corner meniscus was associated with a flat adsorbed film having a thickness of approximately 31 nm. The calculated Hamaker constant, A = -4.47 x 10(-)(20) J, shows that this thin film was stable under equilibrium conditions. During a subsequent evaporation/condensation phase-change process, the thin film of the surfactant solution was unstable, and it broke into microdrops having a finite contact angle. The thickness of the adsorbed film associated with the drops was lower than that of the equilibrium meniscus. The drop profiles were experimentally measured and analyzed during the phase-change process as the contact line advanced and receded. The apparent contact angle, the maximum concave curvature near the contact line region, and the convex curvature of the drop increased as the drop grew during condensation, whereas these quantities decreased during evaporation. The position of the maximum concave curvature of the drop moved toward the center of the drop during condensation, whereas it moved away from the center during evaporation. The contact line velocity was correlated to the observed experimental results and was compared with the results of the drops of a pure alcohol. The experimentally obtained thickness profiles, contact angle profiles, and curvature profiles of the drops explain how the surfactant adsorption affects the contact line motion. We found that there was an abrupt change in the velocity of the

  7. Production And Artile Of Iron/Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Pellets To Retain And Destroy Water Pollutants

    DOEpatents

    BOWMAN, ROBERT S.; [et al

    2001-07-17

    A method of producing a pollutant adsorption and degradation article, and such article, are provided. At least one adsorbent is mixed with at least one pollutant transforming agent to form a mixture. This mixture is compacted to form a porous, highly permeable article. If necessary, the article can be modified with surfactant either after the compacting step or by adding the surfactant to the mixture prior to the compacting step. In addition, if necessary, a binding agent can be added to the mixture prior to the compacting step.

  8. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldareili, Charles; Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity technologies often require aqueous phases to spread over nonwetting hydrophobic solid surfaces. Surfactants facilitate the wetting of water on hydrophobic surfaces by adsorbing on the water/air and hydrophobic solid/water interfaces and lowering the surface tensions of these interfaces. The tension reductions decrease the contact angle, which increases the equilibrium wetted area. Hydrocarbon surfactants; (i.e., amphiphiles with a hydrophobic moiety consisting of an extended chain of (aliphatic) methylene -CH2- groups attached to a large polar group to give aqueous solubility) are capable of reducing the contact angles on surfaces which are not very hydrophobic, but do not reduce significantly the contact angles of the very hydrophobic surfaces such as parafilm, polyethylene or self assembled monolayers. Trisiloxane surfactants (amphiphiles with a hydrophobe consisting of methyl groups linked to a trisiloxane backbone in the form of a disk ((CH3)3-Si-O-Si-O-Si(CH3)3) and an extended ethoxylate (-(OCH2CH2)a-) polar group in the form of a chain with four or eight units) can significantly reduce the contact angle of water on a very hydrophobic surface and cause rapid and complete (or nearly complete) spreading (termed superspreading). The overall goal of the research described in this proposal is to establish and verify a theory for how trisiloxanes cause superspreading, and then use this knowledge as a guide to developing more general hydrocarbon based surfactant systems which superspread. We propose that the trisiloxane surfactants superspread because their structure allows them to strongly lower the high hydrophobic solid/aqueous tension when they adsorb to the solid surface. When the siloxane adsorbs, the hydrophobic disk parts of the molecule adsorb onto the surface removing the surface water. Since the cross-sectional area of the disk is larger than that of the extended ethoxylate chain, the disks can form a space-filling mat on the surface which

  9. Tuning cellulose nanocrystal gelation with polysaccharides and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Cranston, Emily D; Ng, Robin; Pelton, Robert

    2014-03-18

    Gelation of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) dispersions was measured as a function of the presence of four nonionic polysaccharides. Addition of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC), hydroxypropyl guar (HPG), or locust bean gum (LBG) to CNC dispersions induced the gelation of dilute CNC dispersions, whereas dextran (DEX) did not. These behaviors correlated with adsorption tendencies; HEC, HPG, and LBG adsorbed onto CNC-coated quartz crystal microbalance sensors, whereas DEX did not adsorb. We propose that the adsorbing polysaccharides greatly increased the effective volume fraction of dilute CNC dispersions, driving more of the nanocrystals into anisotropic domains. SDS and Triton X-100 addition disrupted HEC-CNC gels whereas CTAB did not. Surface plasmon resonance measurements with CNC-coated sensors showed that SDS and Triton X-100 partially removed adsorbed HEC, whereas CTAB did not. These behaviors illustrate the complexities associated with including CNC dispersions in formulated products: low CNC contents can induce spectacular changes in rheology; however, surfactants and soluble polymers may promote gel formation or induce CNC coagulation.

  10. Uremic toxins and oral adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shunsuke; Yoshiya, Kunihiko; Kita, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Hideki; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2011-04-01

    Uremic toxins are associated with various disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease and it is difficult to remove some of these toxins by dialysis. Since some uremic toxins are generated by bacterial metabolites in the colon, oral adsorbents that interfere with the absorption of uremic toxins or their precursors are believed to prevent their accumulation in the body. AST-120 adsorbs various uremic retention solutes in the gastrointestinal system and has potential for providing clinical benefit. Sevelamer hydrochloride binds some harmful compounds in addition to phosphate and seems to have pleiotropic effects that include lowering serum LDL cholesterol levels and reduction of inflammation. The effect of sevelamer hydrochloride on indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol has been shown in an in vitro study; however, in vivo studies in mice or humans did not demonstrate this effect on protein-binding uremic toxins. Oral adsorbents are thus one of the important modalities in the treatment of uremic syndrome.

  11. Molecule-specific interactions of diatomic adsorbates at metal-liquid interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Kaech, Andres; Hamm, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast vibrational dynamics of small molecules on platinum (Pt) layers in water are investigated using 2D attenuated total reflectance IR spectroscopy. Isotope combinations of carbon monoxide and cyanide are used to elucidate inter-adsorbate and substrate-adsorbate interactions. Despite observed cross-peaks in the CO spectra, we conclude that the molecules are not vibrationally coupled. Rather, strong substrate-adsorbate interactions evoke rapid (∼2 ps) vibrational relaxation from the adsorbate into the Pt layer, leading to thermal cross-peaks. In the case of CN, vibrational relaxation is significantly slower (∼10 ps) and dominated by adsorbate-solvent interactions, while the coupling to the substrate is negligible.

  12. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  13. Measurement of cytotoxicity and irritancy potential of sugar-based surfactants on skin-related 3D models.

    PubMed

    Lu, Biao; Miao, Yong; Vigneron, Pascale; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Pezron, Isabelle; Egles, Christophe; Vayssade, Muriel

    2017-04-01

    Sugar-based surfactants present surface-active properties and relatively low cytotoxicity. They are often considered as safe alternatives to currently used surfactants in cosmetic industries. In this study, four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or a maltose headgroup through an amide linkage, were synthesized and compared to two standard surfactants. The cytotoxic and irritant effects of surfactants were evaluated using two biologically relevant models: 3D dermal model (mouse fibroblasts embedded in collagen gel) and reconstituted human epidermis (RHE, multi-layered human keratinocytes). Results show that three synthesized surfactants possess lower cytotoxicity compared to standard surfactants as demonstrated in the 3D dermal model. Moreover, the IC50s of surfactants against the 3D dermal model are higher than IC50s obtained with the 2D dermal model (monolayer mouse fibroblasts). Both synthesized and standard surfactants show no irritant effects after 48h of topical application on RHE. Throughout the study, we demonstrate the difficulty to link the physico-chemical properties of surfactants and their cytotoxicity in complex models. More importantly, our data suggest that, prior to in vivo tests, a complete understanding of surfactant cytotoxicity or irritancy potential requires a combination of cellular and tissue models.

  14. A double injection ADSA-CSD methodology for lung surfactant inhibition and reversal studies.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Dang, Andrew; Acosta, Edgar J; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a continuation of the development of a drop shape method for film studies, ADSA-CSD (Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis-Constrained Sessile Drop). ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The development presented here allows complete exchange of the subphase of a spread or adsorbed film. This feature allows certain studies relevant to lung surfactant research that cannot be readily performed by other means. The key feature of the design is a second capillary into the bulk of the drop to facilitate addition or removal of a secondary liquid. The development will be illustrated through studies concerning lung surfactant inhibition. After forming a sessile drop of a basic lung surfactant preparation, the bulk phase can be removed and exchanged for one containing different inhibitors. Such studies mimic the leakage of plasma and blood proteins into the alveolar spaces altering the surface activity of lung surfactant in a phenomenon called surfactant inhibition. The resistance of the lung surfactant to specific inhibitors can be readily evaluated using the method. The new method is also useful for surfactant reversal studies, i.e. the ability to restore the normal surface activity of an inhibited lung surfactant film by using special additives. Results show a distinctive difference between the inhibition when an inhibitor is mixed with and when it is injected under a preformed surfactant film. None of the inhibitors studied (serum, albumin, fibrinogen, and cholesterol) were able to penetrate a preexisting film formed by the basic preparation (BLES and protasan), while all of them can alter the surface activity of such preparation when mixed with the preparation. Preliminary results show that reversal of serum inhibition can be easily achieved and evaluated using the modified methodology.

  15. Interaction of cationic hydrophobic surfactants at negatively charged surfaces investigated by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Cathy E; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Higashitani, Ko; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kappl, Michael

    2009-10-06

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the adsorption of the surfactant octadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C18TAC) at a low concentration (0.03 mM) to negatively charged surfaces in water. Atomic force microscopy tips were functionalized with dimethyloctadecyl(3-tripropyl)ammonium chloride (C18TAC-si) or N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammomium chloride (hydrophilpos-si) to facilitate imaging of the adsorbed surfactant without artifacts. Tapping mode images and force measurements revealed C18TAC patches, identified as partial surfactant bilayers or hemimicelles. The forces controlling the adsorption process of the C18TAC to a negatively charged surface were investigated by measuring the forces between a C18TAC-si or a hydrophilpos-si tip and a silica surface in the presence of varying concentrations of either NaCl or NaNO3. Screening of forces with an increasing NaCl concentration was observed for the C18TAC-si and hydrophilpos-si tips, proving an electrostatic contribution. Screening was also observed for the hydrophilpos-si tip in NaNO3, whereas a long-range attraction was observed for the C18TAC-si tip for all NaNO3 concentrations. These results indicate that screening of the forces for the C18TAC-si tip depended on the type and/or size of the anion, possibly due to a different probability of the anions to enter the silane layers. The interaction of C18TAC patches with C18TAC-si tips in the presence of NaCl and the interaction of the patches with hydrophilpos-si tips in either NaCl or NaNO3 were repulsive and independent of the number of force curves measured, indicating a stable, positively charged C18TAC patch. However, the forces measured between the patches and a C18TAC-si tip in NaNO3 depended on the number of force curves measured, indicating a change in patch structure induced by the first interaction.

  16. Surfactant Saturation of Drops in Microgravity by Terrestrial Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviani, Antonio

    It is well known that diffusion plays an appreciable role in mass transfer only in the case of weak gravitational convection. However, even under such conditions the use of a surfactant as a dif-fusing substance essentially complicates the mass transfer processes. The appearance of gas or liquid inclusions in the surfactant solution causes the development of solutocapillary motion on their surface, which may become a generator of the large-scale flows in the surrounding liquid, especially in microgravity conditions. The paper presents the results of terrestrial simulation of such flows during saturation of the drop of weakly soluble fluid by a surfactant from its water solution forming a thin ( 1 ) horizontal layer. In our experiments, we used chlorobenzene and water as the basic fluids of the drop and the surrounding medium, respectively, and isopropyl alcohol -as a surfactant. The initial concentration 0 of the alcohol in the solution ranged from 5 to 50%. This lent specific feature to the saturation process, manifesting itself in the fact that at concentration higher than 25% a mutual dissolution of water and chlorobenzene began to increase. Visualization of flow structures and concentration fields showed that in laboratory conditions even at maximum suppression of the gravitational convection the saturation of the surfactant is a rather complicated process specified by the initial surfactant concentration in the solution and by the degree of the solution homogeneity. In the case of initially homoge-neous solution, a complicated character of mass transfer between the drop and the surrounding medium is evidently due to the small values of surfactant diffusion coefficients in basic flu-ids. Penetration of the surfactant into the drop leads to the formation of local inhomigeneities of the solution density at both sides of the interface and to the development of a slow three-dimensional flow of gravitational nature. An increase in the concentration gives rise to a

  17. NMR study of n-dodecane adsorbed on graphite.

    PubMed

    Alba, M D; Castro, M A; Clarke, S M; Perdigón, A C

    2003-05-01

    In this brief contribution we demonstrate that 1H and 2H NMR spectroscopy can be an effective method of investigating adsorption from liquids at the solid-liquid interface. The method is illustrated here with the adsorption of a simple alkane adsorbed on graphite, in particular the system n-dodecane and graphite at coverages of 1 and 5 monolayers. Static single-pulse proton nuclear magnetic resonance and static quadrupolar echo deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were recorded for both coverages. The experimental NMR results presented here show features clearly consistent with earlier calorimetric and neutron scattering work and demonstrate the formation of solid adsorbed layers that coexist with the bulk adsorbate with both isotopes. This ability to probe both deuterated and protonated materials simultaneously illustrates that this experimental approach can be readily extended to investigate the adsorption behaviour of multicomponent mixtures.

  18. Highly dealuminated Y zeolite as efficient adsorbent for the hydrophobic fraction from wastewater treatment plants effluents.

    PubMed

    Navalon, Sergio; Alvaro, Mercedes; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2009-07-15

    In this work we report that highly dealuminated zeolite Y is a hydrophobic material that is able to remove selectively fatty acids and hydrocarbon compounds from the effluent of an urban wastewater treatment plant (UWTP). This adsorbent capability of zeolite Y could lead to an improved quality of UWTP effluents. Typical domestic wastewaters contain detergents, soaps and surfactants that are only partially removed in conventional UWTP. In the present work using an effluent from a UWTP located at Ribarroja del Turia (Valencia, Spain) containing 10 ppm of total organic carbon, we have been able to retain by adsorption on the dealuminated Y zeolite up to 16 and 60% of the organic matter of the effluent at pH values 7.2 and 4, respectively. Characterization of the adsorbed organic matter by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), (1)H NMR and GC-MS after derivatization has shown that the zeolite adsorbs selectively the hydrophobic compounds of the effluent.

  19. Surfactant damping of water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary S.; Dowling, David R.; Schultz, William W.

    1997-11-01

    The most well known and perhaps most important distinguishing characteristic of a water surface laden with surfactant is the profound increase in small-wave damping with the addition of even small amounts of surfactant material. It would seem to follow that damping increases with increasing surfactant concentration. This is undoubtedly true for some surfactants, however our experiments with a soluble surfactant show that it is possible to increase surfactant concentration and measure a decrease in damping. While the increased concentration is accompanied by a dramatic decrease in measured static surface tension, some of the capillary-wave frequency regime is less damped. Experimental measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the wave speed are compared with existing theory where at least one other physical quantity besides surface tension is needed to properly model the interface. Our on-going work with insoluble surfactants may also provide an example of this type of behavior for materials that do not readily transfer to and from the bulk water. [Supported by the Office of Naval Research

  20. Light-controllable dispersion and recovery of graphenes and carbon nanotubes using a photo-switchable surfactant.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Thomas M; Liu, Amelia C Y; Tabor, Rico F

    2016-04-07

    The aqueous dispersibility of carbon-based nanomaterials, namely graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), can be controlled by light via the photoisomerisation of a photoswitchable surfactant molecule adsorbed to the surface of these materials. By incorporating a cationic azobenzene photosurfactant into these systems, GO, rGO and CNT dispersions can be separated and redispersed on command utilising UV radiation at 365 nm, whereby the surfactant molecules change from the trans to the cis isomer. This increases their aqueous solubility and in turn, alters their adsorption affinity for the GO and rGO sheets such that the ratio of free to adsorbed surfactant molecules changes significantly, allowing for reversible phase separation of the colloids. These effects present a unique method for controlling the dispersion behaviour of two-dimensional nanomaterials using light as a clean and low energy external stimulus.

  1. Sorption of phenol and 4-chlorophenol onto pumice treated with cationic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Akbal, Feryal

    2005-02-01

    In this study the sorption of phenol and 4-chlorophenol on pumice modified with the cationic surfactants hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA) and benzyldimethyl tetradecylammonium chloride (BDTDA) was investigated. Experimental studies indicate that HDTMA-pumice and BDTDA-pumice have the capability to remove phenol and 4-chlorophenol from aqueous solution. The influence of initial concentration and adsorbent dosage was studied. The adsorption of phenol and 4-chlorophenol increased with increasing initial concentration and decreased with increasing amount of adsorbent used. The Freundlich adsorption isotherm was found to describe well the equilibrium adsorption data. The parameters of the Freundlich model have been determined using the adsorption data.

  2. Structural Studies of Protein-Surfactant Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chodankar, S. N.; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-03-17

    The structure of protein-surfactant complexes of two proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that these two proteins form different complex structures with the surfactant. While BSA protein undergoes unfolding on addition of surfactant, lysozyme does not show any unfolding even up to very high surfactant concentrations. The unfolding of BSA protein is caused by micelle-like aggregation of surfactant molecules in the complex. On the other hand, for lysozyme protein there is only binding of individual surfactant molecules to protein. Lysozyme in presence of higher surfactant concentrations has protein-surfactant complex structure coexisting with pure surfactant micelles.

  3. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  4. Poly(methyl methacrylate) Surface Modification for Surfactant-Free Real-Time Toxicity Assay on Droplet Microfluidic Platform.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Raphael; Chen, Jian Lin; Stuckey, David C; Steele, Terry W J

    2017-04-07

    Microfluidic droplet reactors have many potential uses, from analytical to synthesis. Stable operation requires preferential wetting of the channel surface by the continuous phase which is often not fulfilled by materials commonly used for lab-on-chip devices. Here we show that a silica nanoparticle (SiNP) layer coated onto a Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and other thermoplastics surface enhances its wetting properties by creating nanoroughness, and allows simple grafting of hydrocarbon chains through silane chemistry. Using the unusual stability of silica sols at their isoelectric point, a dense SiNP layer is adsorbed onto PMMA and renders the surface superhydrophilic. Subsequently, a self-assembled dodecyltrichlorosilane (DTS) monolayer yields a superhydrophobic surface that allows the repeatable generation of aqueous droplets in a hexadecane continuous phase without surfactant addition. A SiNP-DTS modified chip has been used to monitor bacterial viability with a resazurin assay. The whole process involving sequential reagents injection, and multiplexed droplet fluorescence intensity monitoring is carried out on chip. Metabolic inhibition of the anaerobe Enterococcus faecalis by 30 mg L(-1) of NiCl2 was detected in 5 min.

  5. Light-controllable dispersion and recovery of graphenes and carbon nanotubes using a photo-switchable surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Thomas M.; Liu, Amelia C. Y.; Tabor, Rico F.

    2016-03-01

    The aqueous dispersibility of carbon-based nanomaterials, namely graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), can be controlled by light via the photoisomerisation of a photoswitchable surfactant molecule adsorbed to the surface of these materials. By incorporating a cationic azobenzene photosurfactant into these systems, GO, rGO and CNT dispersions can be separated and redispersed on command utilising UV radiation at 365 nm, whereby the surfactant molecules change from the trans to the cis isomer. This increases their aqueous solubility and in turn, alters their adsorption affinity for the GO and rGO sheets such that the ratio of free to adsorbed surfactant molecules changes significantly, allowing for reversible phase separation of the colloids. These effects present a unique method for controlling the dispersion behaviour of two-dimensional nanomaterials using light as a clean and low energy external stimulus.The aqueous dispersibility of carbon-based nanomaterials, namely graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), can be controlled by light via the photoisomerisation of a photoswitchable surfactant molecule adsorbed to the surface of these materials. By incorporating a cationic azobenzene photosurfactant into these systems, GO, rGO and CNT dispersions can be separated and redispersed on command utilising UV radiation at 365 nm, whereby the surfactant molecules change from the trans to the cis isomer. This increases their aqueous solubility and in turn, alters their adsorption affinity for the GO and rGO sheets such that the ratio of free to adsorbed surfactant molecules changes significantly, allowing for reversible phase separation of the colloids. These effects present a unique method for controlling the dispersion behaviour of two-dimensional nanomaterials using light as a clean and low energy external stimulus. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Includes further details

  6. Determination of 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol from environmental waters by magnetic solid phase extraction with Fe@MgAl-layered double hydroxides nanoparticles as the adsorbents prior to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Lei, Man; Li, Jing; Zhao, Kuifu; Liu, Yongli

    2016-04-08

    Magnetic Fe@MgAl-layered double hydroxides (MgAl-LDHs) composite was firstly synthesized by coating MgAl-layered double hydroxides on the surface of the dispersed nanoscale zero valent irons with co-precipitation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The synthesized Fe@MgAl-LDHs nanoparticles were investigated for magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) of 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol from the water samples. The elutent containing 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with variable wavelength detection (HPLC-UV). Under optimal conditions, there is good linear relationship between the concentration and the peak area in the range of 0.5-200 μgL(-1) with the correlation coefficients (r(2)) above 0.998 for 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol. The limits of detection were 0.22 μgL(-1) and 0.19 μgL(-1) for 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol, respectively, and precisions were both below 2.5% (n=6). The real water analysis demonstrated that the spiked recoveries were in the range of 79.2-80.9% (n=3). All these results indicated that the developed MSPE-HPLC-UV method was proved to be an efficient tool for the analysis of naphthols.

