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Sample records for adsorbed uvi species

  1. Fate of Adsorbed U(VI) during Sulfidization of Lepidocrocite and Hematite

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The impact on U(VI) adsorbed to lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) was assessed when exposed to aqueous sulfide (S(-II)aq) at pH 8.0. With both minerals, competition between S(-II) and U(VI) for surface sites caused instantaneous release of adsorbed U(VI). Compared to lepidocrocite, consumption of S(-II)aq proceeded slower with hematite, but yielded maximum dissolved U concentrations that were more than 10 times higher, representing about one-third of the initially adsorbed U. Prolonged presence of S(-II)aq in experiments with hematite in combination with a larger release of adsorbed U(VI), enhanced the reduction of U(VI): after 24 h of reaction about 60–70% of U was in the form of U(IV), much higher than the 25% detected in the lepidocrocite suspensions. X-ray absorption spectra indicated that U(IV) in both hematite and lepidocrocite suspensions was not in the form of uraninite (UO2). Upon exposure to oxygen only part of U(IV) reoxidized, suggesting that monomeric U(IV) might have become incorporated in newly formed iron precipitates. Hence, sulfidization of Fe oxides can have diverse consequences for U mobility: in short-term, desorption of U(VI) increases U mobility, while reduction to U(IV) and its possible incorporation in Fe transformation products may lead to long-term U immobilization. PMID:28121137

  2. Fate of Adsorbed U(VI) during Sulfidization of Lepidocrocite and Hematite.

    PubMed

    Alexandratos, Vasso G; Behrends, Thilo; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2017-02-21

    The impact on U(VI) adsorbed to lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) was assessed when exposed to aqueous sulfide (S(-II)aq) at pH 8.0. With both minerals, competition between S(-II) and U(VI) for surface sites caused instantaneous release of adsorbed U(VI). Compared to lepidocrocite, consumption of S(-II)aq proceeded slower with hematite, but yielded maximum dissolved U concentrations that were more than 10 times higher, representing about one-third of the initially adsorbed U. Prolonged presence of S(-II)aq in experiments with hematite in combination with a larger release of adsorbed U(VI), enhanced the reduction of U(VI): after 24 h of reaction about 60-70% of U was in the form of U(IV), much higher than the 25% detected in the lepidocrocite suspensions. X-ray absorption spectra indicated that U(IV) in both hematite and lepidocrocite suspensions was not in the form of uraninite (UO2). Upon exposure to oxygen only part of U(IV) reoxidized, suggesting that monomeric U(IV) might have become incorporated in newly formed iron precipitates. Hence, sulfidization of Fe oxides can have diverse consequences for U mobility: in short-term, desorption of U(VI) increases U mobility, while reduction to U(IV) and its possible incorporation in Fe transformation products may lead to long-term U immobilization.

  3. Role of U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter species

    SciTech Connect

    Lovely, Derrick

    2008-12-23

    Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium, and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms. Results from this study showed that the U(VI) sorption capacity of G. uraniireducens was relatively similar in simple solutions, such as sodium chloride or bicarbonate. However, this ability to sorb uranium significantly decreased in groundwater. This suggested that certain chemicals present in the groundwater were inhibiting the ability of cell components of Geobacter to adsorb uranium. It was hypothesized that uranium removal would also be diminished in the bicarbonate solution. However, this did not seem to be the case, as uranium was as easily removed in the bicarbonate solution as in the sodium chloride solution.

  4. Laser spectroscopic studies of interactions of U(VI) withbacterial phosphate species

    SciTech Connect

    Knopp, Roger; Panak, Petra J.; Wray, Lewis A.; Renninger, NeilS.; Keasling, Jay D.; Nitsche, Heino

    2002-03-14

    We investigated the interactions of U(VI) with two bacterialphosphate species: Gram-positive B. sphaericus and Gram-negative P.aeruginosa. The Gram-positive B. sphaericus was investigated using Ramanspectroscopy and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy(TRLFS). We found that living cells, spores, and intact heat-killed cellscomplexed U(VI) (pH 4.5) through phosphate groups bound to theirsurfaces, while decomposed cells released H2PO4- and precipitated U(VI)as UO2(H2PO4)2. TRLFS of U(VI) showed that Gram-negative P.aeruginosa-genetically engineered to accumulate polyphosphate,subsequently degrade it, and secrete phosphate-precipitated U(VI)quantitatively at pH 4.5. The same bacterial strain, not induced tosecrete phosphate, sorbed only a small amount of U(VI).

  5. Time Resolved Studies Of Adsorbed Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J.; Nicol, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A time-resolved Fourier transform IR study of ethyne adsorbed on ZnNaA zeolite yields results very different from those reported for related systems. Initially two species (A and B) are formed by the interaction of C2H2 with the cations. Whereas species A (π-bonded C2H2) was found to be removed immediately on evacuation, species B (probably Zn-acetylide) was not fully removed after 60 mins evacuation. In the presence of the gas phase, bands due to Species A decreased slowly in intensity as new bands due to adsorbed ethanal were observed.

  6. Investigation of U(VI) adsorption in quartz-chlorite mineral mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M; Shang, Jianying; Jeon, Choong; Liu, Juan; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-07-15

    A batch and cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy investigation of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz-chlorite mixtures with variable mass ratios have been performed under field-relevant uranium concentrations (5×10(-7) M and 5×10(-6) M) in pH 8.1 synthetic groundwater. The U(VI) adsorption Kd values steadily increased as the mass fraction of chlorite increased, indicating preferential sorption to chlorite. For all mineral mixtures, U(VI) adsorption Kd values were lower than that calculated from the assumption of component additivity possibly caused by surface modifications stemming from chlorite dissolution; The largest deviation occurred when the mass fractions of the two minerals were equal. U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite displayed characteristic individual luminescence spectra that were not affected by mineral mixing. The spectra of U(VI) adsorbed within the mixtures could be simulated by one surface U(VI) species on quartz and two on chlorite. The luminescence intensity decreased in a nonlinear manner as the adsorbed U(VI) concentration increased with increasing chlorite mass fraction-likely due to ill-defined luminescence quenching by both structural Fe/Cr in chlorite, and trace amounts of solubilized and reprecipitated Fe/Cr in the aqueous phase. However, the fractional spectral intensities of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite followed the same trend of fractional adsorbed U(VI) concentration in each mineral phase with approximate linear correlations, offering a method to estimate of U(VI) concentration distribution between the mineral components with luminescence spectroscopy.

  7. Investigation of U(VI) Adsorption in Quartz-Chlorite Mineral Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Shang, Jianying; Jeon, Choong; Liu, Juan; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-08-25

    A batch and cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz-chlorite mixtures with variable mass ratios have been performed under field-relevant uranium concentrations (5x10-7 M and 5x10-6 M) in pH 8.1 synthetic groundwater. The U(VI) adsorption Kd values steadily increased as the mass fraction of chlorite increased, indicating preferential sorption to chlorite. For all mineral mixtures, U(VI) adsorption Kd values were lower than that calculated from the assumption of component additivity; The largest deviation occurred when the mass fractions of the two minerals were equal. U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite displayed characteristic individual fluorescence spectra that were not affected by mineral mixing. The spectra of U(VI) adsorbed within the mixtures could be simulated by one surface U(VI) species on quartz and two on chlorite. The fluorescence intensity decreased in a nonlinear manner as the adsorbed U(VI) concentration increased with increasing chlorite mass fraction – likely due to ill-defined fluorescence quenching by both structural Fe/Cr in chlorite, and trace amounts of solubilized and re-precipitated Fe/Cr in the aqueous phase. However, the fractional spectral intensities of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite followed the same trend of fractional adsorbed U(VI) concentration in each mineral phase; approximate linear correlations in the quartz:chlorite mass ratio ranges of 0.0 - 0.2 and 0.2 - 1.0, offering a method to estimate of U(VI) concentration distribution between the mineral components.

  8. Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Boily, Jean F.; Xia, Yuanxian; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2011-05-15

    The adsorption and speciation of U(VI) was investigated on contaminated, fine grained sediment materials from the Hanford 300 area (SPP1 GWF) in simulated groundwater using cryogenic laser-induced U(VI) fluorescence spectroscopy combined with chemometric analysis. A series of reference minerals (montmorillonite, illite, Michigan chlorite, North Carolina chlorite, California clinochlore, quartz and synthetic 6-line ferrihydrite) was used for comparison that represents the mineralogical constituents of SPP1 GWF. Surface area-normalized Kd values were measured at U(VI) concentrations of 5x10-7 mol L-1 and 5x10-6 mol L-1, respectively, that displayed the following affinity series: 6-line-ferrihydrite > North Carolina chlorite ≈ California clinochlore > Michigan chlorite ≈ quartz > montmorillonite ≈ illite ≈ SPP1 GWF. Both time-resolved spectra and asynchronous two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis of SPP1 GWF at different delay times indicated that two major adsorbed U(VI) species were present in the sediment that resembled U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and phyllosilicates. Simulations of the normalized fluorescence spectra confirmed that the speciation of SPP1 GWF was best represented by a linear combination of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz (90%) and phyllosilicates (10%). However, the fluorescence quantum yield for U(VI) adsorbed on phyllosilicates was lower than quartz and, consequently, its fractional contribution to speciation may be underestimated. Spectral comparison with literature data suggested that U(VI) exists primarily as inner-sphere U(VI) complexes with surface silanol groups on quartz while U(VI) on phyllosilicates was consistent with the formation of surface U(VI) tricarbonate complexes.

  9. The Sorption Processes of U(VI) onto SiO2 in the Presence of Phosphate: from Binary Surface Species to Precipitation.

    PubMed

    Comarmond, M Josick; Steudtner, Robin; Stockmann, Madlen; Heim, Karsten; Müller, Katharina; Brendler, Vinzenz; Payne, Timothy E; Foerstendorf, Harald

    2016-11-01

    The ternary system containing aqueous U(VI), aqueous phosphate and solid SiO2 was comprehensively investigated using a batch sorption technique, in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy, time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS), and surface complexation modeling (SCM). The batch sorption studies on silica gel (10 g/L) in the pH range 2.5 to 5 showed no significant increase in U(VI) uptake in the presence of phosphate at equimolar concentration of 20 μM, but significant increase in U(VI) uptake was observed for higher phosphate concentrations. In situ infrared and luminescence spectroscopic studies evidence the formation of two binary U(VI) surface species in the absence of phosphate, whereas after prolonged sorption in the presence of phosphate, the formation of a surface precipitate, most likely an autunite-like phase, is strongly suggested. From SCM, excellent fitting results were obtained exclusively considering two binary uranyl surface species and the formation of a solid uranyl phosphate phase. Ternary surface complexes were not needed to explain the data. The results of this study indicate that the sorption of U(VI) on SiO2 in the presence of inorganic phosphate initially involves binary surface-sorption species and evolves toward surface precipitation.

  10. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  11. Multiple species of noninteracting molecules adsorbed on a Bethe lattice.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael; Harris, A B

    2008-10-01

    A simple method, previously used to calculate the equilibrium concentration of dimers adsorbed on a Bethe lattice as a function of the dimer activity, is generalized to solve the problem of a Bethe lattice in contact with a reservoir containing a mixture of molecules. The molecules may have arbitrary sizes and shapes consistent with the geometry of the lattice and the molecules do not interact with one another except for the hard-core restriction that two molecules cannot touch the same site. We obtain a set of simultaneous nonlinear equations, one equation for each species of molecule, which determines the equilibrium concentration of each type of molecule as a function of the (arbitrary) activities of the various species. Surprisingly, regardless of the number of species, the equilibrium concentrations are given explicitly in terms of the solution of a single equation in one unknown which can be solved numerically, if need be. Some numerical examples show that increasing the activity of one species need not necessarily decrease the equilibrium concentration of all other species. We also calculate the adsorption isotherm of an "annealed" Bethe lattice consisting of two types of sites which differently influence the activity of an adsorbed molecule. We prove that if the reservoir contains a finite number of molecular species, regions of two different polymer densities cannot simultaneously exist on the lattice. The widely used Guggenheim theory of mixtures, which can also be construed as a theory of adsorption, assumes for simplicity that the molecules in the mixture are composed of elementary units, which occupy sites of a lattice of coordination number q . Guggenheim's analysis relies on approximate combinatorial formulas which become exact on a Bethe lattice of the same coordination number, as we show in an appendix. Our analysis involves no combinatorics and relies only on recognizing the statistical independence of certain quantities. Despite the nominal

  12. Application of Brazilian kaolinite clay as adsorbent to removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution: Kinetic and thermodynamic of cation-basic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, Denis L.; Leidens, Victor L.; Viana, Rubia R.; Airoldi, Claudio

    2010-05-15

    The compound N{sup 1}-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route. The modified and natural kaolinite samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopic, X-ray diffraction, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C. The well-defined peaks obtained in the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum in the 5.0-62.1 ppm region confirmed the attachment of organic functional groups as pendant chains bonded into the porous clay. The ability of these materials to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation at room temperature and pH 4.0. The kinetic parameters analyzed by the Lagergren and Elovich models gave a good fit for a pseudo-second order reaction with k{sub 2} values 16.0 and 25.1 mmol g{sup -1} min{sup -1} ranges for natural and modified kaolinite clays, respectively. The energetic effects caused by metal ion adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations. - Graphical abstract: This investigation reports the use of original and modified kaolinites as alternative absorbents. The compound N-[3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route.

  13. Quantitative separation of monomeric U(IV) from UO2 in products of U(VI) reduction

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Daniel S.; Uster, Benjamin; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena I.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium to tetravalent uranium can be catalyzed by bacteria and minerals. The end-product of this reduction is often the mineral uraninite, which was long assumed to be the only product of U(VI) reduction. However, recent studies report the formation of other species including an adsorbed U(IV) species, operationally referred to as monomeric U(IV). The discovery of monomeric U(IV) is important because the species is likely to be more labile and more susceptible to reoxidation than uraninite. Because there is a need to distinguish between these two U(IV) species, we propose here a wet chemical method of differentiating monomeric U(IV) from uraninite in environmental samples. To calibrate the method, U(IV) was extracted from known mixtures of uraninite and monomeric U(IV) and testted using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Monomeric U(IV) was efficiently removed from biomass and Fe(II)-bearing phases by bicarbonate extraction, without affecting uraninite stability. After confirming that the method effectively separates monomeric U(IV) and uraninite, it is further evaluated for a system containing those reduced U species and adsorbed U(VI). The method provides a rapid complement, and in some cases alternative, to XAS analyses for quantifying monomeric U(IV), uraninite, and adsorbed U(VI) species in environmental samples. PMID:22540966

  14. Quantitative separation of monomeric U(IV) from UO2 in products of U(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Alessi, Daniel S; Uster, Benjamin; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena I; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Stubbs, Joanne E; Bargar, John R; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2012-06-05

    The reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium to tetravalent uranium can be catalyzed by bacteria and minerals. The end-product of this reduction is often the mineral uraninite, which was long assumed to be the only product of U(VI) reduction. However, recent studies report the formation of other species including an adsorbed U(IV) species, operationally referred to as monomeric U(IV). The discovery of monomeric U(IV) is important because the species is likely to be more labile and more susceptible to reoxidation than uraninite. Because there is a need to distinguish between these two U(IV) species, we propose here a wet chemical method of differentiating monomeric U(IV) from uraninite in environmental samples. To calibrate the method, U(IV) was extracted from known mixtures of uraninite and monomeric U(IV) and tested using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Monomeric U(IV) was efficiently removed from biomass and Fe(II)-bearing phases by bicarbonate extraction, without affecting uraninite stability. After confirming that the method effectively separates monomeric U(IV) and uraninite, it is further evaluated for a system containing those reduced U species and adsorbed U(VI). The method provides a rapid complement, and in some cases alternative, to XAS analyses for quantifying monomeric U(IV), uraninite, and adsorbed U(VI) species in environmental samples.

  15. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by indigenous bacteria in contaminated ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelouas, A.; Lu, Yongming; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, H. E.

    1998-12-01

    We report on bio-catalyzed reduction and immobilization of U(VI) species (0.25 mg/l to 235 mg/l) in ground water in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, sulfate and carbonate. We studied ground water from the uranium mill tailings site near Tuba City, Arizona (USA). Experiments with the ground water were conducted in the presence of the Navajo sandstone host rock. Uranium in solution is complexed by carbonate. Two indigenous denitrifying bacteria were identified Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. stutzeri, and one sulfate reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, also known as Fe(III)-reducer. S. putrefaciens can use U(VI) as an electron acceptor, instead of Fe(III). Ethanol was used as the organic carbon source. Microbially mediated reactions are sequential in the order of decreasing redox intensity. Metabolic reduction of nitrate to gaseous species (N 2, N 2O) was complete within 1 week at 16°C. The sulfate concentration remained constant. Some of the U(VI) coprecipitated with aragonite/calcite or was adsorbed on biomass during denitrification. Subsequently, the enzymatically catalyzed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was complete within 3 weeks but was accompanied by reduction of sulfate to sulfide. U(IV) precipitated as a uraninite solid solution (U, Ca)O 2, adhering to the bacteria. The final concentration in solution was ≤1 μg/l. U(VI) was not reduced by sulfide. Complexation of U(VI) by carbonate made its reduction by sulfide even slower than in pure water. The bio-catalyzed reaction is the faster process under the conditions given by the composition of the ground water.

  16. Gold nanoparticle-aluminum oxide adsorbent for efficient removal of mercury species from natural waters.

    PubMed

    Lo, Sut-I; Chen, Po-Cheng; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2012-03-06

    We report a new adsorbent for removal of mercury species. By mixing Au nanoparticles (NPs) 13 nm in diameter with aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) particles 50-200 μm in diameter, Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbents are easily prepared. Three adsorbents, Al(2)O(3), Au NPs, and Au NP-Al(2)O(3), were tested for removal of mercury species [Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)), and phenylmercury (PhHg(+))]. The Au NP adsorbent has a higher binding affinity (dissociation constant; K(d) = 0.3 nM) for Hg(2+) ions than the Al(2)O(3) adsorbent (K(d) = 52.9 nM). The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent has a higher affinity for mercury species and other tested metal ions than the Al(2)O(3) and Au NP adsorbents. The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent provides a synergic effect and, thus, is effective for removal of most tested metal ions and organic mercury species. After preconcentration of mercury ions by an Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent, analysis of mercury ions down to the subppq level in aqueous solution was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent allows effective removal of mercury species spiked in lake water, groundwater, and seawater with efficiencies greater than 97%. We also used Al(2)O(3) and Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbents sequentially for selectively removing Hg(2+) and MeHg(+) ions from water. The low-cost, effective, and stable Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent shows great potential for economical removal of various mercury species.

  17. Influence of (calcium-)uranyl-carbonate complexation on U(VI) sorption on Ca- and Na-bentonites.

    PubMed

    Meleshyn, A; Azeroual, M; Reeck, T; Houben, G; Riebe, B; Bunnenberg, C

    2009-07-01

    The influence of uranyl-carbonate and calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexations on the kinetics of U(VI) (approximately 3.4 x 10(-3) mol L(-1)) sorption from NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2 solutions on Na- and Ca-bentonites at circumneutral ambient conditions was investigated. Complexation of U(VI) in Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) aqueous species, dominating the U(VI) speciation in Ca(NO3)2 solution, reduces its adsorption on bentonite by a factor of 2-3 in comparison with that in (UO2)2CO3(OH)3- species, dominating in NaNO3 solution, within the studied period of time (21 days). As a result of the dissolution of accessory calcite, Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) can be formed in the initially Ca-free solution in contact with either Na- or Ca-bentonite. U(VI) adsorption on Na-bentonite is a factor of approximately 2 higher than that on Ca-bentonite for solutions with the Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) complex dominating aqueous U(VI) speciation. This favors use of Na-bentonite over that of Ca-bentonite in final disposal of radioactive waste. Furthermore, the observed strong correlation between U(VI) adsorption and Mg release as a result of montmorillonite dissolution indicates in agreement with previous findings that under the applied conditions U(VI) is adsorbed on the edge surface of montmorillonite, which is a major mineral phase of the studied clays.

  18. Photoluminescence Enhancement of Adsorbed Species on Si Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Taketoshi; Maeda, Masanori; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    We have fabricated Si nanoparticles from Si swarf using the beads milling method. The mode diameter of produced Si nanoparticles was between 4.8 and 5.2 nm. Si nanoparticles in hexane show photoluminescence (PL) spectra with peaks at 2.56, 2.73, 2.91, and 3.09 eV. The peaked PL spectra are attributed to the vibronic structure of adsorbed dimethylanthracene (DMA) impurity in hexane. The PL intensity of hexane with DMA increases by ~3000 times by adsorption on Si nanoparticles. The PL enhancement results from an increase in absorption probability of incident light by DMA caused by adsorption on the surface of Si nanoparticles.

  19. Uranyl-chlorite sorption/desorption: Evaluation of different U(VI) sequestration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, David M.; Maher, Kate; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2009-10-01

    Sequestration of soluble uranium(VI) in the form of uranyl UO22+ by clay minerals such as chlorite is potentially a major sink for U in U-contaminated environments. We have used batch sorption/desorption experiments combined with U L III-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, synchrotron-based microdiffraction, and surface complexation modeling to investigate the dominant sorption process(es) governing uranyl uptake by chlorite. Uranium(VI) sorption is independent of ionic strength, suggesting dominantly inner-sphere sorption, which was supported by selective chemical extraction results. The maximum sorption loadings were 0.28 μmol U g -1 chlorite (at pH 4) and 6.3 μmol U g -1 chlorite (at pH 6.5 and 10). Uranium(VI) uptake as a function of solution composition followed the trends (at pH 6.5): CO 3-Ca-free system >CO 3-Ca-bearing system >CO 3-bearing system; (at pH 10): CO 3-Ca-bearing system >CO 3-Ca-free system ≈CO 3-bearing system. Desorption experiments based on selective chemical extractions indicated that (1) there is little or no weakly bound U(VI) or U(VI)-bearing precipitates, (2) 60-80% of U(VI) inner-sphere sorption complexes are desorbed following a 0.1 M HCl step over 1 week, and (3) 100% desorption of adsorbed U(VI) is accomplished by a 1.0 M HCl step over 1 week. Fits of the EXAFS spectra of the short-term sorption samples indicate that UO22+ forms inner-sphere sorption complexes with carbonate (when present) at [Fe(O,OH) 6] octahedral sites in a bidentate, edge-sharing manner. EXAFS-derived structural parameters were used to constrain the type(s) of U(VI)-bearing surface species and were combined with observed batch sorption trends as input for a diffuse double-layer surface complexation model (SCM). This model successfully predicts U(VI) sorption over a range of U(VI) concentrations, pH values, and solution

  20. Abiotic reductive immobilization of U(VI) by biogenic mackinawite.

    PubMed

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas C; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Newville, Matt; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F

    2013-03-05

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U(VI) reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe 1+x S, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U(VI) abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS, and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U(VI) indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of sulfide-bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U(VI) reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U(VI) reduction.

  1. Uranium Isotopic Fractionation Induced by U(VI) Adsorption onto Common Aquifer Minerals.

    PubMed

    Jemison, N E; Johnson, T M; Shiel, A E; Lundstrom, C C

    2016-11-15

    Uranium groundwater contamination due to U mining and processing affects numerous sites globally. Bioreduction of soluble, mobile U(VI) to U(IV)-bearing solids is potentially a very effective remediation strategy. Uranium isotopes ((238)U/(235)U) have been utilized to track the progress of microbial reduction, with laboratory and field studies finding a ∼1‰ isotopic fractionation, with the U(IV) product enriched in (238)U. However, the isotopic fractionation produced by adsorption may complicate the use of (238)U/(235)U to trace microbial reduction. A previous study found that adsorption of U(VI) onto Mn oxides produced a -0.2‰ fractionation with the adsorbed U(VI) depleted in (238)U. In this study, adsorption to quartz, goethite, birnessite, illite, and aquifer sediments induced an average isotopic fractionation of -0.15‰ with the adsorbed U(VI) isotopically lighter than coexisting aqueous U(VI). In bicarbonate-bearing matrices, the fractionation depended little on the nature of the sorbent, with only birnessite producing an atypically large fractionation. In the case of solutions with ionic strengths much lower than those of typical groundwater, less isotopic fractionation was produced than U(VI) solutions with greater ionic strength. Studies using U isotope data to assess U(VI) reduction must consider adsorption as a lesser, but significant isotope fractionation process.

  2. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) on granite.

    PubMed

    Fan, Q H; Hao, L M; Wang, C L; Zheng, Z; Liu, C L; Wu, W S

    2014-03-01

    The effects of pH, counter ions and temperature on the adsorption of U(VI) on Beishan granite (BsG) were investigated in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA). The adsorption edge of U(VI) on BsG suggested that U(VI) adsorption was mainly controlled by ion exchange and outer-sphere complexation at low pH, whereas inner-sphere complex was the dominant adsorption species in the pH range of 4.0-9.0. Above pH 9.0, Na2U2O7 might play an important role in the rise of U(VI) adsorption again. Counter ions such as Cl(-), SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) can provoke U(VI) adsorption on BsG to some extent, which was directly correlated to the complexing ability of U(VI)-ligand. More noticeably, the large enhancement of U(VI) adsorption in the presence of phosphate can be attributed to the ternary complex formation (BsG-PO4-UO2), precipitation ((UO2)3(PO4)2(s)) and secondary phase (Na-autunite). Both FA and HA can slightly increase U(VI) adsorption at low pH, whereas they strongly inhibited U(VI) adsorption at high pH range. Artificial synthesized granite (AsG) prepared in the laboratory is impossible to use as an analogue of natural granite because of the large difference in the adsorption and surface properties.

  3. Nanopore reactive adsorbents for the high-efficiency removal of waste species

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2005-01-04

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g., metal, enzyme, etc., particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as ions, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  4. Rod-like cyanophenyl probe molecules nanoconfined to oxide particles: Density of adsorbed surface species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunza, Stefan; Frunza, Ligia; Ganea, Constantin Paul; Zgura, Irina; Brás, Ana Rita; Schönhals, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Surface layers have already been observed by broadband dielectric spectroscopy for composite systems formed by adsorption of rod-like cyanophenyl derivates as probe molecules on the surface of oxide particles. In this work, features of the surface layer are reported; samples with different amounts of the probe molecules adsorbed onto oxide (nano) particles were prepared in order to study their interactions with the surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to analyze the amount of loaded probe molecules. The density of the surface species ns was introduced and its values were estimated from quantitative Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with TGA. This parameter allows discriminating the composites into several groups assuming a similar interaction of the probe molecules with the hosts of a given group. An influence factor H is further proposed as the ratio of the number of molecules in the surface layer showing a glassy dynamics and the number of molecules adsorbed tightly on the surface of the support: It was found for aerosil composites and used for calculating the maximum filling degree of partially filled silica MCM-41 composites showing only one dielectric process characteristic for glass-forming liquids and a bulk behavior for higher filling degrees.

  5. In situ UV-visible reflection absorption wavelength modulation spectroscopy of species irreversibly adsorbed on electrode surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sunghyun; Scherson, D.A. )

    1992-12-15

    A method is herein described for the in situ detection of species adsorbed on electrode surfaces which employs a vibrating grating to modulate the wavelength of the incident light. This technique denoted as reflection absorption wavelength modulation spectroscopy (RAWMS) has made it possible to obtain at a fixed electrode potential normalized, differential UV-visible spectra of a single, irreversibly adsorbed monolayer of cobalt tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (Co[sup II]TsPc) on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG(bp)) and of methylene blue (MB) on graphite. The (wavelength) integrated difference RAWMS spectra for these adsorbed species were remarkably similar to those observed for the same compounds in aqueous solutions when present in the monomeric form. Complementary wavelength modulation experiments involving a conventional transmission geometry have shown that the instrument involved in the in situ RAWMS measurements is capable of resolving absorbance changes on the order of 0.002 units. 20 refs.

  6. Effect of Amine Surface Coverage on the Co-Adsorption of CO2 and Water: Spectral Deconvolution of Adsorbed Species.

    PubMed

    Didas, Stephanie A; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten; Jones, Christopher W

    2014-12-04

    Three primary amine materials functionalized onto mesoporous silica with low, medium, and high surface amine coverages are prepared and evaluated for binary CO2/H2O adsorption under dilute conditions. Enhancement of amine efficiency due to humid adsorption is most pronounced for low surface amine coverage materials. In situ FT-IR spectra of adsorbed CO2 on these materials suggest this enhancement may be associated with the formation of bicarbonate species during adsorption on materials with low surface amine coverage, though such species are not observed on high surface coverage materials. On the materials with the lowest amine loading, bicarbonate is observed on longer time scales of adsorption, but only after spectral contributions from rapidly forming alkylammonium carbamate species are removed. This is the first time that direct evidence for bicarbonate formation, which is known to occur in liquid aqueous amine solutions, has been presented for CO2 adsorption on solid amine adsorbents.

  7. Mechanical investigation of U(VI) on pyrrhotite by batch, EXAFS and modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibo; Zhu, Yuke; Xu, Bin; Li, Ping; Sun, Yubing; Chen, Tianhu

    2017-01-15

    The interaction mechanism of U(VI) on pyrrhotite was demonstrated by batch, spectroscopic and modeling techniques. Pyrite was selected as control group in this study. The removal of U(VI) on pyrite and pyrrhotite significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength from 0.001 to 0.1mol/L at pH 2.0-6.0, whereas the no effect of ionic strength was observed at pH >6.0. The maximum removal capacity of U(VI) on pyrite and pyrrhotite calculated from Langmuir model was 10.20 and 21.34mgg(-1) at pH 4.0 and 333K, respectively. The XPS analysis indicated the U(VI) was primarily adsorbed on pyrrhotite and pyrite and then approximately 15.5 and 9.8% of U(VI) were reduced to U(IV) by pyrrhotite and pyrite after 20 days, respectively. Based on the XANES analysis, the adsorption edge of uranium-containing pyrrhotite located between U(IV)O2(s) and U(VI)O2(2+) spectra. The EXAFS analysis demonstrated the inner-sphere surface complexation of U(VI) on pyrrhotite due to the occurrence of U-S shell, whereas the U-U shell revealed the reductive co-precipitates of U(VI) on pyrrhotite/pyrite with increasing reaction times. The surface complexation modeling showed that outer- and inner-surface complexation dominated the U(VI) removal at pH<4 and pH>5.0, respectively. The findings presented herein play a crucial role in the removal of radionuclides on iron sulfide in environmental cleanup applications.

