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Sample records for adsorbed surfactant molecules

  1. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  2. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  3. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  4. Relationship between surface viscosity and surface composition of adsorbed surfactant films

    SciTech Connect

    Djabbarah, N.F.; Wasan, D.T.

    1982-02-01

    The single-bubble foaming technique was used to determine the surface excess concentrations of aqueous solutions of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and lauryl alcohol (LOH). The excess concentrations of sodium lauryl sulfate-lauryl alcohol showed that lauryl alcohol is preferentially adsorbed at the surface, but only partially displaces sodium lauryl sulfate. This causes a higher total surface concentration and, consequently, a closer packing of surfactant molecules. The total surface excess concentration increases with an increase in the bulk concentration of the 2 surfactants until the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is reached. At concentrations exceeding the CMC, the surface excess concentration of LOH remains virtually constant, while that of SLS declines. This is due to the formation of SLS micelles. The surface excess concentration data have been used to estimate the extent of molecular packing at the gas/liquid interface and to assess interactions among surfactant molecules in order to explain trends in surface viscosity of a mixed surfactant system adsorbed from an aqueous solution. 30 references.

  5. Imaging the wave functions of adsorbed molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F. Stefan; Ramsey, Michael G.; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The basis for a quantum-mechanical description of matter is electron wave functions. For atoms and molecules, their spatial distributions and phases are known as orbitals. Although orbitals are very powerful concepts, experimentally only the electron densities and -energy levels are directly observable. Regardless whether orbitals are observed in real space with scanning probe experiments, or in reciprocal space by photoemission, the phase information of the orbital is lost. Here, we show that the experimental momentum maps of angle-resolved photoemission from molecular orbitals can be transformed to real-space orbitals via an iterative procedure which also retrieves the lost phase information. This is demonstrated with images obtained of a number of orbitals of the molecules pentacene (C22H14) and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (C24H8O6), adsorbed on silver, which are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. The procedure requires no a priori knowledge of the orbitals and is shown to be simple and robust. PMID:24344291

  6. Adsorption of phenol molecules by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants deposited on solid surfaces: A computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Peredo-Mancilla, Deneb; Dominguez, Hector

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption studies of phenol molecules on a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations were carried out in bulk and on three distinct solid surfaces, silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide and graphite. It was observed that different surfactant micellar shapes were formed on the surfaces. For the silicon dioxide and titanium dioxide surfaces the surfactants were adsorbed by their headgroups whereas for the graphite surface they were adsorbed mainly by their tail groups. It was found that the amount of phenol adsorbed on the SDS micelle was altered by the surfactant shape deposited on the solid surface. However, the best phenol adsorption was obtained by the surfactant modified silicon dioxide surface. Moreover, in all cases, from structural investigations, it was determined that the phenol molecules were located inside the surfactant micelle with their hydroxyl groups close to the SDS headgroups. PMID:26973047

  7. Effect of alkane chain length and counterion on the freezing transition of cationic surfactant adsorbed film at alkane mixture - water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yuhei; Sakamoto, Hiroyasu; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-05-21

    Penetration of alkane molecules into the adsorbed film gives rise to a surface freezing transition of cationic surfactant at the alkane-water interface. To examine the effect of the alkane chain length and counterion on the surface freezing, we employed interfacial tensiometry and ellipsometry to study the interface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride aqueous solutions against dodecane, tetradecane, hexadecane, and their mixtures. Applying theoretical equations to the experimental results obtained, we found that the alkane molecules that have the same chain length as the surfactant adsorb preferentially into the surface freezing film. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the freezing transition temperature of cationic surfactant adsorbed film was independent of the kind of counterion. PMID:25932500

  8. Surfactant induced aggregation behavior of Merocyanine-540 adsorbed on polymer coated positively charged gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, K.; Uppal, A.; Saini, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant induced aggregation behavior of Merocyanine 540 adsorbed on polymer (PDD) coated gold nanoparticles (AuNP) is reported. The absorption band of the dye shifts to higher energy in the presence of free polymer and polymer coated AuNP implying aggregation. Addition of a negatively charged surfactant (SDS) induces multiple bands in the extinction spectrum of the dye adsorbed on nanoparticle surface. The highest (460 nm) and lowest (564 nm) energy bands of the dye become prominent at 10 and >50 μM SDS concentrations respectively (dye: 10 μM; AuNP: 100-200 pM). Based on earlier results the high energy band is likely to originate from dye aggregates and the low energy band is likely to originate from dye monomers. This is attributed to the interplay between polymer-surfactant and polymer-dye interactions at the AuNP surface. The extinction spectra of dye adsorbed at AuNP surface remain unaffected in the presence of a positively charged (CTAB) or a neutral surfactant (Tx-100), at low surfactant concentrations. However at higher surfactant concentrations (>60 μM) dye aggregation takes place which is attributed to dye-surfactant interactions. The fluorescence intensity of the dye quenched significantly but its lifetime increased in the presence of polymer coated AuNP. This is attributed to aggregation and reduction in the photoisomerization rate of the dye adsorbed on AuNP surface.

  9. Enhanced CO2 adsorptive performance of PEI/SBA-15 adsorbent using phosphate ester based surfactants as additives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dandan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Haiqiang; Weng, Xiaole; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a series of polyetherimide/SBA-15: 2-D hexagonal P6mm, Santa Barbara USA (PEI/SBA-15) adsorbents modified by phosphoric ester based surfactants (including tri(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (BEP) and trimethyl phosphonoacetate (TMPA)) were prepared for CO2 adsorption. Experimental results indicated that the addition of TEP and BEP had positive effects on CO2 adsorption capacity over PEI/SBA-15. In particular, the CO2 adsorption amount could be improved by around 20% for 45PEI-5TEP/SBA-15 compared to the additive-free adsorbent. This could be attributed to the decrease of CO2 diffusion resistance in the PEI bulk network due to the interactions between TEP and loaded PEI molecules, which was further confirmed by adsorption kinetics results. In addition, it was also found that the cyclic performance of the TEP-modified adsorbent was better than the surfactant-free one. This could be due to two main reasons, based on the results of in situ DRIFT and TG-DSC tests. First and more importantly, adsorbed CO2 species could be desorbed more rapidly over TEP-modified adsorbent during the thermal desorption process. Furthermore, the enhanced thermal stability after TEP addition ensured lower degradation of amine groups during adsorption/desorption cycles. PMID:26702962

  10. Fabrication of novel microstructures based on orientation-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules in a TMAH solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Prem; Sato, K.; Gosalvez, M. A.; Tang, B.; Hida, H.; Shikida, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the orientation-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules on the silicon surface during etching in surfactant-added tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) is investigated. Triton X-100 (C14H22O(C2H4O)n, n = 9-10) and 25 wt% TMAH are used as surfactant and main etchant, respectively. The crystallographic planes affected by the surfactant molecules are determined by analyzing the etching behavior of different mask patterns on Si{1 0 0} wafers and silicon hemispheres in pure and surfactant-added TMAH. Taken together, the shapes of the etched profiles and the analysis of the hemispherical etch rates confirm that thick and dense adsorbed surfactant layers are typically formed on both the exact and vicinal Si{1 1 0} surfaces. In addition, the results indicate that the adsorbed surfactant layer behaves as a permeable mask, partially slowing down the etch rate of the affected surface orientation/s and thus enforcing their appearance on the etching front. The peculiar etching properties of surfactant-added and surfactant-free TMAH are then utilized for the fabrication of advanced micromechanical structures with new shapes on Si{1 0 0} wafers and polydimethylsiloxane based on complex Si{1 0 0} molds.

  11. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.S.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1982-02-02

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  12. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1980-08-20

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  13. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., James S.; Westmoreland, Clyde G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  14. Adsorbed molecules in external fields: Effect of confining potential.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Ashish; Silotia, Poonam; Maan, Anjali; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational excitation of a molecule adsorbed on a surface. As is well known the interaction potential between the surface and the molecule can be modeled in number of ways, depending on the molecular structure and the geometry under which the molecule is being adsorbed by the surface. We explore the effect of change of confining potential on the excitation, which is largely controlled by the static electric fields and continuous wave laser fields. We focus on dipolar molecules and hence we restrict ourselves to the first order interaction in field-molecule interaction potential either through permanent dipole moment or/and the molecular polarizability parameter. It is shown that confining potential shapes, strength of the confinement, strongly affect the excitation. We compare our results for different confining potentials. PMID:27387127

  15. Rupture force of adsorbed self-assembled surfactant layers. Effect of the dielectric exchange force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Ceotto, G.; de Souza, E. F.

    2001-08-01

    The tip applied force necessary to obtain tip/substrate contact, i.e., rupture force between adsorbed layers of self-assembled surfactant films and atomic force microscope (AFM) tips in water has been measured. A substantial contribution of this rupture force is due to the dielectric exchange force (DEF). The DEF model is in agreement with the observation that the surfactant layer rupture forces are smaller in the thickest layers, where the compactness of the adsorbed film results in the smallest values of the dielectric permittivity. Within experimental accuracy a dielectric permittivity value of ˜4 for bilayers and of ˜36 for monolayers is found.

  16. Inhomogeneous distribution of organic molecules adsorbed in sol gel glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Sánchez-Villicaña, V.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J. J.; King, T. A.

    1999-09-01

    The effects of the porous matrix upon the radiative characteristics of quinine sulphate doped sol-gel glasses are investigated. The broadenings of the absorption and fluorescence spectra are explained by the attachment of the molecules on distorted sites or in a non-planar fashion, creating an inhomogeneous distribution of adsorbed molecules. For this reason, each emitting center relaxes with its own characteristics. This inhomogeneous distribution is also supported by the non-exponential and the wavelength dependence of the fluorescence decay.

  17. Probing atomic positions of adsorbed ammonia molecules in zeolite.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Lo, Benedict T W; Qu, Jin; Wilkinson, Ian; Hughes, Tim; Murray, Claire A; Tang, Chiu C; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2016-02-25

    Atomic positions and interactions between adsorbed guest molecules, such as ammonia in H-ZSM-5 microporous solids, are for the first time revealed by making use of the change in the periodical scattering parameter using in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction combined with refinement within experimental errors. PMID:26833032

  18. Hydrogen molecule on lithium adsorbed graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Gaganpreet, Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structure calculations for the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on lithium (Li) decorated and pristine graphene have been studied systematically using SIESTA code [1] within the framework of the first-principle DFT under the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)[2], including spin polarization. The energy of adsorption of hydrogen molecule on graphene is always enhanced by the presence of co-adsorbed lithium. The most efficient adsorption configuration is when H2 is lying parallel to lithium adsorbed graphene which is in contrast to its adsorption on pristine graphene (PG) where it prefers perpendicular orientation.

  19. Candidate Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs: Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Chuntai; Hu, Jun; Han, Sungho; Yu, Clare C; Wu, R Q

    2015-08-14

    A major obstacle to using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as qubits is flux noise. We propose that the heretofore mysterious spins producing flux noise could be O_{2} molecules adsorbed on the surface. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that an O_{2} molecule adsorbed on an α-alumina surface has a magnetic moment of ~1.8 μ_{B}. The spin is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the O-O bond, the barrier to spin rotations is about 10 mK. Monte Carlo simulations of ferromagnetically coupled, anisotropic XY spins on a square lattice find 1/f magnetization noise, consistent with flux noise in Al SQUIDs. PMID:26317742

  20. Theory of raman scattering from molecules adsorbed at semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueba, H.

    1983-09-01

    A theory is presented to calculate the Raman polarizability of an adsorbed molecule at a semiconductor surface, where the electronic excitation in the molecular site interacts with excitons (elementary excitations in the semiconductor) through non-radiative energy transfer between them, in an intermediate state in the Raman scattering process. The Raman polarizability thus calculated is found to exhibit a peak at the energy corresponding to a resonant excitation of excitons, thereby suggesting the possibility of surface enhanced Raman scattering on semiconductor surfaces. The mechanism studied here can also give an explanation of a recent observation of the Raman excitation profiles of p-NDMA and p-DMAAB adsorbed on ZnO or TiO 2, where those profiles were best described by assuming a resonant intermediate state of the exciton transition in the semiconductors. It is also demonstrated that in addition to vibrational Raman scattering, excitonic Raman scattering of adsorbed molecules will occur in the coupled molecule-semiconductor system, where the molecular returns to its ground electronic state by leaving an exciton in the semiconductor. A spectrum of the excitonic Raman scattering is expected to appear in the background of the vibrational Raman band and to be characterized by the electronic structure of excitons. A desirable experiment is suggested for an examination of the theory.

  1. Coalescence during emulsification. 2. Role of small molecule surfactants.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Lloyd; Svereika, Aileen

    2003-05-15

    An oil-soluble hexadecyl pyrene (HDP) probe is used to monitor coalescence of hexadecane oil-in-water emulsions, during emulsification, in stirred systems and in a high-pressure homogenizer (microfluidizer), when small molecule surfactants are used as emulsifiers. The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration and salt concentration on the amount of coalescence and final drop size is studied. The behavior of oil-soluble surfactants and mixtures of oil-soluble and water-soluble surfactants on emulsification performance is also discussed. For high-pressure homogenizers, the drop sizes obtained are found to depend mostly on the ability of surfactants to stabilize the drops against coalescence, rather than their ability to reduce the interfacial tension. Increasing oil phase fractions increase the coalescence rate, because of the increase in collision frequency, which, in turn, impacts the drop size of the homogenized emulsion. PMID:16256561

  2. A simple model for electronic properties of surface adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Rajesh; Schwalm, William

    We adapt a minimal approximation to one electron quantum theory of molecules referred as Fast Accurate Kinetic Energy method. This in principle handles large complex molecular structures with less computational effort to compute electronic properties of adsorbed molecules. Kinetic energy integrals are calculated accurately but multi-electron potential energy integrals are approximated. The neighboring atom interactions are included also. For layers of isopthalic acids formed on pyrolytic graphite the configuration changes as a function of length of hydrocarbon tails. We study properties of this system as a function of tail length.

  3. SPR-MS: from identifying adsorbed molecules to image tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Jean-François; Breault-Turcot, Julien; Forest, Simon; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have become valuable analytical sensors for biomolecule detection. While SPR is heralded with high sensitivity, label-free and real-time detection, nonspecific adsorption and detection of ultralow concentrations remain issues. Nonspecific adsorption can be minimized using adequate surface chemistry. For example, we have employed peptide monolayers to reduce nonspecific adsorption of crude serum or cell lysate. It is important to uncover the nature of molecules nonspecifically adsorbing to surfaces in these biofluids, to further improve understanding of the nonspecific adsorption processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) provides a complementary tool to SPR to identify biomolecule adsorbed to surface. Trypsic digestion of the proteins adsorbed to surfaces led to identification of characteristic peptides from the proteins involved in nonspecific adsorption. Nonspecific adsorption in crude cell lysate results mainly from lipids, as confirmed with SPR and MS but proteins were observed on some surfaces. In another application of SPR and MS, imaging SPR can be used in combination to imaging MS to image tissue sections. Thin sections of mouse liver were inserted in the fluidic chamber of a SPRi instrument and proteins were transferred to the SPRi chip. The SPR chip was then imaged using MALDI imaging MS to identify the biomolecules that were transferred to the SPRi chip.

  4. Charged supramolecular assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, David; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Indelicato, Sergio; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo; Indelicato, Serena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to critically analyze recent literature on charged supramolecular assemblies formed by surfactant molecules in gas phase. Apart our specific interest on this research area, the stimuli to undertake the task arise from the widespread theoretical and applicative benefits emerging from a comprehensive view of this topic. In fact, the study of the formation, stability, and physicochemical peculiarities of non-covalent assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase allows to unveil interesting aspects such as the role of attractive, repulsive, and steric intermolecular interactions as driving force of supramolecular organization in absence of interactions with surrounding medium and the size and charge state dependence of aggregate structural and dynamical properties. Other interesting aspects worth to be investigated are joined to the ability of these assemblies to incorporate selected solubilizates molecules as well as to give rise to chemical reactions within a single organized structure. In particular, the incorporation of large molecules such as proteins has been of recent interest with the objective to protect their structure and functionality during the transition from solution to gas phase. Exciting fall-out of the study of gas phase surfactant aggregates includes mass and energy transport in the atmosphere, origin of life and simulation of supramolecular aggregation in the interstellar space. Moreover, supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic molecules in gas phase could find remarkable applications as atmospheric cleaning agents, nanosolvents and nanoreactors for specialized chemical processes in confined space. Mass spectrometry techniques have proven to be particularly suitable to generate these assemblies and to furnish useful information on their size, size polydispersity, stability, and structural organization. On the other hand molecular dynamics simulations have been very useful to rationalize many experimental findings and to

  5. Controlling spins in adsorbed molecules by a chemical switch

    PubMed Central

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Chylarecka, Dorota; Kleibert, Armin; Müller, Kathrin; Iacovita, Cristian; Nolting, Frithjof; Jung, Thomas A.; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2010-01-01

    The development of chemical systems with switchable molecular spins could lead to the architecture of materials with controllable magnetic or spintronic properties. Here, we present conclusive evidence that the spin of an organometallic molecule coupled to a ferromagnetic substrate can be switched between magnetic off and on states by a chemical stimulus. This is achieved by nitric oxide (NO) functioning as an axial ligand of cobalt(II)tetraphenylporphyrin (CoTPP) ferromagnetically coupled to nickel thin-film (Ni(001)). On NO addition, the coordination sphere of Co2+ is modified and a NO–CoTPP nitrosyl complex is formed, which corresponds to an off state of the Co spin. Thermal dissociation of NO from the nitrosyl complex restores the on state of the Co spin. The NO-induced reversible off–on switching of surface-adsorbed molecular spins observed here is attributed to a spin trans effect. PMID:20975713

  6. Dynamics of photoinduced electron transfer from adsorbed molecules into solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, L.; Ernstorfer, R.; Willig, F.

    2007-08-01

    Ultrafast interfacial electron transfer from the donor orbital of organic chromophores into empty electronic acceptor states of a semiconductor and of a metal was investigated by two-photon photoemission spectroscopy (2PPE). Experimental tools and procedures have been developed for carrying out wet-chemistry preparation of the molecule/solid interface. The organic chromophore perylene was investigated with several different bridge/anchor groups on TiO2(110). One perylene compound was investigated for comparison on Ag(110). Angle and polarization dependent 2PPE measurements revealed the orientation of the perylene chromophore on the surface as controlled by the adsorption geometry of the respective anchor group on TiO2. UPS measurements gave the position of the HOMO level of the chromophore with respect to the Fermi level of the solid. The donor level of each molecule was found high enough to fulfill the “wide band limit” of heterogeneous electron transfer dynamics. Time constants for heterogeneous electron transfer were extracted from 2PPE transients. A difference by a factor of four was found, 13 fs against 47 fs, when a conjugated bond was exchanged for a saturated bond in the otherwise identical bridge group. The two different contributions to the 2PPE transients arising firstly from the excited state of the chromophore and secondly from the injected electrons were separated by measuring the latter contribution separately in the case of instantaneous interfacial electron transfer realized with catechol as adsorbate. The time scales measured for the electron transfer step and for the subsequent electron escape process from the surface into the bulk of TiO2 showed both good agreement with recent theoretical predictions of other groups for these systems.

  7. Coalescence behavior of oil droplets coated in irreversibly-adsorbed surfactant layers.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Matthew D; Walker, Lynn M

    2015-07-01

    Coalescence between oil caps with irreversibly adsorbed layers of nonionic surfactant is characterized in deionized water and electrolyte solution. The coalescence is characterized using a modified capillary tensiometer allowing for accurate measurement of the coalescence time. Results suggest two types of coalescence behavior, fast coalescence at low surface coverages that are independent of ionic strength and slow coalescence at high coverage. These slow coalescence events (orders of magnitude slower) are argued to be due to electric double layer forces or more complicated stabilization mechanisms arising from interfacial deformation and surface forces. A simple film drainage model is used in combination with measured values for interfacial properties to quantify the interaction potential between the two interfaces. Since this approach allows the two caps to have the same history, interfacial coverage and curvature, the results offer a tool to better understand a mechanism that is important to emulsion stability. PMID:25766654

  8. Theory of surface light scattering from a fluid-fluid interface with adsorbed polymeric surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzza, D. M. A.; Jones, J. L.; McLeish, T. C. B.; Richards, R. W.

    1998-09-01

    We present a microscopic theory for the interfacial rheology of a fluid-fluid interface with adsorbed surfactant and calculate the effect of this on surface light scattering from the interface. We model the head and tail groups of the surfactant as polymer chains, a description that becomes increasingly accurate for large molecular weight surfactants, i.e., polymeric surfactants. Assuming high surface concentrations so that we have a double-sided polymer brush monolayer, we derive microscopic scaling expressions for the surface viscoelastic constants using the Alexander-deGennes model. Our results for the surface elastic constants agree with those in the literature, while the results for the viscous constants are new. We find that four elastic constants, i.e., γ (surface tension), ɛ (dilational elasticity), κ (bending modulus), λ (coupling constant), and three viscous constants, i.e., ɛ',κ',λ' (the viscous counterparts of ɛ, κ, and λ, respectively) are required for a general description of interfacial viscoelasticity (neglecting in-plane shear). In contrast to current phenomenological models, we find (1) there is no viscous counterpart to γ, i.e., γ'≡0; (2) there are two additional complex surface constants (i.e., λ+iωλ' and κ+iωκ') due to the finite thickness of the monolayer. Excellent agreement is found comparing our microscopic theory with measurements on diblock copolymer monolayers. We further derive the dispersion relation governing surface hydrodynamic modes and the power spectrum for surface quasielastic light scattering (SQELS) for a general interface parameterized by all the surface viscoelastic constants. Limiting results are presented for (1) liquid-air interfaces; (2) liquid-liquid interfaces with ultralow γ. The significant contribution of κ in the latter case opens up the possibility for a direct measurement of κ using SQELS for polymeric surfactant monolayers. Finally, we show that the coupling constant λ can lead to

  9. Polarizabilities of Adsorbed and Assembled Molecules: Measuring the Conductance through Buried Contacts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the polarizabilities of four families of molecules adsorbed to Au{111} surfaces, with structures ranging from fully saturated to fully conjugated, including single-molecule switches. Measured polarizabilities increase with increasing length and conjugation in the adsorbed molecules and are consistent with theoretical calculations. For single-molecule switches, the polarizability reflects the difference in substrate−molecule electronic coupling in the ON and OFF conductance states. Calculations suggest that the switch between the two conductance states is correlated with an oxidation state change in a nitro functional group in the switch molecules. PMID:21077677

  10. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Surfactants and Denaturants to Elute and Denature Adsorbed Protein on Different Surface Chemistries.

    PubMed

    Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    The elution and/or denaturation of proteins from material surfaces by chemical excipients such as surfactants and denaturants is important for numerous applications including medical implant reprocessing, bioanalyses, and biodefense. The objective of this study was to develop and apply methods to quantitatively assess how surface chemistry and adsorption conditions influence the effectiveness of three commonly used surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate, n-octyl-β-d-glucoside, and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate) and two denaturants (guanidium hydrochloride and urea) to elute protein (hen egg white lysozyme and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A) from three different surface chemistries (silica glass, poly(methyl methacrylate), and high-density polyethylene). The structure and bioactivity of residual protein on the surface following elution were characterized using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and enzyme assays to assess the extent of protein denaturation. Our results indicate that the denaturants were generally more effective than the surfactants in removing the adsorbed proteins from each type of surface. Also, the denaturing capacity of these excipients on the residual proteins on the surfaces was distinctly different from their influence on the proteins in solution and was unique for each of the adsorption conditions. Taken altogether, these results reveal that the effectiveness of surfactants and denaturants to elute and denature adsorbed protein is significantly influenced by surface chemistry and the conditions from which the protein was adsorbed. These results provide a basis for the selection, design, and further development of chemical agents for protein elution and surface decontamination. PMID:26449787

  11. Quasielastic neutron scattering from adsorbed water molecules on pyrogenic silica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumanov, A. A.; Zarko, V. I.

    1994-04-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QNS) from hydrated samples of high dispersion (Aerosil) and of porous dioxide silicon was investigated. The broadening of the QNS peak analysis permits one to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient D of adsorbed water molecules. It was obtained that the D-value increases with silica hydration. The mean square displacement of the water molecules from equilibrium < x2> equals approximately 0.1 Å 2 and does not depend on the quantity of adsorbed water.

  12. Performance of waste activated carbon as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of anionic surfactant from aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep; Pal, Anjali; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Manas

    2003-02-01

    In the present study, different low cost adsorbents were screened for their sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, an anionic surfactant) removal capacity. Waste activated carbon (WAC) from the aqua purifier has shown high efficiency for SDS removal. The performance evaluation in the presence of various ions (Ca2+, SO4(2-), NO3-, and Cl-) and at various pH was studied. Desorption studies were conducted using simple sonication and pH variation technique. Column adsorption studies were performed. SEM and EDS studies were done on the adsorbing material before adsorption, after adsorption and after desorption of SDS. PMID:12638703

  13. Effects of water hardness and existence of adsorbent on toxic surface tension of surfactants for aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Oya, Masaru; Orito, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Yusuke; Iizuka, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the effectiveness of surface tension on surfactants risk assessment. gamma(tox) was defined as surface tension at a point where acute aquatic toxicity of a surfactant emerges. Oryzias latipes, Daphnia magna, and Podocopida were used for acute aquatic toxicity test of 7 surfactants and 3 detergents. Gamma(tox)values were plotted on surface tension curves, and the effect of water hardness on toxicity and surface tension were examined. Results showed that gamma(tox) varies greatly by kind of surfactant or detergent. Therefore, aquatic toxicity cannot only be explained by surface tension. The change of aquatic toxicity with varying water hardness, however, could be explained by the change of surface tension. Aquatic toxicity of LAS (Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonate) increased and aquatic toxicity of SOAP decreased with an increase of water hardness, but both gamma(tox), values were constant. Aquatic toxicity was decreased by an addition of mud soil as adsorbent into surfactant solution. The toxicity change can be explained by the surface tension since gamma(tox) value of solution with and without mud soil were equal. These results showed that the change of aquatic toxicity of a surfactant caused by water property, such as water hardness, could be explained by the change of surface tension. PMID:17898487

  14. Relaxation dynamics of surface-adsorbed water molecules in nanoporous silica probed by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Ru; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Relaxation dynamics of an exclusively adsorbed water molecule in mesoporous silica MCM-41-S was studied by using terahertz spectroscopy. With the temperature controlled from 0 to 50 °C, we observed strongly frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric relaxation responses, implying that, unlike ice, surface-adsorbed water molecules retained flourishing picosecond dynamics. Based on the Debye relaxation model, a relaxation time constant was found to increase from 1.77 to 4.83 ps when the water molecule was cooled from 50 to 0 °C. An activation energy of ˜15 kJ/mol, which was in close agreement with a hydrogen-bonding energy, was further extracted from the Arrhenius analysis. Combined with previous molecular dynamics simulations, our results indicate that the reorientation relaxation originated from the "flip-flop" rotation of a three hydrogen-bonded surface-adsorbed water molecule.

  15. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  16. Surfactant-modified montmorillonite as a nanosized adsorbent for removal of an insecticide: kinetic and isotherm studies.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Aydin; Khataee, Alireza; Karaca, Semra; Shirzad-Siboni, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant-modified montmorillonites (MMT) were prepared using trimethyloctylammonium bromide (TMOAB) and employed as a nanosized adsorbent to remove diazinon from aqueous solutions. The prepared adsorbent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The dependence of removal efficiency on initial diazinon concentration, amount of adsorbent, pH of the solution and ionic strength was investigated. The affinity sequence for ion adsorption on TMOAB/MMT was in the order: without anion> sodium carbonate> sodium bicarbonate> sodium sulphate> sodium chloride. The adsorption kinetic and isotherm were best fit by a pseudo-second-order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm models, respectively. PMID:26006742

  17. Auger electron spectroscopy as a tool for measuring intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.

    A way for the determination of the values of intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules of some binary dielectrics, based on Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), is proposed. These values can be obtained from the coverage dependences of the ratios of intensities of anion KL 23L 23 and KL 1L 1 Auger transitions, which are sensitive to the amount of charge at the 2p-orbitals. As an example, MgO adsorbed on Mo(110) is presented.

  18. Auger electron spectroscopy as a tool for measuring intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.

    1993-10-01

    A way for the determination of the values of intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules of some binary dielectrics, based on Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), is proposed. These values can be obtained from the coverage dependences of the ratios of intensities of anion KL 23L 23 and KL 1L 1 Auger transitions, which are sensitive to the amount of charge at the 2p-orbitals. As an example, MgO adsorbed on Mo(110) is presented.

  19. Transient magnetization of core excited organic molecules adsorbed on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    This work presents a density functional theory based computational investigation of electronic and magnetic properties of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene in the ground state and core excited one at low molecular coverage. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, it is found that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the contrary, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state presenting two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. This project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement n∘ 607232 [THINFACE].

  20. Rotational Spectromicroscopy: Imaging the Orbital Interaction between Molecular Hydrogen and an Adsorbed Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Yuan, Dingwang; Yu, Arthur; Czap, Gregory; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, W.

    2015-05-01

    A hydrogen molecule can diffuse freely on the surface and be trapped above an adsorbed molecule within the junction of a scanning tunneling microscope. The trapped dihydrogen exhibits the properties of a free rotor. Here we show that the intermolecular interaction between dihydrogen and Mg-porphyrin (MgP) can be visualized by imaging j =0 to 2 rotational excitation of dihydrogen. The interaction leads to a weakened H-H bond and modest electron donation from the dihydrogen to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of MgP, a process similarly observed for the interaction between dihydrogen and an adsorbed Au atom.

  1. Rotational Spectromicroscopy: Imaging the Orbital Interaction between Molecular Hydrogen and an Adsorbed Molecule.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaowei; Yuan, Dingwang; Yu, Arthur; Czap, Gregory; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, W

    2015-05-22

    A hydrogen molecule can diffuse freely on the surface and be trapped above an adsorbed molecule within the junction of a scanning tunneling microscope. The trapped dihydrogen exhibits the properties of a free rotor. Here we show that the intermolecular interaction between dihydrogen and Mg-porphyrin (MgP) can be visualized by imaging j=0 to 2 rotational excitation of dihydrogen. The interaction leads to a weakened H-H bond and modest electron donation from the dihydrogen to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of MgP, a process similarly observed for the interaction between dihydrogen and an adsorbed Au atom. PMID:26047242

  2. Surfactant modified coir pith, an agricultural solid waste as adsorbent for phosphate removal and fertilizer carrier to control phosphate release.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Kumar, M V Suresh

    2005-10-01

    The surface of coir pith, an agricultural solid waste was modified using a cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA) and the modified coir pith was investigated to assess the capacity for the removal of phosphate from aqueous solution. Optimum pH for maximum phosphate adsorption was found to be 4.0. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to model the adsorption equilibrium data. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption obeyed second order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and the overall adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. Effect of coexisting anions has also been studied. The feasibility of using spent adsorbent as fertilizer carrier to control phosphate release was also investigated. PMID:17051911

  3. Dynamics of Molecules Adsorbed in Zeolitic Systems: Neutron Scattering and MD Simulation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.; Sharma, V. K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2011-07-15

    Zeolites represent a class of technologically important materials because of their characteristic properties of molecular sieving and catalysis, which makes them indispensable in the petroleum industries. While the catalytic properties depend upon many factors, a major role is played by the dynamics of hydrocarbon gases. In order to be able to tailor make these materials for use in industry for catalytic and sieving purposes, it is important to understand the dynamical properties of the guest molecules adsorbed in the zeolitic materials. It is of interest to study the effects of size and shape of guest molecules and also the host zeolitic structure, governing the diffusion mechanism of the adsorbed species. Here we report the results of Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of two hydrocarbons namely acetylene and propylene adsorbed in two structurally different zeolites Na-Y and ZSM-5.

  4. Giant Hysteresis of Single-Molecule Magnets Adsorbed on a Nonmagnetic Insulator.

    PubMed

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Donati, Fabio; Singha, Aparajita; Baltic, Romana; Rusponi, Stefano; Diller, Katharina; Patthey, François; Pivetta, Marina; Lan, Yanhua; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Brune, Harald; Dreiser, Jan

    2016-07-01

    TbPc2 single-molecule magnets adsorbed on a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier exhibit record magnetic remanence, record hysteresis opening, perfect out-of-plane alignment of the magnetic easy axes, and self-assembly into a well-ordered layer. PMID:27159732

  5. Dynamics of water molecules adsorbed by silica and resin SGK-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisichkin, Yu. V.; Sakharova, L. A.; Tumanov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper has presented neutron spectroscopy data on the dynamics of light water molecules adsorbed in the cation exchanger (ion-exchange resin) SGK-7 and on the surface of aerosils (highly dispersed pyrogenic silica) with different levels of hydration. The measurements have been performed on a DIN-2PI spectrometer (Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia). The characteristics of the diffusive and vibrational motions of adsorbed water molecules have been determined from the experimental neutron scattering spectra. The data obtained in the quasi-elastic neutron scattering region have been analyzed using a model accounting for the effects of restricted translational and rotational diffusion. The results have demonstrated a significant decrease in the diffusion mobility of adsorbed water molecules as compared to conventional (bulk) water. In particular, the self-diffusion coefficient decreases several times, and the diffusion rate is the lower, the smaller is the thickness of the hydration layer. The dependences of the intensity and half-width of the quasi-elastic scattering peak on the magnitude of the neutron momentum transfer q in the scattering process exhibit a nonmonotonic character. This indicates manifestation of the effects of restricted translational diffusion, rotational diffusion, and jump diffusion. The partial distributions of vibrational frequencies of hydrogen atoms of water molecules adsorbed by the cation exchanger and aerosils have been obtained from the inelastic neutron scattering data.

  6. Structure-property relationship of quinuclidinium surfactants--Towards multifunctional biologically active molecules.

    PubMed

    Skočibušić, Mirjana; Odžak, Renata; Štefanić, Zoran; Križić, Ivana; Krišto, Lucija; Jović, Ozren; Hrenar, Tomica; Primožič, Ines; Jurašin, Darija

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by diverse biological and pharmacological activity of quinuclidine and oxime compounds we have synthesized and characterized novel class of surfactants, 3-hydroxyimino quinuclidinium bromides with different alkyl chains lengths (CnQNOH; n=12, 14 and 16). The incorporation of non conventional hydroxyimino quinuclidinium headgroup and variation in alkyl chain length affects hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of surfactant molecule and thereby physicochemical properties important for its application. Therefore, newly synthesized surfactants were characterized by the combination of different experimental techniques: X-ray analysis, potentiometry, electrical conductivity, surface tension and dynamic light scattering measurements, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Comprehensive investigation of CnQNOH surfactants enabled insight into structure-property relationship i.e., way in which the arrangement of surfactant molecules in the crystal phase correlates with their solution behavior and biologically activity. The synthesized CnQNOH surfactants exhibited high adsorption efficiency and relatively low critical micelle concentrations. In addition, all investigated compounds showed very potent and promising activity against Gram-positive and clinically relevant Gram-negative bacterial strains compared to conventional antimicrobial agents: tetracycline and gentamicin. The overall results indicate that bicyclic headgroup with oxime moiety, which affects both hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of CnQNOH molecule in addition to enabling hydrogen bonding, has dominant effect on crystal packing and physicochemical properties. The unique structural features of cationic surfactants with hydroxyimino quinuclidine headgroup along with diverse biological activity have made them promising structures in novel drug discovery. Obtained fundamental understanding how combination of different functionalities in a single surfactant molecule affects its physicochemical

  7. Adsorption isotherms and structure of cationic surfactants adsorbed on mineral oxide surfaces prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wangchareansak, Thipvaree; Craig, Vincent S J; Notley, Shannon M

    2013-12-01

    The adsorption isotherms and aggregate structures of adsorbed surfactants on smooth thin-film surfaces of mineral oxides have been studied by optical reflectometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Films of the mineral oxides of titania, alumina, hafnia, and zirconia were produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with low roughness. We find that the surface strongly influences the admicelle organization on the surface. At high concentrations (2 × cmc) of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), the surfactant aggregates on a titania surface exhibit a flattened admicelle structure with an average repeat distance of 8.0 ± 1.0 nm whereas aggregates on alumina substrates exhibit a larger admicelle with an average separation distance of 10.5 ± 1.0 nm. A wormlike admicelle structure with an average separation distance of 7.0 ± 1.0 nm can be observed on zirconia substrates whereas a bilayered aggregate structure on hafnia substrates was observed. The change in the surface aggregate structure can be related to an increase in the critical packing parameter through a reduction in the effective headgroup area of the surfactant. The templating strength of the surfaces are found to be hafnia > alumina > zirconia > titania. Weakly templating surfaces are expected to have superior biocompatibility. PMID:24224944

  8. First-order phase transition during displacement of amphiphilic biomacromolecules from interfaces by surfactant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettelaie, Rammile; Dickinson, Eric; Pugnaloni, Luis

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption of surfactants onto a hydrophobic interface, already laden with a fixed number of amphiphilic macromolecules, is studied using the self consistent field calculation method of Scheutjens and Fleer. For biopolymers having unfavourable interactions with the surfactant molecules, the adsorption isotherms show an abrupt jump at a certain value of surfactant bulk concentration. Alternatively, the same behaviour is exhibited when the number of amphiphilic chains on the interface is decreased. We show that this sudden jump is associated with a first-order phase transition, by calculating the free energy values for the stable and the metastable states at both sides of the transition point. We also observe that the transition can occur for two approaching surfaces, from a high surfactant coverage phase to a low surfactant coverage one, at sufficiently close separation distances. The consequence of this finding for the steric colloidal interactions, induced by the overlap of two biopolymer + surfactant films, is explored. In particular, a significantly different interaction, in terms of its magnitude and range, is predicted for these two phases. We also consider the relevance of the current study to problems involving the competitive displacement of proteins by surfactants in food colloid systems.

  9. Vibrational dynamics of fullerene molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces studied with synchrotron infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    P. Rudolf; R. Raval; P. Dumas; Gwyn P. Williams

    2002-04-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy of chemisorbed C{sub 60} on Ag (111), Au (110) and Cu (100) reveals that a non-IR-active mode becomes active upon adsorption, and that its frequency shifts proportionally with the charge transferred from the metal to the molecule by about 5 cm{sup -1} per electron. The temperature dependence of the frequency and the width of this IR feature have also been followed for C{sub 60>}/Cu (100) and were found to agree well with a weak anharmonic coupling (dephasing) to a low-frequency mode, which we suggest to be the frustrated translational mode of the adsorbed molecules.

    Additionally, the adsorption is accompanied by a broadband reflectance change, which is interpreted as due to the scattering of conduction electrons of the metal surface by the adsorbate. The reflectance change allows determination of the friction coefficient of the C{sub 60} molecules, which results in rather small values ({approx}2 x 10{sup 9}s{sup -1} for Ag and Au, and {approx}1.6 x 10{sup 9}s{sup -1} for Cu), consistent with a marked metallic character of the adsorbed molecules.

    Pre-dosing of alkali atoms onto the metal substrates drastically changes the IR spectra recorded during subsequent C{sub 60} deposition: anti-absorption bands, as well as an increase of the broadband reflectance, occur and are interpreted as due to strong electron-phonon coupling with induced surface states.

  10. Rod-like cyanophenyl probe molecules nanoconfined to oxide particles: Density of adsorbed surface species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunza, Stefan; Frunza, Ligia; Ganea, Constantin Paul; Zgura, Irina; Brás, Ana Rita; Schönhals, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Surface layers have already been observed by broadband dielectric spectroscopy for composite systems formed by adsorption of rod-like cyanophenyl derivates as probe molecules on the surface of oxide particles. In this work, features of the surface layer are reported; samples with different amounts of the probe molecules adsorbed onto oxide (nano) particles were prepared in order to study their interactions with the surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to analyze the amount of loaded probe molecules. The density of the surface species ns was introduced and its values were estimated from quantitative Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with TGA. This parameter allows discriminating the composites into several groups assuming a similar interaction of the probe molecules with the hosts of a given group. An influence factor H is further proposed as the ratio of the number of molecules in the surface layer showing a glassy dynamics and the number of molecules adsorbed tightly on the surface of the support: It was found for aerosil composites and used for calculating the maximum filling degree of partially filled silica MCM-41 composites showing only one dielectric process characteristic for glass-forming liquids and a bulk behavior for higher filling degrees.

  11. Role of surfactant molecules in magnetic fluid: comparison of Monte Carlo simulation and electron magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Castro, L L; Gonçalves, G R R; Neto, K Skeff; Morais, P C; Bakuzis, A F; Miotto, R

    2008-12-01

    We investigate a magnetic fluid composed of magnetite nanoparticles surfacted with dodecanoic acid molecules and stably dispersed in a hydrocarbon solvent. A comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and different experimental techniques allows us to validate our methodology and investigate the behavior of the surfactant molecules. Our analysis, based on the Langmuir model, suggests that the surfactant grafting number on isolate nanoparticles increases with the nanoparticle concentration, while the grafting on agglomerated nanoparticles presents a more complicated behavior. Our results suggests that, if properly coated and at a certain concentration range, colloids can become stable even in the presence of agglomerates. The role of the Hamaker constant, which controls the van der Waals interaction intensity, was also investigated. We have found that the ratio between grafting and Hamaker constant governs the level of nanoparticle agglomeration. PMID:19256846

  12. Modeling the binding of fulvic acid by goethite: the speciation of adsorbed FA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filius, Jeroen D.; Meeussen, Johannes C. L.; Lumsdon, David G.; Hiemstra, Tjisse; van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2003-04-01

    Under natural conditions, the adsorption of ions at the solid-water interface may be strongly influenced by the adsorption of organic matter. In this paper, we describe the adsorption of fulvic acid (FA) by metal(hydr)oxide surfaces with a heterogeneous surface complexation model, the ligand and charge distribution (LCD) model. The model is a self-consistent combination of the nonideal competitive adsorption (NICA) equation and the CD-MUSIC model. The LCD model can describe simultaneously the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of the adsorption with a minimum of only three adjustable parameters. Furthermore, the model predicts the coadsorption of protons accurately for an extended range of conditions. Surface speciation calculations show that almost all hydroxyl groups of the adsorbed FA molecules are involved in outer sphere complexation reactions. The carboxylic groups of the adsorbed FA molecule form inner and outer sphere complexes. Furthermore, part of the carboxylate groups remain noncoordinated and deprotonated.

  13. Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules as a Possible Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chuntai; Wang, Hui; Hu, Jun; Yu, Clare; Wu, Ruqian

    2015-03-01

    One of the dominant source of flux noise in SQUIDs is flux noise which has been attributed to mysterious fluctuating magnetic spins on the surface. We propose that the spins producing flux noise could be adsorbed O2 molecules that have a magnetic moment of about 2 μB. Using density functional calculations, we studied O2 molecules adsorbed on a sapphire surface. We find that the barrier for spin rotation is small enough to allow almost free spin reorientation due to thermal excitations at low temperatures. Monte Carlo simulations of a 2D XY spin model yields 1 / f noise where f is frequency. This work was supported by 1000 Talent Program of China through Fudan University. Work at UCI was supported by DOE-BES (Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER46237) and the Army Research Office (Grant No. W911NF-10-1-0494).

  14. Stability, structural and electronic properties of benzene molecule adsorbed on free standing Au layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoch, Neha; Kapoor, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    We report stability and electronic properties of benzene molecule adsorbed on the Au atomic layer within the framework of density function theory (DFT). Horizontal configuration of benzene on the top site of Au monolayer prefers energetically over other studied configurations. On the adsorption of benzene, the ballistic conductance of Au monolayer is found to decrease from 4G0 to 2G0 suggesting its applications for the fabrications of organic sensor devices based on the Au atomic layers.

  15. Orientation and heat capacity of horizontally adsorbed molecules in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Yen

    2014-02-01

    The orientation and the heat capacity of horizontally adsorbed molecules are investigated in static electric fields. We evaluate the energy spectrum and the wave function to probe the rotational characteristics of the molecule. Numerical results indicate that the electric field and the effect of quantum confinement lead to anticrossing behaviors in the energy levels. The orientation reveals a stepped feature due to the anticrossing in the ground state. Moreover, the heat capacity displays two peaks near the anticrossing. By means of comparison, each peak of the heat capacity corresponds to a particular degree of orientation.

  16. VERUCLAY – a new type of photo-adsorbent active in the visible light range: modification of montmorillonite surface with organic surfactant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Montmorillonite K10 was treated with VeruSOL-3, a biodegradable and food-grade surfactant mixture of coconut oil, castor oil and citrus extracts, to manufacture a benign catalytic adsorbent that is active in the visible light. Veruclay was characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, UVDRS, a...

  17. Preparation and performance of chitosan encapsulated activated charcoal (ACCB) adsorbents for small molecules.

    PubMed

    Chandy, T; Sharma, C P

    1993-01-01

    A technique is described to encapsulate activated charcoal for haemoperfusion to be used in an artificial liver support. Activated charcoal was encapsulated within chitosan matrix (ACCB) in different concentrations, and was used as the supports for perfusion of a mixture of solutes, having molecular weight ranges from 60 to 69,000; under a flow rate of 8 ml/min. It seems the ACCB may be a good adsorbent system for the removal of toxic uric acid, creatinine, bilirubin, etc., from solutions; while larger molecules such as albumin are adsorbed less. The encapsulated charcoal did not leach out from the matrix during perfusion, and the system may be useful for detoxification of blood. The haemolytic potential of ACCB has been compatible with polystyrene control tubes. However, further studies are needed to determine their behaviour under clinical conditions. PMID:8263676

  18. Evidence for photo-induced charge separation between dye molecules adsorbed to aluminium oxide surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cappel, Ute B.; Moia, Davide; Bruno, Annalisa; Vaissier, Valerie; Haque, Saif A.; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-01-01

    Excited state dynamics and photo-induced charge transfer of dye molecules have been widely studied due to their relevance for organic and dye-sensitised solar cells. Herein, we present a femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy study of the indolene dye D131 when adsorbed to inert Al2O3 substrates for different surface concentration of the dye. Surprisingly, we find that at high surface concentrations, the first singlet excited state of the dye is converted into a new state with an efficiency of about 80%. We assign the absorption features of this state to the oxidised dye and discuss the possibility of photo-induced charge separation between neighboring dye molecules. Our study is the first to show that this process can be highly efficient without the use of donor and acceptor molecules of different chemical structures. PMID:26891851

  19. Homeotropic orientation of a nematic liquid crystal by bent-core molecules adsorbed on its surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jiyong; Yang, Seungbin; Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Jongyoon; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kang, Shin-Woong; Choi, E.-Joon

    2015-06-01

    We reported the promotion of a homeotropic alignment of a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) by bent-core liquid-crystal (BLC) Molecules adsorbed its surface. The BLC was mixed at various concentrations with the NLC, and the mixtures were injected into an empty cell with a cell gap of 13 μm. Although the pure NLC showed a heterogeneous orientation, the BLC-NLC mixture was gradually transformed to a homeotropic alignment with increasing concentration of the BLC. We investigated the surface topography of the samples by using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and found that the BLC molecules were segregated into a polyimide (PI) surface and formed protrusion domains with diameters of 50-100 nm. The BLC protrusions might promote the homeotropic orientation of the NLC molecules.

  20. Ultra-sensitive fluorescence spectroscopy of isolated surface-adsorbed molecules using an optical nanofiber.

    PubMed

    Stiebeiner, A; Rehband, O; Garcia-Fernandez, R; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2009-11-23

    The strong radial confinement and the pronounced evanescent field of the guided light in optical nanofibers yield favorable conditions for ultra-sensitive surface spectroscopy of molecules deposited on the fiber. Using the guided mode of the nanofiber for both excitation and fluorescence collection, we present spectroscopic measurements on 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride molecules (PTCDA) at ambient conditions. Surface coverages as small as 1 per thousand of a compact monolayer still give rise to fluorescence spectra with a good signal to noise ratio. Moreover, we analyze and quantify the self-absorption effects due to reabsorption of the emitted fluorescence light by circumjacent surface-adsorbed molecules distributed along the fiber waist. PMID:19997412

  1. Evidence for photo-induced charge separation between dye molecules adsorbed to aluminium oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappel, Ute B.; Moia, Davide; Bruno, Annalisa; Vaissier, Valerie; Haque, Saif A.; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-02-01

    Excited state dynamics and photo-induced charge transfer of dye molecules have been widely studied due to their relevance for organic and dye-sensitised solar cells. Herein, we present a femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy study of the indolene dye D131 when adsorbed to inert Al2O3 substrates for different surface concentration of the dye. Surprisingly, we find that at high surface concentrations, the first singlet excited state of the dye is converted into a new state with an efficiency of about 80%. We assign the absorption features of this state to the oxidised dye and discuss the possibility of photo-induced charge separation between neighboring dye molecules. Our study is the first to show that this process can be highly efficient without the use of donor and acceptor molecules of different chemical structures.

  2. Structure formation in adsorbed overlayers comprising functional cross-shaped molecules: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasperski, Adam; Nieckarz, Damian; Szabelski, Paweł

    2015-11-01

    Surface confined self-assembly of functional star-shaped organic molecules is a promising method to create nanoporous networks with tailorable structure and functions. In this work we use the Monte Carlo simulation method to demonstrate how the morphology of these supramolecular assemblies can be tuned by manipulating intrinsic parameters of the building blocks and modified by the presence of co-adsorbed metal atoms. To that purpose we study the 2D self-assembly of planar cruciform molecules modeled as collections of interconnected segments, some of which were activated to represent discrete interaction centers. We consider a few exemplary adsorbed systems in which the molecules with different size, aspect ratio and intramolecular distribution of active centers form superstructures stabilized by short-range segment-segment interactions or by metal-segment interactions. These two situations correspond to supramolecular assemblies sustained by, for example, hydrogen bonding and metal-organic ligand coordination, respectively. The simulated results show that proper encoding of intramolecular interactions into the cruciform building bricks allows for directing the self-assembly towards largely diversified structures ranging from nanoclusters to porous grids. The obtained findings can facilitate designing and optimization of molecular networks comprising cross-shaped units including functionalized porphyrins and phthalocyanines and they can be helpful in preliminary selection of these building blocks.

  3. Cytotoxicity effects of different surfactant molecules conjugated to carbon nanotubes on human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lifeng; Witkowski, Colette M; Craig, Michael M; Greenwade, Molly M; Joseph, Katherine L

    2009-01-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood-brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system. PMID:20652100

  4. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood–brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system. PMID:20652100

  5. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lifeng; Witkowski, Colette M.; Craig, Michael M.; Greenwade, Molly M.; Joseph, Katherine L.

    2009-12-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood-brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system.

  6. Thermal and Electronic Fluctuations of Flexible Adsorbed Molecules: Azobenzene on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Reinhard J.; Liu, Wei; Poltavsky, Igor; Stecher, Thomas; Oberhofer, Harald; Reuter, Karsten; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the thermal and electronic collective fluctuations that contribute to the finite-temperature adsorption properties of flexible adsorbates on surfaces on the example of the molecular switch azobenzene C12 H10 N2 on the Ag(111) surface. Using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, we obtain the free energy of adsorption that accurately accounts for entropic contributions, whereas the inclusion of many-body dispersion interactions accounts for the electronic correlations that govern the adsorbate binding. We find the adsorbate properties to be strongly entropy driven, as can be judged by a kinetic molecular desorption prefactor of 1024 s-1 that largely exceeds previously reported estimates. We relate this effect to sizable fluctuations across structural and electronic observables. A comparison of our calculations to temperature-programed desorption measurements demonstrates that finite-temperature effects play a dominant role for flexible molecules in contact with polarizable surfaces, and that recently developed first-principles methods offer an optimal tool to reveal novel collective behavior in such complex systems.

  7. Thermal and Electronic Fluctuations of Flexible Adsorbed Molecules: Azobenzene on Ag(111).

    PubMed

    Maurer, Reinhard J; Liu, Wei; Poltavsky, Igor; Stecher, Thomas; Oberhofer, Harald; Reuter, Karsten; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the thermal and electronic collective fluctuations that contribute to the finite-temperature adsorption properties of flexible adsorbates on surfaces on the example of the molecular switch azobenzene C_{12}H_{10}N_{2} on the Ag(111) surface. Using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, we obtain the free energy of adsorption that accurately accounts for entropic contributions, whereas the inclusion of many-body dispersion interactions accounts for the electronic correlations that govern the adsorbate binding. We find the adsorbate properties to be strongly entropy driven, as can be judged by a kinetic molecular desorption prefactor of 10^{24}  s^{-1} that largely exceeds previously reported estimates. We relate this effect to sizable fluctuations across structural and electronic observables. A comparison of our calculations to temperature-programed desorption measurements demonstrates that finite-temperature effects play a dominant role for flexible molecules in contact with polarizable surfaces, and that recently developed first-principles methods offer an optimal tool to reveal novel collective behavior in such complex systems. PMID:27104719

  8. Alignment and assembly of adsorbed collagen molecules induced by anisotropic chemical nanopatterns.

    PubMed

    Denis, Frédéric A; Pallandre, Antoine; Nysten, Bernard; Jonas, Alain M; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2005-10-01

    Collagen, a protein widely used to control cell-material interactions, is known to self-assemble in solution. Supramolecular structures also form on material surfaces following collagen adsorption. Herein, we report the use of anisotropic, flat, surface chemical nanopatterns, which consist of alkyl-terminated tracks drawn in an oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated matrix, to direct collagen adsorption. As revealed by atomic force microscopy, the spontaneous collagen adsorption performed on such patterned substrates results in the accumulation of collagen on the hydrophobic tracks. Moreover, the width of the tracks (30-90 nm), which is much smaller than the length of the collagen molecule (approximately 300 nm), is the origin of preferential alignment of the molecules and of their assembly into continuous bundles of adsorbed collagen. This chemical guidance effect due to self-confinement of proteins upon adsorption may bring novel and valuable applications, specifically in biomaterials science and cell growth control. PMID:17193383

  9. Molecular resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by plasmonic nanoscissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenglong; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zheng, Hairong; Xu, Hongxing; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-04-01

    The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis, photosynthesis and the degradation of plastic, it is hard to break individual molecular bonds for those molecules adsorbed on the surface because of the weak light-absorption in molecules and the redistribution of the resulting vibrational energy both inside the molecule and to its surrounding environment. Here we show how to overcome these obstacles with a plasmonic hot-electron mediated process and demonstrate a new method that allows the sensitive control of resonant dissociation of surface-adsorbed molecules by `plasmonic' scissors. To that end, we used a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) setup to dissociate resonantly excited NC2H6 fragments from Malachite green. The surface plasmons (SPs) excited at the sharp metal tip not only enhance the local electric field to harvest the light incident from the laser, but crucially supply `hot electrons' whose energy can be transferred to individual bonds. These processes are resonant Raman, which result in some active chemical bonds and then weaken these bonds, followed by dumping in lots of indiscriminant energy and breaking the weakest bond. The method allows for sensitive control of both the rate and probability of dissociation through their dependence on the density of hot electrons, which can be manipulated by tuning the laser intensity or tunneling current/bias voltage in the HV-TERS setup, respectively. The concepts of plasmonic scissors open up new versatile avenues for the deep understanding of in situ surface-catalyzed chemistry.The ability to break individual bonds or specific modes in chemical reactions is an ardently sought goal by chemists and physicists. While photochemistry based methodologies are very successful in controlling e.g. photocatalysis

  10. Preparation and characterization of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianxi; Qing, Yanhong; Wang, Tong; Zhu, Runliang; Wei, Jingming; Tao, Qi; Yuan, Peng; He, Hongping

    2011-08-15

    A series of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites (ZSMMs) were synthesized using montmorillonite and three zwitterionic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths at different concentrations [0.2-4.0 cation exchange capacity (CEC)]. These ZSMMs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential thermo-gravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses. The zwitterionic surfactant could be intercalated into the interlayer spaces of montmorillonites and causing interlayer space-swelling. From XRD measurements, the amount of the surfactants loaded and the basal spacing increased with surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. One endothermic DTG peak occurred at ~390 °C, which was assigned to the decomposition of the zwitterionic surfactant on the organo-montmorillonites from 0.2 to 0.6 CEC. When the surfactant loading was increased, a new endothermic peak appeared at ~340 °C. From the microstructures of these ZSMMs, the mechanism of zwitterionic surfactant adsorption was proposed. At relatively low loadings of the zwitterionic surfactant, most of surfactants enter the spacing by an ion-exchange mechanism and are adsorbed onto the interlayer cation sites. When the concentration of the zwitterionic surfactant exceeds the CEC of montmorillonite, the surfactant molecules then adhere to the surface-adsorbed surfactant. Some surfactants enter the interlayers, whereas the others are attached to the clay surface. When the concentration of surfactant increases further beyond 2.0 CEC, the surfactants may occupy the inter-particle space within the house-of-cards aggregate structure. PMID:21575956

  11. Study on metal nanoparticles synthesis and orientation of gemini surfactant molecules used as stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Amit Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Subhashis; Chang, Chien-Hsiang; Pande, Surojit; Saha, Subit Kumar

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, we report the synthesis of gold (Au), silver (Ag), and gold-silver alloy (Au-Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) by seed-mediated method using gemini surfactant, containing diethyl ether spacer group as a stabilizer. As-synthesized NPs are found very much stable and have been characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and zeta potential techniques. The orientation of gemini surfactant molecules surrounding the metal NPs has been investigated exploiting twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) fluorescence properties of a probe 4-(N,N-dimethylamino) cinnamaldehyde (DMACA). The quenching efficiencies of different NPs have been performed in the fluorescence of DMACA and are found to be different. This effect can be related to the location of DMACA as well as the electro-negativity of the metals as the extent of orientation of the surfactant molecules around NPs controls the location of DMACA in a bilayer. To support the location of DMACA, fluorescence quenching studies with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) as an external quencher have also been carried out. PMID:25596371

  12. Mechanism of charge transfer and its impacts on Fermi-level pinning for gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjie; Yang, Weihuang; Zhu, Huili

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to assess changes in the geometric and electronic structures of monolayer WS2 upon adsorption of various gas molecules (H2, O2, H2O, NH3, NO, NO2, and CO). The most stable configuration of the adsorbed molecules, the adsorption energy, and the degree of charge transfer between adsorbate and substrate were determined. All evaluated molecules were physisorbed on monolayer WS2 with a low degree of charge transfer and accept charge from the monolayer, except for NH3, which is a charge donor. Band structure calculations showed that the valence and conduction bands of monolayer WS2 are not significantly altered upon adsorption of H2, H2O, NH3, and CO, whereas the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of O2, NO, and NO2 are pinned around the Fermi-level when these molecules are adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The phenomenon of Fermi-level pinning was discussed in light of the traditional and orbital mixing charge transfer theories. The impacts of the charge transfer mechanism on Fermi-level pinning were confirmed for the gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The proposed mechanism governing Fermi-level pinning is applicable to the systems of adsorbates on recently developed two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:26049513

  13. Single-Molecule Magnets: Giant Hysteresis of Single-Molecule Magnets Adsorbed on a Nonmagnetic Insulator (Adv. Mater. 26/2016).