  7. Adsorption of atrazine by natural organic matter and surfactant dispersed carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Baoyou; Zhuang, Xiaoyan; Yan, Xiaomin; Lu, Jiajuan; Tang, Hongxiao

    2010-01-01

    The aggregation and dispersion behaviors of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can regulate the environmental spread and fate of CNTs, as well as the organic pollutants adsorbed onto them. In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were surface modified with humic acids from different sources and with surfactants of different ionic types. The dispersion stability of surface modified CNTs was observed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The effect of humic acid and surfactant dispersion on the adsorption of atrazine by CNTs was investigated by batch equilibrium experiments. Both humic acid and surfactant could effectively disperse MWNTs, but not SWNTs, into stable suspensions under the studied conditions. Surface modified CNTs had a greatly reduced capacity for adsorption of atrazine. The inhibitory effect of peat humic acid was relatively stronger than that of soil humic acid, but the two surfactants had a similar inhibitory effect on atrazine adsorption by the two CNT types. Increases in surfactant concentration resulted in rapid decreases in the adsorption of atrazine by CNTs when the surfactant concentration was less than 0.5 critical micelle concentration.

  8. Surfactant-enhanced solubility and mobility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X.; Puri, R.K.

    1997-12-31

    The role of some selected nonionic, anionic and cationic surfactants was investigated in solubilizing and mobilizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil. The data from the batch experiment showed that Brij 30 (a nonionic surfactant) started transporting the PAHs from soil to water at concentrations well below its apparent critical micelle concentration (ACMC). At its high concentrations, however, Brij 30 transported more PAHs to the aqueous phase. Thus, it showed a great potential in remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The tested anionic and cationic surfactants did not show the solubilization effect until the concentrations reached their ACMCs. The experiment showed that the decomposition of the surfactants was more significant than tat of the PAHs with the passage of time. A considerable portion of the solubilized PAHs was either re-adsorbed by the soil particles or was hanging in the mobile phase after 170 days, depending on the nature and concentration of the individual surfactants. The data showed that the solubilized portion of the PAHs became more persistent in the soil-water system, and its transport is proportional to the concentration and nature of the surfactants studied.

  9. Minimally invasive approaches for surfactant administration.

    PubMed

    Trevisanuto, D; Marchetto, L

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most common respiratory morbidity in preterm infants. In addition to respiratory support, the current clinical treatment includes endotracheal intubation and rapid instillation of exogenous surfactant. However, this approach needs skilled operators and has been associated with complications such as hemodynamic instability and electroencephalogram abnormalities. New, less invasive methods for surfactant administration are needed. In this article, we reviewed the available noninvasive procedures for surfactant administration. In particular, we focused on aerosolized surfactant and surfactant administration through LMA.

  10. Interactions Between Chlorinated Waste Solvents and Clay Minerals in Low Permeability Subsurface Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayral, D.; Otero-Diaz, M.; Demond, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Waste organic contaminants stored in low permeability subsurface layers serve as long-term sources for dissolved phase contaminant plumes. These layers may have a different mineralogical make up than the surrounding geologic media; specifically, they may be characterized by a high clay content. Although these layers are often considered inert, interactions may occur between the clay minerals and the waste liquids that may influence transport. Measurements of the basal spacing of Na-montmorillonite in contact with pure chlorinated organic liquids such as trichloroethylene (TCE) showed that it is similar to that with water; however, its basal spacing in contact with waste chlorinated liquids was reduced, leading to cracking. In fact, the basal spacing in contact with the waste chlorinated liquids was closer to that in contact with air than in contact with water. The observation that contact with pure organic liquids did not cause cracking, but contact with chlorinated wastes obtained from the field did, suggests that other components of the waste are critical to the basal spacing reduction process. Screening experiments indicated that the presence of a binary mixture of surfactants, a nonionic and an anionic surfactant, in the chlorinated solvent were necessary to cause the cracking at the same rate and magnitude as the chlorinated wastes obtained from the field. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy measurements suggest that the mixture alters the adsorbed water OH-bending band, implying a displacement of adsorbed water. Coupling these results with sorption and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, a hypothesis of component conformation in the clay interlayer space that leads to cracking can be constructed.

  11. Nucleation Behaviour in the Initial Stage of Surfactant-Mediated Epitaxial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai-Mu; Sun, Xia; Ding, Ze-Jun; Wu, Zi-Qin

    2004-10-01

    The nucleation kinetics in the early stage of epitaxial growth mediated by a monolayer of surfactant is studied by using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Our simulation model includes three main kinetic parameters: a small barrier for adatom diffusion on the surfactant terrace, a higher barrier for the exchange of adatoms with their underneath surfactant atoms, and a highest barrier for the recovery exchange in which an exchanged adatom resurfaces to the top of the surfactant layer. The simulations reveal a distinct transition of nucleation behaviour as the different atomic processes are activated successively with increasing temperature. The total nucleus density as a function of temperature exhibits a complex N-shape with a minimum and a maximum, which define the transition temperatures. The characteristic behaviour of nucleation density is helpful to rationalize the experimental observations on the temperature dependence of growth mode in some surfactant-mediated epitaxial systems.

  12. Interactions between polymers and surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    de Gennes, P.G. )

    1990-11-01

    A surfactant film (at the water/air interface, or in a bilayer) is exposed to a solution of a neutral, flexible, polymer. Depending on the interactions, and on the Langmuir pressure II of the pure surfactant film, the authors expected to find three types of behavior: (I) the polymer does not absorb; (II) the polymer absorbs and mixes with the surfactant; (III) the polymer absorbs but segregates from the surfactant. Their interest here is in case II. They predict that (a) bilayers become rigid; (b) bilayers, exposed to polymer on one side only, tend to bend strongly; (c) the surface viscosity of monolayers or bilayers is considerably increased; soap films or foams, which usually drain by turbulent (two-dimensional) flows, may be stabilized in case II.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... easy. Without normal surfactant, the tissue surrounding the air sacs in the lungs (the alveoli ) sticks together (because of a force called surface tension) after exhalation, causing the alveoli ...

  14. Controlled Clustering in Binary Charged Colloids by Adsorption of Ionic Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Okachi, Manami; Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2015-12-15

    We report on the controlled clustering of oppositely charged colloidal particles by the adsorption of ionic surfactants, which tunes charge numbers Z of particles. In particular, we studied the heteroclustering of submicron-sized polystyrene (PS) and silica particles, both of which are negatively charged, in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cationic surfactant. The surfactant concentration Csurf was selected below the critical micelle concentration. As CPC molecules were adsorbed, Z values of the PS and silica particles decreased, inverting to positive when Csurf exceeded the isoelectric point Ciep. Hydrophobic PS particles exhibited much lower Ciep than hydrophilic silica particles. At Csurf valuess between their Ciep values, the particles were oppositely charged, and clustering was enabled. To explain the clustering behavior, we investigated adsorption isotherms of the CPC and screened-Coulomb-type pair potential. Expected applications of the present findings are the control of colloidal associations and construction of various particle types into heterogeneous colloidal clusters.

  15. Enhanced perfume surface delivery to interfaces using surfactant surface multilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Brabury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced surface delivery and retention of perfumes at interfaces are the keys to their more effective and efficient deployment in a wide range of home and personal care related formulations. It has been previously demonstrated that the addition of multivalent counterions, notably Ca(2+), induces multilayer adsorption at the air-water interface for the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl-6-benzenesulfonate, LAS-6. Neutron reflectivity, NR, measurements are reported here which demonstrate that such surfactant surface multilayer structures are a potentially promising vehicle for enhanced delivery of perfumes to interfaces. The data show that the incorporation of the model perfumes, phenylethanol, PE, and linalool, LL, into the surface multilayer structure formed by LAS-6/Ca(2+) results in the surface structures being retained up to relatively high perfume mole fractions. Furthermore the amount of perfume at the surface is enhanced by at least an order of magnitude, compared to that co-adsorbed with a surfactant monolayer.

  16. Stabilization of lamellar oil-water liquid crystals by surfactant/ co-surfactant monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braganza, L. F.; Dubois, M.; Tabony, J.

    1989-03-01

    LIQUID crystals are divided into two main classes, thermotropic and lyotropic. Thermotropic liquid crystals are formed by melting, whereas lyotropic liquid crystals arise from the association of molecules, such as soap and water, that in general are not in themselves liquid crystalline. Thermotropic liquid crystals are used for liquid-crystal displays; lyotropic liquid crystals occur in living cells. Here we report a novel sequence of lyotropic liquid crystals comprising alternate layers of oil and water whose thickness varies linearly with the relative proportions of oil and water, and we have determined their structure using neutron diffraction methods. The oil and water layers are separated and stabilized by a monolayer film of surfactant and co-surfactant. The individual layers are typically a hundred ångströms or more in thickness, and total lamellar spacings of up to 1,000 Å were observed. This behaviour is difficult to describe in terms of the theories of colloid stability currently used to describe lyotropic liquid crystals. An understanding of the self-organization of such systems over such large distances would elucidate how long-range liquid-crystalline ordering arises in living cells. Moreover, thermotropic liquid crystals are expensive and chemically relatively unstable, and lamellar mesophases of the lyotopic type described here could lead to inexpensive, chemically stable liquid-crystalline materials suitable for industrial application.

  17. Surfactant-assisted Nanocasting Route for Synthesis of Highly Ordered Mesoporous Graphitic Carbon and Its Application in CO2 Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangang; Bai, Xia; Wang, Fei; Qin, Hengfei; Yin, Chaochuang; Kang, Shifei; Li, Xi; Zuo, Yuanhui; Cui, Lifeng

    2016-05-01

    Highly ordered mesoporous graphitic carbon was synthesized from a simple surfactant-assisted nanocasting route, in which ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 maintaining its triblock copolymer surfactant was used as a hard template and natural soybean oil (SBO) as a carbon precursor. The hydrophobic domain of the surfactant assisted SBO in infiltration into the template’s mesoporous channels. After the silica template was carbonized and removed, a higher yield of highly-ordered graphitic mesoporous carbon with rod-like morphology was obtained. Because of the improved structural ordering, the mesoporous carbon after amine modification could adsorb more CO2 compared with the amine-functionalized carbon prepared without the assistance of surfactant.

  18. Surfactant molecules to promote removal of cadmium ions from solid surfaces: A complementary experimental-simulational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Blas, María del Alba; Dominguez, Hector; Rivera, Margarita

    2017-03-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to interact with metallic ions to demonstrate the efficiency of surfactant molecules to promote desorption of metals from solid surfaces. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy were employed to study desorption of cadmium ions from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), as a model to understand the removal of metallic ions from carbon substrates. Contact angle measurements were carried out to investigate the wettability behavior of the surfactant on the contaminated surface. The desorption mechanism from a microscopic level was studied by using molecular dynamic simulations. Density profiles and pair correlation functions were analyzed to determine the cadmium-surface interaction in the presence of surfactant molecules to improve ion detachment. Simulations showed that surfactant molecules moved in between the adsorbed cadmium ions and the graphite surface pushing up the metallic groups to improve metal desorption. The experimental and theoretical results agree with atomic absorption spectroscopy results.

  19. Surfactant-assisted Nanocasting Route for Synthesis of Highly Ordered Mesoporous Graphitic Carbon and Its Application in CO2 Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yangang; Bai, Xia; Wang, Fei; Qin, Hengfei; Yin, Chaochuang; Kang, Shifei; Li, Xi; Zuo, Yuanhui; Cui, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    Highly ordered mesoporous graphitic carbon was synthesized from a simple surfactant-assisted nanocasting route, in which ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 maintaining its triblock copolymer surfactant was used as a hard template and natural soybean oil (SBO) as a carbon precursor. The hydrophobic domain of the surfactant assisted SBO in infiltration into the template’s mesoporous channels. After the silica template was carbonized and removed, a higher yield of highly-ordered graphitic mesoporous carbon with rod-like morphology was obtained. Because of the improved structural ordering, the mesoporous carbon after amine modification could adsorb more CO2 compared with the amine-functionalized carbon prepared without the assistance of surfactant. PMID:27220563

  20. Protein-nanoparticle interactions evaluation by immunomethods: Surfactants can disturb quantitative determinations.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-08-01

    The adsorption of proteins on nanoparticle surface is one of the first events that occur when nanoparticles enter in the blood stream, which influences nanoparticles lifetime and further biodistribution. Albumin, which is the most abundant protein in serum and which has been deeply characterized, is an interesting model protein to investigate nanoparticle-protein interactions. Therefore, the interaction of nanoparticles with serum albumin has been widely studied. Immunomethods were suggested for the investigation of adsorption isotherms because of their ease to quantify the non-adsorbed bovine serum albumin without the need of applying separation methods that could modify the balance between the adsorbed and non-adsorbed proteins. The present work revealed that this method should be applied with caution. Artifacts in the determination of free protein can be generated by the presence of surfactants such as polysorbate 80, widely used in the pharmaceutical and biomedical field, that are needed to preserve the stability of nanoparticle dispersions. It was shown that the presence of traces of polysorbate 80 in the dispersion leads to an overestimation of the amount of bovine serum albumin remaining free in the dispersion medium when determined by both radial immunodiffusion and rocket immunoelectrophoresis. However, traces of poloxamer 188 did not result in clear perturbed migrations. These methods are not appropriate to perform adsorption isotherms of proteins on nanoparticle dispersions containing traces of remaining free surfactant. They should only be applied on dispersions that are free of surfactant that is not associated with nanoparticles.

  1. Comparison of positional surfactant isomers for displacement of rubisco protein from the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    He, Lizhong; Onaizi, Sagheer A; Dimitrijev-Dwyer, Mirjana; Malcolm, Andrew S; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Dong, Chuchuan; Holt, Stephen A; Thomas, Robert K; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2011-08-15

    Protein-surfactant interaction, which is a function of the protein and surfactant characteristics, is a common phenomenon in a wide range of industrial applications. In this work, we used rubisco, the most abundant protein in nature, as a model protein and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDOBS), one of the most widely used commercial surfactants, with two positional isomers (SDOBS-2 and SDOBS-6), as a model surfactant. We first examined the surface tension and the mechanical properties of interfacial mixed rubisco-SDOBS films adsorbed at the air-water interface. The concentration of rubisco in solution was fixed at 0.1 mg mL(-1) while the SDOBS concentration varied from 0 to 150 μM. Both the surface tension and the mechanical strength of the interfacial film decreased with increasing SDOBS concentration. Overall, the surface tension of a rubisco-SDOBS-6 mixture is lower than that of rubisco-SDOBS-2, while the mechanical strength of both systems is similar. Neutron reflection data suggest that rubisco protein is likely denatured at the interface. The populations of rubisco and SDOBS of the mixed systems at the interface were determined by combining non-deuterated and deuterated SDOBS to provide contrast variation. At a low surfactant concentration, SDOBS-6 has a stronger ability to displace rubisco from the air-water interface than SDOBS-2. However, when surfactant concentration reaches 50 μM, SDOBS-2 has a higher population than SDOBS-6, with more rubisco displaced from the interface. The results presented in this work suggest that the extent of protein displacement from the air-water interface, and hence the nature of the protein-surfactant interactions at the interface, are strongly affected by the position of surfactant isomerisation, which might allow the design of formulations for efficient removal of protein stains.

  2. Competitive adsorption of monoclonal antibodies and nonionic surfactants at solid hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Sebastian J; Larsson, Iben; Van De Weert, Marco; Cárdenas, Marité; Jorgensen, Lene

    2015-02-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies from the IgG subclasses one and two were compared in their adsorption behavior with hydrophobic surfaces upon dilution to 10 mg/mL with 0.9% NaCl. These conditions simulate handling of the compounds at hospital pharmacies and surfaces encountered after preparation, such as infusion bags and i.v. lines. Total internal reflection fluorescence and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring were used to follow and quantify this. Furthermore, the influence of the nonionic surfactant polysorbate 80 (PS80) on the adsorption process of these two antibodies was investigated. Despite belonging to two different IgG subclasses, both antibodies displayed comparable adsorption behavior. Both antibodies readily adsorbed in the absence of PS80, whereas adsorption was reduced in the presence of 30 mg/L surfactant. The sequence of exposure of the surfactant and protein to the surface was found to have a major influence on the extent of protein adsorption. Although only a fraction of adsorbed protein could be removed by rinsing with 30 mg/L surfactant solution, adsorption was entirely prevented when surfaces were pre-exposed to PS80.

  3. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  4. Activity and biophysical inhibition resistance of a novel synthetic lung surfactant containing Super-Mini-B DATK peptide

    PubMed Central

    Notter, Robert H.; Wang, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives. This study examines the surface activity, resistance to biophysical inhibition, and pulmonary efficacy of a synthetic lung surfactant containing glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK, a novel and stable molecular mimic of lung surfactant protein (SP)-B. The objective of the work is to test whether S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant has favorable biophysical and physiological activity for future use in treating surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods. The structure of S-MB DATK peptide was analyzed by homology modeling and by FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro surface activity and inhibition resistance of synthetic S-MB DATK surfactant was assessed in the presence and absence of albumin, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), and free fatty acids (palmitoleic and oleic acid). Adsorption and dynamic surface tension lowering were measured with a stirred subphase dish apparatus and a pulsating bubble surfactometer (20 cycles/min, 50% area compression, 37 °C). In vivo pulmonary activity of S-MB DATK surfactant was measured in ventilated rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by repeated lung lavages that resulted in arterial PO2 values <100 mmHg. Results. S-MB DATK surfactant had very high surface activity in all assessments. The preparation adsorbed rapidly to surface pressures of 46–48 mN/m at 37 °C (low equilibrium surface tensions of 22–24 mN/m), and reduced surface tension to <1 mN/m under dynamic compression on the pulsating bubble surfactometer. S-MB DATK surfactant showed a significant ability to resist inhibition by serum albumin, C16:0 lyso-PC, and free fatty acids, but surfactant inhibition was mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration. S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant quickly improved arterial oxygenation and lung compliance after intratracheal instillation to ventilated rabbits with severe surfactant deficiency. Conclusions. S-MB DATK is an active mimic of native SP

  5. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure–function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  6. Ionic Surfactant Binding to pH-Responsive Polyelectrolyte Brush-Grafted Nanoparticles in Suspension and on Charged Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Riley, John K; An, Junxue; Tilton, Robert D

    2015-12-29

    The interactions between silica nanoparticles grafted with a brush of cationic poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (SiO2-g-PDMAEMA) and anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is investigated by dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy. SiO2-g-PDMAEMA exhibits pH-dependent charge and size properties which enable the SDS binding to be probed over a range of electrostatic conditions and brush conformations. SDS monomers bind irreversibly to SiO2-g-PDMAEMA at low surfactant concentrations (∼10(-4) M) while exhibiting a pH-dependent threshold above which cooperative, partially reversible SDS binding occurs. At pH 5, SDS binding induces collapse of the highly charged and swollen brush as observed in the bulk by DLS and on surfaces by QCM-D. Similar experiments at pH 9 suggest that SDS binds to the periphery of the weakly charged and deswollen brush and produces SiO2-g-PDMAEMA/SDS complexes with a net negative charge. SiO2-g-PDMAEMA brush collapse and charge neutralization is further confirmed by colloidal probe AFM measurements, where reduced electrosteric repulsions and bridging adhesion are attributed to effects of the bound SDS. Additionally, sequential adsorption schemes with SDS and SiO2-g-PDMAEMA are used to enhance deposition relative to SiO2-g-PDMAEMA direct adsorption on silica. This work shows that the polyelectrolyte brush configuration responds in a more dramatic fashion to SDS than to pH-induced changes in ionization, and this can be exploited to manipulate the structure of adsorbed layers and the corresponding forces of compression and friction between opposing surfaces.

  7. Enhanced removal of nitrate from water using surface modification of adsorbents--a review.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Kandasamy, Jaya

    2013-12-15

    Elevated concentration of nitrate results in eutrophication of natural water bodies affecting the aquatic environment and reduces the quality of drinking water. This in turn causes harm to people's health, especially that of infants and livestock. Adsorbents with the high capacity to selectively adsorb nitrate are required to effectively remove nitrate from water. Surface modifications of adsorbents have been reported to enhance their adsorption of nitrate. The major techniques of surface modification are: protonation, impregnation of metals and metal oxides, grafting of amine groups, organic compounds including surfactant coating of aluminosilicate minerals, and heat treatment. This paper reviews current information on these techniques, compares the enhanced nitrate adsorption capacities achieved by the modifications, and the mechanisms of adsorption, and presents advantages and drawbacks of the techniques. Most studies on this subject have been conducted in batch experiments. These studies need to include continuous mode column trials which have more relevance to real operating systems and pilot-plant trials. Reusability of adsorbents is important for economic reasons and practical treatment applications. However, only limited information is available on the regeneration of surface modified adsorbents.