  8. A vibrational and TDS study of sulfur adsorbates on Cu(100): Evidence for CH 3S species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, B. A.; Nyberg, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrational (EELS) and TDS data for methyl mercaptan (CH 3SH), dimethyl sulfide (CH 3) 2S and dimethyl disulfide (CH 3S) 2 are analyzed to determine the nature of the adsorption states on Cu(100). Dimethyl sulfide is reversibly adsorbed on Cu(100); no dissociation (CS bond breaking) was found. By contrast, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl disulfide dissociate below 300 K to form adsorbed CH 3S (methyl mercaptide) species. Depending on the coverage, two orientations of methyl mercaptide are found: linear and bent. The two different orientations can be distinguished via the surface dipole selection rule by different intensities of the methyl rocking and deformation vibrations. By contrast with the methoxy species, which on Cu(100) decomposes to formaldehyde, no H 2C=S is liberated during decomposition of CH 3S. The mercaptide is stable to ˜ 350 K, but decomposes at higher temperatures to form adsorbed sulfur and recombinant methane, hydrogen and ethane. The methane appears to be formed by methyl-hydrogen recombination when the C-S bond scission occurs. TDS results show that sulfur released from the decomposition poisons the surface toward further adsorption. In addition, the selectivity toward methane versus ethane can be altered by pre-titrating the adsorbed hydrogen with oxygen, thereby changing the relative methyl-hydrogen and methyl-methyl recombination probabilities.

  9. Electrochemical hydrogenation of a homogeneous nickel complex to form a surface adsorbed hydrogen-evolving species.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel J; McCarthy, Brian D; Donley, Carrie L; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2015-03-28

    A Ni(II) complex degrades electrochemically in the presence of acid in acetonitrile to form an electrode adsorbed film that catalytically evolves hydrogen. Comparison with a similar compound permitted investigation of the degradation mechanism.

  10. Characterization of molecular and atomic species adsorbed on ferroelectric and semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath, Satyaveda Chavi

    In order to clarify the mechanisms behind the adsorption of atomic and molecular species adsorbed on ferroelectric surfaces, single crystalline lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN), 'Z-cut' along the (0001) plane, has been prepared, characterized and subsequently exposed to molecular and atomic species. 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystal was chosen as a polar molecule for our model system for this study. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface contact angles (CA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surface of LN as well as the nature of the liquid crystal films grown on the surface. Atomically flat LN surfaces were prepared as a support for monolayer thick, 8CB molecular domains. Also, for the purpose of gaining a fundamental understanding of low coverage interactions of metal atoms on ferroelectric surfaces, we choose to deposit gold onto the LN surface. These gold atomic layers were grown under UHV conditions and characterized. Understanding anchoring mechanisms and thin film organization for LC molecules and metal atoms on uniformly poled surfaces allows for a fuller appreciation of how molecular deposition of other polarizable molecules on patterned poled LN surfaces would occur as well as yielding greater insight on the atomic characteristics of metal on ferroelectric interfaces. Also, to reveal the mechanisms involved in the adsorption of organic aromatic molecules on high-index Si surfaces, thiophene (C4H 4S) and pyrrole (C4H5N) molecules were dosed on prepared Si(5 5 12)-2x1 surfaces as our experimental system. The Si(5 5 12) surface was prepared to produce a 2x1 reconstruction after which molecules were dosed at low exposure to observe the preferred adsorption sites on the surface. All surface preparation and experiments were performed in UHV and measurements of the surface before and after deposition were performed using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Fundamental

  11. Study of sorption-retarded U(VI) diffusion in Hanford silt/clay material

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Liu, Chongxuan; Ball, William P.

    2009-10-15

    A diffusion cell method was developed to measure the effective aqueous diffusion coefficient for U(VI) under strictly controlled chemical conditions within the inter-particle pores of silt/clay sediment from the DOE Hanford site, WA. "Inward-flux” diffusion studies were conducted in which U(VI) concentrations in both aqueous and solid phases were measured as a function of distance into the cell under conditions of constant concentration at the cell boundaries. A sequential extraction method was developed to measure sorbed U(VI) content in the solid phase, while accounting for the non-negligible extractable background U(VI). U(VI) diffusion data were found to be consistent with a model that assumed that: 1) a single effective aqueous diffusion coefficient could be used to simulate the coupled diffusion of various aqueous U(VI) species, and 2) the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) is appropriate for modeling the effects of sorption under the given experimental conditions. An effective aqueous diffusion coefficient (De) of 1.6x10^-6 cm2/s was obtained under conditions of pH 8.0 and calcite saturation that are relevant to the subsurface conditions at some regions of the Hanford site. The developed experimental techniques provide a practical approach for measuring effective aqueous U(VI) diffusivity in sorptive porous media.

  12. UVIS CTE Monitor: Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noeske, Kai

    2010-09-01

    *** NOTE 2: 2ND CHANGE MAR 26 2011: VISIT 13 HAD FAILED. APPROVED FOR REPETITION. ****** NEW VISIT 14 IS IDENTICAL TO FORMER VISIT 13, WITH EXCEPTIONS THAT SOME SUBEXPOSURES ARE REMOVED. ****** SEE OBSERVING DESCRIPTION FOR DETAILS. ****** NOTE: THIS IS A CHANGED PHASE II PROPOSAL AFTER VISITS 1,2,7 HAD BEEN EXECUTED ****** CHANGES BECAME NECESSARY AFTER ANALYSIS OF INCOMING CALIBRATION DATA FROM 12379 AND 12348 ****** THIS REVISED PHASE II {submission 14FEB2011} ADDS THE EVALUATION OF CHARGE INJECTION***The changes amount to:1} dropping the 3rd epoch {August 2011} of external CTE monitoring {3 orbits}2} simplifying the CTE monitor observations in the second epoch {March 2011}, freeing up 1 orbit3} using the freed up orbits from 1} and 2}, together with two additional external orbits that we were granted, to thoroughly assess the data quality of charge - injected data under realistic observing setups.These charge-injected observations will be obtained during the 2nd epoch of the CTE monitor program, in the March 2011 window.------ Original Text prior to 14 Feb 2011 below this line -----------This program extends the Cycle 17 external CTE calibration {CAL/WFC3 ID 11924} program for WFC3/UVIS over Cycle 18. Targets are {i} the sparse cluster NGC 6791 observed in Cycle 17, to continue a consistent set of observations that allows to isolate the time evolution of the CTE, and {ii} a denser field in 47 Tuc {NGC 104}. The latter will provide data to measure the dependence of the CTE on field crowding. It will also provide a consistent comparison between the CTE evolution of WFC3/UVIS and that of ACS/WFC at the same time into the flight {1 year}, because ACS/WFC CTE data were based on 47 Tuc observations. Additional observations of 47 Tuc in the CVZ will provide a wide range of background levels to measure the background dependence of the UVIS CTE.Goals are {i} the continued monitoring of the time evolution of the WFC3/UVIS CTE, {ii} establishing the detector X

  13. Long-term diffusion of U(VI) in bentonite: Dependence on density.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Claudia; Mibus, Jens; Trepte, Paul; Müller, Christa; Brendler, Vinzenz; Park, Dan M; Jiao, Yongqin; Kersting, Annie B; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2017-01-01

    As a contribution to the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories, U(VI) diffusion through the potential buffer material MX-80 bentonite was investigated at three clay dry densities over six years. Synthetic MX-80 model pore water was used as background electrolyte. Speciation calculations showed that Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) was the main U(VI) species. The in- and out-diffusion of U(VI) was investigated separately. U(VI) diffused about 3mm, 1.5mm, and 1mm into the clay plug at ρ=1.3, 1.6, and 1.9g/cm(3), respectively. No through-diffusion of the U(VI) tracer was observed. However, leaching of natural uranium contained in the clay occurred and uranium was detected in all receiving reservoirs. As expected, the effective and apparent diffusion coefficients, De and Da, decreased with increasing dry density. The Da values for the out-diffusion of natural U(VI) were in good agreement with previously determined values. Surprisingly, Da values for the in-diffusion of U(VI) were about two orders of magnitude lower than values obtained in short-term in-diffusion experiments reported in the literature. Some potential reasons for this behavior that were evaluated are changes of the U(VI) speciation within the clay (precipitation, reduction) or changes of the clay porosity and pore connectivity with time. By applying Archie's law and the extended Archie's law, it was estimated that a significantly smaller effective porosity must be present for the long-term in-diffusion of U(VI). The results suggest that long-term studies of key transport phenomena may reveal additional processes that can directly impact long-term repository safety assessments.

  14. Long-term diffusion of U(VI) in bentonite: Dependence on density

    DOE PAGES

    Joseph, Claudia; Mibus, Jens; Trepte, Paul; ...

    2016-10-12

    As a contribution to the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories, U(VI) diffusion through the potential buffer material MX-80 bentonite was investigated at three clay dry densities over six years. Synthetic MX-80 model pore water was used as background electrolyte. Speciation calculations showed that Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) was the main U(VI) species. The in- and out-diffusion of U(VI) was investigated separately. U(VI) diffused about 3 mm, 1.5 mm, and 1 mm into the clay plug at ρ = 1.3, 1.6, and 1.9 g/cm3, respectively. No through-diffusion of the U(VI) tracer was observed. However, leaching of natural uranium contained in the clay occurredmore » and uranium was detected in all receiving reservoirs. As expected, the effective and apparent diffusion coefficients, De and Da, decreased with increasing dry density. The Da values for the out-diffusion of natural U(VI) were in good agreement with previously determined values. Surprisingly, Da values for the in-diffusion of U(VI) were about two orders of magnitude lower than values obtained in short-term in-diffusion experiments reported in the literature. Some potential reasons for this behavior that were evaluated are changes of the U(VI) speciation within the clay (precipitation, reduction) or changes of the clay porosity and pore connectivity with time. By applying Archie's law and the extended Archie's law, it was estimated that a significantly smaller effective porosity must be present for the long-term in-diffusion of U(VI). Finally, the results suggest that long-term studies of key transport phenomena may reveal additional processes that can directly impact long-term repository safety assessments.« less

  15. Can the state of platinum species be unambiguously determined by the stretching frequency of an adsorbed CO probe molecule?

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Neyman, Konstantin M; Hadjiivanov, Konstantin I; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2016-08-10

    The paper addresses possible ambiguities in the determination of the state of platinum species by the stretching frequency of a CO probe, which is a common technique for characterization of platinum-containing catalytic systems. We present a comprehensive comparison of the available experimental data with our theoretical modeling (density functional) results of pertinent systems - platinum surfaces, nanoparticles and clusters as well as reduced or oxidized platinum moieties on a ceria support. Our results for CO adsorbed on-top on metallic Pt(0), with C-O vibrational frequencies in the region 2018-2077 cm(-1), suggest that a decrease of the coordination number of the platinum atom, to which CO is bound, by one lowers the CO frequency by about 7 cm(-1). This trend corroborates the Kappers-van der Maas correlation derived from the analysis of the experimental stretching frequency of CO adsorbed on platinum-containing samples on different supports. We also analyzed the effect of the charge of platinum species on the CO frequency. Based on the calculated vibrational frequencies of CO in various model systems, we concluded that the actual state of the platinum species may be mistaken based only on the measured value of the C-O vibrational frequency due to overlapping regions of frequencies corresponding to different types of species. In order to identify the actual state of platinum species one has to combine this powerful technique with other approaches.

  16. Reduction of U(VI) Complexes by Anthraquinone Disulfonate: Experiment and Molecular Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, C.C.; Wang, Z.; Rosso, K.M.; Wagnon, K.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    2004-03-17

    Past studies demonstrate that complexation will limit abiotic and biotic U(VI) reduction rates and the overall extent of reduction. However, the underlying basis for this behavior is not understood and presently unpredictable across species and ligand structure. The central tenets of these investigations are: (1) reduction of U(VI) follows the electron-transfer (ET) mechanism developed by Marcus; (2) the ET rate is the rate-limiting step in U(VI) reduction and is the step that is most affected by complexation; and (3) Marcus theory can be used to unify the apparently disparate U(VI) reduction rate data and as a computational tool to construct a predictive relationship.

  17. Growth of Desulfovibrio vulgaris when respiring U(VI) and characterization of biogenic uraninite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender; Hyun, Sung Pil; Hayes, Kim F; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-06-17

    The capacity of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to reduce U(VI) was studied previously with nongrowth conditions involving a high biomass concentration; thus, bacterial growth through respiration of U(VI) was not proven. In this study, we conducted a series of batch tests on U(VI) reduction by D. vulgaris at a low initial biomass (10 to 20 mg/L of protein) that could reveal biomass growth. D. vulgaris grew with U(VI) respiration alone, as well as with simultaneous sulfate reduction. Patterns of growth kinetics and solids production were affected by sulfate and Fe(2+). Biogenic sulfide nonenzymatically reduced 76% of the U(VI) and greatly enhanced the overall reduction rate in the absence of Fe(2+) but was rapidly scavenged by Fe(2+) to form FeS in the presence of Fe(2+). Biogenic U solids were uraninite (UO2) nanocrystallites associated with 20 mg/g biomass as protein. The crystallite thickness of UO2 was 4 to 5 nm without Fe(2+) but was <1.4 nm in the presence of Fe(2+), indicating poor crystallization inhibited by adsorbed Fe(2+) and other amorphous Fe solids, such as FeS or FeCO3. This work fills critical gaps in understanding the metabolic utilization of U by microorganisms and formation of UO2 solids in bioremediation sites.

  18. WFC3/UVIS Sky Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia; Anderson, Jay

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the on-orbit background levels present in WFC3/UVIS full-frame images. The results are based on nearly all standard readout images taken since the installation of WFC3 on HST in May 2009, with a relatively small number of exclusions e.g. images with obvious anomalous backgrounds (such as extended targets filling the field of view) or those taken with the quad filters (different bandpass in each amp). Comparisons are provided to estimates from the Exposure Time Calculator (ETC). We anticipate these results to be helpful in fine-tuning the level of post-flash required to achieve the optimum balance of charge transfter efficiency (CTE) loss mitigation versus noise penalty. Observers considering the use of post-flash should refer to the White Paper (MacKenty & Smith 2012) on the CTE WWW page (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3/ins_performance/CTE/).

  19. Multiple-overtone resonance Raman scattering and fluorescence from I{sub 2} species adsorbed on silver surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbald, M.S.; Chumanov, G.; Small, G.; Cotton, T.M.

    1998-07-01

    A detailed excitation profile of a Raman progression consisting of up to six overtones and a fundamental band at 123 cm{sup {minus}1} observed from iodide adsorbed on an electrochemically roughened silver surface at 20 K is analyzed. The excitation profile was constructed from 77 spectra obtained by tuning the laser wavelength in {approximately}0.25 nm steps through the spectral range 409 nm{endash}433 nm. The shift between resonances in the excitation profile, corresponding to the spacing between vibronic levels in the excited state, is also equal to 123 cm{sup {minus}1} indicating that the ground state and excited state potential energy surfaces have the same shape. Only two distinct resonances spaced three vibrational quanta apart were evident in the profile for each band in the progression. Curve fitting of the Raman band shapes indicates that each overtone is composed of one sharp and one broad band, whereas the fundamental contains only one sharp component. The measured width of the fundamental was less than 2.5 cm{sup {minus}1} FWHM, limited by the instrument function. It is proposed that the sharp Raman bands represent a normal vibrational mode of a surface-adsorbed I{sub 2}-like species with the width determined by the intrinsic vibrational dephasing in the ground state. On the other hand, the broad Raman bands reflect vibronic coupling between different I{sub 2}-like species adsorbed on the same Ag cluster. The broad bandwidths result from both dephasing associated with the vibronic coupling and the intrinsic vibrational dephasing. Other weak emission bands are attributed to resonance fluorescence corresponding to direct transitions from higher vibronic levels of the excited state to the ground state. An emission at 429.9 nm is assigned to exciton recombination in small silver iodide clusters which are formed after spontaneous oxidation of the iodide-modified silver surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Mixed brush of chemically and physically adsorbed polymers under shear: inverse transport of the physisorbed species.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, C; Müller, M

    2014-01-07

    We study mixed brushes under shear flow by molecular dynamics simulation with an explicit solvent. The primary brush is formed by chemically grafting polymers to a solid substrate, the secondary brush is comprised of shorter, physically end-adsorbed molecules that can laterally diffuse. By virtue of the immobility of the grafted end-points of the primary brush, its individual macromolecules perform a cyclic motion. If there is a well defined solvent-brush interface, this cyclic motion of the primary brush molecules will collectively result in the reversal of the flow inside of the primary brush. This backflow, linear in the shear rate, gives rise to the transport of the shorter, physically end-adsorbed molecules in the opposite direction of the solvent flow. We discuss which conditions are necessary to observe this counter-intuitive phenomenon. Comparing Poiseuille and Couette flow we demonstrate that the magnitude of the local shear rate at the brush-liquid interface dictates the cyclic motion and concomitant inversion of transport but that these universal effects are independent of the type of driving the flow.

  1. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)-CO3/Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Cao, Xiaohong; Luo, Xuanping; Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai; Liu, Yunhai

    2015-12-30

    The influence of U(VI)-CO3 and Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (qe) and distribution constant (Kd) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the qe and Kd values of NZVI were 5-10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0-3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)-CO3 complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO-UO2CO3(-) or SO-UO2 (CO3)2(3-). XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment.

  2. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of U(VI).

    PubMed

    Orellana, Roberto; Hixson, Kim K; Murphy, Sean; Mester, Tünde; Sharma, Manju L; Lipton, Mary S; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-12-01

    Geobacter species often play an important role in the in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater, but little is known about how these microbes avoid uranium toxicity. To evaluate this further, the proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens exposed to 100 µM U(VI) acetate was compared to control cells not exposed to U(VI). Of the 1363 proteins detected from these cultures, 203 proteins had higher abundance during exposure to U(VI) compared with the control cells and 148 proteins had lower abundance. U(VI)-exposed cultures expressed lower levels of proteins involved in growth, protein and amino acid biosynthesis, as well as key central metabolism enzymes as a result of the deleterious effect of U(VI) on the growth of G. sulfurreducens. In contrast, proteins involved in detoxification, such as several efflux pumps belonging to the RND (resistance-nodulation-cell division) family, and membrane protection, and other proteins, such as chaperones and proteins involved in secretion systems, were found in higher abundance in cells exposed to U(VI). Exposing G. sulfurreducens to U(VI) resulted in a higher abundance of many proteins associated with the oxidative stress response, such as superoxide dismutase and superoxide reductase. A strain in which the gene for superoxide dismutase was deleted grew more slowly than the WT strain in the presence of U(VI), but not in its absence. The results suggested that there is no specific mechanism for uranium detoxification. Rather, multiple general stress responses are induced, which presumably enable Geobacter species to tolerate high uranium concentrations.

  3. Bioreduction of U(VI) in the presence of phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanov, M. I.; Mishra, B.; Latta, D. E.; Rui, X.; Kwon, M.-J.; Fletcher, K. E.; Loeffler, F. E.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Kemner, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    Phosphate/phosphoryl moieties are ubiquitous in biological and environmental systems and can potentially affect the speciation of uranium during natural attenuation or stimulated bioremediation processes. The reactivity between U(VI) and phosphate has been studied extensively, but the significant influence of phosphate groups on the formation of reduced U(IV) species has only recently been recognized. We will compare and contrast the bioreduction of dissolved and solid-phase U(VI) by Gram-positive and Gram-negative metal-reducing bacteria (Shewanella, Anaeromyxobacter, Geobacter, and Desulfitobacterium) in the presence and absence of phosphate, from the perspective of solid-phase U speciation as determined by U L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS). In all cases examined, the presence of phosphate at concentrations of P/U > 1 led to the formation of reduced, inner-sphere complexed U(IV)-phosphate species that prevented the lowest-solubility U(IV) mineral uraninite (UO2) from forming over at least several months. In the absence of phosphate, nanoparticulate uraninite or complexed non-uraninite U(IV) species were observed (depending on the system and conditions), suggesting that the interplay between the chemical conditions at the location of electron transfer to U(VI) control the U(IV) product and subsequently the stability of reduced U. The importance of non-uraninite U(IV) species will be discussed in the context of their predominance in biostimulated sediments from the Oak Ridge field site in the United States.

  4. In situ infrared study of adsorbed species during catalytic oxidation and carbon dioxide adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rajesh A.

    2005-11-01

    of the Ni-Re/CeO2 catalyst was reduced by only 20% in the presence of sulfur compared to a 50% reduction with the Ni/CeO 2 catalyst. These results show that Re not only promotes the water-gas shift reaction but also enhances the sulfur tolerance of the Ni/CeO2 catalyst. Novel amine based solid sorbents have been developed to capture CO 2 reversibly using temperature-swing adsorption process. The IR study shows that CO2 adsorbs on amine grafted SBA-15 to form carbonates and bicarbonates. Comparison of monoamine and diamine-grafted SBA-15 showed that diamine grafted SBA-15 provides almost twice the active sites for CO 2 adsorption. The adsorption of SO2 on the amine-grafted SBA-15 revealed that SO2 adsorbs irreversibly and the sorbent cannot be regenerated under normal operating conditions. Results of these studies can be used to enhance the overall conversion of CH4 to H2 thus lowering the cost of H2 product.

  5. Reduction of U(VI) Incorporated in the Structure of Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Lazama Pacheco, Juan S.; Bargar, John R.; Shi, Zhi; Liu, Juan; Kovarik, Libor; Engelhard, Mark H.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-09-04

    U(VI) doped hematite was synthesized and exposed to two different organic reductants with E0 of 0.23 and 0.70 V. A combination of HAADF-TEM and EXAFS provided evidence that uranium was incorporated in hematite in uranate, likely octahedral coordination. XPS indicated that structurally incorporated U(VI) was reduced to U(V), whereas adsorbed U(VI) was reduced to U(IV). Specifically, the experiments indicate that U(V) was the dominant oxidation state of uranium in hematite around Eh -0.24 to -0.28 V and pH 7.7-8.6 for at least up to 5 weeks of reaction time. U(V), but not U(IV), was also detected in hematite at Eh +0.21 V (pH 7.1-7.3). The results support the hypothesis, based on previous experimental and theoretical work, that the stability field of U(V) is widened relative to U(IV) and U(VI) in uranate coordination environments where the coordination number of U is less than 8.

  6. [Leaf micro-morphology and features in adsorbing air suspended particulate matter and accumulating heavy metals in seven trees species].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Fang, Yan-Ming; Wang, Shun-Chang; Xie, Ying; Yang, Dan-Dan

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between tree leaf micro-morphology and features in adsorbing air suspended particulate matter and accumulating heavy metals. Seven tree species, including Ginkgo biloba, at heavy traffic density site in Huainan were selected to analyze the frequency of air particulate matter retained by leaves, the particle amount of different sizes per unit leaf area retained by leaves and its related micro-morphology structure, and the relationship between particle amount of different sizes per unit leaf area retained by leaves and its related accumulation of heavy metals. We found that the species characterized by small leaf area, special epidemis with abundant fax, and highly uneven cell wall, as well as big and dense stomata and without trichomes mainly absorbed fine particulate matter; while those species with many trichomes mainly retained coarse particulate matter. Accumulation of heavy metals in leaves of the seven species was significantly different except for Ph. Tree species with high capacities in heavy metal accumulation were Ginkgo biloba, Ligustrum lucidum, and Cinnamomum camphora. Accumulation of Cd, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu and total heavy metal concentration for seven tree species was positively related to the amount of particulate matter absorbed. Correlation coefficients of d10 vs d2.5, d10 vs d1.0, d2.5 vs d1.0 were 0.987, 0.971, 0.996, respective, and the correlate level was significant. The ratios of d2.5/d10, d1.0/d10, d1.0/d2.5 were 0.844, 0.763, 0.822, indicating that the particulate matter from traffic was mainly fine particulates.

  7. An Assessment of U(VI) removal from groundwater using biochar produced from hydrothermal carbonization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Loganathan, Vijay A; Gupta, Ram B; Barnett, Mark O

    2011-10-01

    The ever-increasing growth of biorefineries is expected to produce huge amounts of lignocellulosic biochar as a byproduct. The hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process to produce biochar from lignocellulosic biomass is getting more attention due to its inherent advantage of using wet biomass. In the present study, biochar was produced from switchgrass at 300 °C in subcritical water and characterized using X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, scanning electron micrcoscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The physiochemical properties indicated that biochar could serve as an excellent adsorbent to remove uranium from groundwater. A batch adsorption experiment at the natural pH (~3.9) of biochar indicated an H-type isotherm. The adsorption data was fitted using a Langmuir isotherm model and the sorption capacity was estimated to be ca. 2.12 mg of U g(-1) of biochar. The adsorption process was highly dependent on the pH of the system. An increase towards circumneutral pH resulted in the maximum adsorption of ca. 4 mg U g(-1) of biochar. The adsorption mechanism of U(VI) onto biochar was strongly related to its pH-dependent aqueous speciation. The results of the column study indicate that biochar could be used as an effective adsorbent for U(VI), as a reactive barrier medium. Overall, the biochar produced via HTC is environmentally benign, carbon neutral, and efficient in removing U(VI) from groundwater.

  8. Inhibition of U(VI) reduction by synthetic and natural pyrite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuanwei; Kang, Mingliang; Ma, Bin; Xie, Jinglin; Chen, Fanrong; Charlet, Laurent; Liu, Chunli

    2014-09-16

    Reductive precipitation is an effective method of attenuating the mobility of uranium (U) in subsurface environments. The reduction of U(VI) by synthetic and naturally occurring pyrite was investigated at pH 3.0-9.5. In contrast to thermodynamic calculations that were used to predict UO2(s) precipitation, a mixed U(IV) and U(VI) product (e.g., U3O8/U4O9/U3O7) was only observed at pH 6.21-8.63 and 4.52-4.83 for synthetic and natural pyrite, respectively. Under acidic conditions, the reduction of UO2(2+) by surface-associated Fe(2+) may not be favored because the mineral surface is nearly neutral or not negative enough. At high pH, the sorption of negatively charged U(VI) species is not favored on the negatively charged mineral surface. Thus, the redox reaction is not favored. Trace elements generally contained within the natural pyrite structure can affect the reactivity of pyrite and lead to a different result between the natural and synthetic pyrite. Because UO2(s) is extremely redox-sensitive toward U(VI), the observed UO2+x(s) phase reduction product indicates a surface reaction that is largely controlled by reaction kinetics and pyrite surface chemistry. These factors may explain why most laboratory experiments have observed incomplete U(VI) reduction on Fe(II)-bearing minerals.

  9. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; ...

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  10. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  11. Direct Identification and Determination of Conformational Response in Adsorbed Individual Nonplanar Molecular Species Using Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Florian; Bischoff, Felix; Auwärter, Willi; Barth, Johannes V; Repp, Jascha

    2016-12-14

    In recent years atomic force microscopy (AFM) at highest resolution was widely applied to mostly planar molecules, while its application toward exploring species with structural flexibility and a distinct 3D character remains a challenge. Herein, the scope of noncontact AFM is widened by investigating subtle conformational differences occurring in the well-studied reference systems 2H-TPP and Cu-TPP on Cu(111). Different saddle-shape conformations of both species can be recognized in conventional constant-height AFM images. To unambiguously identify the behavior of specific molecular moieties, we extend data acquisition to distances that are inaccessible with constant-height measurements by introducing vertical imaging, that is, AFM mapping in a plane perpendicular to the sample surface. Making use of this novel technique the vertical displacement of the central Cu atom upon tip-induced conformational switching of Cu-TPP is quantified. Further, for 2H-TPP two drastically different geometries are observed, which are systematically characterized. Our results underscore the importance of structural flexibility in adsorbed molecules with large conformational variability and, consequently, the objective to characterize their geometry at the single-molecule level in real space.