    PubMed

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Donati, Fabio; Singha, Aparajita; Baltic, Romana; Rusponi, Stefano; Diller, Katharina; Patthey, François; Pivetta, Marina; Lan, Yanhua; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Brune, Harald; Dreiser, Jan

    2016-07-01

    In Tb(Pc)2 single-molecule magnets, where Pc is phthalocyanine, adsorbed on magnesium oxide, the fluctuations of the terbium magnetic moment are strongly suppressed in contrast to the adsorption on silver. On page 5195, J. Dreiser and co-workers investigate that the molecules are perfectly organized by self-assembly, as seen in the scanning tunnelling microscopy image (top part of the design). The molecules are probed by circularly polarized X-rays depicted as green spirals. PMID:27383020

  14. Imaging the wave functions of adsorbed molecules using angle-resolved photoemmision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F. Stefan; Ramsey, Michael G.; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-03-01

    The frontier electronic orbitals of molecules are the prime determinants of the respective compounds' chemical, electronic, and optical properties. Although orbitals are very powerful concepts, experimentally only the electron densities and energy levels are directly observable. As has been shown in recent publications, angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) intensity maps of organic molecular layers are related to the absolute value of the Fourier transform of the initial state molecular orbital. However, the lost phase information impedes the back-transformation of the orbital into real space. Here, we show how molecular orbital images as well as the absent phase information can be retrieved by applying an iterative procedure which takes experimental ARPES maps as input and only assumes spatial confinement of the orbital. The method is demonstrated for several molecular orbitals of two proto-typical pi-conjugated molecules: the LUMO, HOMO, and HOMO-1 of pentacene, and the LUMO and HOMO of PTCDA. The technique is simple and robust and further emphasizes the capabilities of ARPES looking at spatial distributions of wave functions of adsorbed molecules thereby complementing data obtained from scanning probe methods.

  15. Room temperature differential conductance measurements of triethylamine molecules adsorbed on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Naitabdi, Ahmed; Rochet, François; Carniato, Stéphane; Bournel, Fabrice; Gallet, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-17

    We have measured the differential conductance of the triethylamine molecule (N(CH2CH3)3) adsorbed on Si(001)-2 × 1 at room temperature using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Triethylamine can be engaged in a dative bonding with a silicon dimer, forming a Si-Si-N(CH2CH3)3 unit. We have examined the datively bonded adduct, either as an isolated molecule, or within an ordered molecular domain (reconstructed 4 × 2). The differential conductance curves, supported by DFT calculations, show that in the explored energy window (±2.5 near the Fermi level) the main features stem from the uncapped dangling bonds of the reacted dimer and of the adjacent unreacted ones that are electronically coupled The formation of a molecular domain, in which one dimer in two is left unreacted, is reflected in a shift of the up dimer atom occupied level away from the Fermi level, likely due to an increased π-bonding strength. In stark contrast with the preceding, pairs of dissociated molecule (a minority species) are electronically decoupled from the dimer dangling bond states. DFT calculation show that the lone-pair of the Si-N(CH2CH3)2 is a shallow level, that is clearly seen in the differential conductance curve. PMID:27499070

  16. Effect of resonance dipole-dipole interaction on spectra of adsorbed SF6 molecules.

    PubMed

    Dobrotvorskaia, Anna N; Kolomiitsova, Tatiana D; Petrov, Sergey N; Shchepkin, Dmitriy N; Smirnov, Konstantin S; Tsyganenko, Alexey A

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption of SF6 on zinc oxide and on silicalite-1 was investigated by a combination of IR spectroscopy with the calculations of spectra by means of a modernized model, developed previously for liquids. Comparison of the experimental spectra and the results of modeling shows that the complex band shapes in spectra of adsorbed molecules with extremely high absorbance are due to the strong resonance dipole-dipole interaction (RDDI) rather that the surface heterogeneity or the presence of specific surface sites. Perfect agreement between calculated and observed spectra was found for ZnO, while some dissimilarity in band intensities for silicalite-1 was attributed to complicated geometry of molecular arrangement in the channels. PMID:25897721

  17. Does Moisture Influence the Chemical Detection of Gas Molecules Adsorbed on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ming; Tian, W. Q.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2009-03-01

    In this work, the role of water in the detection of hydrazine (N2H4) by a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated using first principles electronic structure calculations (DFT/GGA--USPP)[1]. This calculation is undertaken to interpret the experimental resistivity measurements for N2H4 adsorbed on SWCNT that reveal an n-type behavior [2]. Our preliminary theoretical studies of the adsorption of N2H4 on SWCNT revealed physisorption for N2H4 and an unaltered band structure for the SWCNT [3]. This prompted us to look into the role of water on the bonding of N2H4 to the SWCNT. We found that, by introducing a monolayer of water film on the (8,0) SWCNT, the adsorption of N2H4 can introduce occupied states near the Fermi level, exhibiting an n-type behavior. However, the introduction of just few water molecules was not sufficient to influence the electronic structure of N2H4/SWCNT. Presently, we are studying the influence of water films on the chemical detection of a variety of other gas molecules (N2, NH3, etc.) by SWCNTs, and the results from such studies will also be reported. [1]. G. Kresse et al. Phys. Rev. B 54, 11169 (1996). [2]. S. Desai, et al. (APS, March 2008). [3]. M. Yu, et al. (APS, March 2008).

  18. Electronic structure and binding geometry of tetraphenylporphyrin-derived molecules adsorbed on metal and metal oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Senia

    Tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP)-derived molecules have been studied extensively as efficient photosensitizers when chemisorbed on the metal oxide substrates in dye-sensitized solar cells. Still, many fundamental electronic properties of the dye/oxide interface are not understood and need careful consideration. In this thesis we present a comprehensive study of the electronic structure, energy level alignment and the adsorption geometry of the TPP-derived dye molecules adsorbed on TiO2(110), ZnO(1120) and Ag(100) single crystal surfaces using ultra-high vacuum (UHV) based surface sensitive techniques. The alignment of the molecular energy levels with respect to the TiO 2 and ZnO band edges for all TPP-derived molecules we studied was found to be insensitive to either the nature of the functional groups located on the phenyl rings, presence of zinc as a central metal ion and different binding geometry of the molecules. Binding geometry, molecule-molecule interaction and the aggregation effects in the adsorbed layer, that were observed in the UV-visible spectra of the molecules adsorbed on ZnO substrate were not observed in the ultraviolet photoemission (UPS) and inverse photoemission (IPS) spectra of the occupied and unoccupied molecular states. Using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), binding geometry of the two representative TPP-derivatives was directly determined to be upright, with the porphyrin ring under large angle with respect to the surface for the p-ZnTCPP molecules and with the porphyrin ring parallel to the surface for the m-ZnTCPP molecules. We observe that the energies and the energy level alignment of the ZnTPP molecular levels measured in UPS and IPS depend on the substrate on which the molecules are adsorbed (Ag(100) or TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces). The differences are attributed to different charge screening properties of these two materials. Image charges created in the substrates during

  19. The analysis of surface-adsorbed organic molecules by alkali-assisted MIES combined with UPS(He I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günster, J.; Ochs, D.; Dieckhoff, S.; Kempter, V.

    1996-12-01

    Metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES) in combination with UPS(He I) is applied to the study of s-triazine and triethoxytriazine molecules adsorbed on Si(100) either alone or in combination with cesium atoms. It is demonstrated that the presence of the Cs atoms facilitates the identification of the adsorbed species considerably. It is concluded that (i) non-dissociative adsorption of the studied organic molecules occurs whereby the basal rings of the molecules lie flat on the silicon surface, in accordance with previous studies by Bu and Lin, (ii) the binding of the molecules to the surface is mainly via the lone pair orbitals of the nitrogen in the ring, and (iii) s-triazine reacts strongly with oxygen which bonds to the carbon atoms of the triazine ring.

  20. Adsorption of polyoxyethylenic surfactants on quartz, kaolin, and dolomite: A correlation between surfactant structure and solid surface nature

    SciTech Connect

    Nevskaia, D.M.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Lopez-Gonzalez, J.deD.

    1996-08-10

    Adsorption of a surfactant at a liquid-solid interface makes up the basis of many technological processes such as detergency, flotation, water treatment, and enhanced oil recovery. The influence of variables such as adsorption temperature, polar chain length, and nature of functional groups on the adsorption, from aqueous solutions, of various surfactants (TX-114, TX-100, TX-165, TX-305, NP1P4E, NP4P1E, NP4S, NP10S, and NP25S) has been investigated. Several nonporous solids, including various samples of quartz, kaolin, and dolomite, were studied. Conformational changes of adsorbed surfactant molecules on one quartz, when the oxyethylenic length of Tritons increases, have been detected. For all the other solid samples the surface is not completely covered by Tritons. On quartz, the surfactants are adsorbed by hydrogen bonds between the surfactant`s ether groups and the silanol groups of the solid surface. These hydroxyl groups must be free and sufficiently separated from other hydroxyls of the solid surface. When the number of propoxy groups increases (from NP1P4E to NP4P1E) the adsorbed amount of surfactant on the solid studied decreases. Anionic surfactants are adsorbed on quartz in lower amounts than the corresponding nonionic surfactants. However, the adsorbed amounts of Tritons and sulfated Tritons on kaolin are similar, probably due to the positive charges on the edges of this material.

  1. Biobased surfactant-like molecules from organic wastes: the effect of waste composition and composting process on surfactant properties and on the ability to solubilize Tetrachloroethene (PCE).

    PubMed

    Quadri, Giorgia; Chen, Xiaosong; Jawitz, James W; Tambone, Fulvia; Genevini, Pierluigi; Faoro, Franco; Adani, Fabrizio

    2008-04-01

    In this work, four surfactant-like humic acids (HAs) obtained from garden lignocellulose wastes and kitchen food wastes mixed with garden-lignocellulose wastes, both before and after composting, were tested for surfactant properties and the ability to solubilize tetrachloroethene (PCE). The waste-derived HAs showed good surfactant properties, lowering the water surface tension from 74 mN m(-1) to 45.4 +/- 4.4 mN m(-1), with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 1.54 +/- 1.68 g L(-1), which is lower than many synthetic ionic surfactants. CMC was affected by both waste origin and composting processes. The addition of food waste and composting reduced CMC by adding alkyl-C (measured by CP MAS 13C NMR) and N- and S-HA contents (amide molecules), so that a multistep regression was found [CMC = 24.6 - 0.189 alkyl C - 2.64 (N + S); R2 = 0.77, P < 0.10, n = 6]. The four HAs solubilized PCE at the rate of 0.18-0.47 g PCE/g aqueous biosurfactant. These results were much higher than those reported in the literature for a commercial HA (0.026 g/g), but they were in line with those measured in this work for nonionic surfactants such as Tween-80 (0.69 g/g) and Triton X-100 (1.08 g/g). PMID:18505006

  2. Complexation of ionomers and surfactant molecules of the same charge in a nonpolar solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeev, K.N.; Chugunov, S.A.; Zezin, A.B.; Kabanov, V.A. . Dept. of Polymer Science); Teraoka, I. ); MacKnight, W.J. . Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering)

    1994-07-04

    Complexation between sulfonated polystyrene ionomers and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate sodium salt (aerosol OT, AOT) surfactant molecules in m-xylene was studied by ultracentrifugation, vapor pressure osmometry, viscometry, and dynamic light scattering. When the dilute ionomer solution is mixed with the AOT solution, complexation takes place for both the slightly aggregated state of AOT and reversed micelles of AOT containing water. In the presence of excess AOT molecules, some of the AOT are free from the ionomers, and there are well-defined limiting compositions for complexes of the ionomer and AOT and for those of the ionomer and AOT micelles. The limiting composition depends on the species of the salt or acid group of the ionomer and on the state of AOT before mixing. The composition was estimated to be 0.21--0.66 reversed AOT micelles per salt/acid group for the ionomer--AOT micelles complexes and 14--23 AOT molecules per salt/acid group for the ionomer--AOT complexes. AOT molecules were found to disrupt efficiently the cluster-forming contacts among salt/acid groups, each of them encapsulating a single salt/acid group. The AOT micelles, however, do not completely disrupt the intrachain aggregation.

  3. Barriers to intramolecular rotation determined from the temperature dependence of the Henry constant in the region of adsorbed molecule rigidity failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgonosov, A. M.; Prudkovskii, A. G.

    2008-05-01

    A distribution for the rigid and nonrigid adsorbed molecule forms was found. Adsorbed molecule rigidity failure was shown to be accompanied by a weak nonlinear effect, which manifested itself as a temperature dependence of the Henry constant. A method for the determination of the barrier to intramolecular rotation from the temperature dependence of the molecule adsorption constant was suggested. Barriers to rotation about the C-C and C-O bonds were determined for several molecules.

  4. Direct comparison of the electronic coupling efficiency of sulfur and selenium alligator clips for molecules adsorbed onto gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, L.; Palacin, S.; Bourgoin, J. P.

    2003-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been performed to compare the electronic coupling provided by S and by Se used as alligator clips for bisthiol- and biselenol-terthiophene molecules adsorbed onto gold. The molecules were inserted in a dodecanethiol (DT) self-assembled monolayer. Their apparent height above the dodecanethiol matrix was used as a measure of the electronic coupling strength corresponding to S and Se, respectively. We show that the insertion behaviors of the two molecules are qualitatively the same, and that Se provides systematically a better coupling link than S, whatever the tunneling conditions.

  5. Direct comparison of the electronic coupling efficiency of sulfur and selenium anchoring groups for molecules adsorbed onto gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, L.; Palacin, S.; Bourgoin, J. P.; Lagoute, J.; Zambelli, T.; Gauthier, S.

    2002-08-01

    We performed air and ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy experiments in order to compare the electronic coupling provided by S and by Se used as alligator clips for bisthiol- and biselenol-terthiophene molecules adsorbed onto gold. The molecules were inserted in a dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer. Their apparent height above the dodecanethiol matrix was used as a measure of the electronic coupling strength corresponding to S and Se, respectively. We show that the insertion behaviors of the two molecules are qualitatively the same, and that Se provides systematically a better coupling link than S whatever the tunneling conditions.

  6. Tunneling Spectroscopy Studies of Urea, Thiourea, and Selected Phosphonate Molecules Adsorbed on Aluminum Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Charles D.

    Experimental and calculated inelastic electron tunneling intensities were compared for several of the vibrational modes of thiourea adsorbed on aluminum oxide. The partial charge model of Kirtley, Scalapino, and Hansma was used to compute the theoretical intensities of each mode. The required partial charges were determined using a method developed by Momany. Essentially, the Coulomb potential resulting from point charges located at atom sites was fitted to the quantum mechanical electrostatic potential of a molecule calculated from Hartree-Fock theory. The effect of a vibrational mode pattern on the electrostatic potential of a molecule was investigated. This effect could not be acceptably modeled with a single point charge located on each atom, so one charge was used to represent the positive nucleus of each atom and a second charge was used to represent the valence cloud. The valence charge was allowed to move independently of the nuclear charge during a molecular vibration, and the motions of the two charges were found to be very different for hydrogen atoms. This model gave very reasonable agreement between the theoretical and observed relative intensities for the in plane vibrational modes of thiourea. An acceptable set of out of plane force constants could not be found. This caused problems in the interpretation of the out of plane relative intensities. Based on the in plane modes, it was concluded that thiourea bonded to aluminum oxide with the sulfur atom near the oxide and the sulfur-carbon bond perpendicular to the aluminum oxide surface. Quantum mechanical electrostatic potentials were also calculated for urea, phosphoric acid (PA), methylphosphonic acid (MPA), hydroxymethylphosphonic acid (HMP), and nitrotrismethylphosphonic acid (NTMP). Electron tunneling spectra were taken for PA, HMP and NTMP, and the observed frequencies were compared to values obtained from Fourier transform infrared, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Upward shifts in the P=O and P

  7. Probing nanoparticle effect in protein-surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    SANS experiments have been carried to probe the role of anionic silica nanoparticles in the anionic BSA protein-cationic DTAB surfactant complexes. In protein-surfactant complex, surfactant molecules aggregate to form micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The nanoparticle aggregation mediated by oppositely charged protein-surfactant complex coexists with the free protein-surfactant complexes in the nanoparticle-protein-surfactant system. There is rearrangement of micelles in adsorbed protein-surfactant complex on nanoparticles in leading to their (nanoparticle) aggregation. On the other hand, the unfolding of protein in free protein-surfactant complex is found to be significantly enhanced in presence of nanoparticles.

  8. Effects of molecule-insulator interaction on geometric property of a single phthalocyanine molecule adsorbed on an ultrathin NaCl film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Kuniyuki; Imada, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Shota; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-04-01

    The adsorption structure and orientation of a metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc ) and a magnesium phthalocyanine (MgPc) on a bilayer of NaCl films were investigated both theoretically and experimentally by means of first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and by scanning tunneling microscopy. H2Pc is adsorbed with its center over the sodium cation, and H-N bonds in the molecule are aligned with the [100] or [010] surface direction of a bilayer (001)-terminated NaCl film. The most stable structures of MgPc on the NaCl film show two kinds of orientations corresponding to the molecule rotated by ±7∘ relative to the [110] surface direction, with the Mg cation positioned over the chlorine anion in both cases. The energetic barrier for switching between these orientations is as low as 9.0 meV, and during an STM measurement, an orientational change of MgPc can be observed. The interaction between the adsorbed molecule and the NaCl film were analyzed in terms of dispersion interaction, Mg-Cl chemical bonding, and electrostatic interaction. It is found that the small electrostatic interaction between the molecule and the film gives a dominant contribution to determining the molecular orientation. Our detailed and comprehensive studies of the molecule-insulator interaction will provide knowledge to understand and control the properties of molecules on an insulating material.

  9. Charge transfer interactions of a Ru(II) dye complex and related ligand molecules adsorbed on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, Andrew J.; Weston, Matthew; O'Shea, James N.; Taylor, J. Ben; Rienzo, Anna; Mayor, Louise C.

    2011-10-28

    The interaction of the dye molecule, N3 (cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2{sup '}-bipyridyl-4,4{sup '}-dicarboxylato) -ruthenium(II)), and related ligand molecules with a Au(111) surface has been studied using synchrotron radiation-based electron spectroscopy. Resonant photoemission spectroscopy (RPES) and autoionization of the adsorbed molecules have been used to probe the coupling between the molecules and the substrate. Evidence of charge transfer from the states near the Fermi level of the gold substrate into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the molecules is found in the monolayer RPES spectra of both isonicotinic acid and bi-isonicotinic acid (a ligand of N3), but not for the N3 molecule itself. Calibrated x-ray absorption spectroscopy and valence band spectra of the monolayers reveals that the LUMO crosses the Fermi level of the surface in all cases, showing that charge transfer is energetically possible both from and to the molecule. A core-hole clock analysis of the resonant photoemission reveals a charge transfer time of around 4 fs from the LUMO of the N3 dye molecule to the surface. The lack of charge transfer in the opposite direction is understood in terms of the lack of spatial overlap between the {pi}*-orbitals in the aromatic rings of the bi-isonicotinic acid ligands of N3 and the gold surface.

  10. REUSABLE ADSORBENTS FOR DILUTE SOLUTIONS SEPARATION. 5: PHOTODEGRADATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON SURFACTANT-MODIFIED TITANIA. (R828598C753)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semiconductor titania (TiO2) surface was modified by surfactant adsorption to make it more hydrophobic and to increase the adsorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) and their photodegradation rates under UV irradiation. Photocatalytic experiments using Ti...

  11. Heat capacity measurements of atoms and molecules adsorbed on evaporated metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, T.W.

    1989-05-01

    Investigations of the properties of absorbed monolayers have received great experimental and theoretical attention recently, both because of the importance of surface processes in practical applications such as catalysis, and the importance of such systems to the understanding of the fundamentals of thermodynamics in two dimensions. We have adapted the composite bolometer technology to the construction of microcalorimeters. For these calorimeters, the adsorption substrate is an evaporated film deposited on one surface of an optically polished sapphire wafer. This approach has allowed us to make the first measurements of the heat capacity of submonolayer films of /sup 4/He adsorbed on metallic films. In contrast to measurements of /sup 4/He adsorbed on all other insulating substrates, we have shown that /sup 4/He on silver films occupies a two-dimensional gas phase over a broad range of coverages and temperatures. Our apparatus has been used to study the heat capacity of Indium flakes. CO multilayers, /sup 4/He adsorbed on sapphire and on Ag films and H/sub 2/ adsorbed on Ag films. The results are compared with appropriate theories. 68 refs., 19 figs.

  12. Entropy of adsorption of mixed surfactants from solutions onto the air/water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, L.-W.; Chen, J.-H.; Zhou, N.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The partial molar entropy change for mixed surfactant molecules adsorbed from solution at the air/water interface has been investigated by surface thermodynamics based upon the experimental surface tension isotherms at various temperatures. Results for different surfactant mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate, decylpyridinium chloride and sodium alkylsulfonates have shown that the partial molar entropy changes for adsorption of the mixed surfactants were generally negative and decreased with increasing adsorption to a minimum near the maximum adsorption and then increased abruptly. The entropy decrease can be explained by the adsorption-orientation of surfactant molecules in the adsorbed monolayer and the abrupt entropy increase at the maximum adsorption is possible due to the strong repulsion between the adsorbed molecules.

  13. Self-organization of surfactant molecules on solid surface: an STM study of sodium alkyl sulfonates [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiu-Li; Wan, Li-Jun; Yang, Zheng-Yu; Yu, Jia-Yong

    2005-02-01

    Adsorption and self-organization of sodium alkyl sulfonates (STS and SHS) on HOPG have been studied by using in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Both SHS and STS molecules adsorb on HOPG surface and form long-range well-ordered monolayers. The molecular rows and the axes of alkyl chain of the molecules cross each other at angles of 60° and 90° in the STS and SHS layers, respectively. Molecular details such as sulfonate functional group (head) and alkyl chain are clearly imaged. The neighboring molecules in different rows form a "head to head" configuration. Structural models for the molecular arrangement of the two adlayers are proposed.

  14. Fluorescence studies of polymer surfactant association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, M. da G.; Burrows, H. D.; Formosinho, S. J.; Lindman, B.

    2001-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been successfully used for the study of central issues of solutions of surfactants and associating polymers. Different fluorescence techniques and methods are uniquely adapted to investigate problems in this field and can, by using extrinsic or intrinsic probes, provide information on molecular association, microstructure and molecular dynamics. This constitutes an important contribution to the understanding and control of macroscopic properties, as well as to their biological functions and technical applications. Important aspects of these mixed systems, related to their self-assembly, are: formation of micelles and hydrophobic microdomains in general; size and shape of surfactant molecular aggregates; formation and stability of vesicles; intra- vs. intermolecular association in polymers; conformational changes in polymers as affected by polymer-surfactant association; surfactant organization in adsorbed layers; kinetic aspects of the formation and disintegration of self-assembly structures; residence times of molecules in microdomains and migration of active molecules. Some of these issues will be addressed in this paper.

  15. Charge-transfer photodissociation of adsorbed molecules via electron image states

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E. T.

    2008-01-28

    The 248 and 193 nm photodissociations of submonolayer quantities of CH{sub 3}Br and CH{sub 3}I adsorbed on thin layers of n-hexane indicate that the dissociation is caused by dissociative electron attachment from subvacuum level photoelectrons created in the copper substrate. The characteristics of this photodissociation-translation energy distributions and coverage dependences show that the dissociation is mediated by an image potential state which temporarily traps the photoelectrons near the n-hexane-vacuum interface, and then the charge transfers from this image state to the affinity level of a coadsorbed halomethane which then dissociates.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of surfactants on silver electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Soncheng; Birke, R.L.; Lombardi, J.R. )

    1990-03-08

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been used to study different kinds of surfactants (cationic, anionic, and nonionic surfactants) adsorbed on a roughened Ag electrode. Spectral assignments are made for the SERS spectrum of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and it is shown that the molecule is oriented with its pyridinium ring end-on at the electrode surface at potentials positive to the point of zero charge (pzc) on Ag.

  17. Adsorbed states of chlorophenol on Cu(110) and controlled switching of single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, H.; Kitaguchi, Y.; Hattori, T.; Ueda, Y.; Ferrer, N. G.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.

    2016-06-01

    A molecular junction of substituted benzene (chlorophenol) is fabricated and controlled by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Prior to the junction formation, the bonding geometry of the molecule on the surface is characterized by STM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). EELS shows that the OH group of chlorophenol is dissociated on Cu(110) and that the molecule is bonded nearly flat to the surface via an O atom, with the Cl group intact. We demonstrate controlled contact of an STM tip to the "available" Cl group and lift-up of the molecule while it is anchored to the surface via an O atom. The asymmetric bonding motifs of the molecule to the electrodes allow for reversible control of the junction.

  18. Adsorbed states of chlorophenol on Cu(110) and controlled switching of single-molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, H; Kitaguchi, Y; Hattori, T; Ueda, Y; Ferrer, N G; Hatta, S; Aruga, T

    2016-06-28

    A molecular junction of substituted benzene (chlorophenol) is fabricated and controlled by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Prior to the junction formation, the bonding geometry of the molecule on the surface is characterized by STM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). EELS shows that the OH group of chlorophenol is dissociated on Cu(110) and that the molecule is bonded nearly flat to the surface via an O atom, with the Cl group intact. We demonstrate controlled contact of an STM tip to the "available" Cl group and lift-up of the molecule while it is anchored to the surface via an O atom. The asymmetric bonding motifs of the molecule to the electrodes allow for reversible control of the junction. PMID:27369529

  19. How hottest geometries and adsorptive parameters influence the SER(R)S spectra of Methylene Blue molecules adsorbed on nanocolloidal gold particles of varied sizes?

    PubMed

    Roy, Sannak Dutta; Ghosh, Manash; Chowdhury, Joydeep

    2015-12-01

    The SER(R)S spectra of Methylene Blue (MB) molecule adsorbed on gold nanocolloidal particles (AuNCs) have been investigated. The adsorptive parameters of the molecule adsorbed on AuNCs have been evaluated with the aid of Fluorescence Spectroscopy study. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies have been further applied to understand the concentration of probe molecule actually adsorbed on AuNC surfaces. Gigantic enhancements ∼10(6)-10(16) orders of magnitude have been recorded for the enhanced Raman bands in the SER(R)S spectra. Three-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (3D-FDTD) simulations studies have been carried out to predict the distributions of electric fields around the possible nanoaggregated hot geometries considered to be responsible for the huge enhancements of SER(R)S bands of the MB molecule. PMID:26172467

  20. Mechanism of charge transfer and its impacts on Fermi-level pinning for gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Changjie; Zhu, Huili; Yang, Weihuang

    2015-06-07

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to assess changes in the geometric and electronic structures of monolayer WS{sub 2} upon adsorption of various gas molecules (H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO). The most stable configuration of the adsorbed molecules, the adsorption energy, and the degree of charge transfer between adsorbate and substrate were determined. All evaluated molecules were physisorbed on monolayer WS{sub 2} with a low degree of charge transfer and accept charge from the monolayer, except for NH{sub 3}, which is a charge donor. Band structure calculations showed that the valence and conduction bands of monolayer WS{sub 2} are not significantly altered upon adsorption of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, and CO, whereas the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of O{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2} are pinned around the Fermi-level when these molecules are adsorbed on monolayer WS{sub 2}. The phenomenon of Fermi-level pinning was discussed in light of the traditional and orbital mixing charge transfer theories. The impacts of the charge transfer mechanism on Fermi-level pinning were confirmed for the gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS{sub 2}. The proposed mechanism governing Fermi-level pinning is applicable to the systems of adsorbates on recently developed two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides.

  1. Interfacial Assembly of Surfactant-Decorated Nanoparticles: On the Rheological Description of a Colloidal 2D Glass.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Armando; Deshmukh, Omkar S; Mugele, Frieder; Langevin, Dominique

    2015-06-16

    We address the rheology of assemblies of surfactant-decorated silica nanoparticles irreversibly adsorbed at the gas/liquid interface. Positively charged surfactant molecules (such as CTAB) bind to silica nanoparticle surfaces, and the resulting particle-surfactant complexes adsorb at gas/liquid interfaces. The surfactant molecules control the wettability of such decorated nanoparticles and their adsorption. The interparticle forces can be tuned by changing the surfactant concentration Cs. Increasing Cs, in addition to a decrease of the particles wettability, leads to an increase of the area fraction of particles at the interface. Oscillatory shear measurements (strain- and frequency-sweep) have been performed. Here, we explore the effect of the surfactant concentration Cs. At high enough Cs, the interface is highly packed, and an overall solidlike response is observed, with 2D glass properties. PMID:25973738

  2. Selective Ni-P electroless plating on photopatterned cationic adsorption films influenced by alkyl chain lengths of polyelectrolyte adsorbates and additive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaru; Nawa, Nozomi; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2004-10-26

    We demonstrated that the photopatterned single-layer adsorption film of poly(1-dodecyl-4-pyridinium bromide) on a silica surface was available for a template of nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) electroless plating through sensitization with a SnCl(2) aqueous solution and activation with a PdCl(2) aqueous solution. Four kinds of poly(1-alkyl-4-vinylpyridinium halide)s bearing methyl, propyl, hexyl, and dodecyl groups were prepared. The cationic polymers were adsorbed by a negatively charged silica surface from their solutions, to form single-layer adsorption films exhibiting desorption-resistance toward deionized water and ethanol. The organic adsorption films could be decomposed completely by exposure to 172 nm deep-UV light. The formation and decomposition of the single-layer films were confirmed by deep-UV absorption spectral measurement and zeta-potential measurement. Ni-P electroless plating was carried out on the photopatterned adsorption films, using three types of SnO(x) colloidal materials without and with cationic or anionic surfactant as catalyst precursors in the sensitization step. In the case of the negatively charged SnO(x) colloids surrounded by anionic surfactant, Ni-deposition took place preferentially on the cationic adsorption films remaining in unexposed regions. The Ni-deposition was accelerated significantly on the cationic adsorption film bearing dodecyl groups. It was obvious by ICP-AES analyses that the hydrophobic long-chain dodecyl groups in the adsorption film could promote the adsorption of the negative SnO(x) colloids on the film surface, followed by much nucleus formation of zerovalent Pd catalysts useful for the electroless plating. The result of our experiment clearly showed that, in addition to electrostatic interaction, van der Waals interaction generating between the hydrophobic long-chain hydrocarbons of the adsorption film and the surfactant improved significantly the adsorption stability of the SnO(x) colloids, resulting in highly

  3. Adsorbate-induced absorption redshift in an organic-inorganic cluster conjugate: Electronic effects of surfactants and organic adsorbates on the lowest excited states of a methanethiol-CdSe conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Christopher; Chung, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Sungyul; Weiss, Shimon; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Bioconjugated CdSe quantum dots are promising reagents for bioimaging applications. Experimentally, the binding of a short peptide has been found to redshift the optical absorption of nanoclusters [J. Tsay et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 1669 (2005)]. This study examines this issue by performing density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent-DFT calculations to study the ground state and low-lying excited states of (CdSe)6[SCH3]-, a transition metal complex built by binding methanethiolate to a CdSe molecular cluster. Natural bond orbital results show that the redshift is caused by ligand-inorganic cluster orbital interaction. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of (CdSe)6 is dominated by selenium 4p orbitals; in contrast, the HOMO of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- is dominated by sulfur 3p orbitals. This difference shows that [SCH3]- binding effectively introduces filled sulfur orbitals above the selenium 4p orbitals of (CdSe)6. The resulting smaller HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- indeed leads to redshifts in its excitation energies compared to (CdSe)6. In contrast, binding of multiple NH3 destabilizes cadmium 5p orbitals, which contribute significantly to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of (CdSe)6, while leaving the selenium 4p orbitals near the HOMO relatively unaffected. This has the effect of widening the HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)6ṡ6NH3 compared to (CdSe)6. As expected, the excitation energies of the passivated (CdSe)6ṡ6NH3 are also blueshifted compared to (CdSe)6. As far as NH3 is a faithful representation of a surfactant, the results clearly illustrate the differences between the electronic effects of an alkylthiolate versus those of surfactant molecules. Surface passivation of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- is then simulated by coating it with multiple NH3 molecules. The results suggest that the [SCH3]- adsorption induces a redshift in the excitation energies in a surfactant environment.

  4. Effects of non-local exchange on core level shifts for gas-phase and adsorbed molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bossche, M.; Grönbeck, H.; Martin, N. M.; Gustafson, J.; Lundgren, E.; Hakanoglu, C.; Weaver, J. F.

    2014-07-21

    Density functional theory calculations are often used to interpret experimental shifts in core level binding energies. Calculations based on gradient-corrected (GC) exchange-correlation functionals are known to reproduce measured core level shifts (CLS) of isolated molecules and metal surfaces with reasonable accuracy. In the present study, we discuss a series of examples where the shifts calculated within a GC-functional significantly deviate from the experimental values, namely the CLS of C 1s in ethyl trifluoroacetate, Pd 3d in PdO and the O 1s shift for CO adsorbed on PdO(101). The deviations are traced to effects of the electronic self-interaction error with GC-functionals and substantially better agreements between calculated and measured CLS are obtained when a fraction of exact exchange is used in the exchange-correlation functional.

  5. Effect of surfactant types and their concentration on the structural characteristics of nanoclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawrah, M. F.; Khattab, R. M.; Saad, E. M.; Gado, R. A.

    2014-03-01

    A series of organo-modified nanoclays was synthesized using three different surfactants having different alkyl chain lengths and concentrations [0.5-5.0 cation exchange capacity (CEC)]. These surfactants were Ethanolamine (EA), Cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB) and Tetraoctadecylammoniumbromide (TO). The obtained modified nanoclays were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compared with unmodified nanoclay. The results of XRD analysis indicated that the basal d-spacing has increased with increasing alkyl chain length and surfactant concentration. From the obtained microstructures of these organo-modified nanoclays, the mechanism of surfactant adsorption was proposed. At relatively low loading of surfactant, most of surfactant entered the spacing by an ion-exchange mechanism and is adsorbed onto the interlayer cation sites. When the concentration of the surfactant exceeds the CEC of clay, the surfactant molecules then adhere to the surface adsorbed surfactant. Some surfactants entered the interlayers, whereas the others were attached to the clay surface. When the concentration of surfactant increased further beyond 2.0 CEC, the surfactants might occupy the inter-particle space within the house-of-cards aggregate structure.

  6. Hindered and modulated rotational states and spectra of adsorbed diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.T.; Chuu, D.S.; Mei, W.N.

    1996-10-01

    Both vertical and horizontal adsorption configurations of a diatomic molecule were modeled as the rigid rotor with which the spatial motion was confined by a finite conical well. In addition to the polar hindering potential, a sinusoidal azimuthal modulation, which bears the local symmetry of the adsorption site, was incorporated. Eigenfunctions for different models were expressed analytically in terms of the hypergeometric functions, and eigenvalues were solved numerically. We found that the rotational energy levels exhibit oscillatory behavior when plotted as functions of the hindrance angle. This particular phenomenon was interpreted as the occurrence of resonance transmission of the rotor wave function at certain hindrance condition. We also found that the rotational levels were grouped into bands when the azimuthal modulation strength was increased. The solutions were used to calculate the rotational-state distribution of desorbed molecules, and agreement with the previous experiment was obtained. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. [Sorption and mechanism of surfactants on bentonite in combined pollution].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Hui; Lu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Shu-Guang; Li, Ling-Jian; Shen, Xue-You

    2007-04-01

    Sorption of cationic surfactant cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) and nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) on bentonite was studied. The influences of cation-exchange capacity (CEC), temperature and salinity on the sorption of CPC were also discussed. The results indicate that the sorption of CPC on Na-bentonite is greater than that of TX-100 and SDBS, and SDBS hardly shows any sorption. CPC is adsorbed to Na-bentonite through a combination of hydrophobic bonding and cation-exchange. While TX-100 is adsorbed to Na-bentonite via the formation of an adsorption layer of twain surfactant molecule and hydrogenolysis of silicon-oxygen surface of bentonite and TX-100. The amount of SDBS adsorbed on Ca-bentonite increases with increasing surfactant concentration, reaching a maximum at 1.5 critical micelle concentration (CMC), and then decreases with increasing surfactant loading. The mechanism of the retention appears to be formation of a sparingly soluble Ca-SDBS species, and dissolution in the micelle. The amount of CPC adsorbed on bentonite decreases with increasing temperature, and increases with increasing CEC. NaCl can enhance the sorption of CPC on bentonite. PMID:17639947

  8. Switching orientation of adsorbed molecules: Reverse domino on a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braatz, C. R.; Esat, T.; Wagner, C.; Temirov, R.; Tautz, F. S.; Jakob, P.

    2016-01-01

    A thus far unknown phase of 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (NTCDA) on Ag(111), characterized by an all perpendicular orientation of the planar molecules and bound to the Ag substrate through the carboxyl oxygen atoms has been identified using infrared absorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Its formation process requires second layer NTCDA to squeeze into empty spaces between relaxed monolayer NTCDA molecules. Remarkably, this process causes initially parallel oriented NTCDA to likewise adopt the new, highly inclined adsorption geometry. According to our SPA-LEED and STM findings, the new phase displays a distinct long range order and shows a pronounced tendency to form 1D rows or narrow islands. We suggest that extra NTCDA preferentially transforms into the upright configuration close to existing islands and attaches to them, i.e. the transformation process proceeds in a directed and recurrent manner (reverse domino scenario). Identical processing starting with a compressed NTCDA/Ag(111) monolayer leads to a purely parallel oriented bilayer, that is, the NTCDA monolayer phase is retained and merely acts as a passive template for bilayer NTCDA. The new vertical NTCDA phase represents an unusual molecular system with π-orbitals oriented parallel to a metal surface. A substantially reduced coupling of these orbitals to Ag(111) electronic levels is conjectured, which will have a major impact on intermolecular couplings and electronically excited state lifetimes.

  9. Tribochemical synthesis of nano-lubricant films from adsorbed molecules at sliding solid interface: Tribo-polymers from α-pinene, pinane, and n-decane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Barthel, Anthony J.; Kim, Seong H.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanochemical reactions of adsorbed molecules at sliding interfaces were studied for α-pinene (C10H16), pinane (C10H18), and n-decane (C10H22) on a stainless steel substrate surface. During vapor phase lubrication, molecules adsorbed at the sliding interface could be activated by mechanical shear. Under the equilibrium adsorption condition of these molecules, the friction coefficient of sliding steel surfaces was about 0.2 and a polymeric film was tribochemically produced. The synthesis yield of α-pinene tribo-polymers was about twice as much as pinane tribo-polymers. In contrast to these strained bicyclic hydrocarbons, n-decane showed much weaker activity for tribo-polymerization at the same mechanical shear condition. These results suggested that the mechanical shear at tribological interfaces could induce the opening of the strained ring structure of α-pinene and pinane, which leads to polymerization of adsorbed molecules at the sliding track. On a stainless steel surface, such polymerization reactions of adsorbed molecules do not occur under typical surface reaction conditions. The mechanical properties and boundary lubrication efficiency of the produced tribo-polymer films are discussed.

  10. Adsorption of anionic and non-ionic surfactants on carbon nanotubes in water with dissipative particle dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Minh D.; Shiau, Benjamin; Harwell, Jeffrey H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of surfactants physically adsorbed on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has a significant impact on the dispersion of CNTs in the solution. The adsorption of the surfactants alfoterra 123-8s (AF) and tergitol 15-s-40 (TG) on CNTs was investigated with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, as well as the behavior of the binary surfactant system with CNTs. Properties of surfactants (i.e., critical micelle concentration, aggregation number, shape and size of micelle, and diffusivity) in water were determined to validate the simulation model. Results indicated that the assembly of surfactants (AF and TG) on CNTs depends on the interaction of the surfactant tail and the CNT surface, where surfactants formed mainly hemimicellar structures. For surfactants in solution, most micelles had spherical shape. The particles formed by the CNT and the adsorbed surfactant became hydrophilic, due to the outward orientation of the head groups of the surfactants that formed monolayer adsorption. In the binary surfactant system, the presence of TG on the CNT surface provided a considerable hydrophilic steric effect, due to the EO groups of TG molecules. It was also seen that the adsorption of AF was more favorable than TG on the CNT surface. Diffusion coefficients for the surfactants in the bulk and surface diffusion on the CNT were calculated. These results are applicable, in a qualitative sense, to the more general case of adsorption of surfactants on the hydrophobic surface of cylindrically shaped nanoscale objects.

  11. Adsorption of anionic and non-ionic surfactants on carbon nanotubes in water with dissipative particle dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Vo, Minh D; Shiau, Benjamin; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V

    2016-05-28

    The morphology of surfactants physically adsorbed on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has a significant impact on the dispersion of CNTs in the solution. The adsorption of the surfactants alfoterra 123-8s (AF) and tergitol 15-s-40 (TG) on CNTs was investigated with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, as well as the behavior of the binary surfactant system with CNTs. Properties of surfactants (i.e., critical micelle concentration, aggregation number, shape and size of micelle, and diffusivity) in water were determined to validate the simulation model. Results indicated that the assembly of surfactants (AF and TG) on CNTs depends on the interaction of the surfactant tail and the CNT surface, where surfactants formed mainly hemimicellar structures. For surfactants in solution, most micelles had spherical shape. The particles formed by the CNT and the adsorbed surfactant became hydrophilic, due to the outward orientation of the head groups of the surfactants that formed monolayer adsorption. In the binary surfactant system, the presence of TG on the CNT surface provided a considerable hydrophilic steric effect, due to the EO groups of TG molecules. It was also seen that the adsorption of AF was more favorable than TG on the CNT surface. Diffusion coefficients for the surfactants in the bulk and surface diffusion on the CNT were calculated. These results are applicable, in a qualitative sense, to the more general case of adsorption of surfactants on the hydrophobic surface of cylindrically shaped nanoscale objects. PMID:27250319

  12. Infrared spectroscopy of water clusters co-adsorbed with hydrogen molecules on a sodium chloride film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen gas containing a trace of water vapor was dosed on a vacuum-evaporated sodium chloride film at 13 K, and water clusters formed on the substrate were investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Absorption bands due to (H2O)n clusters with n = 3-6 and an induced absorption band due to hydrogen were clearly observed. With increasing gas dosage, the intensities of the cluster bands increased linearly while the intensity of the hydrogen band was constant. This suggests that the water clusters were formed in two-dimensional matrices of hydrogen. We found that the water clusters did exist on the surface upon heating even after the hydrogen molecules had desorbed. A further rise of the substrate temperature up to 27 K yielded the formation of larger clusters, (H2O)n with n > 6 . We also discuss the origins of the two bands of the trimer in terms of pseudorotation and a metastable isomer.

  13. Intrinsic property measurement of surfactant-templated mesoporous silica films using time-resolved single-molecule imaging.

    PubMed

    Kennard, Raymond; DeSisto, William J; Giririjan, Thanu Praba; Mason, Michael D

    2008-04-01

    Mesoporous silica membranes fabricated by the surfactant-templated sol-gel process have received attention because of the potential to prepare membranes with a narrow pore size distribution and ordering of the interconnected pores. Potential applications include ultrafiltration, biological separations and drug delivery, and separators in lithium-ion batteries. Despite advancements in synthesis and characterization of these membranes, a quantitative description of the membrane microstructure remains a challenge. Currently the membrane microstructure is characterized by the combination of results from several techniques, i.e., gas permeance testing, x-ray diffraction scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and permporometry. The results from these ensemble methods are then compiled and the data fitted to a particular flow model. Although these methods are very effective in determining membrane performance, general pore size distribution, and defect concentration, they are unable to monitor molecular paths through the membrane and quantitatively measure molecular interactions between the molecular specie and pore network. Single-molecule imaging techniques enable optical measurements that probe materials on nanometer length scales through observation of individual molecules without the influence of averaging. Using single-molecule imaging spectroscopy, we can quantitatively characterize the interaction between the probe molecule and the interior of the pore within mesoporous silica membranes. This approach is radically different from typical membrane characterization methods in that it has the potential to spatially sample the underlying pore structure distribution, the surface energy, and the transport properties. Our hope is that this new fundamental knowledge can be quantitatively linked to both the preparation and the performance of membranes, leading to the advancement of membrane science and technology. Fluorescent molecules, 1

  14. Intrinsic property measurement of surfactant-templated mesoporous silica films using time-resolved single-molecule imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennard, Raymond; DeSisto, William J.; Giririjan, Thanu Praba; Mason, Michael D.

    2008-04-01

    Mesoporous silica membranes fabricated by the surfactant-templated sol-gel process have received attention because of the potential to prepare membranes with a narrow pore size distribution and ordering of the interconnected pores. Potential applications include ultrafiltration, biological separations and drug delivery, and separators in lithium-ion batteries. Despite advancements in synthesis and characterization of these membranes, a quantitative description of the membrane microstructure remains a challenge. Currently the membrane microstructure is characterized by the combination of results from several techniques, i.e., gas permeance testing, x-ray diffraction scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and permporometry. The results from these ensemble methods are then compiled and the data fitted to a particular flow model. Although these methods are very effective in determining membrane performance, general pore size distribution, and defect concentration, they are unable to monitor molecular paths through the membrane and quantitatively measure molecular interactions between the molecular specie and pore network. Single-molecule imaging techniques enable optical measurements that probe materials on nanometer length scales through observation of individual molecules without the influence of averaging. Using single-molecule imaging spectroscopy, we can quantitatively characterize the interaction between the probe molecule and the interior of the pore within mesoporous silica membranes. This approach is radically different from typical membrane characterization methods in that it has the potential to spatially sample the underlying pore structure distribution, the surface energy, and the transport properties. Our hope is that this new fundamental knowledge can be quantitatively linked to both the preparation and the performance of membranes, leading to the advancement of membrane science and technology. Fluorescent molecules, 1

  15. Photon-exposure-dependent photon-stimulated desorption for obtaining photolysis cross section of molecules adsorbed on surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons.

    PubMed

    Chou, L-C; Jang, C-Y; Wu, Y-H; Tsai, W-C; Wang, S-K; Chen, J; Chang, S-C; Liu, C-C; Shai, Y; Wen, C-R

    2008-12-01

    Photon-exposure-dependent positive- and negative-ion photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was proposed to study the photoreactions and obtain the photolysis cross sections of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons with energy near the core level of adsorbate. The changes in the F(+) and F(-) PSD ion yields were measured from CF(3)Cl molecules adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 at 30 K (CF(3)Cl dose=0.3x10(15) molecules/cm(2), approximately 0.75 monolayer) during irradiation of monochromatic soft x-ray photons near the F(1s) edge. The PSD ion yield data show the following characteristics: (a) The dissociation of adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules is due to a combination of direct photodissociation via excitation of F(1s) core level and substrate-mediated dissociation [dissociative attachment and dipolar dissociation induced by the photoelectrons emitting from the silicon substrate]. (b) the F(+) ion desorption is associated with the bond breaking of the surface CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, CFCl, and SiF species. (c) the F(-) yield is mainly due to DA and DD of the adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules. (d) The surface SiF is formed by reaction of the surface Si atom with the neutral fluorine atom, F(+), or F(-) ion produced by scission of C-F bond of CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, or CFCl species. A kinetic model was proposed for the explanation of the photolysis of this submonolayer CF(3)Cl-covered surface. Based on this model and the variation rates of the F(+)F(-) signals during fixed-energy monochromatic photon bombardment at 690.2 and 692.6 eV [near the F(1s) edge], the photolysis cross section was deduced as a function of energy. PMID:19063541

  16. Study of conformation and dynamic of surfactant molecules in graphite oxide via NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, X. Q.; Ma, L. G.

    2016-08-01

    The conformation and dynamic of surfactant in graphite oxide (GO) was investigated by solid-state 13C magic-angle-spinning NMR and 1H-13C cross-polarization/magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra. The conformation ordering of the alkyl chains in the confined system shows strong dependence on its orientation. While the alkyl chains parallel to the GO layer in lateral monolayer arrangement are in gauche conformation in addition to a small amount of all-trans conformation, those with orientation radiating away from the GO in paraffin bilayer arrangement is in all-trans conformation in addition to some gauche conformation even though high-order diffraction peaks appears. NMR results suggest that the least mobile segment is located at the GO-surfactant interface corresponding to the N-methylene group. Further from it, the mobility of the alkyl chain increases. The terminal methyl and N-methyl carbon groups have the highest mobile. The chains in all-trans conformational state are characterized as more rigid than chains with gauche conformation; each segment of the confined alkyl chains with the lateral monolayer arrangement exhibits less mobility as compared to that with the paraffin bilayer arrangement.

  17. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  18. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  19. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  20. Changes in the surfaces on DDOAB organoclays adsorbed with paranitrophenol-An XRD, TEM and TG study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qin; He Hongping; Frost, Ray L. Xi Yunfei

    2008-12-01

    The adsorption of paranitrophenol on organoclays synthesised by the ion exchange of the surfactant molecule dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDOAB) of formula (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 17}){sub 2}NBr(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis. The expansion of the montmorillonite depends on the loading of the montmorillonite with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide and is related to the arrangement of the surfactant molecules within the clay interlayer. This expansion is altered by the adsorbed paranitrophenol and is observed in the transmission electron microscopic images of the organoclay with adsorbed paranitrophenol. Changes in the surfactant molecular arrangements were analysed by thermogravimetry. The paranitrophenol is sublimed simultaneously with the loss of surfactant. The dehydroxylation temperature of the montmorillonite is decreased upon adsorption of the paranitrophenol indicating a bonding between the paranitrophenol and the hydroxyl units of the montmorillonite.

  1. Cyclic Changes in the Level of the Innate Immune Molecule, Surfactant Protein-A, and Cytokines in Vaginal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, Colin; de Guzman, Glendell; Sousa, Grace E.; Umstead, Todd M.; Phelps, David S.; Floros, Joanna; Ahn, Kwangmi; Weisz, Judith

    2013-01-01

    PROBLEM Our knowledge of the innate host-defenses in the vagina, a site where these defenses are essential to protecting the host upper reproductive tract from invasion by pathogens, is as yet rudimentary. Specifically, little is known about the pattern-recognition component of vaginal innate immunity, the relationship of pattern-recognition molecules to known cytokine levels, and the role of gonadal hormones in their regulation. METHOD OF STUDY We measured levels of Surfactant Protein-A (SP-A), a prototypic innate pattern-recognition protein, in vaginal fluid (VF) and correlated them with levels of IL-1β and IL-8, two cytokines known to be present in VF. Assays were carried out on VF collected over three consecutive cycles from ten healthy naturally cycling women who were sampled at three specific time points in the menstrual cycle. The three time points were chosen to enable correlation with distinct hormonal states. RESULTS Both SP-A and cytokines levels were highest 5–6 days after menses (p < 0.05) and were significantly lower at ovulation and mid-luteal phase. CONCLUSION SP-A, like other host-defense molecules in the reproductive tract, appears to be regulated by gonadal hormones. PMID:22672628

  2. Biomass-derived chemicals: synthesis of biodegradable surfactant ether molecules from hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Arias, Karen S; Climent, Maria J; Corma, Avelino; Iborra, Sara

    2014-01-01

    A new class of biodegradable anionic surfactants with structures based on 5-alkoxymethylfuroate was prepared starting from 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), through a one-pot-two-steps process which involves the selective etherification of HMF with fatty alcohols using heterogeneous solid acid, followed by a highly selective oxidation of the formyl group with a gold catalyst. The etherification step was optimized using aluminosilicates as acid catalysts with different pore topologies (H-Beta, HY, Mordenite, ZSM-5, ITQ-2, and MCM-41), different active sites (Bronsted or Lewis) and different adsorption properties. It was shown that highly hydrophobic defect-free H-Beta zeolites with Si/Al ratios higher than 25 are excellent acid catalysts to perform the selective etherification of HMF with fatty alcohols, avoiding the competitive self-etherification of HMF. Moreover, the 5-alkoxymethylfurfural derivatives obtained can be selectively oxidized to the corresponding furoic salts in excellent yield using Au/CeO2 as catalyst and air as oxidant, at moderated temperatures. Both H-Beta zeolite and Au/CeO2 could be reused several times without loss of activity. PMID:24106062

  3. [Aggregation Behavior of Collagen-Based Surfactant Molecules in Aqueous Solutions Based on Synchronization Fluorescence Spectrum Technology].

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-hu; Tian, Zhen-hua; Liu, Wen-tao; Li, Guo-ying

    2016-01-01

    Due to the intrinsic fluorescence characteristic of tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe), synchronization fluorescence spectrum technology which adopted the constant wavelength difference (Δλ = 15 nm) was selected to investigate the effects of collagen-based surfactant (CBS) concentration, pH, NaCt concentration and temperature on the aggregation state of CBS molecules in aqueous solutions. Meanwhile, temperature-dependent two-dimensional (2D) synchronization fluorescence correlation analyses was used to investigate the variation order of Tyr and Phe residues in CBS molecules with the change of temperature. The results showed that the characteristic absorption peaks located at 261 and 282 nm were attributed to Phe and Tyr, respectively. With the increase of CBS concentration, the amount of Phe and Tyr residues increased gradually which resulted in the increase of aggregate degree of CBS molecules and then led to the increase of fluorescence intensity. When the pH value (pH 5.0) of CBS solutions was close to the isoelectric point of CBS, the aggregate degree of CBS molecules increased due to the increase of the hydrophobic interaction and the formation ability of hydrogen bond. Additionally, with the increase of NaCl concentration, the repulsion force for inter/intra-molecules of CBS decreased, which helped to improve the aggregation behavior of CBS molecules. However, with the increase of temperature, the aggregation state of CBS was changed to be monomolecular state, and then resulted in the decrease of the fluorescence intensity gradually due to the quenching, the denaturation and the decrease of hydrogen bond formation ability. Furthermore, temperature-dependent 2D synchronization fluorescence correlation spectroscopy demonstrated that at lower temperature (10-40 degrees C), the aggregate state of CBS changed to be loose state and then Phe residues located in the inside of the aggregate varied before Tyr residues; while in the heating process of 45

  4. Adsorption/aggregation of surfactants and their mixtures at solid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Somasundaran, P; Huang, L

    2000-12-11

    Adsorption of surfactants and polymers at solid-liquid interfaces is used widely to modify interfacial properties in a variety of industrial processes such as flotation, ceramic processing, flocculation/dispersion, personal care product formulation and enhanced oil recovery. The behavior of surfactants and polymers at interfaces is determined by a number of forces, including electrostatic attraction, covalent bonding, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic bonding, and solvation and desolvation of various species. The extent and type of the forces involved varies depending on the adsorbate and the adsorbent, and also the composition and other characteristics of the solvent and dissolved components in it. The influence of such forces on the adsorption behavior is reviewed here from a thermodynamics point of view. The experimental results from microcalorimetric and spectroscopic studies of adsorbed layers of different surfactant and polymer systems at solid-liquid interfaces are also presented. Calorimetric data from the adsorption of an anionic surfactant, sodium octylbenzenesulfonate, and a non-ionic surfactant, dodecyloxyheptaethoxyethylalcohol, and their mixtures on alumina, yielded important thermodynamic information. It was found that the adsorption of anionic surfactants alone on alumina was initially highly exothermic due to the electrostatic interaction with the substrate. Further adsorption leading to a solloid (hemimicelle) formation is proposed to be mainly an entropy-driven process. The entropy effect was found to be more pronounced for the adsorption of anionic-non-ionic surfactant mixtures than for the anionic surfactant alone. Fluorescence studies using a pyrene probe on an adsorbed surfactant and polymer layers, along with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, reveal the role of surface aggregation and the conformation of the adsorbed molecules in controlling the dispersion and wettability of the system. PMID:11185696

  5. Photon-exposure-dependent photon-stimulated desorption for obtaining photolysis cross section of molecules adsorbed on surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, L.-C.; Jang, C.-Y.; Wu, Y.-H.; Tsai, W.-C.; Wang, S.-K.; Chen, J.; Chang, S.-C.; Liu, C.-C.; Shai, Y.; Wen, C.-R.

    2008-12-07

    Photon-exposure-dependent positive- and negative-ion photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was proposed to study the photoreactions and obtain the photolysis cross sections of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons with energy near the core level of adsorbate. The changes in the F{sup +} and F{sup -} PSD ion yields were measured from CF{sub 3}Cl molecules adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 at 30 K (CF{sub 3}Cl dose=0.3x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, {approx}0.75 monolayer) during irradiation of monochromatic soft x-ray photons near the F(1s) edge. The PSD ion yield data show the following characteristics: (a) The dissociation of adsorbed CF{sub 3}Cl molecules is due to a combination of direct photodissociation via excitation of F(1s) core level and substrate-mediated dissociation [dissociative attachment and dipolar dissociation induced by the photoelectrons emitting from the silicon substrate]. (b) the F{sup +} ion desorption is associated with the bond breaking of the surface CF{sub 3}Cl, CF{sub 2}Cl, CFCl, and SiF species. (c) the F{sup -} yield is mainly due to DA and DD of the adsorbed CF{sub 3}Cl molecules. (d) The surface SiF is formed by reaction of the surface Si atom with the neutral fluorine atom, F{sup +}, or F{sup -} ion produced by scission of C-F bond of CF{sub 3}Cl, CF{sub 2}Cl, or CFCl species. A kinetic model was proposed for the explanation of the photolysis of this submonolayer CF{sub 3}Cl-covered surface. Based on this model and the variation rates of the F{sup +}/F{sup -} signals during fixed-energy monochromatic photon bombardment at 690.2 and 692.6 eV[near the F(1s) edge], the photolysis cross section was deduced as a function of energy.

  6. Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy for monitoring soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, L.-C.; Wen, C.-R.

    2006-05-15

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was proposed for monitoring the soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used as a soft x-ray light source in the photon-induced reactions of CF{sub 3}Cl adsorbed on a Si(111)-7x7 surface at 30 K and also as a probe for studying the produced fluorination states of the bonding surface Si atom in the positive-ion PSD spectroscopy. The F{sup +} PSD spectrum was obtained by monitoring the F{sup +} signal as a function of incident photon energy near the Si(2p) edge (98-110 eV). Sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra were measured as a function of photon exposure at four adsorbate coverages (the first dose=0.3x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the second dose=0.8x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the third dose=2.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, and the fourth dose=3.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}). For the first and second CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces, the sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and indicate the formation of surface SiF species. The sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra for the third and fourth CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces also show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and depict the production of surface SiF and SiF{sub 3} species.