  8. First-principles calculations of surfactant-assisted growth of polar CaO(111) oxide film: The case of water-based surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xin; Zapol, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Surfactant-assisted growth of polar CaO(111) oxide film in the presence of water-based surfactant is studied by first-principles calculations both from thermodynamic and kinetic points of view. We show that the water molecules not only supply a surfactant by depositing hydrogen on the surface throughout the growth process, but also supply oxygen atoms as an elemental constituent in the film growth with rather small energy barriers, i.e. water oxygen atoms are easily inserted in the top surface layer of the growth film during the wet oxidation process. Adding the water surfactants to conventional synthesis techniques leads to the continuous presence of hydrogen atoms in the surface region during the growth process, which efficiently quenches polarity and dynamically stabilizes the growth of the polar surface, and thus facilitates the growth of defect-free CaO(111) films with arbitrary thickness.

  9. Adsorption of Polyoxyethylenic Nonionic and Anionic Surfactants from Aqueous Solution: Effects Induced by the Addition of NaCl and CaCl2.

    PubMed

    Nevskaia; Guerrero-Ruíz; de D López-González J

    1998-09-01

    The adsorption processes of two different types of surfactant from aqueous solutions have been studied on several solids. The adsorbates used were a nonionic (TX-100) and a series of anionic (NP4S, NP10S, and NP25S) oxyethylenic surfactants. As adsorbent, five nonporous solids, including three quartz (QA, QB, and QC), a kaolin, and a dolomite, were chosen for this study, since these types of materials are frequently found in oil reservoirs. Great differences have been found in the adsorption plateaus, depending on the nature of the surfactant (anionic or nonionic). The influence of the presence of NaCl and CaCl2 in the solutions has been also studied. NaCl affects the adsorption of anionic surfactants on quartz and kaolin samples in a similar way. When this salt is added, the amount of anionic surfactants adsorbed on the solid surfaces increases. Some differences in the adsorption of the TX-100 surfactant, depending on the nature of the surface and the type of salt added, have been detected. Basically, three different adsorption behaviors have been found when NaCl is added. The amounts of TX-100 adsorbed decrease when NaCl is added to the solution on the QA sample; the amounts increase on the QB and kaolin samples; no alteration is observed on QC and dolomite samples. Changes in adsorption isotherms, depending on whether NaCl or CaCl2 is added, have also been observed. For the same five adsorbents, zeta potential measurements also have been carried out. When the nonionic TX-100 surfactant is adsorbed, a decrease in the negative values of the zeta potential takes place. However, for the adsorption of anionic surfactants, an increase in the negative values of the zeta potential is detected. The surface charge has been also determined by potentiometric titration (in presence and in absence of TX-100), and a decrease in surface charge when TX-100 is adsorbed on the sample surfaces has been detected. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  10. Surfactant therapy and spontaneous diuresis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; John, E; Diaz-Blanco, J; Ortega, R; Fornell, L; Vidyasagar, D

    1989-03-01

    The effect of artificial surfactant therapy on renal function and the onset of spontaneous diuresis was prospectively evaluated in 19 infants with hyaline membrane disease in a double-blind, controlled study. Twelve infants were in the surfactant group; seven infants received placebo (0.9% saline solution). There was no difference in the time of onset of spontaneous diuresis (as defined by output greater than or equal to 80% of intake). The glomerular filtration rate, determined by endogenous creatinine clearance, was also similar in the surfactant- and placebo-treated infants during the first 3 days of life. The fractional excretion of sodium was significantly higher in the placebo group at 24 hours and 36 hours. Infants in the placebo group had a higher negative sodium balance than those in the surfactant group. Ventilatory status improved significantly soon after surfactant treatment, as evidenced by improvement in the alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure ratio and by a lower mean airway pressure. These data suggest that ventilatory status can be improved without diuresis; the factors that regulate diuresis are multiple and not fully understood.

  11. Three stage multilayer formation kinetics during adsorption of an anionic fluorinated surfactant onto germanium: solution pH and salt effects.

    PubMed

    Xing, Rong; Rankin, Stephen E

    2013-07-01

    The effects of solution pH, salt type and its concentration on the adsorption kinetics and the structural evolution of an anionic fluorinated surfactant, tetraethylammonium perfluorooctylsulfonate (TEA-FOS), at the hydroxylated Ge/aqueous solution interface are investigated by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode (ATR-FTIR). The surface excess, the adsorption rate, the durations of three-stage adsorption and the molecular orientation of adsorbed TEA-FOS are all dependent on the pH of the solution. Consistent with the expected effects of solution pH on surface charge of the germanium oxide crystal surface, the most surfactant adsorbs at acidic pH 3.4 although a considerable amount still adsorbs at pH 10.0. Linear dichroism measurements suggest that the adsorbed surfactants prefer to form less-curved (flattened) multilayer admicelles, which pack more closely on the solid surface as the solution pH decreases. Under both acidic (pH 3.4) and basic (pH 10.0) conditions, the equilibrium surface excess first passes through a maximum as NaCl concentration increases, followed by a decrease. This suggests that excessive NaCl concentration is not favorable for multilayer formation due to increased electrostatic shielding which reduces the ion-pairing ability between TEA(+) and FOS(-). In addition, infrared dichroism measurements of CF2 stretching show that salt type and its concentration influence the structural evolution of adsorbed surfactants. A moderate amount of NaCl favors the assembly of adsorbed micelles into ordered flattened aggregates, but an excess of NaCl makes adsorbed surfactants assemble randomly like spherical aggregates. Compared to Na(+) and K(+) ions, Ca(2+) ions cause the adsorbed surfactants to pack more closely on the solid surface into flattened micellar aggregates. All of the effects of solution pH and salt can be rationalized based on Coulombic interactions between the substrate surface, surfactants and

  12. Surfactant-free exfoliation of graphite in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Karen B; Sendecki, Anne; Liu, Haitao

    2014-03-14

    We report an ultrasound exfoliation of graphite in a weakly basic solution to produce multi-layer graphene dispersion. A unique feature of this process is that no surfactant was added to stabilize the exfoliated graphene in water. The concentration of the graphene dispersion prepared by this approach can be up to 0.02 mg mL(-1) and it was stable at room temperature for several months.

  13. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2009-03-01

    Adsorbed water films strongly influence residual water saturations and hydraulic conductivities in porous media at low saturations. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media were investigated through combining Langmuir's film model with scaling analysis, without use of any adjustable parameters. Diffuse double layer influences are predicted to be important through the strong dependence of adsorbed water film thickness (f) on matric potential ({Psi}) and ion charge (z). Film thickness, film velocity, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are predicted to vary with z{sup -1}, z{sup -2}, and z{sup -3}, respectively. In monodisperse granular media, the characteristic grain size ({lambda}) controls film hydraulics through {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of (1) the perimeter length per unit cross sectional area over which films occur, (2) the critical matric potential ({Psi}{sub c}) below which films control flow, and (3) the magnitude of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity when {Psi} < {Psi}{sub c}. While it is recognized that finer textured sediments have higher unsaturated hydraulic conductivities than coarser sands at intermediate {Psi}, the {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of hydraulic conductivity predicted here extends this understanding to very low saturations where all pores are drained. Extremely low unsaturated hydraulic conductivities are predicted under adsorbed film-controlled conditions (generally < 0.1 mm y{sup -1}). On flat surfaces, the film hydraulic diffusivity is shown to be constant (invariant with respect to {Psi}).

  14. Sand sorption process for the removal of sodium dodecyl sulfate (anionic surfactant) from water.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nasiruddin; Zareen, Uzma

    2006-05-20

    Granite sand was used to adsorb anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) from water at natural pH 6.25. The effect of adsorbent size, pH, temperature and amount of adsorbent has been examined. The results indicate that the Langmuir model provides the best correlation of experimental data. Thermodynamic parameters like entropy, enthalpy and free energy of adsorption were evaluated. Decreasing the temperature accelerates the adsorption of SDS onto sand surface. The kinetic data were analyzed by using pseudo-first order Lagergren equation. Adsorption of SDS was exothermic and dominated by physisorption with activation energy (Ea) 33.65 kJ mol(-1). In addition, regeneration of granite sand by washing with Fenton likes reagent was examined. The results suggested that granite sand is suitable as a sorbent material for recovery and adsorption of SDS from aqueous solutions in view of its effectiveness and cheaper cost.

  15. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  16. Preparations of organobentonite using nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y H

    2001-08-01

    Due to hydrophilic environment at its surface, natural bentonite is an ineffective sorbent for nonpolar nonionic organic compounds in water even though it has high surface area. The surface properties of natural bentonite can be greatly modified by simple ion-exchange reactions with large organic cations (cationic surfactants) and this organobentonite is highly effective in removing nonionic organic compounds from water. Cationic surfactant derived organobentonites have been investigated extensively for a wide variety of environmental applications. In this study, the preparation of organobentonite using nonionic surfactants has been investigated for the first time. Results indicate that nonionic surfactants intercalates into the interlamellar space of bentonite and may demonstrate higher sorption capacity than cationic surfactant. It is possible to create large interlayer spacing and high organic carbon content organobentonite by use of nonionic surfactants with suitable balance between the hydrocarbon and ethylene oxide chain lengths. In addition, nonionic surfactant derived organobentonites are more chemically stable than cationic surfactant derived organobentonites.

  17. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Tharapiwattananon, N.; Osuwan, S.; Scamehorn, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant from water. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used and three surfactants were studied (two anionic and one cationic). The effects of air flow rate, foam height, liquid height, liquid feed surfactant concentration, and sparger porosity were studied. This technique was shown to be effective in either surfactant recovery or the reduction of surfactant concentration in water to acceptable levels. As an example of the effectiveness of this technique, the cetylpyridinium chloride concentration in water can be reduced by 90% in one stage with a liquid residence time of 375 minutes. The surfactant concentration in the collapsed foam is 21.5 times the feed concentration. This cationic surfactant was easier to remove from water by foam fractionation than the anionic surfactants studied.

  18. Biofoams and natural protein surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring foam constituent and surfactant proteins with intriguing structures and functions are now being identified from a variety of biological sources. The ranaspumins from tropical frog foam nests comprise a range of proteins with a mixture of surfactant, carbohydrate binding and antimicrobial activities that together provide a stable, biocompatible, protective foam environment for developing eggs and embryos. Ranasmurfin, a blue protein from a different species of frog, displays a novel structure with a unique chromophoric crosslink. Latherin, primarily from horse sweat, but with similarities to salivary, oral and upper respiratory tract proteins, illustrates several potential roles for surfactant proteins in mammalian systems. These proteins, together with the previously discovered hydrophobins of fungi, throw new light on biomolecular processes at air–water and other interfaces. This review provides a perspective on these recent findings, focussing on structure and biophysical properties. PMID:20615601

  19. Inverse photoemission of adsorbed xenon multilayers on Ru(001): Refutation of final-state screening effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandelt, K.; Jacob, W.; Memmel, N.; Dose, V.

    1986-09-01

    In this Letter we describe photoemission and inverse photoemission spectra of adsorbed xenon multilayers on Ru(001). Electron energy-loss spectra of xenon adsorbed on gold by Demuth, Avouris, and Schmeisser are included in the discussion. The observed layer-dependent shifts of the inverse photoemission spectra closer to the Fermi level clearly invalidate image screening effects as being the dominant cause of these shifts but support a ``floating'' of the adsorbed Xe potential well as a whole with the surface potential in the initial state.

  20. Adsorbate-metal bond effect on empirical determination of surface plasmon penetration depth.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Laurel L; Menegazzo, Nicola; Booksh, Karl S

    2013-05-21

    The penetration depth of surface plasmons is commonly determined empirically from the observed response for adsorbate loading on gold surface plasmon resonance (SPR) substrates. However, changes in the SPR spectrum may originate from both changes in the effective refractive index near the metal surface and changes in the metal permittivity following covalent binding of the adsorbate layer. Herein, the significance of incorporating an additional adsorbate-metal bonding effect in the calculation is demonstrated in theory and in practice. The bonding effect is determined from the nonzero intercept of a SPR shift versus adsorbate thickness calibration and incorporated into the calculation of penetration depth at various excitation wavelengths. Determinations of plasmon penetration depth with and without the bonding response for alkanethiolate-gold are compared and are shown to be significantly different for a thiol monolayer adsorbate system. Additionally, plasmon penetration depth evaluated with bonding effect compensation shows greater consistency over different adsorbate thicknesses and better agreement with theory derived from Maxwell's equation, particularly for adsorbate thicknesses that are much smaller (<5%) than the plasmon penetration depth. The method is also extended to a more practically applicable polyelectrolyte multilayer adsorbate system.

  1. Adsorption of a cationic surfactant by a magsorbent based on magnetic alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Layaly; El Kolli, Nadia; Dali, Noëlle; Talbot, Delphine; Abramson, Sébastien; Welschbillig, Mathias; Cabuil, Valérie; Bée, Agnès

    2014-10-15

    Adsorption of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cationic surfactant, by magnetic alginate beads (MagAlgbeads) was investigated. The magnetic adsorbent (called magsorbent) was prepared by encapsulation of magnetic functionalized nanoparticles in an alginate gel. The influence on CPC adsorption of several parameters such as contact time, pH and initial surfactant concentration was studied. The equilibrium isotherm shows that adsorption occurs through both electrostatic interactions with charge neutralization of the carboxylate groups of the beads and hydrophobic interactions inducing the formation of surfactant aggregates in the beads. The dosage of calcium ions released in the solution turns out to be a useful tool for understanding the adsorption mechanisms. Adsorption is accompanied by a shrinking of the beads that corresponds to a 45% reduction of the volume. Adsorption kinetic experiments show that equilibrium time is strongly dependent on the surfactant concentration, which monitors the nature of the interactions. On the other hand, since the pH affects the ionization state of adsorption sites, adsorption depends on the pH solution, maximum adsorption being obtained in a large pH range (3.2-12) in agreement with the pKa value of alginate (pKa=3.4-4.2). Finally, due to the formation of micelle-like surfactants aggregates in the magnetic alginate beads, they could be used as a new efficient magsorbent for hydrophobic pollutants.

  2. Fiber coating with surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Amy Q.; Gleason, Blake; McKinley, Gareth H.; Stone, Howard A.

    2002-11-01

    When a fiber is withdrawn at low speeds from a pure fluid, the variation in the thickness of the entrained film with imposed fiber velocity is well-predicted by the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin (LLD) equation. However, surfactant additives are known to alter this response. We study the film thickening properties of the protein BSA (bovine serum albumin), the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, and the anionic surfactant SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate). For each of these additives, the film thickening factor alpha (the ratio of the measured thickness to the LLD prediction) for a fixed fiber radius varies as a function of the ratio of the surfactant concentration c to the critical micelle concentration (CMC). In the case of BSA, which does not form micelles, the reference value is the concentration at which multilayers form. As a result of Marangoni effects, alpha reaches a maximum as c approaches the CMC from below. However, when the surfactant concentration c exceeds the CMC, the behavior of alpha varies as a consequence of the dynamic surface properties, owing for example to different sorption kinetics of these additives, or possibly surface or bulk rheological effects. For SDS, alpha begins to decrease when c exceeds the CMC and causes the surface to become partially or completely remobilized, which is consistent with the experimental and theoretical results published for studies of slug flows of bubbles and surfactant solutions in a capillary tube and the rise of bubbles in surfactant solutions. However, when the SDS or Triton X-100 surfactant concentration is well above the CMC, we observe that the film thickening parameter alpha increases once again. In the case of SDS we observe a second maximum in the film thickening factor. For all the experiments, transport of monomers to the interface is limited by diffusion and the second maximum in the film thickening factor may be explained as a result of a nonmonotonic change in the stability characteristics of suspended SDS

  3. Surfactant adsorption at the metal-oil interface.

    PubMed

    Campana, Mario; Teichert, Anke; Clarke, Stuart; Steitz, Roland; Webster, John R P; Zarbakhsh, Ali

    2011-05-17

    The structure of the adsorbed palmitic acid at the iron oxide/oil interface has been investigated using polarized neutron reflectometry. The palmitic acid was found to be strongly adsorbed at the oxide/oil interface resulting in a monolayer of thickness 16 ± 4 Å for 150 and 500 ppm palmitic acid concentrations (16 ± 5 Å for the 1000 ppm solution). These layer thicknesses suggest tilt for the palmitic acid molecules with respect to the interface. The model also requires a second diffuse layer extending in the bulk oil. The thickness of this diffuse layer was 35 ± 17 Å for the 150 ppm solution and 45 ± 22 Å for 500 and 1000 ppm solution. The composition profiles at the interface suggest a depletion of the oil in the vicinity of the interface as the concentration of palmitic acid increases.

  4. Inorganic dual-layer microporous supported membranes

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Tsai, Chung-Yi; Lu, Yungfeng

    2003-03-25

    The present invention provides for a dual-layer inorganic microporous membrane capable of molecular sieving, and methods for production of the membranes. The inorganic microporous supported membrane includes a porous substrate which supports a first inorganic porous membrane having an average pore size of less than about 25 .ANG. and a second inorganic porous membrane coating the first inorganic membrane having an average pore size of less than about 6 .ANG.. The dual-layered membrane is produced by contacting the porous substrate with a surfactant-template polymeric sol, resulting in a surfactant sol coated membrane support. The surfactant sol coated membrane support is dried, producing a surfactant-templated polymer-coated substrate which is calcined to produce an intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane. The intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane is then contacted with a second polymeric sol producing a polymeric sol coated substrate which is dried producing an inorganic polymeric coated substrate. The inorganic polymeric coated substrate is then calcined producing an inorganic dual-layered microporous supported membrane in accordance with the present invention.

  5. ABC copolymer silicone surfactant templating for biomimetic silicification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Guo, Caiyun; Yao, Yuan; Che, Shunai

    2012-07-15

    Using the ABC copolymer silicone surfactant polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-graft-(polyethylene oxide (PEO)-block-propylene oxide (PPO)) (PSEP, Scheme 1a) as a template and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as a silica source, silica particles with various structures and morphologies (i.e., disordered spherical micellar aggregation, two-dimensional p6mm mesostructure, asymmetric multi-layer non-equilibrium vesicles and symmetric monolayer vesicles) were synthesized by changing the synthesis temperature from 30 to 80 °C. Increasing the hydrophobicity of the surfactant by increasing the temperature resulted in an increase in the surfactant packing parameter g, which led to the mesophase transformation from micellar to cylinder and later to a lamellar structure. The good compatibility between the PDMS and the TEOS, the different natures of the hydrophobic PDMS and PPO segments, and the hydrolysis and condensation rates of TEOS enabled the variation of silicification structures. This novel silicone surfactant templating route and a new type of materials with highly ordered mesostructures and asymmetric morphologies provide a new insight into the molecular factors governing inorganic-organic mesophase and biosilicification for fabricating functionalized materials.

  6. Parametric analysis of surfactant-aided imbibition in fractured carbonates.

    PubMed

    Adibhatla, B; Mohanty, K K

    2008-01-15

    Many carbonate oil reservoirs are oil-wet and fractured; waterflood recovery is very low. Dilute surfactant solution injection into the fractures can improve oil production from the matrix by altering the wettability of the rock to a water-wetting state. A 2D, two-phase, multicomponent, finite-volume, fully-implicit numerical simulator calibrated with our laboratory results is used to assess the sensitivity of the process to wettability alteration, IFT reduction, oil viscosity, surfactant diffusivity, matrix block dimensions, and permeability heterogeneity. Capillarity drives the oil production at the early stage, but gravity is the major driving force afterwards. Surfactants which alter the wettability to a water-wet regime give higher recovery rates for higher IFT systems. Surfactants which cannot alter wettability give higher recovery for lower IFT systems. As the wettability alteration increases the rate of oil recovery increases. Recovery rate decreases with permeability significantly for a low tension system, but only mildly for high tension systems. Increasing the block dimensions and increasing oil viscosity decreases the rate of oil recovery and is in accordance with the scaling group for a gravity driven process. Heterogeneous layers in a porous medium can increase or decrease the rate of oil recovery depending on the permeability and the aspect ratio of the matrix block.

  7. SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION WITH SURFACTANT REGENERATION/REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation was conducted during the spring of 1999 at Marine Corps Base, Camp LeJeune, NC. A PCE-DNAPL zone was identified and delineated by extensive soil sampling in 1997, and was further characteized by a partitioning interwell t...

  8. Phospholipid surfactant adsorption by respirable quartz and in vitro expression of cytotoxicity and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Keane, M J; Harrison, J C; Cilento, E V; Ong, T; Wallace, W E

    1998-08-01

    Respirable-sized quartz was treated with a saline dispersion of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a primary component of pulmonary surfactant, to model the adsorption of phospholipid surfactant onto quartz dust following particle deposition in the bronchoalveolar region of the lung. Control and surfactant-treated dusts were used to challenge lavaged rat pulmonary macrophages in vitro over a 1-week period, to determine the effects of adsorbed surfactant on the expression of quartz cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. DNA damage was determined by the single cell gel electrophoresis 'comet' assay. Untreated quartz induced DNA damage, increasing with dose and with time of incubation of dust with macrophages over a 5 day period. DPPC treatment of quartz suppressed DNA damage through 1 day of macrophage challenge. DNA damage then increased over a 5 day period, to approximately half the positive control (untreated quartz) values. Cytotoxicity was measured by trypan blue dye exclusion and by the Live-Dead fluorescence assay for cell viability. Cytotoxicity of surfactant-treated quartz measured one day after challenge of lavaged macrophages was suppressed to values near those of the negative controls, and then increased over a 1 week incubation period to levels near those expressed by native quartz positive controls. Quartz similarly treated with dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine mixed with DPPC substituted in one acyl group with a boron-containing fluorescent chromophore was used with confocal microscopy to measure particle-associated fluorescent surfactant in cells. Approximately half of the fluorescence intensity was lost over a 1 week period following challenge of lavaged macrophage. Results are discussed in terms of a model of restoration of quartz particle surface toxicity as prophylactic surfactant is removed from particle surface by cellular enzymatic digestion processes.