  12. Theoretical estimation for equilibrium Mo isotope fractionations between dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed complexes on (Fe,Mn)-oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Liu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Although Mo isotopes have been increasingly used as a paleoredox proxy in the study of paleo-oceanographic condition changes (Barling et al., 2001; Siebert et al., 2003, 2005,2006; Arnold et al., 2004; Poulson et al., 2006), some very basic aspects of Mo isotopes geochemistry have not been obtained yet. First, although there are several previous studies on equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors(Tossell,2005; Weeks et al.,2007; Wasylenki et al.,2008), these studies were dealing with situations in vacuum and we find unfortunately the solvation effects for Ge species in solution cannot be ignored. Therefore, accurate Ge fractionation factors are actually not determined yet. Second, except the dominant dissolved Mo species in seawater which is known as molybdate ion (MoO42-), the forms of possible other minor species remain elusive. Third, the Mo removal mechanisms from seawater are only known for the anoxia and euxinic conditions (e.g. Helz et al., 1996; Zheng et al., 2000), the Mo removal mechanism under oxic condition are still arguing. Fourth, the adsorption effects on Mo isotope fractionation are almost completely unknown. Especially, without the adsorption fractionation knowledge, it is difficult to understand many distinct fractionations found in a number of geologic systems and it is difficult to explain the exceptionally long residence time of Mo in seawater. Urey model or Bigeleisen-Mayer equation based theoretical method and the super-molecule clusters are used to precisely evaluate the fractionation factors. The B3LYP/(6-311+G(2df,p),LANL2DZ) level method is used for frequencies calculation. 24 water molecules are used to form the supermolecues surrounding the Mo species. At least 4 different conformers for each supermolecule are used to prevent the errors from the diversity of configurations in solution. This study provides accurate equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors between possible dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed Mo species on the

  13. Long-term diffusion of U(VI) in bentonite: Dependence on density

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Claudia; Mibus, Jens; Trepte, Paul; Muller, Christa; Brendler, Vinzenz; Park, Dan M.; Jiao, Yongqin; Kersting, Annie B.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2016-10-12

    As a contribution to the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories, U(VI) diffusion through the potential buffer material MX-80 bentonite was investigated at three clay dry densities over six years. Synthetic MX-80 model pore water was used as background electrolyte. Speciation calculations showed that Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) was the main U(VI) species. The in- and out-diffusion of U(VI) was investigated separately. U(VI) diffused about 3 mm, 1.5 mm, and 1 mm into the clay plug at ρ = 1.3, 1.6, and 1.9 g/cm3, respectively. No through-diffusion of the U(VI) tracer was observed. However, leaching of natural uranium contained in the clay occurred and uranium was detected in all receiving reservoirs. As expected, the effective and apparent diffusion coefficients, De and Da, decreased with increasing dry density. The Da values for the out-diffusion of natural U(VI) were in good agreement with previously determined values. Surprisingly, Da values for the in-diffusion of U(VI) were about two orders of magnitude lower than values obtained in short-term in-diffusion experiments reported in the literature. Some potential reasons for this behavior that were evaluated are changes of the U(VI) speciation within the clay (precipitation, reduction) or changes of the clay porosity and pore connectivity with time. By applying Archie's law and the extended Archie's law, it was estimated that a significantly smaller effective porosity must be present for the long-term in-diffusion of U(VI). Finally, the results suggest that long-term studies of key transport phenomena may reveal additional processes that can directly impact long-term repository safety assessments.

  14. Removal of uranium from aqueous solution by a low cost and high-efficient adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun-Hai; Wang, You-Qun; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Cao, Xiao-Hong; Nie, Wen-Bin; Li, Qin; Hua, Rong

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a low-cost and high-efficient carbonaceous adsorbent (HTC-COOH) with carboxylic groups was developed for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution compared with the pristine hydrothermal carbon (HTC). The structure and chemical properties of resultant adsorbents were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform-infrared spectra (FT-IR) and acid-base titration. The key factors (solution pH, contact time, initial U(VI) concentrations and temperature) affected the adsorption of U(VI) on adsorbents were investigated using batch experiments. The adsorption of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH was pH-dependent, and increased with temperature and initial ion concentration. The adsorption equilibrium of U(VI) on adsorbents was well defined by the Langmuir isothermal equation, and the monolayer adsorption capacity of HTC-COOH was found to be 205.8 mg/g. The kinetics of adsorption was very in accordance with the pseudo-second-order rate model. The adsorption processes of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH were endothermic and spontaneous in nature according to the thermodynamics of adsorption. Furthermore, HTC-COOH could selectively adsorption of U(VI) in aqueous solution containing co-existing ions (Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+). From the results of the experiments, it is found that the HTC-COOH is a potential adsorbent for effective removal of U(VI) from polluted water.

  15. Reaction of deuterium with olefins on nickel catalysts: evidence for adsorbed vinylic species

    SciTech Connect

    Mintsa-Eya, V.; Hilaire, L.; Choplin, A.; Touroude, R.; Gault, F.G.

    1983-08-01

    The interaction of deuterium with 1,2-dimethylcyclopentene, 2,3-dimethylcyclopentene, 1-methyl-2-methylenecyclopentane, 1,2-dimethylcyclobutene, 1-methyl-2-methylenecyclobutane, bicyclo(2,2,1)heptene, but-1-ene, and cis-but-2-ene was studied from -85 to 50/sup 0/C on nickel films in a static apparatus and on Ni/pumice in a flow system. Unexpected d/sub 3/ and d/sub 4/ molecules were obtained in the deuteration of bicyclo(2,2,1)heptene. The position of the double bond in the ring of the other cycloolefins was the main factor governing their behavior: in the deuteration of 1,2-dimethylcycloalkenes, the saturated products, especially the trans somers, were much more exchanged and the percentage of trans was lower than when the starting material consisted of the olefins with the double bond in 2,3 or exocyclic positions. The hyperfine distribution, obtained by microwave analysis, of the exchanged d/sub 1/ but-1-ene, revealed that the major part of the deuterium was introduced on C/sub 2/; the cis-trans isomerization was much faster than the double bond migration with the introduction of zero or one deuterium atom while the isomerized but-1-ene showed a multiple exchange up to d/sub 4/; in the isomerized d/sub 1/ but-1-ene, the deuterium atom was distributed on the three carbon atoms C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, C/sub 3/. Most of these results clearly show that the classical Horiuti-Polanyi mechanism is not the only one taking part in the reactions. The introduction of other intermediaries, sigma-vinylic, sigma-vinylic ..pi..-olefinic, and sigma-vinylic ..pi..-allylic species, provides a coherent explanation for all our findings. It is shown that nickel and iron behave in a very similar way. 5 tables.

  16. Ultraviolet Observations of Phoebe from the Cassini UVIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Hansen, Candice J.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of Saturn's distant moon Phoebe were made at far-ultraviolet (FUV) (1100-1900 A) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) (600-1100 A) wavelengths by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) during the Cassini spacecraft flyby on June 11, 2004. These are the first UV spectra of Phoebe and the first detection of water ice on a Solar System surface using FUV wavelengths. The characteristics of water ice in the FUV are presented, and Hapke models are used to interpret the spectra in terms of composition and grain size; the use of both areal and intimate mixing models is explored. Non-ice species used in these models include carbon, ice tholin, Triton tholin, poly-HCN and kerogen. Satisfactory disk-integrated fits are obtained for intimate mixtures of approx.10% H2O plus a non-ice species. Spatially resolved regions of higher (approx.20%) and lower (approx.5%) H2O ice concentrations are also detected. Phoebe does not display any evidence of volatile activity. Upper limits on atomic oxygen and carbon are 5 x 10(exp 11) and 2 x 10(exp 12) atoms/sq. cm, respectively, for solar photon scattering. The UVIS detection of water ice on Phoebe, and the ice amounts detected, are consistent with IR measurements and contribute to the evidence for a Phoebe origin in the outer Solar System rather than in the main asteroid belt.

  17. Ultraviolet observations of Phoebe from the Cassini UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Hansen, Candice J.

    2008-02-01

    Observations of Saturn's distant moon Phoebe were made at far-ultraviolet (FUV) (1100-1900 Å) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) (600-1100 Å) wavelengths by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) during the Cassini spacecraft flyby on June 11, 2004. These are the first UV spectra of Phoebe and the first detection of water ice on a Solar System surface using FUV wavelengths. The characteristics of water ice in the FUV are presented, and Hapke models are used to interpret the spectra in terms of composition and grain size; the use of both areal and intimate mixing models is explored. Non-ice species used in these models include carbon, ice tholin, Triton tholin, poly-HCN and kerogen. Satisfactory disk-integrated fits are obtained for intimate mixtures of ˜10% H 2O plus a non-ice species. Spatially resolved regions of higher ( ˜20%) and lower ( ˜5%) H 2O ice concentrations are also detected. Phoebe does not display any evidence of volatile activity. Upper limits on atomic oxygen and carbon are 5×10 and 2×10 atoms/cm, respectively, for solar photon scattering. The UVIS detection of water ice on Phoebe, and the ice amounts detected, are consistent with IR measurements and contribute to the evidence for a Phoebe origin in the outer Solar System rather than in the main asteroid belt.

  18. U(VI) reduction to mononuclear U(VI) by desulfitobacterium spp.

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K. E.; Boyanov, M. I.; Thomas, S. H.; Wu, Q.; Kemner, K. M.; Loffler, F. E.

    2010-06-15

    The bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) affects uranium mobility and fate in contaminated subsurface environments and is best understood in Gram-negative model organisms such as Geobacter and Shewanella spp. This study demonstrates that U(VI) reduction is a common trait of Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium spp. Five different Desulfitobacterium isolates reduced 100 {mu}M U(VI) to U(IV) in <10 days, whereas U(VI) remained soluble in abiotic and heat-killed controls. U(VI) reduction in live cultures was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis. Interestingly, although bioreduction of U(VI) is almost always reported to yield the uraninite mineral (UO{sub 2}), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in the Desulfitobacterium cultures was not UO{sub 2}. The EXAFS data indicated that the U(IV) product was a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms closely surrounded by light element shells. This atomic arrangement likely results from inner-sphere bonds between U(IV) and C/N/O- or P/S-containing ligands, such as carbonate or phosphate. The formation of a distinct U(IV) phase warrants further study because the characteristics of the reduced material affect uranium stability and fate in the contaminated subsurface.

  19. Sediment studies of the biological factors controlling the reduction of U(VI).

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, derek, R.

    2004-08-04

    Studies were conducted primarily with sediments, both in laboratory incubations and in a field experiment, with supporting studies with pure cultures. To our knowledge the sediment studies were the first on microbial U(VI) reduction in actual uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments, under conditions that mimic those found in situ. Important findings included: (1) U(VI) reduction is a biotic process in subsurface sediments. (2) U(VI) reduction can be stimulated most effectively with the addition of acetate. Although it had been speculated that microbial U(VI) reduction might be capable of this type of environmental remediation ever since the discovery of microbial U(VI) reduction, this had not been previously demonstrated under environmentally relevant conditions. (3) U(VI) is reduced concurrently with Fe(III) and prior to sulfate reduction. U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction proceeded concurrently, accompanied by a dramatic enrichment in organisms in the Geobacteraceae. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms do not appear to be important components of the microbial community reducing U(VI) in these subsurface sediments. (4) Nitrate has important influences on U(VI) reduction. Nitrate inhibits the reduction of metals until nitrate is depleted. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter metallireducens and Desulfitobacterium species can oxidize Fe(II) with the reduction of nitrate which is an important consideration because our previous studies have demonstrated that freshly precipitated Fe(III) oxides can reoxidize U(IV) to U(VI). The discovery that G. metallireducens can ''run backwards'' and oxidize U(IV) when nitrate is present reveals another mechanism preventing precipitation of U(IV) in the presence of nitrate as well as potential novel strategy for removing uranium from the subsurface after a site has been remediated. (5) Importance of understanding Fe(III) forms available for microbial reduction. Fe(III) is orders of magnitude more abundant than U(VI) as an

  20. Diffusion of U(VI) in Opalinus Clay: Influence of temperature and humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, C.; Van Loon, L. R.; Jakob, A.; Steudtner, R.; Schmeide, K.; Sachs, S.; Bernhard, G.

    2013-05-01

    The diffusion of U(VI) (c0 = 1 × 10-6 mol/L) in compacted Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri underground laboratory, Switzerland, was studied in the absence and presence of humic acid (10 mg/L) at two different temperatures (25 °C, 60 °C) under anaerobic conditions. As background electrolyte synthetic Opalinus Clay pore water (pH 7.6, I = 0.36 mol/L) was used. The diffusion-accessible porosity, ɛ, was determined for each Opalinus Clay bore core sample by through-diffusion experiments with tritiated water (HTO) before the U(VI) diffusion experiments were carried out. The values for the effective diffusion and distribution coefficients De and Kd obtained for U(VI) and humic acid at 25 °C as well as at 60 °C showed that humic acid has no significant influence on the U(VI) diffusion. The diffusion profiles of humic acid in Opalinus Clay at 25 and 60 °C indicate the contributions of two different humic acid particle size fractions (<1 kDa and 10-100 kDa). The small-sized humic acid fraction diffused through the whole Opalinus Clay samples at both temperatures within the 3 month duration of the U(VI) diffusion experiments. At 60 °C, diffusion profiles of two different U(VI) species were observed. In a separate experiment the U(VI) speciation in the source reservoir solution at 60 °C was analyzed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray detector. The two diffusion profiles could be attributed to an unknown colloidal and a known aquatic U(VI) species (Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq)). The diffusion results showed that the interaction of U(VI) and of the large-sized humic acid colloid fraction with the clay is stronger at 60 °C. An increase of Kd from 0.025 ± 0.003 m3/kg at 25 °C to 0.25 ± 0.05 m3/kg for U(VI)colloidal at 60 °C was determined. In addition, the value for De of U(VI) increased with increasing temperature. Using the De values at 25 and 60 °C, a preliminary

  1. Adsorption of U(VI) on sericite in the presence of Bacillus subtilis: A combined batch, EXAFS and modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yubing; Zhang, Rui; Ding, Congcong; Wang, Xiangxue; Cheng, Wencai; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-05-01

    The effect of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) on the adsorption of U(VI) onto sericite was investigated using batch, EXAFS and modeling techniques. The batch adsorption indicated that the increased adsorption of U(VI) on sericite + B. subtilis systems at pH < 5.0 was predominantly attributed to the formation of inner-sphere complexes between U(VI) and surface functional groups of B. subtilis, whereas the inhibited adsorption was observed at pH > 6.0 due to the combination of deprotonated carboxyl groups of B. subtilis with the hydroxyl of sericite. The slightly enhanced adsorption of U(VI) on sericite + B. subtilis with increasing CO2 contents at pH < 6.0 was ascribed to the electrostatic attraction between positively charged U(VI) species (UO22+ species) and negatively charged surface of sericite + B. subtilis, whereas the U(VI) adsorption sharply decreased at pH > 7.0 owing to electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged sericite + B. subtilis and negatively charged U(VI) species such as UO2(OH)3- or UO2(CO3)22- species. According to EXAFS analysis, the increased adsorption mechanism of U(VI) on sericite + B. subtilis at pH 4.0 was attributed to the formation of U-P shell, whereas the bidentate inner-sphere surface complexes was also observed at pH 7.0 due to the formation of U-C shell (2.92 Å) and/or U-Si/Al (3.18 Å) shell. Under the range of allowable error, the pH-dependent and isothermal adsorption of U(VI) on sericite + B. subtilis can be fitted by surface complexation modeling using ion exchange and surface complexation reaction by using equilibrium parameters obtained from each binary systems. These findings are important to understand the fate and transport of U(VI) on the mineral-bacteria ternary systems in the near-surface environment.

  2. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  3. Low temperature equilibrium isotope fractionation and isotope exchange kinetics between U(IV) and U(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangli; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the uranium (U) isotope ratio 238U/235U provide an emerging redox proxy in environmental and paleoredox studies, but many key parameters concerning U isotope fractionation are still poorly constrained. Here we report the equilibrium isotopic fractionation between dissolved U(IV) and dissolved U(VI), and rates of isotope exchange between solid-phase U(IV) and dissolved U(VI). We conducted one experiment at high concentration [35 mM U(IV) and 32 mM U(VI)] and low pH (0.2) in hydrochloric acid media at room temperature to determine the equilibrium isotopic fractionation between dissolved U(IV) and dissolved U(VI). Isotopic equilibrium was reached in about 19 days under such experimental conditions. The equilibrium isotope fractionation was determined to be 1.64 ± 0.16‰, with U(IV) being enriched in 238U relative to U(VI). Applicability of the determined equilibrium fractionation is discussed. We also conducted a set of experiments to determine isotopic exchange rates between dissolved U(VI) and nanouraninite U(IV) under conditions closer to those in natural system, with lower concentrations and neutral pH. The exchange rate was found to conform to the rate law R = k[U(VI)]adsorbed, in which R is the isotopic exchange rate (μM day-1); k is the rate constant determined to be 0.21 day-1; and [U(VI)]adsorbed is the concentration of U(VI) adsorbed to nanouraninite (μM). Our results, combined with consideration of the variables controlling U(VI)-U(IV) contact in natural settings, indicate that the timescale for significant isotope equilibration varies depending on environmental conditions, mostly uranium concentrations. In natural uncontaminated sediments with low uranium concentrations, equilibration is expected to occur on a timescale of hundreds to thousands of years. In contrast, in U-contaminated aquifers with high U concentrations, significant equilibration could occur on timescales of weeks to years.

  4. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-21

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53–75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  5. Cassini UVIS Auroral Observations in 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, Wayne R.; Jouchoux, Alain; Esposito, Larry W.; Radioti, Aikaterini; Grodent, Denis; Gustin, Jacques; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Lamy, Laurent; Badman, Sarah; Bunce, Emma; Cecconi, Baptiste; Clarke, John T.; Crary, Frank; Dougherty, Michele; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Kurth, William; Mitchell, Don; Nichols, Jonathan; Prange, Renee; Schippers, Patricia; Zarka, Philippe; Cassini UVIS Team

    2016-10-01

    In June of 2016, the Cassini Saturn orbiter began a series of high inclination orbits that will continue until September 2017 when the mission ends as Cassini enters the Saturn atmosphere. These orbits present excellent views of Saturn's polar regions suitable for auroral imaging at the closest distances to date, with the additional prospect of simultaneous particle and fields measurements within the sources of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) associated with ultraviolet auroral emissions and/or acceleration regions likely coinciding with them. We will present new Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) auroral images, spectra and movies obtained during the summer and fall of 2016 and put them in the context of auroral data collected since Cassini orbit insertion in 2004. Included in the new data will be UVIS south polar observations obtained simultaneously with Hubble Space Telescope observations of the north polar region on June 29, 2016 and August 19, 2016.

  6. Interactions between Silicon Oxide Nanoparticles (SONPs) and U(VI) Contaminations: Effects of pH, Temperature and Natural Organic Matters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hanyu; Li, Ping; Pan, Duoqiang; Yin, Zhuoxin; Fan, Qiaohui; Wu, Wangsuo

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between contaminations of U(VI) and silicon oxide nanoparticles (SONPs), both of which have been widely used in modern industry and induced serious environmental challenge due to their high mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity, were studied under different environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and natural organic matters (NOMs) by using both batch and spectroscopic approaches. The results showed that the accumulation process, i.e., sorption, of U(VI) on SONPs was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength, demonstrating that possible outer- and/or inner-sphere complexes were controlling the sorption process of U(VI) on SONPs in the observed pH range. Humic acid (HA), one dominated component of NOMs, bounded SONPs can enhance U(VI) sorption below pH~4.5, whereas restrain at high pH range. The reversible sorption of U(VI) on SONPs possibly indicated that the outer-sphere complexes were prevalent at pH 5. However, an irreversible interaction of U(VI) was observed in the presence of HA (Fig 1). It was mainly due to the ternary SONPs-HA-U(VI) complexes (Type A Complexes). After SONPs adsorbed U(VI), the particle size in suspension was apparently increased from ~240 nm to ~350 nm. These results showed that toxicity of both SONPs and U(VI) will decrease to some extent after the interaction in the environment. These findings are key for providing useful information on the possible mutual interactions among different contaminants in the environment. PMID:26930197

  7. Interactions between Silicon Oxide Nanoparticles (SONPs) and U(VI) Contaminations: Effects of pH, Temperature and Natural Organic Matters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanyu; Li, Ping; Pan, Duoqiang; Yin, Zhuoxin; Fan, Qiaohui; Wu, Wangsuo

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between contaminations of U(VI) and silicon oxide nanoparticles (SONPs), both of which have been widely used in modern industry and induced serious environmental challenge due to their high mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity, were studied under different environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and natural organic matters (NOMs) by using both batch and spectroscopic approaches. The results showed that the accumulation process, i.e., sorption, of U(VI) on SONPs was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength, demonstrating that possible outer- and/or inner-sphere complexes were controlling the sorption process of U(VI) on SONPs in the observed pH range. Humic acid (HA), one dominated component of NOMs, bounded SONPs can enhance U(VI) sorption below pH~4.5, whereas restrain at high pH range. The reversible sorption of U(VI) on SONPs possibly indicated that the outer-sphere complexes were prevalent at pH 5. However, an irreversible interaction of U(VI) was observed in the presence of HA (Fig 1). It was mainly due to the ternary SONPs-HA-U(VI) complexes (Type A Complexes). After SONPs adsorbed U(VI), the particle size in suspension was apparently increased from ~240 nm to ~350 nm. These results showed that toxicity of both SONPs and U(VI) will decrease to some extent after the interaction in the environment. These findings are key for providing useful information on the possible mutual interactions among different contaminants in the environment.

  8. Sorption of U(VI) to G. uraniireducens and A. palmae under Old Rifle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Howe, K.; Comolli, L.; Long, P.; Stucker, V.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial reduction as a remediation method for uranium contaminated Department of Energy (DOE) sites has been explored with promising results. Although transport models have been improved to include variations in geochemical concentration, reductive microbial processes and adsorption of uranium to minerals, they do not incorporate the presence of microbes as possible sorption surfaces that may influence the overall transport of uranium. Our overall objective is to examine U(VI) sorption to biomass by determining partition coefficients between U(VI) and the microbial species of Geobacter uraniireducens and Acholeplasma palmae. Once these partition coefficients are obtained, they will be incorporated into a thermodynamic model with the geochemical parameters of the Old Rifle Site. Preliminary results indicate that U(VI) sorbs 1000X more strongly to bacteria under atmospheric pCO2 conditions than under 2% pCO2 conditions. U(VI) sorption to the surface of G. uraniireducens is 4X stronger than to the surface of A. Palmae and in high-DIC waters is comparable in strength to reported U(VI)-mineral surface sorption. While the concentration of G. uraniireducens during and after remediation results in relatively small sorption site density, the possibility persists that sorption to G. uraniireducens may retard uranium transport at the geochemical gradients which exist in nature.

  9. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-10-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U(VI

  10. U(VI) behaviour in hyperalkaline calcite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kurt F.; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Swinburne, Adam N.; Bots, Pieter; Shaw, Samuel; Natrajan, Louise S.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.; Livens, Francis R.; Morris, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of U(VI) in hyperalkaline fluid/calcite systems was studied over a range of U(VI) concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM to 42.0 μM) and in two high pH systems, young and old synthetic cement leachate in batch sorption experiments. These systems were selected to be representative of young- (pH 13.3) and old-stage (pH 10.5) leachate evolution within a cementitious geological disposal facility. Batch sorption experiments, modelling, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electron microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering and luminescence spectroscopy were used to define the speciation of U(VI) across the systems of study. At the lowest concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM 232U(VI)) significant U removal was observed for both old and young cement leachates, and this was successfully modelled using a first order kinetic adsorption modelling approach. At higher concentrations (>4.20 μM) in the young cement leachate, U(VI) showed no interaction with the calcite surface over an 18 month period. Small angle X-ray scattering techniques indicated that at high U concentrations (42.0 μM) and after 18 months, the U(VI) was present in a colloidal form which had little interaction with the calcite surface and consisted of both primary and aggregated particles with a radius of 7.6 ± 1.1 and 217 ± 24 Å, respectively. In the old cement leachate, luminescence spectroscopy identified two surface binding sites for U(VI) on calcite: in the system with 0.21 μM U(VI), a liebigite-like Ca2UO2(CO3)3 surface complex was identified; at higher U(VI) concentrations (0.42 μM), a second binding site of undetermined coordination was identified. At elevated U(VI) concentrations (>2.10 μM) in old cement leachate, both geochemical data and luminescence spectroscopy suggested that surface mediated precipitation was controlling U(VI) behaviour. A focused ion beam mill was used to create a section across the U(VI) precipitate-calcite interface. Transmission electron

  11. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  12. UVIS 2.0: Ultraviolet Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, J.

    2017-03-01

    Improved UV flat fields were delivered on February 23, 2016 for the four bluest WFC3 filters. These new reference files correct for sensitivity residuals in a crosshatch pattern on spatial scales of 50-100 pixels. The residuals are a result of in-flight temperature differences affecting the detector's spatial response, which was derived from ground test data at a warmer operating temperature. Photometry of white dwarf standards stepped across the UVIS detector shows a linear correlation between the flat field response and the measured flux residual, which is used to model the correction. With the 2016 flats, the photometric repeatability is now 3.0% peak-to-peak (0.7% rms) compared to 6.7% peak-to-peak (1.8% rms) with the original 2011 flats, excluding the left edge of the detector (x<300 pixels) in F275W where photometry is 1% higher than the rest of the frame. The UV filters have color terms of several percent, and the new chip-dependent calibration is intended to produce uniform count rate across the two chips for blue sources. When using the inverse sensitivity values delivered in February 2016, offsets in the UV count rate between chips of up to 2% are found for hot stars, and even more for cool stars. A revised calibration delivered in November 2016 corrects the offset for blue sources, allowing for more accurate drizzled data products when combining pixels from different UVIS chips.

  13. WFC3 UVIS Detector: Improved Flat Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlen, Tomas; Mack, J.; Sabbi, E.; WFC3 Team

    2012-01-01

    We describe the improved flat field calibration for a set of UVIS broad-band filters that were delivered to MAST in August 2011. The total change peak-to-peak with respect to the previous pipeline flats ranges from 3.6% to 5.6%, increasing with wavelength. The flat-fields previously used in the pipeline were obtained during ground testing and contained a large reflection ghost (or flare) that affected 40% of the field. A simplified geometric model of the internal light reflections has been used to remove the flare from the ground flats. Residual low-frequency structures caused by differences in the ground-based and in-flight optical paths were then computed using photometry of Omega Centauri, observed at various roll angles and with large dithered steps. Furthermore, photometry in a range of apertures has been used to study the UVIS PSF in detail. For radii smaller than 0.4" (10 pixels) the PSF is strongly dependent on both the detector position and on the telescope focus at the time of observation. Therefore, the new pipeline flat fields have been normalized to "infinite" aperture by applying local aperture corrections to 10 pixels, making them more generally applicable.

  14. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  15. Uranium Redox Transformations after U(VI) Coprecipitation with Magnetite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pidchenko, Ivan; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Yokosawa, Tadahiro; Finck, Nicolas; Bahl, Sebastian; Schild, Dieter; Polly, Robert; Bohnert, Elke; Rossberg, André; Göttlicher, Jörg; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg; Schäfer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst; Vitova, Tonya

    2017-02-21

    Uranium redox states and speciation in magnetite nanoparticles coprecipitated with U(VI) for uranium loadings varying from 1000 to 10 000 ppm are investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is demonstrated that the U M4 high energy resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure (HR-XANES) method is capable to clearly characterize U(IV), U(V), and U(VI) existing simultaneously in the same sample. The contributions of the three different uranium redox states are quantified with the iterative transformation factor analysis (ITFA) method. U L3 XAS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal that initially sorbed U(VI) species recrystallize to nonstoichiometric UO2+x nanoparticles within 147 days when stored under anoxic conditions. These U(IV) species oxidize again when exposed to air. U M4 HR-XANES data demonstrate strong contribution of U(V) at day 10 and that U(V) remains stable over 142 days under ambient conditions as shown for magnetite nanoparticles containing 1000 ppm U. U L3 XAS indicates that this U(V) species is protected from oxidation likely incorporated into octahedral magnetite sites. XAS results are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Further characterization of the samples include powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fe 2p X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  16. Role of U(VI) Adsorption in U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter Species.

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-03-09

    Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms.

  17. Transport of U(VI) through sediments amended with phosphate to induce in situ uranium immobilization.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vrajesh S; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Catalano, Jeffrey G; Giammar, Daniel E

    2015-02-01

    Phosphate amendments can be added to U(VI)-contaminated subsurface environments to promote in situ remediation. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts of phosphate addition on the transport of U(VI) through contaminated sediments. In batch experiments using sediments (<2 mm size fraction) from a site in Rifle, Colorado, U(VI) only weakly adsorbed due to the dominance of the aqueous speciation by Ca-U(VI)-carbonate complexes. Column experiments with these sediments were performed with flow rates that correspond to a groundwater velocity of 1.1 m/day. In the absence of phosphate, the sediments took up 1.68-1.98 μg U/g of sediments when the synthetic groundwater influent contained 4 μM U(VI). When U(VI)-free influents were then introduced with and without phosphate, substantially more uranium was retained within the column when phosphate was present in the influent. Sequential extractions of sediments from the columns revealed that uranium was uniformly distributed along the length of the columns and was primarily in forms that could be extracted by ion exchange and contact with a weak acid. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) analysis along with sequential extraction results suggest adsorption as the dominant uranium uptake mechanism. The response of dissolved uranium concentrations to stopped-flow events and the comparison of experimental data with simulations from a simple reactive transport model indicated that uranium adsorption to and desorption from the sediments was not always at local equilibrium.