  7. Synthetic pulmonary surfactant preparations: new developments and future trends.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, Ismael; Lukovic, Dunja; Vilar, Marçal; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipid-protein complex that coats the interior of the alveoli and enables the lungs to function properly. Upon its synthesis, lung surfactant adsorbs at the interface between the air and the hypophase, a capillary aqueous layer covering the alveoli. By lowering and modulating surface tension during breathing, lung surfactant reduces respiratory work of expansion, and stabilises alveoli against collapse during expiration. Pulmonary surfactant deficiency, or dysfunction, contributes to several respiratory pathologies, such as infant respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS) in premature neonates, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children and adults. The main clinical exogenous surfactants currently in use to treat some of these pathologies are essentially organic extracts obtained from animal lungs. Although very efficient, natural surfactants bear serious defects: i) they could vary in composition from batch to batch; ii) their production involves relatively high costs, and sources are limited; and iii) they carry a potential risk of transmission of animal infectious agents and the possibility of immunological reaction. All these caveats justify the necessity for a highly controlled synthetic material. In the present review the efforts aimed at new surfactant development, including the modification of existing exogenous surfactants by adding molecules that can enhance their activity, and the progress achieved in the production of completely new preparations, are discussed. PMID:18288994

  8. Infrared Spectroscopy and Catalysis Research: Infrared spectra of adsorbed molecules provide important information in the study of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Eischens, R P

    1964-10-23

    The examples discussed here represent only a small part of the published work relating to infrared spectra of adsorbed molecules. The publications in this field indicate that infrared spectroscopy is being used for surface chemistry research in about 50 laboratories throughout the world. This effort is mainly devoted to problems related to catalysis, and in this field infrared spectroscopy is the most widely used physical tool for surface chemistry studies. The general acceptance of infrared spectroscopy is primarily due to the fact that it provides information which is pertinent to the understanding of surface reactions on an atomic scale. During the last decade significant progress has also been made in the classical chemical techniques of catalysis study and in utilization of physical tools which depend on phenomena of magnetism, conductivity, low-energy electron diffraction, and electron emission. Probably the most important progress has been in the field of inorganic chemistry, where dramatic advances have been made in knowledge of metal coordination compounds. Such knowledge is vital to the understanding of catalysis on metal surfaces. I believe this progress has produced an attitude of sophisticated optimism among catalysis researchers with regard to eventual understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. This attitude is closely related to the realization that there is no "secret of catalysis" which places catalytic action beyond the limits of ordinary chemical knowledge (22). This view implies that the chemical aspects of heterogeneous catalysis are not unique and that the use of solid catalysts merely provides a highly effective exposure of catalytic atoms and facilitates separation of the products from the catalyst. Many capable catalysis researchers believe that studies of homogeneous catalysis provide the most direct route for the study of heterogeneous catalysis. Obviously homogeneous reactions catalyzed by compounds containing only one or two metal atoms

  9. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  10. Observation and analysis of Fano-like lineshapes in the Raman spectra of molecules adsorbed at metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S.; Banik, M.; Hulkko, E.; Rodriguez, K.; Apkarian, V. A.; Galperin, M.; Nitzan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from bipyridyl ethylene adsorbed on gold dumbbells shows Fano-like spectra at high incident light intensity. This is accompanied by an increased electronic temperature, while no vibrational anti-Stokes scattering is observed. Theory indicates that interference between vibrational and electronic Raman scattering can yield such asymmetric scattering lineshapes. The best fit to observations is however obtained by disregarding this coupling and accounting for the detailed lineshape of the continuous electronic component of the SERS.

  11. A study of molecular adsorption of a cationic surfactant on complex surfaces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, I; Zorn, G; Nichols, J M

    2016-02-01

    The study of molecular adsorption on solid surfaces is of broad interest. However, so far the study has been restricted to idealized flat smooth rigid surfaces which are rarely the case in real world applications. Here we describe a study of molecular adsorption on a complex surface of the submicron fibers of a fibrous membrane of regenerated cellulose in aqueous media. We use a cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), as the adsorbing molecule. We study the equilibrium adsorption of CTAC molecules on the same area of the fibers by sequentially immersing the membrane in pure water, 1 mM and then a 20 mM solution of CTAC. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is applied to study the adsorption. The force-volume mode is used to record the force-deformation curves of the adsorbed molecules on the fiber surface. We suggest a model to separate the forces due to the adsorbed molecules from the elastic deformation of the fiber. Interestingly, knowledge of the surface geometry is not required in this model provided the surface is made of elastically homogeneous material. Different models are investigated to estimate the amount of the adsorbed molecules based on the obtained force curves. The exponential steric repulsion model fits the force data the best. The amount of the adsorbed surfactant molecules and its dependence on the concentration are found to be reasonable compared to the data previously measured by means of Raman scattering done on a flat surface of silica. PMID:26730682

  12. Effect of alkyl chain length on the conformation and order of simple ionic surfactants adsorbed at the D{sub 2}O/CCl{sub 4} interface as studied by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, J.C.; Messmer, M.C.; Richmond, G.L.

    1998-11-10

    The conformational order of three alkanesulfonates, sodium hexanesulfonate (HS), sodium undecanesulfonate (UDS), and sodium dodecanesulfonate (DDS), adsorbed at the D{sub 2}O/CCl{sub 4} interface are examined in detail by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. An increase in surfactant concentration at the interface results in the reduction of gauche defects in the hydrocarbon chains as determined from the intensity ratio of the methyl to methylene symmetric stretch vibrational modes. The degree of disorder in the alkyl chains varies greatly with alkyl chain length. The alkyl chain of HS displays the fewest gauche defects while DDS and UDS display more disorder in their hydrocarbon chains at similar surface concentrations. This observation is interpreted as a reduction in the possible number of gauche conformations for the shorter alkyl chain.

  13. Light-controllable dispersion and recovery of graphenes and carbon nanotubes using a photo-switchable surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Thomas M.; Liu, Amelia C. Y.; Tabor, Rico F.

    2016-03-01

    The aqueous dispersibility of carbon-based nanomaterials, namely graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), can be controlled by light via the photoisomerisation of a photoswitchable surfactant molecule adsorbed to the surface of these materials. By incorporating a cationic azobenzene photosurfactant into these systems, GO, rGO and CNT dispersions can be separated and redispersed on command utilising UV radiation at 365 nm, whereby the surfactant molecules change from the trans to the cis isomer. This increases their aqueous solubility and in turn, alters their adsorption affinity for the GO and rGO sheets such that the ratio of free to adsorbed surfactant molecules changes significantly, allowing for reversible phase separation of the colloids. These effects present a unique method for controlling the dispersion behaviour of two-dimensional nanomaterials using light as a clean and low energy external stimulus.The aqueous dispersibility of carbon-based nanomaterials, namely graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), can be controlled by light via the photoisomerisation of a photoswitchable surfactant molecule adsorbed to the surface of these materials. By incorporating a cationic azobenzene photosurfactant into these systems, GO, rGO and CNT dispersions can be separated and redispersed on command utilising UV radiation at 365 nm, whereby the surfactant molecules change from the trans to the cis isomer. This increases their aqueous solubility and in turn, alters their adsorption affinity for the GO and rGO sheets such that the ratio of free to adsorbed surfactant molecules changes significantly, allowing for reversible phase separation of the colloids. These effects present a unique method for controlling the dispersion behaviour of two-dimensional nanomaterials using light as a clean and low energy external stimulus. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Includes further details

  14. Adsorption of surfactant lipids by single-walled carbon nanotubes in mouse lung upon pharyngeal aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kapralov, Alexander A; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E; Kisin, Elena R; Kotchey, Gregg P; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2012-05-22

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells, and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids: phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (∼108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted "coating" whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B, and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model. PMID:22463369

  15. Can the state of platinum species be unambiguously determined by the stretching frequency of an adsorbed CO probe molecule?

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Neyman, Konstantin M; Hadjiivanov, Konstantin I; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2016-08-10

    The paper addresses possible ambiguities in the determination of the state of platinum species by the stretching frequency of a CO probe, which is a common technique for characterization of platinum-containing catalytic systems. We present a comprehensive comparison of the available experimental data with our theoretical modeling (density functional) results of pertinent systems - platinum surfaces, nanoparticles and clusters as well as reduced or oxidized platinum moieties on a ceria support. Our results for CO adsorbed on-top on metallic Pt(0), with C-O vibrational frequencies in the region 2018-2077 cm(-1), suggest that a decrease of the coordination number of the platinum atom, to which CO is bound, by one lowers the CO frequency by about 7 cm(-1). This trend corroborates the Kappers-van der Maas correlation derived from the analysis of the experimental stretching frequency of CO adsorbed on platinum-containing samples on different supports. We also analyzed the effect of the charge of platinum species on the CO frequency. Based on the calculated vibrational frequencies of CO in various model systems, we concluded that the actual state of the platinum species may be mistaken based only on the measured value of the C-O vibrational frequency due to overlapping regions of frequencies corresponding to different types of species. In order to identify the actual state of platinum species one has to combine this powerful technique with other approaches. PMID:27444400

  16. Soap opera : polymer-surfactant interactions on thin film surfaces /

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, B. H.; Johal, M. S.; Wang, H. L.; Robinson, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Surfactants are macromolecules with unique properties. They commonly contain a polar head group with a nonpolar hydrocarbon chain. These properties allow surfactants to solubilize greases and other nonpolar molecules. One particular way that this is accomplished is through the formation of micelles. Micelles are formed at the critical micelle concentration (cmc), which varies depending upon the nature of the surfactant and also the media in which the surfactant resides. These micelles can take a variety of shapes, but are generally characterized by surrounding the grease with the nonpolar hydrocarbon chains, exposing only the polarized head groups to the media, usually water. This property of easy solubilization has made surfactants a very attractive industrial agent, They are used most conventionally as industrial cleaning agents and detergents. However, they also have lesser-known applications in conjunction with polymers and other macromolecular mixtures, often creating a system with novel properties, such as increased solubilization and smoother mixture consistency. A recently developed field has investigated the self-assembly of polymers and polyelectrolytes onto thin film surfaces. There are many reasons for studying this process, such as for second harmonic generation purposes and bioassays. In this study, the interaction between the anionic polyelectrolyte poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) and two surfactants of opposite charge, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and Dodecyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (DTAB), in their assembly onto thin film surfaces was investigated. The kinetics of adsorbance onto the thin films was examined, followed by construction of 10-bilayer films using an alternating layer of the cationic polyelectrolyte poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) to provide the electrostatic means for the PAZO/surfactant combination to assemble onto the thin film. The kinetics of adsorption is being

  17. Conformations of polyaniline molecules adsorbed on Au(111) probed by in situ STM and ex situ XPS and NEXAFS.

    PubMed

    Lee, YiHui; Chang, ChinZen; Yau, ShuehLin; Fan, LiangJen; Yang, YawWen; Yang, LiangYueh Ou; Itaya, Kingo

    2009-05-13

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) have been used to examine the conformation of a monolayer of polyaniline (PAN) molecules produced on a Au(111) single-crystal electrode by anodization at 1.0 V [vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)] in 0.10 M H(2)SO(4) containing 0.030 M aniline. The as-produced PAN molecules took on a well-defined linear conformation stretching for 500 A or more, as shown by in situ and ex situ STM. The XPS and NEXAFS results indicated that the linear PAN seen at 1.0 V assumed the form of an emeraldine salt made of PAN chains and (bi)sulfate anions. Shifting the potential from 1.0 to 0.7 V altered the shape of the PAN molecules from straight to crooked, which was ascribed to restructuring of the Au(111) electrified interface on the basis of voltammetric and XPS results. In situ STM showed that further decreasing the potential to 0.5 V transformed the crooked PAN threads into a mostly linear form again, with preferential alignment and formation of some locally ordered structures. PAN molecules could be reduced from emeraldine to leucoemeraldine as the potential was decreased to 0.2 V or less. In situ STM showed that the fully reduced PAN molecules were straight but mysteriously shortened to approximately 50 A in length. The conformation of PAN did not recuperate when the potential was shifted positively to 1.0 V. PMID:19361217

  18. Mechanistic study of wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface using different surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Bao-feng; Wang, Ye-fei; Huang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Different analytical methods including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential measurements, contact angle measurements and spontaneous imbibition tests were utilized to make clear the mechanism for wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface using different surfactants. Results show that among three types of surfactants including cationic surfactants, anionic surfactants and nonionic surfactants, the cationic surfactant CTAB demonstrates the best effect on the wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface. The positively charged head groups of CTAB molecules and carboxylic acid groups from crude oil could interact to form ion pairs, which could be desorbed from the solid surface and solubilized into the micelle formed by CTAB. Thus, the water-wetness of the solid surface is improved. Nonionic surfactant TX-100 could be adsorbed on oil-wet sandstone surface through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction to alter the wettability of oil-wet solid surface. The wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface using the anionic surfactant POE(1) is caused by hydrophobic interaction. Due to the electrostatic repulsion between the anionic surfactant and the negatively charged surface, POE(1) shows less effect on the wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface.

  19. David Adler Lectureship Award Talk: Friction and energy dissipation mechanisms in adsorbed molecules and molecularly thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krim, Jacqueline

    2015-03-01

    Studies of the fundamental origins of friction have undergone rapid progress in recent years, with the development of new experimental and computational techniques for measuring and simulating friction at atomic length and time scales. The increased interest has sparked a variety of discussions and debates concerning the nature of the atomic-scale and quantum mechanisms that dominate the dissipative process by which mechanical energy is transformed into heat. Measurements of the sliding friction of physisorbed monolayers and bilayers can provide information on the relative contributions of these various dissipative mechanisms. Adsorbed films, whether intentionally applied or present as trace levels of physisorbed contaminants, moreover are ubiquitous at virtually all surfaces. As such, they impact a wide range of applications whose progress depends on precise control and/or knowledge of surface diffusion processes. Examples include nanoscale assembly, directed transport of Brownian particles, material flow through restricted geometries such as graphene membranes and molecular sieves, passivation and edge effects in carbon-based lubricants, and the stability of granular materials associated with frictional and frictionless contacts. Work supported by NSFDMR1310456.

  20. Conductivity Measurements of Pyrrole Molecules Incorporated into Chemically Adsorbed Monolayer by Conducting Probe Technique in Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shin‑ichi; Ogawa, Kazufumi

    2006-03-01

    A monomolecular layer containing pyrrolyl groups at the surface was prepared between two parallel Pt electrodes on a glass substrate by a chemical adsorption technique using N-[11-(trichlorosilyl)undecyl] pyrrole (PNN). Then, the pyrrolyl was polymerized with pure water by applying a DC voltage of 10 V between the two Pt electrodes. It was confirmed using an optical microscope that many electric paths were formed between the two Pt electrodes by a decoration technique using electrochemical polymerization in an aqueous medium containing pyrrole after the polymerization. Next, a conductive probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to examine an electrical polymerized path through the surface of the polypyrrolyl group in a chemically adsorbed monomolecular layer. The resistance of one electric path in the monomolecular layer was measured using an AFM with an attached Au-covered tip at room temperature. With a measurement volume of about 0.2 nm (the thickness of the electric path in the monomolecular layer) × 200 μm (the average width of the electric path) × 100 μm (the distance between the Pt electrode and the Au-covered AFM tip), the resistance at room temperature of one electric path was 4 k Ω under ambient conditions. From the results in the atmosphere, the conductivity of a super long conjugated polypyrrolyl group without any dopant in a lateral direction was ohmically estimated to be at least 6.0 × 105 S/m.

  1. On the widths of Stokes lines in Raman scattering from molecules adsorbed at metal surfaces and in molecular conduction junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Within a generic model we analyze the Stokes linewidth in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from molecules embedded as bridges in molecular junctions. We identify four main contributions to the off-resonant Stokes signal and show that under zero voltage bias (a situation pertaining also to standard SERS experiments) and at low bias junctions only one of these contributions is pronounced. The linewidth of this component is determined by the molecular vibrational relaxation rate, which is dominated by interactions with the essentially bosonic thermal environment when the relevant molecular electronic energy is far from the metal(s) Fermi energy(ies). It increases when the molecular electronic level is close to the metal Fermi level so that an additional vibrational relaxation channel due to electron-hole (eh) exciton in the molecule opens. Other contributions to the Raman signal, of considerably broader linewidths, can become important at larger junction bias.

  2. Action mechanism of small and large molecule surfactant-based clove oil nanoemulsions against food-borne pathogens and real-time detection of their subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Hamid; Antoniou, John; Shoemaker, Charles F; Fang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry exactly discriminated three subpopulations, i.e., viable, damage and sublethal cells of L. monocytogenes, S. aureus and E. coli when treated at their MIC values. Purity gum ultra (PGU) a large molecule surfactant-based CO nanoemulsion exerted significant impact on cellular subpopulations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus, with more membrane-damaged cells. On the other hand, when compared with bulk CO the results showed minimum membrane damage and more viable cells, whereas PGU CO nanoemulsion showed minimum effect on cellular subpopulation and represented more viable than damaged cells in case of E. coli. Similarly, Tween 80 a small molecule surfactant-based CO nanoemulsion showed limited overall activity against three tested microorganisms with more viable cells. We conclude that it was due to sequestration of CO constituents in interfaces, less availability in aqueous phase and finally inhibit bactericidal activity. Moreover, both CO and CO nanoemulsions showed membrane damage as primary inactivation mechanism of tested bacterial cells. PMID:25366496

  3. Temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules and associated crystallization kinetics of noncentrosymmetric Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods in microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kass, Moustafa; Ladj, Rachid; Mugnier, Yannick; Le Dantec, Ronan; Hadji, Rachid; Marty, Jean-Christophe; Rouxel, Didier; Durand, Christiane; Fontvieille, Dominique; Rogalska, Ewa; and others

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Crystallization of Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} in microemulsions probed by hyper-Rayleigh scattering. • A faster growth and a better shape control of nanorods are obtained at 80 °C. • Different persistent cell deformations are related to the crystallization kinetics. • A temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants on nanorods is suggested. - Abstract: Aggregation-induced crystallization of iron iodate nanorods within organic–inorganic aggregates of primary amorphous precursors is probed by time-dependent hyper-Rayleigh scattering measurements in Triton X-100 based-microemulsions. In the context of a growing interest of noncentrosymmetric oxide nanomaterials in multi-photon bioimaging, we demonstrate by a combination of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy that an increase in the synthesis of temperature results in faster crystallization kinetics and in a better shape-control of the final Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods. For initial microemulsions of fixed composition, room-temperature synthesis leads to bundles of 1–3 μm long nanorods, whereas shorter individual nanorods are obtained when the temperature is increased. Results are interpreted in terms of kinetically unfavorable mesoscale transformations due to the strong binding interactions with Triton molecules. The interplay between the nanorod crystallization kinetics and their corresponding unit cell deformation, evidenced by lattice parameter refinements, is attributed to a temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants molecules at the organic–inorganic interface.

  4. Orbital tomography: Molecular band maps, momentum maps and the imaging of real space orbitals of adsorbed molecules

    PubMed Central

    Offenbacher, Hannes; Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Puschnig, Peter; Ramsey, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    The frontier orbitals of molecules are the prime determinants of their chemical, optical and electronic properties. Arguably, the most direct method of addressing the (filled) frontier orbitals is ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Although UPS is a mature technique from the early 1970s on, the angular distribution of the photoemitted electrons was thought to be too complex to be analysed quantitatively. Recently angle resolved UPS (ARUPS) work on conjugated molecules both, in ordered thick films and chemisorbed monolayers, has shown that the angular (momentum) distribution of the photocurrent from orbital emissions can be simply understood. The approach, based on the assumption of a plane wave final state is becoming known as orbital tomography. Here we will demonstrate, with selected examples of pentacene (5A) and sexiphenyl (6P), the potential of orbital tomography. First it will be shown how the full angular distribution of the photocurrent (momentum map) from a specific orbital is related to the real space orbital by a Fourier transform. Examples of the reconstruction of 5A orbitals will be given and the procedure for recovering the lost phase information will be outlined. We then move to examples of sexiphenyl where we interrogate the original band maps of thick sexiphenyl in the light of our understanding of orbital tomography that has developed since then. With comparison to theoretical simulations of the molecular band maps, the molecular conformation and orientation will be concluded. New results for the sexiphenyl monolayer on Al(1 1 0) will then be presented. From the band maps it will be concluded that the molecule is planarised and adopts a tilted geometry. Finally the momentum maps down to HOMO-11 will be analysed and real space orbitals reconstructed. PMID:26752804

  5. Optical and electronic properties of SO2 molecule adsorbed on Si-doped (8, 0) boron nitride nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuang-Shuang; Wei, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Jian-Min; Zhu, Gang-Qiang; Guo, Wan-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The study of the optical properties of pristine BNNT, Si-doped BNNTs and SO2 molecule adsorption on Si-doped BNNTs is that, to our knowledge, few relevant research have ever been found. In this paper, the adsorption behaviors of Sulfur dioxide (SO2) molecule on Si-doped Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are investigated applying the first-principles calculations. The main contribution of this paper is that the foremost investigation for the optical properties of the pristine BNNT, Si-doped BNNTs and SO2 adsorption on Si-doped BNNTs. Additionally, the electronic properties and the structural properties are also presented. In our calculations of optical properties, the dielectric constant, the refractive index and the absorption coefficient are obtained. Comparing the pristine BNNT, our results indicate that, the blue-shifts (in the main peaks of the dielectric constant of SiB -BNNT and SO2-SiB -BNNT), and the red-shifts (in the main peaks of the refractive index of SiN -BNNT and SO2-SiN -BNNT) are appeared. Under these conditions, Si-doped BNNT and Si-doped BNNT with SO2 adsorption, the gaps are reduced both for the speculated optical band gaps and the electronic structure band gaps.

  6. THE APPLICATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION ELECTRON ENERGY LOSS SPECTROSCOPY TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF ADSORBED MOLECULES ON RHODIUM SINGLE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, L.H.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of low energy electrons by metal surfaces has been studied for many years now. The electron's ease of generation and detection and high surface sensitivity (low penetration depth) make it an ideal probe for surface scientists. The impinging electron can interact with the surface in basically two ways: it can either elastically reflect (or diffract) from the surface without losing energy or lose a portion of it's incident energy and inelastically scatter. In this paper we will be concerned with only one of many possible inelastic scattering processes: the loss of the electron's energy to the vibrational modes of atoms and molecules chemisorbed on the surface. This technique is known as high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (or ELS, EELS, HRELS, HREELS, etc.).

  7. Scrutinizing individual CoTPP molecule adsorbed on coinage metal surfaces from the interplay of STM experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houwaart, Torsten; Le Bahers, Tangui; Sautet, Philippe; Auwärter, Willi; Seufert, Knud; Barth, Johannes V.; Bocquet, Marie-Laure

    2015-05-01

    The cobalt tetraphenyl porphyrin (CoTPP) molecule and its adsorption on clean Cu and Ag surfaces are comparatively analyzed within the Density Functional Theory (DFT) framework. Different sets of exchange-correlation functionals - the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Gradient Generalized Approximation (along with the PBE functional and the semi-empirical Grimme's corrections of dispersion) - are compared. Two prominent structural adsorption properties are disclosed in all sets of calculations: an asymmetric saddle deformation of CoTPP with an enhanced tilting of the upwards bent pyrroles and a single adsorption site where the Co center occupies a bridge position and one molecular axis (along the direction of the lowered pair of opposite pyrroles) is aligned with the dense-packed < 1 1 bar 0 > substrate direction. The similarities between Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces extend to the interfacial electronic structure with similar electronic redistribution and molecular charging. However subtle differences between the two substrates are revealed with bias-dependent STM simulations, especially in the low-bias imaging range. The STM calculations underline the difficulty for the commonly used GGA + D2 DFT framework to quantitatively predict the energy positions of the frontier molecular orbitals (MOs).

  8. Interfacial Surfactant Ordering in Thin Films of SDS-Encapsulated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Das, Sushanta K; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Velarde, Luis

    2016-01-21

    The molecular self-assembly of surfactants on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) is currently a common strategy for the tuning of nanotube properties and the stabilization of carbon nanotube dispersions. Here, we report direct measurements of the degree of interfacial ordering for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants adsorbed on colloidal, single-chirality enriched, SWCNTs within a solid film and investigate the dependence of surface alkyl chain order on the surfactant concentration in the precursor solution. The degree of order for the SWCNT-bound SDS molecules, is probed by vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. We find concrete evidence for the presence of highly ordered surface structures at sufficiently high SDS concentrations, attributed here to cylindrical-like micelle assemblies with the SWCNT at the core. As the SDS concentration decreases, the interfacial order is found to decrease as well, generating a more disordered or random adsorption of surfactants on the nanotube surfaces. PMID:26730991

  9. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  10. Droplet Deformation in an Extensional Flow: The Role of Surfactant Physical Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebe, Kathleen J.

    1996-01-01

    Surfactant-induced Marangoni effects strongly alter the stresses exerted along fluid particle interfaces. In low gravity processes, these stresses can dictate the system behavior. The dependence of Marangoni effects on surfactant physical chemistry is not understood, severely impacting our ability to predict and control fluid particle flows. A droplet in an extensional flow allows the controlled study of stretching and deforming interfaces. The deformations of the drop allow both Marangoni stresses, which resist tangential shear, and Marangoni elasticities, which resist surface dilatation, to develop. This flow presents an ideal model system for studying these effects. Prior surfactant-related work in this flow considered a linear dependence of the surface tension on the surface concentration, valid only at dilute surface concentrations, or a non-linear framework at concentrations sufficiently dilute that the linear approximation was valid. The linear framework becomes inadequate for several reasons. The finite dimensions of surfactant molecules must be taken into account with a model that includes surfaces saturation. Nonideal interactions between adsorbed surfactant molecules alter the partitioning of surfactant between the bulk and the interface, the dynamics of surfactant adsorptive/desorptive exchange, and the sensitivity of the surface tension to adsorbed surfactant. For example, cohesion between hydrocarbon chains favors strong adsorption. Cohesion also slows the rate of desorption from interfaces, and decreases the sensitivity of the surface tension to adsorbed surfactant. Strong cohesive interactions result in first order surface phase changes with a plateau in the surface tension vs surface concentration. Within this surface concentration range, the surface tension is decoupled from surface concentration gradients. We are engaged in the study of the role of surfactant physical chemistry in determining the Marangoni stresses on a drop in an extensional

  11. Molecular mobility in the monolayers of foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lalchev, Z I; Todorov, R K; Christova, Y T; Wilde, P J; Mackie, A R; Clark, D C

    1996-01-01

    Certain physical properties of a range of foam film types that are believed to exist in vivo in the lung have been investigated. The contribution of different lung surfactant components found in porcine lung surfactant to molecular surface diffusion in the plane of foam films has been investigated for the first time. The influence of the type and thickness of black foam films, temperature, electrolyte concentration, and extract composition on surface diffusion has been studied using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Fluorescent phospholipid probe molecules in foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant samples or their hydrophobic extracts consisting of surfactant lipids and hydrophobic lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, exhibited more rapid diffusion than observed in films of its principal lipid component alone, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl. This effect appears to be due to contributions from minor lipid components present in the total surfactant lipid extracts. The minor lipid components influence the surface diffusion in foam films both by their negative charge and by lowering the phase transition temperature of lung surfactant samples. In contrast, the presence of high concentrations of the hydrophillic surfactant protein A (SP-A) and non-lung-surfactant proteins in the sample reduced the diffusion coefficient (D) of the lipid analog in the adsorbed layer of the films. Hysteresis behavior of D was observed during temperature cycling, with the cooling curve lying above the heating curve. However, in cases where some surface molecular aggregation and surface heterogeneity were observed during cooling, the films became more rigid and molecules at the interfaces became immobilized. The thickness, size, capillary pressure, configuration, and composition of foam films of lung surfactant prepared in vitro support their investigation as realistic structural analogs of the surface films that exist in vivo in the lung

  12. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  13. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2015-10-28

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  14. Orientation Difference of Chemically Immobilized and Physically Adsorbed Biological Molecules on Polymers Detected at the Solid/Liquid Interfaces in Situ

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shuji; Nguyen, Khoi Tan; Boughton, Andrew P.; Mello, Charlene M.; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    A surface sensitive second order nonlinear optical technique, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, was applied to study peptide orientation on polymer surfaces, supplemented by a linear vibrational spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Using the antimicrobial peptide Cecropin P1 as a model system, we have quantitatively demonstrated that chemically immobilized peptides on polymers adopt a more ordered orientation than less tightly bound physically adsorbed peptides. These differences were also observed in different chemical environments, e.g., air versus water. Although numerous studies have reported a direct correlation between the choice of immobilization method and the performance of an attached biological molecule, the lack of direct biomolecular structure and orientation data has made it difficult to elucidate the relationship between structure, orientation and function at a surface. In this work, we directly studied the effect of chemical immobilization method on biomolecular orientation/ordering, an important step for future studies of biomolecular activity. The methods for orientation analysis described within are also of relevance to understanding biosensors, biocompatibility, marine-antifouling, membrane protein functions, and antimicrobial peptide activities. PMID:19961170

  15. Colloidal stability of hydrophobic nanoparticles in ionic surfactant solutions: definition of the critical dispersion concentration.

    PubMed

    Dederichs, Thomas; Möller, Martin; Weichold, Oliver

    2009-02-17

    The dispersion stability diagrams of hydrophobic boehmite nanoparticles in aqueous n-alkyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions (alkyl chain lengths 10-16) were studied over a wide range of particle and surfactant concentrations. The surfactant molecules adsorb tail-on on the particle surface, which provides the colloidal stability through electrostatic repulsion. In the stable region of each diagram, bimodal particle size distributions (50 and 500 nm) are found at lower surfactant concentration, which give way to monomodal distributions (50 nm) at higher concentration. This deagglomeration is connected with the cmc of the surfactants and can be explained by a desorption of counterions from the self-assembled surfactant layer. The desorption is caused by changes in the counterion concentration upon micellization. At low particle concentrations, the transition from the intermediate to the stable region, that is, the disappearance of the precipitate, occurs at a constant surfactant concentration. This concentration is introduced as the "critical dispersion concentration" (cdc), this being the lowest required concentration of a surfactant that is necessary to disperse the hydrophobic particles. The logarithm of the cdc shows a linear dependence on the surfactant chain length, thus a cmc-analogous behavior. The ratio cdc/cmc decreases with increasing surfactant chain length, indicating that long-chain surfactants are more efficient in dispersing nanoparticles than are their lower homologues. The existence of a system-specific critical cdc/cmc ratio, beyond which stable dispersions cannot be obtained, is proposed, which explains the disability of short-chain surfactants to disperse colloids. PMID:19146423

  16. Adsorption and trace detection of pharmacologically significant 5-methylthio-1, 3, 4-thiadiazole-2-thiol molecule adsorbed on silver nanocolloids and understanding the role of Albrecht's “A” and Herzberg-Teller contributions in the SERS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Joydeep; Chandra, Subhendu; Ghosh, Manash

    2015-01-01

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of biologically and industrially significant 5-methylthio-1, 3, 4-thiadiazole 2-thiol molecule have been investigated. The SERS spectra at various concentrations of the adsorbate are compared with the Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) and normal Raman spectra (NRS) of the probe molecule recorded in different environmental conditions. The optimized molecular structures of the most probable thione and the thiol forms of the molecule have been estimated from the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The vibrational signatures of the molecule have been assigned from the potential energy distributions (PEDs). The detail vibrational analyses reveal that ∼54% of the thione form of the molecule is prevalent in the solid state and its population increases to ∼65% in ACN solvent medium. Concentration dependent SERS, together with the 2-dimensional correlation spectra (2D-COS), corroborate the presence of both the thione and the thiol forms of the molecule even in the surface adsorbed state. The orientations of the thione and the thiol forms of the molecule on the nanocolloidal silver surface have been predicted from the surface selection rule. The selective enhancement of Raman bands in the SERS spectra have been explored from the view of the Albrecht's "A" and Herzberg-Teller (HT) charge transfer (CT) contribution.

  17. Adsorption and trace detection of pharmacologically significant 5-methylthio-1, 3, 4-thiadiazole-2-thiol molecule adsorbed on silver nanocolloids and understanding the role of Albrecht's "A" and Herzberg-Teller contributions in the SERS spectra.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Joydeep; Chandra, Subhendu; Ghosh, Manash

    2015-01-25

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of biologically and industrially significant 5-methylthio-1, 3, 4-thiadiazole 2-thiol molecule have been investigated. The SERS spectra at various concentrations of the adsorbate are compared with the Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) and normal Raman spectra (NRS) of the probe molecule recorded in different environmental conditions. The optimized molecular structures of the most probable thione and the thiol forms of the molecule have been estimated from the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The vibrational signatures of the molecule have been assigned from the potential energy distributions (PEDs). The detail vibrational analyses reveal that ∼54% of the thione form of the molecule is prevalent in the solid state and its population increases to ∼65% in ACN solvent medium. Concentration dependent SERS, together with the 2-dimensional correlation spectra (2D-COS), corroborate the presence of both the thione and the thiol forms of the molecule even in the surface adsorbed state. The orientations of the thione and the thiol forms of the molecule on the nanocolloidal silver surface have been predicted from the surface selection rule. The selective enhancement of Raman bands in the SERS spectra have been explored from the view of the Albrecht's "A" and Herzberg-Teller (HT) charge transfer (CT) contribution. PMID:25168230

  18. Adsorption of Surfactant Lipids by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Mouse Lung upon Pharyngeal Aspiration: Role in Uptake by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kapralov, Alexander A.; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E.; Kisin, Elena R.; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J.; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids – phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (~108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted “coating” whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model. PMID:22463369

  19. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldarelli, Charles; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity technologies often require aqueous phases to spread over nonwetting hydrophobic solid/surfaces. At a hydrophobic surface, the air/hydrophobic solid tension is low, and the solid/aqueous tension is high. A large contact angle forms as the aqueous/air tension acts together with the solid/air tension to balance the large solid/aqueous tension. The aqueous phase, instead of spreading, is held in a meniscus by the large angle. Surfactants facilitate the wetting of water on hydrophobic surfaces by adsorbing on the water/air and hydrophobic solid/water interfaces and lowering the surface tensions of these interfaces. The tension reductions decrease the contact angle, which increases the equilibrium wetted area. Hydrocarbon surfactants (i.e. amphiphiles with a hydrophobic chain of methylene groups attached to a large polar group to give aqueous solubility) do not reduce significantly the contact angles of the very hydrophobic surfaces such as parafilm or polyethylene. Trisiloxane surfactants (amphiphiles with a hydrophobe consisting of methyl groups linked to a trisiloxane backbone in the form of a disk ((CH3)3-Si-O-Si-O-Si(CH3)3)) and an extended ethoxylate (-(OCH2CH2)n-) polar group in the form of a chain with seven or eight units) can significantly reduce the contact angle of water on a very hydrophobic surface and cause rapid and complete (or nearly complete) spreading (lermed superspreading). The overall goal of the research described in this proposal is to establish and verify a theory for how trisiloxanes cause superspreading, and then use this knowledge as a guide to developing more general hydrocarbon based surfactant systems which superspread and can be used in microgravity. We propose that the trisiloxane surfactants superspread when the siloxane adsorbs, the hydrophobic disk parts of the molecule adsorb onto the surface removing the surface water. Since the cross sectional area of the disk is larger than that of the extended ethoxylate chain, the

  20. Co-adsorption of peptide amphiphile V(6)K and conventional surfactants SDS and C(12)TAB at the solid/water interface.

    PubMed

    Jayawardane, Dharana; Pan, Fang; Lu, Jian R; Zhao, Xiubo

    2015-10-28

    Recent research has reported many attractive benefits from short peptide amphiphiles. A practical route for them to enter the real world of applications is through formulation with conventional surfactants. This study reports the co-adsorption of the surfactant-like peptide, V6K, with conventional anionic and cationic surfactants at the solid/water interface. The time-dependant adsorption behaviour was examined using spectroscopic ellipsometry whilst adsorbed layer composition and structural distribution of the components were investigated by neutron reflection with the use of hydrogen/deuterium labelling of the surfactant molecules. Both binary (surfactant/peptide mixtures) and sequential (peptide followed by surfactant) adsorption have been studied. It was found that at the hydrophilic SiO2/water interface, the peptide was able to form a stable, flat, defected bilayer structure however both the structure and adsorbed amount were highly dependent on the initial peptide concentration. This consequently affected surfactant adsorption. In the presence of a pre-adsorbed peptide layer anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) could readily co-adsorb at the interface; however, cationic dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (C12TAB) could not co-adsorb due to the same charge character. However on a trimethoxy octyl silane (C8) coated hydrophobic surface, V6K formed a monolayer, and subsequent exposure to cationic and anionic surfactants both led to some co-adsorption at the interface. In binary surfactant/peptide mixtures, it was found that adsorption was dependent on the molar ratio of the surfactant and peptide. For SDS mixtures below molar unity and concentrations below CMC for C12TAB, V6K was able to dominate adsorption at the interface. Above molar unity, no adsorption was detected for SDS/V6K mixtures. In contrast, C12TAB gradually replaced the peptide and became dominant at the interface. These results thus elucidate the adsorption behaviour of V6K, which was found to

  1. Antagonistic effects between magnetite nanoparticles and a hydrophobic surfactant in highly concentrated Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Menner, Angelika; Bismarck, Alexander; Esquena, Jordi

    2014-05-13

    Herein we present a systematic study of the antagonistic interaction between magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and nonionic hydrophobic surfactant in Pickering highly concentrated emulsions. Interfacial tension measurements, phase behavior, and emulsion stability studies, combined with electron microscopy observations in polymerized systems and magnetometry, are used to support the discussion. First, stable W/O highly concentrated emulsions were obtained using partially hydrophobized magnetite nanoparticles. These emulsions experienced phase separation when surfactant is added at concentrations as low as 0.05 wt %. Such phase separation arises from the preferential affinity of the surfactant for the nanoparticle surfaces, which remarkably enhances their hydrophobicity, leading to a gradual desorption of nanoparticles from the interface. W/O emulsions were obtained at higher surfactant concentrations, but in this case, these emulsions were mainly stabilized by surfactant molecules. Therefore, stable emulsions could be prepared in two separate ranges of surfactant concentrations. After polymerization, low-density macroporous polymers were obtained, and the adsorption and aggregation of nanoparticles was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The progressive displacement of the nanoparticles was revealed: from the oil-water interface, in which aggregated nanoparticles were adsorbed, forming dense layers, to the continuous phase of the emulsions, where small nanoparticle aggregates were randomly dispersed. Interestingly, the results also show that the blocking temperature of the iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles embedded in the macroporous polymers could be modulated by appropriate control of the concentrations of both surfactant and nanoparticles. PMID:24738961

  2. Surfactant-adsorption-induced initial depinning behavior in evaporating water and nanofluid sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2015-05-19

    A surfactant-induced autophobic effect has been observed to initiate an intense depinning behavior at the initial stage of evaporation in both pure water and nanofluid sessile droplets. The cationic surfactant adsorbing to the negatively charged silicon wafer makes the solid surface more hydrophobic. The autophobing-induced depinning behavior, leading to an enlarged contact angle and a shortened base diameter, takes place only when the surfactant concentration is below its critical micelle concentration (cmc). The initial spreading degree right before the droplet retraction, the retracting velocity of the contact line, and the duration of the initial droplet retraction are shown to depend negatively on the surfactant concentration below the cmc. An unexpected enhancement in the initial depinning has been found in the nanofluid droplets, possibly resulting from the hydrophilic interplay between the graphite nanoparticle deposition and the surfactant molecules. Such promotion of the initial depinning due to the nanoparticle deposition makes the droplet retract even at a surfactant concentration higher than the cmc (1.5 cmc). The resulting deposition formed in the presence of the depinning behavior has great enhancement for coffee-ring formation as compared to the one free of surfactant, implying that the formation of a coffee ring does not require the pinning of the contact line during the entire drying process. PMID:25923721

  3. Self-assembly in the mixtures of surfactant and dye molecule controlled via temperature and β-cyclodextrin recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Long, Panfeng; Dong, Renhao; Hao, Jingcheng

    2012-10-01

    A new ternary system of tetradecyldimethylamine oxide (C(14)DMAO)/4-phenylazo benzoic acid (AzoH)/H(2)O was first investigated, and it was found that the self-assembly can be regulated via temperature and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) recognition. In the temperature regulated self-assembly, the self-assembled phase structural transition between wormlike micelles and multilamellar vesicles (onions) were determined by cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) images and (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR) spectra. The phase structural transition temperatures (PSTT) controlled by changing the amount of AzoH were measured by differential scanning calorimetry analysis. The self-assembled phase structural transition mechanism was discussed. It is argued that the self-assembled phase structural transition is the synergetic balance among the hydrophilic headgroup, steric structures of the hydrophobic chain, and membrane charge. β-CD molecules were used as controlling hands to modulate the phase structural transition of self-assembly of the C(14)DMAO/AzoH/H(2)O system in solution via snatching C(14)DMAO molecules. The phase structural transitions from the threadlike micellar phase to the lamellar phase and from the lamellar phase to the vesicular phase can each be controlled because of the β-CD molecular recognition. The phase structural transitions were confirmed by cryo-TEM observations and (2)H NMR measurements. The rheological properties were also investigated to display the importance in the phase structural transition. It was found that the dye molecule, AzoH, is harder to enclose by β-CD than by C(14)DMAO because of the lower complex stability constant (i.e., K(C(14)DMAO@β-CD) ≫ K(AzoH@β-CD). Therefore, the phase structural transition is mainly controlled by the inclusion of C(14)DMAO into the hydrophobic cavity of β-CD molecules. The phase structural transition controlled via temperature and β-CD may find potential applications such as in

  4. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  5. Extending the range of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) surface structure determination: Co-adsorbed molecules, incommensurate overlayers and alloy surface order studied by new video and electron counting LEED techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.

    1986-11-01

    LEED multiple scattering theory is briefly summarized, and aspects of electron scattering with particular significance to experimental measurements such as electron beam coherence, instrument response and phonon scattering are analyzed. Diffuse LEED experiments are discussed. New techniques that enhance the power of LEED are described, including a real-time video image digitizer applied to LEED intensity measurements, along with computer programs to generate I-V curves. The first electron counting LEED detector using a ''wedge and strip'' position sensitive anode and digital electronics is described. This instrument uses picoampere incident beam currents, and its sensitivity is limited only by statistics and counting times. Structural results on new classes of surface systems are presented. The structure of the c(4 x 2) phase of carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pt(111) has been determined, showing that carbon monoxide molecules adsorb in both top and bridge sites, 1.85 +- 0.10 A and 1.55 +- 0.10 A above the metal surface, respectively. The structure of an incommensurate graphite overlayer on Pt(111) is analyzed. The graphite layer is 3.70 +- 0.05 A above the metal surface, with intercalated carbon atoms located 1.25 +- 0.10 A above hollow sites supporting it. The (2..sqrt..3 x 4)-rectangular phase of benzene and carbon monoxide coadsorbed on Pt(111) is analyzed. Benzene molecules adsorb in bridge sites parallel to and 2.10 +- 0.10 A above the surface. The carbon ring is expanded, with an average C-C bond length of 1.72 +- 0.15 A. The carbon monoxide molecules also adsorb in bridge sites. The structure of the (..sqrt..3 x ..sqrt..3) reconstruction on the (111) face of the ..cap alpha..-CuAl alloy has been determined.

  6. Momentum resolved electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution, a new technique, probing the low frequency motion of adsorbed molecules on single crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahner, J.; Mocuta, D.; Yates, J.T. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    A new technique, momentum resolved electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution (ESDIAD), provides a method for taking snapshots of the zero-point position and lateral momentum of particles adsorbed on crystalline surfaces. By employing state-of-the-art electronics and computer technology it is possible to record for each desorbing particle the desorption direction together with the flight time. High momentum and directional resolved images are obtained, with time-of-flight resolution in the picosecond range and data acquisition rates up to 100 kHz. This enables us to deconvolute spatial and momentum contributions to the ESDIAD pattern and to map the low frequency motion of the adsorbed particles. These maps reflect the adsorbate interactions with the substrate and with neighboring species on the substrate. For selected examples it is demonstrated that by measuring the three dimensional momentum vector for each desorbing particle it is possible to probe the lowest energy states of adsorbed species, as well as to measure the momentum distribution when the adsorbed species gains thermal energy. Such information can be used as a basis for thinking about anisotropies in lateral motion of particles on surfaces. One major opportunity involves the study of dissimilar chemisorbed species which, when imaged together in momentum and real space, give new insights into the first stages of interaction between the species, leading ultimately to a chemical reaction. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  7. Thermoreversible crystallization of charged colloids due to adsorption/desorption of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Murakado, Ai; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Nagano, Ryota; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    We report that charged colloids exhibit thermoreversible crystallization via the adsorption of ionic surfactants onto particle surfaces. Due to the temperature dependence of the adsorption quantity, the colloids crystallized upon cooling and melted upon heating. To clarify the influences of surfactant adsorption on the crystallization, polystyrene (PS) particles dispersed in ethylene glycol (EG)/water mixtures were employed, enabling continuous tuning of the adsorption quantity by changing the EG concentration. The thermoreversible crystallization/melting behavior was found to be mainly attributable to changes in the ionic strength of the medium resulting from variation in the concentration of the non-adsorbed ionic surfactant molecules with temperature. We expect that the present findings will be useful for fine control of colloidal crystallization and the further study of colloidal crystallization in low permittivity media. PMID:26674236

  8. Effects of Surfactants and Polyelectrolytes on the Interaction between a Negatively Charged Surface and a Hydrophobic Polymer Surface.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Michael V; Donaldson, Stephen H; Gebbie, Matthew A; Gizaw, Yonas; Koenig, Peter; Roiter, Yuri; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-07-28

    We have measured and characterized how three classes of surface-active molecules self-assemble at, and modulate the interfacial forces between, a negatively charged mica surface and a hydrophobic end-grafted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer surface in solution. We provide a broad overview of how chemical and structural properties of surfactant molecules result in different self-assembled structures at polymer and mineral surfaces, by studying three characteristic surfactants: (1) an anionic aliphatic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), (2) a cationic aliphatic surfactant, myristyltrimethylammonium bromide (MTAB), and (3) a silicone polyelectrolyte with a long-chain PDMS midblock and multiple cationic end groups. Through surface forces apparatus measurements, we show that the separate addition of three surfactants can result in interaction energies ranging from fully attractive to fully repulsive. Specifically, SDS adsorbs at the PDMS surface as a monolayer and modifies the monotonic electrostatic repulsion to a mica surface. MTAB adsorbs at both the PDMS (as a monolayer) and the mica surface (as a monolayer or bilayer), resulting in concentration-dependent interactions, including a long-range electrostatic repulsion, a short-range steric hydration repulsion, and a short-range hydrophobic attraction. The cationic polyelectrolyte adsorbs as a monolayer on the PDMS and causes a long-range electrostatic attraction to mica, which can be modulated to a monotonic repulsion upon further addition of SDS. Therefore, through judicious selection of surfactants, we show how to modify the magnitude and sign of the interaction energy at different separation distances between hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, which govern the static and kinetic stability of colloidal dispersions. Additionally, we demonstrate how the charge density of silicone polyelectrolytes modifies both their self-assembly at polymer interfaces and the robust adhesion of thin PDMS films to target

  9. Adsorption of cationic surfactants and their effects on the interfacial properties of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Renhe

    This dissertation is primarily concerned with an investigation of the interfacial behavior of natural quartz in aqueous solution where the adsorption of various cationic surfactants is involved. The broad objective of this research was to delineate the mechanisms involved in the adsorption of cationic surfactants using experimental determination of adsorption isotherms, zeta potentials, suspension turbidity, contact angles, induction times, as well as Hallimond tube flotation response. With dodecylpyridinium chloride as the model surfactant, four-region adsorption isotherms were observed and found to correlate well with zeta potential, suspension stability and contact angle measurements. Calculations of adsorption energy showed strong specific adsorption in Region I, probably resulting from H-bonding of the pyridinium headgroup to active sites on the silica. As a result of hemimicelle formation at the solid-liquid interface in Region II, pronounced increases in the adsorption density, zeta potential, and surface hydrophobicity were observed. The stability of quartz suspensions showed a significant drop in this region. In Region III, the zeta potential is reversed and the stability of the suspensions begins to increase again. In this region, the surface hydrophobicity of quartz decreases with further surfactant adsorption, suggesting reverse orientation of the adsorbed surfactant ions. In Region IV, the adsorption isotherm and zeta potential reach a plateau when the surfactant concentration reaches the CMC, and the surface becomes completely hydrophilic. The molecular structure of surfactant ions (chain length, number of hydrocarbon chains and number of headgroups) was found to significantly affect their surface activity. Increasing the hydrocarbon chain length of the surfactant lowers the concentration of surfactant required for minimum suspension stability, as well as redispersion. The adsorption is stronger for surfactants whose structure permits hydrogen bonding

  10. Tensiometry and dilational rheology of mixed β-lactoglobulin/ionic surfactant adsorption layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dan, Abhijit; Gochev, Georgi; Miller, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Oscillating drop tensiometry was applied to study adsorbed interfacial layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces formed from mixed solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG, 1 μM in 10 mM buffer, pH 7 - negative net charge) and the anionic surfactant SDS or the cationic DoTAB. The interfacial pressure Π and the dilational viscoelasticity modulus |E| of the mixed layers were measured for mixtures of varying surfactant concentrations. The double capillary technique was employed which enables exchange of the protein solution in the drop bulk by surfactant solution (sequential adsorption) or by pure buffer (washing out). The first protocol allows probing the influence of the surfactant on a pre-adsorbed protein layer thus studying the protein/surfactant interactions at the interface. The second protocol gives access to the residual values of Π and |E| measured after the washing out procedure thus bringing information about the process of protein desorption. The DoTAB/BLG complexes exhibit higher surface activity and higher resistance to desorption in comparison with those for the SDS/BLG complexes due to hydrophobization via electrostatic binding of surfactant molecules. The neutral DoTAB/BLG complexes achieve maximum elastic response of the mixed layer. Mixed BLG/surfactant layers at the water/oil interface are found to reach higher surface pressure and lower maximum dilational elasticity than those at the water/air surface. The sequential adsorption mode experiments and the desorption study reveal that binding of DoTAB to pre-adsorbed BLG globules is somehow restricted at the water/air surface in comparison with the case of complex formation in the solution bulk and subsequently adsorbed at the water/air surface. Maximum elasticity is achieved with washed out layers obtained after simultaneous adsorption, i.e. isolation of the most surface active DoTAB/BLG complex. These specific effects are much less pronounced at the W/H interface. PMID:25666640

  11. Effect of surfactant on temperature stability of solid lipid nanoparticles studied by dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sacheen; Kaur, Jaspreet

    2013-06-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles are new paradigm of drug delivery system of water insoluble active pharmaceutical ingredient. Paliperidone, an antipsychotic used in treatment of schizophrenia is a water insoluble molecule with low bioavailability was studied. Macrogol glyceride surfactant, bile salt based surfactant and sodium dodecyl sulphate were used to stabilize the solid lipid as dispersed nanoparticles form by adsorbing on the surface of the nanoparticles. Anionic surfactants bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate were found to stabilize forming a monomolecular layer of surfactants on the surface of nanoparticles; whereas macrogol glyceride based surfactant have intrusion in the matrix of lipid nanoparticles. So intrusion of macrogol glyceride in matrix was observed by studying the change in size of nanoparticles with respect to temperature with the help of dynamic light scattering. In case of macrogol glyceride size decrease start form 50°C, for bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate size deacrease start at 60°C. So that structural disturbance of nanoparticles by the macrogol glyceride on the surface was found maximum as compared to anionic surfactant.

  12. Quasiparticle excitations of adsorbates on doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Dillon; Karrasch, Christoph; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jiong; Omrani, Arash A.; Brar, Victor; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wu, Qiong; Corsetti, Fabiano; Mostofi, Arash; Kawakami, Roland K.; Moore, Joel; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Mike

    Adsorbed atoms and molecules can modify the electronic structure of graphene, but in turn it is also possible to control the properties of adsorbates via the graphene substrate. In my talk, I will discuss the electronic structure of F4-TCNQ molecules on doped graphene and present a first-principles based theory of quasiparticle excitations that captures the interplay of doping-dependent image charge interactions between substrate and adsorbate and electron-electron interaction effects on the molecule. The resulting doping-dependent quasiparticle energies will be compared to experimental scanning tunnelling spectra. Finally, I will also discuss the effects of charged adsorbates on the electronic structure of doped graphene.

  13. Adsorption at the biocompatible α-pinene-water interface and emulsifying properties of two eco-friendly surfactants.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Cayado, Luis Alfonso; Ramírez, Pablo; Alfaro, María Carmen; Ruíz, Manuela; Muñoz, José

    2014-10-01

    In this contribution, we provide an accurate characterization at the α-pinene/water interface of two commercial polyoxytheylene glycerol ester surfactants which differ in the number of ethylene oxide (EO) groups, comprising a systematic analysis of interfacial pressure isotherms, dynamic curves, interfacial rheology and emulsifying properties. Polyoxyethylene glycerol esters derived from cocoa oil are non-ionic surfactants obtained from a renewable source which fulfill the environmental and toxicological requirements to be used as eco-friendly emulsifying agents. α-Pinene is a renewable biosolvent completely insoluble in water, which could find numerous applications. Interfacial rheology and equilibrium interfacial pressure data fitted a rigorous reorientation model that assumes that the surfactant molecules, when adsorbed at the interface, can acquire two orientations. The surfactant with the highest number of EO groups (Levenol C201) turned out to be more surface active at the α-pinene/water interface. In addition, the surfactant with the lowest number of EO groups (Levenol H&B) is solubilized into the adjacent oil phase. Slightly concentrated α-pinene emulsions were obtained using both surfactants. Nevertheless, more stable α-pinene emulsions with smaller droplet sizes and lower polidispersity were obtained when Levenol C201 was used as emulsifier instead of Levenol H&B. The systematic characterization presented in this work provides important new findings on the interfacial and emulsifying properties of polyoxytheylene glycerol ester surfactants, which can be applied in the rational development of new biocompatible products. PMID:25129697

  14. Mesoporous carbon nanomaterials as environmental adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pranav K; Gan, Lihua; Liu, Mingxian; Rao, Nageswara N

    2014-02-01

    The transportation and diffusion of the guest objects or molecules in the porous carbon nanomaterials can be facilitated by reducing the pathway and resistance. The reduced pathway depends on the porous nature of carbon nanomaterials. Classification of porous carbon materials by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has given a new opportunity to design the pores as per their applicability and to understand the mobility of ions, atoms, and molecules in the porous network of carbon materials and also advanced their countless applicability. However, synthesis of carbon nanomaterials with a desired porous network is still a great challenge. Although, remarkable developments have taken place in the recent years, control over the pores size and/or hierarchical porous architectures, especially in the synthesis of carbon nanospheres (CNSs) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMCs) is still intriguing. The micro and mesoporous CNSs and OMCs have been prepared by a variety of procedures and over a wide range of compositions using various different surfactant templates and carbon precursors etc. The mechanisms of formation of micromesopore in the CNSs and OMCs are still evolving. On the other hand, the urge for adsorbents with very high adsorption capacities for removing contaminants from water is growing steadily. In this review, we address the state-of-the-art synthesis of micro and mesoporous CNSs and OMCs, giving examples of their applications for adsorptive removals of contaminants including our own research studies. PMID:24749459

  15. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Fatty Alcohol/Surfactant/Oil/Water Nanoemulsions and Their Cosmetic Applications.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Toru; Tomomasa, Satoshi; Nakajima, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing fatty alcohols and surfactants have been investigated with the aim of developing new formulations that are less viscous and more transparent than conventional milky lotions, as well as for providing greater skin-improving effects. O/W-based creams can be converted to low viscosity milky lotions following their emulsification with a homogenizer at temperatures greater than the transition temperatures of their molecular assemblies (α-gel). The stability of the O/W emulsions evaluated in the current study increased as the transition temperatures of the molecular assemblies formed from their fatty alcohol and surfactant constituents increased. A decrease in the emulsion droplet size led to the formation of a new formulation, which was transparent in appearance and showed a very low viscosity. The absence of a molecular assembly (α-gel) formed by the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules in the aqueous phase allowed for the formation of a stable transparent and low viscosity nanoemulsion. Furthermore, this decrease in droplet size led to an increase in the interfacial area of the emulsion droplets, with almost all of the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules being adsorbed on the surfaces of the emulsion droplets. This was found to be important for preparing a stable transparent formulation. Notably, this new formulation exhibited high occlusivity, which was equivalent to that of an ordinary cosmetic milky lotion, and consequently provided high skin hydration. The nanoemulsion was destroyed following its application to the skin, which led to the release of the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules from the surface of the nanoemulsion into the aqueous phase. These results therefore suggest that the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules organized the molecular assembly (α-gel) and allowed for the reconstruction of the network structure. PMID:26743668

  16. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  17. Use of layered double hydroxides and their derivatives as adsorbents for inorganic and organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Youwen

    Contamination of surface and groundwaters by hazardous inorganic and organic pollutants has become an increasing threat to the safety of drinking waters. Cleanup of contaminated surface and groundwaters has, therefore, become a major focus of environmental research. Primary objectives of this dissertation study were to examine the adsorption properties of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and their derivatives for inorganic and organic contaminants and to identify potential technologies that utilize LDHs and their derivatives for environment remediation. Studies examined the adsorption characteristics of anionic selenium, arsenic and dicamba (3,6 dichloro-2-methoxy benzoic acid) on original LDHs and calcined-LDHs. Adsorption of selenium and arsenic on LDHs was a function of pH. Competing anions in solution strongly affected adsorption of all three contaminants, with divalent anions decreasing adsorption more intensely than monovalent anions. Adsorbed selenium, arsenic and dicamba could be released from LDHs in anion solutions. Adsorption isotherms for selenium and arsenic retention could be fitted to a simple Langmuir equation. Calcination processes significantly increased adsorption capacities of LDHs. Because of adsorption-desorpion characteristics, LDHs could be recycled. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed an increase of d-spacing coupling with adsorption of contaminants, verifying the intercalation of contaminants into layer structure of LDHs. Long chain anionic surfactants intercalated into LDHs modified their surface properties, resulting in organo-LDHs with hydrophobic surface properties. Various organo-LDHs were developed by incorporating different surfactants into LDHs via different synthesis methods. Surfactant intercalation properties were examined and the geometrical arrangements of the intercalated surfactants were characterized. Results revealed that surfactant molecules could adopt various configurations within the LDH interlayer space. Intercalation

  18. Partitioning of naphthalene to gemini surfactant-treated alumina.

    PubMed

    Neupane, D; Park, J W

    2000-09-01

    Partitioning of naphthalene to anionic surfactants adsorbed on alumina in the aqueous phase was studied for immobilization of the contaminant in the subsurface. Three anionic surfactants with different molecular structures were used: a conventional (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, SDDBS), a gemini (dialkylated disulfonated diphenyl oxide with alkyl chain length of 12, DADS-C12), and a dianionic (monoalkylated disulfonated diphenyl oxide with alkyl chain length of 12, MADS-C12). Sorption of the surfactants onto alumina was studied in a series of batch experiments and the effectiveness of the adsorbed surfactants onto aluminum oxide as a sorptive phase for naphthalene was compared. PMID:10834382

  19. Hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex as a function of surfactant structure.

    PubMed

    Devínsky, Ferdinand; Pisárcik, Martin; Lacko, Ivan

    2009-06-01

    The present study deals with the determination of hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex in sodium bromide solution using the dynamic light scattering method. Cationic gemini surfactants with polymethylene spacer of variable length were used for the interaction with DNA. The scattering experiments were performed at constant DNA and sodium bromide concentrations and variable surfactant concentration in the premicellar and micellar regions as a function of surfactant spacer length. It was found that the DNA conformation strongly depends on the polymethylene spacer length as well as on the surfactant concentration relative to the surfactant critical micelle concentration. Gemini surfactant molecules with 4 methylene groups in the spacer were found to be the least efficient DNA compacting agent in the region above the surfactant cmc. Gemini molecules with the shortest spacer length (2 methylene groups) and the longest spacer length (8 methylene groups) investigated showed the most efficient DNA compaction ability. PMID:19592712

  20. Interaction of nonionic surfactant AEO9 with ionic surfactants*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-guo; Yin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The interaction in two mixtures of a nonionic surfactant AEO9 (C12H25O(CH2CH2O)9H) and different ionic surfactants was investigated. The two mixtures were AEO9/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and AEO9/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at molar fraction of AEO9, α AEO9=0.5. The surface properties of the surfactants, critical micelle concentration (CMC), effectiveness of surface tension reduction (γ CMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Γ max) and minimum area per molecule at the air/solution interface (A min) were determined for both individual surfactants and their mixtures. The significant deviations from ideal behavior (attractive interactions) of the nonionic/ionic surfactant mixtures were determined. Mixtures of both AEO9/SDS and AEO9/CTAB exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction efficiency and mixed micelle formation, but neither exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction effectiveness. PMID:15909351

  1. Direct visual evidence for chemical mechanism of SERRS of the S-complex of pyrimidine molecule adsorbed on silver nanoparticle via charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Wang, Peijie; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Lisheng; Fang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the S-complex of pyrimidine molecule absorbed on silver clusters was employed as a model molecule to study the enhancement mechanism in surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS). We described the chemical enhancement of SERRS through charge transfer (CT) from Ag20 to pyrimidine on resonance excitation, and electromagnetic enhancement through intracluster charge redistribution (CR) on the electronic intracluster collective oscillation excitation. It is shown that SERRS process of the pyrimidine molecule absorbed on silver clusters with different incident wavelength are dominated by different enhancement mechanisms. Both experimental and theoretical works have been performed to understand the CT process in SERRS. PMID:24287052

  2. Targeted adsorption of molecules in the colon with the novel adsorbent-based medicinal product, DAV132: A proof of concept study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    de Gunzburg, Jean; Ducher, Annie; Modess, Christiane; Wegner, Danilo; Oswald, Stefan; Dressman, Jennifer; Augustin, Violaine; Feger, Céline; Andremont, Antoine; Weitschies, Werner; Siegmund, Werner

    2015-01-01

    During antibiotic treatments, active residuals reaching the colon profoundly affect the bacterial flora resulting in the emergence of resistance. To prevent these effects, we developed an enteric-coated formulated activated-charcoal based product, DAV132, meant to deliver its adsorbent to the ileum and neutralize antibiotic residues in the proximal colon. In a randomized, control, crossover study, the plasma pharmacokinetics of the probe drugs amoxicillin (500 mg) absorbed in the proximal intestine, and sulfapyridine (25 mg) metabolized from sulfasalazine in the cecum and rapidly absorbed, were compared after a single administration in 18 healthy subjects who had received DAV132, uncoated formulated activated charcoal (FAC) or water 16 and 8 hours before, concomitantly with the probe drugs, and 8 hours thereafter. The AUC0-96 h of amoxicillin was reduced by more than 70% when it was taken with FAC, but bioequivalent when it was taken with water or DAV132. By contrast, the AUC0-96 h of sulfapyridine was reduced by more than 90% when administered with either FAC or DAV132 in comparison with water. The results show that DAV132 can selectively adsorb drug compounds in the proximal colon, without interfering with drug absorption in the proximal small intestine, thereby constituting a proof of concept that DAV132 actually functions in humans. PMID:25042595

  3. Difference in Surface Properties between Insoluble Monolayer and Adsorbed Film from Kinetics of Water Evaporation and BAM Image.