  9. The intercalation of a vermiculite by cationic surfactants and its subsequent swelling with organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Williams-Daryn, S; Thomas, R K

    2002-11-15

    We have measured the dimensions of the interlamellar space following intercalation of a vermiculite by a range of cationic surfactants and followed the subsequent swelling of the organoclay compounds with several organic solvents. A single vermiculite (Eucatex) was used with three series of surfactants, N-alkyltrimethylammonium bromides, N,N'-dialkyldimethylammonium bromides, and the gemini cationic surfactants, alpha,omega-bis (N-alkyldimethylammonium) alkanes. In all cases well-defined stoichiometric compounds are obtained and the amount of surfactant intercalating the layer indicates that there are two factors controlling this amount, charge neutralization of the clay and hydrophobic packing. Packing arguments are used to deduce the fraction of non-charge-neutralizing material in the interlamellar space. It is clear that by altering the surfactant charge and structure it is possible to control the degree to which adsorption beyond charge neutralization occurs in these complexes, which is important when the capacity of such complexes to sorb other materials is considered. The general pattern of swelling of the surfactant/vermiculite complex by toluene suggests that the maximum expansion of the intralamellar space is limited by the longest chain in the surfactant. In contrast to earlier results we found that these vermiculites could be swollen by alkanes as well as aromatic solvents. This is attributed to the greater hydrophobicity of the interior of an organoclay formed from a clay of higher charge density.

  10. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  11. Adsorbate-induced demagnetization and restructuring of ultrathin magnetic films: CO chemisorbed on γ-Fe/Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spišák, D.; Hafner, J.

    2001-09-01

    First-principles local-spin-density (LSD) investigations of the structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of clean and CO-adsorbed ultrathin γ-iron films epitaxially grown on Cu(100) surfaces demonstrate that both the geometrical and the magnetic structures of the films are profoundly modified by the adsorption of CO. The enhanced magnetic moments of the top-layer atoms are strongly quenched by the presence of the adsorbate. Due to the pronounced magnetovolume effect, this leads also to a correlated change in the interlayer relaxations. Strikingly, the adsorbate-induced demagnetization is primarily limited to those surface atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate. This leads to the formation of an in-plane magnetic pattern in a partially adsorbate-covered film. The comparison of the calculated vibrational eigenfrequencies of the CO adsorbate with experiment confirms the picture based on the LSD calculations.

  12. Interfacial equation of state for ionized surfactants at oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bahramian, Alireza; Zarbakhsh, Ali

    2015-08-28

    A new mathematical approach has been developed for describing the interfacial behaviour of oil/water interfaces in the presence of ionic surfactants. The approach relies on the ideal behaviour of ionized surfactants at oil/water interfaces, which is previously demonstrated by Lucassen-Reynders (J. Phys. Chem., 1966, 70, 1777-1785). The new derived equation simply relates the interfacial tension to the surfactant molecular size and the cmc value of the surfactant in the aqueous phase. The predicted values are in a reasonable agreement with the measured experimental data. Formation of complex multi-layers is considered and the related development is performed. It is shown that, assuming a multi-layer interface, the proposed model gives an area per surfactant molecule similar to the values obtained by techniques such as neutron reflectivity (NR), while a monolayer assumption yields about half the value. The discussion describes the impact of dissolved oil and ionic components on the interfacial tension of the ionized surfactants at oil/water interfaces.

  13. Mechanisms of Polyelectrolyte Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption at the Air-Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Patrick C.; Palazoglu, Omer A.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan, a naturally occurring cationic polyelectrolyte, restores the adsorption of the clinical lung surfactant Survanta to the air-water interface in the presence of albumin at much lower concentrations than uncharged polymers such as polyethylene glycol. This is consistent with the positively charged chitosan forming ion pairs with negative charges on the albumin and lung surfactant particles, reducing the net charge in the double-layer, and decreasing the electrostatic energy barrier to adsorption to the air-water interface. However, chitosan, like other polyelectrolytes, cannot perfectly match the charge distribution on the surfactant, which leads to patches of positive and negative charge at net neutrality. Increasing the chitosan concentration further leads to a reduction in the rate of surfactant adsorption consistent with an over-compensation of the negative charge on the surfactant and albumin surfaces, which creates a new repulsive electrostatic potential between the now cationic surfaces. This charge neutralization followed by charge inversion explains the window of polyelectrolyte concentration that enhances surfactant adsorption; the same physical mechanism is observed in flocculation and re-stabilization of anionic colloids by chitosan and in alternate layer deposition of anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes on charged colloids. PMID:19366599

  14. Correlation between surface free energy of quartz and its wettability by aqueous solutions of nonionic, anionic and cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Szymczyk, Katarzyna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2009-12-15

    The measurements of the advancing contact angle for water, glycerol, diiodomethane and aqueous solutions of Triton X-100 (TX-100), Triton X-165 (TX-165), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDDS), sodium hexadecyl sulfonate (SHDS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPyB) on quartz surface were carried out. On the basis of the contact angles values obtained for water, glycerol and diiodomethane the values of the Lifshitz-van der Waals component and electron-acceptor and electron-donor parameters of the acid-base component of the surface free energy of quartz were determined. The determined components and parameters of the quartz surface free energy were used for interpretation of the influence of nonionic, anionic and cationic surfactants on the wettability of the quartz. From obtained results it was appeared that the wettability of quartz by nonionic and anionic surfactants practically does not depend on the surfactants concentration in the range corresponding to their unsaturated monolayer at water-air interface and that there is linear dependence between adhesional and surface tension of aqueous solution of these surfactants. This dependence for TX-100, TX-165, SDDS and SHDS can be expressed by lines which slopes are positive. This slope and components of quartz surface free energy indicate that the interaction between the water molecules and quartz surface might be stronger than those between the quartz and surfactants molecules. So, the surface excess of surfactants concentration at the quartz-water interface is probably negative, and the possibility of surfactants to adsorb at the quartz/water film-water interface is higher than at the quartz-water interface. This conclusion is confirmed by the values of the adhesion work of "pure" surfactants, aqueous solutions of surfactants and water to quartz surface. In the case of the cationic surfactants the relationship between adhesional and surface tension is more complicated than that for

  15. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-10-01

    Boiling--a process that has powered industries since the steam age--is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles `on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications.

  16. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Boiling—a process that has powered industries since the steam age—is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles ‘on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications. PMID:26486275

  17. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants.

    PubMed

    Cho, H Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-10-21

    Boiling--a process that has powered industries since the steam age--is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles 'on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications.

  18. Binary coalescence of gas bubbles in the presence of a non-ionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Duerr-Auster, N; Gunde, R; Mäder, R; Windhab, Erich J

    2009-05-15

    The coalescence behavior of air bubbles in a dilute aqueous surfactant solution of a polyglycerol fatty acid ester (PGE), a commercial non-ionic surfactant, is investigated in a binary coalescence experiment. The focus is on the influence of the ionic strength of the solution on the rate of coalescence. Results are compared with the adsorption kinetics and surface shear/dilatational rheological properties of the surfactant. Experiments show that the coalescence frequency is significantly lower at low ionic strength, and that bubble stability increases with increasing aging time. Stabilization occurs via surfactant adsorption and a resulting electrostatic and/or steric repulsive force. The electrostatic force presumably originates from small amounts of anionic fatty acid soaps, which are residues from the industrial synthesis. The steric force can be related to the adsorption of visco-elastic layers of PGE at the air-water interface.

  19. Thermodynamically consistent description of the hydrodynamics of free surfaces covered by insoluble surfactants of high concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J.; Plapp, Mathis

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we propose several models that describe the dynamics of liquid films which are covered by a high concentration layer of insoluble surfactant. First, we briefly review the "classical" hydrodynamic form of the coupled evolution equations for the film height and surfactant concentration that are well established for small concentrations. Then we re-formulate the basic model as a gradient dynamics based on an underlying free energy functional that accounts for wettability and capillarity. Based on this re-formulation in the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, we propose extensions of the basic hydrodynamic model that account for (i) nonlinear equations of state, (ii) surfactant-dependent wettability, (iii) surfactant phase transitions, and (iv) substrate-mediated condensation. In passing, we discuss important differences to most of the models found in the literature.

  20. Scaling of submonolayer island growth with reversible adatom exchange in surfactant-mediated epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daimu; Wang, Zhuping; Zhu, Hui

    2007-08-01

    Surfactant-mediated epitaxial growth is studied with a realistic model, which includes three main kinetic processes: diffusion of adatoms on the surfactant terrace, exchange of adatoms with their underneath surfactant atoms, and reexchange in which an exchanged adatom resurfaces to the top of the surfactant layer. The scaling behavior of nucleus density and island size distributions in the initial stage of growth is investigated by using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the temperature dependence of nucleus density and island size distributions governed by the reexchanging-controlled nucleation at high temperatures exhibits similar scaling behavior to that obtained by the standard diffusion-mediated nucleation at low temperatures. However, at intermediate temperatures, the exchanging-controlled nucleation leads to an increase of nucleus density with temperature, while the island size distribution scales to a monotonically decreasing function, showing nonstandard scaling behavior.

  1. Nucleation transition and nucleus density scaling in surfactant-mediated epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daimu; Ding, Zejun; Sun, Xia

    2005-09-01

    A model of submonolayer epitaxial growth mediated by a monolayer of surfactant is studied, where exchange of adatoms with their underneath surfactant atoms is reversible; i.e., an exchanged adatom can reexchange with the lifted surfactant atom to return to the top of the surfactant layer when the substrate temperature is high enough. A rate equation analysis shows that island nucleation governed by the reexchanging-controlled surface diffusion obeys a scaling law, which connects the nucleation density with the rates of the deposition, surface diffusion, exchange, and reexchange process. Our model system reveals distinct nucleation transitions due to the activated exchange and reexchange, and the nucleation density as a function of temperature exhibits a characteristic N shape with a minimum and a maximum, which define the transition temperatures. The analytical results are confirmed by comparison with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Microstructure of Mixed Surfactant Solutions by Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Edward

    1995-01-01

    biological surfactants. We have found that subtle changes by surfactant additives to phosphatidylcholines (PC) produce dramatic changes in the microstructure of the composite that are impossible to determine from simple scattering experiments. Novel microstructures were observed at mole ratios from 4/1 to 9/1 long chain (Di-C_{16}PC)/short chain lipid (Di-C_7PC), including disc-like micelles and rippled bilayers at room temperature. We have also observed for the first time the formation of single layered ripple phase bilayer fragments. The formation of such fragments eliminates a number of theories of formation of this unique structure that depend on coupling between bilayers. In a similar system, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) mixed with the branched alcohol geraniol produces a bluish and extremely viscoelastic phase of giant multilamellar wormy vesicles. This phase shows the Weissenberg effect under flow due to the distortion of the entangled vesicles and may be related to fluid lamellar phases and L _3 phases often seen in surfactant-alcohol -water systems. Lysophosphatidylcholine, the single-chain counterpart of the diacyl phospholipids, can also form bilayer phases when combined with long-chain fatty acids in water. The phase transition characteristics and appearance of the bilayers in equimolar mixtures of lysolipid and fatty acid are similar to those of the diacyl-PC. Electron microscopy reveals large extended multilayers in mixtures with excess lysolipid and multilamellar vesicles in mixtures with excess fatty acid.

  3. Inactivation of surfactant in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Bruni, R; Fan, B R; David-Cu, R; Taeusch, H W; Walther, F J

    1996-02-01

    Although surfactant replacement therapy has dramatically improved the outcome of premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome, approximately 30% of treated infants show a transient or no response. Nonresponse to surfactant replacement therapy may be due to extreme lung immaturity and possibly surfactant inactivation. Surfactant inactivation involves aspecific biophysical events, such as interference with the formation or activity of an alveolar monolayer, and specific interactions with serum proteins, including antibodies, leaking into the alveolar space. As formulations containing surfactant proteins appear to better tolerate serum inactivation, we used an excised rat lung model to compare the susceptibility to serum inactivation of a mixture of synthetic phospholipids selected from surfactant lipid constituents, Exosurf (a protein-free synthetic surfactant), Survanta [containing surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and -C)], and a porcine surfactant (containing SP-A, -B, and -C). For each of these preparations, we used pressure/volume determinations as an in situ measure of surfactant activity and retested the same preparations after mixing with human serum, a nonspecific surfactant inactivator. Human serum inactivated porcine surfactant to a lesser extent than Survanta, Exosurf, or synthetic phospholipids. Temperature exerted a significant effect on deflation stability, as shown by a greater lung compliance in untreated, normal lungs and a larger improvement in compliance after treating lavaged lungs with synthetic phospholipids at 37 degrees C than at 22 degrees C. We conclude that surfactant containing SP-A, -B, and -C is only moderately susceptible to inactivation with whole serum and may therefore exert a greater clinical response than protein-free surfactants or those containing only SP-B and -C.

  4. Prospects for simulating macromolecular surfactant chemistry at the ocean-atmosphere boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, S. M.; Deal, C.; Liu, X.; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, L. M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  5. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; ...

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  6. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana R.; Warner, Marvin G.; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David G.; Mayes, Richard T.; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Addleman, Shane R.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Ken; Breier, Crystal; D'Alessandro, Evan

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing at Woods

  7. Effect of exogenous surfactant on the development of surfactant synthesis in premature rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maurizio; Petit, Kevin; Fiore, Humberto H; Doyle, Cynthia A; Frantz, Ivan D; Nielsen, Heber C

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective therapy for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Full recovery from respiratory distress syndrome requires development of endogenous surfactant synthesis and metabolism. The influence of exogenous surfactant on the development of surfactant synthesis in premature lungs is not known. We hypothesized that different exogenous surfactants have different effects on the development of endogenous surfactant production in the premature lung. We treated organ cultures of d 25 fetal rabbit lung for 3 d with 100 mg/kg body weight of natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, and Exosurf and measured their effects on the development of surfactant synthesis. Additional experiments tested how these surfactants and Curosurf affected surfactant protein (SP) SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C mRNA expression. Surfactant synthesis was measured as the incorporation of 3H-choline and 14C-glycerol into disaturated phosphatidylcholine recovered from lamellar bodies. Randomized-block ANOVA showed significant differences among treatments for incorporation of both labels (p < 0.01), with natural rabbit surfactant less than control, Survanta greater than control, and Exosurf unchanged. Additional experiments with natural rabbit surfactant alone showed no significant effects in doses up to 1000 mg/kg. Survanta stimulated disaturated phosphatidylcholine synthesis (173 +/- 41% of control; p = 0.01), increased total lamellar body disaturated phosphatidylcholine by 22% (p < 0.05), and increased 14C-disat-PC specific activity by 35% (p < 0.05). The response to Survanta was dose-dependent up to 1000 mg/kg. Survanta did not affect surfactant release. No surfactant altered the expression of mRNA for SP-A, SP-B, or SP-C. We conclude that surfactant replacement therapy can enhance the maturation of surfactant synthesis, but this potential benefit differs with different surfactant preparations.

  8. Modeling effects of pH and counterions on surfactant adsorption at the oxide/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, N.P.; O`Haver, J.H.; Harwell, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    The adsorption of surfactants on minerals is important in areas such as enhanced oil recovery, surfactant-enhanced soil remediation, formation of organic thin films, ore flotation, wetting, adhesion, detergency, and dispersion stability. A model is presented that describes the effect of pH on the adsorption of an isomerically pure anionic surfactant species at a mineral oxide/water interface. A site-binding model, to account for effects of pH, surface heterogeneities, and counterions, is incorporated into a patchwise, phase-separation modeling approach, making it possible to predict both the surface charge and the counterion association beneath an adsorbed surfactant aggregate. Parameters for the site binding model on {alpha}-alumina are obtained from experimental surface charge measurements. The formation of both local monolayers (hemimicelles) and bilayers (admicelles) is allowed, although the isotherms studied in this paper are fit by parameter values that predict admicelle formation only. The model is able to predict experimental measurements of the adsorption of an isomerically pure, anionic surfactant species on {alpha}-alumina as a function of pH. It reproduces several previously unexplained experimental observations; in particular, it offers an explanation for the observation of significant adsorption of anionic surfactant above the point of zero charge (pzc) of a mineral oxide surface.

  9. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  10. Comparison of modified montmorillonite adsorbents. Part II: The effects of the type of raw clays and modification conditions on the adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Zeng, Zhiqiang

    2003-10-01

    This paper builds on the preceding researches to study the effects of the type of clays (montmorillonites K10, KSF) and modifying conditions on the structure and adsorption behavior of resulting clay adsorbents. The raw clays were modified by polymeric Al/Fe species, hexadecyl-trimethylammonium (HDTMA) surfactant and a complex of polymeric Al/Fe-HDTMA. X-ray diffraction spectra was applied to analyze the structure of the raw and modified clays. After modification, the basal spacing of the clays varied, depending on the types of raw clay and modification conditions. Copper and phenol were selected as adsorbates for evaluating the adsorption performance of various clays, which was affected significantly by the types of raw clay and modification conditions. In general the inorganic contaminant (e.g., Cu) tend to be adsorbed by the polymeric Al/Fe modified clay and the organic impurities (e.g., phenol) will be preferably captured by the surfactant modified clay; both due to the specific surface properties resulting from introducing the modifiers. The complex modified clays possessed the ability of adsorbing both inorganic and organic contaminants. In addition, the d 0 0 1 spacing of modified KSF was greater than that of K10; the adsorption performance with modified KSF was thus greater than that with the modified K10. Finally, the ratio of modifiers to the clay (metal:surfactant:clay) has been observed to affect the adsorption performance; the optimal conditions have been defined.

  11. Effect of binding of an oligomeric cationic fluorosurfactant on the dilational rheological properties of gelatin adsorbed at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ashwin; Kim, Yongsin; Kausch, Charles M; Thomas, Richard R

    2006-09-12

    The effect of binding of an oligomeric cationic fluorooxetane surfactant on the interfacial properties of adsorbed gelatin-fluorooxetane complexes has been studied using dynamic surface tension and dilational rheological measurements. Adsorption kinetics of gelatin-fluorooxetane complexes are reminiscent of a mixed (barrier/diffusion limited) process, while the dilational rheological properties of the interface exhibit a strong dependence on surfactant concentration. At low surfactant concentrations, dilational surface moduli as well as phase angles are relatively insensitive to the presence of the fluorooxetane. However, at the critical aggregation concentration of the polymer-surfactant system, there is a sharp increase in the complex modulus. Further increase in the fluorooxetane concentration does not significantly affect the complex modulus. The phase angle, however, does increase with increasing fluorooxetane concentration due to the transport of bound fluorooxetane from the subsurface to the solution-air interface. These results indicate that, at fluorooxetane concentrations exceeding the critical aggregation concentration, the polymer-surfactant complexes adsorb to form cross-linked multilayers at the solution-air interface.

  12. Drops in Space: Super Oscillations and Surfactant Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Tian, Yuren; Jankovsky, Joseph; Shi, Tao; Chen, X.; Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene; Croonquist, Arvid; Thornton, Kathyrn C.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Coleman, Catherine; Leslie, Fred W.; Matthiesen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    An unprecedented microgravity observation of maximal shape oscillations of a surfactant-bearing water drop the size of a ping pong ball was observed during a mission of Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the second United States Microgravity Laboratory-USML-2 (STS-73, October 20-November 5, 1995). The observation was precipitated by the action of an intense sound field which produced a deforming force on the drop. When this deforming force was suddenly reduced, the drop executed nearly free and axisymmetric oscillations for several cycles, demonstrating a remarkable amplitude of nonlinear motion. Whether arising from the discussion of modes of oscillation of the atomic nucleus, or the explosion of stars, or how rain forms, the complex processes influencing the motion, fission, and coalescence of drops have fascinated scientists for centuries. Therefore, the axisymmetric oscillations of a maximally deformed liquid drop are noteworthy, not only for their scientific value but also for their aesthetic character. Scientists from Yale University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Vanderbilt University conducted liquid drop experiments in microgravity using the acoustic positioning/manipulation environment of the Drop Physics Module (DPM). The Yale/JPL group's objectives were to study the rheological properties of liquid drop surfaces on which are adsorbed surfactant molecules, and to infer surface properties such as surface tension, Gibb's elasticity, and surface dilatational viscosity by using a theory which relies on spherical symmetry to solve the momentum and mass transport equations.