  18. A first principles investigation of electron transfer between Fe(II) and U(VI) on insulating Al- vs. semiconducting Fe-oxide surfaces via the proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. D.; Marcano, M. C.; Becker, U.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how the intrinsic chemical and electronic properties of mineral surfaces and their associated electron transfer (ET) pathways influence the reduction of U(VI) by surface-associated Fe(II). Density functional theory (DFT), including the Hubbard U correction to the exchange-correlation functional, was used to investigate sorption/redox reactions and ET mechanisms between Fe(II) and U(VI) coadsorbed on isostructural, periodic (0 0 1) surfaces of the insulator corundum (α-Al2O3) vs. the semiconductor hematite (α-Fe2O3). Furthermore, the coadsorbed Fe(II) and U(VI) ions are spatially separated from one another on the surfaces (⩾5.9 Å) to observe whether electronic-coupling through the semiconducting hematite surface facilitates ET between the adsorbates, a phenomenon known as the proximity effect. The calculations show that the different chemical and electronic properties between the isostructural corundum and hematite (0 0 1) surfaces lead to considerably different ET mechanisms between Fe(II) and U(VI). ET on the insulating corundum (0 0 1) surface is limited by the adsorbates' structural configuration. When Fe(II) and U(VI) are spatially separated and do not directly interact with one another (e.g. via an inner-sphere complex), U(VI) reduction by Fe(II) cannot occur as there is no physical pathway enabling ET between the adsorbates. In contrast to the insulating corundum (0 0 1) surface, the hematite (0 0 1) surface can potentially participate in ET reactions due to the high number of electron acceptor sites from the Fe d-states near the Fermi level at the hematite surface. The adsorption of Fe(II) also introduces d-states near the Fermi level as well as shifts unoccupied d-states of the Fe cations at the hematite surface to lower energies, making the surface more conductive. In turn, electronic coupling through the surface can link the spatially separated adsorbates to one another and provide distinct ET pathways for an electron from Fe

  19. Updated WFC3/UVIS Chip Dependent SYNPHOT/PYSYNPHOT Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this ISR is to document the changes to WFC3/UVIS component files that are used with SYNPHOT and PYSYNPHOT as a result of the implementation of the detector dependent photometric calibration in February 2016.

  20. Cryogenic Laser Induced Fluorescence Characterization of U(VI) in Hanford Vadose Zone Pore Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Yantasee, Wassana; Gassman, Paul L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Joly, Alan G.

    2004-11-01

    Ambient and liquid helium temperature laser-induced time-resolved uranyl fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to study the speciation of aqueous uranyl solutions containing carbonate and phosphate and two porewater samples obtained by ultra-centrifugation of U(VI)-contaminated sediments. The significantly enhanced fluorescence signal intensity and spectral resolution found at liquid helium temperature allowed, for the first time, direct fluorescence spectroscopic observation of the higher aqueous uranyl complexes with carbonate: UO2(CO3)22-, UO2(CO3)34- and (UO2)2(OH)3CO3-. The porewater samples were non-fluorescent at room temperature. However, at liquid helium temperature, both porewater samples displayed strong, well-resolved fluorescence spectra. Comparisons of the spectroscopic characteristics of the porewaters with those of the standard uranyl-carbonate complexes confirmed that U(VI) in the porewaters existed primarily as UO2(CO3)34-. A small amount of the dicalcium-urano-tricarbonate complex, Ca2UO2(CO3)3, was also observed that was consistent with thermodynamic calculation. The U(VI)-carbonate complex is apparently the mobile species responsible for the subsurface migration of U(VI), even though the majority of the in-ground U(VI) inventory at the site from which the samples were obtained exists as intragrain U(VI)-silicate precipitates.

  1. Kinetics of Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase U(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong Hun; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-10-01

    Sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH ?1.5H2O) was used to assess the kinetics of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) by a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. The bioreduction kinetics was studied with Na-boltwoodite in suspension or within alginate beads. Concentrations of U(VI)tot and cell number were varied to evaluate the coupling of U(VI) dissolution, diffusion, and microbial activity. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 6.8 buffered with PIPES. Microscopic and spectroscopic analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) collectively indicated that solid phase U(VI) was first dissolved and diffused out of grain interiors before it was reduced on bacterial surfaces and/or within the periplasm. The kinetics of solid phase U(VI) bioreduction was well described by a coupled model of bicarbonate-promoted dissolution of Na-boltwoodite, intraparticle uranyl diffusion, and Monod type bioreduction kinetics with respect to dissolved U(VI) concentration. The results demonstrated the intimate coupling of biological, chemical, and physical processes in microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI).

  2. Cassini UVIS Observations Show Active Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L.; Colwell, J. E.; UVIS Team

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) is part of the remote sensing payload of the NASA/ESA Cassini spacecraft. This spectrograph includes channels for extreme UV and far UV spectroscopic imaging, high speed photometry of stellar occultations, solar EUV occultation, and a hydrogen/deuterium absorption cell. We report our initial results from UVIS observations of Saturn's rings. Dynamic interactions between neutrals, ions, rings, moons and meteoroids produce a highly structured and time variable Saturn system Oxygen in the Saturn system dominates the magnetosphere. Observed fluctuations indicate close interactions with plasma sources. Stochastic events in the E ring may be the ultimate source. The spectral signature of water ice is seen on Phoebe and in Saturn's rings. Water ice is mixed non-uniformly with darker constituents. The high structure of the UV ring reflectance argues that collisional transport dominates ballistic transport in darkening the rings. Our preliminary results support the idea that rings are recycled fragments of moons: the current processes are more important than history and initial conditions. The spectra along the UVIS SOI radial scan indicate varying amounts of water ice. In the A ring, the ice fraction increases outward to a maximum at the outer edge. This large-scale variation is consistent with initially pure ice that has suffered meteoritic bombardment over the age of the Solar system (Cuzzi and Estrada 1998). We also see variations over scales of 1000 - 3000 km, which cannot be explained by this mechanism. Ballistic transport of spectrally neutral extrinsic pollutants from meteoroids striking the rings has a typical throw distance of 6000 km (Durisen et al 1989), too long to explain this finer structure. We propose a class of smaller renewal events, in which a small moon residing within the rings is shattered by an external impactor (Colwell and Esposito 1993, Barbara and Esposito 2002, Esposito and Colwell 2003). The

  3. Phthalocyaninato complexes with peripheral alkylthio chains: disk-like adsorbate species for the vertical anchoring of ligands on gold surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Siemeling, Ulrich; Schirrmacher, Christian; Glebe, Ulrich; Bruhn, Clemens; Baio, Joe E.; Árnadóttir, Líney; Castner, David G.; Weidner, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Thin metalorganic films were prepared on gold by self-assembly of thioether-functionalised phthalocyaninato complexes from solution. The phthalocyaninato ligands used contain eight peripheral, β-positioned, alkylthio substituents SR (1a: R = n-C8H17, 1b: R = n-C12H25), which serve as headgroups for surface binding and promote lateral assembly, while the disk-like phthalocyaninato core offers the scope for the attachment of axial ligands to the adsorbed molecules. This process was mimicked by coordination of pyridine (Py) to [Zn(1a)] and [Zn(1b)], respectively. The crystal structures of the products [Zn(1a)(Py)] and [Zn(1b)(Py)] were determined. The crystal structures of 4,5-bis(octylthio)phthalodinitrile and 4,5-bis(dodecylthio)phthalodinitrile were also determined. The films fabricated from [Mn(1a)Cl] and [Mn(1b)Cl] on gold were characterised by XPS, ToF-SIMS and NEXAFS spectroscopy, which revealed the presence of well-defined and homogeneous self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), whose constituents are bound to the substrate by thioether–gold linkages. The orientation of the macrocycles is predominantly parallel to the surface. Strong electronic interaction of the manganese(III) centre with the substrate leads to Cl loss upon adsorption and its reduction to MnII. PMID:21857743

  4. The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Fanbing; Cheng, Yangjian; Lin, Zhang; Guan, Xiong

    2015-10-30

    The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains was investigated in the present work. Our data showed that the bacteria isolated from uranium mine possessed highly accumulation ability to U(VI), and the maximum accumulation capacity was around 400 mg U/g biomass (dry weight). X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analyzes indicated that the U(VI) was adsorbed on the bacterial surface firstly through coordinating with phosphate, CH2 and amide groups, and then needle-like amorphous uranium compounds were formed. With the extension of time, the extracellular crystalline substances were disappeared, but some particles were appeared in the intracellular region, and these particles were characterized as tetragonal-uramphite. Moreover, the disrupted experiment indicated that the cell-free extracts had better uranium-immobilization ability than cell debris. Our findings provided the understanding of the uranium transformation process from amorphous uranium to crystalline uramphite, which would be useful in the regulation of uranium immobilization process.

  5. Spectroscopic study on the role of TiO{sub 2} in the adsorption of Eu(III) and U(VI) on silica surfaces in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Hee-Jung Park, Kyoung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Enhanced adsorption of Eu(III) and U(VI) onto TiO{sub 2}-coated silica. • Enhanced Eu(III) luminescence and lifetime on TiO{sub 2}-coated silica. • Energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} of TiO{sub 2}-coated silica to Eu(III) in solutions. - Abstract: To determine the effects of TiO{sub 2} on the adsorption of actinides onto mineral surfaces in groundwater, silica was partially coated with TiO{sub 2}, and Eu(III) and U(VI) were individually adsorbed from separate 0.1 mM concentration solutions. The TiO{sub 2}-coated silica showed higher Eu(III) and U(VI) adsorption capacities for increasing amounts of TiO{sub 2} coated on the silica surfaces, and thus the existence of TiO{sub 2} can decrease the mobility of Eu(III) and U(VI) contaminants. In luminescence studies, it was found that TiO{sub 2} considerably enhanced the luminescence of the adsorbed Eu(III) indicating that TiO{sub 2}–Eu(III) forms surface complexes which may decrease the number of water molecules at the inner sphere of Eu(III), but this was not observed for U(VI). An energy transfer from the TiO{sub 2} to the Eu(III) was confirmed in this case of amorphous TiO{sub 2}-coated silica in Eu(III) solutions, and an increase of the luminescence lifetime of Eu(III) for increasing concentrations of coated TiO{sub 2} was also observed.

  6. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in carbonate and sulfate minerals crystallized from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balboni, Enrica; Morrison, Jessica M.; Wang, Zheming; Engelhard, Mark H.; Burns, Peter C.

    2015-02-01

    . The time-resolved spectra of calcite indicate multiple coordination environments about the uranyl unit, with the spectra of the longer-lived components displaying similarities with uranyl-incorporated aragonite. The luminescence spectrum of uranyl-bearing celestine is consistent with a uranyl unit coordinated by monodentate sulfate groups. Anglesite synthesized in the presence of uranyl shows no luminescence, whereas the spectra of gypsum and cerussite suggest uranyl surface adsorption or precipitation of secondary uranyl minerals on the mineral surfaces. Our findings indicate that geometrical constraints of the Np(V) and U(VI) species in solution, together with the crystallographic steric constraints of the host material, affect preferential uptake in the mineral structures studied. Calcium and strontium appear to be favorable incorporation sites for both U(VI) and Np(V) in aragonite and strontianite. In calcite, Np(V) incorporation is strongly favored over U(VI), whereas in gypsum incorporation of neither actinyl ion occurs. Substitution of actinyl ions was also not observed for lead, in either the carbonate or sulfate minerals studied.

  7. Surface Engineering of PAMAM-SDB Chelating Resin with Diglycolamic Acid (DGA) Functional Group for Efficient Sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) from Aqueous Medium.

    PubMed

    Ilaiyaraja, P; Deb, A K Singha; Ponraju, D; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Venkatraman, B

    2017-04-15

    A novel chelating resin obtained via growth of PAMAM dendron on surface of styrene divinyl benzene resin beads, followed by diglycolamic acid functionalization of the dendrimer terminal. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, nitric acid concentration, amount of adsorbent, shaking time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption efficiency. Diglycolamic acid terminated PAMAM dendrimer functionalized styrene divinylbenzene chelating resin (DGA-PAMAM-SDB) is found to be an efficient candidate for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous (pH >4) and nitric acid media (>3M). The sorption equilibrium could be reached within 60min, and the experimental data fits with pseudo-second-order model. Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with sorption equilibrium data. The maximum U(VI) and Th(IV) sorption capacity onto DGA-PAMAMG5-SDB was estimated to be about 682 and 544.2mgg(-1) respectively at 25°C. The interaction of actinides and chelating resin is reversible and hence, the resin can be regenerated and reused. DFT calculation on the interaction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with chelating resin validates the experimental findings.

  8. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to U(VI) immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, Bulbul; Kennedy, David W; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, Jim K; Isern, Nancy G; Majors, Paul D; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells with minimal EPS, we show that (i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contribute significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; (ii) bEPS can be considered a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at lower initial U(VI) concentrations; and (iii) the U(VI) reduction efficiency is dependent upon the initial U(VI) concentration and decreases at lower concentrations. To quantify the relative contributions of sorption and reduction to U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(VI). We found that, when reduced, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated the reactivity of laEPS, while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, possibly facilitated U(VI) reduction.

  9. Proposal for a modification of the UVI risk scale.

    PubMed

    Zaratti, Francesco; Piacentini, Rubén D; Guillén, Héctor A; Cabrera, Sergio H; Liley, J Ben; McKenzie, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    The standardisation of UV information to the public through the UV Index (UVI) has been hugely beneficial since its endorsement by multiple international agencies more than 10 years ago. It has now gained widespread acceptance, and UVI values are available throughout the world from satellite instruments, ground-based measurements, and from forecasts based on model calculations. These have been useful for atmospheric scientists, health professionals (skin and eye specialists), and the general public. But the descriptors and health messages associated with the UVI scale are targeted towards European skin types and UV regimes, and are not directly applicable to the population living closer to the equator, especially for those in the high-altitude Altiplano region of South America. This document arose from discussions at the Latin American Society of Photobiology and Photomedicine's Congress, which was held in Arequipa, Peru, in November 2013. A major outcome of the meeting was the Arequipa Accord, which is intended as a unifying document to ensure co-ordination of UV and health research decisions in Latin America. A plank of that agreement was the need to tailor the UVI scale to make it more relevant to the region and its population. Here we make some suggestions to improve the international applicability of the UVI scale.

  10. Structure-acidity correlation of supported tungsten(VI)-oxo-species: FT-IR and TPD studies of adsorbed pyridine and catalytic decomposition of 2-propanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, M. I.; Mekhemer, G. A. H.; Fouad, N. E.; Rabee, A. I. M.

    2014-07-01

    The amount of 10 wt%-WO3 was supported on alumina, titania or silica by impregnation with aqueous solution of ammonium paratungstate and subsequent calcination at 500 °C for 10 h. Tungstate-related chemical and physical changes in the calcination products were resolved by ex-situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Nature of exposed surface acid sites were probed by in-situ IR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine (Py) molecules at room temperature (RT). The relative strength of the acid sites thus probed was gauged by combining results of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements of the RT-adsorbed Py with those communicated by in-situ IR spectra of residual Py on the surface after a brief thermoevacuation at high temperatures (100-300 °C). Reactivity of the surface acid sites was tested toward 2-propanal catalytic decomposition, and observed by in-situ IR gas phase spectra. Results obtained were correlated with predominant structures assumed by the supported tungstate species. Accordingly, polymerization of the supported tungstate into 2-/3-dimensional structures, was found to be relatively most advanced on favorable locations of titania surfaces as compared to the case on alumina or silica surfaces. Consequently, the Lewis acidity was strengthened, and strong Bronsted acidity was evolved, leading to a 2-propanol dehydration catalyst (tungstate/titania) of optimal activity and selectivity. Strong tungstate/support interfacial interactions were found to hamper the formation of the strongly acidic and catalytically active polymeric structures of the supported tungstate (i.e., the case on alumina or silica).

  11. Influence of Mn oxides on the reduction of U(VI) by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Duff, Martine C.; Hunter, David; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2002-09-16

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) enzymatically reduce Fe(III), Mn(III/IV), U(VI), and other polyvalent metals during anaerobic respiration. Previous investigations of the bacterial reduction of U(VI) in the presence of goethite (a-FeOOH) found that, in spite of potential competition as an electron acceptor, goethite had little impact on the bacterial reduction of U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Mn(III/IV) oxides are also electron acceptors for DMRB but are stronger oxidants than Fe(III) oxides. Differences in the solubility of oxidized Mn and U challenges predictions of their biogeochemical behavior during redox cycling. The potential for Mn oxides to modify the biogeochemical behavior of U during reduction by a subsurface bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was investigated using synthetic Mn(III/IV) oxides [pyrolusite ({beta}-MnO{sub 2}), bixbyite (Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and K{sup +}-birnessite (K{sub 4}Mn{sub 14}O{sub 27} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O)]. In the absence of bacteria, pyrolusite and bixbyite oxidized biogenic uraninite (UO{sub 2}(s)) to soluble U(VI) species, with bixbyite being the most rapid oxidant. The Mn(III/IV) oxides lowered the bioreduction rate of U(VI) relative to rates in their absence, or in the presence of gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] added as a non-redox reactive surface. Evolved Mn(II) increased with increasing initial U(VI) concentration in the biotic experiments, indicating that valence cycling of U facilitated the reduction of Mn(III/IV). Despite an excess of the Mn oxide, 43-100% of the initial U was bioreduced after extended incubation. Analysis of thin sections of bacterial-Mn oxide suspensions revealed that the reduced U resided in the periplasmic space of the bacterial cells. In the absence of Mn(III/IV) oxides, UO{sub 2}(s) accumulated as copius fine-grained particles external to the cell. These results indicate that the presence of Mn(III/IV) oxides may impede the biological reduction of U(VI) in subsoils and sediments?.

  12. Characterization of silver-kaolinite (AgK): an adsorbent for long-lived (129)I species.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Sivachidambaram; Rao, Sudhakar M

    2016-01-01

    Bentonite is a preferred buffer and backfill material for deep geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). Bentonite does not retain anions by virtue of its negatively charged basal surface. Imparting anion retention ability to bentonite is important to enable the expansive clay to retain long-lived (129)I (iodine-129; half-life = 16 million years) species that may escape from the HLW geological repository. Silver-kaolinite (AgK) material is prepared as an additive to improve the iodide retention capacity of bentonite. The AgK is prepared by heating kaolinite-silver nitrate mix at 400 °C to study the kaolinite influence on the transition metal ion when reacting at its dehydroxylation temperature. Thermo gravimetric-Evolved Gas Detection analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy and electron probe micro analysis indicated that silver occurs as AgO/Ag2O surface coating on thermally reacting kaolinite with silver nitrate at 400 °C.

  13. ToF-SIMS Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: Principal Component Analysis of the Primary Ion Species Effect on the Protein Fragmentation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Graham, Daniel J; Wagner, Matthew S; Lee, Tae Geol; Moon, Dae Won; Castner, David G

    2011-12-15

    In time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), the choice of primary ion used for analysis can influence the resulting mass spectrum. This is because different primary ion types can produce different fragmentation pathways. In this study, analysis of single-component protein monolayers were performed using monatomic, tri-atomic, and polyatomic primary ion sources. Eight primary ions (Cs(+), Au(+), Au(3) (+), Bi(+), Bi(3) (+), Bi(3) (++), C(60) (+)) were used to examine to the low mass (m/z < 200) fragmentation patterns from five different proteins (bovine serum albumin, bovine serum fibrinogen, bovine immunoglobulin G and chicken egg white lysozyme) adsorbed onto mica surfaces. Principal component analysis (PCA) processing of the ToF-SIMS data showed that variation in peak intensity caused by the primary ions was greater than differences in protein composition. The spectra generated by Cs(+), Au(+) and Bi(+) primary ions were similar, but the spectra generated by monatomic, tri-atomic and polyatomic primary ion ions varied significantly. C(60) primary ions increased fragmentation of the adsorbed proteins in the m/z < 200 region, resulting in more intense low m/z peaks. Thus, comparison of data obtained by one primary ion species with that obtained by another primary ion species should be done with caution. However, for the spectra generated using a given primary ion beam, discrimination between the spectra of different proteins followed similar trends. Therefore, a PCA model of proteins created with a given ion source should only be applied to datasets obtained using the same ion source. The type of information obtained from PCA depended on the peak set used. When only amino acid peaks were used, PCA was able to identify the relationship between proteins by their amino acid composition. When all peaks from m/z 12-200 were used, PCA separated proteins based on a ratio of C(4)H(8)N(+) to K(+) peak intensities. This ratio correlated with the thickness

  14. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  15. The effect of temperature on the speciation of U(VI) in sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

    2008-09-15

    Sulfate, one of the inorganic constituents that could be present in the nuclear waste repository, forms complexes with U(VI) and affects its migration in the environment. Results show that the complexation of U(VI) with sulfate is enhanced by the increase in temperature. The effect of temperature on the complexation and speciation of U(VI) in sulfate solutions is discussed.

  16. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-06-05

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

  17. Kinetic Desorption and Sorption of U(VI) During Reactive Transport in a Contaminated Hanford Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Qafoku, Odeta; Smith, Steven C.

    2005-05-12

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate U(VI) desorption and sorption kinetics in a sand-textured, contaminated (22.7 µmol kg-1) capillary fringe sediment that had experienced long-term exposure to U(VI). The clay fraction mineralogy of the sediment was dominated by montmorillonite, muscovite, vermiculite, and chlorite. Saturated column experiments were performed under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of the Hanford site where uranyl–carbonate and calcium–uranyl–carbonate complexes dominate aqueous speciation. A U(VI) free solution was used to study U(VI) desorption in columns where different flow rates were applied. Uranium(VI) sorption was studied after the desorption of labile contaminant U(VI) using different U(VI) concentrations in the leaching solution. Strong kinetic behavior was observed for both U(VI) desorption and sorption. Although U(VI) is semi–mobile in mildly alkaline, calcareous subsurface environments, our results showed substantial U(VI) sorption, significant retardation during transport, and atypical breakthrough curves with extended tailing. A distributed rate model was applied to describe the effluent data and to allow comparisons between the desorption rate of contaminant U(VI) with the rate of short-term U(VI) sorption. Desorption was the slower process. Our results suggest that U(VI) release and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer system from which the sediment was obtained are kinetically controlled.

  18. The hydrophobic character of nonsulfide mineral surfaces as influenced by double-bond reactions of adsorbed unsaturated collector species. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    The primary goal of this research is to improve the flotation efficiency of nonsulfide mineral systems by establishing the fundamental features of collector adsorption reactions and developing appropriate chemical control strategies. In situ real-time FR-IR/IRS measurements, nonequilibrium electrophoresis, vacuum flotation, contact-angle goniometry, and laser Raman spectroscopy have been used to accomplish this goal. These experimental techniques have led to the determination of important information concerning collector adsorption phenomena in each nonsulfide mineral system. For example, the demonstration of polymerization of adsorbed unsaturated surfactant species has added a new dimension to semi-soluble salt flotation chemistry and may have more general utility. Furthermore, refinement of the in situ FT-IR/IRS analysis has been accomplished particularly for the examination of surfactant aggregation phenomena at nonsulfide mineral surfaces. Finally, the significance of the lattice ion hydration theory has been demonstrated by nonequilibrium electrophoretic mobility measurements, and the new results will provide a better basis for the understanding of soluble-salt flotation phenomena.

  19. Adsorbate Diffusion on Transition Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    systematically studied adsorption and diffusion of atomic and diatomic species (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) on nanometer-sized Pt and Cu nanoparticles with...species and two diatomic molecules (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) as adsorbates and study the adsorption and diffusion of these adsorbates across the edges

  20. UVIS 2.0 Chip-dependent Inverse Sensitivity Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, S. E.; Mack, J.; Bowers, A. S.; Baggett, S.; Bajaj, V.; Dahlen, T.; Durbin, M.; Gosmeyer, C.; Gunning, H.; Hammer, D.; Hartig, G.; Khandrika, H.; MacKenty, J.; Ryan, R.; Sabbi, E.; Sosey, M.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze 6 years of standard star observations acquired with the WFC3/UVIS imager between 2009 and 2015. Observations of the three white dwarf standard stars, GD 153, GD 71, and G191B2B were obtained at multiple dither positions near the center of the array and in all four-corner subarrays. Departing from previous practice, chip-dependent inverse sensitivities are computed at r=10 pixels (0.3962 arcsec) for the 42 full frame filters (excluding the 20 quad filters); and these data also provide encircled energy fractions as a function of filter. Chip-dependent inverse sensitivities differ on average by 3% from previous computations, primarily due to drizzling errors. UVIS2 science data are scaled to UVIS1 by the inverse sensitivity ratio so that only a single photflam value is needed for the full detector. We describe the UVIS 2.0 (chip-dependent) philosophy and discuss our results in the context of prior photometric calculations. An updated version of CALWF3 (version 3.3) is required to process the new chip-dependent solutions.

  1. UVIS 2.0: Chip-Dependent Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, J.; Dahlen, T.; Sabbi, E.; Bowers, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    An improved set of flat fields was delivered to the HST archive on February 23, 2016 as part of the UVIS 2.0 photometric calibration. This new methodology treats the two UVIS chips as separate detectors when computing the flats and zeropoints. The most significant difference in the new flats is that each chip is now normalized by its median value, removing any inherent sensitivity offsets from the flats themselves. Instead, the new software (CALWF3 version 3.3) corrects for this effect by scaling the UVIS2 science extension by the sensitivity ratio between chips, as determined from observations of white dwarf standards. For the majority of filters, the maximum change in the flat field is less than 1%. For the UV filters, the flats are based on ground test data obtained in ambient conditions. These have been updated to correct for 3% sensitivity variations in a crosshatch pattern on scales of 50-100 pixels across both chips. To improve cosmetics in calibrated images, the new flats contain additional corrections for bad rows and columns and new data quality flags for slight vignetting in the outer corner of UVIS1 (amp A).

  2. Biogeochemical controls on the product of microbial U(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Alessi, Daniel S; Shao, Paul PaoYun; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Bargar, John R; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2013-01-01

    Biologically mediated immobilization of radionuclides in the subsurface is a promising strategy for the remediation of uranium-contaminated sites. During this process, soluble U(VI) is reduced by indigenous microorganisms to sparingly soluble U(IV). The crystalline U(IV) phase uraninite, or UO2, is the preferable end-product of bioremediation due to its relatively high stability and low solubility in comparison to biomass-associated nonuraninite U(IV) species that have been reported in laboratory and under field conditions. The goal of this study was to delineate the geochemical conditions that promote the formation of nonuraninite U(IV) versus uraninite and to decipher the mechanisms of its preferential formation. U(IV) products were prepared under varying geochemical conditions and characterized with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), and various wet chemical methods. We report an increasing fraction of nonuraninite U(IV) species with decreasing initial U concentration. Additionally, the presence of several common groundwater solutes (sulfate, silicate, and phosphate) promote the formation of nonuraninite U(IV). Our experiments revealed that the presence of those solutes promotes the formation of bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and increases bacterial viability, suggesting that the formation of nonuraninite U(IV) is due to a biological response to solute presence during U(VI) reduction. The results obtained from this laboratory-scale research provide insight into biogeochemical controls on the product(s) of uranium reduction during bioremediation of the subsurface.

  3. Réduction enzymatique de U(VI) dans des eaux souterraines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner; Nuttall, Eric; Gong, Weiliang; Fritz, Bertrand; Crovisier, Jean-Louis

    1999-03-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with UCVI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters U(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and trimetaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium.

  4. Production of a new adsorbent from Moroccan oil shale by chemical activation and its adsorption characteristics for U and Th bearing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouya, E.; Fakhi, S.; Hannache, H.; Ichcho, S.; Pailler, R.; Naslain, R.; Abbe, J. C.

    2005-03-01

    New adsorbents were prepared from Moroccan oil shale of Tarfaya (layer R3) by chemical activation with sulphuric acid diluted at 80%. The influence of activation temperature, atmosphere gas, holding time in oven and weight ratio of sulphuric acid to precursor was investigated by determination of yield of adsorbents and adsorption capacity of methylene blue. The best adsorbent properties were found for a particular combination of the chosen parameters: temperature and time of activation respectively equal to 250° C and 2 hours, the gas vector being nitrogen (N{2}). The adsorption capacity for methylene blue and specific surface (SBET) of the new adsorbent were equal to 300 mg/g and 270 m2/g respectively. The batch mode experiment was used to explore the feasibility of this adsorbent for removal of radionuclides (U and Th) from aqueous solution. Applicability of the adsorbent was examined for synthetic solution prepared from hydrated uranyl nitrate (UO{2}(NO{3})2.6H{2}O) and hydrated thorium nitrate (Th(NO{3})4.5H{2}O). The parameters of adsorption for the two radioelements were determined by application of the Langmuir, Freundlich and Elovich models.

  5. Effect of Phosphate on U(VI) Sorption to Montmorillonite: Ternary Complexation and Precipitation Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh; Giammar, Daniel; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-15

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated. Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This work

  6. The effect of U(VI) bioreduction kinetics on subsequent reoxidation of biogenic U(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Senko, John M.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mcdonough, J. T.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Burgos, William D.

    2007-10-01

    Microbially mediated in situ reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) (as UO2) has been proposed as a means of preventing the migration of that radionuclide with groundwater, but preventing the oxidative resolubilization of U has proven difficult. We hypothesized that relatively slow rates of U(VI) bioreduction would yield larger UO2 precipitates that would be more resistant to oxidation than those produced by rapid U(VI) bioreduction. We manipulated U(VI) bioreduction rates by varying the density of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 added to U(VI) containing solutions with lactate as an electron donor. Characterization of biogenic UO2 particles by extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that UO2 nanoparticles formed by relatively slow rates of U(VI) reduction were larger and more highly aggregated than those formed by relatively rapid U(VI) reduction. UO2 particles formed at various rates were incubated under a variety of abiotically and biologically oxidizing conditions. In all cases, UO2 that was formed by relatively slow U(VI) reduction was oxidized at a slower rate and to a lesser extent than UO2 formed by relatively rapid U(VI) bioreduction, suggesting that the stability of UO2 in situ may be enhanced by stimulation of relatively slow rates of U(VI) reduction.

  7. Complexation of U(VI) with 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonicAcid (HEDPA) in Acidic to Basic Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W A; Rao, L; Zanonato, P; Garnov, A; Powell, B A; Nash, K L

    2007-01-24

    Complexation of U(VI) with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in acidic to basic solutions has been studied with multiple techniques. A number of 1:1 (UO{sub 2}H{sub 3}L), 1:2 (UO{sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 and -1) and 2:2 ((UO{sub 2}){sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 1, 0 and -1) complexes form, but the 1:2 complexes are the major species in a wide pH range. Thermodynamic parameters (formation constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation) were determined by potentiometry and calorimetry. Data indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with HEDPA is exothermic, favored by the enthalpy of complexation. This is in contrast to the complexation of U(VI) with dicarboxylic acids in which the enthalpy term usually is unfavorable. Results from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and {sup 31}P NMR have confirmed the presence of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:2 U(VI)-HEDPA complexes.