    PubMed

    Moroi, Yoshikiyo; Rusdi, Muhammad; Kubo, Izumi

    2004-05-20

    The evaporation rate of water molecules across three kinds of interfaces (air/water interface (1), air/surfactant solution interface (2), and air/water interface covered by insoluble monolayer (3)) was examined using a remodeled thermogravimetric balance. There was no difference in both the evaporation rate and the activation energy for the first two interfaces for three types of surfactant solutions below and above the critical micelle concentration (cmc). This means that the molecular surface area from the Gibbs surface excess has nothing to do with the evaporation rate. In the third case, the insoluble monolayer of 1-heptadecanol decreased the evaporation rate and increased the activation energy, indicating a clear difference between an insoluble monolayer and an adsorbed film of soluble surfactant. This difference was substantiated by BAM images, too. The images of three surfactant solution interfaces were similar to that of just the water surface, while distinct structures of molecular assemblies were observed for the insoluble monolayer. The concentration profile of water molecules in an air/liquid interfacial region was derived by Fix's second law. The profile indicates that a definite layer just beneath the air/liquid interface of the surfactant solution is made mostly of water molecules and that the layer thickness is a few times the root-mean-square displacement %@mt;sys@%%@rl;;@%2%@ital@%Dt%@rsf@%%@rlx@%%@mx@% of the water molecules. The thickness was found to be more than a few nanometers, as estimated from several relaxation times derived from the other kinetics than evaporation of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous systems and a maximum evaporation rate of purified water. PMID:18950121

  4. The effect of temperatures and γ-ray irradiation on silica-based calix[4]arene-R14 adsorbent modified with surfactants for the adsorption of cesium from nuclear waste solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi; Wu, Yan; Wei, Yuezhou

    2014-10-01

    1,3-[(2,4-Diethylheptylethoxy)oxy]-2,4-crown-6-Calix[4]arene(Calix[4]arene-R14), used as an extractant of Cs(I) from nitric acid, modified by dodecanol and dodecyl benzenesulfonic acid (DBS), was loaded into the pores of macroporous silica-based polymer support (SiO2-P) particles. To evaluate the stability of the adsorbent, the adsorption data at different temperatures (298-323 K) and γ-ray absorbed doses (10-200 kGy) were analyzed by the Langmuir isotherm. The minimum adsorbed amount was calculated to be 0.121 mmol g-1 at 323 K, approximately 23% reduction compared to 298 K. The maximum adsorbed amount of not-irradiated adsorbent with 0.156 mmol g-1 decreased by 20% than that irradiated in 0.5 M HNO3. The thermodynamic parameters have revealed that this adsorption reaction is an exothermic and spontaneous process. The reduction in 3 M HNO3 was about 45% by the comparison between the before- and after-irradiation. It was found that both the concentrations of HNO3 and DBS have significant influence on the degradation of the adsorbents.

  5. Release of surfactant cargo from interfacially-active halloysite clay nanotubes for oil spill remediation.

    PubMed

    Owoseni, Olasehinde; Nyankson, Emmanuel; Zhang, Yueheng; Adams, Samantha J; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Bose, Arijit; Gupta, Ram B; John, Vijay T

    2014-11-18

    Naturally occurring halloysite clay nanotubes are effective in stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions and can serve as interfacially-active vehicles for delivering oil spill treating agents. Halloysite nanotubes adsorb at the oil-water interface and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions that are stable for months. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) imaging of the oil-in-water emulsions shows that these nanotubes assemble in a side-on orientation at the oil-water interface and form networks on the interface through end-to-end linkages. For application in the treatment of marine oil spills, halloysite nanotubes were successfully loaded with surfactants and utilized as an interfacially-active vehicle for the delivery of surfactant cargo. The adsorption of surfactant molecules at the interface serves to lower the interfacial tension while the adsorption of particles provides a steric barrier to drop coalescence. Pendant drop tensiometry was used to characterize the dynamic reduction in interfacial tension resulting from the release of dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (DOSS) from halloysite nanotubes. At appropriate surfactant compositions and loadings in halloysite nanotubes, the crude oil-saline water interfacial tension is effectively lowered to levels appropriate for the dispersion of oil. This work indicates a novel concept of integrating particle stabilization of emulsions together with the release of chemical surfactants from the particles for the development of an alternative, cheaper, and environmentally-benign technology for oil spill remediation. PMID:25346266

  6. Enhanced Raman spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on carbon-doped TiO₂ obtained from titanium carbide: a visible-light-assisted renewable substrate.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Vankayala; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2012-08-01

    Titanium carbide (TiC) is an electrically conducting material with favorable electrochemical properties. In the present studies, carbon-doped TiO(2) (C-TiO(2)) has been synthesized from TiC particles, as well as TiC films coated on stainless steel substrate via thermal annealing under various conditions. Several C-TiO(2) substrates are synthesized by varying experimental conditions and characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic techniques. C-TiO(2) in the dry state (in powder form as well as in film form) is subsequently used as a substrate for enhancing Raman signals corresponding to 4-mercaptobenzoic acid and 4-nitrothiophenol by utilizing chemical enhancement based on charge-transfer interactions. Carbon, a nonmetal dopant in TiO(2), improves the intensities of Raman signals, compared to undoped TiO(2). Significant dependence of Raman intensity on carbon doping is observed. Ameliorated performance obtained using C-TiO(2) is attributed to the presence of surface defects that originate due to carbon as a dopant, which, in turn, triggers charge transfer between TiO(2) and analyte. The C-TiO(2) substrates are subsequently regenerated for repetitive use by illuminating an analyte-adsorbed substrate with visible light for a period of 5 h. PMID:22738214

  7. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldareili, Charles; Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity technologies often require aqueous phases to spread over nonwetting hydrophobic solid surfaces. Surfactants facilitate the wetting of water on hydrophobic surfaces by adsorbing on the water/air and hydrophobic solid/water interfaces and lowering the surface tensions of these interfaces. The tension reductions decrease the contact angle, which increases the equilibrium wetted area. Hydrocarbon surfactants; (i.e., amphiphiles with a hydrophobic moiety consisting of an extended chain of (aliphatic) methylene -CH2- groups attached to a large polar group to give aqueous solubility) are capable of reducing the contact angles on surfaces which are not very hydrophobic, but do not reduce significantly the contact angles of the very hydrophobic surfaces such as parafilm, polyethylene or self assembled monolayers. Trisiloxane surfactants (amphiphiles with a hydrophobe consisting of methyl groups linked to a trisiloxane backbone in the form of a disk ((CH3)3-Si-O-Si-O-Si(CH3)3) and an extended ethoxylate (-(OCH2CH2)a-) polar group in the form of a chain with four or eight units) can significantly reduce the contact angle of water on a very hydrophobic surface and cause rapid and complete (or nearly complete) spreading (termed superspreading). The overall goal of the research described in this proposal is to establish and verify a theory for how trisiloxanes cause superspreading, and then use this knowledge as a guide to developing more general hydrocarbon based surfactant systems which superspread. We propose that the trisiloxane surfactants superspread because their structure allows them to strongly lower the high hydrophobic solid/aqueous tension when they adsorb to the solid surface. When the siloxane adsorbs, the hydrophobic disk parts of the molecule adsorb onto the surface removing the surface water. Since the cross-sectional area of the disk is larger than that of the extended ethoxylate chain, the disks can form a space-filling mat on the surface which

  8. Proteomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Nanoparticle Corona upon Contact with Lung Surfactant Reveals Differences in Protein, but Not Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Raesch, Simon Sebastian; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Rurainski, Alexander; Selzer, Dominik; Ruge, Christian Arnold; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Schaefer, Ulrich Friedrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-22

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) constitutes the first line of host defense in the deep lung. Because of its high content of phospholipids and surfactant specific proteins, the interaction of inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) with the pulmonary surfactant layer is likely to form a corona that is different to the one formed in plasma. Here we present a detailed lipidomic and proteomic analysis of NP corona formation using native porcine surfactant as a model. We analyzed the adsorbed biomolecules in the corona of three NP with different surface properties (PEG-, PLGA-, and Lipid-NP) after incubation with native porcine surfactant. Using label-free shotgun analysis for protein and LC-MS for lipid analysis, we quantitatively determined the corona composition. Our results show a conserved lipid composition in the coronas of all investigated NPs regardless of their surface properties, with only hydrophilic PEG-NPs adsorbing fewer lipids in total. In contrast, the analyzed NP displayed a marked difference in the protein corona, consisting of up to 417 different proteins. Among the proteins showing significant differences between the NP coronas, there was a striking prevalence of molecules with a notoriously high lipid and surface binding, such as, e.g., SP-A, SP-D, DMBT1. Our data indicate that the selective adsorption of proteins mediates the relatively similar lipid pattern in the coronas of different NPs. On the basis of our lipidomic and proteomic analysis, we provide a detailed set of quantitative data on the composition of the surfactant corona formed upon NP inhalation, which is unique and markedly different to the plasma corona. PMID:26575243

  9. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  10. Interfacial structure and rearrangement of nonionic surfactants near a receding contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luokkala, Barry B.

    Surfactant solutions exhibit a wide variety of wetting and dewetting behaviors on high energy surfaces. These behaviors are driven by surfactant self-assemblies at the moving contact line. To probe these self-assemblies, we have undertaken a study of surfactant structure at the three interfaces near a receding contact line. We immerse a hydrophilic silica surface in aqueous solutions of polyethyleneglycol monododecyl ether (C12En, 1 ≤ n ≤ 8) below the critical micelle concentration. The substrate is withdrawn from solution at a speed, U < Ucrit, the critical velocity for pulling a macroscopic film on the solid surface, so that a receding contact line moves across the surface. We determine the area per molecule adsorbed at the solid-liquid and liquid-vapor interfaces, and the structural details of the monolayer deposited to the solid-vapor interface at the receding contact line. We also describe in detail a new technique which we have developed for objectively interpreting data from x-ray reflectivity measurements, our primary tool for probing structure at the solid-vapor interface. We find that the adsorbed amount at the solid-liquid interface is a small-to-negligible contribution to the monolayer deposited at the solid-vapor interface for all n. The primary source of the deposited surfactant is the self-assembled layer at the liquid-vapor interface. The density of the deposited monolayer is substantially less than the density at the liquid-vapor interface. Conservation of mass demands a dividing streamline in the bulk, along which surfactant from the liquid-vapor interface is returned to solution. We note a transition at n = 6 from reversible to partially irreversible adsorption, suggesting the ethylene oxide (EO) head groups begin to behave like PEO polymer for n ≥ 6. At the liquid-vapor interface the area per molecule increases monotonically with n, suggesting increasing disorder in the head group region. The deposited monolayer at the solid

  11. DNA interaction with cis- and trans- isomers of photosensitive surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unksov, I. N.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Interaction between DNA and photosensitive cationic surfactant in a solution is studied. Studies were conducted to examine the impact of the surfactant in its cis- conformation on the size of DNA molecule and also to investigate the phase behavior of the system depending on DNA and surfactant concentration. We conclude that trans- isomer of surfactant requires its smaller concentration to reach the DNA compaction compared with cis- isomer received by UV radiation of solutions. Studies of DNA-surfactant systems were performed by means of spectrophotometry and viscometry. Variation of surfactant concentration enables us to determine the precipitation zone on phase diagram. From the viscosity study it can be indicated that precipitation zone is narrower for UV-radiated surfactant and it shifts to higher surfactant concentration. Also we examine the reversibility of DNA compaction in systems with the surfactant in its trans- form.

  12. Adsorption of quantum dots onto polymer and Gemini surfactant films: a quartz crystal microbalance study.

    PubMed

    Alejo, T; Merchán, M D; Velázquez, M M

    2014-08-26

    We used quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation to study the mechanical properties, the kinetics of adsorption, and the amount of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) adsorbed onto a SiO2 sensor, referred as bare sensor, onto the sensor modified with a film of the polymer poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene), PMAO, or with a film of the Gemini surfactant ethyl-bis(dimethyl octadecyl ammonium bromide), abbreviated as 18-2-18. Results showed that when the sensor is coated with polymer or surfactant molecules, the coverage increases compared with that obtained for the bare sensor. On the other hand, rheological properties and kinetics of adsorption of QDs are driven by QD nanoparticles. Thus, the QD films present elastic behavior, and the elasticity values are independent of the molecule used as coating and similar to the elasticity value obtained for QDs films on the bare sensor. The QD adsorption is a two-step mechanism in which the fastest process is attributed to the QD adsorption onto the solid substrate and the slowest one is ascribed to rearrangement movements of the nanoparticles adsorbed at the surface. PMID:25093530

  13. Characterizing the Effect of Salt and Surfactant Concentration on the Counterion Atmosphere around Surfactant Stabilized SWCNTs Using Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Lam, Stephanie; Zheng, Ming; Fagan, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-26

    Accurate characterization of dispersed-phase nanoparticle properties such as density, size, solvation, and charge is necessary for their utilization in applications such as medicine, energy, and materials. Herein, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is used to quantify bile salt surfactant adsorption on length sorted (7,6) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a function of bulk surfactant concentration and in the presence of varying quantities of a monovalent salt-sodium chloride. These measurements provide high precision adsorbed surfactant density values in the literature for only the second SWCNT structure to date and report the quantity of adsorbed surfactant across a broad range of bulk surfactant concentrations utilized in SWCNT dispersion processing. Second, the measurements presented herein unambiguously demonstrate, via AUC, a direct relation between the size of the counterion cloud around a surfactant-stabilized SWCNT and solution ionic strength. The results show that changes in the size of the counterion cloud around surfactant-stabilized SWCNT are attributable to electrostatic phenomenon and not to changes in the quantity of adsorbed surfactant with salt addition. These results provide important reference values for projecting SWCNT dispersion behavior as a function of solution conditions and extend the range of nanoparticle properties measurable via AUC. PMID:27031248

  14. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  15. Preparation of nanocrystalline MgO by surfactant assisted precipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei, Mehran; Khajenoori, Majid; Nematollahi, Behzad

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide with high surface area. {yields} MgO prepared with surfactant showed different morphologies compared with the sample prepared without surfactant. {yields} MgO prepared with surfactant showed a plate-like shape. {yields} Refluxing temperature and time and the surfactant to metal molar ratio affect the textural properties of MgO. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide with high surface area was prepared by a simple precipitation method using pluronic P123 triblock copolymer (Poly (ethylene glycol)-block, Poly (propylene glycol)-block, Poly (ethylene glycol)) as surfactant and under refluxing conditions. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption (BET) and scanning and transmission electron microscopies (SEM and TEM). The obtained results revealed that the refluxing time and temperature and the molar ratio of surfactant to metal affect the structural properties of MgO, because of the changes in the rate and extent of P123 adsorption on the prepared samples. The results showed that the addition of surfactant is effective to prepare magnesium oxide with high surface area and affects the morphology of the prepared samples. With increasing the P123/MgO molar ratio to 0.05 the pore size distribution was shifted to larger size. The sample prepared with addition of surfactant showed a plate-like shape which was completely different with the morphology of the sample prepared without surfactant. The formation of nanoplate-like MgO was related to higher surface density of Mg ions on the (0 0 1) plane than that on the other planes of the Mg(OH){sub 2} crystal. The (0 0 1) plane would be blocked preferentially by the adsorbed P123 molecules during the growing process of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoentities and the growth on the (0 0 1) plane would be markedly restricted, and the consequence is the generation of nanoplate-like MgO. In addition, increase in refluxing temperature and time

  16. Kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF): Reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants and surfactant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakey, Pascale; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Oxidants cause damage to biosurfaces such as the lung epithelium unless they are effectively scavenged. The respiratory tract is covered in a thin layer of fluid which extends from the nasal cavity to the alveoli and contain species that scavenge ozone and other incoming oxidants. The kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF) has been developed in order to investigate the reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants (ascorbate, uric acid, glutathione and α-tocopherol) and surfactant lipids and proteins within the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The model incorporates different processes: gas phase diffusion, adsorption and desorption from the surface, bulk phase diffusion and known reactions at the surface and in the bulk. The ELF is split into many layers: a sorption layer, a surfactant layer, a near surface bulk layer and several bulk layers. Initial results using KM-ELF indicate that at ELF thicknesses of 80 nm and 1 × 10-4cm the ELF would become rapidly saturated with ozone with saturation occurring in less than a second. However, at an ELF thickness of 1 × 10-3cm concentration gradients were observed throughout the ELF and the presence of antioxidants reduced the O3 reaching the lung cells and tissues by 40% after 1 hour of exposure. In contrast, the antioxidants were efficient scavengers of OH radicals, although the large rate constants of OH reacting with the antioxidants resulted in the antioxidants decaying away rapidly. The chemical half-lives of the antioxidants and surface species were also calculated using KM-ELF as a function of O3 and OH concentration and ELF thickness. Finally, the pH dependence of the products of reactions between antioxidants and O3 were investigated. The KM-ELF model predicted that a harmful ascorbate ozonide product would increase from 1.4 × 1011cm-3at pH 7.4 to 1.1 × 1014 cm-3 at pH 4after 1 hour although a uric acid ozonide product would decrease from 2.0 × 1015cm-3to 5.9 × 1012cm-3.

  17. Competitive adsorption of proteins and low-molecular-weight surfactants: computer simulation and microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Dickinson, Eric; Ettelaie, Rammile; Mackie, Alan R; Wilde, Peter J

    2004-01-30

    Proteins and low-molecular-weight (LMW) surfactants are used in the food industry as emulsifying (and foaming) ingredients and as stabilizers. These attributes are related to their ability to adsorb at fluid-fluid (and gas-fluid) interfaces lowering the interfacial (and surface) tension of liquids. Hence, the study of the properties of adsorbed layers of these molecules can be expected to lead to a better understanding of their effect on food products. Direct proof of the validity of mesoscopic models of systems of proteins and LMW surfactants can only be achieved by quantitative theoretical predictions being tested against both macroscopic and mesoscopic experiments. Computer simulation constitutes one of the few available tools to predict mathematically the behaviour of models of realistic complexity. Furthermore, experimental techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) now allow high resolution imaging of these systems, providing the mesoscopic scale measurements to compare with the simulations. In this review, we bring together a number of related findings that have been generated at this mesoscopic level over the past few years. A useful simple model consisting of spherical particles interacting via bonded and unbonded forces is described, and the derived computer simulation results are compared against those from the imaging experiments. Special attention is paid to the adsorption of binary mixtures of proteins, mixtures of LMW surfactants, and also protein+surfactant mixed systems. We believe that further development of these mathematically well-defined physical models is necessary in order to achieve a proper understanding of the key physico-chemical processes involved. PMID:14962406

  18. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Pyrrole-Terminated Ionic Liquid Surfactant: One Molecule with Multiple Functions for Controlled Synthesis of Diverse Multispecies Co-Doped Porous Hollow Carbon Spheres.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Ji, Jingwei; Wang, Peng; Lan, Yue; Gao, Ning; Yin, Xianpeng; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2016-05-01

    Rationally and efficiently controlling chemical composition, microstructure, and morphology of carbon nanomaterials plays a crucial role in significantly enhancing their functional properties and expending their applications. In this work, a novel strategy for simultaneously controlling these structural parameters was developed on the base of a multifunctional precursor approach, in which the precursor not only serves as carbon source and structure-directing agent, but also contains two heteroatom doping sites. As exemplified by using pyrrole-terminated ionic liquid surfactant as such precursor, in conjunction with sol-gel chemistry this strategy allows for efficiently producing well-defined hollow carbon spheres with controlled microstructure and chemical compositions. Remarkably, the dual-doping sites in confined silica channels provide an exciting opportunity and flexibility to access various doped carbons through simply anion exchange or altering the used oxidative polymerization agent, especially the multispecies codoped materials by combination of the two doping modes. All the results indicate that the described strategy may open up a new avenue for efficiently synthesizing functional carbon materials with highly controllable capability. PMID:27093191

  20. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications. PMID:27124722

  1. Drops in Space: Super Oscillations and Surfactant Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Tian, Yuren; Jankovsky, Joseph; Shi, Tao; Chen, X.; Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene; Croonquist, Arvid; Thornton, Kathyrn C.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Coleman, Catherine; Leslie, Fred W.; Matthiesen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    An unprecedented microgravity observation of maximal shape oscillations of a surfactant-bearing water drop the size of a ping pong ball was observed during a mission of Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the second United States Microgravity Laboratory-USML-2 (STS-73, October 20-November 5, 1995). The observation was precipitated by the action of an intense sound field which produced a deforming force on the drop. When this deforming force was suddenly reduced, the drop executed nearly free and axisymmetric oscillations for several cycles, demonstrating a remarkable amplitude of nonlinear motion. Whether arising from the discussion of modes of oscillation of the atomic nucleus, or the explosion of stars, or how rain forms, the complex processes influencing the motion, fission, and coalescence of drops have fascinated scientists for centuries. Therefore, the axisymmetric oscillations of a maximally deformed liquid drop are noteworthy, not only for their scientific value but also for their aesthetic character. Scientists from Yale University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Vanderbilt University conducted liquid drop experiments in microgravity using the acoustic positioning/manipulation environment of the Drop Physics Module (DPM). The Yale/JPL group's objectives were to study the rheological properties of liquid drop surfaces on which are adsorbed surfactant molecules, and to infer surface properties such as surface tension, Gibb's elasticity, and surface dilatational viscosity by using a theory which relies on spherical symmetry to solve the momentum and mass transport equations.

  2. A study of the thermodynamic properties of surfactant mixtures: Mixed micelle formation and mixed surfactant adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    The volumetric mixing in anionic/nonionic, cationic/nonionic, and anionic/cationic mixed micelles was determined by examining the total surfactant apparent molar volumes at total surfactant concentrations much greater than the mixture critical micelle concentration. The mixed surfactant systems investigated were: sodium dodecyl sulfate and a polyethoxylated nonylphenol, at 0.15 M NaCl and with no added NaCl; cetyl pyridinium chloride and polyethoxylated nonylphenol, at 0.03 M NaCl; and sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride, at 0.15 M NaCl. The results of this study suggest that the electrostatic interactions in the mixed micelles do no significantly effect the molar volume of the mixed micelle. Therefore, the micelle hydrophobic core dominates the volumetric mixing in mixed micelles. The adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate and a polyethoxylated nonylphenol and well defined mixtures thereof was measured on gamma alumina. A pseudo-phase separation model to describe mixed anionic/nonionic admicelle (adsorbed surfactant aggregate) formation was developed. In this model, regular solution theory was used to describe the anionic/nonionic surfactant interactions in the mixed admicelle and a patch-wise adsorption model was used to describe surfactant adsorption on a heterogeneous surface. Regular solution theory was tested on specific homogeneous surface patches by examining constant total surfactant adsorption levels. For the adsorption of binary surfactant mixtures adsorbing at total equilibrium concentrations above the mixture critical micelle concentration, simultaneous solution of the pseudo-phase separation models for mixed admicelle and mixed micelle formation predicts that the surfactant compositions in the monomer, micelle, and admicelle pseudo-phases are constant at a constant total adsorption level.

  3. Flexible polyelectrolyte conformation in the presence of cationic and anionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, C. B.; Kuhn, P. S.; Diehl, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we have studied the conformation of flexible polyelectrolyte chains in the presence of cationic and anionic surfactant molecules. We developed a simple theoretical model for the formation of the polyelectrolyte-cationic surfactant complexes and mixed micelles formed by cationic and anionic surfactant molecules, in the framework of the Debye-Hückel-Bjerrum-Manning and Flory theories, with the hydrophobic interaction included explicitly as an effective short-ranged attraction between the surfactant hydrocarbon tails. This simple model allows us to calculate the extension of the polyelectrolyte-cationic surfactant complexes as a function of the anionic surfactant concentration, for different types of cationic and anionic surfactant molecules. A discrete conformational transition from a collapsed state to an elongated coil was found, for all surfactant chain lengths we have considered, in agreement with the experimental observations for the unfolding of ​DNA-cationic surfactant complexes.

  4. Remobilizing the Interfaces of Thermocapillary Driven Bubbles Retarded by the Adsorption of a Surfactant Impurity on the Bubble Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaparthi, Ravi; Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Thermocapillary migration is a method for moving bubbles in space in the absence of buoyancy. A temperature gradient is applied to the continuous phase in which a bubble is situated, and the applied gradient impressed on the bubble surface causes one pole of the drop to be cooler than the opposite pole. As the surface tension is a decreasing function of temperature, the cooler pole pulls at the warmer pole, creating a flow which propels the bubble in the direction of the warmer fluid. A major impediment to the practical use of thermocapillarity to direct the movement of bubbles in space is the fact that surfactant impurities which are unavoidably present in the continuous phase can significantly reduce the migration velocity. A surfactant impurity adsorbed onto the bubble interface is swept to the trailing end of the bubble. When bulk concentrations are low (which is the case with an impurity), diffusion of surfactant to the front end is slow relative to convection, and surfactant collects at the back end of the bubble. Collection at the back lowers the surface tension relative to the front end setting up a reverse tension gradient. For buoyancy driven bubble motions in the absence of a thermocapillarity, the tension gradient opposes the surface flow, and reduces the surface and terminal velocities (the interface becomes more solid-like). When thermocapillary forces are present, the reverse tension gradient set up by the surfactant accumulation reduces the temperature tension gradient, and decreases to near zero the thermocapillary velocity. The objective of our research is to develop a method for enhancing the thermocapillary migration of bubbles which have been retarded by the adsorption onto the bubble surface of a surfactant impurity, Our remobilization theory proposes to use surfactant molecules which kinetically rapidly exchange between the bulk and the surface and are at high bulk concentrations. Because the remobilizing surfactant is present at much higher

  5. Orientation- and concentration-dependent surfactant adsorption on silicon in aqueous alkaline solutions: explaining the changes in the etch rate, roughness and undercutting for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosálvez, M. A.; Tang, B.; Pal, P.; Sato, K.; Kimura, Y.; Ishibashi, K.

    2009-12-01

    We combine spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (KMC) and convex corner undercutting analysis in order to characterize and explain the effect of the addition of small amounts of surfactant in alkaline aqueous solutions, such as Triton X-100 in tetra methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH). We propose that the surfactant is adsorbed at the silicon-etchant interface as a thin layer, acting as a filter that moderates the surface reactivity by reducing the amount of reactant molecules that reach the surface. According to the SE and FT-IR measurements, the thickness of the adsorbed layer is an orientation- and concentration-dependent quantity, mostly due to the orientation dependence of the surface density of H-terminations and the concentration dependence of the relative rates of the underlying oxidation and etching reactions, which have a direct impact on the number of OH terminations. For partial OH coverage of the surface, the hydration of the OH group effectively acts as an anchoring location for the hydration shell of a surfactant molecule, thus enabling the formation of hydration bridges that amplify the adsorption density of the surfactant. At high concentration, the model explains the large reduction in the etch rate of the exact and vicinal Si{1 1 0} surfaces, and the small changes in the etch rates for the exact and vicinal Si{1 0 0} surfaces. At low concentration, it explains how the etch rate for both families is significantly reduced. The orientation and concentration dependence of the surfactant adsorption explains the dramatic differences in the micron-scale wet-etched patterns obtained using TMAH and TMAH+Triton for microelectromechanical systems applications.

  6. Surfactant Dynamics: Spreading and Wave Induced Dynamics of a Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen Lee

    Material adsorbed to the surface of a fluid - for instance crude oil in the ocean, biological surfactant on ocular or pulmonary mucous, or emulsions - can form a 2-dimensional mono-molecular layer. These materials, called surfactants, can behave like a compressible viscous 2-dimensional fluid, and can generate surface stresses that influence the sub-fluid's bulk flow. Additionally, the sub-fluid's flow can advect the surfactant and generate gradients in the surfactant distribution and thereby generate gradients in the interfacial properties. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurements of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer at the surface, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface motion and the evolving density field. In this dissertation, I will present a novel method for measuring the spatiotemporal dynamics of the surfactant surface density through the fluorescence emission of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine, a lipid, and we will compare the surfactant dynamics to the dynamics of the surface morphology.With this method, we will consider the inward and outward spreading of a surfactant on a thin fluid film as well as the advection of a surfactant by linear and non-linear gravity-capillary waves. These two types of surfactant coupled fluid flows will allow us to probe well-accepted assumptions about the coupled fluid-surfactant dynamics. In chapter 1, we review the models used for understanding the spreading of a surfactant on a thin fluid film and the motion of surfactant on a linear gravity-capillary wave. In chapter 2, we will present the experimental methods used in this dissertation. In chapter 3, we will study the outward spreading of a localized region of surfactant and show that the spreading of a monolayer is considerably different from the spreading of thicker-layered surfactant. In chapter 4, we will investigate the inward spreading of a surfactant into a circular surfactant-free region and show that hole closure and

  7. Nonionic surfactants enhancing bactericidal activity at their critical micelle concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Seiichi; Majima, Toshiaki; Tadenuma, Hirohiko; Suekuni, Tomonari; Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Bactericidal activities of benzalkonium chloride [also known as alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (ADBAC)] containing nonionic surfactants such as methyl ester ethoxylates (MEE) with the alkyl group C8-C14 and oxyethylene (EO) group of average adduct number 3-15 were measured against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Sample solutions containing MEE in the vicinity of the critical micelle concentration exhibited a dramatic decrease in viable bacterial counts. MEE with an alkyl group of C12 and an oxyethylene group of lower adduct number exhibited little viable bacterial counts than those having higher EO adduct numbers. MEE with reduced EO adduct numbers increased fluorescence intensity in E. coli using the viability stain SYTO 9. Our results show that MEE molecules with low EO adduct numbers exhibited bactericidal activity by increasing the permeability of the E. coli cell membrane. Sample solution containing ADBAC and MEE molecules with lower EO adduct numbers also displayed higher zeta potentials. Moreover, ADBAC molecules incorporated into micelles of MEE with lower EO adduct numbers were adsorbed onto the surface of E. coli, which augmented bactericidal activity. PMID:25492231

  8. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries. PMID:18065212

  9. Adsorption, Ordering, and Local Environments of Surfactant-Encapsulated Polyoxometalate Ions Probed at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Benjamin; Yin, Panchao; Ma, Ying-Zhong

    2016-08-16

    The continued development and application of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalates (SEPs) relies on understanding the ordering and organization of species at their interface and how these are impacted by the various local environments to which they are exposed. Here, we report on the equilibrium properties of two common SEPs adsorbed to the air-water interface and probed with surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. These results reveal clear shifts in vibrational band positions, the magnitude of which scales with the charge of the SEP core, which is indicative of a static field effect on the surfactant coating and the associated local chemical environment. This static field also induces ordering in surrounding water molecules that is mediated by charge screening via the surface-bound surfactants. From these SFG measurements, we are able to show that Mo132-based SEPs are more polar than Mo72V30 SEPs. Disorder in the surfactant chain packing at the highly curved SEP surfaces is attributed to large conic volumes that can be sampled without interactions with neighboring chains. Measurements of adsorption isotherms yield free energies of adsorption to the air-water interface of -46.8 ± 0.4 and -44.8 ± 1.2 kJ/mol for the Mo132 and Mo72V30 SEPs, respectively, indicating a strong propensity for the fluid surface. The influence of intermolecular interactions on the surface adsorption energies is discussed. PMID:27452922

  10. Aqueous Foam Stabilized by Tricationic Amphiphilic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerschap, Seth; Marafino, John; McKenna, Kristin; Caran, Kevin; Feitosa, Klebert; Kevin Caran's Research Group Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The unique surface properties of amphiphilic molecules have made them widely used in applications where foaming, emulsifying or coating processes are needed. The development of novel architectures with multi-cephalic/tailed molecules have enhanced their anti-bacterial activity in connection with tail length and the nature of the head group. Here we report on the foamability of two triple head double, tail cationic surfactants (M-1,14,14, M-P, 14,14) and a triple head single tail cationic surfactant (M-1,1,14) and compare them with commercially available single headed, single tailed anionic and cationic surfactants (SDS,CTAB and DTAB). The results show that bubble rupture rate decrease with the length of the carbon chain irrespective of head structure. The growth rate of bubbles with short tailed surfactants (SDS) and longer, single tailed tricationic surfactants (M-1,1,14) was shown to be twice as high as those with longer tailed surfactants (CTAB, M-P,14,14, M-1,14,14). This fact was related to the size variation of bubbles, where the foams made with short tail surfactants exhibited higher polydispersivity than those with short tails. This suggests that foams with tricationic amphiphilics are closed linked to their tail length and generally insensitive to their head structure.

  11. Adaptations to hibernation in lung surfactant composition of 13-lined ground squirrels influence surfactant lipid phase segregation properties.

    PubMed

    Suri, Lakshmi N M; Cruz, Antonio; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Staples, James F; Possmayer, Fred; Orgeig, Sandra; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lines the entire alveolar surface, serving primarily to reduce the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant films adsorb as a monolayer interspersed with multilayers with surfactant lipids segregating into different phases or domains. Temperature variation, which influences lipid physical properties, affects both the lipid phase segregation and the surface activity of surfactants. In hibernating animals, such as 13-lined ground squirrels, which vary their body temperature, surfactant must be functional over a wide range of temperatures. We hypothesised that surfactant from the 13-lined ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, would undergo appropriate lipid structural re-arrangements at air-water interfaces to generate phase separation, sufficient to attain the low surface tensions required to remain stable at both low and high body temperatures. Here, we examined pressure-area isotherms at 10, 25 and 37°C and found that surfactant films from both hibernating and summer-active squirrels reached their highest surface pressure on the Wilhelmy-Langmuir balance at 10°C. Epifluorescence microscopy demonstrated that films of hibernating squirrel surfactant display different lipid micro-domain organisation characteristics than surfactant from summer-active squirrels. These differences were also reflected at the nanoscale as determined by atomic force microscopy. Such re-arrangement of lipid domains in the relatively more fluid surfactant films of hibernating squirrels may contribute to overcoming collapse pressures and support low surface tension during the normal breathing cycle at low body temperatures. PMID:23506681

  12. The Equilibrium Spreading Tension of Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Maayan P; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-12-01

    Monomolecular films at an air/water interface coexist at the equilibrium spreading tension (γ(e)) with the bulk phase from which they form. For individual phospholipids, γ(e) is single-valued, and separates conditions at which hydrated vesicles adsorb from tensions at which overcompressed monolayers collapse. With pulmonary surfactant, isotherms show that monolayers compressed on the surface of bubbles coexist with the three-dimensional collapsed phase over a range of surface tensions. γ(e) therefore represents a range rather than a single value of surface tension. Between the upper and lower ends of this range, rates of collapse for spread and adsorbed films decrease substantially. Changes during adsorption across this narrow region of coexistence between the two- and three-dimensional structures at least partially explain how alveolar films of pulmonary surfactant become resistant to collapse. PMID:26583569

  13. Separation of the attractive and repulsive contributions to the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions of polar adsorbates on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Deng-Sung

    2015-11-01

    Dissociative adsorption of H2O, NH3, CH3OH and CH3NH2 polar molecules on the Si(100) surface results in a 1:1 mixture of two adsorbates (H and multi-atomic fragment A = OH, NH2, CH3O, CH3NH, respectively) on the surface. By using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption geometry, the total energies and the charge densities for various possible ordered structures of the mixed adsorbate layer have been found. Analyzing the systematic trends in the total energies unveils concurrently the nearest-neighbor interactions ENN and the next nearest-neighbor interactions ENNN between two polar adsorbates A. In going from small to large polar adsorbates, ENN's exhibit an attractive-to-repulsive crossover behavior, indicating that they include competing attractive and repulsive contributions. Exploration of the charge density distributions allows the estimation of the degree of charge overlapping between immediately neighboring A's, the resulting contribution of the steric repulsions, and that of the attractive interactions to the corresponding ENN's. The attractive contributions to nearest neighboring adsorbate-adsorbate interactions between the polar adsorbates under study are shown to result from hydrogen bonds or dipole-dipole interactions.

  14. Effect of surfactant on TPP (tetraphenylporphyrin)-SnO[sub 2] photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Z.; Li, Y. . Inst. of Photographic Chemistry); Tien, H.T. . Dept. of Biophysics)

    1994-02-01

    A simple photovoltaic cell has been constructed by using Nesa glass coated with SnO[sub 2] on both sides as transparent electrodes, one of which is further coated with a photosensitizing dyestuff, tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), forming the photocathode, and by using an aqueous solution of Fe[sup 3+]/Fe[sup 2+] redox couple as the electrolytic solution. By adding an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS), to the solution, both the photovoltage and the photocurrent of the cell are markedly enhanced. The power conversion efficiency of the SDS-containing cell is about eight times the value of the original cell. Other anionic surfactants (e.g., sodium octyl sulfate and sodium dodecyl sulfate) have a similar effect. From the data of the surface tension and the contact angle which the authors have measured, the interface excess of SDS at the interface between the TPP film of the photocathode and the solution has been calculated. The relationship between the photovoltage of the cell and the conformation of the adsorbed SDS molecules at the interface as well as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SDS in the solution are discussed. Other types of surfactant were also tested.

  15. Adsorbed Tween 80 is unique in its ability to improve the stability of gold nanoparticles in solutions of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuyun; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2010-10-01

    This report shows that, of the Tween series (Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 60 and Tween 80) of nonionic surfactants adsorbed on gold nanoparticles (NPs), Tween 80 makes the NPs most stably dispersed in aqueous solutions with or without the presence of representative biological molecules, such as nucleic acids or proteins of different sizes, isoelectric points (pIs) and shapes. In addition, the stability of gold NPs already modified with poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-PEG) or hexa(ethylene glycol)-terminated undecanylthiol (HS(CH2)11EG6OH) is further improved in solutions of proteins when Tween 80 is co-adsorbed on the gold NPs. This strategy is the most effective when adsorption of Tween 80 on gold NPs precedes the coating of PLL-PEG or HS(CH2)11EG6OH on the NPs.This report shows that, of the Tween series (Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 60 and Tween 80) of nonionic surfactants adsorbed on gold nanoparticles (NPs), Tween 80 makes the NPs most stably dispersed in aqueous solutions with or without the presence of representative biological molecules, such as nucleic acids or proteins of different sizes, isoelectric points (pIs) and shapes. In addition, the stability of gold NPs already modified with poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-PEG) or hexa(ethylene glycol)-terminated undecanylthiol (HS(CH2)11EG6OH) is further improved in solutions of proteins when Tween 80 is co-adsorbed on the gold NPs. This strategy is the most effective when adsorption of Tween 80 on gold NPs precedes the coating of PLL-PEG or HS(CH2)11EG6OH on the NPs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Chemical structures and physicochemical properties of nonionic surfactants of Tween series, transmission electron microscopy of gold NPs stabilized by citrate and size distribution. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00309c

  16. Examining Adsorbed Polymer Conformations with Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Maria; Chennaoui, Mourad; Wong, Janet; Tribology Group, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Team

    2011-03-01

    The conformation of adsorbed polymers can have significant impact on their properties such as dynamics and elasticity as well as their ability to take part in reactions with other molecules. Experimental research to determine adsorbed polymer conformation has relied mainly on atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. During an AFM scan, the contact between the scanning probe and the polymer could affect the polymer conformation, particularly where parts of the polymer might have formed projected loops and tails. In this work, conformations of model polymers are examined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The advantage of TIRFM over AFM is that TIRFM is a non contact technique. Lambda DNA labelled along its length with fluorescent probes was adsorbed in a projected 2D -- 3D state. With TIRFM, the relationship between intensity and depth was used as a basis to determine how the conformation of the adsorbed polymers evolved with time using our custom algorithm.

  17. Influence of surfactant charge on antimicrobial efficacy of surfactant-stabilized thyme oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Khalid; Chang, Yuhua; McLandsborough, Lynne; McClements, David Julian

    2011-06-01

    Thyme oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilized by a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80, T80) were prepared as potential antimicrobial delivery systems (pH 4). The nanoemulsions were highly unstable to droplet growth and phase separation, which was attributed to Ostwald ripening due to the relatively high water solubility of thyme oil. Ostwald ripening could be inhibited by incorporating ≥75% of corn oil (a hydrophobic material with a low water solubility) into the nanoemulsion droplets. The electrical characteristics of the droplets in the nanoemulsions were varied by incorporating ionic surfactants with different charges after homogenization: a cationic surfactant (lauric arginate, LAE) or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). The antifungal activity of nanoemulsions containing positive, negative, or neutral thymol droplets was then conducted against four strains of acid-resistant spoilage yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces bailli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, and Brettanomyces naardenensis. The antifungal properties of the three surfactants (T80, LAE, SDS) were also tested in the absence of thymol droplets. Both ionic surfactants showed strong antifungal activity in the absence of thymol droplets, but no antimicrobial activity in their presence. This effect was attributed to partitioning of the antimicrobial surfactant molecules between the oil droplet and microbial surfaces, thereby reducing the effective concentration of active surfactants available to act as antimicrobials. This study shows oil droplets may decrease the efficacy of surfactant-based antimicrobials, which has important consequences for formulating effective antimicrobial agents for utilization in emulsion-based food and beverage products. PMID:21520914

  18. Rheological properties of ovalbumin hydrogels as affected by surfactants addition.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Messina, Paula V; Dodero, Veronica I; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-04-01

    The gel properties of ovalbumin mixtures with three different surfactants (sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate and sodium dodecanoate) have been studied by rheological techniques. The gel elasticities were determined as a function of surfactant concentration and surfactant type. The fractal dimension of the formed structures was evaluated from plots of storage modulus against surfactant concentration. The role of electrostatic, hydrophobic and disulfide SS interactions in these systems has been demonstrated to be the predominant. The viscosity of these structures tends to increase with surfactant concentration, except for the fluorinated one. Unfolded ovalbumin molecules tend to form fibrillar structures that tend to increase with surfactant concentration, except for the fluorinated one. This fact has been related to the particular nature of this molecule. PMID:21262258

  19. Status of surfactants as penetration enhancers in transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Som, Iti; Bhatia, Kashish; Yasir, Mohd.

    2012-01-01

    Surfactants are found in many existing therapeutic, cosmetic, and agro-chemical preparations. In recent years, surfactants have been employed to enhance the permeation rates of several drugs via transdermal route. The application of transdermal route to a wider range of drugs is limited due to significant barrier to penetration across the skin which is associated with the outermost stratum corneum layer. Surfactants have effects on the permeability characteristics of several biological membranes including skin. They have the potential to solubilize lipids within the stratum corneum. The penetration of the surfactant molecule into the lipid lamellae of the stratum corneum is strongly dependent on the partitioning behavior and solubility of surfactant. Surfactants ranging from hydrophobic agents such as oleic acid to hydrophilic sodium lauryl sulfate have been tested as permeation enhancer to improve drug delivery. This article reviews the status of surfactants as permeation enhancer in transdermal drug delivery of various drugs. PMID:22368393

  20. Adsorption of organic molecules on silica surface.

    PubMed

    Parida, Sudam K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, B K

    2006-09-13

    The adsorption behaviour of various organic adsorbates on silica surface is reviewed. Most of the structural information on silica is obtained from IR spectral data and from the characteristics of water present at the silica surface. Silica surface is generally embedded with hydroxy groups and ethereal linkages, and hence considered to have a negative charged surface prone to adsorption of electron deficient species. Adsorption isotherms of the adsorbates delineate the nature of binding of the adsorbate with silica. Aromatic compounds are found to involve the pi-cloud in hydrogen bonding with silanol OH group during adsorption. Cationic and nonionic surfactants adsorb on silica surface involving hydrogen bonding. Sometimes, a polar part of the surfactants also contributes to the adsorption process. Styryl pyridinium dyes are found to anchor on silica surface in flat-on position. On modification of the silica by treating with alkali, the adsorption behaviour of cationic surfactant or polyethylene glycol changes due to change in the characteristics of silica or modified silica surface. In case of PEG-modified silica, adsolubilization of the adsorbate is observed. By using a modified adsorption equation, hemimicellization is proposed for these dyes. Adsorptions of some natural macromolecules like proteins and nucleic acids are investigated to study the hydrophobic and hydrophilic binding sites of silica. Artificial macromolecules like synthetic polymers are found to be adsorbed on silica surface due to the interaction of the multifunctional groups of the polymers with silanols. Preferential adsorption of polar adsorbates is observed in case of adsorbate mixtures. When surfactant mixtures are considered to study competitive adsorption on silica surface, critical micelle concentration of individual surfactant also contributes to the adsorption isotherm. The structural study of adsorbed surface and the thermodynamics of adsorption are given some importance in this review

  1. Surfactant Uptake Dynamics in Mammalian Cells Elucidated with Quantitative Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Fujii, Kenkichi; Bito, Kotatsu; Naito, Satoru; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of surfactant-induced cell lysis has been studied with quantitative coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy. The dynamics of surfactant molecules as well as intracellular biomolecules in living Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells has been examined for a low surfactant concentration (0.01 w%). By using an isotope labeled surfactant having CD bonds, surfactant uptake dynamics in living cells has been traced in detail. The simultaneous CARS imaging of the cell itself and the internalized surfactant has shown that the surfactant molecules is first accumulated inside a CHL cell followed by a sudden leak of cytosolic components such as proteins to the outside of the cell. This finding indicates that surfactant uptake occurs prior to the cell lysis, contrary to what has been believed: surface adsorption of surfactant molecules has been thought to occur first with subsequent disruption of cell membranes. Quantitative CARS microspectroscopy enables us to determine the molecular concentration of the surfactant molecules accumulated in a cell. We have also investigated the effect of a drug, nocodazole, on the surfactant uptake dynamics. As a result of the inhibition of tubulin polymerization by nocodazole, the surfactant uptake rate is significantly lowered. This fact suggests that intracellular membrane trafficking contributes to the surfactant uptake mechanism. PMID:24710120

  2. The effect of adsorption kinetics on the rate of surfactant-enhanced spreading.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, N M; Matar, O K; Craster, R V; Miller, R; Starov, V M

    2016-01-28

    A comparison of the kinetics of spreading of aqueous solutions of two different surfactants on an identical substrate and their short time adsorption kinetics at the water/air interface has shown that the surfactant which adsorbs slower provides a higher spreading rate. This observation indicates that Marangoni flow should be an important part of the spreading mechanism enabling surfactant solutions to spread much faster than pure liquids with comparable viscosities and surface tensions. PMID:26610693

  3. Adsorption of mixed cationic-nonionic surfactant and its effect on bentonite structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxin; Zhao, Yan; Zhu, Yong; Wu, Huayong; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of cationic-nonionic mixed surfactant onto bentonite and its effect on bentonite structure were investigated. The objective was to improve the understanding of surfactant behavior on clay mineral for its possible use in remediation technologies of soil and groundwater contaminated by toxic organic compounds. The cationic surfactant used was hexadecylpyridinium bromide (HDPB), and the nonionic surfactant was Triton X-100 (TX100). Adsorption of TX100 was enhanced significantly by the addition of HDPB, but this enhancement decreased with an increase in the fraction of the cationic surfactant. Part of HDPB was replaced by TX100 which decreased the adsorption of HDPB. However, the total adsorbed amount of the mixed surfactant was still increased substantially, indicating the synergistic effect between the cationic and nonionic surfactants. The surfactant-modified bentonite was characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric-derivative thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses. Surfactant intercalation was found to decrease the bentonite specific surface area, pore volume, and surface roughness and irregularities, as calculated by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The co-adsorption of the cationic and nonionic surfactants increased the ordering conformation of the adsorbed surfactants on bentonite, but decreased the thermal stability of the organobentonite system. PMID:23513697

  4. Structure and Conformational Dynamics of DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant and DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant/DNA Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pietralik, Zuzanna; Krzysztoń, Rafał; Kida, Wojciech; Andrzejewska, Weronika; Kozak, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Amphiphilic dicationic surfactants, known as gemini surfactants, are currently studied for gene delivery purposes. The gemini surfactant molecule is composed of two hydrophilic “head” groups attached to hydrophobic chains and connected via molecular linker between them. The influence of different concentrations of 1,5-bis (1-imidazolilo-3- decyloxymethyl) pentane chloride (gemini surfactant) on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayers with and without the presence of DNA was investigated using Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing concentration of surfactant in DMPC/DNA systems, a disappearance of pretransition and a decrease in the main phase transition enthalpy and temperature were observed. The increasing intensity of diffraction peaks as a function of surfactant concentration also clearly shows the ability of the surfactant to promote the organisation of lipid bilayers in the multilayer lamellar phase. PMID:23571492

  5. Removal of BTEX by using a surfactant--Bio originated composite.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, H; Arshadi, M; Salvacion, J W L

    2016-03-15

    The application of ostrich bone waste-loaded a cationic surfactant (OBW-OH-CTABr) bioadsorbent for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene (BTEX) removal from the synthetic and real waters have been studied, and the prepared biomaterials were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area measurements (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and point of zero (pH(PZC)). The immobilization of CTABr molecules on the framework of modified OBW showed good tendency to adsorb BTEX from aqueous solution. The exposure time to obtain equilibrium for maximum removal of BTEX was observed to be 60 min. The removal kinetics of BTEX has been evaluated in terms of pseudo-first- and -second-order kinetics, and the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models have also been utilized to the equilibrium removal data. The removal process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature and followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The immobilized CTABr showed high reusability because of its high adsorption efficiency after 12th cycles. The proposed low-cost bioadsorbent could also be utilized to adsorb BTEX from the real water (Anzali lagoon water). The OBW-OH-CTABr composite is indeed an attractive biomaterial for drinking water-based pollutants and act as an adsorbent for BTEX and oil spills especially in third world due to its low-cost preparation and regeneration and clean processing of the biomaterial with no byproducts after utilize. PMID:26724701

  6. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  7. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-15

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  8. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  9. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldareili, Charles; Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity technologies often require aqueous phases to spread over nonwetting hydrophobic solid surfaces. Surfactants facilitate the wetting of water on hydrophobic surfaces by adsorbing on the water/air and hydrophobic solid/water interfaces and lowering the surface tensions of these interfaces. The tension reductions decrease the contact angle, which increases the equilibrium wetted area. Hydrocarbon surfactants; (i.e., amphiphiles with a hydrophobic moiety consisting of an extended chain of (aliphatic) methylene -CH2- groups attached to a large polar group to give aqueous solubility) are capable of reducing the contact angles on surfaces which are not very hydrophobic, but do not reduce significantly the contact angles of the very hydrophobic surfaces such as parafilm, polyethylene or self assembled monolayers. Trisiloxane surfactants (amphiphiles with a hydrophobe consisting of methyl groups linked to a trisiloxane backbone in the form of a disk ((CH3)3-Si-O-Si-O-Si(CH3)3) and an extended ethoxylate (-(OCH2CH2)a-) polar group in the form of a chain with four or eight units) can significantly reduce the contact angle of water on a very hydrophobic surface and cause rapid and complete (or nearly complete) spreading (termed superspreading). The overall goal of the research described in this proposal is to establish and verify a theory for how trisiloxanes cause superspreading, and then use this knowledge as a guide to developing more general hydrocarbon based surfactant systems which superspread. We propose that the trisiloxane surfactants superspread because their structure allows them to strongly lower the high hydrophobic solid/aqueous tension when they adsorb to the solid surface. When the siloxane adsorbs, the hydrophobic disk parts of the molecule adsorb onto the surface removing the surface water. Since the cross-sectional area of the disk is larger than that of the extended ethoxylate chain, the disks can form a space-filling mat on the surface which

  10. Rheology of Natural Lung Surfactant Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zsadzinski, Joseph

    2004-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) is a lipoprotein mixture lining the inside of the pulmonary alveoli which has the ability to lower the surface tension of the air-liquid hypophase interface to value near zero thus reducing the work of breathing and which also prevents the alveolar collapse. A lack or malfunction of lung surfactant, as it is often the case for premature infants, leads to respiratory distress syndrome. RDS can be treated by supplying replacement LS to the infants and several medications derived from natural sources, are now widely used. The lung surfactant is adsorbed at the air-liquid interface and is subjected to incessant compression expansion cycles therefore Langmuir monolayers provide a suitable model to investigate the physical properties of lung surfactant films. Using a magnetic needle rheometer, we measured the shear viscosity of natural lung surfactant spread at the air-liquid interface upon compression and expansion cycles for three different formulations. The shear viscosity of Survanta changes by orders of magnitude along one cycle while for Curosurf samples it changes only slightly and for Infasurf films it remains constant. These different behaviors can be explained by differences in composition between the three formulations leading to different organizations on the molecular scale.

  11. Functionalized lipids and surfactants for specific applications.

    PubMed

    Kepczynski, Mariusz; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic lipids and surfactants that do not exist in biological systems have been used for the last few decades in both basic and applied science. The most notable applications for synthetic lipids and surfactants are drug delivery, gene transfection, as reporting molecules, and as support for structural lipid biology. In this review, we describe the potential of the synergistic combination of computational and experimental methodologies to study the behavior of synthetic lipids and surfactants embedded in lipid membranes and liposomes. We focused on select cases in which molecular dynamics simulations were used to complement experimental studies aiming to understand the structure and properties of new compounds at the atomistic level. We also describe cases in which molecular dynamics simulations were used to design new synthetic lipids and surfactants, as well as emerging fields for the application of these compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26946243

  12. Phase behavior and interfacial properties of a switchable ethoxylated amine surfactant at high temperature and effects on CO2-in-water foams.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunshen; Elhag, Amro S; Reddy, Prathima P; Chen, Hao; Cui, Leyu; Worthen, Andrew J; Ma, Kun; Quintanilla, Heriberto; Noguera, Jose A; Hirasaki, George J; Nguyen, Quoc P; Biswal, Sibani L; Johnston, Keith P

    2016-05-15

    The interfacial properties for surfactants at the supercritical CO2-water (C-W) interface at temperatures above 80°C have very rarely been reported given limitations in surfactant solubility and chemical stability. These limitations, along with the weak solvent strength of CO2, make it challenging to design surfactants that adsorb at the C-W interface, despite the interest in CO2-in-water (C/W) foams (also referred to as macroemulsions). Herein, we examine the thermodynamic, interfacial and rheological properties of the surfactant C12-14N(EO)2 in systems containing brine and/or supercritical CO2 at elevated temperatures and pressures. Because the surfactant is switchable from the nonionic state to the protonated cationic state as the pH is lowered over a wide range in temperature, it is readily soluble in brine in the cationic state below pH 5.5, even up to 120°C, and also in supercritical CO2 in the nonionic state. As a consequence of the affinity for both phases, the surfactant adsorption at the CO2-water interface was high, with an area of 207Å(2)/molecule. Remarkably, the surfactant lowered the interfacial tension (IFT) down to ∼5mN/m at 120°C and 3400 psia (23MPa), despite the low CO2 density of 0.48g/ml, indicating sufficient solvation of the surfactant tails. The phase behavior and interfacial properties of the surfactant in the cationic form were favorable for the formation and stabilization of bulk C/W foam at high temperature and high salinity. Additionally, in a 1.2 Darcy glass bead pack at 120°C, a very high foam apparent viscosity of 146 cP was observed at low interstitial velocities given the low degree of shear thinning. For a calcium carbonate pack, C/W foam was formed upon addition of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in the feed brine to keep the pH below 4, by the common ion effect, in order to sufficiently protonate the surfactant. The ability to form C/W foams at high temperatures is of interest for a variety of applications in chemical synthesis

  13. Flexible polyelectrolyte conformation in the presence of oppositely charged surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, P S; Diehl, A

    2007-10-01

    Conformational behavior of flexible polyelectrolytes in the presence of monovalent cationic surfactants is examined. A simple model is presented for the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes in salt-free solutions in the framework of the Debye-Hückel-Bjerrum-Manning and Flory theories, including explicitly the hydrophobic interactions between the associated surfactant molecules on the polyelectrolyte. The distribution of complexes is calculated as a function of the surfactant concentration and a discrete conformational transition between an elongated coil and a compact globule was found, in agreement with experimental observations. PMID:17995019

  14. Synthesis of organic rectorite with novel Gemini surfactants for copper removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guocheng; Han, Yang; Wang, Xiaoying; Liu, Shijie; Sun, Runcang

    2014-10-01

    Three novel Gemini surfactants were used to prepare organic rectorite (OREC) under microwave irradiation, in comparison with single-chain surfactant ester quaternary ammonium salt (EQAS) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The structure and morphology of OREC were characterized by XRD, BET, FT-IR, TEM and TGA. The removal of Cu2+ on OREC from aqueous solution was performed. The results reveal that Gemini surfactants modified REC had larger interlayer distance and higher surface area than single-chain surfactants EQAS and CTAB, and the increasing amount or chain length of Gemini surfactants led to larger layer spacing and higher adsorption capacities. The adsorption behavior of Gemini surfactant modified REC can be better described by Freundlich adsorption isotherm model, with a maximum adsorption capacity of 15.16 mg g-1. The desorption and regeneration experiments indicate good reuse property of Gemini modified REC adsorbent. Therefore, this study may widen the utilization of Gemini surfactants modified layered silicates.

  15. Stabilization of aqueous suspensions serving as the basis for cooling lubricant liquids using nonionogenic surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Baranova, B.I.; Volkova, M.V.; Belyaeva, N.N.; Lavrov, I.S.; Kopylov, Y.S.