  13. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldareili, Charles; Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity technologies often require aqueous phases to spread over nonwetting hydrophobic solid surfaces. Surfactants facilitate the wetting of water on hydrophobic surfaces by adsorbing on the water/air and hydrophobic solid/water interfaces and lowering the surface tensions of these interfaces. The tension reductions decrease the contact angle, which increases the equilibrium wetted area. Hydrocarbon surfactants; (i.e., amphiphiles with a hydrophobic moiety consisting of an extended chain of (aliphatic) methylene -CH2- groups attached to a large polar group to give aqueous solubility) are capable of reducing the contact angles on surfaces which are not very hydrophobic, but do not reduce significantly the contact angles of the very hydrophobic surfaces such as parafilm, polyethylene or self assembled monolayers. Trisiloxane surfactants (amphiphiles with a hydrophobe consisting of methyl groups linked to a trisiloxane backbone in the form of a disk ((CH3)3-Si-O-Si-O-Si(CH3)3) and an extended ethoxylate (-(OCH2CH2)a-) polar group in the form of a chain with four or eight units) can significantly reduce the contact angle of water on a very hydrophobic surface and cause rapid and complete (or nearly complete) spreading (termed superspreading). The overall goal of the research described in this proposal is to establish and verify a theory for how trisiloxanes cause superspreading, and then use this knowledge as a guide to developing more general hydrocarbon based surfactant systems which superspread. We propose that the trisiloxane surfactants superspread because their structure allows them to strongly lower the high hydrophobic solid/aqueous tension when they adsorb to the solid surface. When the siloxane adsorbs, the hydrophobic disk parts of the molecule adsorb onto the surface removing the surface water. Since the cross-sectional area of the disk is larger than that of the extended ethoxylate chain, the disks can form a space-filling mat on the surface which

  14. Nanofiltration and Fenton's process over iron shavings for surfactants removal.

    PubMed

    Martins, Rui C; Nunes, Marta; Gando-Ferreira, Licínio M; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    The presence of surfactants in wastewater composition tends to jeopardize the efficiency of the traditional aerobic treatment processes. In this regard, the application of Fenton's reaction and nanofiltration as single processes and integrated (nanofiltration followed by Fenton's process) was investigated on the abatement of a solution containing two surfactants usually found in effluents coming from detergent industry (dodecylbenzene--DDB and sodium lauryl ether sulphate--SLES). The potential of a solid waste (iron shavings) as catalyst in the Fenton's process was evaluated and the reaction system was optimized regarding the key operating parameters (iron and hydrogen peroxide concentration and pH). The highest chemical oxygen demand (COD) degradation (66%) was attained for pH 3, [H2O2] = 32 mM and 50 g/L of iron shavings. Besides, it was concluded that oxidation was due to hydroxyl radicals adsorbed on the metal surface even if bulk interaction between hydrogen peroxide and dissolved iron cannot be neglected. The main variables ruling nanofiltration were evaluated (pH, temperature and cross-flow rate). Eighty-four percent of COD rejection was determined at pH 7.5, cross-flow 14.4 cm3 s(-1), 20 degrees C and 15 bar of pressure drop. Finally, nanofiltration followed by Fenton's process under the best conditions was integrated; however, no significant improvement was attained with 85% of COD being globally removed.

  15. Pulmonary surfactant: hydrophobic nature of the mucosal surface of the human amnion.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D B; Hills, B A

    1984-04-01

    The contact angle has been measured for a drop of saline placed upon the rinsed mucosal surface of the amnion in eleven human placental membranes obtained from normal births at full term. The contact angle averaged 70 degrees, indicating a hydrophobic surface comparable with graphite (86 degrees), polyethylene (94 degrees) or oxyntic tissue (85 degrees) which is also exposed to endogenous surface-active phospholipids in vivo. By comparison, four pre-term placentas with an average gestation period of 29.5 weeks gave a mean contact angle of 32 degrees, indicating that hydrophobicity of the placenta increases with maturity (41 weeks) and might well be imparted by adsorbed surfactants present in amniotic fluid and known to render other surfaces hydrophobic. Since the mucosal epithelium of the amnion is exposed to the same surfactants in the same physical state as the fetal alveolar wall, the above results imply that this surface may also be hydrophobic, as indicated in the adult lung by other studies. The concept of surfactant directly adsorbed to the pulmonary tissue surfaces is discussed in connexion with its possible functional advantages in 'de-watering' the lung at birth, maintaining homeostasis by water repellency , releasing airway surfaces and lymph ducts glued by protein and lubricating tissue respiratory movement.

  16. Adsorbate Diffusion on Transition Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    systematically studied adsorption and diffusion of atomic and diatomic species (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) on nanometer-sized Pt and Cu nanoparticles with...species and two diatomic molecules (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) as adsorbates and study the adsorption and diffusion of these adsorbates across the edges

  17. Retention of radium from thermal waters on sand filters and adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Elejalde, C; Herranz, M; Idoeta, R; Legarda, F; Romero, F; Baeza, A

    2007-06-18

    This study was focussed on laboratory experiences of retention of radium from one thermal water on sand filters and adsorbents, trying to find an easy method for the elimination in drinkable waters polluted with this natural radio-nuclide. A thermal water from Cantabria (Spain) was selected for this work. Retention experiences were made with columns of 35 mm of diameter containing 15 cm layers of washed river sand or 4 cm layers of zeolite A3, passing known volumes of thermal water at flows between 4 and 40 ml/min with control of the retained radium by determining the amount in the water after the treatment. The statistical analysis of data suggests that retention depends on the flow and the volume passed through the columns. As additional adsorbents were used kaolin and a clay rich in illite. Jar-test experiences were made agitating known weights of adsorbents with the selected thermal water, with addition of flocculants and determination of radium in filtrated water after the treatment. Data suggest that retention is related to the weight of adsorbent used, but important quantities of radium seem remain in solution for higher amounts of adsorbents, according to the statistical treatment of data. The elution of retained radium from columns or adsorbents, previously used in experiences, should be the aim of a future research.

  18. Surfactant-Assisted Growth of CdS Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C. L.; Hasoon, F. S.

    2005-11-01

    A common non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-100, was used to modify the chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS "buffer" layers on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) data demonstrate that films produced with the surfactant have about the same levels of impurities as films grown without it. For thin, ~130 ..ANG.. CdS layers and relative to devices made without the surfactant, average absolute cell efficiencies were increased from 10.5% to 14.8%, or by a relative 41%. Visual inspection of the CdS depositions reveals one possible mechanism of the surfactant's effects: bubbles that form and adhere to the CIGS surface during the CBD reaction are almost completely eliminated with the addition of the TX-100. Thus, pinholes and thin areas in the CdS layers caused by poor wetting of the substrate surface are sharply reduced, leading to large increases in the open circuit voltage in devices produced with the surfactant.

  19. Surfactants in the management of rhinopathologies

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Philip L.; Palmer, James N.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surfactants are a class of amphiphilic surface active compounds that show several unique physical properties at liquid–liquid or liquid–solid surface interfaces including the ability to increase the solubility of substances, lower the surface tension of a liquid, and decrease friction between two mediums. Because of these unique physical properties several in vitro, ex vivo, and human trials have examined the role of surfactants as stand-alone or adjunct therapy in recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Methods: A review of the literature was performed. Results: The data from three different surfactants have been examined in this review: citric acid zwitterionic surfactant (CAZS; Medtronic ENT, Jacksonville FL), Johnson's Baby Shampoo (Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick NJ), and SinuSurf (NeilMed Pharmaceuticals, Santa Rosa, CA). Dilute surfactant therapy shows in vitro antimicrobial effects with modest inhibition of bacterial biofilm formation. In patients with CRS, surfactants may improve symptoms, most likely through its mucolytic effects. In addition, surfactants have several distinct potential benefits including their ability to improve an irrigant's penetration of the nonoperated sinus and their synergistic effects with antibiotics. However, surfactants potential for nasal irritation and possible transient ciliotoxicity may limit their use. Conclusion: Recent data suggest a possible therapeutic role of surfactants in treating rhinopathologies associated with mucostasis. Further investigation, including a standardization of surfactant formulations, is warranted to further elucidate the potential benefits and drawbacks of this therapy. PMID:23710951

  20. Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 205 NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials (Web, free access)   The NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials is a free, web-based catalog of adsorbent materials and measured adsorption properties of numerous materials obtained from article entries from the scientific literature. Search fields for the database include adsorbent material, adsorbate gas, experimental conditions (pressure, temperature), and bibliographic information (author, title, journal), and results from queries are provided as a list of articles matching the search parameters. The database also contains adsorption isotherms digitized from the cataloged articles, which can be compared visually online in the web application or exported for offline analysis.

  1. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    DOEpatents

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  2. Picosecond adsorbate dynamics at condensed phase interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, T.W.; Chang, Y.J.; Martorell, J.

    1993-12-31

    Picosecond surface second harmonic generation has been used to probe a variety of elementary adsorbate reactions at liquid-solid interfaces. Electron transfer reactions at semiconductor-liquid junctions, geminate recombination of photogenerated free radical pairs and the orientational dynamics of dipolar adsorbates have all been explored in varying degrees of detail. These kinetic studies have led to a detailed analysis of adsorbate detection on the surface of non-centrosymmetric substrates as well as the use of total internal reflection geometries for signal enhancement from optically absorbing liquids. Particular emphasis has been placed on the static and dynamic characterization of adsorbate orientational distribution functions and how these are determined from the torque exerted on adsorbates by the angular part of the molecule-surface interaction potential.

  3. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  4. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications.

  5. Performance of a membrane adsorber for trace impurity removal in biotechnology manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Michael; Cormier, Jason; Ferrence, Jennifer; Dowd, Chris; Kiss, Robert; Lutz, Herbert; Carter, Jeffrey

    2005-06-17

    Membrane adsorbers provide an attractive alternative to traditional bead-based chromatography columns used to remove trace impurities in downstream applications. A linearly scalable novel membrane adsorber family designed for the efficient removal of trace impurities from biotherapeutics, are capable of reproducibly achieving greater than 4 log removal of mammalian viruses, 3 log removal of endotoxin and DNA, and greater than 1 log removal of host cell protein. Single use, disposable membrane adsorbers eliminate the need for costly and time consuming column packing and cleaning validation associated with bead-based chromatography systems, and minimize the required number and volume of buffers. A membrane adsorber step reduces process time, floor space, buffer usage, labor cost, and improves manufacturing flexibility. This "process compression" effect is commonly associated with reducing the number of processing steps. The rigid microporous structure of the membrane layers allows for high process flux operation and uniform bed consistency at all processing scales.

  6. Effect of ionic surfactants on the phase behavior and structure of sucrose ester/water/oil systems.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Carlos; Acharya, Durga P; Hinata, Shigeki; Ishitobi, Masahiko; Kunieda, Hironobu

    2003-06-15

    The phase behavior and structure of sucrose ester/water/oil systems in the presence of long-chain cosurfactant (monolaurin) and small amounts of ionic surfactants was investigated by phase study and small angle X-ray scattering. In a water/sucrose ester/monolaurin/decane system at 27 degrees C, instead of a three-phase microemulsion, lamellar liquid crystals are formed in the dilute region. Unlike other systems in the presence of alcohol as cosurfactant, the HLB composition does not change with dilution, since monolaurin adsorbs almost completely in the interface. The addition of small amounts of ionic surfactant, regardless of the counterion, increases the solubilization of water in W/O microemulsions. The solubilization on oil in O/W microemulsions is not much affected, but structuring is induced and a viscous isotropic phase is formed. At high ionic surfactant concentrations, the single-phase microemulsion disappears and liquid crystals are favored.

  7. Bio-inspired surfactants capable of generating plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Bhadani, Avinash; Rane, Jayant; Veresmortean, Cristina; Banerjee, Sanjoy; John, George

    2015-04-21

    Plants are able to synthesize, store and release lipophilic organic molecules known as plant volatiles (PVs) utilizing specific biological pathways and different enzymes which play vital roles in the plant's defence and in dealing with biotic and abiotic stress situations. The process of generation, storage and release of PVs by plants acquired during the course of evolution is a very complex phenomenon. Bio-inspired molecular design of farnesol-based surfactants facilitates similar production, storage and release of PVs. The designed molecules adsorb at air-water interface and self-aggregate into micelles in aqueous system. The structural design of the molecules allows them to self-activate in water via intramolecular cation-π interactions. The activated molecules undergo molecular rearrangements generating volatile organic molecules both at interface and inside the micelle core. The molecules adsorbed at the interface initially release the formed volatile molecules creating vacant space at interface, thus thermodynamically directing the micelle to release the manufactured volatile products.

  8. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  9. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Fatty Alcohol/Surfactant/Oil/Water Nanoemulsions and Their Cosmetic Applications.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Toru; Tomomasa, Satoshi; Nakajima, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing fatty alcohols and surfactants have been investigated with the aim of developing new formulations that are less viscous and more transparent than conventional milky lotions, as well as for providing greater skin-improving effects. O/W-based creams can be converted to low viscosity milky lotions following their emulsification with a homogenizer at temperatures greater than the transition temperatures of their molecular assemblies (α-gel). The stability of the O/W emulsions evaluated in the current study increased as the transition temperatures of the molecular assemblies formed from their fatty alcohol and surfactant constituents increased. A decrease in the emulsion droplet size led to the formation of a new formulation, which was transparent in appearance and showed a very low viscosity. The absence of a molecular assembly (α-gel) formed by the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules in the aqueous phase allowed for the formation of a stable transparent and low viscosity nanoemulsion. Furthermore, this decrease in droplet size led to an increase in the interfacial area of the emulsion droplets, with almost all of the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules being adsorbed on the surfaces of the emulsion droplets. This was found to be important for preparing a stable transparent formulation. Notably, this new formulation exhibited high occlusivity, which was equivalent to that of an ordinary cosmetic milky lotion, and consequently provided high skin hydration. The nanoemulsion was destroyed following its application to the skin, which led to the release of the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules from the surface of the nanoemulsion into the aqueous phase. These results therefore suggest that the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules organized the molecular assembly (α-gel) and allowed for the reconstruction of the network structure.

  10. Recent progress of the characterization of oppositely charged polymer/surfactant complex in dilution deposition system.

    PubMed

    Miyake, M

    2017-01-01

    A mixture of oppositely charged polymer and surfactants changes the solubilized state, having a complex precipitation region at the composition of electric neutralization. This complex behavior has been applied to surface modification in the fields of health care and cosmetic products such as conditioning shampoos, as a dilution-deposition system in which the polymer/surfactant mixture at the higher surfactant concentration precipitates the insoluble complex by dilution. A large number of studies over many years have revealed the basic coacervation behavior and physicochemical properties of complexes. However, the mechanism by which a precipitated complex performs surface modification is not well understood. The precipitation region and the morphology of precipitated complex that are changed by molecular structure and additives affect the performance. Hydrophilic groups such as the EO unit in polymers and surfactants, the mixing of nonionic or amphoteric surfactant and nonionic polymer, and the addition of low polar solvent influence the complex precipitation region. Furthermore, the morphology of precipitated complex is formed by crosslinking and aggregating among polymers in the dilution process, and characterizes the performance of products. The polymer chain density in precipitated complex is determined by the charges of both the polymer and surfactant micelle and the conformation of polymer. As a result, the morphology of precipitated complexes is changed from a closely packed film to looser meshes, and/or to small particles, and it is possible for the morphology to control the rheological properties and the amount of adsorbed silicone. In the future, further investigation of the relationships between the morphology and performance is needed.

  11. Multilayering of Surfactant Systems at the Air-Dilute Aqueous Solution Interface.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Robert K; Penfold, Jeffrey

    2015-07-14

    In the last 15 years there have been a number of observations of surfactants adsorbed at the air-water interface with structures more complicated than the expected single monolayer. These observations, mostly made by neutron or X-ray reflectivity, show structures varying from the usual monolayer to monolayer plus one or two additional bilayers to multilayer adsorption at the surface. These observations have been assembled in this article with a view to finding some common features between the very different systems and to relating them to aspects of the bulk solution phase behavior. It is argued that multilayering is primarily associated with wetting or prewetting of the air-water interface by phases in the bulk system, whose structures depend on an overall attractive force between the constituent units. Two such phases, whose formation is assumed to be partially driven by strong specific ion binding, are a concentrated lamellar phase that forms at low concentrations and a swollen lamellar phase that is not space-filling. Multilayering phenomena at the air-water interface then offer a delicate and easy means of studying the finer details of the incompletely understood attraction that leads to these two phases, as well as an interesting new means of self-assembling surface structures. In addition, multilayering is often associated with unusual wetting characteristics. Examples of systems discussed, and in some cases their bulk phase behavior, include surfactants with multivalent metal counterions, surfactants with oligomers and polymers, surfactant with hydrophobin, dichain surfactants, lung surfactant, and the unusual system of ethanolamine and stearic acid. Two situations where the air-water surface is deliberately held out of equilibrium are also assessed for features in common with the steady-state/equilibrium observations.

  12. Use of surfactants to reduce the driving voltage of switchable optical elements based on electrowetting.

    PubMed

    Roques-Carmes, Thibault; Gigante, Alexandra; Commenge, Jean-Marc; Corbel, Serge

    2009-11-03

    The advantage of using electrowetting as a novel principle for a reflective display has been previously demonstrated. The principle is based on the controlled two-dimensional movement of an oil/water interface across a hydrophobic fluoropolymer insulator. The main objective of this paper is to show experimentally the influence of surfactants on the electro-optic behavior of a single electrowetting pixel. The concentration and type of nonionic surfactant (Tween 80 and Span 20) have been varied. The experimental data are compared with calculations from the electro-optic model developed previously. The electro-optic performance is significantly affected by the nature and the concentration of surfactant. In the presence of Tween, at concentrations lower than the critical micelle concentration (CMC), and mixtures of Tween and Span the electro-optic behavior can be related to the interfacial tension. When decreasing the oil/water interfacial tension, the amplitude of the driving voltage required for obtaining a given oil displacement decreases and the switching curve becomes steeper. These effects can be accurately reproduced by means of the previously developed electro-optic model. Mixtures of Tween and Span produce a significant synergetic reduction of the driving voltage. For Tween concentrations higher than the CMC and Span, a strong disagreement is observed between the previously developed model and experimental data. Here a new physical model is reported that describes the electro-optic behavior of electrowetting-based optical elements in the presence of surfactants. The model takes into account the actual voltage used to control the liquid movement in electrowetting (lower than the applied voltage), the amount of surfactant adsorbed at the decane/water interface, and the dipole moment of the surfactant molecules. The calculated results are in very good agreement with experimental data without employing fitting parameters. The dipoles interact with the applied

  13. Preparation of nanocrystalline MgO by surfactant assisted precipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei, Mehran; Khajenoori, Majid; Nematollahi, Behzad

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide with high surface area. {yields} MgO prepared with surfactant showed different morphologies compared with the sample prepared without surfactant. {yields} MgO prepared with surfactant showed a plate-like shape. {yields} Refluxing temperature and time and the surfactant to metal molar ratio affect the textural properties of MgO. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide with high surface area was prepared by a simple precipitation method using pluronic P123 triblock copolymer (Poly (ethylene glycol)-block, Poly (propylene glycol)-block, Poly (ethylene glycol)) as surfactant and under refluxing conditions. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption (BET) and scanning and transmission electron microscopies (SEM and TEM). The obtained results revealed that the refluxing time and temperature and the molar ratio of surfactant to metal affect the structural properties of MgO, because of the changes in the rate and extent of P123 adsorption on the prepared samples. The results showed that the addition of surfactant is effective to prepare magnesium oxide with high surface area and affects the morphology of the prepared samples. With increasing the P123/MgO molar ratio to 0.05 the pore size distribution was shifted to larger size. The sample prepared with addition of surfactant showed a plate-like shape which was completely different with the morphology of the sample prepared without surfactant. The formation of nanoplate-like MgO was related to higher surface density of Mg ions on the (0 0 1) plane than that on the other planes of the Mg(OH){sub 2} crystal. The (0 0 1) plane would be blocked preferentially by the adsorbed P123 molecules during the growing process of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoentities and the growth on the (0 0 1) plane would be markedly restricted, and the consequence is the generation of nanoplate-like MgO. In addition, increase in refluxing temperature and time

  14. Do methanethiol adsorbates on the Au(111) surface dissociate?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank

    2006-07-28

    The interaction of methanethiol molecules CH3SH with the Au(111) surface is investigated, and it is found for the first time that the S-H bond remains intact when the methanethiol molecules are adsorbed on the regular Au(111) surface. However, it breaks if defects are present in the Au(111) surface. At low coverage, the fcc region is favored for S atom adsorption, but at saturated coverage the adsorption energies at various sites are almost isoenergetic. The presented calculations show that a methanethiol layer on the regular Au(111) surface does not dimerize.

  15. Do Methanethiol Adsorbates on the Au(111) Surface Dissociate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank

    2006-07-01

    The interaction of methanethiol molecules CH3SH with the Au(111) surface is investigated, and it is found for the first time that the S-H bond remains intact when the methanethiol molecules are adsorbed on the regular Au(111) surface. However, it breaks if defects are present in the Au(111) surface. At low coverage, the fcc region is favored for S atom adsorption, but at saturated coverage the adsorption energies at various sites are almost isoenergetic. The presented calculations show that a methanethiol layer on the regular Au(111) surface does not dimerize.