  8. U(VI) reduction at the nano, meso and meter scale: concomitant transition from simpler to more complex biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, H.; Hochella, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Reduction of aqueous hexavalent U(VI) to the sparingly soluble nanoparticulate mineral uraninite [UO2] represents a promising strategy for the in situ immobilization of uranium in contaminated subsurface sediments and groundwater. Studies related to uranium reduction have been extensively carried out at various scales ranging from nano to meso to the meter scale with varying degrees of success. While nanoscale processes involving simple two-electron transfer reactions such as enzymatic microbial U(VI) reduction results in biogenic UO2 formation, mesoscale processes involving minerals and U(VI) are a step up in complexity and have shown varying results ranging from partial uranium reduction to the formation of mixed U(IV)/U(V) species. Although nano- and meso-scale biogeochemical processes have been helpful in predicting the contaminant dynamics at the meter scale, their occurrence is not necessarily apparent in soils and aquifers given the enormous volume of contaminated groundwater to be remediated, among other factors. The formation and long-term stability of biologically reduced uranium at the meter scale is also determined in addition by the complex interplay of aqueous geochemistry, hydrology, soil and sediment mineralogy and microbial community dynamics. For instance, indigenous subsurface microbes often encounter multiple electron acceptors in heterogeneous environments during biostimulation and can catalyze the formation of various reactive biogenic minerals. In such cases, abiotic interactions between U(VI) and reactive biogenic minerals is potentially important because the success of a remediation strategy is contingent upon the speciation of reduced uranium. This presentation will give an overview of uranium reduction ranging from simple nanoscale biological processes to increasingly complex meso and meter scale processes involving abiotic interactions between aqueous uranium and nano-biogenic minerals and the effect of mineralogy and aqueous

  9. CASSINI UVIS STELLAR OCCULTATION OBSERVATIONS OF SATURN's RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. G.; Pettis, D.; Bradley, E. T.; Esposito, L. W.; Sremcevic, M.

    2010-12-15

    The Cassini spacecraft's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) includes a high-speed photometer (HSP) that has observed more than 100 stellar occultations by Saturn's rings. Here, we document a standardized technique applied to the UVIS-HSP ring occultation datasets delivered to the Planetary Data System as higher level data products. These observations provide measurements of ring structure that approaches the scale of the largest common ring particles ({approx}5 m). The combination of multiple occultations at different viewing geometries enables reconstruction of the three-dimensional structure of the rings. This inversion of the occultation data depends on accurate calibration of the data so that occultations of different stars taken at different times and under different viewing conditions can be combined to retrieve ring structure. We provide examples of the structure of the rings as seen from several occultations at different incidence angles to the rings, illustrating changes in the apparent structure with viewing geometry.

  10. WFC3 TV2 Testing: UVIS Channel Glint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas M.

    2007-10-01

    The UVIS spare detector (UVIS build 2) was housed in WFC3 during the most recent epoch of thermal vaccum ground testing. We scanned the chip gap with a HeNe laser, to look for scattering from any material in the CCD chip gap or the edges of the CCD chips themselves. Although we found no such scattering issues, we did find a significant glint problem involving reflection from the surface of the CCD to the CCD housing and back down to the CCD. The glint appears as a large streak, ~10,000 pixels in area, containing anywhere from 1% to 30% of the energy within the source itself, depending upon the wavelength and position of the source. Approximately 10% of the detector area leads to glint when a source is placed in that area. Although any one glint comprises a tiny fraction of the detector area, the glint sweeps over a large area as the source is moved, implying that approximately 15% of the detector could be significantly illuminated by glint when observing a crowded field. As a result, the UVIS detectors currently not installed in the instrument have been modified to mask the surfaces responsible for the glint, to avoid this issue on orbit.

  11. Preparation, characterization and application of NaHCO3 leached bulk U(VI) imprinted polymers endowed with γ-MPS coated magnetite in contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Tavengwa, Nikita Tawanda; Cukrowska, Ewa; Chimuka, Luke

    2014-02-28

    A new type of ion imprinted polymer (IIP) embedded with γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (γ-MPS) coated magnetic particles for selective extraction of uranyl ions was synthesized by bulk polymerization. The performance of the magnetic sorbent on the extraction of U(VI) was evaluated by various parameters which included the influence of pH, amount of the magnetic polymers, contact time and initial U(VI) concentration. The adsorption capacity of the magnetic polymers was found to be 1.1 and 0.95mgg(-1) for the IIP and its control ion non-imprinted polymer (NIP), respectively. The optimum amount of the sorbent was 50mg for an initial concentration of 2.5mgL(-1). The prepared magnetic imprinted sorbent displayed an uptake with a time of 45min considered optimum. The magnetic polymer displayed good selectivity and exhibited good reusability. Studies from binary mixtures of metal ions in aqueous solutions showed that the magnetic adsorbent selectivity following the order: U(VI)>Ni(II)>Pb(II). Experimental results illustrated the potential application of magnetic ion imprinted polymer sorbents for selective removal of U(VI) from contaminated water.

  12. The Composition and Structure of Enceladus' Plume from a Cassini UVIS Observation of a Solar Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Shemansky, D. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, I.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed an occultation of the sun by Enceladus’ water vapor plume on May 18, 2010. UVIS used its extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channel for this new observation, to detect absorptions in the wavelength range 55 to 110 nm. Molecular nitrogen and water vapor have absorptions in this range. The N2 b(3,0) line is at 97.2 nm, extinguishing the solar H Lyman gamma emission. Cassini’s Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) detected a species with an atomic mass of 28 amu, which could be CO, C2H4 or N2 [1, 2]. Definitive UVIS detection of N2 was important to clear up this ambiguity, and this was an important goal of the observation, as the presence or lack of N2 is key to models of the geochemistry in the interior [3, 4, 5]. UVIS did not detect N2 and we set an upper limit for the column density of 3 x 10^13 cm^-2. The absorption features in the spectrum are best fit by a water vapor column density of 0.9 x 10^16 cm^-2. This column density is in family with previous UVIS measurements from stellar occultations in 2005 and 2007 at far ultraviolet wavelengths, suggesting that Enceladus’ activity has been stable for the last 5 years [6, 7]. We used fluctuations in the signal to probe the structure of the gas jets again, as was analyzed in the 2007 occultation of zeta Orionis [7]. Gas jets are correlated to the dust jets detected by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem [8]. The path of the sun cut through the jets horizontally at an altitude above the limb of ~15 km at the closest point. The resolution of the solar occultation is higher than the stellar occultation, and collimation of the gas jets observed in the solar occultation is greater than estimated in 2007. The observed collimation allows us to derive a mach number of ~4 for the ratio of the vertical velocity in the jet to the thermal velocity of the plume gas. The new opportunity afforded by this solar occultation is used to further model the structure and

  13. Development of magnetic graphene oxide adsorbent for the removal and preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) species from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Rashidi Nodeh, Hamid; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Ali, Imran; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2016-05-01

    New-generation adsorbent, Fe3O4@SiO2/GO, was developed by modification of graphene oxide (GO) with silica-coated (SiO2) magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4). The synthesized adsorbent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The developed adsorbent was used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from environmental waters prior to ICP-MS analysis. Fe3O4@SiO2/GO provided high adsorption capacities, i.e., 7.51 and 11.46 mg g(-1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively, at pH 4.0. Adsorption isotherm, kinetic, and thermodynamic were investigated for As(III) and As(V) adsorption. Preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) were studied using magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) method at pH 9.0 as the adsorbent showed selective adsorption for As(III) only in pH range 7-10. MSPE using Fe3O4@SiO2/GO was developed with good linearities (0.05-2.0 ng mL(-1)) and high coefficient of determination (R (2) = 0.9992 and 0.9985) for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) (3× SD/m, n = 3) obtained were 7.9 pg mL(-1) for As(III) and 28.0 pg mL(-1) for As(V). The LOD obtained is 357-1265× lower than the WHO maximum permissible limit of 10.0 ng mL(-1). The developed MSPE method showed good relative recoveries (72.55-109.71 %) and good RSDs (0.1-4.3 %, n = 3) for spring water, lake, river, and tap water samples. The new-generation adsorbent can be used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from water samples successfully. The adsorbent removal for As(III) is better than As(V).

  14. Reaction of U-VI with titanium-substituted magnetite: Influence of Ti on U-IV speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Latta, Drew; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2013-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent uranium (UVI) to less soluble tetravalent uranium (UIV) through enzymatic or abiotic redox reactions has the potential to alter U mobility in subsurface environments. As a ubiquitous natural mineral, magnetite (Fe3O4) is of interest because of its ability to act as a rechargeable reductant for UVI. Natural magnetites are often impure with titanium, and structural Fe3+ replacement by TiIV yields a proportional increase in the relative Fe2+ content in the metal sublattice to maintain bulk charge neutrality. In the absence of oxidation, the Ti content sets the initial bulk Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio (R). Here, we demonstrate that Ti-doped magnetites (Fe3 xTixO4) reduce UVI to UIV. The UVI-Fe2+ redox reactivity was found to be controlled directly by R, but was otherwise independent of Ti content (xTi). However, in contrast to previous studies with pure magnetite where UVI was reduced to nanocrystalline uraninite (UO2), the presence of structural Ti (xTi = 0.25 0.53) results in the formation of UIV species that lack the bidentate U-O2-U bridges of uraninite. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic analysis indicated that the titanomagnetite-bound UIV phase has a novel UIV-Ti binding geometry, different from the coordination of UIV in the mineral brannerite (UIVTi2O6). The observed UIV-Ti coordination at a distance of 3.43 Å suggests a binuclear corner-sharing adsorption/incorporation UIV complex with the solid phase. Furthermore, we explored the effect of oxidation (decreasing R) and solids-to-solution ratio on the reduced UIV phase. The formation of the non-uraninite UIV-Ti phase appears to be controlled by availability of surface Ti sites, rather than R. Our work highlights a previously unrecognized role of Ti in the environmental chemistry of UIV and suggests that further work to characterize the long-term stability of UIV phases formed in the presence of Ti is warranted.

  15. Discovery Of B Ring Propellers In Cassini UVIS, And ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, Miodrag; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2012-10-01

    We present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We identify two propeller populations: (1) tens of degrees wide propellers in the dense B ring core, and (2) smaller, more A ring like, propellers populating the inner B ring. The prototype of the first population is an object observed at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. The ubiquitous propeller "S" shape is seen both in UVIS occultations as an optical depth depletion and in ISS as a 40 degrees wide bright stripe in unlit geometries and dark in lit geometries. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap embedded in the high optical depth region of the B ring. The gap moves at orbital speed consistent with its radial location. From the radial separation of the propeller wings we estimate that the embedded body, which causes the propeller structure, is about 1.5km in size located at a=112,921km. The UVIS occultations indicate an asymmetric propeller "S" shape. Since the object is located at an edge between high and relatively low optical depth, this asymmetry is most likely a consequence of the strong surface mass density gradient. We estimate that there are possibly dozen up to 100 other propeller objects in Saturn's B ring. The location of the discovered body, at an edge of a dense ringlet within the B ring, suggests a novel mechanism for the up to now illusive B ring irregular large-scale structure of alternating high and low optical depth ringlets. We propose that this B ring irregular structure may have its cause in the presence of many embedded bodies that shepherd the individual B ring ringlets.

  16. Saturn's variable thermosphere from Cassini/UVIS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Sandel, B. R.; Yelle, R. V.; Strobel, D. F.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Erwin, J. T.

    2015-11-01

    We retrieved the density and temperature profiles in Saturn's thermosphere from 26 stellar occultations observed by the Cassini/UVIS instrument. These results expand upon and complement the previous analysis of 15 Cassini/UVIS solar occultations by Saturn's upper thermosphere. We find that the exospheric temperatures based on the stellar occultations agree with the solar occultations and range from 380 K to 590 K. These temperatures are also consistent with the recent re-analysis of the Voyager/UVS occultations. The retrieved density profiles support our earlier inference that the shape of the atmosphere at low pressures is consistent with a meridional trend of increasing temperatures with absolute latitude. This implies a high-latitude heat source, such as auroral heating, although the existing circulation models that include auroral heating still underestimate the equatorial temperatures by overestimating the meridional temperature gradient. This suggests either that the circulation models are somehow incomplete or there is some other heat source at low to mid latitudes that is relatively less efficient than high-latitude heating. We also find evidence for the expansion of the exobase by about 500 km between 2006 and 2011 near the equator, followed by possible contraction after 2011. The expansion appears to be caused by significant warming of the lower thermosphere that anti-correlates with solar activity and may be connected to changes in global circulation. Lastly, we note that our density profiles are in good general agreement with the Voyager/UVS data. In particular, the Voyager density profiles are most consistent with the Cassini/UVIS stellar occultations from late 2008 and early 2009 that roughly coincide in season with the Voyager flybys.

  17. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-05

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  18. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  19. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  20. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, J.; Haggerty, R.; Stoliker, D.L.; Kent, D.B.; Istok, J.D.; Greskowiak, J.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. U(VI) transport under the condition of water table fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Haggerty, R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Kent, D. B.; Istok, J. D.; Zachara, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    U(VI) transport at the 300 Area Hanford IFRC site, WA appears to be strongly related to water table fluctuations resulting from rapid changes of Column River stage. In the “smear zone” (zone through which the water table sweeps) at the IFRC site, sediment can experience more than one saturation cycle every day. This unique phenomenon complicates the current understanding of U(VI) transport because the smear zone is likely a persistent source of long-term U(VI) contamination. In our study, two comparison column (4.28 cm × 44.4 cm) experiments are conducted to exam the U(VI) desorption affected by occasional, partially unsaturated conditions. In the experiment, one column remains saturated and the other one experiences three saturation-desaturation cycles. Less than 8 mm composite sediments collected from the Hanford IFRC site are packed into the column. TDRs and tensiometers are built into the column to measure both water contents and metric potentials at different depths. U-free synthetic ground water (SGW) is used to desorb U(VI) in both columns. In the experiment, both columns are initially saturated and SGW is injected in at a constant rate to desorb U(VI). Three stop flow events are embedded into desorption. Before each stop flow event, one of the columns is freely drained and the sediment represents the smear zone with the water table at the bottom of the column. After each stop flow, the column is re-saturated and regular desorption continues in both columns. During desorption and drainage, the pH in the effluent is continuously monitored. In addition, U(VI), major ions and alkalinity are measured in all samples. Previous studies show that aqueous U(VI) concentration increases due to the kinetic behavior of U(VI) desorption. If the column remains unsaturated during the stop flow, it is expected that the kinetic behavior of U(VI) will cause a much higher U(VI) concentration in less mobile pore water . Therefore, a lower U(VI) spike and a longer U(VI) tail

  2. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  3. Influence of Dynamical Conditions on the Reduction of UVI at the Magnetite-Solution Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Boily, Jean F.; Buck, Edgar C.; Skomurski, Frances N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Bargar, John R.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2010-01-14

    The heterogeneous reduction of UVI to UIV by ferrous iron is a potentially key process influencing the fate and transport of U in the environment. The reactivity of both sorbed and structural FeII has been studied for numerous substrates, including magnetite. The results from UVI-magnetite experiments have been variable, ranging from no reduction to clear evidence for the formation of UIV. In this contribution, we used XAS and high resolution (+cryogenic) XPS to study the interaction of UVI with nano-particulate magnetite. The results indicated that UVI was partially reduced to UV with no evidence of UIV. However, thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed-valence U phases with average oxidation states below (V) should have been stable, indicating that the system was not in redox equilibrium. A reaction pathway that involves incorporation of U and stabilization of UV and UVI in secondary phases is invoked to explain the observations.

  4. Thermodynamic Insight into the Solvation and Complexation Behavior of U(VI) in Ionic Liquid: Binding of CMPO with U(VI) Studied by Optical Spectroscopy and Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Sun, Taoxiang; Meng, Xianghai; Chen, Jing; Xu, Chao

    2017-03-06

    The complexation of U(VI) with octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO, denoted as L) in ionic liquid (IL) C4mimNTf2 was investigated by UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry and isothermal titration calorimetry. Spectro-photometric titration suggests that three successive complexes, UO2Lj(2+) (j = 1-3), formed both in "dry" (water content < 250 ppm) and "wet" (water content ≈ 12 500 ppm) ionic liquid. However, the thermodynamic parameters are distinctly different in the two ILs. In dry IL, the complexation strength between CMPO and U(VI) is much stronger, with stability constants of the respective complexes more than 1 order of magnitude higher than that in wet IL. Energetically, the complexation of U(VI) with CMPO in dry IL is mainly driven by negative enthalpies. In contrast, the complexation in wet IL is overwhelmingly driven by highly positive entropies as a result of the release of a large amount of water molecules from the solvation sphere of U(VI). Moreover, comparisons between the fitted absorption spectra of complexes in wet IL and that of extractive samples from solvent extraction have identified the speciation involved in the extraction of U(VI) by CMPO in ionic liquid. The results from this study not only offer a thermodynamic insight into the complexation behavior of U(VI) with CMPO in IL but also provide valuable information for understanding the extraction behavior in the corresponding solvent extraction system.

  5. uVis Studio: an integrated development environment for visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantazos, Kostas; Kuhail, Mohammad A.; Lauesen, Soren; Xu, Shangjin

    2013-01-01

    A toolkit facilitates the visualization development process. The process can be further enhanced by integrating the toolkits in development environments. This paper describes how the uVis toolkit, a formula-based visualiza- tion toolkit, has been extended with a development environment, called uVis Studio. Instead of programming, developers apply a Drag-Drop-Set-View-Interact approach. Developers bind controls to data, and the Studio gives immediate visual feedback in the Design Panel. This is a novel feature, called What-You-Bind-Is-What- You-Get. The Studio also provides Modes that allow developers to interact and view the visualization from the end-user's perspective without switching workspace, and Auto-Completion; a feature of the Property Grid that provides suggestions not only for the formula language syntax but also for the tables, the table elds and the relationships in the database. We conducted a usability study with six developers to evaluate if the Studio and its features enhance cognition and facilitate the visualization development. The results show that developers appreciated the Drag-Drop-Set- View-Interact approach, the What-You-Bind-Is-What-You-Get, the Auto-Completion and the Modes. Several usability problems were identified, and some suggestions for improvement include: new panels, better presentation of the Modes, and better error messages.

  6. WFC3 UVIS High-resolution Imaging Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliland, R. L.; Rajan, A.

    2011-01-01

    The sharp and stable point spread function of HST and WFC3 allows for the detection of stellar companions at small offsets from target stars. Deep images obtained through six UVIS filters are used to assess this ability to detect faint companions of brighter targets. Analogous capabilities from the ground make use of Adaptive Optics and Speckle imaging. We contrast the capabilities of HST/WFC3 with several existing AO systems for imaging of V 12 stars for which detection of faint companions as close as possible is desired, and to a delta-magnitude of 10. The observations under comparison are motivated by high-resolution imaging applications for the Kepler Mission to constrain the existence of fainter background stars which, if eclipsing binaries, could mimic transits. The HST/WFC3 observations are found to be superior in the comparisons made to Keck, MMT and Palomar AO and WIYN Speckle systems in terms of delta-magnitude limits outside of about 0.3 arcseconds. In a metric of fraction of phase space that can be probed for delta-magnitude to 10 companions out to 2 arcsecs the UVIS imaging out performs all other approaches by a factor > 5.

  7. Effects of Bacillus subtilis on the reduction of U(VI) by nano-Fe0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Sun, Yubing; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-09-01

    The effects of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis, a typical model bacterium) on the reduction of U(VI) by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nano-Fe0) were investigated using batch techniques. The reaction products were analysed using spectroscopic techniques, and a kinetics model was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of U(VI) reduction by nano-Fe0. The presence of B. subtilis enhanced the U(VI) sorption rate at pH 3.5-9.5 but inhibited the reduction rate of U(VI) to U(IV) at pH > 4.5. According to the FTIR and XRD analysis, the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was inhibited due to the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes between the oxygen-containing functional groups of B. subtilis or extracellular polymeric substances with the Fe(II)/Fe(III) generated by nano-Fe0, which blocked electron transport from the Fe0 core to U(VI). Based on the EXAFS analysis, a fitting of U-Fe shell at ∼3.44 Å revealed inner-sphere bidentate complexes between uranyl and the oxide film of nano-Fe0. For the nano-Fe0 + B. subtilis system, the U-Fe shell (at ∼3.44 Å) and the U-C/P shell (at ∼2.90 Å) further indicated the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes. The kinetics model supported that U(VI) reduction was triggered by U(VI) sorption on the oxide shell of nano-Fe0. The XPS and XANES analyses showed that reductive precipitation was the main mechanism of U(VI) removal by nano-Fe0, whereas the sorption process dominated the removal of U(VI) in the presence of B. subtilis, which was further demonstrated by TEM images.

  8. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation / Biobarriers- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Wood

    2007-01-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides represent some of the most challenging remediation problems confronting the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. In situ remediation of these contaminants by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been proposed as a potential cost effective remediation strategy. The primary focus of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the fluxes of electron acceptors, electron donors, and other species can be controlled to maximize the transfer of reductive equivalents to the aqueous and solid phases. The proposed research is unique in the NABIR portfolio in that it focuses on (i) the role of flow and transport in the initiation of biostimulation and the successful sequestration of metals and radionuclides [specifically U(VI)], (ii) the subsequent reductive capacity and stability of the reduced sediments produced by the biostimulation process, and (iii) the potential for altering the growth of biomass in the subsurface by the addition of specific metabolic uncoupling compounds. A scientifically-based understanding of these phenomena are critical to the ability to design successful bioremediation schemes. The laboratory research will employ Shewanella putrefaciens (CN32), a facultative DMRB that can use Fe(III) oxides as a terminal electron acceptor. Sediment-packed columns will be inoculated with this organism, and the reduction of U(VI) by the DMRB will be stimulated by the addition of a carbon and energy source in the presence of Fe(III). Separate column experiments will be conducted to independently examine: (1) the importance of the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by biogenic Fe(II); (2) the influence of the transport process on Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization, with emphasis on methods for controlling the fluxes of aqueous species to maximize uranium reduction; (3) the reductive capacity of biologically-reduced sediments (with respect to re-oxidation by convective fluxes of O2 and NO3-) and

  9. The role of surface oxygenated-species and adsorbed hydrogen in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism and product selectivity on Pd-based catalysts in acid media.

    PubMed

    Rahul, R; Singh, R K; Bera, B; Devivaraprasad, R; Neergat, M

    2015-06-21

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is investigated on bulk PdO-based catalysts (oxides of Pd and Pd3Co) in oxygen-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 to establish the role of surface oxides and adsorbed hydrogen in the activity and product selectivity (H2O/H2O2). The initial voltammetric features suggest that the oxides are inactive toward ORR. The evolution of the ORR voltammograms and potential-dependent H2O2 generation features on the PdO catalyst suggest gradual and parallel in situ reduction of the bulk PdO phase below ∼0.4 V in the hydrogen underpotential deposition (Hupd) region; the reduction of the bulk PdO catalyst is confirmed from the X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. The potential-dependent H2O2 generation features originate due to the presence of surface oxides and adsorbed hydrogen; this is further confirmed using halide ions (Cl(-) and Br(-)) and peroxide as the external impurities.

  10. EUV spectroscopy of the Venus dayglow with UVIS on Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, J.-C.; Hubert, B.; Gustin, J.; Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze EUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus on 24 June 1999, a period of high solar activity level. Emissions from OI, OII, NI, CI and CII and CO have been identified and their disc average intensity has been determined. They are generally somewhat brighter than those determined from the observations made with the HUT spectrograph at a lower activity level, We present the brightness distribution along the foot track of the UVIS slit of the OII 83.4 nm, OI 98.9 nm, Lyman-ß + OI 102.5 nm and NI 120.0 nm multiplets, and the CO C-X and B-X Hopfield-Birge bands. We make a detailed comparison of the intensities of the 834 nm, 989 nm, 120.0 nm multiplets and CO B-X band measured along the slit foot track on the disc with those predicted by an airglow model previously used to analyze Venus and Mars ultraviolet spectra. This model includes the treatment of multiple scattering for the optically thick OI, OII and NI multiplets. It is found that the observed intensity of the OII emission at 83.4 nm is higher than predicted by the model. An increase of the O + ion density relative to the densities usually measured by Pioneer Venus brings the observations and the modeled values into better agreement. The calculated intensity variation of the CO B-X emission along the track of the UVIS slit is in fair agreement with the observations. The intensity of the OI 98.9 nm emission is well predicted by the model if resonance scattering of solar radiation by O atoms is included as a source. The calculated brightness of the NI 120 nm multiplet is larger than observed by a factor of ˜2-3 if photons from all sources encounter multiple scattering. The discrepancy reduces to 30-80% if the photon electron impact and photodissociation of N 2 sources of N( 4S) atoms are considered as optically thin. Overall, we find that the O, N 2 and CO densities from the empirical VTS3 model provide satisfactory

  11. Cassini UVIS highest resolution occultations of Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, Miodrag; Esposito, L. W.; Colwell, J.

    2013-10-01

    Since the beginning of the Cassini mission in 2004 the UVIS instrument has recorded >100 stellar occultations of Saturn's rings. Despite achieved radial resolutions of <1m true resolution is limited by the orbital motion of particles. These can move by almost 20m during a 1ms integration period, effectively smearing the ring profile. In order to achieve superior true resolution we designed a special type of observations, dubbed tracking occultations, where the spacecraft velocity projected onto the rings cancels the orbital motion of ring particles. The ring particles are thus nearly motionless in the field of view of UVIS instrument and essentially tracked. So far Cassini UVIS has recorded two "tracking" occultations of mid-A ring, one of the inner A ring, and one of the so called A ring ramp (a transition region between Cassini division and A ring). The occultations have at least 2m true resolution limited only by diffraction. The two mid-A ring occultations for the first time directly resolve the self-gravity (SG) Toomre like wakes. The SG wakes show as a train of opaque regions (tau>1.5) and nearly transparent gaps (tau<0.05). The observed opaque wakes can be as large as 200m, while transparent gaps are somewhat shorter (L<100m). The opaque and transparent regions are interspersed with material in an intermittent state (0.05

  12. Comparing approaches for simulating the reactive transport of U(VI) in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, G.P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The reactive transport of U(VI) in a well-characterized shallow alluvial aquifer at a former U(VI) mill located near Naturita, CO, was predicted for comparative purposes using a surface complexation model (SCM) and a constant K d approach to simulate U(VI) adsorption. The ground water at the site had U(VI) concentrations that ranged from 0.01 to 20 ??M, alkalinities that ranged from 2.5 to 18 meq/L, and a nearly constant pH of 7.1. The SCM used to simulate U(VI) adsorption was previously determined independently using laboratory batch adsorption experiments. Simulations obtained using the SCM approach were compared with simulations that used a constant K d approach to simulate adsorption using previously determined site-specific K d values. In both cases, the ground water flow and transport models used a conceptual model that was previously calibrated to a chloride plume present at the site. Simulations with the SCM approach demonstrated that the retardation factor varied temporally and spatially because of the differential transport of alkalinity and dissolved U(VI) and the nonlinearity of the U(VI) adsorption. The SCM model also simulated a prolonged slow decline in U(VI) concentration, which was not simulated using a constant K d model. Simulations using the SCM approach and the constant K d approach were similar after 20 years of transport but diverged significantly after 60 years. The simulations demonstrate the need for site-specific geochemical information on U(VI) adsorption to produce credible simulations of future transport. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  13. HST WFC3/UVIS: charge transfer efficiency monitoring and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia M.; Sosey, Megan L.; Anderson, Jay; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; Bajaj, Varun; Khandrika, Harish G.; Martlin, Catherine; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Sabbi, Elena; WFC3 Team

    2016-01-01

    The harsh low-earth orbit environment is known to damage CCD devices and the HST WFC3/UVIS camera is no exception. One consequence of the radiation damage is charge-transfer efficiency (CTE) loss over time. We summarize the level of the CTE losses, the effect on science data, and the pre- and post-observation mitigation options available. Among them is the pixel-based CTE correction, which has been incorporated into the HST automatic data processing pipeline. The pipeline now provides both standard and CTE-corrected data products; observers with older data can re-retrieve their images via the the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to obtain the new products.

  14. Reaction of U(VI) with titanium-substituted magnetite: influence of Ti on U(IV) speciation.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Pearce, Carolyn I; Rosso, Kevin M; Kemner, Kenneth M; Boyanov, Maxim I

    2013-05-07

    Reduction of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) to less soluble tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) through enzymatic or abiotic redox reactions has the potential to alter U mobility in subsurface environments. As a ubiquitous natural mineral, magnetite (Fe3O4) is of interest because of its ability to act as a rechargeable reductant for U(VI). Natural magnetites are often impure with titanium, and structural Fe(3+) replacement by Ti(IV) yields a proportional increase in the relative Fe(2+) content in the metal sublattice to maintain bulk charge neutrality. In the absence of oxidation, the Ti content sets the initial bulk Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ratio (R). Here, we demonstrate that Ti-doped magnetites (Fe3 - xTixO4) reduce U(VI) to U(IV). The U(VI)-Fe(2+) redox reactivity was found to be controlled directly by R but was otherwise independent of Ti content (xTi). However, in contrast to previous studies with pure magnetite where U(VI) was reduced to nanocrystalline uraninite (UO2), the presence of structural Ti (xTi = 0.25-0.53) results in the formation of U(IV) species that lack the bidentate U-O2-U bridges of uraninite. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic analysis indicated that the titanomagnetite-bound U(IV) phase has a novel U(IV)-Ti binding geometry different from the coordination of U(IV) in the mineral brannerite (U(IV)Ti2O6). The observed U(IV)-Ti coordination at a distance of 3.43 Å suggests a binuclear corner-sharing adsorption/incorporation U(IV) complex with the solid phase. Furthermore, we explored the effect of oxidation (decreasing R) and solids-to-solution ratio on the reduced U(IV) phase. The formation of the non-uraninite U(IV)-Ti phase appears to be controlled by availability of surface Ti sites rather than R. Our work highlights a previously unrecognized role of Ti in the environmental chemistry of U(IV) and suggests that further work to characterize the long-term stability of U(IV) phases formed in the presence of Ti is warranted.