    1983-01-20

    A study of the adsorption of nonionogenic surfactants on the surface of antifriction materials (S-O graphite, molybdenum disulfide, and boron nitride) showed that the formation of saturated adsorption layers occurs at surfactant concentrations close to the critical micelle concentration. The adsorption of all the surfactants studied occurs best on the most hydrophobic surface (the graphite surface). The best stabilizing action of the surfactant is found at surfactant concentrations corresponding to the formation of a saturated adsorption layer when the packing of the surfactant molecules in the adsorption layer is rather dense, which apparently corresponds to the best hydration of the particle surface.

  16. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  17. Fixed Bed Column Study for Adsolubilization of 2,4-D Herbicide on Surfactant Modified Silica Gel Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koner, S.; Adak, A.

    2012-09-01

    The fixed bed column study was conducted for the removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a widely used herbicide from synthetically prepared wastewater using surfactant modified silica gel waste (SMSGW) as an adsorbing media. The adsorbing media was prepared by treating silica gel waste (SGW) with cationic surfactant. The removal was due to adsolubilization of 2,4-D molecules within the admicelles formed on the surface of SGW. The column having 2.5 cm diameter, with different bed heights such as 20, 30 and 40 cm were used in the study. The different column design parameters like depth of exchange zone, time required for exchange zone to move its own height, adsorption rate constant, adsorption capacity constant were calculated using BDST model. The SMSGW was found to be a very efficient media for the removal of 2,4-D from wastewater. Column design parameters were modeled for different field conditions to predict the duration of column run for practical application.

  18. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-01

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  19. Impact of a surfactant on the electroactivity of proteins at an aqueous-organogel microinterface array.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2013-02-01

    The impact of surfactant addition to the organic phase on the electroactivity of proteins at the aqueous-organogel interface was examined by voltammetry. The presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) in the organogel phase, as the sodium salt, caused marked changes in the peak currents for myoglobin detection. The protein desorption voltammetric peak exhibited a 6-fold increase in the current compared to the corresponding experiment without surfactant. Interfacial coverage showed a 17-fold increase in the adsorbed protein at the interface, from 50 pmol cm(-2), in the absence of surfactant, to 850 pmol cm(-2), in the presence of 10 mM surfactant. Additionally, the presence of the surfactant resulted in a second pair of adsorption/desorption peaks at lower potentials and in a change in the capacitance of the system. The formation of surfactant-protein and surfactant-protein-organic anion deposits is proposed on the basis of these features, leading to increased voltammetric signals for myoglobin, hemoglobin, and cytochrome c. The mechanism of protein-surfactant interaction was probed by using the surfactant as the anion in the organic phase electrolyte salt. Repetitive cyclic voltammetry of cytochrome c showed that in the presence of surfactant there was an enhancement of the signal, caused by a buildup of the protein-surfactant-electrolyte anion assembly at the interface. These findings provide the basis for surfactant-modified interfaces to enhance the electroanalytical performance for protein detection. PMID:23259491

  20. Modulating the Substrate Selectivity of DNA Aptamers Using Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Amberlyn M; Jahnke, Frank M; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2015-11-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers have a number of advantages compared to antibodies, including greater ease of production and increased thermal stability. We hypothesized that aptamers may also be capable of functioning in the presence of high concentrations of surfactants, which readily denature antibodies and other protein-based affinity reagents. Here we report the first systematic investigation into the compatibility of DNA aptamers with surfactants. We find that neutral and anionic surfactants have only a minor impact on the ability of aptamers to fold and bind hydrophilic target molecules. Additionally, we demonstrate that surfactants can be utilized to modulate the substrate binding preferences of aptamers, likely due to the sequestration of hydrophobic target molecules within micelles. The compatibility of aptamers with commonly used surfactants is anticipated to expand their scope of potential applications, and the ability to modulate the substrate binding preferences of aptamers using a simple additive provides a novel route to increasing their selectivity in analytical applications. PMID:26465173

  1. Standoff Spectroscopy of Surface Adsorbed Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Despite its immediate applications, selective detection of trace quantities of surface adsorbed chemicals, such as explosives, without physically collecting the sample molecules is a challenging task. Standoff spectroscopic techniques offer an ideal method of detecting chemicals without using a sample collection step. Though standoff spectroscopic techniques are capable of providing high selectivity, their demonstrated sensitivities are poor. Here we describe standoff detection of trace quantities of surface adsorbed chemicals using two quantum cascade lasers operated simultaneously, with tunable wavelength windows that match with absorption peaks of the analytes. This standoff method is a variation of photoacoustic spectroscopy, where scattered light from the sample surface is used for exciting acoustic resonance of the detector. We demonstrate a sensitivity of 100 ng/cm{sup 2} and a standoff detection distance of 20 m for surface adsorbed analytes such as explosives and tributyl phosphate.

  2. Electrical resistivity of assembled transparent inorganic oxide nanoparticle thin layers: Influence of silica, insulating impurities and surfactant layer thickness

    PubMed Central

    Bubenhofer, Stephanie B.; Schumacher, Christoph M.; Koehler, Fabian M.; Luechinger, Norman A.; Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Grass, Robert N.; Stark, Wendelin J.

    2013-01-01

    Transparent, conductive layers prepared from nanoparticle dispersion of doped oxides are highly sensitive to impurities. Currently investigated cost efficient and fast production of thin conducting films for use in consumer electronics relies on wet processing such as spin and/or dip coating of surfactant-stabilized nanoparticle dispersions. This inherently results in entrainment of organic and inorganic impurities into the conducting layer leading to largely varying electrical conductivity. Therefore this study provides a systematic investigation on the effect of insulating surfactants, small organic molecules and silica in terms of pressure dependent electrical conductivity as a result of different core/shell structure (layer thickness). Application of high temperature flame synthesis gives access to antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles with high purity. This well-defined starting material was then subjected to representative film preparation processes using organic additives. In addition ATO nanoparticles were prepared with a homogeneous inorganic silica layer (silica layer thickness from 0.7 to 2 nm). Testing both organic and inorganic shell materials for the electronic transport through the nanoparticle composite allowed a systematic study on the influence of surface adsorbates (e.g. organic, insulating materials on the conducting nanoparticle’s surface) in comparison to well-known insulators such as silica. Insulating impurities or shells revealed a dominant influence of tunneling effect on the overall layer resistance. Mechanical relaxation phenomena were found for 2 nm insulating shells for both large polymer surfactants and (inorganic) SiO2 shells. PMID:22545730

  3. Controlled Uniform Coating from the Interplay of Marangoni Flows and Surface-Adsorbed Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Boulogne, François; Um, Eujin; Jacobi, Ian; Button, Ernie; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-03-01

    Surface coatings and patterning technologies are essential for various physicochemical applications. In this Letter, we describe key parameters to achieve uniform particle coatings from binary solutions. First, multiple sequential Marangoni flows, set by solute and surfactant simultaneously, prevent nonuniform particle distributions and continuously mix suspended materials during droplet evaporation. Second, we show the importance of particle-surface interactions that can be established by surface-adsorbed macromolecules. To achieve a uniform deposit in a binary mixture, a small concentration of surfactant and surface-adsorbed polymer (0.05 wt% each) is sufficient, which offers a new physicochemical avenue for control of coatings.

  4. [Study of novel artificial lung surfactants incorporating partially fluorinated amphiphiles].

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    Lung surfactants (LS), a complex of ∼90 wt% lipids (mainly dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine or DPPC) and ∼10 wt% surfactant proteins (SP-A, -B, -C, and -D), adsorb to an air-alveolar fluid interface and then lower its surface tension down to near zero during expiration. Intratracheal instillation of exogenous LS preparations can effectively compensate for surfactant deficiency in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Surfacten® (Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Osaka, Japan), a modified bovine lung extract and an effective surfactant replacement in treatment for RDS patients, is supplemented with DPPC, palmitic acid, and tripalmitin. For the premature infants suffering from RDS, instillation of Surfacten® leads to a dramatic improvement in lung function and compliance. Herein, the author reviews potential use of newly designed preparations containing a mimicking peptide of SP-B and also introduces the current research on the preparations incorporated with partially fluorinated amphiphiles to improve their efficacy. PMID:22790027

  5. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  6. The surfactant system protects both fetus and newborn.

    PubMed

    Hallman, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant complex and its individual components decrease surface tension, silence inflammatory responses, bind and destroy air-borne microbes, facilitate phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages and bind endogenous and exogenous molecules. Surfactant components generally decrease harmful inflammatory responses. New exogenous surfactants and new indications for surfactant therapy remain to be studied. At term the pool of human surfactant from developing airways extends to the amniotic cavity and to the gastrointestinal tract. Preterm labor-inducing inflammatory ligands (interleukin-1 or lipopolysaccharide) cause a robust induction of surfactant complex and lower the risk of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The effect of antenatal glucocorticoid therapy is complementary. According to transgenic experiments or genetic evidence in humans, surfactant proteins A, D or C (SP-A, SP-D, SP-C), expressed in fetal tissue, influence the onset of term or preterm labor. After birth, the surface tension-reducing and the inflammation-silencing effects of exogenous and endogenous surfactant are complementary. Surfactant proteins influence the genetic predisposition of RDS, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and airway infections in early infancy. Moderate to severe BPD has a strong genetic predisposition. Deleterious mutations of SP-B, ABCA3 or SP-C cause congenital interstitial lung disease that mimics the phenotype of established severe BPD. I propose that lung surfactant protects both the fetus and the newborn. Surfactant ameliorates inflammatory responses that are harmful to the mother, fetus and infant. In chorioamnionitis, inflammatory ligands are carried from the fetal membranes to the alveolar space via amniotic fluid and developing airways. They induce surfactant synthesis and secretion. Surfactant ameliorates severe inflammatory responses in fetal compartments and promotes spontaneous preterm birth. PMID:23736009

  7. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  8. Computer simulations of adsorbed liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Greg D.; Cleaver, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    The structures adopted by adsorbed thin films of Gay-Berne particles in the presence of a coexisting vapour phase are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The films are adsorbed at a flat substrate which favours planar anchoring, whereas the nematic-vapour interface favours normal alignment. On cooling, a system with a high molecule-substrate interaction strength exhibits substrate-induced planar orientational ordering and considerable stratification is observed in the density profiles. In contrast, a system with weak molecule-substrate coupling adopts a director orientation orthogonal to the substrate plane, owing to the increased influence of the nematic-vapour interface. There are significant differences between the structures adopted at the two interfaces, in contrast with the predictions of density functional treatments of such systems.

  9. Towards unravelling surfactant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Mathieu; Panda, Satyananda

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant transport arises in many natural or industrial settings. Examples include lipid tear layers in the eye, pulmonary surfactant replacement therapy, or industrial coating flows. Flows driven by the surface tension gradient which arises as a consequence of surfactant concentration inhomogeneity, also known as Marangoni-driven flows, have attracted the attention of fluid dynamists for several decades and has led to the development of sophisticated models and the undeniable advancement of the understanding of such flows. Yet, experimental confirmation of these models has been hampered by the difficulty in reliably and accurately measuring the surfactant concentration and its temporal evolution. In this contribution, we propose a methodology which may help shed some light on surfactant transport at the surface of thin liquid films. The surface stress induced by surfactant concentration induces a flow at the free surface which is visible and measurable. In the context of thin film flows for which the lubrication approximation hold, we demonstrate how the knowledge of this free surface flow field provides sufficient information to reconstruct the surfactant tension field. From the surface tension and an assumed equation of state, the local surfactant concentration can also be calculated and other transport parameters such as the surfactant surface diffusivity indirectly inferred. In this contribution, the proposed methodology is tested with synthetic data generated by the forward solution of the governing partial differential equations in order to illustrate the feasibility of the algorithm and highlight numerical challenges.

  10. Molecular interactions of a polyaromatic surfactant C5Pe in aqueous solutions studied by a surface forces apparatus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Qingye; Harbottle, David; Sjöblom, Johan; Xu, Zhenghe; Zeng, Hongbo

    2012-09-13

    Studies on molecular mechanisms of polyaromatic surfactants in stabilizing water-in-oil (W/O) or oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions are of great scientific and practical importance. A polyaromatic surfactant N-(1-hexylheptyl)-N'-(5-carboxylicpentyl) perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic bisimide (C5Pe) with well-defined molecular structure containing fused aromatic rings and heteroatoms similar to asphaltene molecules, was used in this study in an attempt to understand molecular interaction mechanisms of heavy oil components in aqueous solutions. A surface forces apparatus (SFA) was used to directly measure the molecular interactions of C5Pe. Solution pH, salt concentration and Ca(2+) addition showed a strong impact on molecular interactions between C5Pe adsorbed on mica surfaces. The repulsion observed between the two adsorbed C5Pe molecular layers was shown to have a steric and electrosteric origin. The force-distance profiles at short separation distances under high compression force were well fitted with the Alexander-de Gennes (AdG) model. At pH ≥ 4, the repulsive forces measured over a long separation distance under low compression force were shown to deviate from the AdG model but could be fitted with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, indicating an electrostatic origin of the observed repulsion due to ionization of -COOH groups. Adhesion between two C5Pe surfaces was shown to decrease sharply with increasing solution pH and salt concentration, being attributed to the decrease in surface hydrophobicity and hence hydrophobic attraction. Addition of Ca(2+) ions induced the formation of large C5Pe aggregates due to strong bonding of Ca(2+) with -COOH groups, leading to a longer range steric repulsion. Our results provide a new insight into the molecular interactions of polyaromatic surfactants at oil-water interfaces and in complex aqueous solutions. PMID:22913670

  11. Interfacial layers of complex-forming ionic surfactants with gelatin.

    PubMed

    Derkach, Svetlana R

    2015-08-01

    This review is devoted to discussing the results of studies of the influence of low-molecular weight surfactant additions on the composition and properties of gelatin adsorbed layers which are spontaneously created at water/air and water/non-polar-liquid interfaces. The interaction of surfactant with gelatin leads to the formation of complexes of variable content in the bulk of the aqueous phase. The composition content is determined by the component ratio and concentration of the added surfactant. The role of surfactants (anionic, cationic, non-ionic) capable of forming complexes with gelatin due to electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is considered. Analysis of the interfacial layer properties is based on literature information, as well as the own author's data. These data include the results of measuring thermodynamic properties (interface tension), laws of formation (adsorption kinetics and thickness), and rheological properties of the layers, which are considered to be dependent on gelatin and surfactant concentration, pH, and temperature. The evolution of the interfacial layers' properties (with increasing surfactant concentration) is discussed in connection with the properties and content of gelatin-surfactant complexes appearing in the aqueous phase. Such an approach allows us to explain the main peculiarities of the layers' behavior including their stabilizing activity in relation to bilateral foam and emulsion films. PMID:24970019

  12. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  13. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1992--September 30 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Casteel, J.

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this research project was to investigate mechanisms governing adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effects of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, various inorganic and polymeric species, and solids mineralogy have been determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability is used in this study. The results obtained should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the three years contract period, adsorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures was studied at the solid-liquid and gas-liquid interfaces. Alkyl xylene sulfonates, polyethoxylated alkyl phenols, octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride were the surfactants studied. Adsorption of surfactant mixtures of varying composition was also investigated. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes in interfacial properties such as wettability, electrokinetics and stability of reservoir minerals were correlated with the amounts of reagent adsorbed. Strong effects of the structure of the surfactant and position of functional groups were revealed. Changes of microstructure upon dilution (desorption) were also studied. Presence of the nonionic surfactants in mixed aggregate leads to shielding of the charge of ionic surfactants which in turn promotes aggregation but reduced electrostatic attraction between the charged surfactant and the mineral surface. Strong consequences of surfactant interactions in solution on adsorption as well as correlations between monomer concentration in mixtures and adsorption were revealed.

  14. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  15. Stabilizing and destabilizing protein surfactant-based foams in the presence of a chemical surfactant: Effect of adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Li, Huazhen; Le Brun, Anton P; Agyei, Dominic; Shen, Wei; Middelberg, Anton P J; He, Lizhong

    2016-01-15

    Stimuli-responsive protein surfactants promise alternative foaming materials that can be made from renewable sources. However, the cost of protein surfactants is still higher than their chemical counterparts. In order to reduce the required amount of protein surfactant for foaming, we investigated the foaming and adsorption properties of the protein surfactant, DAMP4, with addition of low concentrations of the chemical surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). The results show that the small addition of SDS can enhance foaming functions of DAMP4 at a lowered protein concentration. Dynamic surface tension measurements suggest that there is a synergy between DAMP4 and SDS which enhances adsorption kinetics of DAMP4 at the initial stage of adsorption (first 60s), which in turn stabilizes protein foams. Further interfacial properties were revealed by X-ray reflectometry measurements, showing that there is a re-arrangement of adsorbed protein-surfactant layer over a long period of 1h. Importantly, the foaming switchability of DAMP4 by metal ions is not affected by the presence of SDS, and foams can be switched off by the addition of zinc ions at permissive pH. This work provides fundamental knowledge to guide formulation using a mixture of protein and chemical surfactants towards a high performance of foaming at a low cost. PMID:26433478

  16. Remobilizing the Interface of Thermocapillary Driven Bubbles Retarded By the Adsorption of a Surfactant Impurity on the Bubble Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaparthi, Ravi; Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    molecules which kinetically rapidly exchange between the bulk and the surface and are at high bulk concentrations. Because the remobilizing surfactant is present at much higher concentrations than the impurity, it adsorbs to the bubble surface much faster than the impurity when the bubble is formed, and thereby prevents the impurity from adsorbing onto the surface. In addition, the rapid kinetic exchange and high bulk concentration maintain a saturated surface with uniform surface concentrations. This prevents retarding surface tension gradients and keeps the thermocapillary velocity high. In our reports over the first 2 years, we presented numerical simulations of the bubble motion and surfactant transport which verified theoretically the concept of remobilization, and the development of an apparatus to track and measure the velocity of rising bubbles in a glycerol/water surfactant solution. This year, we detail experimental observations of remobilization. Two polyethylene oxide surfactants were studied, C12E6 (CH3(CH2)11(OCH2)6OH) and C10E8 (CH3(CH2)4(OCH2CH2)8OH). Measurements of the kinetic exchange for these surfactants show that the one with the longer hydrophobe chain C12E6 has a lower rate of kinetic exchange. In addition, this surfactant is much less soluble in the glycerol/water mixture because of the shorter ethoxylate chain. As a result, we found that C12E6 had only a very limited ability to remobilize rising bubbles because of the limited kinetic exchange and reduced solubility. However, C10E8, with its higher solubility and more rapid exchange was found to dramatically remobilize rising bubbles. We also compared our theoretical calculations to the experimental measurements of velocity for both the non-remobilizing and remobilizing surfactants and found excellent agreement. We further observed that for C10E8 at high concentrations, which exceeded the critical micelle concentrations, additional remobilization was measured. In this case the rapid exchange of

  17. The interactions between surfactants and vesicles: Dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuei-Chun; Lin, Chun-Min; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Sheng, Yu-Jane

    2009-06-01

    The interactions between surfactants and vesicles formed by double-tail amphiphiles are investigated by the dissipative particle dynamics. As the surfactant concentration is increased, vesicle solubilization can be generally described by the three-stage hypothesis including vesicular region, vesicle-micelle coexistence, and mixed micellar region. We study the partition of surfactants between the bilayer phase and the aqueous phase where a higher value of K indicates that more surfactant molecules are incorporated in the bilayer. It is found that ln(K-1) is proportional to the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), which depicts the degree of hydrophilicity associated with a surfactant. As the overall hydrophilicity of surfactants increases, i.e., higher HLB, K declines and vice versa. When the amounts of surfactants reach a critical point, the solubilization begins and the coexistence of vesicles and mixed micelles is observed. Further increase in the surfactant concentration results in total collapse of the vesicle. Consistent with experimental observations, the three stages are identified through the vesicle size-surfactant concentration relation. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the process of the vesicle solubilization and confirm the validity of the three-stage hypothesis.

  18. Effects of the conjugation of whey proteins with gellan polysaccharides on surfactant-induced competitive displacement from the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Cai, B; Ikeda, S

    2016-08-01

    Whey proteins can be used to stabilize foams and emulsions against coalescence because of their ability to form viscoelastic films at the interface that resist film rupture on collision between colloidal particles. However, whey proteins are competitively displaced from the interface if small-molecule surfactants are added, leading to destabilization of the entire system. This is because surfactants are more effective in molecular packing at the interface, and they lower interfacial tension to a greater degree than whey proteins do, but their interfacial films are poor in viscoelasticity. We hypothesized that whey proteins would become more resistant to surfactant-induced competitive displacement if they were conjugated with network-forming polysaccharides. The protein moiety of the conjugate would be expected to enable its adsorption to the interface, and the polysaccharide moiety would be expected to form self-assembled networks, strengthening the interfacial film as a whole. In this study, whey proteins were conjugated with gellan polysaccharides using the Maillard reaction. Atomic force microscopy images of interfacial films formed by the whey protein-gellan conjugate at the air-water interface and transferred onto mica sheets using the Langmuir-Blodgett method revealed that gellan did form self-assembled networks at the interface and that interfacial films also contained a large number of unconjugated whey protein molecules. Following the addition of a small-molecule surfactant (Tween 20) to the sub-phase, surface pressure increased, indicating spontaneous adsorption of surfactants to the interface. Atomic force microscopy images showed decreases in interfacial area coverage by whey proteins as surface pressure increased. At a given surface pressure, the interfacial area coverage by whey protein-gellan conjugates was greater than coverage by unconjugated whey proteins, confirming that whey proteins became more resistant to surfactant-induced displacement after

  19. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  20. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  1. Controlled Sequestration of DNA Intercalated Drug by Polymer-Surfactant Supramolecular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Mora, Aruna K; Singh, Prabhat K; Nath, Sukhendu

    2016-05-01

    Triblock copolymer and surfactant based supramolecular assemblies have been used for the controlled sequestration of the DNA intercalator. The triblock copolymer micelles do not affect the molecules that are intercalated in the DNA. However, on addition of charged surfactant to the triblock copolymer micellar solution, sequestration of the intercalated molecules from DNA to the polymer-surfactant supramolecular assemblies takes place. Such sequestration of the intercalated molecules in the polymer-surfactant supramolecular assemblies has been explained on the basis of the charged surface formed in the polymer micelles due to the addition of surfactants. Sequestration of the intercalated molecules from the DNA to the polymer-surfactant supramolecular assemblies has been monitored through the ground state absorption, steady state, and time-resolved emission measurements. It is shown that the extent of sequestration of the intercalated molecules can be finely tuned by tuning the concentration of the surfactant in the triblock copolymer solution. Quantitative sequestration of the intercalated molecules by the supramolecular assemblies has been achieved. Such controlled sequestration of the DNA intercalated molecules by polymer-surfactant supramolecular assemblies can be used to study the binding of drug with DNA and may be useful in applications like detoxification in the case of drug overdose. PMID:27077791

  2. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  3. New insights into perfluorinated adsorbents for analytical and bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Nicola; Guzzinati, Roberta; Catani, Martina; Massi, Alessandro; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorinated (F-) adsorbents are generally prepared by bonding perfluoro-functionalized silanes to silica gels. They have been employed for a long time essentially as media for solid-phase extraction of F-molecules or F-tagged molecules in organic chemistry and heterogeneous catalysis. More recently, this approach has been extended to proteomics and metabolomics. Owing to their unique physicochemical properties, namely fluorophilicity and proteinophilicity, and a better understanding of some fundamental aspects of their behavior, new applications of F-adsorbents in the field of environmental science and bio-affinity studies can be envisaged. In this article, we revisit the most important features of F-adsorbents by focusing, in particular, on some basic information that has been recently obtained through (nonlinear) chromatographic studies. Finally, we try to envisage new applications and possibilities that F-adsorbents will allow in the near future. PMID:25358910

  4. Advances in reactive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Guyot, A

    2004-05-20

    The study of reactive surfactants and their applications in the synthesis of latexes for waterborne coatings has been recently boosted by two successive European programmes, involving all together eight academic and five industrial laboratories. The most significant results were obtained using surfactants derived from maleic and related anhydrides, or both nonionic and anionic reactive polymeric surfactants. Such surfactants are able to improve the stability of styrenic and acrylic latexes vs. various constraints, such as electrolyte addition, freeze-thawing tests or extraction with alcohol or acetone. The properties of films used in waterborne coatings are also improved in case of water exposure (less water uptake, dimensional stability), as well as improved weatherability, and blocking properties. Formulations for woodstain varnishes, metal coating of printing inks, based on the use of simple polymerizable surfactants, are now in the market. PMID:15072924

  5. Micellization properties of cardanol as a renewable co-surfactant.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Antonella; Guernelli, Susanna; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Zappacosta, Romina; Genovese, Damiano; De Crescentini, Lucia; Riela, Serena

    2015-09-21

    With the aim to improve the features of surfactant solutions in terms of sustainability and renewability we propose the use of hydrogenated natural and sustainable plant-derived cardanol as an additive to commercial surfactants. In the present study we demonstrated that its addition, in amounts as high as 10%, to commercial surfactants of different charge does not significantly affect surfactant properties. Conversely, the presence of hydrogenated cardanol can strongly affect spectrophotometric determination of CMC if preferential interactions with the dyes used take place. This latter evidence may be profitably exploited in surfactant manufacturing by considering that the concurrent presence of a rigid organic molecule such as Orange OT and 10% hydrogenated cardanol decreases the CMC of CTAB up to 65 times. PMID:26223697

  6. Self-Assembly of Gemini Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun; Mondal, Jagannath; Mahanthappa, Mahesh

    2013-03-01

    The self-assembly behavior of Gemini (dimeric or twin-tail) dicarboxylate disodium surfactants is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. This gemini architecture, in which two single tailed surfactants are joined through a flexible hydrophobic linker, has been shown to exhibit concentration-dependent aqueous self-assembly into lyotropic phases including hexagonal, gyroid, and lamellar morphologies. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally observed phases at similar amphiphile concentrations in water, including the unusual ability of these surfactants to form gyroid phases over unprecedentedly large amphiphile concentration windows. We demonstrate quanitative agreement between the predicted and experimentally observed domain spacings of these nanostructured materials. Through careful conformation analyses of the surfactant molecules, we show that the gyroid phase is electrostatically stabilized related to the lamellar phase. By starting with a lamellar phase, we show that decreasing the charge on the surfactant headgroups by carboxylate protonation or use of a bulkier tetramethyl ammonium counterion in place of sodium drives the formation of a gyroid phase.

  7. Surface shear inviscidity of soluble surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Zachary A.; Nowbahar, Arash; Mansard, Vincent; Leal, L. Gary; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Mecca, Jodi M.; Tucker, Christopher J.; Squires, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Foam and emulsion stability has long been believed to correlate with the surface shear viscosity of the surfactant used to stabilize them. Many subtleties arise in interpreting surface shear viscosity measurements, however, and correlations do not necessarily indicate causation. Using a sensitive technique designed to excite purely surface shear deformations, we make the most sensitive and precise measurements to date of the surface shear viscosity of a variety of soluble surfactants, focusing on SDS in particular. Our measurements reveal the surface shear viscosity of SDS to be below the sensitivity limit of our technique, giving an upper bound of order 0.01 μN·s/m. This conflicts directly with almost all previous studies, which reported values up to 103–104 times higher. Multiple control and complementary measurements confirm this result, including direct visualization of monolayer deformation, for SDS and a wide variety of soluble polymeric, ionic, and nonionic surfactants of high- and low-foaming character. No soluble, small-molecule surfactant was found to have a measurable surface shear viscosity, which seriously undermines most support for any correlation between foam stability and surface shear rheology of soluble surfactants. PMID:24563383

  8. Surfactant effect on functionalized carbon nanotube coated snowman-like particles and their electro-responsive characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ke; Liu, Ying Dan; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2012-10-15

    The core–shell structured snowman-like (SL) microparticles coated by functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) were prepared in the presence of different surfactants including cationic surfactant-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and anionic surfactant-sodium lauryl sulfate (SDS). The effect of surfactants on adsorption onto SL particles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and conductivity. The cationic surfactant is found to be more effective than anionic surfactant for helping nanotube adsorbed onto microparticle due to the presence of electrostatic interaction between the functionalized MWNT and the surfactant. Furthermore, the MWNT/SL particles dispersed in silicone oil exhibited a typical fibril structure of the electrorheological characteristics under an applied electric field observed by an optical microscope (OM), in which the state of nanotubes wrapped on the particles strongly affects their electro-responsive characteristics.

  9. Enhanced photodegradation of pentachlorophenol by single and mixed nonionic and anionic surfactants using graphene-TiO₂ as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxin; He, Xin; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Tan; Zhou, Zeyu; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2015-11-01

    The photodegradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in a surfactant-containing (single and mixed) complex system using graphene-TiO2 (GT) as catalyst was investigated. The objective was to better understand the behavior of surfactants in a GT catalysis system for its possible use in remediation technology of soil contaminated by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). In a single-surfactant system, surfactant molecules aggregated on GT via hydrogen bonding and electrostatic force; nonideal mixing between nonionic and anionic surfactants rendered GT surface with mixed admicelles in a mixed surfactant system. Both effects helped incorporating PCP molecules into surfactant aggregates on catalyst surface. Hence, the targeted pollutants were rendered easily available to photo-yielded oxidative radicals, and photodegradation efficiency was significantly enhanced. Finally, real soil washing-photocatalysis trials proved that anionic-nonionic mixed surfactant soil washing coupled with graphene-TiO2 photocatalysis can be one promising technology for HOC-polluted soil remediation. PMID:26194233

  10. Tuning of protein-surfactant interaction to modify the resultant structure.

    PubMed

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering studies have been carried out to examine the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with different surfactants under varying solution conditions. We show that the interaction of anionic BSA protein (pH7) with surfactant and the resultant structure are strongly modified by the charge head group of the surfactant, ionic strength of the solution, and mixed surfactants. The protein-surfactant interaction is maximum when two components are oppositely charged, followed by components being similarly charged through the site-specific binding, and no interaction in the case of a nonionic surfactant. This interaction of protein with ionic surfactants is characterized by the fractal structure representing a bead-necklace structure of micellelike clusters adsorbed along the unfolded protein chain. The interaction is enhanced with ionic strength only in the case of site-specific binding of an anionic surfactant with an anionic protein, whereas it is almost unchanged for other complexes of cationic and nonionic surfactants with anionic proteins. Interestingly, the interaction of BSA protein with ionic surfactants is significantly suppressed in the presence of nonionic surfactant. These results with mixed surfactants thus can be used to fold back the unfolded protein as well as to prevent surfactant-induced protein unfolding. For different solution conditions, the results are interpreted in terms of a change in fractal dimension, the overall size of the protein-surfactant complex, and the number of micelles attached to the protein. The interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is found to govern the resultant structure of complexes. PMID:26465504

  11. Tuning of protein-surfactant interaction to modify the resultant structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering studies have been carried out to examine the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with different surfactants under varying solution conditions. We show that the interaction of anionic BSA protein (p H 7 ) with surfactant and the resultant structure are strongly modified by the charge head group of the surfactant, ionic strength of the solution, and mixed surfactants. The protein-surfactant interaction is maximum when two components are oppositely charged, followed by components being similarly charged through the site-specific binding, and no interaction in the case of a nonionic surfactant. This interaction of protein with ionic surfactants is characterized by the fractal structure representing a bead-necklace structure of micellelike clusters adsorbed along the unfolded protein chain. The interaction is enhanced with ionic strength only in the case of site-specific binding of an anionic surfactant with an anionic protein, whereas it is almost unchanged for other complexes of cationic and nonionic surfactants with anionic proteins. Interestingly, the interaction of BSA protein with ionic surfactants is significantly suppressed in the presence of nonionic surfactant. These results with mixed surfactants thus can be used to fold back the unfolded protein as well as to prevent surfactant-induced protein unfolding. For different solution conditions, the results are interpreted in terms of a change in fractal dimension, the overall size of the protein-surfactant complex, and the number of micelles attached to the protein. The interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is found to govern the resultant structure of complexes.

  12. Detecting the mass and position of an adsorbate on a drum resonator

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y. P.

    2014-01-01

    The resonant frequency shifts of a circular membrane caused by an adsorbate are the sensing mechanism for a drum resonator. The adsorbate mass and position are the two major (unknown) parameters determining the resonant frequency shifts. There are infinite combinations of mass and position which can cause the same shift of one resonant frequency. Finding the mass and position of an adsorbate from the experimentally measured resonant frequencies forms an inverse problem. This study presents a straightforward method to determine the adsorbate mass and position by using the changes of two resonant frequencies. Because detecting the position of an adsorbate can be extremely difficult, especially when the adsorbate is as small as an atom or a molecule, this new inverse problem-solving method should be of some help to the mass resonator sensor application of detecting a single adsorbate. How to apply this method to the case of multiple adsorbates is also discussed. PMID:25294971

  13. Orbital tomography for highly symmetric adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtmüller, B.; Willenbockel, M.; Reinisch, E. M.; Ules, T.; Bocquet, F. C.; Soubatch, S.; Puschnig, P.; Koller, G.; Ramsey, M. G.; Tautz, F. S.; Kumpf, C.

    2012-10-01

    Orbital tomography is a new and very powerful tool to analyze the angular distribution of a photoemission spectroscopy experiment. It was successfully used for organic adsorbate systems to identify (and consequently deconvolute) the contributions of specific molecular orbitals to the photoemission data. The technique was so far limited to surfaces with low symmetry like fcc(110) oriented surfaces, owing to the small number of rotational domains that occur on such surfaces. In this letter we overcome this limitation and present an orbital tomography study of a 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetra-carboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer film adsorbed on Ag(111). Although this system exhibits twelve differently oriented molecules, the angular resolved photoemission data still allow a meaningful analysis of the different local density of states and reveal different electronic structures for symmetrically inequivalent molecules. We also discuss the precision of the orbital tomography technique in terms of counting statistics and linear regression fitting algorithm. Our results demonstrate that orbital tomography is not limited to low-symmetry surfaces, a finding which makes a broad field of complex adsorbate systems accessible to this powerful technique.

  14. Surface adsorption of zwitterionic surfactants: n-alkyl phosphocholines characterised by surface tensiometry and neutron reflection.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, M; Wang, Y; Su, T J; Lu, J R

    2005-08-15

    The surface adsorption of n-dodecyl phosphocholine (C12PC) has been characterised by a combined measurement of surface tension and neutron reflectivity. The critical micellar concentration (CMC) was found to be 0.91 mM at 25 degrees C in pure water. At the CMC, the limiting area per molecule (A(cmc)) was found to be 52+/-3 A2 and the surface tension (gamma(cmc)) to be ca. 40.0+/-0.5 mN/m. The parallel study of chain isomer n-hexadecyl phosphocholine (C16PC) showed a decrease of the CMC to 0.012 mM and a drop of gamma(cmc) to 38.1+/-0.5 mN/m. However, A(cmc) for C16PC was found to be 54+/-3 A2, showing that increase in alkyl chain length by four methylene groups has little effect on A(cmc). The almost constant A(cmc) suggested that the limiting area per molecule was determined by the bulky PC head group. It was further found that the surface tension and related key physical parameters did not vary much with temperature, salt addition, solution pH or any combination of these, thus showing that surface adsorption and solution aggregation from PC surfactants is largely similar to the zwitterionic betaine surfactants and is distinctly different from ionic and non-ionic surfactants. The thickness of the adsorbed monolayers measured from both dC12hPC and dC16hPC was found to be 20-22 A at the CMC from neutron reflectivity. Neither A(cmc) nor layer thickness varied with alkyl chain length, indicating that as the alkyl chain length became longer it was further tilted away from the surface normal direction and the layer packing density increased. It was also observed that the thickness of the layer varied little with surfactant concentration, indicating that the average conformational orientation of the alkyl chain remained unchanged against varying surface coverage. PMID:15927600

  15. Influence of residual surfactants on DNAPL characterization using partitioning tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaehyun; Annable, Michael D.; Rao, P. Suresh C.

    2004-08-01

    The partitioning tracer technique is among the DNAPL source-zone characterization methods being evaluated, while surfactant in-situ flushing is receiving attention as an innovative technology for enhanced source-zone cleanup. Here, we examine in batch and column experiments the magnitude of artifacts introduced in estimating DNAPL content when residual surfactants are present. The batch equilibrium tests, using residual surfactants ranging from 0.05 to 0.5 wt.%, showed that as the surfactant concentrations increased, the tracer partition coefficients decreased linearly for sodium hexadecyl diphenyl oxide disulfonate (DowFax 8390), increased linearly for polyoxyethylene (10) oleyl ether (Brij 97), and decreased slightly or exhibited no observable trend for sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate (AMA 80). Results from column tests using clean sand with residual DowFax 8390 and Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were consistent with those of batch tests. In the presence of DowFax 8390 (less than 0.5 wt.%), the PCE saturations were underestimated by up to 20%. Adsorbed surfactants on a loamy sand with positively charged oxides showed false indications of PCE saturation based on partitioning tracers in the absence of PCE. Using no surfactant (background soil) gave a false PCE saturation of 0.0004, while soil contacted by AMA 80, Brij 97, and DowFax 8390 gave false PCE saturations of 0.0024, 0.043, and 0.23, respectively.

  16. Surface-enhanced fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering of push-pull molecules: sulfur-functionalized 4-amino-7-nitrobenzofurazan adsorbed on Ag and Au nanostructured substrates.

    PubMed

    Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Giorgetti, Emilia; Margheri, Giancarlo; Ghini, Giacomo; Cicchi, Stefano

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the chemisorption of self-assembled monolayers of sulfur-functionalized 4-amino-7-nitrobenzofurazan on gold and silver nanoisland films (NIFs) by means of surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The ligand is a push-pull molecule, where an intramolecular charge transfer occurs between an electron-donor and an electron-acceptor group, thus exhibiting nonlinear optical properties that are related to both SERS and SEF effects. The presence of different heteroatoms in the molecule ensures the possibility of chemical interaction with both silver and gold substrates. The SERS spectra suggest that furazan is bound to silver via lone pairs of the nitrogen atoms, whereas the ligand is linked to gold via a sulfur atom. Silver NIFs provide more efficient enhancement of both fluorescence and Raman scattering in comparison with gold NIFs. The present SEF and SERS investigation could provide useful information for foreseeing changes in the nonlinear responses of this push-pull molecule. PMID:21331491

  17. Equilibrium molecular theory of two-dimensional adsorbate drops on surfaces of heterogeneous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2016-08-01

    A molecular statistical theory for calculating the linear tension of small multicomponent droplets in two-dimensional adsorption systems is developed. The theory describes discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a scale comparable to molecular size) and continuous distributions of molecules (at short distances inside cells) in their translational and vibrational motions. Pair intermolecular interaction potentials (the Mie type potential) in several coordination spheres are considered. For simplicity, it is assumed that distinctions in the sizes of mixture components are slight and comparable to the sizes of adsorbent adsorption centers. Expressions for the pressure tensor components inside small droplets on the heterogeneous surface of an adsorbent are obtained, allowing calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of a vapor-fluid interface, including linear tension. Problems in refining the molecular theory are discussed: describing the properties of small droplets using a coordination model of their structure, considering the effect an adsorbate has on the state of a near-surface adsorbent region, and the surface heterogeneity factor in the conditions for the formation of droplets.

  18. Effect of polymer-surfactant association on colloidal force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, John; Jaykumar, T.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Raj, Baldev; Mondain-Monval, O.

    2002-07-01

    We investigate the forces between emulsion droplets in the presence of neutral polymer-surfactant complexes. The polymer used in our experiment was statistical copolymer of polyvinyl alcohol. The anionic surfactant used is sodiumdodecyl sulphate, the cationic surfactants are cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide, and the nonionic surfactant is nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP10). It has been found that the force profiles in the presence of surfactant-polymer complexes follow an exponential scaling with a characteristic decay length, close to the radius of gyration of the polymer alone. A continuous increase in the onset of repulsion is observed in the case of all three ionic surfactants, whereas no such variation was noticed in the case of nonionic surfactant, NP10. The experimental observations suggest that in the presence of charged surfactant molecules or micelles, the neutral polymer chain at the interface is converted into partial polyelectrolytes, where the charges on the chain repel each other and the electrostatic repulsion collectively leads to chain stretching. These results suggest that the associative polymers can be potential candidates for making the emulsions stable for a sufficiently long period.

  19. Three-component Langmuir-Blodgett films consisting of surfactant, clay mineral, and lysozyme: construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Miao, Shiding; Leeman, Hugo; De Feyter, Steven; Schoonheydt, Robert A

    2010-02-22

    The Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) technique has been employed for the construction of hybrid films consisting of three components: surfactant, clay, and lysozyme (Lys). The surfactants are octadecylammonium chloride (ODAH) and octadecyl ester of rhodamine B (RhB18). The clays include saponite and laponite. Surface pressure versus area isotherms indicate that lysozyme is adsorbed by the surfactant-clay L-B film at the air-water interface without phase transition. The UV-visible spectra of the hybrid film ODAH-saponite-Lys show that the amount of immobilized lysozyme in the hybrid film is (1.3+/-0.2) ng mm(-2). The average surface area (Omega) per molecule of lysozyme is approximately 18.2 nm(2) in the saponite layer. For the multilayer film (ODAH-saponite-Lys)(n), the average amount of lysozyme per layer is (1.0+/-0.1) ng mm(-2). The amount of lysozyme found in the hybrid films of ODAH-laponite-Lys is at the detection limit of about 0.4 ng mm(-2). Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectra give evidence for clay layers, ODAH, lysozyme, and water in the hybrid film. The octadecylammonium cations are partially oxidized to the corresponding carbamate. A weak 1620 cm(-1) band of lysozyme in the hybrid films is reminiscent of the presence of lysozyme aggregates. AFM reveals evidence of randomly oriented saponite layers of various sizes and shapes. Individual lysozyme molecules are not resolved, but aggregates of about 20 nm in diameter are clearly seen. Some aggregates are in contact with the clay mineral layers, others are not. These aggregates are aligned in films deposited at a surface pressure of 20 mN m(-1). PMID:20104549

  20. Chirality transfer from gold nanocluster to adsorbate evidenced by vibrational circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Dolamic, Igor; Varnholt, Birte; Bürgi, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of chirality from one set of molecules to another is fundamental for applications in chiral technology and has likely played a crucial role for establishing homochirality on earth. Here we show that an intrinsically chiral gold cluster can transfer its handedness to an achiral molecule adsorbed on its surface. Solutions of chiral Au38(2-PET)24 (2-PET=2-phenylethylthiolate) cluster enantiomers show strong vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) signals in vibrations of the achiral adsorbate. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that 2-PET molecules adopt a chiral conformation. Chirality transfer from the cluster to the achiral adsorbate is responsible for the preference of one of the two mirror images. Intermolecular interactions between the adsorbed molecules on the crowded cluster surface seem to play a dominant role for the phenomena. Such chirality transfer from metals to adsorbates likely plays an important role in heterogeneous enantioselective catalysis. PMID:25960309

  1. Removal of cationic heavy metal from aqueous solution by activated carbon impregnated with anionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chi K; Park, Donghee; Woo, Seung H; Park, Jong M

    2009-05-30

    To increase their capacity to adsorb heavy metals, activated carbons were impregnated with the anionic surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), or dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium (DSS). Surfactant-impregnated activated carbons removed Cd(II) at up to 0.198 mmol g(-1), which was more than an order of magnitude better than the Cd(II) removal performance of activated carbon without surfactant (i.e., 0.016 mmol g(-1)) even at optimal pH (i.e., pH 6). The capacity of the activated carbon to adsorb Cd(II) increased in proportion to the quantity of surfactant with which they were impregnated. The kinetics of the adsorption of Cd(II) onto the surfactant-impregnated activated carbon was best described by a pseudo-second-order model, and was described better by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm than by the Langmuir isotherm. The surface charge of activated carbon was negative in all pH ranges tested (2-6). These results indicate that surface modification with anionic surfactant could be used to significantly enhance the capacity of activated carbon to adsorb cations. PMID:19022570

  2. Enhanced stabilization of aerosol-OT surfactant monolayer upon interaction with small amounts of bovine serum albumin at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Wilker; Ferreira, Marystela; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Itri, Rosangela

    2004-10-10

    An investigation is made of the influence from small amounts of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the lateral organization of low molecular weight surfactant sodium bis-2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) at the air-water interface. Surface pressure (pi - A), surface potential (deltaV - A) and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) experiments were carried out, with particular emphasis on the monolayer stability under successive compression-expansion cycles. AOT monolayer is not stable at the air-water interface, which means that the majority of AOT molecules go into the aqueous subphase as monomers and/or normal micelles. When a waiting time elapses between spreading and compression, the surfactant monolayer tends to reorganize partially at the air-water interface, with a monolayer expansion being observed for waiting times as large as 12 h. The incorporation of very small amount of BSA (10(-9)M) at the interface, also inferred from BAM, increases the monolayer stability as revealed by pi - A and deltaV - A results. For a waiting time of circa 3 h, the mixed monolayer reaches its maximum stability. This must be related to protein (and/or protein-surfactant complexes) adsorbed onto the AOT monolayer, thus altering the BSA conformation to accommodate its hydrophobic/hydrophilic residues. Furthermore, the effects from such small amounts of BSA in the monolayer formation and stabilization mean that the AOT monolayer responds cooperatively to BSA. PMID:15465300

  3. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. PMID:26869216

  4. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is composed of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23026158

  5. Waterflooding employing amphoteric surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Stournas, S.

    1980-08-05

    Process for the recovery of oil from a subterranean oil reservoir involving the injection into the reservoir of an aqueous solution of an amphoteric surfactant having an inner quaternary ammonium group linked to a terminal sulfonate or carboxylate group is described. The amphoteric surfactants may be employed in relatively low concentrations within the range of 0.0005 to 0.1% by weight and injected in a slug of at least 0.5 pv. The apparatus may be applied in situations in which the reservoir waters and/or the waters employed in formulating the surfactant solution contain relatively high amounts of divalent metal ions. Specifically described amphoteric surfactants include hydrocarby dialkyl or dihydroxyalkyl ammonium alkane sulfonates and carboxylates in which the hydrocarbyl group contains from 8 to 26 carbon atoms. 29 claims.

  6. Foam stabilisation using surfactant exfoliated graphene.

    PubMed

    Sham, Alison Y W; Notley, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Liquid-air foams have been stabilised using a suspension of graphene particles at very low particle loadings. The suspension was prepared through the liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in the presence of the non-ionic tri-block surfactant, Pluronic® F108. The graphene particles possess an extremely high aspect ratio, with lateral dimensions of between 0.1 and 1.3 μm as evidenced by TEM imaging. The particles were shown to exhibit a number of other properties known to favour stabilisation of foam structures. Particle surface activity was confirmed through surface tension measurements, suggesting the particles favour adsorption at the air-water interface. The evolution of bubble size distributions over time indicated the presence of particles yielded improvements to foam stability due to a reduction in disproportionation. Foam stability measurements showed a non-linear relationship between foam half-life and graphene concentration, indicative of the rate at which particles adsorb at bubble surfaces. The wettability of the graphene particles was altered upon addition of alkali metal chlorides, with the stability of the foams being enhanced according to the series Na(+)>Li(+)>K(+)>Cs(+). This effect is indicative of the relative hydration capacity of each salt with respect to the surfactant, which is adsorbed along the graphene plane as a result of the exfoliation process. Thus, surfactant exfoliated graphene particles exhibit a number of different features that demonstrate efficient application of high-aspect ratio particles in the customisation and enhancement of foams. PMID:26890385

  7. Controlling the Mobility of the Fluid Interface of Moving Gas Bubbles or Liquid Drops by Using Micellar Solutions of Surfactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity processes must rely on mechanisms other than buoyancy to move bubbles or droplets from one region to another in a continuous liquid phase. One suggested method is thermocapillary migration in which a temperature gradient is applied to the continuous phase. A significant and as yet unresolved impediment to the use of thermocapillary migration to direct bubble or drop motion is that these migrations can be significantly retarded by the adsorption onto the fluid particle surface of surface active impurities unavoidably present in the continuous or (if the particle is a liquid) droplet phases. The focus of our research was to develop a theory for remobilizing fluid particle interfaces retarded by a surfactant impurity in an effort to make more viable the use of thermocapillary migrations for the management of bubbles and drops in microgravity. We postulated that a surfactant at high bulk concentration which kinetically exchanges rapidly with the surface can restore interface mobility. The scaling arguments along with a discussion of the previous literature is reviewed in the context of the scaling framework. The specific objectives of the research were twofold. The first was to prove the remobilization theory by studying a model problem. As the mechanism for remobilization is independent of the force which drives the particle, the fluid particle shape and the presence of fluid inertia, we chose the simplest model consisting of a spherical bubble rising steadily by buoyancy in creeping flow. We solved the hydrodynamic and surfactant transport equations for rapid kinetic exchange to demonstrate that as the concentration increases, the Marangoni retardation at first increases (the low k behavior) and then decreases (the high k behavior). The second objective was to develop a method to determine the kinetic rate constants of a surfactant molecule, since this information is necessary to select surfactants which will exchange rapidly enough relative to the

  8. Nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in aqueous surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasekar, Vivek Mahadeorao

    Saturated, nucleate pool boiling in aqueous surfactant solutions is investigated experimentally. Also, the role of Marangoni convection, driven both by temperature and surfactant concentration gradients at the vapor-liquid interface of a nucleating bubble is computationally explored. Experimental measurements of dynamic and equilibrium sigma using the maximum bubble pressure method indicate dynamic sigma to be higher than the corresponding equilibrium value, both at room and elevated temperatures. Also, nonionic surfactants (Triton X-100, Triton X-305) show larger sigma depression than anionic surfactants (SDS, SLES), and a normalized representation of their dynamic adsorption isotherms is shown to be helpful in generalizing the surfactant effectiveness to reduce surface tension. The dynamic sigma has a primary role in the modification of bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer, and is dictated by the adsorption kinetics of the surfactant molecules at boiling temperatures. In general, an enhancement in heat transfer is observed, which is characterized by an early incipience and an optimum boiling performance at or around the critical micelle concentration of the surfactant. The optimum performances, typically in the fully developed boiling regime ( q''w > 100 kW/m2), show a reverse trend with respect to surfactant molecular weights M, i.e., higher molecular weight additives promote lower enhancement. Normalized boiling performance using the respective solution's dynamic sigma correlates heat transfer coefficient by M-0.5 for anionics and M 0 for nonionics. This has been shown to be brought about by the surfactant concentration and its interfacial activity in a concentration sublayer around the growing vapor bubble, which governs the bubble growth behavior through the mechanism of dynamic sigma. The ionic nature of the surfactant influences the thickness and molecular makeup of the enveloping sublayer, thereby affecting the bubble dynamics and boiling heat

  9. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B.; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient. PMID:26534840

  10. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B.; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient.

  11. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient. PMID:26534840

  12. Mobility and surfactant migration in EA/MAA latex films; ATR FT-IR spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thorstenson, T.A.; Tebelius, L.K.; Urban, M.W.

    1993-12-31

    Although numerous factors such as compatibility, mechanical deformation, and the nature of the substrate have been addressed with respect to surfactant migration and distribution within latex films, latex suspension stability and the effects of particle flocculation are also key issues. In this paper, surfactant behavior in an ethyl acrylate/methacrylic acid/sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (EA/MAA/SDOSS) latex system is monitored as a function of stability of the liquid latex suspensions. Particle size data obtained using light scattering reveals an appreciable degree of flocculation over the period of study. It is found that flocculation is paralleled by a significantly increased degree of interfacial surfactant enrichment, a monitored by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR). It is concluded that the enhanced surfactant exudation observed for flocculated latexes is due to displacement of adsorbed surfactant during the course of flocculation.

  13. Molecular mechanisms for surfactant-aided oil removal from a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shumeng; Li, Zhi; Liu, Bei; Zhang, Xianren; Yang, Qingyuan

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the detachment mechanism of oil molecules from the hydrophobic solid surface in the aqueous surfactant solution is studied with lattice Monte Carlo simulations. Three different mechanisms for oil removal, including oil carrying microemulsion model, oil film stripping model, and surfactant-aided diffusion model are identified. The molecular mechanisms that agree with experimental observations are found to be dependent sensitively on surfactant structure.

  14. Surface characterization and AFM imaging of mixed fibrinogen-surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Gunning, A Patrick; Morris, Victor J; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-05-19

    This study describes the adsorption behavior of mixed protein/surfactant systems at the air-water interface: specifically fibrinogen and the fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)FONa, C(8)HONa, and C(12)HONa). Surface tension techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been combined to investigate the adsorption behavior of these mixed systems. Interfacial rheology showed that fibrinogen has a low dilatational modulus at the air-water interface when compared to other proteins, suggesting the formation of a weak surface network. Fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants severely decreased the dilatational modulus of the adsorbed fibrinogen film at the air-water interface. These measurements suggest the progressive displacement of fibrinogen from the air-water interface by both types of surfactants. However, in the case of fibrinogen/fluorinated surfactant systems, surface tension and dilatational rheology measurements suggest the formation of complexes with improved surface activity. AFM imaging of fibrinogen in the presence and absence of surfactants provided new information on the structure of mixed surface films, and revealed new features of the interaction of fibrinogen with hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants. These studies suggest complexes formed between fibrinogen and fluorinated surfactants which are more surface active than fibrinogen, while the absence of interaction between fibrinogen and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)HONa and C(12)HONa) results in compaction of the surface layer. PMID:21491854

  15. Genetic disorders of surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant reduces surface tension at the air-liquid interface in the alveolus, thereby maintaining lung volumes during the respiratory cycle. In premature newborn infants, the lack of surfactant causes atelectasis and respiratory failure, characteristic of respiratory of distress syndrome. Surfactant is comprised of lipids and associated proteins that are required for surfactant function. Surfactant proteins B and C and a lamellar body associated transport protein, ABCA3 play critical roles in surfactant synthesis and function. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins cause lethal respiratory distress in newborn infants. This review discusses the clinical and pathological findings associated with these inherited disorders of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:16798578

  16. Adsorption kinetics of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Burde, Jared T; Calbi, M Mercedes

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption dynamics of diatomic molecules on solid surfaces is examined by using a Kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm. Equilibration times at increasing loadings are obtained, and explained based on the elementary processes that lead to the formation of the adsorbed film. The ability of the molecules to change their orientation accelerates the overall uptake and leads to competitive kinetic behaviour between the different orientations. The dependence of the equilibration time on coverage follows the same decreasing trend obtained experimentally for ethane adsorption on closed-end carbon nanotube bundles. The exploration of molecule-molecule interaction effects on this trend provides relevant insights to understand the kinetic behaviour of other species, from simpler molecules to larger polyatomic molecules, adsorbing on surfaces with different binding strength. PMID:24654004

  17. Potential commercial applications of microbial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Banat, I M; Makkar, R S; Cameotra, S S

    2000-05-01

    Surfactants are surface-active compounds capable of reducing surface and interfacial tension at the interfaces between liquids, solids and gases, thereby allowing them to mix or disperse readily as emulsions in water or other liquids. The enormous market demand for surfactants is currently met by numerous synthetic, mainly petroleum-based, chemical surfactants. These compounds are usually toxic to the environment and non-biodegradable. They may bio-accumulate and their production, processes and by-products can be environmentally hazardous. Tightening environmental regulations and increasing awareness for the need to protect the ecosystem have effectively resulted in an increasing interest in biosurfactants as possible alternatives to chemical surfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic compounds of microbial origin with considerable potential in commercial applications within various industries. They have advantages over their chemical counterparts in biodegradability and effectiveness at extreme temperature or pH and in having lower toxicity. Biosurfactants are beginning to acquire a status as potential performance-effective molecules in various fields. At present biosurfactants are mainly used in studies on enhanced oil recovery and hydrocarbon bioremediation. The solubilization and emulsification of toxic chemicals by biosurfactants have also been reported. Biosurfactants also have potential applications in agriculture, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, detergents, personal care products, food processing, textile manufacturing, laundry supplies, metal treatment and processing, pulp and paper processing and paint industries. Their uses and potential commercial applications in these fields are reviewed. PMID:10855707

  18. Interaction of surfactants with hydrophobic surfaces in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Brumaru, Claudiu; Geng, Maxwell L

    2010-12-21

    Surfactant-induced wetting of hydrophobic nanopores is investigated. SDS micelles interact with the C18 layer on the nanopore walls with their hydrophobic tails, creating a charged wall lining with their head groups and inducing a breakthrough of the aqueous solution to wet the pores. The surface coverage of the surfactant molecules is evaluated electrophoretically. A surprising discovery is that pore wetting is achieved with 0.73 μmol/m(2) coverage of SDS surfactant, corresponding to only 18% of a monolayer on the walls of the nanopores. Clearly, the surfactant molecules cannot organize as a compact uninterrupted monolayer. Instead, formation of hemimicelles is thermodynamically favored. Modeling shows that, to be consistent with the experimental observations, the aggregation number of hemimicelles is lower than 25 and the size of hemimicelle is limited to a maximum radius of 11.7 Å. The hydrophobic tails of SDS thus penetrate into and intercalate with the C18 layer. The insight gained in the C18-surfactant interactions is essential in the surfactant-induced solubilization of hydrophobic nanoporous particles. The results have bearing on the understanding of the nature of hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21043464

  19. Solubilization of herbicides by single and mixed commercial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Galán-Jiménez, M C; Gómez-Pantoja, E; Morillo, E; Undabeytia, T

    2015-12-15

    The solubilization capabilities of micellar solutions of three single surfactants, two alcohol alkoxylates B048 and B266, and the tallow alkyl ethoxylated amine ET15, and their equimolar mixed solutions toward the herbicides flurtamone (FL), metribuzin (MTZ) and mesotrione (MST) were investigated. The solubilization capacity was quantified in terms of the molar solubilization ratio (MSR), critical micellar concentration (CMC), micelle-water partition coefficient (Kmc), binding constant (K1), number of aggregation (Nagg) and Stern-Volmer constant (Ksv). The herbicides were greatly solubilized into different loci of the micelles: FL within the inner hydrophobic core, MST at the micelle/water interface and MTZ in the palisade region. Equimolar binary surfactant mixtures did not improve the solubilization of herbicides over those of single components, with the exception of MTZ by the B266/ET15 system which enhanced solubilization by 10-20%. This enhanced solubilization of MTZ was due to an increased number of micelles that arise from both the intermediate Nagg relative to that of the single surfactants and the lower CMC. The use of Ksv values was a better predictor of the solubilization of polar molecules within binary mixtures of these surfactants than the interaction parameter β(M) from regular solution theory (RST). The results herein suggest that the use of mixed surfactant systems for the solubilization of polar molecules in environmental remediation technologies may be very limited in scope, without clear advantages over the use of single surfactant systems. PMID:26311582

  20. A fragment method for systematic improvement of anharmonic adsorbate vibrational frequencies: Acetylene on Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Chulkov, Sergey K. Benoit, David M.

    2013-12-07

    We suggest a novel method for systematic improvement of anharmonic adsorbate frequencies based on a fragment approach. The calculations are carried out by considering the adsorbed molecule separately and computing an energy correction using high-level ab initio method in addition to a standard calculation of the whole adsorbed system using quantum mechanical techniques with periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate its reliability for a C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecule chemisorbed on a Cu(001) surface. We also show that the accuracy of the presented approach with a suitable description of the periodic surface depends mainly on the accuracy of the high-level ab initio method used to describe the adsorbate molecule. Moreover, our technique potentially allows to predict adsorbate vibrational spectra with spectroscopic accuracy.