  16. Nonlinear analysis of the influence of surfactant on the stability of a liquid bilayer inside a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanyuan; Halpern, David; Grotberg, James

    2014-11-01

    The lung's airways are coated internally with a liquid bilayer consisting of a serous layer immediately coating the airway wall and a more viscous mucus layer which is exposed to the gas core. A surface tension instability at the interfaces may lead to the formation of liquid plugs that block the passage of air. This is known as airway closure. Here we consider this thin liquid bilayer coating within a compliant tube in the presence of insoluble surfactant at the mucus-gas interface. Surfactant can reduce the surface tension and induce a stress gradient, both of which are stabilizing. Lubrication theory is used to derive a system of nonlinear evolution equations for the thickness of the layers, the location of the tube wall, and the surfactant concentration. The effects of various parameters, the thickness of the bilayer to the tube radius, the layer thicknesses ratio, the surface tension ratio, and the viscosity ratio between the two layers, and wall compliance parameters, are investigated numerically. For a single layer in a rigid tube, surfactant can increase the closure time by approximately a factor of five. However, for a bilayer, the presence of surfactant slows down the closure time by a significantly larger factor, twenty times or more dependent on system parameters.

  17. Pulmonary surfactant suppressed phenanthrene adsorption on carbon nanotubes through solubilization and competition as examined by passive dosing technique.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Wang, Zhenyu; Mashayekhi, Hamid; Mayer, Philipp; Chefetz, Benny; Xing, Baoshan

    2012-05-15

    Adsorption of phenanthrene on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was examined in the presence of pulmonary surfactant (Curosurf) and its main components, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A passive-dosing method based on equilibrium partitioning from a preloaded polymer was successfully employed to measure phenanthrene binding and speciation at controlled freely dissolved concentrations while avoiding phase separation steps. Curosurf, DPPC, and BSA could all linearly solubilize phenanthrene, and phenanthrene solubilization by Curosurf was 4 times higher than individual components (DPPC or BSA). In the presence of Curosurf, DPPC or BSA, adsorption of phenanthrene by multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) was suppressed, showing competitive adsorption between pulmonary surfactant (or DPPC, BSA) and phenanthrene. Competitive adsorption between Curosurf and phenanthrene was the strongest. Therefore, when phenanthrene-adsorbed CNTs enter the respiratory tract, phenanthrene can be desorbed due to both solubilization and competition. The bioaccessibility of phenanthrene adsorbed on three MWCNTs in the respiratory tract would be positively related to the size of their outer diameters. Moreover, the contribution of solubilization and competition to desorption of phenanthrene from MWCNTs was successfully separated for the first time. These findings demonstrate the two mechanisms on how pulmonary surfactants can enhance desorption and thus possibly biological absorption of phenanthrene adsorbed on CNTs.

  18. Solution behavior of surfactants. Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, K.L.; Fendler, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    This three-volume set constitutes the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Surfactants in Solution held in Sweden in 1982. Volume 1 considers phase behavior and phase equilibria in surfactant solutions (e.g., thermodynamics of partially miscible micelles and liquid crystals; multi-method characterization of micelles; the surfactant-block model of micelle structure). Volume 2 considers thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of micellization (computation of the micelle-size distribution; salt-induced sphere-rod transition of ionic micelles; micellar effects on kinetics and equilibria of electron transfer reactions). Volume 3 considers reverse micelles, microemulsions and reactions in microemulsions. Topics covered include solubilization, surfactants in analytical chemistry, the adsorption and binding of surfactants, the polymerization of organized surfactant assemblies, light scattering by liquid surfaces, and vesicles.

  19. A new nano-engineered hierarchical membrane for concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from oil-in-water nanoemulsion

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Detao; Liu, Zhaoyang; Bai, Hongwei; Sun, Darren Delai; Song, Xiaoxiao

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsions pose a severe threat to both the environment and human health. Recent development of membrane filtration technology has enabled efficient oil removal from oil/water nanoemulsion, however, the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil remains unsolved because the existing filtration membranes still suffer from low surfactant removal rate and serious surfactant-induced fouling issue. In this study, to realize the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from nanoemulsion, a novel hierarchically-structured membrane is designed with a nanostructured selective layer on top of a microstructured support layer. The physical and chemical properties of the overall membrane, including wettability, surface roughness, electric charge, thickness and structures, are delicately tailored through a nano-engineered fabrication process, that is, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet assisted phase inversion coupled with surface functionalization. Compared with the membrane fabricated by conventional phase inversion, this novel membrane has four times higher water flux, significantly higher rejections of both oil (~99.9%) and surfactant (as high as 93.5%), and two thirds lower fouling ratio when treating surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsion. Due to its excellent performances and facile fabrication process, this nano-engineered membrane is expected to have wide practical applications in the oil/water separation fields of environmental protection and water purification. PMID:27087362

  20. A new nano-engineered hierarchical membrane for concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from oil-in-water nanoemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Detao; Liu, Zhaoyang; Bai, Hongwei; Sun, Darren Delai; Song, Xiaoxiao

    2016-04-01

    Surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsions pose a severe threat to both the environment and human health. Recent development of membrane filtration technology has enabled efficient oil removal from oil/water nanoemulsion, however, the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil remains unsolved because the existing filtration membranes still suffer from low surfactant removal rate and serious surfactant-induced fouling issue. In this study, to realize the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from nanoemulsion, a novel hierarchically-structured membrane is designed with a nanostructured selective layer on top of a microstructured support layer. The physical and chemical properties of the overall membrane, including wettability, surface roughness, electric charge, thickness and structures, are delicately tailored through a nano-engineered fabrication process, that is, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet assisted phase inversion coupled with surface functionalization. Compared with the membrane fabricated by conventional phase inversion, this novel membrane has four times higher water flux, significantly higher rejections of both oil (~99.9%) and surfactant (as high as 93.5%), and two thirds lower fouling ratio when treating surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsion. Due to its excellent performances and facile fabrication process, this nano-engineered membrane is expected to have wide practical applications in the oil/water separation fields of environmental protection and water purification.

  1. A new nano-engineered hierarchical membrane for concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from oil-in-water nanoemulsion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Detao; Liu, Zhaoyang; Bai, Hongwei; Sun, Darren Delai; Song, Xiaoxiao

    2016-04-18

    Surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsions pose a severe threat to both the environment and human health. Recent development of membrane filtration technology has enabled efficient oil removal from oil/water nanoemulsion, however, the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil remains unsolved because the existing filtration membranes still suffer from low surfactant removal rate and serious surfactant-induced fouling issue. In this study, to realize the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from nanoemulsion, a novel hierarchically-structured membrane is designed with a nanostructured selective layer on top of a microstructured support layer. The physical and chemical properties of the overall membrane, including wettability, surface roughness, electric charge, thickness and structures, are delicately tailored through a nano-engineered fabrication process, that is, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet assisted phase inversion coupled with surface functionalization. Compared with the membrane fabricated by conventional phase inversion, this novel membrane has four times higher water flux, significantly higher rejections of both oil (~99.9%) and surfactant (as high as 93.5%), and two thirds lower fouling ratio when treating surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsion. Due to its excellent performances and facile fabrication process, this nano-engineered membrane is expected to have wide practical applications in the oil/water separation fields of environmental protection and water purification.

  2. Effect of laundry surfactants on surface charge and colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, Sara; Lowe, Troy A; Hedberg, Jonas; Blomberg, Eva; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall; Wold, Susanna; Lundin, Maria

    2013-07-16

    The stability of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) potentially released from clothing during a laundry cycle and their interactions with laundry-relevant surfactants [anionic (LAS), cationic (DTAC), and nonionic (Berol)] have been investigated. Surface interactions between Ag NPs and surfactants influence their speciation and stability. In the absence of surfactants as well as in the presence of LAS, the negatively charged Ag NPs were stable in solution for more than 1 day. At low DTAC concentrations (≤1 mM), DTAC-Ag NP interactions resulted in charge neutralization and formation of agglomerates. The surface charge of the particles became positive at higher concentrations due to a bilayer type formation of DTAC that prevents from agglomeration due to repulsive electrostatic forces between the positively charged colloids. The adsorption of Berol was enhanced when above its critical micelle concentration (cmc). This resulted in a surface charge close to zero and subsequent agglomeration. Extended DLVO theory calculations were in compliance with observed findings. The stability of the Ag NPs was shown to depend on the charge and concentration of the adsorbed surfactants. Such knowledge is important as it may influence the subsequent transport of Ag NPs through different chemical transients and thus their potential bioavailability and toxicity.

  3. Improving the quality of patchouli oil by adsorption process using surfactant modified of natural zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntari, Purbaningtias, Tri Esti; Wiyantoko, Bayu; Kurniawati, Puji; Prasetyoko, Didik; Suprapto

    2017-03-01

    This research concerns with the development of natural material i.e. natural zeolite. Natural zeolite were modified by surfactant treatment. Material modification has been done using cetyltrimethyllammonium bromide as cationic surfactant for mesopore template. The physicochemical characters of natural material modified and unmodified was investigated by using XRD, FTIR, nitrogen physisorption, and SEM-EDX. The XRD was used to show crystallinity structure of natural material modified and unmodified. Surfactant treatment caused decreasing crystallinity of natural zeolite. The FTIR spectra showed characteristic peaks for natural zeolite modified and unmodified, the bands around 3400-3500 cm-1 and 1635-1641 cm-1 correspond to adsorbed water and bands around finger print area were characteristic for silica and alumina. Meanwhile physisorption nitrogen profiles gave information that the pore modification by surfactant. The morphologies of natural material modified and unmodified as well as chemical composition of the particles were shown by SEM-EDX. The usage of modified material decrease acidity number into 19.47% than unmodified material, which is 7,62%. The GC analysis showed that percentage of patchouli alcohol increases and new peaks were not identified indicated there was not any reaction appeared.

  4. Infrared Analysis Of Enzymes Adsorbed Onto Model Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Gloria M.; Rauch, Deborah S.; Brode, Philip F.; Marcott, Curtis A.

    1989-12-01

    The adsorption of the enzymes, subtilisin BPN' and lysozyme, onto model surfaces was examined using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Using a cylindrical internal reflection (CIRcle) cell with a Germanium (Ge) internal reflection element (IRE), model hydrophilic surfaces were made by plasma cleaning the IRE and model hydrophobic surfaces were made by precoating the IRE with a thin film of polystyrene. Gas chromatography (GC)-IR data collection software was used to monitor adsorption kinetics during the first five minutes after injection of the enzyme into the CIRcle cell. It was found that for both lysozyme and BPN', most of the enzyme that was going to adsorb onto the model surface did so within ten seconds after injection. Nearly an order-of-magnitude more BPN' adsorbed on the hydrophobic Ge surface than the hydrophilic one, while lysozyme adsorbed somewhat more strongly to the hydrophilic Ge surface. Overnight, the lysozyme layer continued to increase in thickness, while BPN' maintained its initial coverage. The appearance of carboxylate bands in some of the adsorbed BPN' spectra suggests the occurrence of peptide bond hydrolysis. A Au/Pd coating on the CIRcle cell o-rings had a significant effect on the adsorption of BPN'. (This coating was applied in an attempt to eliminate interfering Teflon absorption bands.) An apparent electrochemical reaction occurred, involving BPN', Ge, Au/Pd, and the salt solution used to stabilize BPN'. The result of this reaction was enhanced adsorption of the enzyme around the coated o-rings, etching of the Ge IRE at the o-ring site, and some autolysis of the enzyme. No such reaction was observed with lysozyme.

  5. Remediation using trace element humate surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Taylor, Steven Cheney; Bruhn, Debra Fox

    2016-08-30

    A method of remediation at a remediation site having one or more undesirable conditions in which one or more soil characteristics, preferably soil pH and/or elemental concentrations, are measured at a remediation site. A trace element humate surfactant composition is prepared comprising a humate solution, element solution and at least one surfactant. The prepared trace element humate surfactant composition is then dispensed onto the remediation site whereby the trace element humate surfactant composition will reduce the amount of undesirable compounds by promoting growth of native species activity. By promoting native species activity, remediation occurs quickly and environmental impact is minimal.

  6. Inhibition of Aflatoxin Production by Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Susan B.; Mahoney, Noreen E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of 12 surfactants on aflatoxin production, growth, and conidial germination by the fungus Aspergillus flavus is reported. Five nonionic surfactants, Triton X-100, Tergitol NP-7, Tergitol NP-10, polyoxyethylene (POE) 10 lauryl ether, and Latron AG-98, reduced aflatoxin production by 96 to 99% at 1% (wt/vol). Colony growth was restricted by the five nonionic surfactants at this concentration. Aflatoxin production was inhibited 31 to 53% by lower concentrations of Triton X-100 (0.001 to 0.0001%) at which colony growth was not affected. Triton X-301, a POE-derived anionic surfactant, had an effect on colony growth and aflatoxin production similar to that of the five POE-derived nonionic surfactants. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), an anionic surfactant, and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, a cationic surfactant, suppressed conidial germination at 1% (wt/vol). SDS had no effect on aflatoxin production or colony growth at 0.001%. The degree of aflatoxin inhibition by a surfactant appears to be a function of the length of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic chains of POE-derived surfactants. Images PMID:16349144

  7. Clay swelling and formation permeability reductions induced by a nonionic surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, K.H.; Arias, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    A major concern with the use of surfactant flushing to mobilize nonaqueous phase liquids in aquifers is specific mineral-surfactant interactions that may effect significant permeability changes in the soil formation. Soils comprised of Ottawa sand mixed with small percentages of bentonite that had moderate initial hydraulic conductivity were investigated for loss of permeability upon flushing with solution containing a nonionic surfactant (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate). Columns containing 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5% had permeability reductions of 1, 5, 13, 44, 49, and 69%, respectively. The surfactant-clay interactions were further investigated as the cause of the permeability reductions. Some transport of clay through the column was apparent from a small amount of release measured. A permeability change was correlated with the colloid transport in the column with the highest clay concentration, although its effect was transient. Clay swelling was postulated as the primary mechanism for the permeability reductions. It was determined through X-ray diffraction that the surfactant was spreading the silica layer spacings of the clay from a hydration spacing of 15.23 {angstrom} to a surfactant-swelled spacing of 18.02 {angstrom}. A model was formulated to describe the reduced permeability by the increase in clay volume due to swelling measured by X-ray diffraction and was capable of describing the observed data well with an average error of approximately 10%.

  8. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  9. Mysterious Lattice Rotations in Adsorbed Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Renee D.

    1997-03-01

    Lattice rotations due to a mismatch in structure have been observed in film growth for many years, probably beginning in the 1930's with the Nishiyama-Wasserman and Kurdjumov-Sachs orientations observed when fcc(111) films grow on bcc(110) surfaces, or vice versa. Early analysis of this problem was carried out with the aid of Moiré patterns and the observation that the preferred lattice orientations are those which maximize the Moiré fringe spacing. Later energy calculations indicated that the structures which were predicted by the the Moiré technique actually do correspond to energy minima. Epitaxial rotation in adsorbed monolayers is a conceptually simpler problem since in principle it involves only two planes of atoms, and it was first observed in 1977 for Ar on a graphite surface(C. G. Shaw, M. D. Chinn, S. C. Fain, Jr. Phys. Rev. Lett. 41 (1978) 955.). This observation came only a few months after a new theory, based on the expected elastic behavior of an overlayer, was developed by A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague(A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague, Phys. Rev. Lett. 38 (1977) 1286.), and the agreement with the experimental results was remarkable. It was later shown that a few symmetry principles similar to those used for the film growth studies sometimes can also predict the observed structures. However, the situation for incommensurate layers physisorbed on metal surfaces currently looks bleak. None of the existing theories or models appears to describe the experimental results. New data for physisorbed gases on metal surfaces will be presented, along with some half-baked (and probably wrong) ideas for what might be happening. This work was supported by NSF.

  10. Quantification of the Influence of Protein-Protein Interactions on Adsorbed Protein Structure and Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yang; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Latour, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    While protein-surface interactions have been widely studied, relatively little is understood at this time regarding how protein-surface interaction effects are influenced by protein-protein interactions and how these effects combine with the internal stability of a protein to influence its adsorbed-state structure and bioactivity. The objectives of this study were to develop a method to study these combined effects under widely varying protein-protein interaction conditions using hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) adsorbed on silica glass, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polyethylene as our model systems. In order to vary protein-protein interaction effects over a wide range, HEWL was first adsorbed to each surface type under widely varying protein solution concentrations for 2 h to saturate the surface, followed by immersion in pure buffer solution for 15 h to equilibrate the adsorbed protein layers in the absence of additionally adsorbing protein. Periodic measurements were made at selected time points of the areal density of the adsorbed protein layer as an indicator of the level of protein-protein interaction effects within the layer, and these values were then correlated with measurements of the adsorbed protein’s secondary structure and bioactivity. The results from these studies indicate that protein-protein interaction effects help stabilize the structure of HEWL adsorbed on silica glass, have little influence on the structural behavior of HEWL on HDPE, and actually serve to destabilize HEWL’s structure on PMMA. The bioactivity of HEWL on silica glass and HDPE was found to decrease in direct proportion to the degree of adsorption-induce protein unfolding. A direct correlation between bioactivity and the conformational state of adsorbed HEWL was less apparent on PMMA, thus suggesting that other factors influenced HEWL’s bioactivity on this surface, such as the accessibility of HEWL’s bioactive site being blocked by neighboring proteins or the surface

  11. Chest position and pulmonary deposition of surfactant in surfactant depleted rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, R.; Fok, T. F.; Dolovich, M.; Watts, J.; Coates, G.; Bowen, B.; Kirpalani, H.

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the correlation between chest position and the distribution of surfactant in the lungs of surfactant depleted rabbits, to corroborate current guidelines on the intratracheal instillation of exogenous surfactant in newborns. METHODS--Twelve tracheotomised rabbits, depleted of pulmonary surfactant by saline bronchoalveolar lavage, were given intratracheal 99m Technetium labelled Exosurf in three positions (prone, right side down, and left side down) (n = 4 in each group). They were monitored for 10 minutes using dynamic gamma scintigraphy monitoring. Instillation completed, the lateral lying animals were turned to the opposite side to determine whether redistribution of the surfactant had taken place. The amount of radiolabelled surfactant deposited at the peripheral, central, dorsal and ventral parts of the lungs was then estimated by gamma counting of the lung sections at necropsy. RESULTS--Both gamma scintigraphy and gamma counting showed similar rates and total amount of surfactant accumulation in both lungs of the prone animals. In the lateral lying animals surfactant accumulated at a significantly faster rate in the dependent lungs: the amount of surfactant deposition was three to 14-fold that in the raised lungs (p = 0.017; nested ANOVA). Changing the chest position immediately after instillation did not redistribute the surfactant. In all three groups of animals there was no significant difference in deposition between the peripheral, central, ventral and dorsal parts of the lungs. CONCLUSIONS--Pulmonary distribution of intratracheally instilled surfactant is largely determined by gravity, and changing the chest position after instillation does not result in any redistribution of the surfactant. During the instillation of exogenous surfactant to newborn infants, keeping the chest in the horizontal position may therefore result in the most even distribution of the surfactant in the two lungs. Further deposition studies are required to

  12. Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow transition in lung surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoughi, Amir; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2010-11-01

    The lining of normal lungs is covered by surfactants, because otherwise the surface tension of the aqueous layer would be too large to allow breathing. A lack of functioning surfactants can lead to respiratory distress syndrome, a potentially fatal condition in both premature infants and adults, and a major cause of death in the US and world-wide. We use a home-built Brewster angle microscope on an optically accessible deep channel viscometer to simultaneously observe the mesoscale structures of DPPC, the primary constituent of lung surfactant, on water surface and measure the interfacial velocity field. The measured interfacial velocity is compared to Navier-Stokes computations with the Boussinesq-Scriven surface model. Results show that DPPC monolayer behaves i) purely elastically at low surface pressures on water, ii) viscoelastically at modest surface pressures, exhibiting non-zero surface shear viscosity that is independent of the shear rate and flow inertia, and iii) at surface pressures approaching film collapse, DPPC loses its fluid characteristics, and a Newtonian surface model no longer captures its hydrodynamics.

  13. Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K.

    1993-08-01

    The proposed research addressed the application of ESI`s particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system.

  14. Adsorbed Proteins Influence the Biological Activity and Molecular Targeting of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Debamitra; Sundaram, S. K.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Riley, Brian J.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Kaysen, George A.; Moudgil, Brij M.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2007-11-01

    The possible combination of unique physicochemical properties operating at unique sites of action within cells and tissues has led to considerable uncertainty surrounding nanomaterial toxic potential. Here we have investigated the relative importance of proteins adsorbed onto nanomaterial surfaces in guiding uptake and toxicity to determine whether a priori identification of adsorbed proteins will contribute to nanomaterial toxicity assessment. Albumin was identified as the major protein adsorbed onto single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) following incubation with fetal bovine or human serum/plasma, but not when plasma from the Nagase Analbuminemic Rat (NAR) was used, and precoating SWCNTs with a non-ionic surfactant (Pluronic F127) inhibited albumin adsorption. Damaged or structurally altered albumin is rapidly cleared by scavenger receptors. In the RAW 264.7 macrophage-like model, we observed that SWCNTs inhibited the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 ng/ml, 6 hr) and this anti-inflammatory response was inhibited by fucoidan (scavenger receptor antagonist) and by precoating SWCNTs with Pluronic F127. Fucoidan also reduced the uptake of fluorescent SWCNTs (Alexa647) in RAW 264.7 cells. Albumin-coated SWCNTs reduced LPS-mediated Cox-2 induction. SWCNTs did not appear to reduce binding of a fluorescent LPS (Alexa488) to RAW 264.7 cells. The profile of proteins adsorbed onto amorphous silica (50 – 1000 nm) was qualitatively different, relative to SWCNTs, and coating amorphous silica with Pluronic F127 dramatically reduced protein binding and toxicity. Collectively, these observations are consistent with an important role for adsorbed proteins in guiding nanomaterial disposition and toxicity.