  15. The effect of organic and inorganic aqueous uranium speciation on U(VI) bioavailability to an aquatic invertebrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C.; Croteau, M. N.; Campbell, K. M.; Cain, D.; Aiken, G.

    2015-12-01

    Growing world-wide demand for uranium (U) as an energy source has raised concerns of the human and ecological risks of U extraction and processing in the United States. Because of limited information on the relationship between U speciation and bioavailability, particularly in aquatic animals, we are characterizing U uptake by a model freshwater invertebrate (the snail Lymnaea stagnalis). This species grazes on biofilms and is thus key in the trophic transfer of contaminants through aquatic food webs. We determined the bioavailability of dissolved U(VI) over a range of water hardness, pH (6 to 8), and the presence of dissolved natural organic matter (NOM) as a competing ligand, to test the effect of aqueous speciation on uptake. Bioavailability was assessed using U uptake rate constants (kuw) derived from a kinetic bioaccumulation model. Dissolved U (1 to 1000 nM) was bioavailable over the range of geochemical conditions tested with kuw (L/g/d) decreasing with increasing dissolved Ca and with increasing pH. For example, kuw decreased from 1.6 to 0.3 as dissolved Ca was increased from 0.04 to 1.5 mM, suggesting competition between bioavailable U(VI) species and strong ternary calcium uranyl carbonato complexes. At pH 7.5 in synthetic moderately hard freshwater, kuw decreased from 0.22 in the absence of NOM to 0.07 in the presence of a hydrophobic acid NOM isolate of high aromaticity (SUVA = 5) consistent with strong aqueous complexation of U(VI) by the NOM. The co-variance of U uptake and aqueous U species distribution is being analyzed to determine which U species are bioavailable. U speciation in systems with NOM is calculated using conditional U-NOM binding constants derived by equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange methodology. The bioavailability of dietborne U is being tested since dietary metal uptake prevails for many aquatic species. These experiments include addition of ferrihydrite with U sorbed, both in the presence and absence of NOM, and mixed with diet.

  16. Solution thermodynamics and structures of biscatecholamide complexes of Fe(III) and U(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Gohdes, J.W.; Reilly, S.D.; Pecha, A.W.; Neu, M.P.

    1996-12-31

    We have studied the solution and solid-state complexes of a bis-catecholamide ligand, 2-LICAMS, with Fe(III) and U(VI). The first protonation constant was found to be pK{sub al} = 14.2(3) using {sup 1}H NMR titrations. Subsequent protonation constants were determined by potentiometric titration in 0.1 M TMAOTf at 25{degrees}C to be pK{sub a2} = 11.2(1), pK{sub 13} =6.5(1), pK{sub a4}= 5.9(1). Ligand-metal formation constants, {Beta}{sub mlh}, were found to be log {beta}{sub 110} = 31.4(2), log {beta}{sub 111} = 31.7(2), log {beta}{sub 112} = 34.9(2), and log {beta}11.1 = 18.0(1) for uranium(VI). To discriminate between monomeric or dimeric species models which both fit the potentiometric titration data, we isolated the hydroxide species and determined its single-crystal X-ray structure and EXAFS. The structure consists of a dimeric, bis-hydroxide bridged iron core which is spanned by two ligands. This study of solution equilibria indicates a higher stability for iron complexes of 2-LICAMS relative to uranyl complexes.

  17. Interaction of U(VI) with Schizophyllum commune studied by microscopic and spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Günther, Alix; Raff, Johannes; Merroun, Mohamed Larbi; Rossberg, André; Kothe, Erika; Bernhard, Gert

    2014-08-01

    Biosorption of actinides like uranium by fungal cells can play an important role in the mobilization or immobilization of these elements in nature. Sorption experiments of U(VI) with Schizophyllum commune at different initial uranium concentrations and varying metal speciation showed high uranium sorption capacities in the pH range of 4–7. A combination of high angle annular dark-field and scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis (HAADF-STEM) showed that living mycelium cells accumulate uranium at the cell wall and intracellular. For the first time the fluorescence properties of uranium accumulates were investigated by means of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) beside the determination of corresponding structural parameters using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). While the oxidation state of uranium remained unchanged during sorption, uranium speciation changed significantly. Extra and intracellular phosphate groups are mainly responsible for uranium binding. TRLFS spectra clearly show differences between the emission properties of dissolved species in the initial mineral medium and of uranium species on fungi. The latter were proved to be organic and inorganic uranyl phosphates formed depending on the uranyl initial concentration and in some cases on pH.

  18. Spectrophotometric Investigation of U(VI) Chloride Complexation in the NaCl/NaClO{sub 4} System

    SciTech Connect

    Paviet-Hartmann, P.; Lin, M.R.; Runde, W.H.

    1998-11-30

    Post closure radioactive release scenarios from geologic salt formation, such as the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant)(USA) include hydrologic transport of radionuclides through a chloride saturated aquifer. Consequently, the understanding of actinide solution chemistry in brines is essential for modeling requiring accurate knowledge of the interaction between AnO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and chloride ions. Complexation constants of two U(VI) chloride species, UO{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}{sup 0}, have been intensively studied for about 40 years using different methods. However, large uncertainties reflect the general difficulty in determining accurate stability constants of weak complexes. In order to model the behavior of U(VI) in brines, we studied the formation of its chloride complexes by UV-Vis spectroscopy as a function of the NaCl concentration at 25 C. The experiments were performed at constant ionic strength by varying the concentration ratio of NaCl and NaClO{sub 4}. Deconvolution resulted in single component absorption spectra for UO{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}{sup 0}. The apparent stability constants of UO{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}{sup 0} are at different ionic strengths and the experimental data are used to parameterize using the SIT approach.

  19. Spectrophotometric investigation of U(VI) chloride complexation in the NaCl/NaClO{sub 4} system

    SciTech Connect

    Paviet-Hartmann, P.; Lin, M.R.; Runde, W.H.

    1999-02-01

    The option of a nuclear waste disposal in deep salt formations such as Gorleben in Germany, and the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) in southeastern New Mexico, US has generated, over the last ten years, interests in thermodynamic data of radioactive trace elements in concentrated electrolyte solutions. Furthermore, post closure radioactive release scenarios from geologic salt formation, such as the WIPP include hydrologic transport of radionuclides through a chloride saturated aquifer. Consequently, the understanding of actinide solution chemistry in brines is essential for modeling requiring accurate knowledge of the interaction between AnO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and chloride ions. The goal is to develop models capable of predicting their behavior in natural multicomponent brines of high concentration. Complexation constants of two U(VI) chloride species, UO{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}{sup 0}, have been intensively studied for about 40 years using different methods. However, large uncertainties reflect the general difficulty in determining accurate stability constants of weak complexes. In order to model the behavior of U(VI) in brines, the authors studied the formation of its chloride complexes by UV-Vis spectroscopy as a function of the NaCl concentration at 25 C.

  20. Aqueous U(VI) interaction with magnetite nanoparticles in a mixed flow reactor system: HR-XANES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidchenko, I.; Heberling, F.; Kvashnina, KO; Finck, N.; Schild, D.; Bohnert, E.; Schäfer, T.; Rothe, J.; Geckeis, H.; Vitova, T.

    2016-05-01

    The redox variations and changes in local atomic environment of uranium (U) interacted with the magnetite nanoparticles were studied in a proof of principle experiment by the U L3 and M4 edges high energy resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure (HR-XANES) technique. We designed and applied a mixed flow reactor (MFR) set-up to maintain dynamic flow conditions during U-magnetite interactions. Formation of hydrolyzed, bi- and poly-nuclear U species were excluded by slow continuous injection of U(VI) (10-6 M) and pH control integrated in the MFR set-up. The applied U HR-XANES technique is more sensitive to minor changes in the U redox states and bonding compared to the conventional XANES method. Major U(VI) contribution in uranyl type of bonding is found in the magnetite nanoparticles after three days operation time of the MFR. Indications for shortening of the U-Oaxial bond length for the magnetite compared to the maghemite system are present too.

  1. Modeling of Erythemal Dose Rate (UVI) and its Relationship to Column Ozone and Cloud Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herceg, D.; Minschwaner, K.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between column ozone, cloud reflectivity, and surface ultraviolet has become an important issue in the last 25 years. We will show correlations between solar zenith angle, erythemal dose rate (UVI), cloud reflection, and column ozone, using ground based observation made at Socorro, New Mexico from 1997 to 2004. We will also use data retrieved from the Earth Probe TOMS satellite instrument which overpassed the observing site during the same time period. Through this correlation, we can take accurate ozone, and reflectivity data from satellites such as EP-TOMS and NIMBUS 7 to model past UVI trends dating back 25 years. Finally, we may then examine the trends in UVI, column ozone, and cloud reflectivity to understand the relationship of column ozone and cloud reflectivity to UVI.

  2. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-12-31

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination.

  4. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  5. Discovery of B ring propellers in Cassini UVIS and ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    One of the successes of the planetary ring theory has been the theoretical prediction of gravitational signatures of bodies embedded in the rings, and their subsequent detection in Cassini data. Bodies within the rings perturb the nearby ring material, and the orbital shear forms a two-armed structure -- dubbed a ``propeller'' -- which is centered at the embedded body. Although direct evidence of the present body or moonlet is still lacking, the observations of their propeller signatures has proved as an indispensable method to extend our knowledge about ring structure and dynamics. So far, propellers have been successfully detected within Saturn's A ring in two populations: a group of small and numerous propellers interior to the Encke gap forming belts, and by far less numerous but larger propellers exterior to Pan's orbit. Although there have been hints of propellers present within the B ring, or even C ring, their detection is less certain (e.g. neither has a single propeller been seen twice, nor has the ubiquitous two armed structure been observed). In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. A single object is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe the feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at a=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B ring. The gap moves at Kepler speed appropriate for its radial location. Radial offsets of the gap locations in UVIS

  6. Investigation of interaction between U(VI) and carbonaceous nanofibers by batch experiments and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Changlun; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-12-15

    Carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) were synthesized using tellurium nanowires as a template and using glucose as carbon source by the hydrothermal carbonization method. The sorption capacity and mechanism of U(VI) on CNFs were investigated by a combination of batch sorption experiments, the double layer model (DLM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sorption edges were modeled well by considering the following surface complexes: SOUO2(+), SOUO2OH, SOUO2(OH)2(-) and SOUO2(OH)3(2-) on the strong site as well as XOUO2OH and XOUO2(+) on the weak one (S and X represent surface). The sorption isotherms could be well fitted by the DLM parameters. The difference between type A (SOUO2OH and XOUO2OH) and type B (SOUO2(+) and XOUO2(+)) was observed in XPS because the former species are of low binding energy while the latter are of high one. Desorption and recycle experiments showed that CNFs had good reusability and stability in the present of common sodium salts within five rounds. When co-existing with montmorillonite, CNFs could extract the sorbed uranium onto their surface by a pseudo-second order kinetic process. As a new sort of environmental functional nanomaterials, CNFs should be paid more attention in the area of separation and wastewater remediation.

  7. Characterization of U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments with slow-degrading electron donor source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Watson, D. B.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Earles, J.; Phillips, J.; Kelly, S. D.; Boyanov, M.; Kemner, K. M.; Schadt, C.; Criddle, C. S.; Jardine, P. M.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    In order to select sustainable, high efficiency and cost effective electron donor source, oleate and emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) were tested uranium (VI) reduction in comparison with ethanol in microcosms using uranium contaminated sediments and groundwater from the US DOE Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site. The effect of initial sulfate concentration on U(VI) reduction was also tested. Both oleate and EVO were effective electron donor sources for U(VI) reduction. Accumulation of acetate as a major product and the removal of aqueous U(VI) were observed and were associated with sulfate reduction. Both oleate and EVO supported U(VI) reduction but at slower rates with a comparable but slightly lower extent of reduction than ethanol. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The extent of U(VI) reduction in solid phase was negatively influenced by aqueous calcium concentration. The majority of electrons of the three substrates were consumed by sulfate reduction, Fe(III) reduction, and methanogenesis. Initial U(VI) concentration in the aqueous phase increased with increased sulfate concentration (1 versus 5 mM), likely due to U(VI) desorption from the solid phase. At the higher initial sulfate concentration more U(VI) was reduced and fewer electrons were used in methanogenesis. Analysis of bacterial and archeal populations using 16S rRNA gene libraries showed a significant increase in Deltaproteobacteria after biostimulation. The microbial community structures developed with oleate and EVO were significantly distinct from those developed with ethanol. Bacteria similar to Desulforegula spp. was predominant for oleate and EVO degradation but were not observed in ethanol-amended microcosms. Known U(VI)-reducing bacteria in the microcosms amended with the three electron donor sources included iron(III) reducing Geobacter spp. but in lower abundances than sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio spp. The

  8. Monitoring the WFC3/UVIS Relative Gain with Internal Flatfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, J.; Baggett, S.

    2017-03-01

    The WFC3/UVIS gain stability has been monitored twice yearly. This project provides a new examination of gain stability, making use of the existing internal flatfield observations taken every three days (for the Bowtie monitor) for a regular look at relative gain stability. Amplifiers are examined for consistency both in comparison to each other and over time, by normalizing the B, C, and D amplifiers to A, and then plotting statistics for each of the three normalized amplifiers with time. We find minimal trends in these statistics, with a 0.02 - 0.2% change in mean amplifier ratio over 7.5 years. The trends in the amplifiers are well-behaved with the exception of the B/A ratio, which shows increased scatter in mean, median, and standard deviation. The cause of the scatter remains unclear though we find it is not dependent upon detector defects, filter features, or shutter effects, and is only observable after pixel flagging (both from the data quality arrays and outlier values) has been applied.

  9. Green approach for ultratrace determination of divalent metal ions and arsenic species using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and mercapto-modified graphene oxide nanosheets as a novel adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Sitko, Rafal; Janik, Paulina; Zawisza, Beata; Talik, Ewa; Margui, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi

    2015-03-17

    A new method based on dispersive microsolid phase extraction (DMSPE) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) is proposed for multielemental ultratrace determination of heavy metal ions and arsenic species. In the developed methodology, the crucial issue is a novel adsorbent synthesized by grafting 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on a graphene oxide (GO) surface. Mercapto-modified graphene oxide (GO-SH) can be applied in quantitative adsorption of cobalt, nickel, copper, cadmium, and lead ions. Moreover, GO-SH demonstrates selectivity toward arsenite in the presence of arsenate. Due to such features of GO-SH nanosheets as wrinkled structure and excellent dispersibility in water, GO-SH seems to be ideal for fast and simple preconcentration and determination of heavy metal ions using methodology based on DMSPE and TXRF measurement. The suspension of GO-SH was injected into an analyzed water sample; after filtration, the GO-SH nanosheets with adsorbed metal ions were redispersed in a small volume of internal standard solution and deposited onto a quartz reflector. The high enrichment factor of 150 allows obtaining detection limits of 0.11, 0.078, 0.079, 0.064, 0.054, and 0.083 ng mL(-1) for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), As(III), Cd(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Such low detection limits can be obtained using a benchtop TXRF system without cooling media and gas consumption. The method is suitable for the analysis of water, including high salinity samples difficult to analyze using other spectroscopy techniques. Moreover, GO-SH can be applied to the arsenic speciation due to its selectivity toward arsenite.

  10. Resupply Mechanism to a Contaminated Aquifer: A Laboratory Study of U(VI) Desorption from Capillary Fringe Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Moore, Dean A.; Rod, Kenton A.

    2010-09-15

    Contaminated capillary fringe sediments are believed to function as long term source of U(VI) to Hanford’s 300 Area groundwater uranium plume that discharges to the Columbia River. The deep vadose zone at this site experiences seasonal water table elevation and water compositional changes in response to Columbia River stage. Batch and column desorption experiments of U(VI) were performed on two mildly contaminated sediments from this system that vary in hydrologic position to ascertain their U(VI) release behavior and factors controlling it. Solid phase characterization of the sediments was performed to identify mineralogic and chemical factors controlling U(VI) desorption. The desorption behavior of U(VI) was different from the two sediments in spite of similar chemical and textural characteristics, and non-carbonate mineralogy. Adsorption strength and sorbed U(VI) lability was higher in the near-river sediment 11D. Inland sediment 39B displayed low sorbed U(VI) lability (~ 10%) and measurable solid-phase carbonate content. Kinetic desorption was observed that was attributed to regeneration of labile U(VI) in 11D, and carbonate mineral dissolution in 39B. The desorption reaction was best described as an equilibrium surface complexation reaction. The noted differences in desorption behavior appear to result from U(VI) contamination and hydrologic history, as well as sediment carbonate content. Insights are provided on the dynamic adsorption/desorption behavior of contaminants in linked groundwater-river systems.

  11. Bicarbonate impact on U(VI) bioreduction in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Chris; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al., 2003; Williams et al., 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al., 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer sediments desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ∼3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction in the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in

  12. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  13. Macroscopic and Microscopic Investigation of U(VI) and Eu(III) Adsorption on Carbonaceous Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yubing; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Xiangxue; Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Yu, Shu-Hong; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-04-19

    The adsorption mechanism of U(VI) and Eu(III) on carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated using batch, IR, XPS, XANES, and EXAFS techniques. The pH-dependent adsorption indicated that the adsorption of U(VI) on the CNFs was significantly higher than the adsorption of Eu(III) at pH < 7.0. The maximum adsorption capacity of the CNFs calculated from the Langmuir model at pH 4.5 and 298 K for U(VI) and Eu(III) were 125 and 91 mg/g, respectively. The CNFs displayed good recyclability and recoverability by regeneration experiments. Based on XPS and XANES analyses, the enrichment of U(VI) and Eu(III) was attributed to the abundant adsorption sites (e.g., -OH and -COOH groups) of the CNFs. IR analysis further demonstrated that -COOH groups were more responsible for U(VI) adsorption. In addition, the remarkable reducing agents of the R-CH2OH groups were responsible for the highly efficient adsorption of U(VI) on the CNFs. The adsorption mechanism of U(VI) on the CNFs at pH 4.5 was shifted from inner- to outer-sphere surface complexation with increasing initial concentration, whereas the surface (co)precipitate (i.e., schoepite) was observed at pH 7.0 by EXAFS spectra. The findings presented herein play an important role in the removal of radionuclides on inexpensive and available carbon-based nanoparticles in environmental cleanup applications.

  14. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  15. Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2013-09-15

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 μmol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 μmol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 μmol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 μmol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 μmol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

  16. Using Cassini UVIS Data to Constrain Enceladus' Libration State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, Terry A.; Helfenstein, P.; Hansen, C.

    2010-01-01

    Given the non-spherical shape of Enceladus, the satellite may experience gravitational torques that will cause it to physically librate as it orbits Saturn. Physical libration would produce a diurnal oscillation in the longitude of Enceladus' tidal bulge, which could have a profound effect on the diurnal stresses experienced by the surface of the satellite. Although Cassini ISS has placed an observational upper limit on Enceladus' libration amplitude, stall amplitude librations may have geologically significant consequences. For example, a physical libration will affect heat production along the tiger stripes as produced by tidal shear heating and a previous study has explored possible libration states that provided better matches to Cassini CIRS observations of heat along the tiger stripes. Cassini UVIS stellar occultations provided measurements of the column density of the Enceladus plume at two different points in Enceladus' orbit and find comparable column density values. This column density may be a reflection of the amount of the tiger stripe rifts in tension and able to vent volatiles and a physical libration will also affect the fraction of tiger stripe in tension at different points in the orbit. We have modeled the expected fraction of tiger stripes in tension under different libration conditions. Without libration the amount of tiger stripe rifts in tension at both paints in the orbit would not be comparable and therefore may not allow comparable amounts of volatiles to escape. However, we identify libration conditions that do allow comparable amounts of the tiger stripes to be in tension at each point in the orbit, which might lead to comparable column densities. The librations identified coincide with possible librations states identified in the earlier study, which used Cassini CIRS observations.

  17. Classification of F Ring Features Observed Using Cassini UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Esposito, L. W.; Albers, N.

    2009-09-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed 39 statistically significant F ring features in 103 occultations since July 2004. This work triples the number of features reported by Esposito et al. (2008). As the number of statistically significant features has grown, we are now able to classify them for the purposes of cataloging. We define three categories: moonlet, core, and icicle, which categorize the shapes of features seen to date in the occultation profiles of the F ring. With complete signal attenuation for a radial distance of 600 m, the feature observed in the Alp Leo Rev 9 occultation is the only moonlet observed. A myriad of icicles have been observed, which partially block stellar signal for 30 m to 1 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Finally, the large variety of core region shapes displays how even the general shape of the F ring is ever-changing due to continuous perturbations from internal and external objects. The core region of the F ring usually has a smooth U-shape to it, but particle-size segregation and narrow channeling of material lead to the core region taking the shape of Ws and Vs. These three categories show that F ring behavior is highly variable with time and space and that the locations of certain features correlate to proximity to Prometheus. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals possible states and possible causes of the observed structure. This research was supported by the Cassini Project.

  18. A representative retinoid X receptor antagonist UVI3003 induced teratogenesis in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liang; Xu, Ting; Li, Daoji; Zhou, Junliang

    2015-03-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) interfering activity has been detected in different water resources. To study RXR disruptor-induced toxicological effects on vertebrates, embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to a representative RXR antagonist UVI3003. Results showed that the teratogenic index (LC50 /EC50 ) of UVI3003 was as high as 5.4. UVI3003 induced multiple malformations of embryos, including deformed fins, reduced brains, small jaws, bent tails and edema in hearts, the degree of which became more severe with increasing exposure concentration. Although no significant difference was observed in the hatching rates between the exposure group and control, the whole body length was significantly reduced by 6.5% and 8.9% when exposed to 200 and 300 µg l(-1) of UVI3003, respectively. The heart rate also significantly decreased by 8.8-50.2% during exposure. Further experiments revealed that the pharyngula stage was the most sensitive development phase in terms of embryo response to UVI3003. The results demonstrated severe teratogenicity of RXR antagonist in zebrafish embryos and provided important data for ecotoxicological evaluation of RXR antagonists.

  19. U(VI) Sequestration in Hydroxyapatite Produced by Microbial Glycerol 3-Phosphate Metabolism▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for removal of U(VI) from solution via precipitation of U(VI)-bearing calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) minerals coupled to microbial hydrolysis of glycerol phosphate compounds. We evaluated this process in circumneutral-pH groundwater from Area 2 of the U.S. Department of Energy Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Area 2 groundwater contains high concentrations of dissolved calcium (ca. 4 mM), and thus, release of phosphate during glycerol phosphate metabolism has the potential to create conditions favorable for U(VI) sequestration in Ca-P minerals. Microbial enumeration and isolation studies verified the presence of aerobic and nitrate-reducing glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P)-metabolizing microorganisms in Area 2 sediments. Coprecipitation of U(VI) with Ca-P minerals coupled to microbial G3P hydrolysis was demonstrated in artificial groundwater under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions. Transmission electron microscopy analysis and mineral-washing experiments demonstrated that U(VI) was incorporated into the structure of the insoluble Ca-P mineral hydroxyapatite [Ca5(PO4)3OH]. Our results support the idea that U(VI) can be effectively removed from solution in contaminated aquifers through stimulation of microbial organophosphate metabolism. PMID:19633115

  20. Bioreduction of U(VI) and stability of immobilized uranium under suboxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Ding, De-xin; Li, Shi-mi; Tan, Xiang; Li, Guang-yue; Wang, Yong-dong; Xu, Fei

    2016-04-01

    In order to study the bioreduction of U(VI) and stability of immobilized uranium under suboxic conditions, microcosm were amended with ethanol, lactate and glucose, and incubated under suboxic conditions. During the incubation, total dissolved U in amended microcosms decreased from 0.95 mg/L to 0.03 mg/L. Pyrosequencing results showed that, the proportion of anaerobic microorganisms capable of reducing U(VI) under suboxic conditions was small compared with that under anoxic conditions; the proportion of aerobic and facultative anaerobic microorganisms capable of consuming the dissolved oxygen was large; and some of the facultative anaerobic microorganisms could reduce U(VI). These results indicated that different microbial communities were responsible for the bioreduction of U(VI) under suboxic and anoxic conditions. After the electron donors were exhausted, total dissolved U in the amended microcosms remained unchanged, while the U(VI)/U(IV) ratio in the solid phase of sediments increased obviously. This implied that the performance of bioreduction of the U(VI) can be maintained under suboxic condition.

  1. Sorption and desorption of perchlorate and U(VI) by strong-base anion-exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Gu, Baohua; Ku, Yee-Kyoung; Brown, Gilbert M

    2005-02-01

    This study investigated the sorption affinity and capacity of six strong-base anion-exchange (SBA) resins for both uranium [U(VI)] and perchlorate (ClO4-) in simulated groundwater containing varying concentrations of sulfate (SO4(2-)). Additionally, desorption of U(VI) from spent resins was studied to separate U(VI) from resins with sorbed ClO4- for waste segregation and minimization. Results indicate that all SBA resins investigated in this study strongly sorb U(VI). The gel-type polyacrylic resin (Purolite A850) showed the highest sorption affinity and capacityfor U(VI) butwasthe least effective in sorbing ClO4-. The presence of SO4(2-) had little impact on the sorption of U(VI) but significantly affected the sorption of ClO4-, particularly on monofunctional SBA resins. A dilute acid wash was found to be effective in desorbing U(VI) but ineffective in desorbing ClO4- from bifunctional resins (Purolite A530E and WBR109). A single wash removed approximately 75% of sorbed U(VI) but only approximately 0.1% of sorbed ClO4- from the bifunctional resins. On the other hand, only 21.4% of sorbed U(VI) but approximately 34% of sorbed ClO4- was desorbed from the Purolite A850 resin. This study concludes that bifunctional resins could be used effectively to treatwater contaminated with ClO4- and traces of U(VI), and dilute acid washes could minimize hazardous wastes by separating sorbed U(VI) from ClO4- prior to the regeneration of the spent resin loaded with ClO4-.

  2. Pilot-scale in situ bioremedation of uranium in a highly contaminated aquifer. 2. Reduction of u(VI) and geochemical control of u(VI) bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Min; Carley, Jack; Gentry, Terry; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A; Fienen, Michael; Mehlhorn, Tonia; Yan, Hui; Caroll, Sue; Pace, Molly N; Nyman, Jennifer; Luo, Jian; Gentile, Margaret E; Fields, Matthew W; Hickey, Robert F; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David; Cirpka, Olaf A; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig S

    2006-06-15

    In situ microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to sparingly soluble U(IV) was evaluated at the site of the former S-3 Ponds in Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center, Oak Ridge, TN. After establishing conditions favorable for bioremediation (Wu, et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 3988-3995), intermittent additions of ethanol were initiated within the conditioned inner loop of a nested well recirculation system. These additions initially stimulated denitrification of matrix-entrapped nitrate, but after 2 months, aqueous U levels fell from 5 to approximately 1 microM and sulfate reduction ensued. Continued additions sustained U(VI) reduction over 13 months. X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy (XANES) confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV) within the inner loop wells, with up to 51%, 35%, and 28% solid-phase U(IV) in sediment samples from the injection well, a monitoring well, and the extraction well, respectively. Microbial analyses confirmed the presence of denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and iron-reducing bacteria in groundwater and sediments. System pH was generally maintained at less than 6.2 with low bicarbonate level (0.75-1.5 mM) and residual sulfate to suppress methanogenesis and minimize uranium mobilization. The bioavailability of sorbed U(VI) was manipulated by addition of low-level carbonate (< 5 mM) followed by ethanol (1-1.5 mM). Addition of low levels of carbonate increased the concentration of aqueous U, indicating an increased rate of U desorption due to formation of uranyl carbonate complexes. Upon ethanol addition, aqueous U(VI) levels fell, indicating that the rate of microbial reduction exceeded the rate of desorption. Sulfate levels simultaneously decreased, with a corresponding increase in sulfide. When ethanol addition ended but carbonate addition continued, soluble U levels increased, indicating faster desorption than reduction. When bicarbonate addition stopped

  3. Remediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Philips , Elizabeth J.P.; Landa, Edward R.; Lovely, Derek R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for concentrating uranium from contaminated soils in which the uranium is first extracted with bicarbonate and then the extracted uranium is precipitated with U(VI)-reducing microorganisms was evaluated for a variety of uranuum-contaminated soils. Bicarbonate (100 mM) extracted 20–94% of the uranium that was extracted with nitric acid. The U(VI)-reducing microorganism,Desulfovibrio desulfuricans reduced the U(VI) to U(IV) in the bicarbonate extracts. In some instances unidentified dissolved extracted components, presumably organics, gave the extract a yellow color and inhibited U(VI) reduction and/or the precipitation of U(IV). Removal of the dissolved yellow material with the addition of hydrogen peroxide alleviated this inhibition. These results demonstrate that bicarbonate extraction of uranium from soil followed by microbial U(VI) reduction might be an effective mechanism for concentrating uranium from some contaminated soils.