  1. Effects of surfactants on the deformation of microfluidic drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Maria Luisa; Ulloa, Camilo

    2013-11-01

    A microfluidic analog of the four-roll-mill experiment is used to study the deformation and breakup of microfluidic drops. The behavior of water drops flowing in mineral oil is quantified as a function of the capillary number, Ca , which is based on the oil viscosity, drop radius, flow shear rate and equilibrium interfacial tension, both in the presence and absence of surfactants. In the absence of surfactants the deformation of the drops increases linearly with Ca . If surfactants are added to the carrier oil then, for the same value of Ca , drops deform less if the flow velocity is larger. Moreover, for a given drop size in the presence of surfactants, drops begin to split at a threshold shear rate but stop breaking if the shear rate is increased beyond a second threshold. These observations are explained by a decrease in the surfactant concentration at the surface of the drop due to advection of surfactant molecules by the oil flow. This increases the interfacial tension, thus making the drop less deformable for higher flow velocities. We use the deformation of the drops to infer the mean interfacial tension and from this we quantify the surface concentration of surfactants at the drop interface. Work supported by FONDECYT 11100204.

  2. The effect of surfactant on pollutant biosorption of Trametes versicolor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, Ülküye Dudu; Silah, Hülya; Akbaş, Halide; Has, Merve

    2016-04-01

    The major problem concerning industrial wastewater is treatment of dye and heavy metal containing effluents. Industrial effluents are also contained surfactants that are used as levelling, dispersing and wetting agents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surfactant on textile dye biosorption properties of a white rot fungus named Trametes versicolor. Reactive dyes are commonly used in textile industry because of their advantages such as brightness and excellent color fastness. A recative textile dye, called Everzol Black, was used in this study. The low-cost mollasses medium is used for fungal growth. The usage of mollases, the sugar refinery effluent as a source of energy and nutrients, gained importance because of reducing the cost and also reusing another waste. In biosorption process the effect of surfactant on dye removal properties of T. versicolor was examined as a function of pH, dye consentration and surfactant concentration. The results of this study showed that the surfactant enhanced the dye removal capacity of Trametes versicolor. The dye and surfactant molecules were interacted electrostatically and these electrostatic interactions improved dye removal properties of filamentous fungus T. versicolor. The results of this study recommended the use of surfactants as an inducer in textile wastewater treatment technologies.

  3. Self-Probing of Micellization within Phenyl-Containing Surfactant Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Om, Hari; Behera, Kamalakanta; Kumar, Vinod; Verma, Krishan; Pandey, Siddharth

    2010-01-01

    The propensity of amphiphilic molecules to accumulate at the interface between the solution and adjacent gaseous, liquid, or solid phases is responsible for many remarkable physicochemical properties of aqueous surfactant systems such as wetting, foaming, emulsification, dispersion, adsorption, micellization, detergency, synergistic interactions with other surfactants, solubility, and solubilization, among others.

  4. Adsorption of surfactants on sand surface in enhanced oil recovery: Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Achinta; Kumar, T.; Ojha, Keka; Mandal, Ajay

    2013-11-01

    Adsorption of surfactants onto reservoir rock surface may result in the loss and reduction of their concentrations in surfactant flooding, which may render them less efficient or ineffective in practical applications of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. Surfactant flooding for EOR received attraction due to its ability to increase the displacement efficiency by lowering the interfacial tension between oil and water and mobilizing the residual oil. This article highlights the adsorption of surfactants onto sand surface with variation of different influencing factors. It has been experimentally found that adsorption of cationic surfactant on sand surface is more and less for anionic surfactant, while non-ionic surfactant shows intermediate behaviour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study of clean sand particles has been made to determine the main component present in the sand particles. The interaction between sand particles and surfactant has been studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the sand particles before and after aging with surfactant. Salinity plays an important role in adsorption of anionic surfactant. Batch experiments were also performed to understand the effects of pH and adsorbent dose on the sorption efficiency. The sand particles exhibited high adsorption efficiency at low pH for anionic and nonionic surfactants. But opposite trend was found for cationic surfactant. Adsorption data were analyzed by fitting with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Sips isotherm models. Results show that the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetics models suit the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption on sand surface. Thermodynamics feasibility of the adsorption process was also studied to verify the spontaneity of the process.

  5. Surfactant effects on the dynamics of an intravascular bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Eckmann, David; Ayyaswamy, P. S.

    2004-11-01

    The effects of a surfactant on the dynamics of gas bubble behavior in the arteriolar vasculature are numerically investigated. The equations for momentum in the bulk fluid (blood) and the bubble, and the convection-diffusion equations for mass transport both in the bulk fluid and on the gas-liquid interface are numerically solved using a front tracking method. Both soluble and insoluble surfactants are considered. The adsorption/desorption dynamics of the soluble surfactant is accurately resolved. For a nearly occluded bubble, a faster rate of depletion of the surfactant from the region adjacent to the wall of the vessel is observed. In several cases studied here, the bulk medium is treated as non-Newtonian (power law, Casson), although the majority of cases treat blood as Newtonian. Results show that the adsorbed surfactant serves to prevent blood proteins and other macromolecules from occupying the interface. This prevents clotting or adhesion of the bubble to the vessel wall. The results obtained have significance in the study of intravascular gas embolism. Supported by NIH R01 HL67986

  6. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid - for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants - will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. We report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moire-imaging and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling meniscus waves and in the troughs of the standing Faraday waves. We fit the spatiotemporal variations in the two fields and report measurements of the wavenumbers as well as a temporal phase shift between the two fields. These measurements suggest that longitudinal waves contribute to the dynamics. Funded by NSF grant DMS-0968258.

  7. Halide anion effect on surface enhanced Raman scattering of 2-amino,5-nitropyridine adsorbed on silver sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Neto, Natale; Sbrana, Giuseppe

    1995-03-01

    2-Amino,5-nitropiridine (ANP) can be adsorbed on silver sols as neutral molecule or ANP- anion, as detected by SERS. The adsorption of the ANP- is related to the presence of hydroxide ions on the metal surface. Strongly adsorbed halide anions are able to remove hydroxide ions from the silver surface, inducing the adsorption of ANP as neutral molecule.

  8. Colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles with multivalent polymer surfactants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Wook; Lee, Hoik; Song, Youngjun; Sohn, Daewon

    2015-04-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for preparing magnetic colloidal suspensions with electrostatic repulsion between particles and polyelectrolyte surfactants. The surface charge of the iron oxide particles was positive in acidic aqueous conditions; however the surface charge of the colloid was negative in basic aqueous conditions due to the amphoteric property of Fe2O3. The long-term colloidal stability and particle distribution of the multivalent charged polymers, Poly(4-vinylbenzenesulfonate sodium salt) (PSS), Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), and Poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) were compared with the monovalent surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Both mono- and multivalent surfactant molecules showed good colloidal stability for extended periods of time. However, the particle distribution was dependent on the hydrophobicity of the surfactants' functional groups. Polyelectrolytes with a negatively charged functional group showed good long-term stability of particles and a narrow particle distribution regardless of the acid dissociation constant (pKa) of the polymer. PMID:25526296

  9. Evaulation of irritation potential of surfactant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, M; Sakr, A

    1999-12-01

    Irritation potential of sodium laureth sulfate (SLES) alone, and in combination with lauryl glucoside (LG), polysorbate 20 (PS) and cocoamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) was tested in 13 human subjects. Four main and six sub-formulations were prepared and evaluated. Formulations were applied to the forearm as a 24 h close patch study. Irritation was scored by two different methods using an in vivo clinical protocol based on visual scoring and on the stratum corneum capacitance measurement. Irritation was found to be dose dependent. At 2 mg/patch level ten subjects did not show any skin reaction. At 20 mg/patch level eleven subjects showed a broad range of skin irritation. The highest irritation was observed with the formula that contained SLES, LG, and cocamide DEA together. Among the sub-formulations, cocamide DEA showed the highest irritation grade. A statistically significant correlation was observed between visual, clinical and corneometer scores. It was concluded that the irritation potential of surfactants was related to the total surfactant concentration, application mode, and the thermodynamic activity of molecules in the solution as well as the chemical structure of the surfactant molecules. PMID:18503452

  10. Remobilizing the Interfaces of Thermocapillary Driven Bubbles Retarded by the Adsorption of a Surfactant Impurity on the Bubble Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaparthi, Ravi; Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Thermocapillary migration is a method for moving bubbles in space in the absence of buoyancy. A temperature gradient is applied to the continuous phase in which a bubble is situated, and the applied gradient impressed on the bubble surface causes one pole of the drop to be cooler than the opposite pole. As the surface tension is a decreasing function of temperature, the cooler pole pulls at the warmer pole, creating a flow which propels the bubble in the direction of the warmer fluid. A major impediment to the practical use of thermocapillarity to direct the movement of bubbles in space is the fact that surfactant impurities which are unavoidably present in the continuous phase can significantly reduce the migration velocity. A surfactant impurity adsorbed onto the bubble interface is swept to the trailing end of the bubble. When bulk concentrations are low (which is the case with an impurity), diffusion of surfactant to the front end is slow relative to convection, and surfactant collects at the back end of the bubble. Collection at the back lowers the surface tension relative to the front end setting up a reverse tension gradient. For buoyancy driven bubble motions in the absence of a thermocapillarity, the tension gradient opposes the surface flow, and reduces the surface and terminal velocities (the interface becomes more solid-like). When thermocapillary forces are present, the reverse tension gradient set up by the surfactant accumulation reduces the temperature tension gradient, and decreases to near zero the thermocapillary velocity. The objective of our research is to develop a method for enhancing the thermocapillary migration of bubbles which have been retarded by the adsorption onto the bubble surface of a surfactant impurity, Our remobilization theory proposes to use surfactant molecules which kinetically rapidly exchange between the bulk and the surface and are at high bulk concentrations. Because the remobilizing surfactant is present at much higher

  11. Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-08-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

  12. Surfactant mixing rules applied to surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses surfactant mixing rules which have been used to describe crude oil/alkali/surfactant phase behavior, using David Lloydminster crude oil and the surfactant Neodol 25-3S. It was found that at a fixed salinity and alkali concentration, a specific mole fraction of synthetic surfactant to petroleum soap was required to produce optimal phase behavior as the water-to-oil ratio varied. This methodology is useful in understanding the relationship between the variables of water-to-oil ratio and synthetic surfactant concentration in phase behavior systems that produce a petroleum soap.

  13. Enhanced photocatalytic degradation of norfloxacin in aqueous Bi2WO6 dispersions containing nonionic surfactant under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lin; Wang, Jiajia; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yani; Deng, Yaocheng; Zhou, Yaoyu; Tang, Jing; Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Photocatalytic degradation is an alternative method to remove pharmaceutical compounds in water, however it is hard to achieve efficient rate because of the poor solubility of pharmaceutical compounds in water. This study investigated the photodegradation of norfloxacin in a nonionic surfactant Triton-X100 (TX100)/Bi2WO6 dispersion under visible light irradiation (400-750nm). It was found that the degradation of poorly soluble NOF can be strongly enhanced with the addition of TX100. TX100 was adsorbed strongly on Bi2WO6 surface and accelerated NOF photodegradation at the critical micelle concentration (CMC=0.25mM). Higher TX100 concentration (>0.25mM) lowered the degradation rate. In the presence of TX100, the degradation rate reached the maximum value when the pH value was 8.06. FTIR analyses demonstrated that the adsorbed NOF on the catalyst was completely degraded after 2h irradiation. According to the intermediates identified by HPLC/MS/MS, three possible degradation pathways were proposed to include addition of hydroxyl radical to quinolone ring, elimination of piperazynilic ring in fluoroquinolone molecules, and replacement of F atoms on the aromatic ring by hydroxyl radicals. PMID:26774984

  14. Effect of monovalent salt on the conformation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, A.; Kuhn, P. S.

    2009-01-01

    We study the conformation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes in the presence of monovalent salt. A simple model for the formation of these structures is presented in the framework of the Debye-Hückel-Bjerrum-Manning and Flory theories, with the hydrophobic interactions between the hydrocarbon tails of surfactant molecules treated in the spirit of van der Waals theory as an effective attraction. The extension of the polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes is analyzed as a function of the salt concentration and a discrete conformational transition between a compact globule and an elongated coil is found, in agreement with experimental results for the unfolding transition of a DNA-cationic surfactant complex.

  15. Modelling the superspreading of surfactant-laden droplets with computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis E; Müller, Erich A; Craster, Richard V; Matar, Omar K

    2015-12-28

    The surfactant-driven superspreading of droplets on hydrophobic substrates is considered. A key element of the superspreading mechanism is the adsorption of surfactant molecules from the liquid-vapour interface onto the substrate through the contact line, which must be coordinated with the replenishment of interfaces with surfactant from the interior of the droplet. We use molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained force fields to provide a detailed structural description of the droplet shape and surfactant dynamics during the superspreading process. We also provide a simple method for accurate estimation of the contact angle subtended by the droplets at the contact line. PMID:26537741

  16. Combined Experimental and Molecular Simulation Investigation of the Individual Effects of Corexit Surfactants on the Aerosolization of Oil Spill Matter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zenghui; Avij, Paria; Perkins, Matt J; Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Field, Jennifer A; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; Hung, Francisco R

    2016-08-01

    We report laboratory aerosolization experiments and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, with the objective of investigating the individual effects of the two Corexit surfactants Span 80 (nonionic) and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS, ionic), on the aerosolization of oil spill matter to the atmosphere. Our simulation results show that Span 80, DOSS, and the oil alkanes n-pentadecane (C15) and n-triacontane (C30) exhibit deep free energy minima at the air/seawater interface. C15 and C30 exhibit deeper free energy minima at the interface when Span 80 is present, as compared to the situation when DOSS or no surfactants are at the interface. These results suggest that Span 80 makes these oil hydrocarbons more likely to be adsorbed at the surface of seawater droplets and carried out to the atmosphere, relative to DOSS or to the situation where no surfactants are present. These simulation trends are in qualitative agreement with our experimental observations in a bubble-column setup, where larger amounts of oil hydrocarbons are ejected when Span 80 is mixed with oil and injected into the column, as compared to when DOSS is used. Our simulations also indicate that Span 80 has a larger thermodynamic incentive than DOSS to move from the seawater phase and into the air/seawater interface. This observation is also in qualitative agreement with our experimental measurements, which indicate that Span 80 is ejected in larger quantities than DOSS. Our simulations also suggest that DOSS predominantly adopts a perpendicular orientation with respect to the air/seawater interface at a dispersant to oil ratio (DOR) of 1:20, but has a slight preference to lie parallel to the interfaces at a DOR = 1:5; in both cases, DOSS molecules have their tails wide open and stretched. In contrast, Span 80 has a slight preference to align parallel to the interfaces with a coiled conformation at both DOR values. PMID:27398714

  17. Selective separation of beta-lactoglobulin from sweet whey using CGAs generated from the cationic surfactant CTAB.

    PubMed

    Fuda, Elisabeth; Bhatia, Divesh; Pyle, D L; Jauregi, Paula

    2005-06-01

    The selective separation of whey proteins was studied using colloidal gas aphrons generated from the cationic surfactant cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). From the titration curves obtained by zeta potential measurements of individual whey proteins, it was expected to selectively adsorb the major whey proteins, i.e., bovine serum albumin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin to the aphrons and elute the remaining proteins (lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase) in the liquid phase. A number of process parameters including pH, ionic strength, and mass ratio of surfactant to protein (M(CTAB)/M(TP)) were varied in order to evaluate their effect on protein separation. Under optimum conditions (2 mmol/l CTAB, M(CTAB)/M(TP) = 0.26-0.35, pH 8, and ionic strength = 0.018 mol/l), 80-90% beta-lactoglobulin was removed from the liquid phase as a precipitate, while about 75% lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase, 80% bovine serum albumin, 95% immunoglobulin, and 65% alpha-lactalbumin were recovered in the liquid fraction. Mechanistic studies using zeta potential measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that electrostatic interactions modulate only partially the selectivity of protein separation, as proteins with similar surface charges do not separate to the same extent between the two phases. The selectivity of recovery of beta-lactoglobulin probably occurs in two steps: the first being the selective interaction of the protein with opposite-charged surfactant molecules by means of electrostatic interactions, which leads to denaturation of the protein and subsequent formation and precipitation of the CTAB-beta-lactoglobulin complex. This is followed by the separation of CTAB-beta-lactoglobulin aggregates from the bulk liquid by flotation in the aphron phase. In this way, CGAs act as carriers which facilitate the removal of protein precipitate. PMID:15816026

  18. Three-stage multilayer formation kinetics during adsorption of an anionic fluorinated surfactant onto germanium. 1. Concentration effect.

    PubMed

    Xing, Rong; Rankin, Stephen E

    2006-01-12

    The adsorption of tetraethylammonium perfluorooctylsulfonate (TEA-FOS) from aqueous solution onto hydroxylated germanium is studied using in situ polarized attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The adsorption is monitored at a series of bulk solution concentrations spanning from well below to above the critical micelle concentration (CMC; 1.0 mM). The kinetics of adsorption is followed by monitoring the intensity of the fluorocarbon bands. The orientation of the fluorocarbon director with respect to the germanium surface is determined by circular dichroism measurements of CF2 stretching bands. At bulk concentrations ranging from 10% of the CMC to at least 500% of the CMC, the adsorption occurs in an unusual sequence of three stages. Initially, rapid adsorption occurs within 200 min, leading to coverage of a monolayer or less. A long period of slow adsorption follows, during which we hypothesize that surfactant molecules form clusters, some of which serve as nuclei for multilayer growth. This stage concludes suddenly with an acceleration in the rate of adsorption, which eventually leads to multilayer formation. Because this is an anionic surfactant adsorbing onto a negatively charged surface at pH 6, the tetraethylammonium ions must mediate the interactions between the surfactant headgroups and the surface. The dichroism measurements show that TEA-FOS is initially oriented randomly or somewhat parallel to the surface, but over time adopts an orientation somewhat normal to the surface. This behavior is consistent with initial adsorption at isolated sites, followed by aggregation into isotropic admicelles, and finally growth into flattened admicelles. The sudden onset of accelerated adsorption can be explained either by autoaccelerating adsorption or nucleation and growth of a hydrophobic multilayer structure. PMID:16471536

  19. Normal and shear forces between charged solid surfaces immersed in cationic surfactant solution: the role of the alkyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Silbert, Gilad; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2014-05-13

    Using a surface force balance (SFB), we measured the boundary friction and the normal forces between mica surfaces immersed in a series of alkyltrimethylammonium chloride (TAC) surfactant solutions well above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). The surfactants that were used--C14TAC, C16TAC, and C18TAC--varied by the length of the alkyl chain. The structures of the adsorbed layers on the mica were obtained using AFM imaging and ranged from flat bilayers to rodlike micelles. Despite the difference in alkyl chain, all the surfactant solutions reduce the friction between the two mica surfaces enormously relative to immersion in water, and have similar friction coefficients (μ ≈ 0.001). The pressure at which such lubrication breaks down is higher for the surfactants with longer chain lengths and indicates that an important role of the chain length is to provide a more robust structure of the adsorbed layers which maintains its integrity to higher pressures. PMID:24720712

  20. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  1. The structure of montmorillonites modified with zwitterionic surfactants and their sorption ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianxi; Qing, Yanhong; Ma, Lingya; Zhu, Runliang; He, Hongping

    2015-06-01

    In this work, a novel organo-clays, zwitterionic surfactant modified montmorillonites (ZSMMs) were synthesized by using sulphobetaine and montmorillonites. The structures of ZSMMs were characterized by X ray diffraction (XRD) methods; the surfactant loading levels were measured by Total organic carbon (TOC) analysis, and their sorptive characteristics toward p-nitrophenol and nitrobenzene were investigated. XRD and TOC measurements indicated that the amount of adsorbed surfactants and the basal spacing of the ZSMMs increase with alkyl chain length and surfactant concentration. Sorption experiments showed that the capacity of p-nitrophenol to sorb onto the ZSMMs is higher than that of nitrobenzene. Both capacities increase with surfactant loading level; However, sorption capacity decreases when the surfactant concentration is higher than 2.0 CEC. Under the same surfactant loading level, the sorption capacities of p-nitrophenol and nitrobenzene increase with alkyl chain length. Under this experimental condition, the longer alkyl chain leads to a higher sorption capacity for hydrophobic organic compounds. On the basis of the ability of p-nitrophenol and nitrobenzene to sorb onto the montmorillonites, we conclude that the contaminant sorption coefficients, normalized with organic carbon content, highly depend on surfactant loading levels.

  2. Marangoni Effects of a Drop in an Extensional Flow: The Role of Surfactant Physical Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebe, Kathleen J.; Balasubramaniam, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    While the changes in stresses caused by surfactant adsorption on non-deforming interfaces have been fairly well established, prior to this work, there were few studies addressing how surfactants alter stresses on strongly deforming interfaces. We chose the model problem of a drop in a uniaxial extensional flow to study these stress conditions To model surfactant effects at fluid interfaces, a proper description of the dependence of the surface tension on surface concentration, the surface equation of state, is required. We have adopted a surface equation of state that accounts for the maximum coverage limit; that is, because surfactants have a finite cross sectional area, there is an upper bound to the amount of surfactant that can adsorb in a monolayer. The surface tension reduces strongly only when this maximum coverage is approached. Since the Marangoni stresses go as the derivative of the surface equation of state times the surface concentration gradient, the non-linear equation of state determines both the effect of surfactants in the normal stress jump, (which is balanced by the product of the mean curvature of the interface times the surface tension), and the tangential stress jump, which is balanced by Marangoni stresses. First, the effects of surface coverage and intermolecular interactions among surfactants which drive aggregation of surfactants in the interface were studied. (see Pawar and Stebe, Physics of Fluids).

  3. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  4. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  5. Diseases of pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  6. Role of surfactant in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    2000-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that demonstrates how the mesothelial cell in the normal peritoneum and comparable serosal cavities secretes surface-active phospholipid (SAPL) as a means of protecting itself and the membrane it forms with its neighbors. It is shown how SAPL, if adsorbed (reversibly bound) to mesothelium, can impart excellent lubricity, antiwear and release (antistick) properties, while impeding surgical adhesion formation. More-speculative benefits include acting as a deterrent to fibrosis and as a barrier to both protein leakage and pathogen invasion by spanning cell junctions. Such spanning would also "pin down" cell corners, impeding peeling as the first step in exfoliation encountered in prolonged continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The molecular mechanism underlying each of these possible functions is adsorption. Morphological and hydrophobicity studies are discussed as validation for such an adsorbed lining and how it can be fortified by administering exogenous SAPL. Any role for SAPL in ultrafiltration is much more controversial. However, a surfactant lining can explain the very high permeability of the membrane to lipid-soluble drugs, implying that it is a barrier to water-soluble solutes. The clinical and animal evidence is conflicting but would seem to be best explained by a role for the barrier in promoting semipermeability, and hence the osmotic driving force for water transmission. Thus, adsorption of exogenous SAPL in CAPD patients with low ultrafiltration seems to restore this barrier function. The future direction for surfactant in CAPD would seem to rest with the physical chemists in producing formulations that optimize adsorption, probably involving a compromise between water solubility and surface activity of the phospholipids selected. It might even warrant using the interdialytic interval for readsorbing SAPL without the problem of dilution by a large volume of dialysate. PMID:11117241

  7. Effect of different surfactants and thicknesses on electrodeposited films of bismuth telluride and its thermoelectric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulsi, Chiranjit; Mitra, Mousumi; Kargupta, Kajari; Ganguly, Saibal; Banerjee, Dipali; Goswami, Shyamaprosad

    2015-10-01

    Thin films of bismuth telluride using various surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) have been electrochemically deposited. The influence of different surfactants on crystal orientation and morphology was investigated and correlated with the thermoelectric performance of the electrodeposited films. Since thickness affects the thermoelectric performance compared to the surfactant, thickness- dependent thermoelectric performance has also been investigated. The carrier mobilities of the films obtained are significantly enhanced due to improved surface morphology using different surfactants. Between the two surfactants, films with SDS exhibited the higher value of thermoelectric power, power factor, and figure of merit, which is due to the effect of micelle formation. The XRD pattern of all the films, which are electrodeposited without surfactant or using SDS and PVP, showed preferred crystal orientation along the (018) direction. The roles of organic molecules in the development of nanoparticles with improved thermoelectric properties have been investigated.

  8. Adsorbed water and CO on Pt electrode modified with Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futamata, Masayuki; Luo, Liqiang

    Highly sensitive ATR-SEIRA spectroscopy was exploited to elucidate water, CO and electrolyte anions adsorbed on the Ru modified Pt film electrode. CO on Ru domains was oxidized below ca. +0.3 V, followed by pronounced water adsorption. Since the oxidation potential of CO on Pt domain was significantly reduced compared to bare Pt, these water molecules on Ru obviously prompt CO oxidation on adjacent Pt surface as consistent with the bifunctional mechanism. Diffusion of adsorbate from Ru to Pt surfaces was indicated in dilute CH 3OH solution by spectral changes with potential.

  9. Determination of the critical micelle concentration in simulations of surfactant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Andrew P.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative methods for determining the critical micelle concentration (cmc) are investigated using canonical and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice surfactant model. A common measure of the cmc is the "free" (unassociated) surfactant concentration in the presence of micellar aggregates. Many prior simulations of micellizing systems have observed a decrease in the free surfactant concentration with overall surfactant loading for both ionic and nonionic surfactants, contrary to theoretical expectations from mass-action models of aggregation. In the present study, we investigate a simple lattice nonionic surfactant model in implicit solvent, for which highly reproducible simulations are possible in both the canonical (NVT) and grand canonical (μVT) ensembles. We confirm the previously observed decrease of free surfactant concentration at higher overall loadings and propose an algorithm for the precise calculation of the excluded volume and effective concentration of unassociated surfactant molecules in the accessible volume of the solution. We find that the cmc can be obtained by correcting the free surfactant concentration for volume exclusion effects resulting from the presence of micellar aggregates. We also develop an improved method for determination of the cmc based on the maximum in curvature for the osmotic pressure curve determined from μVT simulations. Excellent agreement in cmc and other micellar properties between NVT and μVT simulations of different system sizes is observed. The methodological developments in this work are broadly applicable to simulations of aggregating systems using any type of surfactant model (atomistic/coarse grained) or solvent description (explicit/implicit).

  10. Dispersion of carbon nanotubes using mixed surfactants: experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, B; Poorgholami-Bejarpasi, N; Nayeri, N

    2014-03-20

    The ability of cationic-rich and anionic-rich mixtures of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) and SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) for dispersing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous media has been studied through both the experimental and molecular dynamics simulation methods. Compared to the pure CTAB and SDS, these mixtures are more effective with the lower concentrations and more individual CNTs, reflecting a synergistic effect in these mixtures. The synergistic effects observed in mixed surfactant systems are mainly due to the electrostatic attractions between surfactant heads. In addition, the surface charge related to the colloidal stability of mixed surfactant-covered nanotubes has been characterized by means of ζ-potential measurements. The results indicate that the hydrophobic interactions between surfactant tails also give rise to the higher adsorption of surfactant molecules. Furthermore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to provide insight about the structure of surfactant aggregates onto nanotubes and to attempt an explanation of the experimental results. The MD simulation results indicate that the random and disordered adsorption of mixed surfactants onto carbon nanotubes may be preferred for a low surfactant concentration. Our research may provide experimental and theoretical bases for using mixed surfactants to disperse CNTs, which can open an avenue for new applications of mixed surfactants. PMID:24555914

  11. Sorption of nonionic organic compounds in soil-water systems containing a micelle-forming surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.; Inskeep, W.P.; Boyd, S.A. |

    1994-12-31

    The solubility enhancement of nonionic organic compounds (NOCs) by surfactants may represent an important tool in chemical and biological remediation of contaminated soils. In aqueous systems, the presence of dissolved surfactant emulsions or micelles may enhance the solubility of NOCs by acting as a hydrophobic partitioning phase for the NOCs. However, most environmental remediation efforts involve soil-water or sediment-water systems, where surfactant molecules may also interact with the solid phase. An understanding of the effect of surfactants on the sorption and distribution of NOCs in soil or sediment environments will provide an essential basis for utilizing surfactants in environmental remediation. In this study, the authors examined the effect of a micelle-forming surfactant (Triton X-100) on the sorption of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-PCB, 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (p,p{prime}-DDT) and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB). A conceptual model, which accurately describes the functional dependence of K* on Triton X-100 concentration, was developed based on the partition coefficients of these NOCs by soil, soil-surfactant, surfactant monomer and surfactant micelle phases. This model can be further modified to provide quantitative prediction of K* of a given NOC at different surfactant concentrations.

  12. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Md. Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications.

  13. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy.

    PubMed

    Raza, Md Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications. PMID:26743179

  14. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Md. Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications. PMID:26743179

  15. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide promotes destabilization of lung surfactant-like films.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, Olga; Keough, Kevin M W; Casals, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The airspaces are lined with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-rich film called pulmonary surfactant, which is named for its ability to maintain normal respiratory mechanics by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Inhaled airborne particles containing bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may incorporate into the surfactant monolayer. In this study, we evaluated the effect of smooth LPS (S-LPS), containing the entire core oligosaccharide region and the O-antigen, on the biophysical properties of lung surfactant-like films composed of either DPPC or DPPC/palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG)/palmitic acid (PA) (28:9:5.6, w/w/w). Our results show that low amounts of S-LPS fluidized DPPC monolayers, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and changes in the compressibility modulus. This promoted early collapse and prevented the attainment of high surface pressures. These destabilizing effects could not be relieved by repeated compression-expansion cycles. Similar effects were observed with surfactant-like films composed of DPPC/POPG/PA. On the other hand, the interaction of SP-A, a surfactant membrane-associated alveolar protein that also binds to LPS, with surfactant-like films containing S-LPS increased monolayer destabilization due to the extraction of lipid molecules from the monolayer, leading to the dissolution of monolayer material in the aqueous subphase. This suggests that SP-A may act as an LPS scavenger. PMID:21190662

  16. Growth kinetics of sulfur nanoparticles in aqueous surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rajib Ghosh; Paria, Santanu

    2011-02-15

    Sulfur is an important element has many practical applications when present as nanoparticles. Despite the practicable applications, limited studies are available in the literature related to synthesis of sulfur nanoparticles. Growth kinetics of colloidal sulfur particles synthesized from aqueous solutions using different surfactants have been studied here. The effects of different parameters such as reactant concentration, temperature, sonication, types of acids, types of surfactants, and even surfactant concentration are studied on the growth kinetics. Since the reaction rate is fast, particle growth depends on the parameters which affect diffusion of sulfur molecules. There is a linear relationship found among the reactant concentration and the particle coarsening rate constant. The growth kinetics was studied in the presence of different surfactants such as nonionic (poly(oxyethylene) p-tert-octylphenyl ether, TX-100), anionic (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, SDBS), cationic (cetyltrimethyammonium bromide, CTAB) and results show the coarsening constant changes according to the following order: water>TX-100>SDBS>CTAB. The particle growth rate also depends on the surfactant concentration, coarsening rate constant decreases with the increase in surfactant concentration and become constant close to the critical micellar concentration (CMC). The coarsening rate constant also highly depends on the types of acid used as catalyst. PMID:21147482

  17. Highly stable surfactant assisted polyaniline nanostructures with enhanced electroactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdegni, Monika; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2016-05-01

    Different nanostructures of Polyaniline(PANI) i.e. nanospheres, nanorods, nanofibers and layered structures have been successfully synthesized using varied concentration of anionic sodium dodecyl sulphate(SDS) and cationic Hexamethyltriammonium bromide (HTAB) by electrochemical method. Surfactant assisted morphology has been studied using FESEM. Incorporation of surfactants to the polymer matrix has been confirmed using FTIR spectroscopy. Electro activity and stability towards reversible redox activity was studied using cyclic voltammatry and chronoamperometry.The anionic surfactant severely enhances electroactivity and areal capacitance (3 Fcm-2) which was found to be two order higher than PANI film prepared without surfactant (0.039 Fcm-2), attributable to its additional doping effect. Immobilization of large surfactant molecule to polymer matrix inhibits its degradation due to nuleophilic attack ascribed to hydrophobic effect of surfactant. For PANI-SDS redox behavior remained almost same after 1000 reverse redox cycles while for PANI-HTAB we got only marginal changes.Our PANI-SDS samples are promising candidates for electro chromic applications.

  18. Surfactant studies for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, G.C.

    1990-12-20

    Objectives of this project include: select economical/practical surfactants for use in coal liquefaction; screen surfactants for the proposed work through simple laboratory screening tests; and check the survivability of the selected surfactants at 350{degrees}C and 2000 psi using a 1-hour residence time for the thermal treatment in a stirred autoclave. Surfactant screening studies have shown the lignin sulfonate salt being the best candidate studied. Based upon the findings from the screening studies and practical considerations (e.g., potential cost, thermal survivability and recycling recovery), two surfactant choices in the anionic and nonionic categories were tested further in the autoclave reactor and engineering experiments at JPL. The goal of the autoclave work was to engineering experiments at JPL. The goal of the autoclave work was to determine the effects of surfactants on coal liquefaction performance and to test surfactant survivability. A eight of (8) autoclave experiments using 100 grams of as-received coal were performed. Two commercial surfactant choices were evaluated. They were: Sodium Lignin Sulfonate (LS) as a colloidal (heterogenous) surfactant of anionic type; and Triton X-100 (TRI) (trade name of a polyoxyethylated tert-octyphenol) as a liquid (homogenous) surfactant of nonionic type. Two additional reference tests were performed. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Separation of surfactant functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes via free solution electrophoresis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, Blazej; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa; Kalenczuk, Ryszard J.

    2011-04-01

    This work presents the application of the free solution electrophoresis method (FSE) in the metallic / semiconductive (M/S) separation process of the surfactant functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The SWCNTs synthesized via laser ablation were purified through high vacuum annealing and subsequent refluxing processes in aqua regia solution. The purified and annealed material was divided into six batches. First three batches were dispersed in anionic surfactants: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium cholate (SC) and sodium deoxycholate (DOC). The next three batches were dispersed in cationic surfactants: cetrimonium bromide (CTAB), benzalkonium chloride (BKC) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). All the prepared SWCNTs samples were subjected to FSE separation process. The fractionated samples were recovered from control and electrode areas and annealed in order to remove the adsorbed surfactants on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) surface. The changes of the van Hove singularities (vHS) present in SWCNTs spectra were investigated via UV-Vis-NIR optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS).

  20. Chemisorption on surfaces — an historical look at a representative adsorbate: carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, John T.

    1994-01-01

    The study of the interaction of molecules with clean surfaces extends back to the work of Irving Langmuir. In this historical account, the development of selected experimental methods for the study of molecular adsorption will be discussed. This will be done by historically reviewing research on one of the most well-studied adsorbate molecules, carbon monoxide. Many of the modern surface science techniques have first been used to study chemisorbed carbon monoxide, and the CO molecule is employed even today as a test molecule for currently developing surface measurement instruments such as the low temperature STM. In addition to being a good test molecule for new surface measurement techniques, adsorbed carbon monoxide is one of the centrally important molecules in the field of heterogeneous catalysis where the production of synthetic fuels and useful organic molecules often depends on the catalytic behavior of the adsorbed CO molecule. Interestingly, the carbon monoxide molecule also serves as a bridge between surface chemistry on the transition metals and the field of organometallic chemistry. Concepts about the chemical bonding and the reactive behavior of CO chemisorbed on transition metal surfaces and CO bound in transition metal carbonyls link these two fields together in a significant manner. The carbon monoxide molecule has been the historical focal point of many endeavors in surface chemistry and surface physics, and research on adsorbed carbon monoxide well represents many of the key advances which characterize the first thirty years of the development of surface science.

  1. Evaporation of Sessile Droplets Laden with Particles and Insoluble Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Karapetsas, George; Chandra Sahu, Kirti; Matar, Omar K

    2016-07-12

    We consider the flow dynamics of a thin evaporating droplet in the presence of an insoluble surfactant and noninteracting particles in the bulk. On the basis of lubrication theory, we derive a set of evolution equations for the film height, the interfacial surfactant, and bulk particle concentrations, taking into account the dependence of liquid viscosity on the local particle concentration. An important ingredient of our model is that it takes into account the fact that the surfactant adsorbed at the interface hinders evaporation. We perform a parametric study to investigate how the presence of surfactants affects the evaporation process as well as the flow dynamics with and without the presence of particles in the bulk. Our numerical calculations show that the droplet lifetime is affected significantly by the balance between the ability of the surfactant to enhance spreading, suppressing the effect of thermal Marangoni stresses-induced motion, and to hinder the evaporation flux through the reduction of the effective interfacial area of evaporation, which tend to accelerate and decelerate the evaporation process, respectively. For particle-laden droplets and in the case of dilute solutions, the droplet lifetime is found to be weakly dependent on the initial particle concentration. We also show that the particle deposition patterns are influenced strongly by the direct effect of the surfactant on the evaporative flux; in certain cases, the "coffee-stain" effect is enhanced significantly. A discussion of the delicate interplay between the effects of capillary pressure and solutal and thermal Marangoni stresses, which drive the liquid flow inside of the evaporating droplet giving rise to the observed results, is provided herein. PMID:27300638

  2. Surfactant-Wrapped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes in Aquatic Systems: Surfactant Displacement in the Presence of Humic Acid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojun; Bouchard, Dermont C

    2016-09-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) facilitates multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) debundling and enhances nanotube stability in the aqueous environment by adsorbing on the nanotube surfaces, thereby increasing repulsive electrostatic forces and steric effects. The resulting SDS-wrapped MWCNTs are utilized in industrial applications and have been widely employed in environmental studies. In the present study, MWCNTs adsorbed SDS during ultrasonication to form stable MWCNTs suspensions. Desorption of SDS from MWCNTs surfaces was then investigated as a function of Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) and background electrolyte concentrations. Due to hydrophobic effects and π-π interactions, MWCNTs exhibit higher affinity for SRHA than SDS. In the presence of SRHA, SDS adsorbed on MWCNTs was displaced. Cations (Na(+), Ca(2+)) decreased SDS desorption from MWCNTs due to charge screening effects. Interestingly, the presence of the divalent calcium cation facilitated multilayered SRHA adsorption on MWCNTs through bridging effects, while monovalent sodium reduced SRHA adsorption. Results of the present study suggest that properties of MWCNTs wrapped with commercial surfactants will be altered when these materials are released to surface waters and the surfactant coating will be displaced by natural organic matter (NOM). Changes on their surfaces will significantly affect MWCNTs fate in aquatic environments. PMID:27500910

  3. Characterization of colloidal silica and its adsorption phenomenon with silicon-base surfactants with relation to film strength

    SciTech Connect

    Fariza, H.; Huang, D.

    1996-10-01

    Colloidal silica has been used for film formation in many industrial applications. The film strength depends on the siloxane bond formation, which is modulated by the surfactants present in the system. The adsorption of surfactants on surface of silica dispersed in aqueous systems affects its surface properties - well as physical and chemical reactions. Colloidal silica, having surface silanol groups can interact with the hydrophilic end of surfactant molecules through H-bonding. A commonly used surfactant, a polyalkylene oxide-modified polydimethylsiloxane, affects the reactions of silica under various conditions. A systematic study of silica and its chemistry in presence of the surfactant show that the surface properties of silica particles influence hydrogen bonding of silanols and adsorption of the surfactant. The level of surfactant adsorption on silica modifies the film strength by changing the extent of siloxane bond formed between two silicon atoms.

  4. Surfactants and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Seely, S

    1977-01-01

    In previous publications (1,2) the hypothesis was put forward that atheroma is caused by some pathogen or metabolic fault which impairs the transportability of cholesterol in the plasma. The lipoproteins containing the faulty metabolites are assumed to be incapable of traversing the capillary endothelium and continue to circulate uselessly in the blood stream, possibly giving rise to hypercholesterolaemia, until captured by lipophages which, if they can successfully complete their journey, void them into the gall bladder. The present paper takes the argument a step further by pointing out that the types of substances most likely to cause the described impairment are surfactants. A surfactant finding its way into the plasma could separate cholesterol from its carrier protein and itself become its carrier. The complex would still be kept in suspension in the plasma, but unable to cross biological barriers like the capillary endothelium. An important argument in favour of the hypothesis is that it can offer an explanation of the long-standing medical mystery of the connection between atheroma and the hardness or softness of the water supply. Infant deaths from coronary occlusion present a similar enigma. The paper points out that surfactants can conceivably find their way into infants' feeding bottles. PMID:593183

  5. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-05-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like `top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and `bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated.

  6. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like ‘top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and ‘bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated. PMID:27193558

  7. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2016-01-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like 'top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and 'bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated. PMID:27193558

  8. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1994-07-01

    The aim of this research project is to investigate mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effects of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, various inorganic and polymeric species, and solids mineralogy will be determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability; is used in this study. The results obtained should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the first year of this three year contract, adsorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures was studied at the solid-liquid and gas-liquid interfaces. Surfactants studied include alkyl xylene sulfonates, polyethoxylated alkyl phenols, octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride. Adsorption of surfactant mixtures of varying composition was also investigated. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes interfacial properties such as wettability, electrokinetics and stability of reservoir minerals were correlated with the amount of reagent adsorbed. Strong effects of the structure of the surfactant and position of functional groups were revealed.

  9. Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2008-09-20

    /conformation of the adsorbed layers), as well as precipitation/abstraction characteristics. (3) Investigation of the role of dissolved species, especially multivalent ions, on interactions between reservoir minerals and surfactants and/or polymers leading to surfactant precipitation or activated adsorption. (4) Solution behavior tests--surface tension, interaction, ultra filtration, and other tests. (5) Surfactant-mineral interactions relative to adsorption, wettability, and electrophoresis. (6) Work on the effects of multivalent ions, pH, temperature, salinity, and mixing ratio on the adsorption. Developments of adsorption models to explain interactions between surfactants/polymers/minerals. (7) General guidelines for the use of certain surfactants, polymers and their mixtures in micelle flooding processes.

  10. Control of stain geometry by drop evaporation of surfactant containing dispersions.

    PubMed

    Erbil, H Yildirim

    2015-08-01

    Control of stain geometry by drop evaporation of surfactant containing dispersions is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many applications such as forming templates on solid surfaces, in ink-jet printing, spraying of pesticides, micro/nano material fabrication, thin film coatings, biochemical assays, deposition of DNA/RNA micro-arrays, and manufacture of novel optical and electronic materials. This paper presents a review of the published articles on the diffusive drop evaporation of pure liquids (water), the surfactant stains obtained from evaporating drops that do not contain dispersed particles and deposits obtained from drops containing polymer colloids and carbon based particles such as carbon nanotubes, graphite and fullerenes. Experimental results of specific systems and modeling attempts are discussed. This review also has some special subtopics such as suppression of coffee-rings by surfactant addition and "stick-slip" behavior of evaporating nanosuspension drops. In general, the drop evaporation process of a surfactant/particle/substrate system is very complex since dissolved surfactants adsorb on both the insoluble organic/inorganic micro/nanoparticles in the drop, on the air/solution interface and on the substrate surface in different extends. Meanwhile, surfactant adsorbed particles interact with the substrate giving a specific contact angle, and free surfactants create a solutal Marangoni flow in the drop which controls the location of the particle deposition together with the rate of evaporation. In some cases, the presence of a surfactant monolayer at the air/solution interface alters the rate of evaporation. At present, the magnitude of each effect cannot be predicted adequately in advance and consequently they should be carefully studied for any system in order to control the shape and size of the final deposit. PMID:25217332

  11. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources. PMID:21296314

  12. Adsorption of a multicomponent rhamnolipid surfactant to soil

    SciTech Connect

    Noordmann, W.H.; Brusseau, M.L.; Janssen, D.B.

    2000-03-01

    The adsorption of rhamnolipid, a multicomponent biosurfactant with potential application in soil remediation, to two sandy soils was investigated using batch and column studies. The surfactant mixture contained six anionic components differing in lipid chain length and number of rhamnose moieties. Batch adsorption experiments indicated that the overall adsorption isotherms of total surfactant and of the individual components leveled off above a concentration at which micelles were formed. Column experiments showed that the retardation factors for the total surfactant and for the individual components decreased with increasing influent concentration. Extended tailing was observed in the distal portion of the surfactant breakthrough curve. The concentration-dependent retardation factors and the extended tailing are in accordance with the nonlinear (concave) adsorption isotherms found in the batch adsorption studies. The more hydrophobic rhamnolipid components were preferentially adsorbed, but adsorption was not correlated with the organic carbon content of the soil. This suggests that adsorption of rhamnolipid to soil is not a partitioning process but mainly an interfacial adsorption process.

  13. Probing interactions of neurotransmitters with twin tailed anionic surfactant: A detailed physicochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rajwinder; Sanan, Reshu; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Keeping in view the role of neurotransmitters (NTs) in central nervous system diseases and in controlling various physiological processes, present study is aimed to study the binding of neurotransmitters (NTs) such as norepinephrine hydrochloride (NE) and serotonin hydrochloride (5-HT) with twin tailed surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT). Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements combined with microcalorimetric measurements were used to characterize the interactions between AOT and NTs. Meteoric modifications to emission profile and absorption spectra of NTs upon addition of AOT are indicative of the binding of NTs with AOT. Distinct interactional states such as formation of ion-pairs, induced and regular micelles with adsorbed NTs molecules have been observed in different concentration regimes of AOT. The formation of ion-pairs from oppositely charged NTs and AOT is confirmed by the reduced absorbance, quenched fluorescence intensity and decrease in peak current (ipa) as well as shifts in peak potential (Epa) values. The stoichiometry and formation of the NTs-AOT complexes has been judged and the extent of interactions is quantitatively discussed in terms of binding constant (K) and free energy of binding (ΔG°). The enthalpy (ΔH°mic) and free energy of micellization (ΔG°mic) for AOT in presence and absence of NTs are determined from the enthalpy curves. PMID:26866888

  14. Photodecomposition of chloromethanes adsorbed on silica surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausloos, P.; Rebbert, R. E.; Glasgow, L.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation of CCl4, CFCl3, and CF2Cl2 in the presence of C2H6 in vessels containing silica sand or fused quartz tubing results in the formation of chlorine-containing products. The formation of these compounds occurs at wavelengths extending up to approximately 400 nm, that is, at wavelengths well beyond the absorption threshold of the chloromethanes in the gas phase. It is suggested that CCl4 adsorbed on silica surfaces photodissociates to yield CCl3 and CCl2 species. The poor material balance obtained in these experiments indicates that several of the chlorine-containing fragments are strongly adsorbed on the surface. At a CCl4 pressure of 13 Pa (0.1 torr), photolysis with 366 nm light in the presence of sand results in the decomposition of one molecule for every 10,000 photons striking the surface. Under otherwise identical conditions, the photon-induced breadkdown of CFCl3 and CF2Cl2 is respectively only 10% or 3% as efficient.

  15. A Computational Study of the Rheology and Structure of Surfactant Covered Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Joao; Boromand, Arman

    Using different types of surface-active agents are ubiquitous in different industrial applications ranging from cosmetic and food industries to polymeric nano-composite and blends. This allows to produce stable multiphasic systems like foams and emulsions whose stability and shelf-life are directly determined by the efficiency and the type of the surfactant molecules. Moreover, presence and self-assembly of these species on an interface will display complex dynamics and structural evolution under different processing conditions. Analogous to bulk rheology of complex systems, surfactant covered interfaces will response to an external mechanical forces or deformation differently depends on the molecular configuration and topology of the system constituents. Although the effect of molecular configuration of the surface-active molecules on the planar interfaces has been studied both experimentally and computationally, it remains challenging from both experimental and computational aspects to track efficiency and effectiveness of different surfactant molecules with different molecular geometries on curved interfaces. Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, we have studies effectiveness and efficiency of different surfactant molecules on a curved interface in equilibrium and far from equilibrium. Interfacial tension is calculated for linear and branched surfactant with different hydrophobic and hydrophilic tail and head groups with different branching densities. Deformation parameter and Taylor plots are obtained for individual surfactant molecules under shear flow.

  16. Magnetic Nanoparticles Interaction with Humic Acid: In the Presence of Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhi; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhao, Tianhui; Wang, Hao; Wang, Peifang; Wu, Fengchang; Giesy, John P

    2016-08-16

    Adsorbed humic acid (HA) on surfaces of nanoparticles (NPs) will affect their transport, transfer, and fate in the aquatic environment, especially in the presence of surfactants, and thereby potentially alter exposures and bioavailable fractions of NPs and surfactants. This study investigated adsorption of HA on Fe3O4 NPs in the presence or absence of surfactant. Surfactant established a bridge connecting HA and Fe3O4 NPs, and significantly changed adsorption behavior of HA on NPs. Adsorption of HA in the absence of surfactant was 120.3 mg/g, but 350.0 mg/g and 146.5 mg/g in the present of CTAB (hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide) and SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), respectively. Surfactants can form different stages (hemimicelles, mixed hemimicelles and admicelles) on Fe3O4 NPs by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, adsorption of HA was different for each of those stages. Adsorption of HA on surface of Fe3O4 NPs/CTAB was codetermined by hydrophobic, electrostatic interactions and ligand exchange. The presence of CTAB or SDS changed mechanisms for adsorption and effects of functional groups. Results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that carbohydrate carbon was important in adsorption of HA on Fe3O4 NPs in the presence of surfactants. PMID:27404337

  17. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1984-12-11

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with either a petroleum sulfonate or an alkaryl sulfonate. A surfactant system containing the above surfactant useful in enhanced oil recovery processes is also provided.

  18. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1995-06-01

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, other inorganic and polymeric species is being studied. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro and nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability is used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the second year of this three year contract, adsorption/desorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures on alumina and silica was studied. Surfactants studied include the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC), nonionic pentadecylethoxylated nonyl phenol (NP-15) and the nonionic octaethylene glycol n-dodecyl ether (C{sub 12}EO{sub 8}) of varying hydrocarbon chain length. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer in terms of micropolarity and aggregation numbers was probed using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes of microstructure upon dilution (desorption) were also studied. Presence of the nonionic surfactant in the mixed aggregate led to shielding of the charge of the ionic surfactant which in-turn promoted aggregation but reduced electrostatic attraction between the charged surfactant and the mineral surface. Strong consequences of surfactant interactions in solution upon adsorption as well as correlations between monomer concentrations in mixtures and adsorption were revealed.

  19. High capacity cryogel-type adsorbents for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naveen Kumar; Dsouza, Roy N; Grasselli, Mariano; Fernández-Lahore, Marcelo

    2014-08-15

    Cryogel bodies were modified to obtain epoxy groups by graft-copolymerization using both chemical and gamma irradiation initiation techniques. The free epoxy adsorbents were reacted further to introduce diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) functionalities. The resulting weak anion-exchange cryogel adsorbents showed dynamic binding capacities of ca. 27±3mg/mL, which was significantly higher than previously reported for this type of adsorbent material. Gamma irradiated grafting initiation showed a 4-fold higher capacity for proteins than chemical grafting initiation procedures. The phosphate capacity for these DEAE cryogels was 119mmol/L and also showed similar column efficiency as compared to commercial adsorbents. The large pores in the cryogel structure ensure convective transport of the molecules to active binding sites located on the polymer-grafted surface of cryogels. However, as cryogels have relatively large pores (10-100μm), the BET area available for surface activation is low, and consequently, the capacity of the cryogels is relatively low for biomolecules, especially when compared to commercial beaded adsorbents. Nevertheless, we have shown that gamma ray mediated surface grafting of cryogel matrices greatly enhance their functional and adsorptive properties. PMID:24980092

  20. The density and refractive index of adsorbing protein layers.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Janos

    2004-07-01

    The structure of the adsorbing layers of native and denatured proteins (fibrinogen, gamma-immunoglobulin, albumin, and lysozyme) was studied on hydrophilic TiO(2) and hydrophobic Teflon-AF surfaces using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy techniques. The density and the refractive index of the adsorbing protein layers could be determined from the complementary information provided by the two in situ instruments. The observed density and refractive index changes during the protein-adsorption process indicated the presence of conformational changes (e.g., partial unfolding) in general, especially upon contact with the hydrophobic surface. The structure of the formed layers was found to depend on the size of the proteins and on the experimental conditions. On the TiO(2) surface smaller proteins formed a denser layer than larger ones and the layer of unfolded proteins was less dense than that adsorbed from the native conformation. The hydrophobic surface induced denaturation and resulted in the formation of thin compact protein films of albumin and lysozyme. A linear correlation was found between the quartz crystal microbalance measured dissipation factor and the total water content of the layer, suggesting the existence of a dissipative process that is related to the solvent molecules present inside the adsorbed protein layer. Our measurements indicated that water and solvent molecules not only influence the 3D structure of proteins in solution but also play a crucial role in their adsorption onto surfaces. PMID:15240488

  1. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-02-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs.

  2. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  3. Revisiting the Thermodynamics of Water Surfaces and the Effects of Surfactant Head Group.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Mafi, Amirhossein; Chou, Keng C

    2016-03-10

    It is common knowledge that surfactants lower the surface tension of water. The typical textbook explanation of this phenomenon is that the force of attraction between surfactant and water molecules is less than that between two water molecules; hence the surface contraction force decreases in the presence of surfactants; however, this common description, based on the strength of intermolecular interactions, is overly simplified because it ignores an important thermodynamic function: the surface entropy of water. Here we report separate measurements of water's surface enthalpy and surface entropy in the presence of nonionic, zwitterionic, anionic, and cationic surfactants. While all of these surfactants decreased the surface enthalpy of water by 50-70%, the surface entropy of water could drop to near-zero or even negative values for ionic surfactants. Studies of this zero-entropy state of water surface using phase-sensitive sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggested that the zero-entropy state of the water surface was associated with surfactant-induced ordering of water molecules and enhanced hydrogen bond formation at the water surface. Both effects reduce water molecules' degrees of freedom for motion and thus lower the surface entropy of water. The ability of a surfactant to decrease the surface entropy of water is in the order ionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. For all surfactant head groups surface entropy plays a critical role in determining the surface tension of water. The description of water's surface tension is not complete without considering its surface entropy. PMID:26842782

  4. Regenerable granular carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid adsorbents for diclofenac sodium and carbamazepine removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haoran; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Qian; Nie, Yao; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2013-08-01

    A novel granular carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/alumina (Al2O3) hybrid adsorbent with good sorption and regeneration properties was successfully prepared by mixing CNTs with surfactant Brij 35 and pseudo boehmite, followed by calcining to remove surfactant and form porous granules. Alumina binder increased the mechanical strength, hydrophilicity and porosity of the granular adsorbent, while the dispersed CNTs in the granular adsorbent were responsible for the sorption of diclofenac sodium (DS) and carbamazepine (CBZ). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the CNTs and Al2O3 were mixed well and the porous structure was formed in the granular adsorbent. The high surface area and appropriate pore size of granular CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were favorable for sorption. The sorption of DS decreased with increasing solution pH, while pH had little effect on CBZ sorption. The maximum sorption capacities of CBZ and DS on the CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were 157.4 and 106.5 μmol/g according to the Langmuir fitting. Moreover, the spent CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent can be thermally regenerated at 400 °C in air due to the thermal stability of CNTs. The removal of CBZ and DS changed a little in the initial reuse cycles and then kept relatively constant until tenth cycles. The adsorbed CBZ and DS were decomposed in the regeneration process. This regenerable adsorbent may find potential application in water or wastewater treatment for the removal of some micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals. PMID:23579087

  5. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  6. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  7. Concentration quenching of rhodamine 6G fluorescence in the adsorbed state

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskii, V.I.; Meshkovskii, I.K.; Sokolov, I.A.

    1985-08-01

    Porous glass to which molecules of organic dyes have been added is a promising active solid medium for tunable lasers. The spectroluminescent characteristics of samples of porous glass activated with rhodamine 6G molecules have been studied. It is shown that molecules of rhodamine 6G adsorbed in porus glass retain their capacity for fluorescence with a high quantum yield. Fixation of rhodamine 6G molecules on the pore walls interferes with their association in the concentration range up to 10/sup 19/ cm/sup -3/. Concentration quenching of fluorescence is observed starting with a concentration of dye molecules of 5 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/; this is explained by inductive-resonance energy transfer between monomeric molecules under conditions of inhomogeneous broadening of the electronic spectra of the adsorbed molecules.

  8. Identification of vitronectin as a major plasma protein adsorbed on polymer surfaces of different copolymer composition.

    PubMed

    Bale, M D; Wohlfahrt, L A; Mosher, D F; Tomasini, B; Sutton, R C

    1989-12-01

    The arrays of proteins adsorbed from plasma onto a series of polystyrene copolymeric latexes were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of washed beads and immunoblotting of proteins desorbed from the beads and separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Beads were prepared by continuous emulsion polymerization in the absence of surfactant. Coomassie brilliant blue staining of gel electropherograms of desorbed proteins indicated that the presence of small amounts of comonomers (1 to 10 mole %) significantly influenced the composition of the adsorbed protein layer. Immunoblotting revealed that fibrinogen, fibronectin, and vitronectin were adsorbed by all surfaces investigated. C3 and Clq adsorption varied significantly with copolymer composition. The ELISAs revealed that although the concentrations of vitronectin and fibronectin in plasma are similar, the extent of vitronectin adsorption from 70% to 85% plasma was greater by two orders of magnitude than fibronectin adsorption. Vitronectin adsorbed on carboxylic acid-containing copolymers reacted more strongly with a conformationally sensitive antivitronectin monoclonal antibody (MoAb) than vitronectin adsorbed to polystyrene and was more susceptible to cleavage by plasma proteases(s). The results show that vitronectin is a major protein adsorbed from concentrated plasma and that small changes in the chemical composition of a copolymer profoundly affects the extent and nature of protein adsorption from complex mixtures such as plasma. PMID:2479428

  9. Modification of Deeply Buried Hydrophobic Interfaces by Ionic Surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Ocko, B.M.; Tamam, L.; Pontoni, D.; Sapir, Z.; Yefet, S.; Sloutskin, E.; Reichert, H.; Deutsch, M.

    2011-04-05

    Hydrophobicity, the spontaneous segregation of oil and water, can be modified by surfactants. The way this modification occurs is studied at the oil-water interface for a range of alkanes and two ionic surfactants. A liquid interfacial monolayer, consisting of a mixture of alkane molecules and surfactant tails, is found. Upon cooling, it freezes at T{sub s}, well above the alkane's bulk freezing temperature, T{sub b}. The monolayer's phase diagram, derived by surface tensiometry, is accounted for by a mixtures-based theory. The monolayer's structure is measured by high-energy X-ray reflectivity above and below T{sub s}. A solid-solid transition in the frozen monolayer, occurring approximately 3 C below T{sub s}, is discovered and tentatively suggested to be a rotator-to-crystal transition.

  10. Modification of Deeply Buried Hydrophobic Interfaces by Ionic Surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    L Tamam; D Pontoni Z Sapir; S Yefet; S Sloutskin; B Ocko; H Reichert; M Deutsch

    2011-12-31

    Hydrophobicity, the spontaneous segregation of oil and water, can be modified by surfactants. The way this modification occurs is studied at the oil-water interface for a range of alkanes and two ionic surfactants. A liquid interfacial monolayer, consisting of a mixture of alkane molecules and surfactant tails, is found. Upon cooling, it freezes at T{sub s}, well above the alkane's bulk freezing temperature, T{sub b}. The monolayer's phase diagram, derived by surface tensiometry, is accounted for by a mixtures-based theory. The monolayer's structure is measured by high-energy X-ray reflectivity above and below T{sub s}. A solid-solid transition in the frozen monolayer, occurring approximately 3 C below T{sub s}, is discovered and tentatively suggested to be a rotator-to-crystal transition.