  15. Study of Asorption Kinetics of Surfactants onto Polyethersulfone Membrane Surface Using QCM-D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption kinetics of surfactants onto the crystal surface spin-coated with a thin layer of a model membrane material, polyethersulfone was monitored through measurements of frequency and dissipation shifts simultaneously using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) device. In ...

  16. Low temperature synthesis of transition metal oxides containing surfactant ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janauer, Gerald Gilbert

    1998-11-01

    Recently there has been much interest in reacting vanadium oxides hydrothermally with cationic surfactants to form novel layered compounds. A series of new transition metal oxides, however, has also been formed at or near room temperature in open containers. Synthesis, characterization, and proposed mechanisms of formation are the focus of this work. Low temperature reactions of vanadium pentoxide and ammonium transition metallates with long chain amine surfactants, such as dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide yielded interesting new products many of which are layered phases. DTAsb4\\ Hsb2Vsb{10}Osb{28}. 8Hsb2O, a layered highly crystalline phase, is the first such phase for which a single crystal X-ray structure has been determined. The unit cell for this material was found to be triclinic with space group P1-, cell parameters a=9.8945(3)A, b=11.5962(1)A, c=21.9238(2)A, alpha=95.153(2)sp°,\\ beta=93.778(1)sp°, and gamma=101.360(1)sp°. Additionally, a novel tungsten, a molybdenum and a dichromate phase will be discussed. Both the tungsten and the dichromate materials were indexed from their powder diffraction patterns yielding monoclinic unit cells. The tungsten material was found to have a=50.56(4)A, b=54.41(4)A, c=13.12(1)A, and beta=99.21sp°. The dichromate compound was determined to have a=26.757(5)A, b=10.458(2)A, c=14.829(3)A and beta=98.01(1)sp°. Interlayer spacings for the lamellar dichromate and molybdenum phases were d001 = 28.7 A, and d001 = 22.9 A. The synthesis, characterization, composition, and structure of these transition metal oxide-surfactant materials will be discussed.

  17. Surfactant-mediated epitaxy of thin germanium films on SiGe(001) virtual substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J.; Tetzlaff, D.; Bugiel, E.; Wietler, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the impact of a surfactant on the growth mode and strain relaxation of thin Ge films on Si0.21Ge0.79 virtual substrates grown by surfactant mediated epitaxy on Si(001) wafers. Ge epitaxy without surfactant results in island formation after deposition of only 5 nm Ge. A certain part of the strain in the Ge islands is relaxed via interfacial misfit dislocations, which are located within the core part of the islands. We discuss the possibilities for the occurrence of three-dimensional growth at low Ge layer thickness. The use of Sb as a surfactant suppresses three-dimensional islanding and enables the growth of smooth pseudomorphically strained Ge films on Si0.21Ge0.79(001) virtual substrates up to a thickness of 10 nm. At thicknesses higher than 20 nm, the films relax via the formation of a misfit dislocation network at the Ge/ Si1-xGex interface. The surface roughness of up to 30 nm thick layers is below 1.6 nm. Our experimental results corroborate the calculated thickness for plastic relaxation of Ge on Si1-xGex. The effect of the surfactant on the growth of the virtual substrate and on the subsequent growth of Ge on Si0.21Ge0.79 is discussed.

  18. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  19. Chitin Adsorbents for Toxic Metals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Bhatnagar, Amit; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.; Kyzas, George Z.

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater treatment is still a critical issue all over the world. Among examined methods for the decontamination of wastewaters, adsorption is a promising, cheap, environmentally friendly and efficient procedure. There are various types of adsorbents that have been used to remove different pollutants such as agricultural waste, compost, nanomaterials, algae, etc., Chitin (poly-β-(1,4)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) is the second most abundant natural biopolymer and it has attracted scientific attention as an inexpensive adsorbent for toxic metals. This review article provides information about the use of chitin as an adsorbent. A list of chitin adsorbents with maximum adsorption capacity and the best isotherm and kinetic fitting models are provided. Moreover, thermodynamic studies, regeneration studies, the mechanism of adsorption and the experimental conditions are also discussed in depth. PMID:28067848

  20. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  1. IR investigations of surfaces and adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn Williams

    2001-12-10

    Synchrotron infrared reflection-absorption measurements on single crystal metal surfaces with adsorbates have led to the determination of many key parameters related to the bonding vibrational modes and the dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, energy couplings between electrons and adsorbate motion have been shown to be a dominant mechanism on metal surfaces. Excellent agreement has been obtained with calculations for many of the observations, and the synergy between theory and experiment has led to a deeper understanding of the roles of electrons and phonons in determining the properties of interfaces and their roles in phenomena as diverse as friction, lubrication, catalysis and adhesion. Nonetheless, as the experiments are pushed harder, to describe such effects as co-adsorbed systems, disagreements continue to challenge the theory and our comprehension also is still evolving.

  2. Hemolysis by surfactants--A review.

    PubMed

    Manaargadoo-Catin, Magalie; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Pougnas, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    An overview of the use of surfactants for erythrocyte lysis and their cell membrane action mechanisms is given. Erythrocyte membrane characteristics and its association with the cell cytoskeleton are presented in order to complete understanding of the erythrocyte membrane distortion. Cell homeostasis disturbances caused by surfactants might induce changes starting from shape modification to cell lysis. Two main mechanisms are hypothesized in literature which are osmotic lysis and lysis by solubilization even if the boundary between them is not clearly defined. Another specific mechanism based on the formation of membrane pores is suggested in the particular case of saponins. The lytic potency of a surfactant is related to its affinity for the membrane and the modification of the lipid membrane curvature. This is to be related to the surfactant shape defined by its hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties but also by experimental conditions. As a consequence, prediction of the hemolytic potency of a given surfactant is challenging. Several studies are focused on the relation between surfactant erythrolytic potency and their physico-chemical parameters such as the critical micellar concentration (CMC), the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), the surfactant membrane/water partition coefficient (K) or the packing parameter (P). The CMC is one of the most important factors considered even if a lytic activity cut-off effect points out that the only consideration of CMC not enough predictive. The relation K.CMC must be considered in addition to the CMC to predict the surfactant lytic capacity within the same family of non ionic surfactant. Those surfactant structure/lytic activity studies demonstrate the requirement to take into account a combination of physico-chemical parameters to understand and foresee surfactant lytic potency.

  3. Controlling the magnetism of adsorbed metal-organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuch, Wolfgang; Bernien, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Gaining control on the size or the direction of the magnetic moment of adsorbed metal-organic molecules constitutes an important step towards the realization of a surface-mounted molecular spin electronics. Such control can be gained by taking advantage of interactions of the molecule’s magnetic moment with the environment. The paramagnetic moments of adsorbed metal-organic molecules, for example, can be controlled by the interaction with magnetically ordered substrates. Metalloporphyrins and -phthalocyanines display a quasi-planar geometry, allowing the central metal ion to interact with substrate electronic states. This can lead to magnetic coupling with a ferromagnetic or even antiferromagnetic substrate. The molecule-substrate coupling can be mediated and controlled by insertion layers such as oxygen atoms, graphene, or nonmagnetic metal layers. Control on the magnetic properties of adsorbed metalloporphyrins or -phthalocyanines can also be gained by on-surface chemical modification of the molecules. The magnetic moment or the magnetic coupling to ferromagnetic substrates can be changed by adsorption and thermal desorption of small molecules that interact with the fourfold-coordinated metal center via the remaining axial coordination site. Spin-crossover molecules, which possess a metastable spin state that can be switched by external stimuli such as temperature or light, are another promising class of candidates for control of magnetic properties. However, the immobilization of such molecules on a solid surface often results in a quench of the spin transition due to the interaction with the substrate. We present examples of Fe(II) spin-crossover complexes in direct contact with a solid surface that undergo a reversible spin-crossover transition as a function of temperature, by illumination with visible light, or can be switched by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

  4. Controlling the magnetism of adsorbed metal-organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Kuch, Wolfgang; Bernien, Matthias

    2017-01-18

    Gaining control on the size or the direction of the magnetic moment of adsorbed metal-organic molecules constitutes an important step towards the realization of a surface-mounted molecular spin electronics. Such control can be gained by taking advantage of interactions of the molecule's magnetic moment with the environment. The paramagnetic moments of adsorbed metal-organic molecules, for example, can be controlled by the interaction with magnetically ordered substrates. Metalloporphyrins and -phthalocyanines display a quasi-planar geometry, allowing the central metal ion to interact with substrate electronic states. This can lead to magnetic coupling with a ferromagnetic or even antiferromagnetic substrate. The molecule-substrate coupling can be mediated and controlled by insertion layers such as oxygen atoms, graphene, or nonmagnetic metal layers. Control on the magnetic properties of adsorbed metalloporphyrins or -phthalocyanines can also be gained by on-surface chemical modification of the molecules. The magnetic moment or the magnetic coupling to ferromagnetic substrates can be changed by adsorption and thermal desorption of small molecules that interact with the fourfold-coordinated metal center via the remaining axial coordination site. Spin-crossover molecules, which possess a metastable spin state that can be switched by external stimuli such as temperature or light, are another promising class of candidates for control of magnetic properties. However, the immobilization of such molecules on a solid surface often results in a quench of the spin transition due to the interaction with the substrate. We present examples of Fe(II) spin-crossover complexes in direct contact with a solid surface that undergo a reversible spin-crossover transition as a function of temperature, by illumination with visible light, or can be switched by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

  5. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  6. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  7. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1991-01-22

    This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

  8. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  9. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Sea Surface Microlayer and their Effect on Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, N.; Vella, K.; Tartar, A.; Matt, S.; Shivji, M.; Perrie, W. A.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar remote sensing captures various fine-scale features on the ocean surface such as coastal discharges, oil pollution, vessel traffic, algal blooms and sea slicks. Although numerous factors potentially affect the synthetic aperture radar imaging process, the influence of biogenic and anthropogenic surfactants has been suggested as one of the primary parameters, especially under relatively low wind conditions. Surfactants have a tendency to dampen the short gravity-capillary ocean waves causing the sea surface to smoothen, thus allowing the radar to detect areas of surfactants. Surfactants are found in sea slicks, which are the accumulation of organic material shaped as elongated bands on the ocean's surface. Sea slicks are often observable with the naked eye due to their glassy appearance and can also be seen on synthetic aperture radar images as dark scars. While the sources of surfactants can vary, some are known to be of marine bacteria origin. Countless numbers of marine bacteria are present in the oceanic environment, and their biogeochemical contributions cannot be overlooked. Not only does marine-bacteria produce surfactants, but they also play an important role in the transformation of surfactants. In this study, we profiled the surfactant-associated bacteria composition within the biogenic thin layer of the ocean surface more commonly referred as the sea surface microlayer. Bacterial samples were collected from the sea surface microlayer for comparative analysis from both within and outside of sea slick areas as well as the underlying subsurface water. The bacterial microlayer sampling coincided with synthetic aperture radar satellite, RADARSAT-2, overpasses to demonstrate the simultaneous in-situ measurements during a satellite image capture. The sea surface microlayer sampling method was designed to enable aseptic bacterial sampling. A 47 mm polycarbonate membrane was utilized at each sampling site to obtain a snapshot of the

  10. Surface properties of mesoporous carbon-silica gel adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Leboda, R.; Turov, V.V.; Charmas, B.; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J.; Gun'ko, V.M.

    2000-03-01

    Carbon/silica (carbosil) samples prepared utilizing mesoporous silica gel (Si-60) modified by methylene chloride pyrolysis were studied by nitrogen adsorption, quasi-isothermal thermogravimetry, p-nitrophenol adsorption from aqueous solution, and {sup 1}H NMR methods. The structural characteristics and other properties of carbosils depend markedly on the synthetic conditions and the amount of carbon deposited. The changes in the pore size distribution with increasing carbon concentration suggest grafting of carbon mainly in pores, leading to diminution of the mesopore radii. However, heating pure silica gel at the pyrolysis temperature of 550 C leads to an increase in the pore radii. The quasi-isothermal thermogravimetry and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy methods used to investigate the water layers on carbosils showed a significant capability of carbosils to adsorb water despite a relatively large content of the hydrophobic carbon deposit, which represents a nonuniform layer incompletely covering the oxide surface.

  11. Selective retardation of perfume oil evaporation from oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by either surfactant or nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-12-07

    We have used dynamic headspace analysis to investigate the evaporation rates of perfume oils from stirred oil-in-water emulsions into a flowing gas stream. We compare the behavior of an oil of low water solubility (limonene) and one of high water solubility (benzyl acetate). It is shown how the evaporation of an oil of low water solubility is selectively retarded and how the retardation effect depends on the oil volume fraction in the emulsion. We compare how the evaporation retardation depends on the nature of the adsorbed film stabilizing the emulsion. Surfactant films are less effective than adsorbed films of nanoparticles, and the retardation can be further enhanced by compression of the adsorbed nanoparticle films by preshrinking the emulsion drops.

  12. Surfactant-Mediated Growth of Ge/Si(001) Interface Studied by XPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnella, R.; Castrucci, P.; Pinto, N.; Cucculelli, P.; Davoli, I.; Sébilleau, D.; de Crescenzi, M.

    The influence of Sb as a surfactant on the formation of Si/Ge interface is studied by means of XPD (X-ray photoelectron diffraction) and AED (Auger electron diffraction) from Ge and Si core levels. The technique employed is particularly suitable for checking the film tetragonal distortion, the growth morphology and the sharpness of the interface. We found a layer by layer growth mode for 3 ML of Ge on Si(001) and related values of strain of the film close to the value predicted by the elastic theory which enforces the use of such a surfactant to obtain high quality and sharp heterostructures. In addition, studying the influence of 3 ML of the Si cap layer on the 3 ML Ge, we obtain no indication of Ge segregation into the Si cap layer. Finally, evidences of quality degradation after high temperature (T > 600°C) annealing are shown.

  13. Dewetting and deposition of thin films with insoluble surfactants from curved silicone hydrogel substrates.

    PubMed

    Bhamla, M Saad; Balemans, Caroline; Fuller, Gerald G

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the stabilizing effect of insoluble surfactant monolayers on thin aqueous films. We first describe an experimental platform that enables the formation of aqueous films laden with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers on curved silicone hydrogel (SiHy) substrates. We show that these surfactant layers extend the lifetime of the aqueous films. The films eventually "dewet" by the nucleation and growth of dry areas and the onset of this dewetting can be controlled by the surface rheology of the DPPC layer. We thus demonstrate that increasing the interfacial rheology of the DPPC layer leads to stable films that delay dewetting. We also show that dewetting can be exploited to controllably pattern the underlying curved SiHy substrates with DPPC layers.

  14. SURFACTANT SPRAY: A NOVEL TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE FLOTATION DEINKING PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Yulin Deng; Junyong Zhu

    2004-01-31

    Based on the fundamental understanding of ink removal and fiber loss mechanism in flotation deinking process, we developed this innovative technology using surfactant spray to improve the ink removal efficiency, reduce the water and fiber loss, reduce the chemical consumption and carry over in the flotation deinking. The innovative flotation deinking process uses a spray to deliver the frothing agent during flotation deinking to control several key process variables. The spray can control the foam stability and structure and modify the fluid dynamics to reduce the fibers entrapped in the froth layer. The froth formed at the top part of the flotation column will act as a physical filter to prevent the penetration of frothing agent into the pulp suspension to eliminate fiber contamination and unfavorable deinking surface chemistry modification due to surfactant adsorption on the fiber surface. Because of the filter effect, frothing agents will be better utilized. Under the sponsorships of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) and the member companies of the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, we studied the chem-mechanical mechanism of surfactant spray for flotation deinking using different furnishes, chemicals, and flotation devices in the past four years. In the final year of the project, we successfully conducted mill trials at Abitibi-Consolidated, Inc., Snowflake paper recycling operation of 100% mixture of ONP/OMG. Results from laboratory, pilot-plant and mill trials indicated that surfactant spray technology can significantly reduce fiber loss in flotation deinking. It can be concluded that paper industry can profit greatly when this technology is commercialized in flotation deinking mills.

  15. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) specifically binds dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, Y.; Akino, T. )

    1991-02-15

    Phospholipids are the major components of pulmonary surfactant. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is believed to be especially essential for the surfactant function of reducing the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) with a reduced denatured molecular mass of 26-38 kDa, characterized by a collagen-like structure and N-linked glycosylation, interacts strongly with a mixture of surfactant-like phospholipids. In the present study the direct binding of SP-A to phospholipids on a thin layer chromatogram was visualized using 125I-SP-A as a probe, so that the phospholipid specificities of SP-A binding and the structural requirements of SP-A and phospholipids for the binding could be examined. Although 125I-SP-A bound phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyeline, it was especially strong in binding dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but failed to bind phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. Labeled SP-A also exhibited strong binding to distearoylphosphatidylcholine, but weak binding to dimyristoyl-, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-, and dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine. Unlabeled SP-A readily competed with labeled SP-A for phospholipid binding. SP-A strongly bound dipalmitoylglycerol produced by phospholipase C treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but not palmitic acid. This protein also failed to bind lysophosphatidylcholine produced by phospholipase A2 treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. 125I-SP-A shows almost no binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine. The addition of 10 mM EGTA into the binding buffer reduced much of the 125I-SP-A binding to phospholipids. Excess deglycosylated SP-A competed with labeled SP-A for binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but the excess collagenase-resistant fragment of SP-A failed.

  16. The BAC-process for treatment of waste water containing non-ionogenic synthetic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, A S; Koshkina LYu; Ippolitov, K G

    2001-09-01

    In this paper experimental results on the biological-activated carbon (BAC)-process for biological degradation and adsorption of non-ionogenic surfactants (NISS) in the waste water treatment are discussed. It is shown that the mechanism of the BAC-process is not the simple addition but the synergetic combination of biodegradation and carbon adsorption. The major aspects of such synergism are the biological regeneration (bioregeneration) of the adsorbent and the reduction of the toxic effect of waste water contaminants on microorganisms. It is shown that the basis of the bioregeneration process is the desorption of substances previously adsorbed on the activated carbon. The desorption from micropores takes place because of the reverse concentration gradient, due to the microbial degradation of waste water contaminants in the liquid phase. The desorption from mesopores is also supported by the activity of microorganisms exoenzymes. Thus, the process of bioregeneration is featured by two non-contradictory hypotheses.

  17. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets.

  18. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  19. Measuring surfactant concentration in plating solutions

    DOEpatents

    Bonivert, William D.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hachman, John T.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the concentration of surfactants in a electrolyte containing metal ions includes applying a DC bias voltage and a modulated voltage to a counter electrode. The phase angle between the modulated voltage and the current response to the modulated voltage at a working electrode is correlated to the surfactant concentration.

  20. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

  1. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  2. Wettability of a glass surface in the presence of two nonionic surfactant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Szymczyk, Katarzyna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2008-08-05

    Measurements of the advancing contact angle (theta) were carried out for aqueous solution of p-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenoxypoly(ethylene glycol), Triton X-100 (TX100), and Triton X-165 (TX165) mixtures on glass. The obtained results indicate that the wettability of glass depends on the concentration and composition of the surfactant mixture. The relationship between the contact angle and concentration suggests that the lowest wettability corresponds to the concentration of TX100 and TX165 and their mixture near the critical micelle concentration (CMC). The minimum of the dependence between the contact angle and composition of the mixtures for each concentration at a monomer mole fraction of TX100, alpha, equals 0.2 and 0.4 points to synergism in the wettability of the glass surface. In contrast to the results of Zisman ( Zisman, W. A. In Contact Angle, Wettability and Adhesion; Gould, R. F., Ed.; Advances in Chemistry Series 43; American Chemical Society Washington, DC, 1964; p 1 ) there was no linear dependence between cos theta and the surface tension of aqueous solutions of TX100 and TX165 mixtures for all studied systems, but a linear dependence exists between the adhesional tension and surface tension for glass, practically, in the whole concentration range of surfactants studied, the slopes of which are positive in the range of 0.43-0.67. These positive slopes indicate that the interactions between the water molecules and glass surface might be stronger than those between the surface and surfactant molecules. So, the surface excess of surfactant concentration at the glass-water interface is probably negative, and the possibility for surfactant to adsorb at the glass/water film-water interface is higher than that at the glass-water interface. This conclusion is confirmed by the values of the work of adhesion of "pure" surfactants, aqueous solutions of surfactants, and aqueous solutions of their mixtures to the glass surface and by the negative values of

  3. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSOPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2004-04-30

    The aim of the project is to delineate the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions between reservoir minerals and externally added reagents (surfactants/polymers) and its effect on the solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Previous studies have suggested that significant surfactant loss by precipitation or adsorption on reservoir minerals can cause chemical schemes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. Both macroscopic adsorption, wettability and microscopic orientation and conformation studies for various surfactant/polymer mixtures/reservoir rocks systems will be conducted to explore the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this reporting period, the minerals used have been characterized, for particle size distribution and surface area. Also a series of novel cationic Gemini surfactants: butane-1,4-bis(quaternary ammonium chloride), has been synthesized. The solution and adsorption behavior of individual surfactants, the highly surface-active Gemini surfactant C{sub 12}-C{sub 4}-C{sub 12}, the sugar-based nonionic surfactant n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and their mixture has been studied. DM alone shows low adsorption on silica because of the lack of any electrostatic attraction between the surfactant and the silica particle. On the other hand, the cationic Gemini adsorbs markedly on the oppositely charged silica surface. Marked synergism has been observed in the case of DM/C{sub 12}-C{sub 4}-C{sub 12} mixture adsorption on silica. Adsorption of DM from the mixtures increases dramatically in both the rising part and the plateau regions. Adsorption of the cationic Gemini C{sub 12}-C{sub 4}-C{sub 12} from the mixture on the other hand increases in the rising part, but decreases in the plateau regions due to the

  4. Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L. ); Lewis, B.A. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which twenty-one surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Flow of Thin Liquid Films with Surfactant: Analysis, Numerics, and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ellen R.