  4. Efficient sorption and reduction of U(VI) on zero-valent iron-polyaniline-graphene aerogel ternary composite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Feng, Shaojie; Zhao, Donglin; Chen, Shaohua; Li, Feifei; Chen, Changlun

    2017-03-15

    In this work, zero-valent iron-polyaniline-graphene aerogel composite (Fe-PANI-GA) was prepared and applied in the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions by batch sorption experiments. The experimental results showed that the Fe-PANI-GA composite had an excellent removal capacity for the removal of U(VI) in acidic solutions. The results also showed that the maximum removal capacity of the Fe-PANI-GA toward U(VI) was 350.47mg/g at pH 5.5. The sorption kinetics data were well-described by pseudo-second-order. The sorption isotherms of U(VI) fitted well with Langmuir isotherm and exhibited better removal efficiency with the increase of temperature. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔS, ΔH) indicated that the sorption of U(VI) on the Fe-PANI-GA was an endothermic and spontaneous process. Moreover, removal mechanisms were studied based on the results of XRD, FTIR and XPS. Both U(VI) sorption and partially reductive precipitation of U(VI) to U(IV) contributed to the removal of U(VI) on Fe-PANI-GA. Therefore, Fe-PANI-GA was an economic and effective material for the removal of uranium from nuclear waste in practical application.

  5. U(VI) Sorption and Reduction Kinetics on the Magnetite (111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, David M.; Chatman, Shawn M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2012-04-03

    Sorption of contaminants onto mineral surfaces is an important process that can restrict their transport in the environment. In the current study, uranium (U) uptake on magnetite (111) was measured as a function of time and solution composition (pH, [CO3]T, [Ca]) under continuous batch-flow conditions. We observed, in real-time and in situ, adsorption and reduction of U(VI) and subsequent growth of UO2 nanoprecipitates using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and newly developed batch-flow U LIII-edge grazing-incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge structure (GI-XANES) spectroscopy. U(VI) reduction occurred with and without CO3 present, and coincided with nucleation and growth of UO2 particles. When Ca and CO3 were both present no U(VI) reduction occurred and the U surface loading was lower. In situ batch-flow AFM data indicated that UO2 particles achieved a maximum height of 4–5 nm after about 8 h of exposure, however, aggregates continued to grow laterally after 8 h reaching up to about 300 nm in diameter. The combination of techniques indicated that U uptake is divided into three-stages; (1) initial adsorption of U(VI), (2) reduction of U(VI) to UO2 nanoprecipitates at surface-specific sites after 2–3 h of exposure, and (3) completion of U(VI) reduction after ~6–8 h. U(VI) reduction also corresponded to detectable increases in Fe released to solution and surface topography changes. Redox reactions are proposed that explicitly couple the reduction of U(VI) to enhanced release of Fe(II) from magnetite. Although counterintuitive, the proposed reaction stoichiometry was shown to be largely consistent with the experimental results. In addition to providing molecular-scale details about U sorption on magnetite, this work also presents novel advances for collecting surface sensitive molecular-scale information in real-time under batch-flow conditions.

  6. Elucidating Geochemical and Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction Via Soil Sterilization at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, T. L.; Jardine, P. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Ginder-Vogel, M. A.; Fendorf, S. E.; Baldwin, M. E.

    2005-12-01

    The adsorption and reduction of U(VI) onto sterilized and nonsterilized soil from the Oak Ridge Reservation was studied to distinguish biogeochemical versus geochemical effects on metal reduction. The Oak Ridge soil under investigation is a saprolite sequence of interbedded weathered shale and limestone obtained at the capillary fringe with a pH near 7.6. Experiments were conducted on unaltered soils as well as subsamples of the soil that were pre-treated to remove free oxides and/or organic matter. Soils were sterilized by either steam sterilization at 1210C or by γ-irradiation using a Cobalt-60 source with a γ-ray dosage of 20kGy. Sterile and nonsterile U(VI) batch experiments were completed aerobically over a reaction time of 400 hours. The reactions were buffered using 25mM HEPES and NaHCO3. Initial U(VI) concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 10 ppm. The effects of sterilization on bacterial population, soil mineralogy, pH, ζ-potential, cation exchange capacity, redox potential, and soil organic matter (SOM) were identified. Sterilization by irradiation was >99.99% efficient and steam sterilization was approximately 99% efficient. Major mineralogy, soil pH, and clay mineral ζ-potential were unaffected by the sterilization techniques. The cation exchange capacity of the irradiated soils decreased from 40 to 30 cmolc/kg. Sterilization by irradiation caused some degradation of the SOM, as determined by UV-VIS, however the results were practically insignificant due to the small quantity of SOM in the Oak Ridge soil (<0.1%). The redox potential of the soil before and after sterilization is being tested. Results indicate that the removal of U(VI) from solution onto untreated soils was significantly increased in soil sterilized by γ-irradiation compared to nonsterilized soil and suggests that geochemical processes, rather than biogeochemical processes, controlled U(VI) sorption/reduction in these soils. Results of experiments completed using soils pre-treated with H2

  7. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome c3

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2003-06-01

    The project, ''Reduction of U(VI) and toxic metals by Desulfovibrio cytochrome c3'', is designed to obtain spectroscopic information for or against a functional interaction of cytochrome c3 and uranium in the whole cells. That is, is the cytochrome c3 the uranium reductase? Our approach has been to start with purified cytochrome and determine any unique spectral disturbances during electron flow to U(VI). Then we will attempt to identify these signals emanating from cells actively reducing uranium. This project is being carried out in collaboration with Dr. William Woodruff at the Los Alamos National Laboratory where the spectral experiments are being carried out.

  8. Comparing different Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation observations using modeling of water vapor jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Hansen, Candice; Aye, Klaus-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Motivation: On March 11, 2016 the Cassini UVIS observed its 6th star occultation by Enceladus' plume. This observation was aimed to determine variability in the total gas flux from the Enceladus' southern polar region. The analysis of the received data suggests that the total gas flux is moderately increased comparing to the average gas flux observed by UVIS from 2005 to 2011 [1]. However, UVIS detected variability in individual jets. In particular, Baghdad 1 is more collimated in 2016 than in 2005, meaning its gas escapes at higher velocity.Model and fits: We use 3D DSMC model for water vapor jets to compare different UVIS occultation observations from 2005 to 2016. The model traces test articles from jets' sources [2] into space and results in coordinates and velocities for a set of test particles. We convert particle positions into the particle number density and integrate along UVIS line of sight (LoS) for each time step of the UVIS observation using precise observational geometry derived from SPICE [3]. We integrate all jets that are crossed by the LoS and perform constrained least-squares fit of resulting modeled opacities to the observed data to solved for relative strengths of jets. The geometry of each occultation is specific, for example, during solar occultation in 2010 UVIS LoS was almost parallel to tiger stripes, which made it possible to distinguish jets venting from different tiger stripes. In 2011 Eps Orionis occultation LoS was perpendicular to tiger stripes and thus many of the jets were geometrically overlapping. Solar occultation provided us with the largest inventory of active jets - our model fit detects at least 43 non-zero jet contributions. Stellar occultations generally have lower temporal resolution and observe only a sub-set of these jets: 2011 Eps Orionis needs minimum 25 non-zero jets to fit UVIS data. We will discuss different occultations and models fits, including the most recent Epsilon Orionis occultation of 2016.[1] Hansen et al

  9. Using High Performance Computing to Understand Roles of Labile and Nonlabile U(VI) on Hanford 300 Area Plume Longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.; Hammond, Glenn E.

    2012-07-28

    Evolution of a hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] plume at the Hanford 300 Area bordering the Columbia River is investigated to evaluate the roles of labile and nonlabile forms of U(VI) on the longevity of the plume. A high fidelity, three-dimensional, field-scale, reactive flow and transport model is used to represent the system. Richards equation coupled to multicomponent reactive transport equations are solved for times up to 100 years taking into account rapid fluctuations in the Columbia River stage resulting in pulse releases of U(VI) into the river. The peta-scale computer code PFLOTRAN developed under a DOE SciDAC-2 project is employed in the simulations and executed on ORNL's Cray XT5 supercomputer Jaguar. Labile U(VI) is represented in the model through surface complexation reactions and its nonlabile form through dissolution of metatorbernite used as a surrogate mineral. Initial conditions are constructed corresponding to the U(VI) plume already in place to avoid uncertainties associated with the lack of historical data for the waste stream. The cumulative U(VI) flux into the river is compared for cases of equilibrium and multirate sorption models and for no sorption. The sensitivity of the U(VI) flux into the river on the initial plume configuration is investigated. The presence of nonlabile U(VI) was found to be essential in explaining the longevity of the U(VI) plume and the prolonged high U(VI) concentrations at the site exceeding the EPA MCL for uranium.

  10. Atmospheric modelling for NOMAD-UVIS on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, D. G.; Patel, M. R.; Lewis, S. R.

    2012-09-01

    The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVIS) instrument development process requires the construction of an atmospheric model to provide synthetic UV transmission spectra. We discuss the requirements of the model to enable observational limits to be found, and the potential for certain atmospheric parameters to be further constrained.

  11. Microbial reduction of U(VI) under alkaline conditions: implications for radioactive waste geodisposal.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adam J; Morris, Katherine; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Charnock, John M; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2014-11-18

    Although there is consensus that microorganisms significantly influence uranium speciation and mobility in the subsurface under circumneutral conditions, microbiologically mediated U(VI) redox cycling under alkaline conditions relevant to the geological disposal of cementitious intermediate level radioactive waste, remains unexplored. Here, we describe microcosm experiments that investigate the biogeochemical fate of U(VI) at pH 10-10.5, using sediments from a legacy lime working site, stimulated with an added electron donor, and incubated in the presence and absence of added Fe(III) as ferrihydrite. In systems without added Fe(III), partial U(VI) reduction occurred, forming a U(IV)-bearing non-uraninite phase which underwent reoxidation in the presence of air (O2) and to some extent nitrate. By contrast, in the presence of added Fe(III), U(VI) was first removed from solution by sorption to the Fe(III) mineral, followed by bioreduction and (bio)magnetite formation coupled to formation of a complex U(IV)-bearing phase with uraninite present, which also underwent air (O2) and partial nitrate reoxidation. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed that Gram-positive bacteria affiliated with the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes dominated in the post-reduction sediments. These data provide the first insights into uranium biogeochemistry at high pH and have significant implications for the long-term fate of uranium in geological disposal in both engineered barrier systems and the alkaline, chemically disturbed geosphere.

  12. Reduction of U(VI) incorporated in the structure of hematite.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Pacheco, Juan S Lezama; Bargar, John R; Shi, Zhi; Liu, Juan; Kovarik, Libor; Engelhard, Mark H; Felmy, Andrew R

    2012-09-04

    U(VI) doped hematite was synthesized and exposed to two different organic reductants with E(0) of 0.23 and 0.70 V. A combination of HAADF-TEM and EXAFS provided evidence that uranium was incorporated in hematite in uranate, likely octahedral coordination. XPS indicated that structurally incorporated U(VI) was reduced to U(V), whereas non-incorporated U(VI) was reduced to U(IV). Specifically, the experiments indicate that U(V) was the dominant oxidation state of uranium in hematite around Eh -0.24 to -0.28 V and pH 7.7-8.6 for at least up to 5 weeks of reaction time. U(V), but not U(IV), was also detected in hematite at Eh +0.21 V (pH 7.1-7.3). The results support the hypothesis, based on previous experimental and theoretical work, that the stability field of U(V) is widened relative to U(IV) and U(VI) in uranate coordination environments where the coordination number of U is less than 8.

  13. Influence of ammonium availability on expression of nifD and amtB genes during biostimulation of a U(VI) contaminated aquifer: implications for U(VI) removal and monitoring the metabolic state of Geobacteraceae

    SciTech Connect

    Mouser, Paula J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, Hila; Holmes, Dawn E.; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2009-03-25

    The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by 2 orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 ?M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels, whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical and physiological interactions at the field scale in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

  14. Probing the interaction of U(vi) with phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Eva C; Mason, Harris E; Shusterman, Jennifer A; Bruchet, Anthony; Nitsche, Heino

    2016-06-21

    The fundamental interaction of U(vi) with diethylphosphatoethyl triethoxysilane functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous silica is studied by macroscopic batch experiments and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. DPTS-functionalized silica has been shown to extract U(vi) from nitric acid solutions at or above pH 3. Extraction is dependent on pH and ionic strength. Single-pulse (31)P NMR on U(vi) contacted samples revealed that U(vi) only interacts with a fraction of the ligands present on the surface. At pH 4 the U(vi) extraction capacity of the material is limited to 27-37% of the theoretical capacity, based on ligand loading. We combined single pulse (31)P NMR on U(vi)-contacted samples with batch studies to measure a ligand-to-metal ratio of approximately 2 : 1 at pH 3 and 4. Batch studies and cross-polarization NMR measurements reveal that U(vi) binds to deprotonated phosphonate and/or silanol sites. We use (31)P-(31)P DQ-DRENAR NMR studies to compare the average dipolar coupling between phosphorus spins for both U(vi)-complexed and non-complexed ligand environments. These measurements reveal that U(vi) extraction is not limited by inadequate surface distribution of ligands, but rather by low stability of the surface phosphonate complex.

  15. U(VI) reduction by diverse outer surface c-type cytochromes of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Roberto; Leavitt, Janet J; Comolli, Luis R; Csencsits, Roseann; Janot, Noemie; Flanagan, Kelly A; Gray, Arianna S; Leang, Ching; Izallalen, Mounir; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-10-01

    Early studies with Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested that outer-surface c-type cytochromes might play a role in U(VI) reduction, but it has recently been suggested that there is substantial U(VI) reduction at the surface of the electrically conductive pili known as microbial nanowires. This phenomenon was further investigated. A strain of G. sulfurreducens, known as Aro-5, which produces pili with substantially reduced conductivity reduced U(VI) nearly as well as the wild type, as did a strain in which the gene for PilA, the structural pilin protein, was deleted. In order to reduce rates of U(VI) reduction to levels less than 20% of the wild-type rates, it was necessary to delete the genes for the five most abundant outer surface c-type cytochromes of G. sulfurreducens. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy demonstrated that whereas 83% ± 10% of the uranium associated with wild-type cells correspond to U(IV) after 4 h of incubation, with the quintuple mutant, 89% ± 10% of uranium was U(VI). Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy revealed that wild-type cells did not precipitate uranium along pili as previously reported, but U(IV) was precipitated at the outer cell surface. These findings are consistent with those of previous studies, which have suggested that G. sulfurreducens requires outer-surface c-type cytochromes but not pili for the reduction of soluble extracellular electron acceptors.

  16. U(VI) Reduction by Diverse Outer Surface c-Type Cytochromes of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Janet J.; Comolli, Luis R.; Csencsits, Roseann; Janot, Noemie; Flanagan, Kelly A.; Gray, Arianna S.; Leang, Ching; Izallalen, Mounir; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    Early studies with Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested that outer-surface c-type cytochromes might play a role in U(VI) reduction, but it has recently been suggested that there is substantial U(VI) reduction at the surface of the electrically conductive pili known as microbial nanowires. This phenomenon was further investigated. A strain of G. sulfurreducens, known as Aro-5, which produces pili with substantially reduced conductivity reduced U(VI) nearly as well as the wild type, as did a strain in which the gene for PilA, the structural pilin protein, was deleted. In order to reduce rates of U(VI) reduction to levels less than 20% of the wild-type rates, it was necessary to delete the genes for the five most abundant outer surface c-type cytochromes of G. sulfurreducens. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy demonstrated that whereas 83% ± 10% of the uranium associated with wild-type cells correspond to U(IV) after 4 h of incubation, with the quintuple mutant, 89% ± 10% of uranium was U(VI). Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy revealed that wild-type cells did not precipitate uranium along pili as previously reported, but U(IV) was precipitated at the outer cell surface. These findings are consistent with those of previous studies, which have suggested that G. sulfurreducens requires outer-surface c-type cytochromes but not pili for the reduction of soluble extracellular electron acceptors. PMID:23934497

  17. Reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) in the presence of hydrous ferric oxide and hematite: effects of solid transformation, surface coverage, and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Je-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D

    2008-04-01

    Fe(II) was added to U(VI)-spiked suspensions of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) or hematite to compare the redox behaviors of uranium in the presence of two different Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. Experiments were conducted with low or high initial sorption density of U(VI) and in the presence or absence of humic acid (HA). About 80% of U(VI) was reduced within 3 days for low sorbed U(VI) conditions, with either hematite or HFO. The {Fe(3+)} in the low U(VI) experiments at 3 days, based on measured Fe(II) and U(VI) and the assumed presence of amorphous UO(2(s)), was consistent with control by HFO for either initial Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide. After about 1 day, partial re-oxidation to U(VI) was observed in the low sorbed U(VI) experiments in the absence of HA, without equivalent increase of dissolved U(VI). No reduction of U(VI) was observed in the high sorbed U(VI) experiments; it was hypothesized that the reduction required sorption proximity of U(VI) and Fe(II). Addition of 5mg/L HA slowed the reduction with HFO and had less effect with hematite. Mössbauer spectroscopy (MBS) of (57)Fe(II)-enriched samples identified the formation of goethite, hematite, and non-stoichiometric magnetite from HFO, and the formation of HFO, hydrated hematite, and non-stoichiometric magnetite from hematite.

  18. Effects of sulfate ligand on uranyl carbonato surface species on ferrihydrite surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Yuji; Fuller, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding uranium (U) sorption processes in permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are critical in modeling reactive transport for evaluating PRB performance at the Fry Canyon demonstration site in Utah, USA. To gain insight into the U sequestration mechanism in the amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide (AFO)-coated gravel PRB, U(VI) sorption processes on ferrihydrite surfaces were studied in 0.01 M Na2SO4 solutions to simulate the major chemical composition of U-contaminatedgroundwater (i.e., [SO42-]~13 mM L-1) at the site. Uranyl sorption was greater at pH 7.5 than that at pH 4 in both air- and 2% pCO2-equilibrated systems. While there were negligible effects of sulfate ligands on the pH-dependent U(VI) sorption (<24 h) in both systems, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis showed sulfate ligand associated U(VI) surface species at the ferrihydrite–water interface. In air-equilibrated systems, binary and mono-sulfate U(VI) ternary surface species co-existed at pH 5.43. At pH 6.55–7.83, a mixture of mono-sulfate and bis-carbonato U(VI) ternary surface species became more important. At 2% pCO2, there was no contribution of sulfate ligands on the U(VI) ternary surface species. Instead, a mixture of bis-carbonato inner-sphere (38%) and tris-carbonato outer-sphere U(VI) ternary surface species (62%) was found at pH 7.62. The study suggests that the competitive ligand (bicarbonate and sulfate) coordination on U(VI) surface species might be important in evaluating the U solid-state speciation in the AFO PRB at the study site where pCO2 fluctuates between 1 and 2 pCO2%.

  19. The effect of Si and Al concentrations on the removal of U(VI) in the alkaline conditions created by NH3 gas

    SciTech Connect

    Katsenovich, Yelena P.; Cardona, Claudia; Lapierre, Robert; Szecsody, Jim; Lagos, Leonel E.

    2016-10-01

    Remediation of uranium in the deep unsaturated zone is a challenging task, especially in the presence of oxygenated, high-carbonate alkalinity soil and pore water composition typical for arid and semi-arid environments of the western regions of the U.S. This study evaluates the effect of various pore water constituencies on changes of uranium concentrations in alkaline conditions, created in the presence of reactive gases such as NH3 to effectively mitigate uranium contamination in the vadose zone sediments. This contaminant is a potential source for groundwater pollution through slow infiltration of soluble and highly mobile uranium species towards the water table. The objective of this research was to evaluate uranium sequestration efficiencies in the alkaline synthetic pore water solutions prepared in a broad range of Si, Al, and bicarbonate concentrations typically present in field systems of the western U.S. regions and identify solid uranium-bearing phases that result from ammonia gas treatment. In previous studies (Szecsody et al. 2012; Zhong et al. 2015), although uranium mobility was greatly decreased, solid phases could not be identified at the low uranium concentrations in field-contaminated sediments. The chemical composition of the synthetic pore water used in the experiments varied for silica (5–250 mM), Al3+ (2.8 or 5 mM), HCO3- (0–100 mM) and U(VI) (0.0021–0.0084 mM) in the solution mixture. Experiment results suggested that solutions with Si concentrations higher than 50 mM exhibited greater removal efficiencies of U(VI). Solutions with higher concentrations of bicarbonate also exhibited greater removal efficiencies for Si, Al, and U(VI). Overall, the silica polymerization reaction leading to the formation of Si gel correlated with the removal of U(VI), Si, and Al from the solution. If no Si polymerization was observed, there was no U removal from the supernatant solution. Speciation modeling indicated that the dominant uranium species in the

  20. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  1. Removal of adsorbed gases with CO2 snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    1991-09-01

    During the outgassing of orbiting astronomical observatories, the condensation of molecular species on optical surfaces can create difficulties for astronomers. The problem is particularly severe in ultraviolet astronomy where the adsorption of only a few atomic layers of some substances can be very damaging. In this paper the removal of adsorbed atomic layers using carbon dioxide snow is discussed. The rate of removal of adsorbed layers of isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF, and deionized distilled water on Teflon substrates was experimentally determined. The removal of fingerprints (containing fatty acids such as stearic acid) from optical surfaces is also demonstrated. The presence and rate of removal of the multilayers was monitored by detecting the molecular dipole field of adsorbed molecular species. For isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF (trichlorotrifluoroethane), and water adsorbed multilayers were removed in under 1.5 seconds. Fingerprint removal was much more difficult and required 20 seconds of spraying with a mixture of carbon dioxide snow flakes and atomized microdroplets of isopropyl alcohol.

  2. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample‐specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)‐reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes. PMID:21255372

  3. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lovely, Derek R.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  4. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Michael J; Callister, Stephen J; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H; Nicora, Carrie D; Lovley, Derek R; Long, Philip E; Lipton, Mary S

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  5. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; Nicora, C.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Long, P.E.; Lipton, M.S.

    2010-02-15

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  6. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport from Decimeter-Scale Heterogeneity to Plume-Scale Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Gary P.; Kohler, Matthias; Kannappan, Ramakrishnan; Briggs, Martin; Day-Lewis, Fred

    2015-02-24

    Scientifically defensible predictions of field scale U(VI) transport in groundwater requires an understanding of key processes at multiple scales. These scales range from smaller than the sediment grain scale (less than 10 μm) to as large as the field scale which can extend over several kilometers. The key processes that need to be considered include both geochemical reactions in solution and at sediment surfaces as well as physical transport processes including advection, dispersion, and pore-scale diffusion. The research summarized in this report includes both experimental and modeling results in batch, column and tracer tests. The objectives of this research were to: (1) quantify the rates of U(VI) desorption from sediments acquired from a uranium contaminated aquifer in batch experiments;(2) quantify rates of U(VI) desorption in column experiments with variable chemical conditions, and(3) quantify nonreactive tracer and U(VI) transport in field tests.

  7. The Effect of Variable Geochemical Conditions on the Reactive Transport of U(VI) in Small Scale Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, G. P.; Fox, P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Small-scale tracer tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of variable geochemical conditions on the reactive transport of U(VI). The tracer tests were conducted in a shallow alluvial aquifer downgradient from a former uranium mill and a tailings disposal area near Naturita, CO. The U(VI) concentration in the groundwater at the tracer test site was approximately 5 μM, the alkalinity was 8.5 meq/L and the pH was approximately 7.1. Previous studies at the site demonstrated the U(VI) was most sensitive to the alkalinity and least sensitive to the pH values relative to the range of measured values. Uranium migration tests were conducted on a scale of 1-2.5 m and considered variable U(VI) and alkalinity and included Br as an inert tracer. The tracer tests demonstrated that the sediment readily released U(VI) even after many years of contact with the contaminated groundwater suggesting the U(VI) migration is controlled by adsorption reactions. Reactive transport simulations used a surface complexation model developed independently from laboratory bench scale studies to simulate adsorption. The reactive transport simulations gave good predictions of the observed breakthrough of U(VI) when the advection and dispersion parameters were fitted to Br breakthrough. Field studies also included several single well push-pull tests that were conducted at increased and decreased U(VI) and alkalinity values. Reactive transport simulations of these experiments will be presented and compared with the tracer tests simulations.

  8. A mutation in the uvi4 gene promotes progression of endo-reduplication and confers increased tolerance towards ultraviolet B light.

    PubMed

    Hase, Yoshihiro; Trung, Khuat Huu; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Atsushi

    2006-04-01

    We have isolated and characterized a new ultraviolet B (UV-B)-resistant mutant, uvi4 (UV-B-insensitive 4), of Arabidopsis. The fresh weight (FW) of uvi4 plants grown under supplemental UV-B light was more than twice that of the wild-type. No significant difference was found in their ability to repair the UV-B-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, or in the amount of UV-B absorptive compounds, both of which are well-known factors that contribute to UV sensitivity. Positional cloning revealed that the UVI4 gene encodes a novel basic protein of unknown function. We found that the hypocotyl cells in uvi4 undergo one extra round of endo-reduplication. The uvi4 mutation also promoted the progression of endo-reduplication during leaf development. The UVI4 gene is expressed mainly in actively dividing cells. In the leaves of P(UVI4)::GUS plants, the GUS signal disappeared in basipetal fashion as the leaf developed. The total leaf blade area was not different between uvi4 and the wild-type through leaf development, while the average cell area in the adaxial epidermis was considerably larger in uvi4, suggesting that the uvi4 leaves have fewer but larger epidermal cells. These results suggest that UVI4 is necessary for the maintenance of the mitotic state, and the loss of UVI4 function stimulated endo-reduplication. Tetraploid Arabidopsis was hyper-resistant to UV-B compared to diploid Arabidopsis, suggesting that the enhanced polyploidization is responsible for the increased UV-B tolerance of the uvi4 mutant.

  9. Deriving the Structure and Composition of Enceladus’ Plume from Cassini UVIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Esposito, Larry; Colwell, Josh; Hendrix, Amanda; Portyankina, Ganna; Shemansky, Don; West, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed 4 stellar and one solar occultation by Enceladus’ water vapor plume. The July 2005 occultation observation established that water is the primary constituent of the plume [1], and allowed us to calculate the flux of water coming from the plume; the 2007 occultation showed super-sonic jets of gas imbedded within the plume [2]. The solar occultation observation set upper limits for N2 as a constituent of the plume and provided higher resolution data on the jets [3]. On 19 October 2011, epsilon and zeta Orionis were simultaneously occulted by the plume. The stars were in separate pixels on the detector, separated by 24 mrad, or ~20 km, with the lower altitude star (epsilon Orionis) 18 km above the limb at its closest point. The profile at two altitudes shows evidence for a new gas jet location, possibly between dust jet #50 and #51 identified in [4].Results from the assemblage of these data sets, with implications for the composition and vertical structure of the plume and jets, will be described. Gas being expelled from the “tiger stripe” fissures is largely on a vertical escape trajectory away from Enceladus. Upper limits are set for water vapor near the limb at latitudes well away from the south pole at 3 x 1015 cm-2. Upper limits are set for the amount of ethylene and H2 in the plume, two species of interest to the chemistry of the plume [5]. No hydrogen or oxygen emission features have been observed from Enceladus’ water vapor plume, in contrast to the purported plumes at Europa, probably due to the very different plasma environment at Saturn. Data have now been processed consistently for all occultations with slightly different results for water vapor supply to the Saturn magnetosphere than previously reported. Overall, eruptive activity has been steady to within ~20% from 2005 to 2011.References: [1] Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422 (2006). Hansen, C. J. et al., Nature 456:477 (2008

  10. Probing the interaction of U(VI) with phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Uribe, Eva C.; Mason, Harris E.; Shusterman, Jennifer A.; ...

    2016-05-30

    The fundamental interaction of U(VI) with diethylphosphatoethyl triethoxysilane functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous silica is studied by macroscopic batch experiments and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. DPTS-functionalized silica has been shown to extract U(VI) from nitric acid solutions at or above pH 3. Extraction is dependent on pH and ionic strength. Single-pulse 31P NMR on U(VI) contacted samples revealed that U(VI)only interacts with a fraction of the ligands present on the surface. At pH 4 the U(VI) extraction capacity of the material is limited to 27–37% of the theoretical capacity, based on ligand loading. We combined single pulse 31P NMR on U(VI)-contacted samples withmore » batch studies to measure a ligand-to-metal ratio of approximately 2 : 1 at pH 3 and 4. Batch studies and cross-polarization NMR measurements reveal that U(VI) binds to deprotonated phosphonate and/or silanol sites. We use 31P–31P DQ-DRENAR NMR studies to compare the average dipolar coupling between phosphorus spins for both U(VI)-complexed and non-complexed ligand environments. Furthermore, these measurements reveal that U(VI) extraction is not limited by inadequate surface distribution of ligands, but rather by low stability of the surface phosphonate complex.« less

  11. Observation of CI FUV emissions from the Venus thermosphere using Cassini-UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, B. A.; Gerard, J. M.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; Gladstone, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on 15 October 1997. On its long journey to Saturn, the spacecraft took a gravitational assist to gain energy from Venus on 24 June 1999. The UVIS instrument on board Cassini obtained a series of FUV spectra during this flyby, while the solar F10.7 index was larger than 200 at Earth orbit. The UVIS instrument obtained ultraviolet spectra of Venus with a still unmatched spectral resolution of ~0.37 nm. We developed a least squares fit method able to extract the intensity of most of the emissions present in the instrument passband, that has already been used to quantify the CO Fourth Positive spectral system and oxygen emissions, among others. We identify several emissions of the carbon atom in the UVIS spectra, and estimate their intensity. In particular, we extract the intensity of the CI - 126.1, 156.1 and 165.7 nm multiplets, for every dayglow spectra recorded by UVIS along the Cassini track. These intensities are compared with a full radiative transfer modeling of these emissions, that includes the known photochemical sources of photons and resonant scattering of sunlight. The carbon density profile of the Venus thermosphere has never been directly measured and is taken from a photochemical model. We find a serious disagreement between observation and modeling that can be accounted for by applying a correction factor to the carbon column. This needed correction factor is found to increase monotonically as the solar zenith angle decreases, suggesting a possible photochemical origin to the disagreement, possibly involving the photochemistry of molecular oxygen to which the carbon density is highly sensitive.