  11. Novel Approaches to Surfactant Administration

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir; Donn, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy has been the mainstay of treatment for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome for more than twenty years. For the most part, surfactant is administered intratracheally, followed by mechanical ventilation. In recent years, the growing interest in noninvasive ventilation has led to novel approaches of administration. This paper will review these techniques and the associated clinical evidence. PMID:23243504

  12. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  13. NATURAL SURFACTANTS IN PAPER RECYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to introduce new types of surfactants based on renewable materials (sugar surfactants) for use in ink removal from recycled paper. By applying green chemistry approaches we not only will solve an important industry and environmental problem but...

  14. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  15. Direct Observation Of Nanoparticle-Surfactant Interactions Using Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2010-12-01

    Interactions of anionic silica nanoparticles with anionic, cationic and nonionic surfactants have directly been studied by contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements are performed on 1 wt% of both silica nanoparticles and surfactants of anionic sodium dodecyle sulphate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and non-ionic polyoxyethylene 10 lauryl ether (C12E10) in aqueous solution. We show that there is no direct interaction in the case of SDS with silica particles, whereas strong interaction for DTAB leads to the aggregation of silica particles. The interaction of C12E10 is found through the micelles adsorbed on the silica particles.

  16. Femtosecond spectroscopy on MoS2 flakes from liquid exfoliation: surfactant independent exciton dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, Daniele; Vega-Mayoral, Victor; Gadermaier, Christoph; Vujicic, Natasa; Borzda, Tetiana; Topolovsek, Peter; Prijatelj, Matej; Tempra, Iacopo; Pogna, Eva A. A.; Cerullo, Giulio

    2016-03-01

    Ionic surfactants, which are widely used to stabilize nanomaterials in dispersions, can drastically alter the nanomaterial's photophysical properties. Here, we use femtosecond optical spectroscopy to study the dynamics of excitons and charges in few-layer flakes of the two-dimensional semiconductor MoS2. We compare samples obtained via exfoliation in water with different amounts of adsorbed sodium cholate, obtained by repeated washing of the dried flakes. We find that the femtosecond dynamics is remarkably stable against the surfactant adsorption, with a slight increase of the initial exciton quenching occurring during the first few picoseconds as the only appreciable effect.

  17. Production And Artile Of Iron/Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Pellets To Retain And Destroy Water Pollutants

    DOEpatents

    BOWMAN, ROBERT S.; [et al

    2001-07-17

    A method of producing a pollutant adsorption and degradation article, and such article, are provided. At least one adsorbent is mixed with at least one pollutant transforming agent to form a mixture. This mixture is compacted to form a porous, highly permeable article. If necessary, the article can be modified with surfactant either after the compacting step or by adding the surfactant to the mixture prior to the compacting step. In addition, if necessary, a binding agent can be added to the mixture prior to the compacting step.

  18. Surfactant Assemblies and their Various Possible Roles for the Origin(S) of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walde, Peter

    2006-04-01

    A large number of surfactants (surface active molecules) are chemically simple compounds that can be obtained by simple chemical reactions, in some cases even under presumably prebiotic conditions. Surfactant assemblies are self-organized polymolecular aggregates of surfactants, in the simplest case micelles, vesicles, hexagonal and cubic phases. It may be that these different types of surfactant assemblies have played various, so-far underestimated important roles in the processes that led to the formation of the first living systems. Although nucleic acids are key players in the formation of cells as we know them today (RNA world hypothesis), it is still unclear how RNA could have been formed under prebiotic conditions. Surfactants with their self-organizing properties may have assisted, controlled and compartimentalized some of the chemical reactions that eventually led to the formation of molecules like RNA. Therefore, surfactants were possibly very important in prebiotic times in the sense that they may have been involved in different physical and chemical processes that finally led to a transformation of non-living matter to the first cellular form(s) of life. This hypothesis is based on four main experimental observations: (i) Surfactant aggregation can lead to cell-like compartimentation (vesicles). (ii) Surfactant assemblies can provide local reaction conditions that are very different from the bulk medium, which may lead to a dramatic change in the rate of chemical reactions and to a change in reaction product distributions. (iii) The surface properties of surfactant assemblies that may be liquid- or solid-like, charged or neutral, and the elasticity and packing density of surfactant assemblies depend on the chemical structure of the surfactants, on the presence of other molecules, and on the overall environmental conditions (e. g. temperature). This wide range of surface characteristics of surfactant assemblies may allow a control of surface

  19. Tuning cellulose nanocrystal gelation with polysaccharides and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Cranston, Emily D; Ng, Robin; Pelton, Robert

    2014-03-18

    Gelation of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) dispersions was measured as a function of the presence of four nonionic polysaccharides. Addition of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC), hydroxypropyl guar (HPG), or locust bean gum (LBG) to CNC dispersions induced the gelation of dilute CNC dispersions, whereas dextran (DEX) did not. These behaviors correlated with adsorption tendencies; HEC, HPG, and LBG adsorbed onto CNC-coated quartz crystal microbalance sensors, whereas DEX did not adsorb. We propose that the adsorbing polysaccharides greatly increased the effective volume fraction of dilute CNC dispersions, driving more of the nanocrystals into anisotropic domains. SDS and Triton X-100 addition disrupted HEC-CNC gels whereas CTAB did not. Surface plasmon resonance measurements with CNC-coated sensors showed that SDS and Triton X-100 partially removed adsorbed HEC, whereas CTAB did not. These behaviors illustrate the complexities associated with including CNC dispersions in formulated products: low CNC contents can induce spectacular changes in rheology; however, surfactants and soluble polymers may promote gel formation or induce CNC coagulation. PMID:24559239

  20. On-line surfactant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, K.I.; Neal, E.E.; Soran, P.D.; Smith, B.

    1995-04-01

    This group has developed a process to extract metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The process uses water soluble polymers to complex metal ions. The metal/polymer complex is concentrated by ultrafiltration and the metals are recovered by a pH adjustment that frees the metal ions. The metal ions pass through the ultrafiltration membrane and are recovered in a concentrated form suitable for reuse. Surfactants are present in one of the target waste streams. Surfactants foul the costly ultrafiltration membranes. It was necessary to remove the surfactants before processing the waste stream. This paper discusses an on-line device the authors fabricated to monitor the process stream to assure that all the surfactant had been removed. The device is inexpensive and sensitive to very low levels of surfactants.

  1. Computer simulations of lung surfactant.

    PubMed

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-10-01

    Lung surfactant lines the gas-exchange interface in the lungs and reduces the surface tension, which is necessary for breathing. Lung surfactant consists mainly of lipids with a small amount of proteins and forms a monolayer at the air-water interface connected to bilayer reservoirs. Lung surfactant function involves transfer of material between the monolayer and bilayers during the breathing cycle. Lipids and proteins are organized laterally in the monolayer; selected species are possibly preferentially transferred to bilayers. The complex 3D structure of lung surfactant and the exact roles of lipid organization and proteins remain important goals for research. We review recent simulation studies on the properties of lipid monolayers, monolayers with phase coexistence, monolayer-bilayer transformations, lipid-protein interactions, and effects of nanoparticles on lung surfactant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26922885

  2. Surfactant induced autophobing.

    PubMed

    Bera, B; Duits, M H G; Cohen Stuart, M A; van den Ende, D; Mugele, F

    2016-05-18

    Surfactant adsorption in a three-phase system and its influence on wetting properties are relevant in various applications. Here, we report a hitherto not observed phenomenon, namely the retraction of an aqueous drop on hydrophilic solid substrates (which we refer to as 'autophobing') in ambient oil containing water-insoluble fatty acids, caused by the deposition of these fatty acids from the ambient oil onto the solid substrate. AFM measurements confirm that the surfactant is deposited on the solid by the moving contact line. This leads to a more hydrophobic substrate, the retraction of the contact line and a concomitant increase in the contact angle. The deposition process is enabled by the formation of a reaction product between deprotonated fatty acids and Ca(2+) ions at the oil/water interface. We investigate how the transition to a new equilibrium depends on the concentrations of the fatty acids, the aqueous solute, the chain lengths of the fatty acid, and the types of alkane solvent and silica or mica substrates. This phenomenon is observed on both substrates and for all explored combinations of fatty acids and solvents and thus appears to be generic. In order to capture the evolution of the contact angle, we develop a theoretical model in which the rate of adsorption at the oil-water interface governs the overall kinetics of autophobing, and transfer to the solid is determined by a mass flux balance (similar to a Langmuir Blodgett transfer). PMID:27102975

  3. Do Methanethiol Adsorbates on the Au(111) Surface Dissociate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank

    2006-07-01

    The interaction of methanethiol molecules CH3SH with the Au(111) surface is investigated, and it is found for the first time that the S-H bond remains intact when the methanethiol molecules are adsorbed on the regular Au(111) surface. However, it breaks if defects are present in the Au(111) surface. At low coverage, the fcc region is favored for S atom adsorption, but at saturated coverage the adsorption energies at various sites are almost isoenergetic. The presented calculations show that a methanethiol layer on the regular Au(111) surface does not dimerize.

  4. Molecular switches from benzene derivatives adsorbed on metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Filimonov, Sergey N.; Carrasco, Javier; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Transient precursor states are often experimentally observed for molecules adsorbing on surfaces. However, such precursor states are typically rather short-lived, quickly yielding to more stable adsorption configurations. Here we employ first-principles calculations to systematically explore the interaction mechanism for benzene derivatives on metal surfaces, enabling us to selectively tune the stability and the barrier between two metastable adsorption states. In particular, in the case of the tetrachloropyrazine molecule, two equally stable adsorption states are identified with a moderate and conceivably reversible barrier between them. We address the feasibility of experimentally detecting the predicted bistable behaviour and discuss its potential usefulness in a molecular switch. PMID:24157660

  5. Temperature programmed desorption of weakly bound adsorbates on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Meling, Artur; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2016-08-01

    We have performed temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to analyze the desorption kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, C2H2, SF6, N2, NO and CO on Au(111). We report desorption activation energies (Edes), which are an excellent proxy for the binding energies. The derived binding energies scale with the polarizability of the molecules, consistent with the conclusion that the surface-adsorbate bonds arise due to dispersion forces. The reported results serve as a benchmark for theories of dispersion force interactions of molecules at metal surfaces.

  6. Stabilization of emulsions using polymeric surfactants based on inulin.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Th F; Vandamme, A; Levecke, B; Booten, K; Stevens, C V

    2004-05-20

    The use of polymeric surfactants for stabilization of emulsions is described. A brief account of general classification and description of polymeric surfactants is given. This is followed by a description of the adsorption and conformation of polymeric surfactants at interfaces. The theoretical approaches for studying polymer adsorption are briefly described. This is followed by a section on the experimental techniques that can be applied to study adsorption and conformation of polymers at the interface. Examples are given to illustrate the experimental techniques. A section is devoted to the interaction between droplets containing adsorbed polymer layers (steric stabilization). The last section gives results on oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions stabilised with a novel graft copolymeric surfactant based on inulin that has been modified by introducing alkyl groups. Two oils were used, namely Isopar M (isoparaffinic oil) and cyclomethicone. Emulsions prepared using the inulin-based surfactant have large droplets, but this could be significantly reduced by addition of a cosurfactant in the oil phase, namely Span 20. The stability of the emulsions was investigated in water, in 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mol dm(-3) NaCl and in 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mol dm(-3) MgSO(4). These emulsions were stable for more than 1 year up to 50 degrees C in NaCl concentrations up to 2 mol dm(-3) and 1 mol dm(-3) MgSO(4). This high stability in high electrolyte concentrations could be attributed to the nature of the hydrophilic (stabilizing) polyfructose chain. This was confirmed using cloud point measurements, which showed high hydration of the polyfructose chain in such high electrolyte concentrations. This ensured the long-term physical stability resulting from the strong steric repulsion between the polyfructose chains. PMID:15072943

  7. Interaction between DNA and cationic surfactants: effect of DNA conformation and surfactant headgroup.

    PubMed

    Dias, Rita S; Magno, Luís M; Valente, Artur J M; Das, Dibyendu; Das, Prasanta K; Maiti, Souvik; Miguel, Maria G; Lindman, Björn

    2008-11-20

    for surfactant concentrations below the cac; this feature was not displayed at higher concentrations of DNA. The effect is attributed to the presence of a mixture of ss- and dsDNA molecules. Thus the stability of dsDNA is dependent on a certain ion atmosphere; at lower ion concentrations the electrostatic repulsions between the DNA strands become too strong compared to the attractive interactions, and there is a dissociation into the individual strands. Fluorescence microscopy studies, performed at much lower DNA concentrations, demonstrated a transformation of dsDNA from an extended "coil" state to a compact "globule" condition, with a broad concentration region of coexistence of coils and globules. The onset of DNA compaction coincides roughly with the cac values obtained from conductivity measurements. This is in line with the observed independence of cac on the DNA concentration, together with the assumption that the onset of binding corresponds to an initiation of DNA compaction. No major changes in either the onset of compaction or complete compaction were observed as the surfactant headgroup was made more polar. PMID:18774843

  8. Surfactant protein B deficiency: insights into surfactant function through clinical surfactant protein deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M W

    2001-01-01

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B) deficiency is a disorder of surfactant function with complete or transient absence of SP-B in term neonates. SP-B, 1 of 4 described surfactant-associated proteins, plays a key role in surfactant metabolism, particularly in intracellular packaging of surfactant components, formation of tubular myelin, and the presentation of the surfactant phospholipid monolayer to the air-fluid interface within the alveolus. Neonates with clinical SP-B deficiency best demonstrate the key role of SP-B in surfactant function. "Classic" deficiency results in severe respiratory failure in term infants and death unless lung transplantation is performed. Because the initial description of complete deficiency secondary to a homozygous frameshift mutation in codon 121 of the SP-B cDNA, partial deficiencies with differing genetic backgrounds and less severe clinical courses have been reported. These partial deficiency states may provide a clearer picture of genotype/phenotype relationships in SP-B function and surfactant metabolism. SP-B deficiency or dysfunction may be more common than once thought and may play a significant role in neonatal lung disease. PMID:11202476

  9. A double injection ADSA-CSD methodology for lung surfactant inhibition and reversal studies.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Dang, Andrew; Acosta, Edgar J; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a continuation of the development of a drop shape method for film studies, ADSA-CSD (Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis-Constrained Sessile Drop). ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The development presented here allows complete exchange of the subphase of a spread or adsorbed film. This feature allows certain studies relevant to lung surfactant research that cannot be readily performed by other means. The key feature of the design is a second capillary into the bulk of the drop to facilitate addition or removal of a secondary liquid. The development will be illustrated through studies concerning lung surfactant inhibition. After forming a sessile drop of a basic lung surfactant preparation, the bulk phase can be removed and exchanged for one containing different inhibitors. Such studies mimic the leakage of plasma and blood proteins into the alveolar spaces altering the surface activity of lung surfactant in a phenomenon called surfactant inhibition. The resistance of the lung surfactant to specific inhibitors can be readily evaluated using the method. The new method is also useful for surfactant reversal studies, i.e. the ability to restore the normal surface activity of an inhibited lung surfactant film by using special additives. Results show a distinctive difference between the inhibition when an inhibitor is mixed with and when it is injected under a preformed surfactant film. None of the inhibitors studied (serum, albumin, fibrinogen, and cholesterol) were able to penetrate a preexisting film formed by the basic preparation (BLES and protasan), while all of them can alter the surface activity of such preparation when mixed with the preparation. Preliminary results show that reversal of serum inhibition can be easily achieved and evaluated using the modified methodology. PMID:19586757

  10. Thermodynamic formalism of water uptakes on solid porous adsorbents for adsorption cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Baichuan; Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2014-05-19

    This Letter presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the amount of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and silica gel for the development of an advanced adsorption chiller. This formalism is developed from the rigor of the partition distribution function of each water vapor adsorptive site on adsorbents and the condensation approximation of adsorptive water molecules and is validated with experimental data. An interesting and useful finding has been established that the proposed model is thermodynamically connected with the pore structures of adsorbent materials, and the water vapor uptake highly depends on the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero surface coverage and the adsorptive sites of the adsorbent materials. Employing the proposed model, the thermodynamic trends of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents can be estimated.

  11. Theoretical and Simulations-Based Modeling of Micellization in Linear and Branched Surfactant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendenhall, Jonathan D.

    Surfactants are chemically-heterogeneous molecules possessing hydrophilic (head) and hydrophobic (tail) moieties. This dual nature of surfactants leads to interesting phase behavior in aqueous solution as a function of surfactant concentration, including: (i) formation of surfactant monolayers at surfaces and interfaces, and (ii) self-assembly into finite aggregates (micelles) in the bulk solution beyond the critical micelle concentration (cmc). This concentration-dependent phase behavior induces changes in solution properties. For example, the surface activity of surfactants can decrease the surface tension, and self-assembly in bulk solution can lead to changes in viscosity, equivalent conductivity, solubilization capacity, and other bulk properties. These effects make surfactants quite attractive and unique for use in product formulations, where they are utilized as detergents, dispersants, emulsifiers, solubilizers, surface and interfacial tension modifiers, and in other contexts. The specific chemical structure of the surfactant head and tail is essential in determining the overall performance properties of a surfactant in aqueous media. The surfactant tail drives the self-assembly process through the hydrophobic effect, while the surfactant head imparts a certain extent of solubility to the surfactant in aqueous solution through preferential interactions with the hydrogen-bonding network of water. The interplay between these two effects gives rise to the particular phase diagram of a surfactant, including the specific cmc at which micelles begin to form. In addition to serving as a quantitative indicator of micelle formation, the cmc represents a limit to surface monolayer formation, and hence to surface and interfacial tension reduction, because surfactant adsorption at interfaces remains approximately constant beyond the cmc. In addition, the cmc represents the onset of changes in bulk solution properties. This Thesis is concerned with the prediction of cmc

  12. The interaction of a model active pharmaceutical with cationic surfactant and the subsequent design of drug based ionic liquid surfactants.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Sara; Brown, Paul; Ferguson, Steven; Khan, Rafaqat Ali; Ismail, Bushra; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Sayed, Murtaza; Khan, Asad Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Interactions of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) with surfactants remain an important research area due to the need to improve drug delivery systems. In this study, UV-Visible spectrophotometry was used to investigate the interactions between a model low molecular weight hydrophilic drug sodium valproate (SV) and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Changes in the spectra of SV were observed in pre- and post-micellar concentrations of CTAB. The binding constant (Kb) values and the number of drug molecules encapsulated per micelle were calculated, which posed the possibility of mixed micelle formation and strong complexation between SV and CTAB. These results were compared to those of a novel room temperature surface active ionic liquid, which was synthesized by the removal of inorganic counterions from a 1:1 mixture of CTAB and SV. In this new compound the drug now constitutes a building block of the carrier and, as such, has considerably different surfactant properties to its building blocks. In addition, enhanced solubility in a range of solvents, including simulated gastric fluid, was observed. The study provides valuable experimental evidence concerning the performance of drug based surfactant ionic liquids and how their chemical manipulation, without altering the architecture of the API, leads to control of surfactant behavior and physicochemical properties. In turn, this should feed through to improved and controlled drug release rates and delivery mechanisms, and the prevention of precipitation or formation of polymorphs typical of crystalline form APIs. PMID:27472069

  13. Genetic disorders of surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Xu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Adaptation to air breathing at birth requires the precise orchestration of cellular processes to initiate fluid clearance, enhance pulmonary blood flow, and to synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant needed to reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic programs regulating the synthesis of the surfactant proteins and lipids required for the production and function of pulmonary surfactant are highly conserved across vertebrates, and include proteins that regulate the synthesis and packaging of pulmonary surfactant proteins and lipids. Surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and -C) are small, uniquely hydrophobic proteins that play important roles in the stability and spreading of surfactant lipids in the alveolus. Deletion or mutations in SP-B and -C cause acute and chronic lung disease in neonates and infants. SP-B and -C are synthesized and packaged with surfactant phospholipids in lamellar bodies. Normal lamellar body formation requires SP-B and a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of ATP-dependent membrane-associated transport proteins, ABCA3. Mutations in ABCA3 cause fatal respiratory disease in newborns and severe chronic lung disease in infancy. Expression of SP-B, -C, and ABCA3 are coregulated during late gestation by transcriptional programs influenced by thyroid transcription factor-1 and forkhead box a2, transcription factors that regulate both differentiation of the respiratory epithelium and transcription of genes required for perinatal adaptation to air breathing. PMID:15985750

  14. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1985-03-12

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with a polynuclear aromatic compound having a molecular weight of at least 155. A novel surfactant system useful in enhanced oil recovery containing the above surfactant is also provided. In addition, an improved process for the enhanced recovery of oil is provided utilizing the novel surfactant system.

  15. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V.; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M.; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of ‘extra adsorption domains’—that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically.

  16. Molecular conformation-controlled vesicle/micelle transition of cationic trimeric surfactants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxian; Hou, Yanbo; Deng, Manli; Huang, Xu; Yu, Defeng; Xiang, Junfeng; Liu, Yu; Li, Zhibo; Wang, Yilin

    2010-06-01

    Two star-like trimeric cationic surfactants with amide groups in spacers, tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD) and tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)tris(2-aminoethyl)amine trichloride (DDAD), have been synthesized, and the aggregation behavior of the surfactants in aqueous solution has been investigated by surface tension, electrical conductivity, isothermal titration microcalorimetry, dynamic light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, and NMR techniques. Typically, both the surfactants form vesicles just above critical aggregation concentration (CAC), and then the vesicles transfer to micelles gradually with an increase of the surfactant concentration. It is approved that the conformation of the surfactant molecules changes in this transition process. Just above the CAC, the hydrophobic chains of the surfactant molecules pack more loosely because of the rigid spacer and intramolecular electrostatic repulsion in the three-charged headgroup. With the increase of the surfactant concentration, hydrophobic interaction becomes strong enough to pack the hydrophobic tails tightly and turn the molecular conformation into a pyramid-like shape, thus leading to the vesicle to micelle transition. PMID:20426428

  17. Structure of diglycerol polyisostearate nonionic surfactant micelles in nonpolar oil hexadecane: a SAXS study.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Oyama, Keiichi; Matsuzawa, Makoto; Aramaki, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Using a small-angle X-ray scattering technique, shape and size, and internal structure of diglycerol polyisostearate nonionic surfactant micelles in nonpolar oil n-hexadecane (HD) were investigated at 25 degrees C. Furthermore, the effect of added water on the structure of host reverse micelles was also investigated. The scattering data were evaluated by the generalized indirect Fourier transformation (GIFT) method and model fittings. It was found that diglycerol polyisostearate (abbreviated as (iso-C18)nG2, where n=2-4 represent the number of isostearate chain per surfactant molecule) spontaneously form reverse micelles in HD at 25 degrees C and their geometry (shape and size, and internal structure) could flexibly be controlled by a small change in the lipophilic tail architecture of the surfactant, temperature, and water addition. Increasing number of isostearate chain per surfactant molecule decreases the micelles size favoring prolate-to-sphere type transition. This phenomenon could be best understood due to voluminous lipophilic part of the surfactant. Increasing temperature decreases the size of the reverse micelles due to enhanced inter-penetration of the surfactant chain and the oil and also due to dominant hydrophobic character of the surfactant at higher temperatures. In the studies of effect of added water on the structure of micelles, it was found that the reverse micelles swell with water causing two dimensional micellar growths. PMID:20513967

  18. Optimizing the Interactions of Surfactants with Graphitic Surfaces and Clathrate Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Di Crescenzo, Antonello; Di Profio, Pietro; Siani, Gabriella; Zappacosta, Romina; Fontana, Antonella

    2016-07-01

    Surfactants are amphiphilic molecules active at the surface/interface and able to self-assemble. Because of these properties, surfactants have been extensively used as detergents, emulsifiers, foaming agents, and wetting agents. New perspectives have been opened by the exploitation of surfactants for their capacity to interact as well with simple molecules or surfaces. This feature article gives an overview of significant contributions in the panorama of the current research on surfactants, partly accomplished as well by our research group. We look at several recent applications (e.g., adsorption to graphitic surfaces and interactions with hydrate crystals) with the eye of physical organic chemists. We demonstrate that, from the detailed investigation of the forces involved in the interactions with hydrophobic surfaces, it is possible to optimize the design of the surfactant that is able to form a stable and unbundled carbon nanotube dispersion as well as the best exfoliating agent for graphitic surfaces. By studying the effect of different surfactants on the capacity to favor or disfavor the formation of a gas hydrate, it is possible to highlight the main features that a surfactant should possess in order to be devoted to that specific application. PMID:27264111

  19. Study for optical manipulation of a surfactant-covered droplet using lattice Boltzmann method

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Se Bin; Kondaraju, Sasidhar; Sang Lee, Joon

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we simulated deformation and surfactant distribution on the interface of a surfactant-covered droplet using optical tweezers as an external source. Two optical forces attracted a single droplet from the center to both sides. This resulted in an elliptical shape deformation. The droplet deformation was characterized as the change of the magnitudes of surface tension and optical force. In this process, a non-linear relationship among deformation, surface tension, and optical forces was observed. The change in the local surfactant concentration resulting from the application of optical forces was also analyzed and compared with the concentration of surfactants subjected to an extensional flow. Under the optical force influence, the surfactant molecules were concentrated at the droplet equator, which is totally opposite to the surfactants behavior under extensional flow, where the molecules were concentrated at the poles. Lastly, the quasi-equilibrium surfactant distribution was obtained by combining the effects of the optical forces with the extensional flow. All simulations were executed by the lattice Boltzmann method which is a powerful tool for solving micro-scale problems. PMID:24753737

  20. Concentration Dependent Specific Rotations of Chiral Surfactants: Experimental and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Covington, Cody L; Polavarapu, Prasad L

    2016-07-21

    Recent experimental studies have shown unexpected chiroptical response from some chiral surfactant molecules, where the specific rotations changed significantly as a function of concentration. To establish a theoretical understanding of this experimentally observed phenomena, a novel methodology for studying chiral surfactants via combined molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations is presented. MD simulations on the +10 000 atom surfactant systems have been performed using MD and QM/molecular mechanics (MM) approaches. QM calculations performed on MD snapshots coupled with extensive analysis on lauryl ester of phenylalanine (LEP) surfactant system indicate that the experimentally observed variation of specific rotation with concentration may be due to the conformational differences of the surfactant monomers in the aggregates. Though traditional MM simulations did not show significant differences in the conformer populations, QM/MM simulations using the forces derived from the PM6 method did predict conformational differences between aggregated and nonaggregated LEP molecules, which is consistent with experimental data. Additionally the electrostatic environment of charged surfactants may also be important, since dramatic changes in the Boltzmann populations of surfactant monomers can be noted in the presence of an electric field generated by the chiral ionic aggregates. PMID:27355395

  1. Factors influencing the mechanism of surfactant catalyzed reaction of vitamin C-ferric chloride hexahydrate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrukh, Muhammad Akhyar; Kauser, Robina; Adnan, Rohana

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of vitamin C by ferric chloride hexahydrate has been investigated in the aqueous ethanol solution of basic surfactant viz. octadecylamine (ODA) under pseudo-first order conditions. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant was determined by surface tension measurement. The effect of pH (2.5-4.5) and temperature (15-35°C) in the presence and absence of surfactant were investigated. Activation parameters, Δ E a, Δ H #, Δ S #, Δ G ≠, for the reaction were calculated by using Arrhenius and Eyring plot. Surface excess concentration (Γmax), minimum area per surfactant molecule ( A min), average area occupied by each molecule of surfactant ( a), surface pressure at the CMC (Πmax), Gibb's energy of micellization (Δ G M°), Gibb's energy of adsorption (Δ G ad°), were calculated. It was found that the reaction in the presence of surfactant showed faster oxidation rate than the aqueous ethanol solution. Reaction mechanism has been deduced in the presence and absence of surfactant.

  2. Tuning Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Interactions: Modification of Poly(ethylenimine) with Propylene Oxide and Blocks of Ethylene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Li, P; Batchelor, S N; Tucker, I M; Burley, A W

    2016-02-01

    Significantly enhanced adsorption at the air-water interface arises in polyelectrolyte/ionic surfactant mixtures, such as poly(ethylenimine)/sodium dodecyl sulfate (PEI/SDS), down to relatively low surfactant concentrations due to a strong surface interaction between the polyelectrolyte and surfactant. In the region of charge neutralization this can result in precipitation or coacervation and give rise to undesirable properties in many applications. Ethoxylation of the PEI can avoid precipitation, but can also considerably weaken the interaction. Localization of the ethoxylation can overcome these shortcomings. Further manipulation of the polyelectrolyte-surfactant interaction can be achieved by selective ethoxylation and propoxylation of the PEI amine groups. Neutron reflectivity and surface tension data are presented here which show how the polyelectrolyte-surfactant interaction can be manipulated by tuning the PEI structure. Using deuterium labeled surfactant and polymer the neutron reflectivity measurements provide details of the surface composition and structure of the adsorbed layer. The general pattern of behavior is that at low surfactant concentrations there is enhanced surfactant adsorption due to the strong surface interaction; whereas around the region of the SDS critical micellar concentration, cmc, the surface is partially depleted of surfactant in favor bulk aggregate structures. The results presented here show how these characteristic features of the adsorption are affected by the degree of ethoxylation and propoxylation. Increasing the degree of propoxylation enhances the surfactant adsorption, whereas varying the degree of ethoxylation has a less pronounced effect. In the region of surfactant surface depletion increasing both the degree of ethoxylation and propoxylation result in an increased surface depletion. PMID:26757099

  3. Binding of 12-s-12 dimeric surfactants to calf thymus DNA: Evaluation of the spacer length influence.

    PubMed

    Sarrión, Beatriz; Bernal, Eva; Martín, Victoria Isabel; López-López, Manuel; López-Cornejo, Pilar; García-Calderón, Margarita; Moyá, María Luisa

    2016-08-01

    Several cationic dimeric surfactants have shown high affinity towards DNA. Bis-quaternary ammonium salts (m-s-m) have been the most common type of dimeric surfactants investigated and it is generally admitted that those that posses a short spacer (s≤3) show better efficiency to bind or compact DNA. However, experimental results in this work show that 12-s-12 surfactants with long spacers make the surfactant/ctDNA complexation more favorable than those with short spacers. A larger contribution of the hydrophobic interactions, which control the binding Gibbs energy, as well as a higher average charge of the surfactant molecules bound to the nucleic acid, which favors the electrostatic attractions, could explain the experimental observations. Dimeric surfactants with intermediate spacer length seem to be the less efficient for DNA binding. PMID:27108208

  4. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  5. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  6. A model of flow and surfactant transport in an oscillatory alveolus partially filled with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Fujioka, Hideki; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Grotberg, James B.

    2005-03-01

    The flow and transport in an alveolus are of fundamental importance to partial liquid ventilation, surfactant transport, pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. We model the system in which an alveolus is partially filled with liquid in the presence of surfactants. By assuming a circular interface due to sufficiently strong surface tension and small surfactant activity, we combine semianalytical and numerical techniques to solve the Stokes flow and the surfactant transport equations. In the absence of surfactants, there is no steady streaming because of reversibility of Stokes flow. The presence of surfactants, however, induces a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns (e.g., number of vortices) particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration periods (I :E ratio) and the sorption parameter K. For an insoluble surfactant, a single vortex is formed when the I :E ratio is either smaller or larger than 1:1, but the recirculations have opposite directions in the two cases. A soluble surfactant can lead to more complex flow patterns such as three vortices or saddle-point flow structures. The estimated unsteady velocity is 10-3cm/s, and the corresponding Péclet number for transporting respiratory gas is O(1). For a cell-cell signaling molecule such as surfactant-associated protein-A for regulating surfactant secretion, the Péclet number could be O(10) or higher. Convection is either comparable to or more dominant than diffusion in these processes. The estimated steady velocity ranges from 10-6to10-4cm /s, depending on I :E and K, and the corresponding steady Péclet number is between 10-8/Dm and 10-6/Dm (Dm is the molecular diffusivity with units of cm2/s). Therefore, for Dm⩽10-8cm2/s, the convective transport dominates.

  7. Footprint organization of chiral molecules on metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uñac, R. O.; Rabaza, A. V. Gil; Vidales, A. M.; Zgrablich, G.

    2007-10-01

    We study the behavior of chiral molecules adsorbed on clean metallic surfaces using a lattice-gas model and Monte Carlo simulation. The aim is to model and simulate the structure (footprints and organization) formed by molecules on the surface as they adsorb. The model, which is applicable to chiral species like S- and R-alanine, or similar, discloses the conditions to generate different ordered phases that have been observed in experiments by other authors. In our model, each enantiomer may adsorb in two different configurations (species) and several effects are taken into account: inhibition, blockage of neighboring adsorptive sites (steric effects) and promotion of sites representing, in some sense, modifications in the surface properties due to molecule-surface interactions. These adsorption rules are inspired by the enantiomeric character of adsorbed species. We perform a systematic study of the different phases formed in order to qualitatively understand the mechanism for the formation of adsorbate structures experimentally found by other authors.

  8. Selective Gas Capture Ability of Gas-Adsorbent-Incorporated Cellulose Nanofiber Films.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kinjal J; Imae, Toyoko

    2016-05-01

    The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCNF) were hybridized with cation and anion-exchange organoclays, where poly(amido amine) dendrimers were loaded to enhance the functionality of gas adsorption, since dendrimers have the high adsorbability and the enough selectivity on the gas adsorption. The thin films were prepared from the organoclay-TOCNF hybrids and supplied to the gas adsorption. The adsorption of CO2 and NH3 gases increased with an increasing amount of organoclays in TOCNF films, but the behavior of the increase depended on gases, clays, and dendrimers. The hydrotalcite organoclay-TOCNF films displayed the highest adsorption of both gases, but the desorption of CO2 gas from hydrotalcite organoclay-TOCNF films was drastically high in comparison with the other systems. While the CO2 gas is adsorbed and remained on cationic dendrimer sites in cation-exchange organoclay-TOCNF films, the CO2 gas is adsorbed on cationic clay sites in anion exchange organoclay-TOCNF films, and it is easily desorbed from the films. The NH3 adsorption is inversive to the CO2 adsorption. Then the CO2 molecules adsorbed on the cationic dendrimers and the NH3 molecules adsorbed on the anionic dendrimers are preferably captured in these adsorbents. The present research incorporated dendrimers will be contributing to the development of gas-specialized adsorbents, which are selectively storable only in particular gases. PMID:27035217

  9. Understanding the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface from molecular level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhipei; Ren, Tao; Wu, Pan; Shen, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xinping

    2014-11-25

    Understanding the behavior of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is crucial for many applications, such as lubricants, paints, cosmetics, and fire-fighting foams. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the microscopic properties of non-ionic fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface. Several properties, including the distribution of head groups, the distribution probability of the tilt angle between hydrophobic tails with respect to the xy plane, and the order parameter of surfactants, were computed to probe the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface. The effects of the monomer structure on interfacial phenomena of non-ionic surfactants were investigated as well. It is observed that the structure of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is more ordered than that of hydrocarbons, which is dominated by the van der Waals interaction between surfactants and water molecules. However, replacing one or two CF2 with one or two CH2 group does not significantly influence the interfacial structure, suggesting that hydrocarbons may be promising alternatives to perfluorinated surfactants. PMID:25358083

  10. Smart Adsorbents with Photoregulated Molecular Gates for Both Selective Adsorption and Efficient Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Jiang, Yao; Yan, Ni; Shan, Shu-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Bing

    2016-09-01

    Selective adsorption and efficient regeneration are two crucial issues for adsorption processes; unfortunately, only one of them instead of both is favored by traditional adsorbents with fixed pore orifices. Herein, we fabricated a new generation of smart adsorbents through grafting photoresponsive molecules, namely, 4-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl-ureido)azobenzene (AB-TPI), onto pore orifices of the support mesoporous silica. The azobenzene (AB) derivatives serve as the molecular gates of mesopores and are reversibly opened and closed upon light irradiation. Irradiation with visible light (450 nm) causes AB molecules to isomerize from cis to trans configuration, and the molecular gates are closed. It is easy for smaller adsorbates to enter while difficult for the larger ones, and the selective adsorption is consequently facilitated. Upon irradiation with UV light (365 nm), the AB molecules are transformed from trans to cis isomers, promoting the desorption of adsorbates due to the opened molecular gates. The present smart adsorbents can consequently benefit not only selective adsorption but also efficient desorption, which are exceedingly desirable for adsorptive separation but impossible for traditional adsorbents with fixed pore orifices. PMID:27559985

  11. Factors Affecting the Design of Slow Release Formulations of Herbicides Based on Clay-Surfactant Systems. A Methodological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Galán-Jiménez, María del Carmen; Mishael, Yael-Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Morillo, Esmeralda; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ), mesotrione (MS) and flurtamone (FL), whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i) neutral: two berols (B048, B266) and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202); (ii) cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15). Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i.) in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for encapsulation and

  12. Factors affecting the design of slow release formulations of herbicides based on clay-surfactant systems. A methodological approach.

    PubMed

    Galán-Jiménez, María Del Carmen; Mishael, Yael-Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Morillo, Esmeralda; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ), mesotrione (MS) and flurtamone (FL), whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i) neutral: two berols (B048, B266) and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202); (ii) cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15). Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i.) in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for encapsulation and

  13. Surfactant-Enhanced Benard Convection on an Evaporating Drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van X.; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    2001-11-01

    Surfactant effects on an evaporating drop are studied experimentally. Using a fluorescent probe, the distribution and surface phase of the surfactant is directly imaged throughout the evaporation process. From these experiments, we identify conditions in which surfactants promote surface tension-driven Benard instabilities in aqueous systems. The drops under study contain finely divided particles, which act as tracers in the flow, and form well-defined patterns after the drop evaporates. Two flow fields have been reported in this system. The first occurs because the contact line becomes pinned by solid particles at the contact line region. In order for the contact line to remain fixed, an outward flow toward the ring results, driving further accumulation at the contact ring. A ‘coffee ring’ of particles is left as residue after the drop evaporates[1]. The second flow is Benard convection, driven by surface tension gradients on the drop[2,3]. In our experiments, an insoluble monolayer of pentadecanoic acid is spread at the interface of a pendant drop. The surface tension is recorded, and the drop is deposited on a well-defined solid substrate. Fluorescent images of the surface phase of the surfactant are recorded as the drop evaporates. The surfactant monolayer assumes a variety of surface states as a function of the area per molecule at the interface: surface gaseous, surface liquid expanded, and surface liquid condensed phases[4]. Depending upon the surface state of the surfactant as the drop evaporates, transitions of residue patterns left by the particles occur, from the coffee ring pattern to Benard cells to irregular patterns, suggesting a strong resistance to outward flow are observed. The occurrence of Benard cells on a surfactant-rich interface occurs when the interface is in LE-LC coexistence. Prior research concerning surfactant effects on this instability predict that surfactants are strongly stabilizing[5]. The mechanisms for this change in behavior

  14. Competition between Displacement and Dissociation of a Strong Acid Compared to a Weak Acid Adsorbed on Silica Particle Surfaces: The Role of Adsorbed Water.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Tang, Mingjin; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-16

    The adsorption of nitric (HNO3) and formic (HCOOH) acids on silica particle surfaces and the effect of adsorbed water have been investigated at 296 K using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Under dry conditions, both nitric and formic acids adsorb reversibly on silica. Additionally, the FTIR spectra show that both of these molecules remain in the protonated form. At elevated relative humidities (RH), adsorbed water competes both for surface adsorption sites with these acids as well as promotes their dissociation to hydronium ions and the corresponding anions. Compared to HNO3, the extent of dissociation is much smaller for HCOOH, very likely because it is a weaker acid. This study provides valuable insights into the interaction of HNO3 and HCOOH with silica surface on the molecular level and further reveals the complex roles of surface-adsorbed water in atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust particles-many of these containing silica. PMID:27220375

  15. Method And Apparatus For Regenerating Nox Adsorbers

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, J. Joshua; Endicott, Dennis L.; Faulkner, Stephen A.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-03-28

    Methods and apparatuses for regenerating a NOx adsorber coupled with an exhaust of an engine. An actuator drives a throttle valve to a first position when regeneration of the NOx adsorber is desired. The first position is a position that causes the regeneration of the NOx adsorber. An actuator drives the throttle valve to a second position while regeneration of the NOx adsorber is still desired. The second position being a position that is more open than the first position and operable to regenerate a NOx adsorber.

  16. Surfactant-enhanced aquifier remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surfactants can be used to rapidly remove NAPL from contaminated aquifers. They are effective for virtually any organic contaminant. Use in LNAPL contaminated sites requires adequate hydraulic conductivity and control of flow using either hydraulic or physical methods. The presence of DNAPL requires consideration of vertical mobility; a competent confining layer (aquitard) is required if additional aquifers are present at greater depths. Surfactant processes, whether based upon mobilization or solubilization, can be effective at mass removal, but cannot be expected to provide resortation to drinking water standards. The fraction of mass removal, and the cost of remediation using surfactants are dependent upon a sites hydrogeology. Both minimization of cost and maximization of NAPL removal requires detailed characterization of sites contaminant distribution and hydrogeology. Assessment of the feasibility of surfactant-enhanced remediation is dependent upon a detailed site characterization.

  17. Protein recovery from surfactant precipitation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu Ian; Stuckey, David C

    2011-01-01

    The recovery of lysozyme from an aqueous solution containing precipitated lysozyme-AOT complexes formed by the direct addition of sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) to a lysozyme solution was studied using both solvents, and a counterionic surfactant. Ethanol,methanol and solvent mixtures dissolved the surfactant precipitate and recovered lysozyme as a solid. Recovery efficiency and protein stability varied with the type of solvent used. An entirely different method of recovery was also evaluated using a counterionic surfactant: tri-octylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC) which bound to AOT releasing lysozyme into solution.Complete recovery (100%) of lysozyme was achieved at a molar ratio of 2:1(TOMAC:AOT), and the original protein activity was maintained in the final aqueous phase.The recovered lysozyme retained its secondary structure as observed in circular dichroism(CD) spectra. Specific activity studies show that counterionic surfactant extraction does not alter the biological activity of the enzyme. PMID:22235487

  18. Enhanced removal of nitrate from water using surface modification of adsorbents--a review.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Kandasamy, Jaya

    2013-12-15

    Elevated concentration of nitrate results in eutrophication of natural water bodies affecting the aquatic environment and reduces the quality of drinking water. This in turn causes harm to people's health, especially that of infants and livestock. Adsorbents with the high capacity to selectively adsorb nitrate are required to effectively remove nitrate from water. Surface modifications of adsorbents have been reported to enhance their adsorption of nitrate. The major techniques of surface modification are: protonation, impregnation of metals and metal oxides, grafting of amine groups, organic compounds including surfactant coating of aluminosilicate minerals, and heat treatment. This paper reviews current information on these techniques, compares the enhanced nitrate adsorption capacities achieved by the modifications, and the mechanisms of adsorption, and presents advantages and drawbacks of the techniques. Most studies on this subject have been conducted in batch experiments. These studies need to include continuous mode column trials which have more relevance to real operating systems and pilot-plant trials. Reusability of adsorbents is important for economic reasons and practical treatment applications. However, only limited information is available on the regeneration of surface modified adsorbents. PMID:24211565

  19. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  20. Enhanced perfume surface delivery to interfaces using surfactant surface multilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Brabury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced surface delivery and retention of perfumes at interfaces are the keys to their more effective and efficient deployment in a wide range of home and personal care related formulations. It has been previously demonstrated that the addition of multivalent counterions, notably Ca(2+), induces multilayer adsorption at the air-water interface for the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl-6-benzenesulfonate, LAS-6. Neutron reflectivity, NR, measurements are reported here which demonstrate that such surfactant surface multilayer structures are a potentially promising vehicle for enhanced delivery of perfumes to interfaces. The data show that the incorporation of the model perfumes, phenylethanol, PE, and linalool, LL, into the surface multilayer structure formed by LAS-6/Ca(2+) results in the surface structures being retained up to relatively high perfume mole fractions. Furthermore the amount of perfume at the surface is enhanced by at least an order of magnitude, compared to that co-adsorbed with a surfactant monolayer. PMID:26409782

  1. Analysis of improved Lattice Boltzmann phase field method for soluble surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sman, R. G. M.; Meinders, M. B. J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a novel Lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible fluids with soluble surfactants adsorbing at the interface with improved numerical and extended physical properties. The numerical improvements are based on the use of an analytical representation of a regularized delta-function in the surface free energy functional for the surfactant. Furthermore, the physics of the system have been extended to differential solubility of the surfactant combined with the use of Frumkin sorption behaviour. This enables the scheme to approach more realistic systems like foams and emulsions. This novel scheme is much superior in numerical stability than our previous scheme, based on a squared gradient approximation. Furthermore, we have observed the phenomenon of interface broadening under certain conditions. This phenomenon limits the surface pressure to about 30% of the capillary pressure of a bare droplet. It remains to be investigated whether this interface broadening reflects some physical effect, as has been observed for proteins.

  2. Size dependent fractal aggregation mediated through surfactant in silica nanoparticle solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2012-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study aggregation of anionic silica nanoparticles in presence of cationic surfactant (DTAB) in aqueous solution. The measurements were carried out for different sizes of nanoparticles (8.2, 16.4 and 26.4 nm) at fixed (1 wt%) nanoparticles and surfactant concentration. It is found that the adsorption of surfactant micelles on the silica nanoparticles leads to the aggregation of nanoparticles, which is characterized by a fractal structure. The number of adsorbed micelles on nanoparticle increases from 7 to 152 with the increase in the size of the nanoparticle from 8.2 to 26.4 nm, whereas interestingly the fractal dimension remains same. The aggregate morphology in these systems is expected to be governed by the diffusion limited aggregation.

  3. Surfactant-assisted Nanocasting Route for Synthesis of Highly Ordered Mesoporous Graphitic Carbon and Its Application in CO2 Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangang; Bai, Xia; Wang, Fei; Qin, Hengfei; Yin, Chaochuang; Kang, Shifei; Li, Xi; Zuo, Yuanhui; Cui, Lifeng

    2016-05-01

    Highly ordered mesoporous graphitic carbon was synthesized from a simple surfactant-assisted nanocasting route, in which ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 maintaining its triblock copolymer surfactant was used as a hard template and natural soybean oil (SBO) as a carbon precursor. The hydrophobic domain of the surfactant assisted SBO in infiltration into the template’s mesoporous channels. After the silica template was carbonized and removed, a higher yield of highly-ordered graphitic mesoporous carbon with rod-like morphology was obtained. Because of the improved structural ordering, the mesoporous carbon after amine modification could adsorb more CO2 compared with the amine-functionalized carbon prepared without the assistance of surfactant.

  4. Surfactant-assisted Nanocasting Route for Synthesis of Highly Ordered Mesoporous Graphitic Carbon and Its Application in CO2 Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yangang; Bai, Xia; Wang, Fei; Qin, Hengfei; Yin, Chaochuang; Kang, Shifei; Li, Xi; Zuo, Yuanhui; Cui, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    Highly ordered mesoporous graphitic carbon was synthesized from a simple surfactant-assisted nanocasting route, in which ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 maintaining its triblock copolymer surfactant was used as a hard template and natural soybean oil (SBO) as a carbon precursor. The hydrophobic domain of the surfactant assisted SBO in infiltration into the template’s mesoporous channels. After the silica template was carbonized and removed, a higher yield of highly-ordered graphitic mesoporous carbon with rod-like morphology was obtained. Because of the improved structural ordering, the mesoporous carbon after amine modification could adsorb more CO2 compared with the amine-functionalized carbon prepared without the assistance of surfactant. PMID:27220563

  5. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2004-10-30

    Significant surfactant loss by adsorption or precipitation on reservoir minerals can cause chemical flooding processes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. This project is aimed towards an understanding of the role of reservoir minerals and their dissolved species in chemical loss by precipitation or adsorption of surfactants/polymers in enhanced oil recovery. Emphasis will be on the type and nature of different minerals in the oil reservoirs. Macroscopic adsorption, precipitation, wettability and nanoscopic orientation/conformation studies for aggregates of various surfactant/polymer mixtures on reservoir rocks systems is planned for exploring the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this reporting period, the minerals proposed in this study: sandstone, limestone, gypsum, kaolinite and pyrite, have been characterized to obtain their particle size distribution and surface area, which will be used in the analysis of adsorption and wettability data. The effect of surfactant mixing ratio on the adsorption of mixture of C{sub 12}-C{sub 4}-C{sub 12} Gemini surfactant (synthesized during last period) and sugar-based nonionic surfactant n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) has been studied. It was discovered that even trace amounts of Gemini in the mixture is sufficient to force significant adsorption of DM. DM adsorption on silica increased from relatively negligible levels to very high levels. It is clear form analysis of the results that desired adsorption of either surfactant component in the mixtures can be obtained by controlling the mixing ratio, the total mixture concentration, pH etc. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of Gemini/DM mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. With increasing total surfactant adsorption, the silica mineral

  6. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2005-04-30

    The aim of this project is to delineate the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions between reservoir minerals and externally added reagents (surfactants/polymers) and its effect on critical solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Previous studies have suggested that significant surfactant loss by precipitation or adsorption on reservoir minerals can cause chemical schemes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. Both macroscopic adsorption, wettability and microscopic orientation and conformation studies for various surfactant/polymer mixtures/reservoir rocks systems were conducted to explore the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) has been studied. The effects of solution pH, surfactant mixing ratio and different salts on surfactant adsorption on alumina have been investigated in detail. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of the mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. Solution properties of C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na/DM mixtures were also studied to identify surfactant interactions that affect the mixed aggregate formation in solution. Adsorption of SDS on gypsum and limestone suggested stronger surfactant/mineral interaction than on alumina, due to the precipitation of surfactant by dissolved calcium ions. The effects of different salts such as sodium nitrate, sodium sulfite and sodium chloride on DM adsorption on alumina have also been determined. As surfactant hemimicelles at interface and micelles in solution have drastic effects on oil recovery processes, their microstructures in

  7. Pulmonary Surfactant: An Immunological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chroneos, Zissis C.; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Shepherd, Virginia L.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant has two crucial roles in respiratory function; first, as a biophysical entity it reduces surface tension at the air water interface, facilitating gas exchange and alveolar stability during breathing, and, second, as an innate component of the lung's immune system it helps maintain sterility and balance immune reactions in the distal airways. Pulmonary surfactant consists of 90% lipids and 10% protein. There are four surfactant proteins named SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D; their distinct interactions with surfactant phospholipids are necessary for the ultra-structural organization, stability, metabolism, and lowering of surface tension. In addition, SP-A and SP-D bind pathogens, inflict damage to microbial membranes, and regulate microbial phagocytosis and activation or deactivation of inflammatory responses by alveolar macrophages. SP-A and SP-D, also known as pulmonary collectins, mediate microbial phagocytosis via SP-A and SP-D receptors and the coordinated induction of other innate receptors. Several receptors (SP-R210, CD91/calreticulin, SIRPα, and toll-like receptors) mediate the immunological functions of SP-A and SP-D. However, accumulating evidence indicate that SP-B and SP-C and one or more lipid constituents of surfactant share similar immuno-regulatory properties as SP-A and SP-D. The present review discusses current knowledge on the interaction of surfactant with lung innate host defense. PMID:20054141

  8. Protein-nanoparticle interactions evaluation by immunomethods: Surfactants can disturb quantitative determinations.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-08-01

    The adsorption of proteins on nanoparticle surface is one of the first events that occur when nanoparticles enter in the blood stream, which influences nanoparticles lifetime and further biodistribution. Albumin, which is the most abundant protein in serum and which has been deeply characterized, is an interesting model protein to investigate nanoparticle-protein interactions. Therefore, the interaction of nanoparticles with serum albumin has been widely studied. Immunomethods were suggested for the investigation of adsorption isotherms because of their ease to quantify the non-adsorbed bovine serum albumin without the need of applying separation methods that could modify the balance between the adsorbed and non-adsorbed proteins. The present work revealed that this method should be applied with caution. Artifacts in the determination of free protein can be generated by the presence of surfactants such as polysorbate 80, widely used in the pharmaceutical and biomedical field, that are needed to preserve the stability of nanoparticle dispersions. It was shown that the presence of traces of polysorbate 80 in the dispersion leads to an overestimation of the amount of bovine serum albumin remaining free in the dispersion medium when determined by both radial immunodiffusion and rocket immunoelectrophoresis. However, traces of poloxamer 188 did not result in clear perturbed migrations. These methods are not appropriate to perform adsorption isotherms of proteins on nanoparticle dispersions containing traces of remaining free surfactant. They should only be applied on dispersions that are free of surfactant that is not associated with nanoparticles. PMID:26070388

  9. Direct Measurement of Adsorbed Gas Redistribution in Metal–Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying-Pin; Liu, Yangyang; Liu, Dahuan; Bosch, Mathieu; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-03-04

    Knowledge about the interactions between gas molecules and adsorption sites is essential to customize metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as adsorbents. The dynamic interactions occurring during adsorption/desorption working cycles with several states are especially complicated. Even so, the gas dynamics based upon experimental observations and the distribution of guest molecules under various conditions in MOFs have not been extensively studied yet. In this work, a direct time-resolved diffraction structure envelope (TRDSE) method using sequential measurements by in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has been developed to monitor several gas dynamic processes taking place in MOFs: infusion, desorption, and gas redistribution upon temperature change. The electron density maps indicate that gas molecules prefer to redistribute over heterogeneous types of sites rather than to exclusively occupy the primary binding sites. We found that the gas molecules are entropically driven from open metal sites to larger neighboring spaces during the gas infusion period, matching the localized-to-mobile mechanism. In addition, the partitioning ratio of molecules adsorbed at each site varies with different temperatures, as opposed to an invariant distribution mode. Equally important, the gas adsorption in MOFs is intensely influenced by the gas–gas interactions, which might induce more molecules to be accommodated in an orderly compact arrangement. This sequential TRDSE method is generally applicable to most crystalline adsorbents, yielding information on distribution ratios of adsorbates at each type of site.

  10. Dicationic Alkylammonium Bromide Gemini Surfactants. Membrane Perturbation and Skin Irritation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, João A. S.; Faneca, Henrique; Carvalho, Rui A.; Marques, Eduardo F.; Pais, Alberto A. C. C.

    2011-01-01

    Dicationic alkylammonium bromide gemini surfactants represent a class of amphiphiles potentially effective as skin permeation enhancers. However, only a limited number of studies has been dedicated to the evaluation of the respective cytotoxicity, and none directed to skin irritation endpoints. Supported on a cell viability study, the cytotoxicity of gemini surfactants of variable tail and spacer length was assessed. For this purpose, keratinocyte cells from human skin (NCTC 2544 cell line), frequently used as a model for skin irritation, were employed. The impact of the different gemini surfactants on the permeability and morphology of model vesicles was additionally investigated by measuring the leakage of calcein fluorescent dye and analyzing the NMR spectra of 31P, respectively. Detail on the interaction of gemini molecules with model membranes was also provided by a systematic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. An irreversible impact on the viability of the NCTC 2544 cell line was observed for gemini concentrations higher than 25 mM, while no cytotoxicity was found for any of the surfactants in a concentration range up to 10 mM. A higher cytotoxicity was also found for gemini surfactants presenting longer spacer and shorter tails. The same trend was obtained in the calorimetric and permeability studies, with the gemini of longest spacer promoting the highest degree of membrane destabilization. Additional structural and dynamical characterization of the various systems, obtained by 31P NMR and MD, provide some insight on the relationship between the architecture of gemini surfactants and the respective perturbation mechanism. PMID:22102870

  11. Size-dependent interaction of silica nanoparticles with different surfactants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2012-06-26

    The size-dependent interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles with ionic (anionic and cationic) and nonionic surfactants has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The surfactants used are anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), and nonionic decaoxyethylene n-dodecylether (C(12)E(10)). The measurements have been carried out for three different sizes of silica nanoparticles (8, 16, and 26 nm) at fixed concentrations (1 wt % each) of nanoparticles and surfactants. It is found that irrespective of the size of the nanoparticles there is no significant interaction evolved between like-charged nanoparticles and the SDS micelles leading to any structural changes. However, the strong attraction of oppositely charged DTAB micelles with silica nanoparticles results in the aggregation of nanoparticles. The number of micelles mediating the nanoparticle aggregation increases with the size of the nanoparticle. The aggregates are characterized by fractal structure where the fractal dimension is found to be constant (D ≈ 2.3) independent of the size of the nanoparticles and consistent with diffusion-limited-aggregation-type fractal morphology in these systems. In the case of nonionic surfactant C(12)E(10), micelles interact with the individual silica nanoparticles. The number of adsorbed micelles per nanoparticle increases drastically whereas the percentage of adsorbed micelles on nanoparticles decreases with the increase in the size of the nanoparticles. PMID:22655980

  12. Polylactide-co-glycolide microparticles with surface adsorbed antigens as vaccine delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manmohan; Kazzaz, Jina; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Malyala, Padma; Chesko, James; O'Hagan, Derek T

    2006-01-01

    Several groups have shown that vaccine antigens can be encapsulated within polymeric microparticles and can serve as potent antigen delivery systems. We have recently shown that an alternative approach involving charged polylactide co-glycolide (PLG) microparticles with surface adsorbed antigen(s) can also be used to deliver antigen into antigen presenting cell (APC). We have described the preparation of cationic and anionic PLG microparticles which have been used to adsorb a variety of agents, which include plasmid DNA, recombinant proteins and adjuvant active oligonucleotides. These PLG microparticles were prepared using a w/o/w solvent evaporation process in the presence of the anionic surfactants, including DSS (dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) or cationic surfactants, including CTAB (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide). Antigen binding to the charged PLG microparticles was influenced by several factors including electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. These microparticle based formulations resulted in the induction of significantly enhanced immune responses in comparison to alum. The surface adsorbed microparticle formulation offers an alternative and novel way of delivering antigens in a vaccine formulation. PMID:16472100

  13. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D variation in pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Husby, Steffen; Holmskov, Uffe

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) have been implicated in pulmonary innate immunity. The proteins are host defense lectins, belonging to the collectin family which also includes mannan-binding lectin (MBL). SP-A and SP-D are pattern-recognition molecules with the lectin domains binding preferentially to sugars on a broad spectrum of pathogen surfaces and thereby facilitating immune functions including viral neutralization, clearance of bacteria, fungi and apoptotic and necrotic cells, modulation of allergic reactions, and resolution of inflammation. SP-A and SP-D can interact with receptor molecules present on immune cells leading to enhanced microbial clearance and modulation of inflammation. SP-A and SP-D also modulate the functions of cells of the adaptive immune system including dendritic cells and T cells. Studies on SP-A and SP-D polymorphisms and protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage and blood have indicated associations with a multitude of pulmonary inflammatory diseases. In addition, accumulating evidence in mouse models of infection and inflammation indicates that recombinant forms of the surfactant proteins are biologically active in vivo and may have therapeutic potential in controlling pulmonary inflammatory disease. The presence of the surfactant collectins, especially SP-D, in non-pulmonary tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract and genital organs, suggest additional actions located to other mucosal surfaces. The aim of this review is to summarize studies on genetic polymorphisms, structural variants, and serum levels of human SP-A and SP-D and their associations with human pulmonary disease. PMID:17544823

  14. Performance of metal-organic framework MIL-101 after surfactant modification in the extraction of endocrine disrupting chemicals from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenzhen; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-10-01

    The research presented in this paper explored the modification and application of a metal-organic framework, MIL-101, with nonionic surfactant-Triton X-114 in dispersive solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of four endocrine disrupting chemicals (estrone, 17α-ethynylestradiol, estriol and diethylstilbestrol) from environmental water samples. Triton X-114 molecules could be adsorbed by the hydrophobic surface of the MIL-101 crystals, and thus improved the dispersibility of MIL-101 in aqueous solution by serving as a hydrophilic coating. Cloud point phase separation from Triton X-114 accelerated the separation of extracts from the aqueous matrix. The proposed method combines the favorable attributes of strong adsorption capacity resulting from the porous structure of MIL-101 and self-assembly of Triton X-114 molecules. Post-extraction derivatization using N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide was employed to facilitate the quantitative determination of the extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main factors affecting the preparation of modified MIL-101, and extraction of the analytes, such as the amount of surfactant, the ultrasonic and vortex durations, solution pH and desorption conditions, were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the present method yielded low limits of detection (0.006-0.023 ng/mL), good linearity from 0.09 to 45 ng/mL (coefficients of determination higher than 0.9980) and acceptable precision (relative standard deviations of 2.2-13%). The surface modified MIL-101 was demonstrated to be effective for the extraction of the selected estrogens from aqueous samples, giving rise to markedly improved extraction performance compared to the unmodified MIL-101. PMID:26078172

  15. Removal of perfluorinated surfactants by sorption onto granular activated carbon, zeolite and sludge.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Herrera, Valeria; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2008-08-01

    Perfluorinated surfactants are emerging pollutants of increasing public health and environmental concern due to recent reports of their world-wide distribution, environmental persistence and bioaccumulation potential. Treatment methods for the removal of anionic perfluorochemical (PFC) surfactants from industrial effluents are needed to minimize the environmental release of these pollutants. Removal of PFC surfactants from aqueous solutions by sorption onto various types of granular activated carbon was investigated. Three anionic PFC surfactants, i.e., perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), were evaluated for the ability to adsorb onto activated carbon. Additionally, the sorptive capacity of zeolites and sludge for PFOS was compared to that of granular activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms were determined at constant ionic strength in a pH 7.2 phosphate buffer at 30 degrees C. Sorption of PFOS onto activated carbon was stronger than PFOA and PFBS, suggesting that the length of the fluorocarbon chain and the nature of the functional group influenced sorption of the anionic surfactants. Among all adsorbents evaluated in this study, activated carbon (Freundlich K(F) values=36.7-60.9) showed the highest affinity for PFOS at low aqueous equilibrium concentrations, followed by the hydrophobic, high-silica zeolite NaY (Si/Al 80, K(F)=31.8), and anaerobic sludge (K(F)=0.95-1.85). Activated carbon also displayed a superior sorptive capacity at high soluble concentrations of the surfactant (up to 80 mg l(-1)). These findings indicate that activated carbon adsorption is a promising treatment technique for the removal of PFOS from dilute aqueous streams. PMID:18511099

  16. Activity and biophysical inhibition resistance of a novel synthetic lung surfactant containing Super-Mini-B DATK peptide

    PubMed Central

    Notter, Robert H.; Wang, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives. This study examines the surface activity, resistance to biophysical inhibition, and pulmonary efficacy of a synthetic lung surfactant containing glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK, a novel and stable molecular mimic of lung surfactant protein (SP)-B. The objective of the work is to test whether S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant has favorable biophysical and physiological activity for future use in treating surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods. The structure of S-MB DATK peptide was analyzed by homology modeling and by FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro surface activity and inhibition resistance of synthetic S-MB DATK surfactant was assessed in the presence and absence of albumin, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), and free fatty acids (palmitoleic and oleic acid). Adsorption and dynamic surface tension lowering were measured with a stirred subphase dish apparatus and a pulsating bubble surfactometer (20 cycles/min, 50% area compression, 37 °C). In vivo pulmonary activity of S-MB DATK surfactant was measured in ventilated rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by repeated lung lavages that resulted in arterial PO2 values <100 mmHg. Results. S-MB DATK surfactant had very high surface activity in all assessments. The preparation adsorbed rapidly to surface pressures of 46–48 mN/m at 37 °C (low equilibrium surface tensions of 22–24 mN/m), and reduced surface tension to <1 mN/m under dynamic compression on the pulsating bubble surfactometer. S-MB DATK surfactant showed a significant ability to resist inhibition by serum albumin, C16:0 lyso-PC, and free fatty acids, but surfactant inhibition was mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration. S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant quickly improved arterial oxygenation and lung compliance after intratracheal instillation to ventilated rabbits with severe surfactant deficiency. Conclusions. S-MB DATK is an active mimic of native SP

  17. Activity and biophysical inhibition resistance of a novel synthetic lung surfactant containing Super-Mini-B DATK peptide.