    When surfactant is deposited on a thin layer of fluid the liquid is instantaneously set into motion. This striking effect is caused by a surface force, the Marangoni force, induced by a surface tension gradient produced by the local presence of surfactant. We investigate the motion of the fluid, and associated spreading of surfactant, in two scenarios: spreading on a horizontal solid substrate, where surface tension is the sole driving force, and on an inclined substrate, where gravity provides an additional force. The governing equations in both cases are derived from the Navier Stokes equations applying the lubrication approximation. The resulting fourth order system of nonlinear PDE consists of two equations: one for the height of the fluid free surface and the other for the distribution of surfactant. On a horizontal substrate, we introduce a droplet of insoluble surfactant on a film with initially uniform height. Neglecting the physical and smoothing effects of gravity, capillarity, and surface diffusion the development of a numerical method is complicated by the loss of smoothness at the leading edge of surfactant. We address this issue by transforming the spatial variable to a fixed domain and using the jump conditions of the simplified system as boundary conditions. These numerical results are then compared to a known similarity scaling and solution developed by Jensen and Grotberg [34, 35] for the region of the solution near the leading edge of the surfactant. We further this investigation by examining the solution near the center of the droplet. Using a phase plane analysis we determine that a similarity solution does exist for this region of the solution. However, this solution contradicts the behavior observed in the numerical simulations and we turn to an asymptotic analysis to determine the structure of the solution, which does not have self-similarity but agrees with numerical simulations. We compare the spreading behavior of the thin film and

  6. Syntheses of amine-type adsorbents with emulsion graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, N.; Bang, L. T.; Tamada, M.

    2007-12-01

    Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) which was precursor monomer for the synthesis of metal ion adsorbent was emulsified by surfactant of Tween 20 (Tw-20). The emulsion of 5% GMA in the water was stable for 48 h at Tw-20 concentration of 0.5%. Graft polymerization of GMA on polyethylene fiber was carried out in the emulsion state at various pre-irradiation doses. Degree of grafting (Dg) reached 103%, 301% and 348% for 1 h grafting at 40 °C with pre-irradiation of 10, 30 and 40 kGy, respectively. But the Dg was depressed when the pre-irradiation dose was over 50 kGy since cross-linking occurred simultaneously in the trunk polymer. Dg decreased with increment of Tw-20 concentration in emulsion of 5% GMA at pre-irradiation of 40 kGy. The three kinds of amine-type adsorbents were synthesized by reacting diethylenetriamine (DETA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and ethylenediamine (EDA) with GMA-grafted polyethylene fiber. The synthesized EDA-type adsorbent had the highest selectivity against U ion and the distribution coefficient was 2.0 × 10 6.

  7. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction.

  8. Solubilisation capacity of Brij surfactants.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria E N P; de Moura, Carolina L; Vieira, Mariano G S; Gramosa, Nilce V; Chaibundit, Chiraphon; de Mattos, Marcos C; Attwood, David; Yeates, Stephen G; Nixon, S Keith; Ricardo, Nágila M P S

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of selected Brij non-ionic surfactants for enhancing the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. Griseofulvin was selected as a model drug candidate enabling comparisons to be made with the solubilisation capacities of other poly(ethylene oxide)-based copolymers. UV/Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopies were used to quantify the enhancement of solubility of griseofulvin in 1 wt% aqueous micellar solutions of Brij 78 (C(18)H(37)E(20)), Brij 98 (C(18)H(35)E(20)) and Brij 700 (C(18)H(37)E(100)) (where E represents the OCH(2)CH(2) unit of the poly(ethylene oxide) chain) at 25, 37 and 40 °C. Solubilisation capacities (S(cp) expressed as mg griseofulvin per g Brij) were similar for Brij 78 and 98 (range 6-11 mg g(-1)) but lower for Brij 700 (3-4 mg g(-1)) as would be expected for the surfactant with the higher ethylene oxide content. The drug loading capacity of micelles of Brij 78 was higher than many di- and triblock copolymers with hydrophilic E-blocks specifically designed for enhancement of drug solubility.

  9. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications.

  10. Influence of a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) on contaminant distribution between water and several soil solids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-F.; Liao, P.-M.; Kuo, C.-C.; Yang, H.-T.; Chiou, C.T.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) on the contaminant distribution coefficients in solid-water mixtures was determined for a number of relatively nonpolar compounds (contaminants) on several natural solids. The studied compounds consisted of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylene) and chlorinated pesticides (lindane, ??-BHC, and heptachlor epoxide), which span several orders of magnitude in water solubility (S(W)); the solid samples comprised a bentonite, a peat, and two other soils, which cover a wide range of solid organic matter (SOM) content. The applied surfactant concentrations (X) ranged from below the (nominal) CMC to 2-3 times the CMC. For relatively water-soluble BTEX compounds, the distribution coefficients with surfactant (K*(d)) all exceeded those without surfactant (K(d)); the K*(d)/K(d) ratios increased with increasing S(w) from p-xylene to benzene on each solid at a given X, with increasing X for each compound on a solid, and with decreasing solid SOM content for each compound over the range of X studied. For the less-soluble pesticides, the K*(d)/K(d) ratios exhibited a large increase with X for bentonite, a marginal change (increase or decrease) for a soil of 2.4% SOM, and a moderate-to-large decrease for two soils of 14.8% and 86.4% SOM. These unique observations were rationalized in terms of the properties of the compound, the amount of surfactant sorbed on the solid, the enhanced solubilization of the compound by surfactant in water, and the relative effects of the surfactant when adsorbed on minerals and when partitioned into SOM. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Silanol-based surfactants: synthetic access and properties of an innovative class of environmentally benign detergents.

    PubMed

    Hurkes, Natascha; Ehmann, Heike M A; List, Martina; Spirk, Stefan; Bussiek, Malte; Belaj, Ferdinand; Pietschnig, Rudolf

    2014-07-21

    Herein, environmentally friendly surfactants based on new silanols as substitutes for the isoelectronic phosphonates were explored. Surface tensions of aqueous solutions are significantly reduced, particularly with those silanols that feature a high ratio of organic moiety to silanol. Besides their use as surfactants, their potential as coating agents for hydrophilic oxide surfaces was investigated for the example of glass substrates. In the solid-state sheet structures with silanol, double layers are present, in which the sheet spacing varies with the alkyl-chain length.

  12. Influence of nonionic surfactants on the surface and interfacial film properties of asphaltenes investigated by Langmuir balance and Brewster angle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanru; Simon, Sébastien; Sjöblom, Johan

    2010-07-06

    The interfacial film properties of asphaltenes and their mixtures with nonionic surfactants (polyoxyethylene nonylphenols) have been investigated using a Langmuir trough and a Brewster angle microscope (BAM). The effects of asphaltene concentration, surfactant/asphaltene ratio, and surfactant HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) have been studied at the air-water interface. The BAM image for asphaltenes show irregular domains with various structures even before compression, indicating preaggregation of asphaltenes in the spreading solution. The film morphology depends on both concentration and total amount of asphaltenes in the spreading solution. Lower proportions of surfactant (5 wt %) compared to asphaltenes increases the film compressibility and disperses the asphaltene domains; however, the behavior of the surface film is still dominated by asphaltenes. When the proportion of surfactant is increased to 50 wt %, surfactant molecules can occupy the interface top layer with multilayer formation by asphaltenes beneath this layer, and a relatively homogeneous film is observed by BAM. At the oil-water interface, surfactant was examined as both an inhibitor and a demulsifier for water-in-oil emulsions. Surfactants with intermediate HLB = 14.2 are most efficient in both cases preventing asphaltene adsorption at the interface by competitive adsorption and breaking the existing asphaltene film by displacement of asphaltenes from the interface.

  13. Reverse micellar extraction of bovine serum albumin - a comparison between the effects of gemini surfactant and its corresponding monomeric surfactant.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Cai, Juan; Guo, Xia

    2013-01-15

    Gemini surfactant displayed distinct advantages over monomeric surfactant in the liquid-liquid reverse micellar extraction process. First, less amount of gemini surfactant than monomeric surfactant was needed for transferring almost complete bovine serum albumin (BSA) into organic phase from aqueous phase. Second, the loading capacity of gemini surfactant reverse micelle phase was much higher than that of the corresponding monomeric surfactant reverse micelle. Third, efficient backward extraction (75-92%) of BSA could be effected in a wide pH range from 4 to 9 with gemini surfactant reverse micelle while a pH of ca. 4.3 is prerequisite to the recovery of BSA from monomeric surfactant reverse micelle. So far, the reports about the effect of surfactant structure on protein extraction have been limited. This study indicates the important role of the spacer of gemini surfactant in protein extraction process and may provide more knowledge on how to optimise surfactant structure.

  14. Exogenous Pulmonary Surfactant as a Vehicle for Antimicrobials: Assessment of Surfactant-Antibacterial Interactions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its unique surface-active properties, an exogenous pulmonary surfactant may become a promising drug delivery agent, in particular, acting as a vehicle for antibiotics in topical treatment of pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to assess a mutual influence of natural surfactant preparation and three antibiotics (amikacin, cefepime, and colistimethate sodium) in vitro and to identify appropriate combination(s) for subsequent in vivo investigations of experimental surfactant/antibiotic mixtures. Influence of antibiotics on surface-active properties of exogenous surfactant was assessed using the modified Pattle method. Effects of exogenous surfactant on antibacterial activity of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated using conventional microbiologic procedures. Addition of amikacin or cefepime to surfactant had no significant influence on surface-active properties of the latter. Obvious reduction of surface-active properties was confirmed for surfactant/colistimethate composition. When suspended with antibiotics, surfactant either had no impact on their antimicrobial activity (amikacin) or exerted mild to moderate influence (reduction of cefepime bactericidal activity and increase of colistimethate bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa). Considering favorable compatibility profile, the surfactant/amikacin combination is advisable for subsequent investigation of joint surfactant/antibacterial therapy in animals with bacterial pneumonia. PMID:24876994

  15. Variation in performance of surfactant loading and resulting nitrate removal among four selected natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Guan, Huade; Bestland, Erick; Zhu, Chuanyu; Zhu, Honglin; Albertsdottir, Dora; Hutson, John; Simmons, Craig T; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Tao, Xian; Ellis, Amanda V

    2010-11-15

    Surfactant modified zeolites (SMZs) have the capacity to target various types of water contaminants at relatively low cost and thus are being increasingly considered for use in improving water quality. It is important to know the surfactant loading performance of a zeolite before it is put into application. In this work we compare the loading capacity of a surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br), onto four natural zeolites obtained from specific locations in the USA, Croatia, China, and Australia. The surfactant loading is examined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We then compare the resulting SMZs performance in removing nitrate from water. Results show that TGA is useful to determine the HDTMA loading capacity on natural zeolites. It is also useful to distinguish between a HDTMA bi-layer and a HDTMA mono-layer on the SMZ surface, which has not been previously reported in the literature. TGA results infer that HDTMA (bi-layer) loading decreases in the order of US zeolite>Croatian zeolite>Chinese zeolite>Australian zeolite. This order of loading explains variation in performance of nitrate removal between the four SMZs. The SMZs remove 8-18 times more nitrate than the raw zeolites. SMZs prepared from the selected US and Croatian zeolites were more efficient in nitrate removal than the two zeolites commercially obtained from Australia and China.

  16. Fluctuation mechanism of the dielectric polarization of water-in-oil microemulsions with ionic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovich, Nick; Puzenko, Alexander; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Feldman, Yuri

    1998-08-01

    A statistical model is proposed to describe the dielectric polarization of ionic microemulsions at a region far below percolation in which the microemulsions consist of spherical single droplets with water in the central core surrounded by a layer of surfactant molecules. The model describes the effect of temperature and dispersed phase content on the behavior of the dielectric polarization of ionic water-in-oil microemulsions and explains the experimentally observed increase of the static dielectric permittivity as a function of temperature. The microemulsions formed with surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate have been analyzed with the help of this model. The systems are considered to consist of nanometer-sized spherical noninteracting water droplets of equal size with negatively charged head groups, staying at the interface, and positive counterions, distributed in the electrical diffuse double layer of the droplet interior. It is shown that the droplet polarizability is proportional to the mean-square fluctuation dipole moment of the droplet. This mean-square dipole moment and the corresponding value of the dielectric increment depend on the equilibrium distribution of counterions within a diffuse double layer. The density distribution of ions is determined by the degree of the dissociation of the ionic surfactant. The relationship between the dielectric permittivity, the constant of dissociation of surfactant, the content of the dispersed phase, and the temperature has been ascertained.

  17. Studying luminescent characteristics of the specific surfactants in various regions of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdowska, V.; Darecki, M.; Gutowska, D.; Makuch, P.; Kowalczyk, J.; Strzałkowska, A.; Petelski, T.; Piskozub, J.

    2012-04-01

    The sea surface layer is the interface between the atmosphere and marine environment, where there are a variety of physical, biological and chemical processes that contribute to accumulation and exchange of surface-active-agents (surfactants). At the same time the dynamic properties of the water surface (surface wave spectrum) and fluxes (especially in gas exchange and production of marine aerosol) and even the apparent and real optical properties of seawater are affected by the surfactants gathered on the sea surface. Moreover, the presence of the surface film may restrict the supply of light energy into the depths of the sea. The study was conducted in different regions of the Baltic Sea which also assessed the impact of external environment (estuaries, vicinity of the ports and shipping routs) on the marine environment. The primary scientific objectives were: - to investigate the variability of luminescent properties of surfactants and organic matter contained in the surface film and layer of the sea from the results of spectrophotometric studies. - to find any special surfactants (characterized by luminescent properties) occurring in certain regions of the Baltic. The practical aim was to answer the question whether and to what extent changes in luminescence properties of organic matter contained in the film and the layer depend on the biological activity of the basin and how they affect the water leaving radiance remotely measured over the surface of the sea.

  18. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  19. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  20. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  1. Control of formaldehyde emission from wood-based panels by doping adsorbents: optimization and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhongkai; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-06-01

    This paper puts forward an approach to determine the optimal mode of doping adsorbents into the wood-based panels for control of their formaldehyde emission. Based on the optimization conclusion, a novel design method for low-emitting wood-based panels by daubing adsorbent layer on the panel's surface is proposed. The formaldehyde emission results from the prepared laboratory specimens indicate the feasibility of the proposed method. This study provides a meaningful guidance on designing low-emitting wood-based panels.

  2. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  3. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-15

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  4. A study of surfactant-assisted waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Scamehorn, J F; Harwell, J H

    1990-09-01

    In surfactant-assisted waterflooding, a surfactant slug is injected into a reservoir, followed by a brine spacer, followed by second surfactant slug. The charge on the surfactant in the first slug has opposite sign to that in the second slug. When the two slugs mix in the reservoir, a precipitate or coacervate is formed which plugs the permeable region of the reservoir. Subsequently injected water or brine is forced through the low permeability region of the reservoir, increasing sweep efficiency of the waterflood, compared to a waterflood not using surfactants. In this part of the work, two major tasks are performed. First, core floods are performed with oil present to demonstrate the improvement in incremental oil production, as well as permeability modification. Second, a reservoir simulation model will be proposed to further delineate the optimum strategy for implementation of the surfactant-assisted waterflooding, as well as indicate the reservoir types for which it would be most effective. Surfactants utilized were sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride. 44 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  6. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  7. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity.

  8. Fluorescence emission of pyrene in surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, Lucas; Novo, Mercedes; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2015-01-01

    The systematic description of the complex photophysical behaviour of pyrene in surfactant solutions in combination with a quantitative model for the surfactant concentrations reproduces with high accuracy the steady-state and the time resolved fluorescence intensity of pyrene in surfactant solutions near the cmc, both in the monomer and in the excimer emission bands. We present concise model equations that can be used for the analysis of the pyrene fluorescence intensity in order to estimate fundamental parameters of the pyrene-surfactant system, such as the binding equilibrium constant K of pyrene to a given surfactant micelle, the rate constant of excimer formation in micelles, and the equilibrium constant of pyrene-surfactant quenching. The values of the binding equilibrium constant K(TX100)=3300·10³ M⁻¹ and K(SDS)=190·10³ M⁻¹ for Triton X-100 (TX100) and SDS micelles, respectively, show that the partition of pyrene between bulk water and micelles cannot be ignored, even at relatively high surfactant concentrations above the cmc. We apply the model to the determination of the cmc from the pyrene fluorescence intensity, especially from the intensity ratio at two vibronic bands in the monomer emission or from the ratio of excimer to monomer emission intensity. We relate the finite width of the transition region below and above the cmc with the observed changes in the pyrene fluorescence in this region.

  9. Nanostructured chitosan-surfactant matrices as polyphenols nanocapsules template with zero order release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gârlea, Ana; Melnig, V; Popa, M I

    2010-04-01

    Nanostructured membranes and films of cationic surfactant-chitosan with tannic acid as polyphenol model were obtained by phase inversion method. The membranes were investigated by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRred, X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Thermogravimetry, and the films topography was analysed by Atomic Force Microscopy. The analysis reveals that the interactions at the molecular level between cationic CTAB surfactant and cationic chitosan polymer strive to weaken membrane stability, whereas, the tannic acid is favoured to cluster with CTAB and diminish the membrane thermodynamic instability. The nanocapsules formed, with dimensions in the range of 16.35-27.68 nm, are congregating in clusters having dimensions in the domain of 50-300 nm. The layers resulted from these nanostructures arrangement constitute a surfactant-chitosan matrix with tannic acid suitable for drug controlled release with zero order kinetics.

  10. Influence of surfactants in forced dynamic dewetting.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Franziska; Fell, Daniela; Truszkowska, Dorota; Weirich, Marcel; Anyfantakis, Manos; Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Wagner, Manfred; Auernhammer, Günter K; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-09-20

    In this work we show that the forced dynamic dewetting of surfactant solutions depends sensitively on the surfactant concentration. To measure this effect, a hydrophobic rotating cylinder was horizontally half immersed in aqueous surfactant solutions. Dynamic contact angles were measured optically by extrapolating the contour of the meniscus to the contact line. Anionic (sodium 1-decanesulfonate, S-1DeS), cationic (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) and nonionic surfactants (C4E1, C8E3 and C12E5) with critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) spanning four orders of magnitude were used. The receding contact angle in water decreased with increasing velocity. This decrease was strongly enhanced when adding surfactant, even at surfactant concentrations of 10% of the critical micelle concentration. Plots of the receding contact angle-versus-velocity almost superimpose when being plotted at the same relative concentration (concentration/CMC). Thus the rescaled concentration is the dominating property for dynamic dewetting. The charge of the surfactants did not play a role, thus excluding electrostatic effects. The change in contact angle can be interpreted by local surface tension gradients, i.e. Marangoni stresses, close to the three-phase contact line. The decrease of dynamic contact angles with velocity follows two regimes. Despite the existence of Marangoni stresses close to the contact line, for a dewetting velocity above 1-10 mm s(-1) the hydrodynamic theory is able to describe the experimental results for all surfactant concentrations. At slower velocities an additional steep decrease of the contact angle with velocity was observed. Particle tracking velocimetry showed that the flow profiles do not differ with and without surfactant on a scales >100 μm.

  11. Silica supported phospholipid layers doped with GM1: A comparison between different methods.

    PubMed

    Santos, Olga; Arnebrant, Thomas

    2009-01-15

    A method to coat hydrophobic surfaces with lipid molecules in a reproducible manner and in which the lipid molecules are resistant to detergent washings, would benefit the development of new ELISA assays. This work presents different approaches to build 1,2-dioleolyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) layers doped with a monosialoganglioside (GM1) supported on silica surfaces, which are stable toward buffer rinsing and washing with surfactant (Tween 20). The three methods employed were: method 1, coadsorption of DOPC:GM1 (0-10 mol%) with the surfactant n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside (DDM) from micellar solutions, with successive adsorption and rinsing steps; method 2, vesicle fusion from DOPC: GM1 (0-10 mol%) liposomes; and method 3, deposition of GM1 from organic solvent (chloroform) and exposure to an aqueous environment (hydration method). The vesicle fusion method was also tested in polystyrene surfaces. Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was used to detect the presence of GM1 on the formed layers. The results indicated that the vesicle fusion was the only method that was successful in creating stable mono- and bilayers onto hydrophobized and hydrophilic silica, respectively. The mixed micellar solution method was suitable for creating pure lipid (DOPC) monolayers but the incorporation of GM1 in the micelles led to monolayers which were very unstable with respect to buffer rinsing. The hydration method led to monolayers of GM1 that were partly rinsed of