    PubMed

    Notter, Robert H; Wang, Zhengdong; Walther, Frans J

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives. This study examines the surface activity, resistance to biophysical inhibition, and pulmonary efficacy of a synthetic lung surfactant containing glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK, a novel and stable molecular mimic of lung surfactant protein (SP)-B. The objective of the work is to test whether S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant has favorable biophysical and physiological activity for future use in treating surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods. The structure of S-MB DATK peptide was analyzed by homology modeling and by FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro surface activity and inhibition resistance of synthetic S-MB DATK surfactant was assessed in the presence and absence of albumin, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), and free fatty acids (palmitoleic and oleic acid). Adsorption and dynamic surface tension lowering were measured with a stirred subphase dish apparatus and a pulsating bubble surfactometer (20 cycles/min, 50% area compression, 37 °C). In vivo pulmonary activity of S-MB DATK surfactant was measured in ventilated rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by repeated lung lavages that resulted in arterial PO2 values <100 mmHg. Results. S-MB DATK surfactant had very high surface activity in all assessments. The preparation adsorbed rapidly to surface pressures of 46-48 mN/m at 37 °C (low equilibrium surface tensions of 22-24 mN/m), and reduced surface tension to <1 mN/m under dynamic compression on the pulsating bubble surfactometer. S-MB DATK surfactant showed a significant ability to resist inhibition by serum albumin, C16:0 lyso-PC, and free fatty acids, but surfactant inhibition was mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration. S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant quickly improved arterial oxygenation and lung compliance after intratracheal instillation to ventilated rabbits with severe surfactant deficiency. Conclusions. S-MB DATK is an active mimic of native SP

  18. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  19. Adsorbate-induced curvature and stiffening of graphene.

    PubMed

    Svatek, Simon A; Scott, Oliver R; Rivett, Jasmine P H; Wright, Katherine; Baldoni, Matteo; Bichoutskaia, Elena; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Marsden, Alexander J; Wilson, Neil R; Beton, Peter H

    2015-01-14

    The adsorption of the alkane tetratetracontane (TTC, C44H90) on graphene induces the formation of a curved surface stabilized by a gain in adsorption energy. This effect arises from a curvature-dependent variation of a moiré pattern due to the mismatch of the carbon-carbon separation in the adsorbed molecule and the period of graphene. The effect is observed when graphene is transferred onto a deformable substrate, which in our case is the interface between water layers adsorbed on mica and an organic solvent, but is not observed on more rigid substrates such as boron nitride. Our results show that molecular adsorption can be influenced by substrate curvature, provide an example of two-dimensional molecular self-assembly on a soft, responsive interface, and demonstrate that the mechanical properties of graphene may be modified by molecular adsorption, which is of relevance to nanomechanical systems, electronics, and membrane technology. PMID:25469625

  20. Monte Carlo lattice models for adsorbed polymer conformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, B. S.

    1985-01-01

    The adhesion between a polymer film and a metal surface is of great technological interest. However, the prediction of adhesion and wear properties of polymer coated metals is quite difficult because a fundamental understanding of the polymer surface interaction does not yet exist. A computer model for the conformation of a polymer molecule adsorbed on a surface is discussed. The chain conformation is assumed to be described by a partially directed random walk on a three dimensional simple cubic lattice. An attractive surface potential is incorporated into the model through the use of a random walk step probability distribution that is anisotropic in the direction normal to the attractive surface. The effects of variations in potential characteristics are qualitatively included by varying both the degree of anisotropy of the step distribution and the range of the anisotropy. Polymer conformation is characterized by the average end to end distance, average radius of gyration, and average number of chain segments adsorbed on the surface.

  1. Surface Adsorbate Fluctuations and Noise in Nanoelectromechanical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y. T.; Callegari, C.; Feng, X. L.; Roukes, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Physisorption on solid surfaces is important in both fundamental studies and technology. Adsorbates can also be critical for the performance of miniature electromechanical resonators and sensors. Advances in resonant nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), particularly mass sensitivity attaining the single-molecule level, make it possible to probe surface physics in a new regime, where a small number of adatoms cause a detectable frequency shift in a high quality factor (Q) NEMS resonator, and adsorbate fluctuations result in resonance frequency noise. Here we report measurements and analysis of the kinetics and fluctuations of physisorbed xenon (Xe) atoms on a high-Q NEMS resonator vibrating at 190.5 MHz. The measured adsorption spectrum and frequency noise, combined with analytic modeling of surface diffusion and adsorption–desorption processes, suggest that diffusion dominates the observed excess noise. This study also reveals new power laws of frequency noise induced by diffusion, which could be important in other low-dimensional nanoscale systems. PMID:21388120

  2. Allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent for removing endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-10-01

    In this study we present a simple and robust method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions by using crystals of the small-molecule compound 2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl urea (allantoin) as a solid phase adsorbent. Allantoin crystalline powder is added to a protein solution at supersaturated concentrations, endotoxins bind and undissolved allantoin crystals with bound endotoxins are removed by filtration or centrifugation. This method removes an average of 99.98% endotoxin for 20 test proteins. The average protein recovery is ∼80%. Endotoxin binding is largely independent of pH, conductivity, reducing agent and various organic solvents. This is consistent with a hydrogen-bond based binding mechanism. Allantoin does not affect protein activity and stability, and the use of allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent provides better endotoxin removal than anion exchange, polymixin affinity and biological affinity methods for endotoxin clearance. PMID:24001944

  3. Uptake of Hydrocarbon by Pseudomonas fluorescens (P1) and Pseudomonas putida (K1) Strains in the Presence of Surfactants: A Cell Surface Modification

    PubMed Central

    Olszanowski, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was the evaluation of the effects of exogenous added surfactants on hydrocarbon biodegradation and on cell surface properties. Crude oil hydrocarbons are often difficult to remove from the environment because of their insolubility in water. The addition of surfactants enhances the removal of hydrocarbons by raising the solubility of these compounds. These surfactants cause them to become more vulnerable to degradation, thereby facilitating transportation across the cell membrane. The obtained results showed that the microorganism consortia of bacteria are useful biological agents within environmental bioremediation. The most effective amongst all, as regards biodegradation, were the consortia of Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. strains. The results indicated that the natural surfactants (rhamnolipides and saponins) are more effective surfactants in hydrocarbon biodegradation as compared to Triton X-100. The addition of natural surfactants enhanced the removal of hydrocarbon and diesel oil from the environment. Very promising was the use of saponins as a surfactant in hydrocarbon biodegradation. This surfactant significantly increases the organic compound biodegradation. In the case of those surfactants that could be easily adsorbed on cells of strains (e.g., rhamnolipides), a change of hydrophobicity to ca. 30–40% was noted. As the final result, an increase in hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed. PMID:21258434

  4. Graphene-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of thymine adsorbed on single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesenko, Olena; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Dementjev, Andrej; Karpicz, Renata; Kaplas, Tommi; Svirko, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    Graphene-enhanced Raman scattering (GERS) spectra and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of thymine molecules adsorbed on a single-layer graphene were studied. The enhancement factor was shown to depend on the molecular groups of thymine. In the GERS spectra of thymine, the main bands are shifted with respect to those for molecules adsorbed on a glass surface, indicating charge transfer for thymine on graphene. The probable mechanism of the GERS enhancement is discussed. CARS spectra are in accord with the GERS results, which indicates similar benefit from the chemical enhancement.

  5. Surfactants as bubble surface modifiers in the flotation of algae: dissolved air flotation that utilizes a chemically modified bubble surface.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Rita K; Parsons, Simon A; Jefferson, Bruce

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into the use of bubbles modified with surfactants in dissolved air flotation (DAF). Bubble modification was investigated by dosing surfactants of varying character into the saturator of a DAF unit in turn. The cell removal efficiency only improved when using a cationic surfactant where optimum removal of Microcystis aeruginosa cells was obtained when using 0.0022-0.004 mequiv L(-1) surfactant. However, the magnitude of the removal differed according to the hydrophobicity of the surfactant. Typically, the more efficiently the surfactant adsorbed at the bubble interface, the better the removal efficiency. When the dose to saturator ratio was kept constant and the recycle ratio varied, the removal efficiency improved with increasing recycle ratio, reaching a maximum removal efficiency of 87% for M. aeruginosa. This value was comparable with that predicted by a theoretical model. The bubble collection efficiency of a maximum of two cells per bubble was constant irrespective of the influent cell number or recycle ratio. Treatment of additional species in this way revealed a relationship between increasing size and both increasing removal efficiency and decreasing surfactant dose, which is supported by theoretical relationships. PMID:18678021

  6. Tunable synergism/antagonism in a mixed nonionic/anionic surfactant layer at the solid/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaohua; Somasundaran, Ponisseril

    2008-04-15

    The use of mixed surfactants for modification of solid surfaces is important for many applications, since beneficial synergism often occurs depending on the surfactant type and mixing conditions. Systematical information on the properties of surfactant mixtures at the solid/liquid interface can be helpful for optimizing the interactions between the surfactants and then their corresponding performance. In this work, a nonionic/anionic surfactant combination, n-dodecyl beta-d-maltoside (DM) and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS), was selected for the study of adsorption on an oxide solid, alumina. Interestingly, the mixture of the two surfactants with opposite pH-dependence of adsorption on alumina exhibits some unique synergistic or antagonistic features that were found to be tunable in the region of pH 4-10. In addition, the DM/SDS molar ratio in the adsorbed layer was found to decrease with concentration in the saturated region at all the pH and mixing ratios tested. The decrease is attributed to the monomer concentration changes in solution due to the difference in surface activities of the two surfactants. The tunable features of this mixture at the solid/liquid interface provide a way to optimize the properties by changing the mixing conditions. This can be valuable in many applications, such as enhanced oil recovery, flotation, and solubilization. PMID:18324849

  7. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  8. Dynamic surface tension of natural surfactant extract under superimposed oscillations.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Prasika I; Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M; Bold, Geoff T

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant dysfunction plays a major role in respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). This research seeks to determine whether the use of natural surfactant, Curosurf™ (Cheisi Farmaceutici, Parma, Italy), accompanied with pressure oscillations at the level of the alveoli can reduce the surface tension in the lung, thereby making it easier for infants with RDS to maintain the required level of functional residual capacity (FRC) without collapse. To simulate the alveolar environment, dynamic surface tension measurements were performed on a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer (PBS) type device and showed that introducing superimposed oscillations about the tidal volume excursion between 10 and 70 Hz in a surfactant bubble lowers interfacial surface tension below values observed using tidal volume excursion alone. The specific mechanisms responsible for this improvement are yet to be established; however it is believed that one mechanism may be the rapid transient changes in the interfacial area increase the number of interfacial binding sites for surfactant molecules, increasing adsorption and diffusion to the interface, thereby decreasing interfacial surface tension. Existing mathematical models in the literature reproduce trends noticed in experiments in the range of breathing frequencies only. Thus, a modification is introduced to an existing model to both incorporate superimposed pressure oscillations and demonstrate that these may improve the dynamic surface tension in the alveoli. PMID:20883997

  9. The interaction between bovine serum albumin and surfactants.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M N; Skinner, H A; Tipping, E

    1975-01-01

    1. Potassium n-decyl phosphate binds exothermically to bovine serum albumin at pH 7.0 to form a specific complex containing approx. 60 phosphate anions. 2. The formation of the complex is accompanied by changes in the u.v. difference spectrum of the protein. 3. At higher phosphate concentrations (above 0.4mM) surfactant molecules continue to be bound, and the protein undergoes a gross change in conformation. 4. n-Dodecyltri-methylammonium bromide binds endothermically to bovine serum albumin at pH7.0 but the extent of binding for a given free surfactant concentration is less than for the phosphate surfactant. 5. Binding is accompanied by a small change in the specific viscosity and by changes in the u.v. difference spectrum of the protein. 6. It is suggested that over the surfactant concentration ranges studied n-decyl phosphate ions first bind to the C-terminal part of the protein and then to the more compact N-terminal part whereas n-dodecyltrimethylammonium ions bind only to the C-terminal part of bovine serum albumin. PMID:1180891

  10. Photophysics of new photostable rylene derivatives: applications in single-molecule studies and membrane labelling.

    PubMed

    Davies, Melari; Jung, Christophe; Wallis, Philipp; Schnitzler, Tobias; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    Three new photostable rylene dyes for applications in single molecule studies and membrane labelling have been synthesized and their photophysical properties were characterized. These dyes differ in the number of polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains attached to the core structure which is either a perylene derivate or a terrylene derivate. One perylene and one terrylene dye is modified with two PEG chains, and another terrylene derivate has four PEG chains. The results show that the terrylene dye with four PEG chains (4-PEG-TDI) forms soluble nonfluorescing H-aggregates in water, so that the absorption bands are blue-shifted with respect to those of the fluorescing monomeric form. The presence of a surfactant such as Pluronic P123 leads to the disruption of the aggregates due to the formation of monomers in micelles and a strong increase in fluorescence. Application for labelling cell membranes can be considered for this dye since it adsorbs in a similar way as monomer to a lipid bilayer. Furthermore a single-molecule study of all three rylene dyes in polymeric films of PMMA showed excellent photostability with respect to photobleaching, far above the photostability of other common water-soluble dyes, such as Oxazine-1, Atto647N, Cy5, Alexa647 and Rhodamin6G. Especially 4-PEG-TDI seems to be a promising dye for membrane labelling with its high photostability. PMID:21154947

  11. Viscoelastic properties of polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) dispersions sterically stabilized by hydrophobically modified inulin (polyfructose) polymeric surfactant.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Jérémie; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Esquena, Jordi; Solans, Conxita; Levecke, Bart; Booten, Karl; Tadros, Tharwat F

    2008-03-01

    Recently, steric repulsive forces induced by a new graft copolymer surfactant, which is based in inulin (polyfructose), have been described. Previous investigations by atomic force microscopy between solid surfaces covered with adsorbed surfactant indicated strong repulsive forces even at high electrolyte concentration, due to the steric repulsion produced by the surfactant hydration. In the present paper, the colloidal stabilization provided by this surfactant is studied by rheology. The measurements were carried out on sterically stabilized polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) containing adsorbed surfactant (INUTEC SP1). Steady-state shear stress as a function of shear rate curves was established at various latex volume fractions. The viscosity volume fraction curves were compared with those calculated using the Doughtry-Krieger equation for hard sphere dispersions. From the experimental eta r-phi curves the effective volume fraction of the latex dispersions could be calculated and this was used to determine the adsorbed layer thickness Delta. The value obtained was 9.6 nm, which is in good agreement with that obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Viscoelastic measurements of the various latex dispersions were carried out as a function of applied stress (to obtain the linear viscoelastic region) and frequency. The results showed a change from predominantly viscous to predominantly elastic response at a critical volume fraction (phi c). The effective critical volume fraction, phi eff, was calculated using the adsorbed layer thickness (Delta) obtained from steady-state measurements. For PS latex dispersions phi eff was found to be equal to 0.24 whereas for PMMA phi eff=0.12. These results indicated a much softer interaction between the latex dispersions containing hydrated polyfructose loops and tails when compared with latices containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) layers. The difference could be attributed to the stronger hydration of the

  12. Surfactant therapy and spontaneous diuresis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; John, E; Diaz-Blanco, J; Ortega, R; Fornell, L; Vidyasagar, D

    1989-03-01

    The effect of artificial surfactant therapy on renal function and the onset of spontaneous diuresis was prospectively evaluated in 19 infants with hyaline membrane disease in a double-blind, controlled study. Twelve infants were in the surfactant group; seven infants received placebo (0.9% saline solution). There was no difference in the time of onset of spontaneous diuresis (as defined by output greater than or equal to 80% of intake). The glomerular filtration rate, determined by endogenous creatinine clearance, was also similar in the surfactant- and placebo-treated infants during the first 3 days of life. The fractional excretion of sodium was significantly higher in the placebo group at 24 hours and 36 hours. Infants in the placebo group had a higher negative sodium balance than those in the surfactant group. Ventilatory status improved significantly soon after surfactant treatment, as evidenced by improvement in the alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure ratio and by a lower mean airway pressure. These data suggest that ventilatory status can be improved without diuresis; the factors that regulate diuresis are multiple and not fully understood. PMID:2646416

  13. Biodegradability and aquatic toxicity of quaternary ammonium-based gemini surfactants: Effect of the spacer on their ecological properties.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Teresa; Kaczerewska, Olga; Ribosa, Isabel; Brycki, Bogumił; Materna, Paulina; Drgas, Małgorzata

    2016-07-01

    Aerobic biodegradability and aquatic toxicity of five types of quaternary ammonium-based gemini surfactants have been examined. The effect of the spacer structure and the head group polarity on the ecological properties of a series of dimeric dodecyl ammonium surfactants has been investigated. Standard tests for ready biodegradability assessment (OECD 310) were conducted for C12 alkyl chain gemini surfactants containing oxygen, nitrogen or a benzene ring in the spacer linkage and/or a hydroxyethyl group attached to the nitrogen atom of the head groups. According to the results obtained, the gemini surfactants examined cannot be considered as readily biodegradable compounds. The negligible biotransformation of the gemini surfactants under the standard biodegradation test conditions was found to be due to their toxic effects on the microbial population responsible for aerobic biodegradation. Aquatic toxicity of gemini surfactants was evaluated against Daphnia magna. The acute toxicity values to Daphnia magna, IC50 at 48 h exposure, ranged from 0.6 to 1 mg/L. On the basis of these values, the gemini surfactants tested should be classified as toxic or very toxic to the aquatic environment. However, the dimeric quaternary ammonium-based surfactants examined result to be less toxic than their corresponding monomeric analogs. Nevertheless the aquatic toxicity of these gemini surfactants can be reduced by increasing the molecule hydrophilicity by adding a heteroatom to the spacer or a hydroxyethyl group to the polar head groups. PMID:27045632

  14. Excitation energy migration in yellow fluorescent protein (citrine) layers adsorbed on modified gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Hanis Mohd; Rzeźnicka, Izabela I.; Hoshi, Hirotaka; Kajimoto, Shinji; Horimoto, Noriko Nishizawa; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    The nature of functional proteins adsorbed on solid surfaces is interesting from the perspective of developing of bioelectronics and biomaterials. Here we present evidence that citrine (one of yellow fluorescent protein variants) adsorbed on modified gold surfaces would not undergo denaturation and energy transfer among the adsorbed citrine molecules would occur. Gold substrates were chemically modified with 3-mercaptopropionic acid and tert-butyl mercaptan for the preparation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, respectively. A pure solution of citrine was dropped and dried on the modified gold substrates and their surface morphology was studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The obtained STM images showed multilayers of citrine adsorbed on the modified surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, citrine was adsorbed more randomly, formed various non-uniform aggregates, while on hydrophilic surfaces, citrine appeared more aligned and isolated uniform protein clusters were observed. Fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay of these dried citrine layers were also measured using the time correlated single photon counting method. Fluorescence anisotropy of citrine on the hydrophobic surface decayed faster than citrine on the hydrophilic surface. From these results we concluded that fluorescence energy migration occurred faster among citrine molecules which were randomly adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface to compare with the hydrophilic surface.

  15. Photoexcitation of adsorbates on metal surfaces: One-step or three-step

    SciTech Connect

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-09-07

    In this essay we discuss the light-matter interactions at molecule-covered metal surfaces that initiate surface photochemistry. The hot-electron mechanism for surface photochemistry, whereby the absorption of light by a metal surface creates an electron-hole pair, and the hot electron scatters through an unoccupied resonance of adsorbate to initiate nuclear dynamics leading to photochemistry, has become widely accepted. Yet, ultrafast spectroscopic measurements of molecule-surface electronic structure and photoexcitation dynamics provide scant support for the hot electron mechanism. Instead, in most cases the adsorbate resonances are excited through photoinduced substrate-to-adsorbate charge transfer. Based on recent studies of the role of coherence in adsorbate photoexcitation, as measured by the optical phase and momentum resolved two-photon photoemission measurements, we examine critically the hot electron mechanism, and propose an alternative description based on direct charge transfer of electrons from the substrate to adsorbate. The advantage of this more quantum mechanically rigorous description is that it informs how material properties of the substrate and adsorbate, as well as their interaction, influence the frequency dependent probability of photoexcitation and ultimately how light can be used to probe and control surface femtochemistry.

  16. Mobility of adsorbed proteins: a Brownian dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, S; Talbot, J

    2000-01-01

    We simulate the adsorption of lysozyme on a solid surface, using Brownian dynamics simulations. A protein molecule is represented as a uniformly charged sphere and interacts with other molecules through screened Coulombic and double-layer forces. The simulation starts from an empty surface and attempts are made to introduce additional proteins at a fixed time interval that is inversely proportional to the bulk protein concentration. We examine the effect of ionic strength and bulk protein concentration on the adsorption kinetics over a range of surface coverages. The structure of the adsorbed layer is examined through snapshots of the configurations and quantitatively with the radial distribution function. We extract the surface diffusion coefficient from the mean square displacement. At high ionic strengths the Coulombic interaction is effectively shielded, leading to increased surface coverage. This effect is quantified with an effective particle radius. Clustering of the adsorbed molecules is promoted by high ionic strength and low bulk concentrations. We find that lateral protein mobility decreases with increasing surface coverage. The observed trends are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental studies. PMID:10620278

  17. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  18. Interactions of water with the nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene glycol alkyl ethers studied by phase-sensitive sum frequency generation and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafi, Amirhossein; Hu, Dan; Chou, Keng C.

    2016-06-01

    Phase-sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were used to study the interactions between water molecules and the surfactant polyoxyethylene glycol alkyl ether (C12E4) at its critical micelle concentration. The surfactant enhanced the positive peak of water's SFG spectrum suggesting that C12E4 was more anionic-like, even though the surfactant was overall neutral. MD simulations showed that the surfactant increased the depth of the surface anisotropic layer from 0.31 to 1.82 nm and the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule from 2.7 to 3.1. For water molecules near the surfactant, their H and O atoms are confined in well-separated shells. Both the O and C atoms in the head group of the surfactant are surrounded by the H atoms, instead of the O atoms, of water indicating that the negatively charged O atoms of the surfactant play a more important role than the C atoms in determining the orientation of water. The simulation also showed that the orientation of surface water molecules was flipped in the presence of the surfactant, which was consistent with the observed SFG spectra.

  19. Polymer/surfactant transport in micellar flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.S.; Kellerhals, G.E.

    1981-10-01

    For the surfactant formulations used (particular surfactant concentration, surfactant type, cosolvent type, cosolvent concentration, etc.), the results show that surfactant systems containing polymer as a mobility control agent may exhibit adverse polymer transport behavior during flow through porous media. Polymer generally lagged behind the surfactant even though the two species were injected simultaneously in the surfactant slug. This poor polymer transport definitely could have a detrimental effect on the efficiency of a micellar flooding process in the field. Phase studies show that when some surfactant systems containing xanthan gum are mixed with crude oil at various salinities, a polymer-rich, gel-like phase forms. The polymer lag phenomenon in core tests can be related to phase separation due to divalent cations generated in situ as a result of ion exchange with the clays and the surfactant. 18 refs.

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF SURFACTANTS IN TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of a number of anionic, nonionic and cationic surfactants in manipulations associated with toxicity identification evaluations was studied. t was found that toxicity of the surfactants could be removed from aqueous samples via aeration, apparently through sublation. ...

  1. Metal Toxicity Reduction in Naphthalene Biodegradation by Use of Metal-Chelating Adsorbents

    PubMed Central

    Malakul, Pomthong; Srinivasan, Keeran R.; Wang, Henry Y.

    1998-01-01

    A model system comprising microbial degradation of naphthalene in the presence of cadmium has been developed to evaluate metal toxicity associated with polyaromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation and its reduction by the use of unmodified and surfactant-modified clays in comparison with a commercially available chelating resin (Chelex 100; Bio-Rad). The toxicity of cadmium associated with naphthalene biodegradation was shown to be reduced significantly by using the modified-clay complex and Chelex resin, while unmodified clay has no significant impact on this reduction. The degree of metal toxicity reduction can be quantitatively related to the metal adsorption characteristics of these adsorbents, such as adsorption capacity and selectivity. PMID:9797332

  2. Self-Assembly of Nanoparticle-Surfactant Complexes with Rodlike Micelles: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Sambasivam, Abhinanden; Sangwai, Ashish V; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2016-02-01

    The self-assembly of nanoparticles (NPs) with cationic micelles of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) is known to produce stable nanogels with rich rheological and optical properties. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying this self-assembly process. In an aqueous solution of CTAC surfactants, a negatively charged NP with a zeta potential of less than -45 mV is observed to form a stable vesicular structure in which the particle surface is almost entirely covered with a double layer of surfactants. In comparison, surfactants form a monolayer, or a corona, around an uncharged hydrophobic NP with the tailgroups physically adsorbed onto the particle. In the presence of sodium salicylate salt, such NP-surfactant complexes (NPSCs) interact with rodlike CTAC micelles, resulting in the formation of stable junctions through the opening up of the micelle end-cap followed by surfactant exchange, which is diffusion-limited. The diffusive regime spans several hundred nanoseconds, thereby necessitating MD simulations over microsecond time scales. The energetics of NPSC-micelle complexation is analyzed from the variation in the total pair-potential energy of the structures. PMID:26760445

  3. Adsorption of a cationic surfactant by a magsorbent based on magnetic alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Layaly; El Kolli, Nadia; Dali, Noëlle; Talbot, Delphine; Abramson, Sébastien; Welschbillig, Mathias; Cabuil, Valérie; Bée, Agnès

    2014-10-15

    Adsorption of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cationic surfactant, by magnetic alginate beads (MagAlgbeads) was investigated. The magnetic adsorbent (called magsorbent) was prepared by encapsulation of magnetic functionalized nanoparticles in an alginate gel. The influence on CPC adsorption of several parameters such as contact time, pH and initial surfactant concentration was studied. The equilibrium isotherm shows that adsorption occurs through both electrostatic interactions with charge neutralization of the carboxylate groups of the beads and hydrophobic interactions inducing the formation of surfactant aggregates in the beads. The dosage of calcium ions released in the solution turns out to be a useful tool for understanding the adsorption mechanisms. Adsorption is accompanied by a shrinking of the beads that corresponds to a 45% reduction of the volume. Adsorption kinetic experiments show that equilibrium time is strongly dependent on the surfactant concentration, which monitors the nature of the interactions. On the other hand, since the pH affects the ionization state of adsorption sites, adsorption depends on the pH solution, maximum adsorption being obtained in a large pH range (3.2-12) in agreement with the pKa value of alginate (pKa=3.4-4.2). Finally, due to the formation of micelle-like surfactants aggregates in the magnetic alginate beads, they could be used as a new efficient magsorbent for hydrophobic pollutants. PMID:25086393

  4. Surfactant size effect on surface-enhanced Raman scattering intensity from silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bae, Doo Ri; Chang, Sung-Jin; Huh, Yun Suk; Han, Young-Kyu; Lee, You-Jin; Yi, Gi-Ra; Kim, Soohyun; Lee, Gaehang

    2013-08-01

    We report on the synthesis of two types of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and the influence of adsorbed surfactant size on the NP surface for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals. Both particles were of similar size and morphology but were covered by surfactants of different sizes; one surfactant was sodium citrate (molecular weight: 258) and the other was sodium polyacrylate (molecular weight: 2100). For SERS measurement, 4-mecapobenzoic acid and 4-naphthalene thiol as Raman-active dyes were immobilized on the surface of each AgNP. The signals from Raman-active dyes on AgNPs covered with citrate displayed 10 times higher intensity than those from polyacrylate-stabilized AgNPs. Elemental analysis (EA) revealed that the average weight percentage of sulfur is 0.94 wt% and 0.12 wt% for citrate-stabilized and polyacrylate-stabilized AgNPs, respectively. The sulfur content difference was attributed to the size of the existing surfactant influencing the ligand exchange by steric hindrance and subsequently the amount of sulfur content of the particles. These experimental results suggest that the size of initial surfactant should be taken into account when synthesizing a metal particle for enhancing SERS signal. PMID:23882845

  5. Biofoams and natural protein surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring foam constituent and surfactant proteins with intriguing structures and functions are now being identified from a variety of biological sources. The ranaspumins from tropical frog foam nests comprise a range of proteins with a mixture of surfactant, carbohydrate binding and antimicrobial activities that together provide a stable, biocompatible, protective foam environment for developing eggs and embryos. Ranasmurfin, a blue protein from a different species of frog, displays a novel structure with a unique chromophoric crosslink. Latherin, primarily from horse sweat, but with similarities to salivary, oral and upper respiratory tract proteins, illustrates several potential roles for surfactant proteins in mammalian systems. These proteins, together with the previously discovered hydrophobins of fungi, throw new light on biomolecular processes at air–water and other interfaces. This review provides a perspective on these recent findings, focussing on structure and biophysical properties. PMID:20615601

  6. Molecular adsorbates as probes of the local properties of doped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Van Dong; Joucken, Frédéric; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Sporken, Robert; Santos, Maria Cristina dos; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Graphene-based sensors are among the most promising of graphene’s applications. The ability to signal the presence of molecular species adsorbed on this atomically thin substrate has been explored from electric measurements to light scattering. Here we show that the adsorbed molecules can be used to sense graphene properties. The interaction of porphyrin molecules with nitrogen-doped graphene has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations. Molecular manipulation was used to reveal the surface below the adsorbed molecules allowing to achieve an atomic-scale measure of the interaction of molecules with doped graphene. The adsorbate’s frontier electronic states are downshifted in energy as the molecule approaches the doping site, with largest effect when the molecule sits over the nitrogen dopant. Theoretical calculations showed that, due to graphene’s high polarizability, the adsorption of porphyrin induces a charge rearrangement on the substrate similar to the image charges on a metal. This charge polarization is enhanced around nitrogen site, leading to an increased interaction of molecules with their image charges on graphene. Consequently, the molecular states are stabilized and shift to lower energies. These findings reveal the local variation of polarizability induced by nitrogen dopant opening new routes towards the electronic tuning of graphene. PMID:27097555

  7. Molecular adsorbates as probes of the local properties of doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Dong; Joucken, Frédéric; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Sporken, Robert; Santos, Maria Cristina Dos; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-based sensors are among the most promising of graphene’s applications. The ability to signal the presence of molecular species adsorbed on this atomically thin substrate has been explored from electric measurements to light scattering. Here we show that the adsorbed molecules can be used to sense graphene properties. The interaction of porphyrin molecules with nitrogen-doped graphene has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations. Molecular manipulation was used to reveal the surface below the adsorbed molecules allowing to achieve an atomic-scale measure of the interaction of molecules with doped graphene. The adsorbate’s frontier electronic states are downshifted in energy as the molecule approaches the doping site, with largest effect when the molecule sits over the nitrogen dopant. Theoretical calculations showed that, due to graphene’s high polarizability, the adsorption of porphyrin induces a charge rearrangement on the substrate similar to the image charges on a metal. This charge polarization is enhanced around nitrogen site, leading to an increased interaction of molecules with their image charges on graphene. Consequently, the molecular states are stabilized and shift to lower energies. These findings reveal the local variation of polarizability induced by nitrogen dopant opening new routes towards the electronic tuning of graphene.

  8. Amphiphilic block copolymers in oil-water-surfactant mixtures: efficiency boosting, structure, phase behaviour and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gompper, G.; Richter, D.; Strey, R.

    2001-10-01

    The effect of amphiphilic block copolymers on the phase behaviour and structure of ternary microemulsions in water, oil and non-ionic surfactant mixtures is reviewed. Recent experiments have revealed that the addition of small amounts of polyethylenepropylene-polyethyleneoxide block copolymer to the ternary systems leads to a dramatic increase in the volumes of oil and water solubilized into a bicontinuous microemulsion for a given surfactant volume fraction. While phase diagrams directly show the power of the amphiphilic block copolymers as efficiency boosters, the theoretical analysis in terms of bending energy discloses the mechanism for the efficiency boosting as due to the variation of the surfactant film curvature elasticity by tethered polymers in the form of mushrooms at the interface. Neutron scattering experiments employing a high-precision two-dimensional contrast variation technique confirm this picture and demonstrate that the polymer molecules uniformly decorate the surfactant film.

  9. [Determination of contact angle of pharmaceutical excipients and regulating effect of surfactants on their wettability].

    PubMed

    Hua, Dong-dong; Li, He-ran; Yang, Bai-xue; Song, Li-na; Liu, Tiao-tiao; Cong, Yu-tang; Li, San-ming

    2015-10-01

    To study the effects of surfactants on wettability of excipients, the contact angles of six types of surfactants on the surface of two common excipients and mixture of three surfactants with excipients were measured using hypsometry method. The results demonstrated that contact angle of water on the surface of excipients was associated with hydrophilcity of excipients. Contact angle was lowered with increase in hydrophilic groups of excipient molecules. The sequence of contact angle from small to large was starch < sodium benzoate < polyvinylpyrrolidone < sodium carboxymethylcellulose < sodium alginate < chitosan < hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose surfactants both in droplets and mixed in excipients significantly reduced the contact angle of excipients, and their abilities to lower contact angle varied. The results of the present study offer a guideline in the formulation design of tablets. PMID:26837184

  10. Removal of surfactants from hydrocarbons with alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, R.P.; Poling, D.E.; Stefanidakis, G.

    1984-02-07

    A method is disclosed for removing hydrocarbon-soluble anionic surfactants from gasoline or kerosene boiling range hydrocarbons. The method comprises (a) contacting a hydrocarbon mixture containing surfactants with a lower alcohol which is miscible with the hydrocarbon mixture to extract the surfactants; (b) contacting the mixture with water or caustic solution to extract the lower alcohol and surfactants from the hydrocarbon mixture; (c) separating the water or caustic solution from the hydrocarbons; and (d) removing the hydrocarbons.

  11. Genetic Disorders of Surfactant Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Susan E.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Nogee, Lawrence M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding the surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and the phospholipid transporter, ABCA3, are associated with respiratory distress and interstitial lung disease in the pediatric population. Expression of these proteins is regulated developmentally, increasing with gestational age, and is critical for pulmonary surfactant function at birth. Pulmonary surfactant is a unique mixture of lipids and proteins that reduces surface tension at the air-liquid interface, preventing collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. SP-B and ABCA3 are required for the normal organization and packaging of surfactant phospholipids into specialized secretory organelles, known as lamellar bodies, while both SP-B and SP-C are important for adsorption of secreted surfactant phospholipids to the alveolar surface. In general, mutations in the SP-B gene SFTPB are associated with fatal respiratory distress in the neonatal period, and mutations in the SP-C gene SFTPC are more commonly associated with interstitial lung disease in older infants, children, and adults. Mutations in the ABCA3 gene are associated with both phenotypes. Despite this general classification, there is considerable overlap in the clinical and histologic characteristics of these genetic disorders. In this review, similarities and differences in the presentation of these disorders with an emphasis on their histochemical and ultrastructural features will be described, along with a brief discussion of surfactant metabolism. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of lung disease caused by mutations in these genes will also be discussed. PMID:19220077

  12. Agglutination of lung surfactant with glucan.

    PubMed Central

    De Lucca, A J; Brogden, K A; French, A D

    1992-01-01

    Respirable cotton dust, implicated in the pathogenesis of byssinosis, contains a number of bioactive compounds. These include lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tannins, bacterial peptides, byssinosin, iacinilene C, and 1,3-beta-D-glucan. The exact aetiological agent of byssinosis in such dust has not been definitively identified nor has its mechanism of action on lower lung surfaces been determined. In the present study 1,3-beta-D-glucan, Enterobacter agglomerans LPS, and ovine pulmonary surfactant were mixed in varying combinations. After incubation, their characteristics were determined by sucrose density centrifugation, TLC, and carbohydrate analysis. Precipitates were found in mixtures containing surfactant-glucan and surfactant-glucan-LPS, but not in surfactant-LPS. Precipitates were not seen in the surfactant, LPS, and glucan controls. The formation of a precipitate did not increase the density of the surfactant glucan mixture when compared by density gradient centrifugation with the surfactant control. The interaction between surfactant and glucan was analysed by molecular modelling. The energy of a surfactant-glucan complex (60.07 kcal/mol) was calculated to be much lower than the sum of glucan (47.09 kcal/mol) and surfactant (30.98 kcal/mol) when added separately. The results indicate that 1,3-beta-D-glucan does interact with surfactant and this complex may play a part in the pathogenesis of byssinosis by altering lung physiology maintained by pulmonary surfactant. Images PMID:1463675

  13. Dynamic adsorption of weakly interacting polymer/surfactant mixtures at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Angus-Smyth, Anna; Campbell, Richard A; Bain, Colin D

    2012-08-28

    The dynamic adsorption of polymer/surfactant mixtures containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with either tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C(14)TAB) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied at the expanding air/water interface created by an overflowing cylinder, which has a surface age of 0.1-1 s. The composition of the adsorption layer is obtained by a new approach that co-models data obtained from ellipsometry and only one isotopic contrast from neutron reflectometry (NR) without the need for any deuterated polymer. The precision and accuracy of the polymer surface excess obtained matches the levels achieved from NR measurements of different isotopic contrasts involving deuterated polymer, and requires much less neutron beamtime. The PEO concentration was fixed at 100 ppm and the electrolyte concentration at 0.1 M while the surfactant concentration was varied over three orders of magnitude. For both systems, at low bulk surfactant concentrations, adsorption of the polymer is diffusion-controlled while surfactant adsorption is under mixed kinetic/diffusion control. Adsorption of PEO is inhibited once the surfactant coverage exceeds 2 μmol m(-2). For PEO/C(14)TAB, polymer adsorption drops abruptly to zero over a narrow range of surfactant concentration. For PEO/SDS, inhibition of polymer adsorption is much more gradual, and a small amount remains adsorbed even at bulk surfactant concentrations above the cmc. The difference in behavior of the two mixtures is ascribed to favorable interactions between the PEO and SDS in the bulk solution and at the surface. PMID:22746543

  14. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; et al

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  15. The Uranium from Seawater Program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T; Bonheyo, George; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana; Warner, Marvin G; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David; Mayes, Richard T; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas; Addleman, Shane R; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Dr. Ken; Breier, Crystalline; D'Alessandro, Dr. Evan

    2016-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory s (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing at Woods Hole

  16. Amine-pillared Nanosheet Adsorbents for CO2 Capture Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui

    Amine-functionalized solid adsorbents have gained attention within the last decade for their application in carbon dioxide capture, due to their many advantages such as low energy cost for regeneration, tunable structure, elimination of corrosion problems, and additional advantages. However, one of the challenges facing this technology is to accomplish both high CO 2 capture capacity along with high CO2 diffusion rates concurrently. Current amine-based solid sorbents such as porous materials similar to SBA-15 have large pores diffusion entering molecules; however, the pores become clogged upon amine inclusion. To meet this challenge, our group's solution involves the creation of a new type of material which we are calling-amino-pillared nanosheet (APN) adsorbents which are generated from layered nanosheet precursors. These materials are being proposed because of their unique lamellar structure which exhibits ability to be modified by organic or inorganic pillars through consecutive swelling and pillaring steps to form large mesoporous interlayer spaces. After the expansion of the layer space through swelling and pillaring, the large pore space can be functionalized with amine groups. This selective functionalization is possible by the choice of amine group introduced. Our choice, large amine molecules, do not access the micropore within each layer; however, either physically or chemically immobilized onto the surface of the mesoporous interlayer space between each layer. The final goal of the research is to investigate the ability to prepare APN adsorbents from a model nanoporous layered materials including nanosheets precursor material MCM-22(P) and nanoporous layered silicate material AMH-3. MCM-22(P) contains 2-dimensional porous channels, 6 membered rings (MB) openings perpendicular to the layers and 10 MB channels in the plane of the layers. However, the transport limiting openings (6 MB) to the layers is smaller than CO2 gas molecules. In contrast, AMH-3 has

  17. SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION WITH SURFACTANT REGENERATION/REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation was conducted during the spring of 1999 at Marine Corps Base, Camp LeJeune, NC. A PCE-DNAPL zone was identified and delineated by extensive soil sampling in 1997, and was further characteized by a partitioning interwell t...

  18. A comparison of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide adsorbed at mica/water and silica/water interfaces using neutron reflection.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Lucy R; Browning, Kathryn L; Truscott, Chris L; Clifton, Luke A; Webster, John; Clarke, Stuart M

    2016-09-15

    The layer structure of the dichain alkyl ammonium surfactant, didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), adsorbed from water on to silica and mica surfaces has been determined using neutron reflection. Although sometimes considered interchangeable surfaces for study, we present evidence of significant differences in the adsorbed layer structure below the critical micelle concentration. A complete DDAB bilayer was assembled at the water/mica interface at concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (CMC). In contrast it is not until the CMC was reached that the complete bilayer structure formed on the oxidised silicon crystal. Removal of the complete bilayer on both surfaces was attempted by both washing and ion exchange yet the adsorbed structure proved tenacious. PMID:27318715

  19. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  20. Vibrational lifetimes and friction in adsorbate motion determined from quasi-elastic scattering.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Barbara A J; Hedgeland, Holly; Jardine, Andrew P; Allison, William; Hinch, B J; Ellis, John

    2015-09-14

    The vibrational excitation of molecules adsorbed on a surface is typically probed by spectroscopic techniques such as infrared or Raman spectroscopy. In the present article we demonstrate an alternative method to determine vibrational lifetimes of adsorbate molecules using quasi-elastic helium atom scattering (QHAS). As a probe of diffusive motion of molecules on surfaces QHAS is well established. Here, we demonstrate that QHAS can also be used to probe the vibrational lifetime of a molecule in its adsorption well. Measurements of cyclopentadienyl, C5H5, on Cu(111) allow us to distinguish two substrate phonon modes as well as two molecular vibrational modes, perpendicular and parallel to the surface. We further find that the dephasing of the vibrational motion corresponds to the friction determined in previous diffusion measurements. PMID:26204093

  1. Hemoglobin-mimetic oxygen adsorbent prepared via self-assembly of cysteinyl bolaamphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chaemyeong; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a novel cysteinyl bolaamphiphilic molecule was synthesized and its self-assembled planar suprastructure was applied as a biomimetic matrix to create a hemoglobin-mimetic oxygen adsorbent that exploits the ability of cysteine thiols to bind hemin. Self-assembly of the cysteinyl bolaamphiphilic molecule exposed cysteine thiols on its surface in the presence of β-mercaptoethanol, known to reduce disulfide bonds, without which, helically coiled structures were generated. The self-assembled planar structure was used as a soft matrix to create a hemoglobin-mimetic oxygen adsorbent. The surface-exposed cysteine thiols were used to attach hemin, producing a hemin-bound, planar structure mimicking hemoglobin. This hemoglobin mimic strongly adsorbed oxygen and remained stable up to 50°C. The cysteinyl bolaamphiphile self-assembled structure provided a biomimetic platform that allowed for the association of biological substances in a manner similar to natural proteins. PMID:26970824

  2. Influences of Dilute Organic Adsorbates on the Hydration of Low-Surface-Area Silicates.

    PubMed

    Sangodkar, Rahul P; Smith, Benjamin J; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J; Roberts, Lawrence R; Funkhouser, Gary P; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2015-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of dilute quantities of certain organic molecules and water at silicate surfaces strongly influence the rates of silicate dissolution, hydration, and crystallization. Here, we determine the molecular-level structures, compositions, and site-specific interactions of adsorbed organic molecules at low absolute bulk concentrations on heterogeneous silicate particle surfaces at early stages of hydration. Specifically, dilute quantities (∼0.1% by weight of solids) of the disaccharide sucrose or industrially important phosphonic acid species slow dramatically the hydration of low-surface-area (∼1 m(2)/g) silicate particles. Here, the physicochemically distinct adsorption interactions of these organic species are established by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced solid-state NMR techniques. These measurements provide significantly improved signal sensitivity for near-surface species that is crucial for the detection and analysis of dilute adsorbed organic molecules and silicate species on low-surface-area particles, which until now have been infeasible to characterize. DNP-enhanced 2D (29)Si{(1)H}, (13)C{(1)H}, and (31)P{(1)H} heteronuclear correlation and 1D (29)Si{(13)C} rotational-echo double-resonance NMR measurements establish hydrogen-bond-mediated adsorption of sucrose at distinct nonhydrated and hydrated silicate surface sites and electrostatic interactions with surface Ca(2+) cations. By comparison, phosphonic acid molecules are found to adsorb electrostatically at or near cationic calcium surface sites to form Ca(2+)-phosphonate complexes. Although dilute quantities of both types of organic molecules effectively inhibit hydration, they do so by adsorbing in distinct ways that depend on their specific architectures and physicochemical interactions. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNP-enhanced NMR techniques to measure and assess dilute adsorbed molecules and their molecular interactions on low

  3. New ester based gemini surfactants: the effect of different cationic headgroups on micellization properties and viscosity of aqueous micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Bhadani, Avinash; Tani, Misako; Endo, Takeshi; Sakai, Kenichi; Abe, Masahiko; Sakai, Hideki

    2015-07-15

    A new series of ester functionalized cationic gemini surfactants having different cationic headgroups (i.e. piperidinium, pyrrolidinium, morpholinium and quaternary ammonium) have been synthesized and characterized using NMR and Mass spectroscopy. These new gemini surfactants were investigated for their micellization and viscosity properties using surface tension, conductivity, fluorescence and rheology thechniques. The physicochemical properties of the aqueous surfactant system were influenced by polarity, size and the nature of cationic headgroups as the surface, thermodynamic and viscosity properties of these gemini surfactants were found to be dependent on the type of cationic headgroup. The current research finding establishes the structure-property relationship of the surfactant molecule specifically taking into account the dominant role displayed by the nature of the cationic headgroup. PMID:26145125

  4. Photoinduced surface dynamics of CO adsorbed on a platinum electrode.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hidenori; Okada, Tsubasa; Uosaki, Kohei

    2006-08-10

    The surface dynamics of adsorbed CO molecules formed by dissociative adsorption of HCHO at a polycrystalline Pt electrode/electrolyte solution interface was studied by picosecond time-resolved sum-frequency generation (TR-SFG) spectroscopy. A SFG peak at 2050-2060 cm(-1) was observed at the Pt electrode in HClO(4) solution containing HCHO at 0-300 mV (vs Ag/AgCl), indicating the formation of adsorbed CO at an atop site of the Pt surface as a result of dissociative adsorption of HCHO. The peak position varied with potential by approximately 33 cm(-1)/V, as previously found in an infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) study. Irradiation of an intense picosecond visible pulse (25 ps, 532 nm) caused an instant intensity decrease and broadening of the CO peak accompanied by the emergence of a new broad peak at approximately 1980 cm(-1) within the time resolution of the system. These results suggest a decrease and increase in the populations of CO adsorbed on atop and bridge sites, respectively, upon visible pump pulse irradiation. PMID:16884215

  5. Energetics of adsorbed CH3 on Pt(111) by calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Karp, Eric M; Silbaugh, Trent L; Campbell, Charles T

    2013-04-01

    The enthalpy and sticking probability for the dissociative adsorption of methyl iodide were measured on Pt(111) at 320 K and at low coverages (up to 0.04 ML, where 1 ML is equal to one adsorbate molecule for every surface Pt atom) using single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC). At this temperature and in this coverage range, methyl iodide produces adsorbed methyl (CH(3,ad)) plus an iodine adatom (I(ad)). Combining the heat of this reaction with reported energetics for Iad gives the standard heat of formation of adsorbed methyl, ΔH(f)(0)(CH3,ad), to be −53 kJ/mol and a Pt(111)–CH3 bond energy of 197 kJ/mol. (The error bar of ±20 kJ/mol for both values is limited by the reported heat of formation of I(ad).) This is the first direct measurement of these values for any alkyl fragment on any surface. PMID:23461481

  6. The interaction of photo-responsive surfactants with biological macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazwi, Khiza L.

    The interaction of photo-responsive surfactants with proteins has been considered as a means to exert reversible control over a number of aspects of protein structure and function. The azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB) family of cationic surfactants undergo a photo-reversible cis to trans isomerization upon exposure to light of the appropriate wavelength. The trans form of the molecule has a lower dipole moment across its azo linkage, and is more hydrophobic than the cis isomer. This results in a higher binding affinity with proteins for the trans isomer, inducing a greater degree of unfolding of tertiary and secondary structures. The surfactant has been applied to the study of the amyloid fibrillation pathway in insulin, in which the protein self-associates into long, insoluble, rod-like structures. The fibrillation rate in insulin is enhanced in the presence of the trans- isomer while the formation of fibrils is largely inhibited in the presence of the cis- isomer, where amorphous aggregates are observed instead. Additionally early fibrillar species formed in the trans-azoTAB assays exhibit a greater tendency to lateral aggregation than do structures in the pure protein, resulting in a more truncated, bundled final aggregate morphology. Use of the surfactants as a means to control protein quaternary solution structure has also been explored in the subunit dissociation of tetrameric catalase. In the presence of azoTAB surfactants, catalase dissociates first into a super-active dimer, then at higher concentrations into an aggregation prone monomer. Finally, the structural changes associated with azoTAB-induced unfolding of the two domain protein papain are tracked. The denaturation pathway involves a progressive loss in secondary structure with increasing azoTAB concentration, along with a relaxation of the compact tertiary structure, and a spatial separation of the two domains. A number of complementary experimental techniques are combined to determine

  7. Solution Properties of Dissymmetric Sulfonate-type Anionic Gemini Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Tomokazu; Akiba, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Dissymmetric and symmetric anionic gemini surfactants, N-alkyl-N'-alkyl-N,N'dipropanesulfonylethylenediamine (CmCnSul, where m and n represent alkyl chain lengths of m-n = 4-16, 6-14, 8-12, 10-10, and 12-12), were synthesized by two- or three-step reactions. Their physicochemical properties were characterized by equilibrium surface tension measurements, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy of pyrene, and dynamic light scattering. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the dissymmetric surfactants C4C16Sul, C6C14Sul, and C8C12Sul was slightly lower than that of the symmetric surfactant C10C10Sul. The occupied area per molecule (A) of C8C12Sul was smaller than that of C10C10Sul, indicating that C8C12Sul has a high surface activity. However, the increase in the degree of dissymmetry from C8C12Sul to C6C14Sul and then to C4C16Sul resulted in high surface tension and large A. Based on the surface tension, the standard free energies of micellization (∆G°mic) and adsorption (∆G°ads), the efficiency of surface adsorption (pC20), and the effectiveness of surface adsorption (CMC/C20) were obtained. These parameters suggested that C8C12Sul formed micelles more readily than the other surfactants. The properties determined from the surface tension indicated that C8C12Sul's ability is intermediate between those of C10C10Sul and C12C12Sul. The pyrene fluorescence and dynamic light scattering results revealed that the micelle size depends on the longer of the two alkyl chains in dissymmetric surfactants. PMID:26782304

  8. Hydration-Induced Phase Transitions in Surfactant and Lipid Films.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Sebastian; Kocherbitov, Vitaly

    2016-05-31

    For several surfactant and lipid systems, it is crucial to understand how hydration influences the physical and chemical properties. When humidity changes, it affects the degree of hydration by adding or removing water molecules. In many cases, this process induces transitions between liquid crystalline phases. This phenomenon is of general interest for numerous applications simply because of the fact that humidity variations are ubiquitous. Of particular interest are hydration-induced phase transitions in amphiphilic films, which in many cases appear as the frontier toward a vapor phase with changing humidity. Considering this, it is important to characterize the film thickness needed for the formation of 3D liquid crystalline phases and the lyotropic phase behavior of this kind of film. In this work, we study this issue by employing a recently developed method based on the humidity scanning quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (HS QCM-D), which enables continuous scanning of the film hydration. We investigate five surfactants films (DDAO, DTAC, CTAC, SDS, and n-octylβ-d-glucoside) and one lipid film (monoolein) and show that HS QCM-D enables the fast characterization of hydration-induced phase transitions with small samples. Film thicknesses range from tens to hundreds of nanometers, and clear phase transitions are observed in all cases. It is shown that phase transitions in films occur at the same water activities as for corresponding bulk samples. This allows us to conclude that surfactant and lipid films, with a thickness of as low as 50 nm, are in fact assembled as 3D-structured liquid crystalline phases. Furthermore, liquid crystalline phases of surfactant films show liquidlike behavior, which decreases the accuracy of the absorbed water mass measurement. On the other hand, the monoolein lipid forms more rigid liquid crystalline films, allowing for an accurate determination of the water sorption isotherm, which is also true for the

  9. Making More-Complex Molecules Using Superthermal Atom/Molecule Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, Brian; Chutjian, Ara; Orient, Otto

    2008-01-01

    A method of making more-complex molecules from simpler ones has emerged as a by-product of an experimental study in outer-space atom/surface collision physics. The subject of the study was the formation of CO2 molecules as a result of impingement of O atoms at controlled kinetic energies upon cold surfaces onto which CO molecules had been adsorbed. In this study, the O/CO system served as a laboratory model, not only for the formation of CO2 but also for the formation of other compounds through impingement of rapidly moving atoms upon molecules adsorbed on such cold interstellar surfaces as those of dust grains or comets. By contributing to the formation of increasingly complex molecules, including organic ones, this study and related other studies may eventually contribute to understanding of the origins of life.

  10. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kröger, J.; Berndt, R.; Vázquez, H.; Brandbyge, M.; Paulsson, M.

    2010-04-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure of the surface electrode. Nonequilibrium Green’s function calculations reproduce the trend of the conductance and visualize the current flow through the junction, which is guided through molecule-electrode chemical bonds.

  11. Polymer gels with associating side chains and their interaction with surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordievskaya, Yulia D.; Rumyantsev, Artem M.; Kramarenko, Elena Yu.

    2016-05-01

    Conformational behaviour of hydrophobically modified (HM) polymer gels in solutions of nonionic surfactants is studied theoretically. A HM gel contains hydrophobic side chains (stickers) grafted to its subchains. Hydrophobic stickers are capable to aggregate into joint micelles with surfactant molecules. Micelles containing more than one sticker serve as additional physical cross-links of the network, and their formation causes gel shrinking. In the proposed theoretical model, the interior of the gel/surfactant complex is treated as an array of densely packed spherical polymer brushes consisting of gel subchains tethered to the surface of the spherical sticker/surfactant micelles. Effect of stickers length and grafting density, surfactant concentration and hydrophobicity on gel swelling as well as on hydrophobic association inside it is analyzed. It is shown that increasing surfactant concentration can result in a gel collapse, which is caused by surfactant-induced hydrophobic aggregation of stickers, and a successive gel reswelling. The latter should be attributed to a growing fraction of surfactants in joint aggregates and, hence, increasing number of micelles containing only one sticker and not participating in gel physical cross-linking. In polyelectrolyte (PE) gels hydrophobic aggregation is opposed by osmotic pressure of mobile counterions, so that at some critical ionization degree hydrophobic association is completely suppressed. Hydrophobic modification of polymers is shown to open new ways for controlling gel responsiveness. In particular, it is discussed that incorporation of photosensitive groups into gel subchains and/or surfactant tail could give a possibility to vary the gel volume by light. Since hydrophobic aggregation regularities in gels and solutions are common, we hope our findings will be useful for design of polymer based self-healin