  12. Boreal winter comparison of auroral images from Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, J. F.; Germany, G.; Maddox, W.; Fillingim, M.; Parks, G.; Mende, S.

    2004-12-01

    Same-scene images made with Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV are compared for the boreal winter of 2000-2001. The results of the comparison are used to determine whether the use of both instruments could lead to a better evaluation of the average precipitation and total energy input than with either one individually. These results are a part of a broader investigation to quantitatively compare conjugate images using both instruments and to correlate observed asymmetries with solar wind and seasonal parameters.

  13. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. HST/WFC3: Evolution of the UVIS Channel's Charge Transfer Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosmeyer, Catherine; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Anderson, Jay; WFC3 Team

    2016-06-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) contains both an IR and a UVIS channel. After more than six years on orbit, the UVIS channel performance remains stable; however, on-orbit radiation damage has caused the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of UVIS's two CCDs to degrade. This degradation is seen as vertical charge 'bleeding' from sources during readout and its effect evolves as the CCDs age. The WFC3 team has developed software to perform corrections that push the charge back to the sources, although it cannot recover faint sources that have been bled out entirely. Observers can mitigate this effect in various ways such as by placing sources near the amplifiers, observing bright targets, and by increasing the total background to at least 12 electrons, either by using a broader filter, lengthening exposure time, or post-flashing. We present results from six years of calibration data to re-evaluate the best level of total background for mitigating CTE loss and to re-verify that the pixel-based CTE correction software is performing optimally over various background levels. In addition, we alert observers that CTE-corrected products are now available for retrieval from MAST as part of the CALWF3 v3.3 pipeline upgrade.

  15. Uranium isotopic fractionation factors during U(VI) reduction by bacterial isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban; Sanford, Robert A.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2014-07-01

    We experimentally determined the magnitude of uranium isotopic fractionation induced by U(VI) reduction by metal reducing bacterial isolates. Our results indicate that microbial U(VI) reduction induces isotopic fractionation; heavier isotopes (i.e., 238U) partition into the solid U(IV) products. The magnitudes of isotopic fractionation (expressed as ε = 1000‰ * (α-1)) for 238U/235U were 0.68‰ ± 0.05‰ and 0.99‰ ± 0.12‰ for Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and strain IFRC-N, respectively. The ε values for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain FRC-W, strain FRC-R5, a novel Shewanella isolate, and Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1 were 0.72‰ ± 0.15‰, 0.99‰ ± 0.12‰, 0.96‰ ± 0.16‰ and 0.86‰ ± 0.06‰, respectively. Our results show that the maximum ε values of ∼1.0‰ were obtained with low biomass (∼107 cells/mL) and low electron donor concentrations (∼500 μM). These results provide an initial assessment of 238U/235U shifts induced by microbially-mediated U(VI) reduction, which is needed as 238U/235U data are increasingly applied as redox indicators in various geochemical settings.

  16. MTBE adsorption on alternative adsorbents and packed bed adsorber performance.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Alfred; Knappe, Detlef R U

    2008-04-01

    Widespread use of the fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) has led to frequent MTBE detections in North American and European drinking water sources. The overall objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a silicalite zeolite, a carbonaceous resin, and a coconut-shell-based granular activated carbon (GAC) for the removal of MTBE from water. Isotherm and short bed adsorber tests were conducted in ultrapure water and river water to obtain parameters describing MTBE adsorption equilibria and kinetics and to quantify the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on MTBE adsorption. Both the silicalite zeolite and the carbonaceous resin exhibited larger MTBE adsorption uptakes than the tested GAC. Surface diffusion coefficients describing intraparticle MTBE mass transfer rates were largest for the GAC and smallest for the carbonaceous resin. Pilot tests were conducted to verify MTBE breakthrough curve predictions obtained with the homogeneous surface diffusion model and to evaluate the effect of NOM preloading on packed bed adsorber performance. Results showed that GAC was the most cost-competitive adsorbent when considering adsorbent usage rate only; however, the useful life of an adsorber containing silicalite zeolite was predicted to be approximately 5-6 times longer than that of an equally sized adsorber containing GAC. Pilot column results also showed that NOM preloading did not impair the MTBE removal efficiency of the silicalite zeolite. Thus, it may be possible to regenerate spent silicalite with less energy-intensive methods than those required to regenerate GAC.

  17. Electrochemical and spectroscopic evidence on the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S.; Antonio, Mark R.; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J.; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces has been considered as a one-step two electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated the mechanisms of uranium reduction by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4 . The one electron reduction of U(VI) was first confirmed using the cyclic voltammetry method. Formation of nano-size uranium precipitates on the surface of magnetite at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials were observed by in situ electrochemical AFM. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from 0.1 ~ 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) showed the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The highest amount of U(V) relative to U(VI) was prepared at 0.7 V, where the longest average U–Oaxial distance of 2.05 ± 0.01 Å was evident in the same sample revealed by EXAFS analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of 0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) did not disproportionate but stabilized on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(VI)/U(V) solids.

  18. Structure of adsorbed organometallic rhodium: model single atom catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bennett, R A; McCavish, N D; Basham, M; Dhanak, V R; Newton, M A

    2007-02-02

    We have determined the structure of a complex rhodium carbonyl chloride [Rh(CO)2Cl] molecule adsorbed on the TiO2(110) surface by the normal incidence x-ray standing wave technique. The data show that the technique is applicable to reducible oxide systems and that the dominant adsorbed species is undissociated with Rh binding atop bridging oxygen and to the Cl found close to the fivefold coordinated Ti ions in the surface. A minority geminal dicarbonyl species, where Rh-Cl bond scission has occurred, is found bridging the bridging oxygen ions forming a high-symmetry site.

  19. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor--microcosm tests and model development.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-Min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C; Schadt, Christopher W; Shi, Xiaoqing; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-04-02

    We conducted microcosm tests and biogeochemical modeling to study U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments amended with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO). Indigenous microorganisms in the sediments degraded EVO and stimulated Fe(III), U(VI), and sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. Acetate concentration peaked in 100-120 days in the EVO microcosms versus 10-20 days in the oleate microcosms, suggesting that triglyceride hydrolysis was a rate-limiting step in EVO degradation and subsequent reactions. Acetate persisted 50 days longer in oleate- and EVO- than in ethanol-amended microcosms, indicating that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the oleate and EVO than ethanol microcosms. We developed a comprehensive biogeochemical model to couple EVO hydrolysis, production, and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of multiple functional microbial groups. By estimating EVO, LCFA, and glycerol degradation rate coefficients, and introducing a 100 day lag time for acetoclastic methanogenesis for oleate and EVO microcosms, the model approximately matched observed sulfate, U(VI), and acetate concentrations. Our results confirmed that EVO could stimulate U(VI) bioreduction in sediments and the slow EVO hydrolysis and acetate-utilizing methanogens growth could contribute to longer term bioreduction than simple substrates (e.g., ethanol, acetate, etc.) in the subsurface.

  20. Effect of Subgrid Heterogeneity on Scaling Geochemical and Biogeochemical Reactions: A Case of U(VI) Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Shan, Huimei; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-04

    The effect of subgrid heterogeneity in sediment properties on the rate of uranyl[U(VI)] desorption was investigated using a sediment collected from the US Department of Energy Hanford site. The sediment was sieved into 7 grain size fractions that each exhibited different U(VI) desorption properties. Six columns were assembled using the sediment with its grain size fractions arranged in different spatial configurations to mimic subgrid heterogeneity in reactive transport properties. The apparent rate of U(VI) desorption varied significantly in the columns. Those columns with sediment structures leading to preferential transport had much lower rates of U(VI) desorption than those with relatively homogeneous transport. Modeling analysis indicated that the U(VI) desorption model and parameters characterized from well-mixed reactors significantly over-predicted the measured U(VI) desorption in the columns with preferential transport. A dual domain model, which operationally separates reactive transport properties into two subgrid domains improved the predictions significantly. A similar effect of subgrid heterogeneity, albeit at a less degree, was observed for denitrification, which also occurred in the columns. The results imply that subgrid heterogeneity is an important consideration in extrapolating reaction rates from the laboratory to field.

  1. Saturn's F ring as seen by Cassini UVIS: Kinematics and statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole; Sremčević, Miodrag; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new orbital model of Saturn's F ring core based on 93 occultations by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and the Voyager radio and stellar occultations. We demonstrate that the core, despite its intrinsic variability, is well-described as an inclined, freely precessing ellipse. We find that post-fit residuals with a root-mean-square of 24 km are genuine, representing the well-known non-Keplerian features observed in the ring. Over the nearly 4 years of UVIS observations we find the residual variance to increase, coincident with the apse anti-alignment of Prometheus and F ring core in December 2009. This increase in dynamical F ring core temperature most likely reflects the ever-stronger perturbations by Prometheus. Our results are in good agreement with Earth-based and HST observations as well as Voyager imaging. Cassini UVIS stellar occultations resolve the F ring at unprecedented resolutions of a few meters and we identify the F ring core and inner and outer strands. We infer their normal optical depth and full width at half maximum (FWHM) and show that core and strands form distinct morphological groups. Typically, a strand is about ten times wider than the core (average FWHM is ˜10 km) while having a ten times smaller optical depth. Unlike in pre-Cassini occultations the F ring core displays significant optical depth with in some cases >3. In many cases we find a narrow optically thick component (˜ few km and τ > 0.5) embedded in the F ring core. Entertaining the possibility that this is the actual, "true" F ring core then UVIS results suggest that this "true" core is highly non-continuous. In addition, we report the detection of a previously unknown structure - dubbed the "secondary" as it visually resembles the F ring core. Its morphology is similar to that of the core in optical depth and FWHM and it displays individual opaque features. Despite its core-like appearance, we show that its kinematics is consistent with that of

  2. Winter Comparison of Auroral Images from Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.; Germany, Glynn; Maddox, Will

    2004-01-01

    Same-scene images made with Polar UVI and IMAGE Fuv are compared for the period between 2000 and 2001. The comparison indicates that the use of both instruments may lead to a better evaluation of the average precipitation than with either one individually. The evaluation of total energy input is however, not improved With use of both measurements. These results are a part of a larger investigation to quantitatively compare conjugate images using both instruments and to correlate observed asymmetries with solar wind and seasonal parameters.

  3. Sub-cm Particles in Saturn's Rings from VIMS, UVIS, and RSS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerousek, Richard Gregory; Colwell, Josh E.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Marouf, Essam A.; Esposito, Larry W.; Nicholson, Philip D.; French, Richard G.

    2016-10-01

    Particles sizes in Saturn's rings roughly follow a truncated power law. One way to determine the governing parameters of the size distribution is through the analysis of differential optical depths (Zebker et al. 1983). Non-axisymmetric self-gravity wakes complicate this approach when optical depth measurements at different wavelengths are not made at same viewing geometry. Using occultations spanning a wide range of viewing angles and from multiple instruments onboard Cassini (the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS), the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), and the Radio Science Subsystem (RSS)), we forward-model the properties of the self-gravity wakes in Saturn's A and B rings while simultaneously constraining the parameters of the cm - sub-cm particle size distribution. In the absence of wakes, and in regions where particles smaller than ~ 8.86 mm are present, VIMS stellar occultations measure larger optical depths than UVIS stellar occultations due to the diffraction of 2.9 μm light out of the small (0.25 × 0.5 mrad) VIMS field of view compared with UVIS which measures shorter wavelength (0.15 μm) light over a much larger (6.4 × 6.0 mrad) field of view. This excess optical depth combined with RSS X-band (λ = 3.6 cm) optical depths provides a way to probe both the power law slope and the minimum particle size. In the A and B rings where self-gravity wakes are prevalent, we use the wake model of Colwell et al. (2006, 2007) with an additional free parameter representing the excess optical depth which would be measured through the gaps between opaque wakes, by VIMS compared to UVIS. In the B ring and inner A ring we find and absence of sub-cm particles and power law slopes of q ~ 2.8. In the trans-Encke region, where there are a multitude of satellite driven resonances, we find an increasing abundance of sub-cm particles as the outer edge of the A ring is approached. In the C Ring and the Cassini Division, where self-gravity wakes are absent

  4. Small particles and self-gravity wakes in Saturn's rings from UVIS and VIMS stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerousek, Richard G.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of particle sizes in Saturn's rings roughly follows a truncated inverse power-law. Though it is well known that differential optical depths provide a way to probe the parameters of size distribution (i.e. Zebker et al. [1985] Icarus, 64, 531-548), the technique is complicated by the presence of self-gravity wakes which introduce a geometric dependence to the observed optical depth. Here we present a method of extracting information about the size distribution of the particles in the gaps between the self-gravity wakes. The Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) occultations measure starlight at an effective wavelength of 2.9 μm falling onto a single pixel with angular dimensions 0.25 mrad × 0.5 mrad while Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultations measure starlight at a much smaller effective wavelength of 0.15 μm and over a field of view with larger angular dimensions of 6.0 mrad × 6.4 mrad. Starlight diffracted out of the VIMS pixel by particles smaller than 1.22λVIMS/2θ ∼8.86 mm, is not replaced by neighboring particles, while the UVIS instrument, with its larger field of view and smaller effective wavelength, collects all of the light diffracted by particles larger than 1.22λVIMS/2θ ∼0.025 mm. Consequently, measurements by VIMS overstate the optical depth in regions where sub-centimeter-sized particles are present. Using the rectangular cross section wake model of (Colwell et al. [2006], Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L07201) and (Colwell et al. [2007] Icarus, 190, 127-144) with a new parameter to represent the excess VIMS optical depth not seen by UVIS, we combine VIMS and UVIS occultations for the first time for particle size analysis. We find a significant fraction of sub-cm particles only in the outermost portion of the A ring, and in the B1 region of the B ring. In the Trans-Encke region, we find a trend of increasing abundance of sub-cm particles as the outer edge of the A Ring is approached

  5. Aqueous Complexation Reactions Governing the Rate and Extent of Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Scott C. Brooks; Wenming Dong; Sue Carroll; Jim Fredrickson; Ken Kemner; Shelly Kelly

    2006-06-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. In addition, the work plan is designed to: (1) Generate fundamental scientific understanding on the relationship between U(VI) chemical speciation and its susceptibility to biogeochemical reduction reactions. ? Elucidate the controls on the rate and extent of contaminant reactivity. (2) Provide new insights into the aqueous and solid speciation of U(VI)/U(IV) under representative groundwater conditions.

  6. Aqueous Complexation Reactions Governing the Rate and Extent of Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Scott C. Brooks; Wenming Dong; Sue Carroll; James K. Fredrickson; Kenneth M. Kemner; Shelly D. Kelly

    2006-06-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. In addition, the work plan is designed to: (1) Generate fundamental scientific understanding on the relationship between U(VI) chemical speciation and its susceptibility to biogeochemical reduction reactions. (2) Elucidate the controls on the rate and extent of contaminant reactivity. (3) Provide new insights into the aqueous and solid speciation of U(VI)/U(IV) under representative groundwater conditions.

  7. Modeling of the Enceladus water vapor jets for interpreting UVIS star and solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the Cassini mission is jets emitting from the southern pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The composition of the jets is water vapor and salty ice grains with traces of organic compounds. Jets, merging into a wide plume at a distance, are observed by multiple instruments on Cassini. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along “tiger stripes” [Porco et al. 2014]. There is a recent controversy on the question if some of these jets are “optical illusion” caused by geometrical overlap of continuous source eruptions along the “tiger stripes” in the field of view of ISS [Spitale et al. 2015]. The Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume of Enceladus. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. These observations directly provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument and could help distinguish between the presence of only localized or also continuous sources. We use Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model the plume of Enceladus with multiple (or continuous) jet sources. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. The models result in the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densities derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets. The specific geometry of the UVIS observations helps to estimate the production rates and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted by the individual jets.Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422-1425 (2006); Hansen, C. J. et al, GRL 38:L11202 (2011

  8. Uremic toxins and oral adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shunsuke; Yoshiya, Kunihiko; Kita, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Hideki; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2011-04-01

    Uremic toxins are associated with various disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease and it is difficult to remove some of these toxins by dialysis. Since some uremic toxins are generated by bacterial metabolites in the colon, oral adsorbents that interfere with the absorption of uremic toxins or their precursors are believed to prevent their accumulation in the body. AST-120 adsorbs various uremic retention solutes in the gastrointestinal system and has potential for providing clinical benefit. Sevelamer hydrochloride binds some harmful compounds in addition to phosphate and seems to have pleiotropic effects that include lowering serum LDL cholesterol levels and reduction of inflammation. The effect of sevelamer hydrochloride on indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol has been shown in an in vitro study; however, in vivo studies in mice or humans did not demonstrate this effect on protein-binding uremic toxins. Oral adsorbents are thus one of the important modalities in the treatment of uremic syndrome.

  9. Ultraviolet irradiation-dependent fluorescence enhancement of hemoglobin catalyzed by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Pan, Leiting; Wang, Xiaoxu; Yang, Shuying; Wu, Xian; Lee, Imshik; Zhang, Xinzheng; Rupp, Romano A; Xu, Jingjun

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has a potent effect on biological organisms. Hemoglobin, an oxygen-transport protein, plays an irreplaceable role in sustaining life of all vertebrates. In this study we scrutinize the effects of ultraviolet irradiation (UVI) as well as visible irradiation on the fluorescence characteristics of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) in vitro. Data show that UVI results in fluorescence enhancement of BHb in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, UVI-induced fluorescence enhancement is significantly increased when BHb is pretreated with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), a type of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Meanwhile, The water-soluble antioxidant vitamin C suppresses this UVI-induced fluorescence enhancement. In contrast, green light irradiation does not lead to fluorescence enhancement of BHb no matter whether H(2)O(2) is acting on the BHb solution or not. Taken together, these results indicate that catalysis of ROS and UVI-dependent irradiation play two key roles in the process of UVI-induced fluorescence enhancement of BHb.

  10. Can microbially-generated hydrogen sulfide account for the rates of U(VI) reduction by a sulfate-reducing bacterium?

    SciTech Connect

    Boonchayaanant, Benjaporn; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei; Ortiz, Monica E; Criddle, Craig

    2010-01-01

    In situ remediation of uranium contaminated soil and groundwater is attractive because a diverse range of microbial and abiotic processes reduce soluble and mobile U(VI) to sparingly soluble and immobile U(IV). Often these processes are linked. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), for example, enzymatically reduce U(VI) to U(IV), but they also produce hydrogen sulfide that can itself reduce U(VI). This study evaluated the relative importance of these processes for Desulfovibrio aerotolerans, a SRB isolated from a U(VI)-contaminated site. For the conditions evaluated, the observed rate of SRB-mediated U(VI) reduction can be explained by the abiotic reaction of U(VI) with the microbially-generated H{sub 2}S. The presence of trace ferrous iron appeared to enhance the extent of hydrogen sulfide-mediated U(VI) reduction at 5 mM bicarbonate, but had no clear effect at 15 mM. During the hydrogen sulfide-mediated reduction of U(VI), a floc formed containing uranium and sulfur. U(VI) sequestered in the floc was not available for further reduction.

  11. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE PAGES

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; ...

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore » an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  12. Adsorption characteristics of U(VI) on Fe(III)Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxides synthesized at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyangsig; Jo, Ho Young; Lee, Young Jae; Kim, Geon-Young

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the adsorption behavior of U(VI) on (oxy)hydroxides synthesized at different temperatures (25 and 75 °C) was investigated. Four (oxy)hydroxides were synthesized by drying slurries of Fe(III) and Fe(III)Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxide in a vacuum desiccator (25 °C) or in an oven (75 °C). Batch adsorption tests were conducted using the (oxy)hydroxides thus synthesized and groundwater containing uranium ions. In general, the U(VI) removal fraction significantly increased with increasing pH from 3 to 5, remained constant with increasing pH from 5 to 9, and decreased at pH greater than 9, regardless of the type of (oxy)hydroxides and solid-to-liquid ratio. The effect of pH on the U(VI) removal fraction was more significant at a low solid-to-liquid ratio. The oven-dried Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide exhibited a U(VI) removal fraction lower than that of the vacuum-dried one, whereas the oven-dried Fe(III)Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxide exhibited a U(VI) removal fraction higher than that exhibited by the vacuum-dried one. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis results indicated that the difference in the U(VI) removal fraction is attributed to the dissolution and precipitation of the Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide during oven drying and dehydration of the Fe(III)Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxide during oven drying.

  13. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  14. Dispersive kinetic of fluorescence decay of alloxazines adsorbed into cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Alina; Sikorska, Ewa; Khmelinskii, Igor V.; Sikorski, Marek

    2005-09-01

    The fluorescence decay of alloxazines adsorbed into microcrystalline cellulose shows a complex kinetics suggesting at least three emitting species. The exponential series method and the Albery model were used to calculate the underlying distributions, providing results about the decay rate constants or lifetime distributions.

  15. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediments from a former mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, S. P.; Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Campbell, Kate M.; Hayes, Kim F.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-12-15

    U(VI) adsorption by two aquifer sediment samples was studied under oxic conditions as a function of pH, U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentration. Background-A (BKG-A) sediment was collected upstream of a former uranium mill-tailings site at Rifle, Colorado, and Little Rusty Composite (LRC) was collected on site but with low U contamination. Batch adsorption experiments were performed using artificial groundwater solutions prepared to simulate the field groundwater composition in equilibrium with specific partial pressures of carbon dioxide. To encompass the geochemical conditions of the alluvial aquifer at the site, the experimental conditions ranged from 6.8×10-8 to 10-5 M in [U(VI)]tot, 7.2 to 8.0 in pH, 3.0×10-3 to 6.0×10-3 M in [Ca2+], and 0.05 to 2.6% in partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The sediment was extracted with a dilute bicarbonate/carbonate solution to determine the background labile U(VI) already present in the sediment. A semi-empirical surface complexation model was developed to describe U(VI) adsorption using FITEQL4. The non-electrostatic, generalized composite surface complexation model successfully simulated U(VI) adsorption over the range of groundwater conditions at the Old Rifle site, using a two-site, two-reaction fitting scheme. The sensitivity of model parameters to background U(VI) concentration on the two samples was evaluated. U(VI) adsorption experiments were also performed using a sand fraction of BKG-A separated through repeated sonication and wet-sieving. Surface area normalized Kd for the bulk and sand fraction indicated similar reactivity for both. The surface complexation model developed in this work is expected to contribute to the prediction of fate and transport of U(VI) in the alluvial aquifer at the Old Rifle site, and to assist in the simulation of biostimulation field experiments performed at the site.

  16. Modeling the inhibition of the bacteral reduction of U(VI) by beta-MnO2(s).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K; Kennedy, David W; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2002-04-01

    Pyrolusite (beta-MnO2(s)) was used to assess the influence of a competitive electron acceptor on the kinetics of reduction of aqueous uranyl carbonate by a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32. The enzymatic reduction of U(VI) and beta-MnO2(s) and the abiotic redox reaction between beta-MnO2(s) and biogenic uraninite (UO2(s)) were independently investigated to allow for interpretation of studies of U(VI) bioreduction in the presence of beta-MnO2(s). Uranyl bioreduction to UO2(s) by CN32 with H2 as the electron donor followed Monod kinetics, with a maximum specific reduction rate of 110 M/h/10(8) cells/mL and a half-saturation constant of 370 microM. The bioreduction rate of beta-MnO2(s) by CN32 was described by a pseudo-first-order model with respect to beta-MnO2(s) surface sites, with a rate constant of 7.92 x 10(-2) h(-1)/10(8) cells/mL. Uraninite that precipitated as a result of microbial U(VI) reduction was abiotically reoxidized to U(VI) by beta-MnO2(s), with concomitant reduction to Mn(II). The oxidation of biogenic UO2(s) coupled with beta-MnO2(s) reduction was well-described by an electrochemical model. However, a simple model that coupled the bacterial reduction of U(VI) and beta-MnO2(s) with an abiotic redox reaction between UO2(s) and beta-MnO2(s) failed to describe the mass loss of U(VI) in the presence of beta-MnO2(s). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that the particle size and spatial distribution of the biogenic UO2(s) changed dynamically in systems with, as compared to without, beta-MnO2(s)). These observations suggested that the surface properties and localization of UO2(s) in relation to the cell and beta-MnO2(s) surfaces was an important factor controlling the abiotic oxidation of UO2(s) and, thus, the overall rate and extent of U(VI) bioreduction. The coupled model that was modified to account for the "effective" contact surface area between UO2

  17. Surface-enhanced raman spectra and molecular orientation of phthalazine adsorbed on a silver electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Machiko; Fujita, Masato; Ito, Masatoki

    1984-08-01

    SERS from phthalazine adsorbed on an Ag electrode was investigated under several conditions of applied voltage and solution concentration. Spectral assignments of the Raman bands were successfully performed and two differently oriented adsorbates, i.e. flat and end-on species, were identified. The contribution of the image field to the SERS intensity was considerable.

  18. Cassini UVIS Observations of the Io Plasma Torus. 4; Modeling Temporal and Azimuthal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffl, A. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this fourth paper in a series, we present a model of the remarkable temporal and azimuthal variability of the Io plasma torus observed during the Cassini encounter with Jupiter. Over a period of three months, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed a dramatic variaton in the average torus composition. Superimposed on this long-term variation, is a 10.07-hour periodicity caused by azimuthal variation in plasma composition subcorotating relative to System III longitude. Quite surprisingly, the amplitude of the azimuthal variation appears to be modulated at the beat frequency between the System III period and the observed 10.07-hour period. Previously, we have successfully modeled the months-long compositional change by supposing a factor of three increase in the amount of material supplied to Io's extended neutral clouds. Here, we extend our torus chemistry model to include an azimuthal dimension. We postulate the existence of two azimuthal variations in the number of superthermal electrons in the torus: a primary variation that subcorotates with a period of 10.07 hours and a secondary variation that remains fixed in System III longitude. Using these two hot electron variations, our model can reproduce the observed temporal and azimuthal variations observed by Cassini UVIS.

  19. Analysis of Dragon's Breath and Scattered Light Detector Anomalies on WFC3/UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Julia; Markwardt, Larissa; Bourque, Matthew; Anderson, Jay

    2017-02-01

    We summarize the examination of the light anomalies known as Dragon's Breath and Scattered Light for the UVIS channel of Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We present three methods for WFC3 users to help avoid these effects during observation planning. We analyzed all of the full-frame wide and long pass filters with exposure times ≥ 300 seconds, comprising ∼13% of WFC3/UVIS on-orbit data (∼20% of all full-frame data, and ∼35% of all full-frame ≥300 second exposures.) We find that stars producing Dragon's Breath peak at specific orientations to the detector and V-band magnitudes. The bulk of these stars fall along the vertical and horizontal edges, within ∼490 pixels of the image frame. The corners of the detector show significantly fewer instances of Dragon's Breath and Scattered Light, though still a few occurrences. Furthermore, matching stars outside the field of the image to V-band magnitude data from the Hubble Guide Star Catalog II (GSC-II) shows that stars causing the anomaly consistently peak around a V-band magnitude of 11.9 or 14.6, whereas the general trend of objects lying outside the field instead peaks around a magnitude of 16.5 within our exposure time and filter selection.

  20. WFC3/UVIS Dark Calibration: Monitoring Results and Improvements to Dark Reference Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, M.; Baggett, S.

    2016-04-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS detector possesses an intrinsic signal during exposures, even in the absence of light, known as dark current. A daily monitor program is employed every HST cycle to characterize and measure this current as well as to create calibration files which serve to subtract the dark current from science data. We summarize the results of the daily monitor program for all on-orbit data. We also introduce a new algorithm for generating the dark reference files that provides several improvements to their overall quality. Key features to the new algorithm include correcting the dark frames for Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses, using an anneal-cycle average value to measure the dark current, and generating reference files on a daily basis. This new algorithm is part of the release of the CALWF3 v3.3 calibration pipeline on February 23, 2016 (also known as "UVIS 2.0"). Improved dark reference files have been regenerated and re-delivered to the Calibration Reference Data System (CRDS) for all on-orbit data. Observers with science data taken prior to the release of CALWF3 v3.3 may request their data through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to obtain the improved products.

  1. Microbial Community Changes in Response to Ethanol or Methanol Amendments for U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Brandt, Craig C; Madden, Andrew; Drake, Meghan M; Kostka, Joel; Akob, Denise M.; Kusel, Kirsten; Palumbo, Anthony Vito

    2010-01-01

    Microbial community responses to ethanol, methanol and methanol + humics amendments in relationship to uranium bioremediation were studied in laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments and ground water from a uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ethanol addition always resulted in uranium reduction at rate of 0.8-1.0 mol l-1 d-1 while methanol addition did so occasionally at rate 0.95 mol l-1 d-1. The type of carbon source added, the duration of incubation, and the sampling site influenced the bacterial community structure upon incubation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated (1) bacterial communities found in ethanol- and methanol-amended samples with U(VI) reduction were similar due to presence of -Proteobacteria, and -Proteobacteria (members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae); (2) methanol-amended samples without U(VI) reduction exhibited the lowest diversity and the bacterial community contained 69.2-92.8% of the family Methylophilaceae; and (3) the addition of humics resulted in an increase of phylogenetic diversity of -Proteobacteria (Rodoferax, Polaromonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylophilales, unclassified) and Firmicutes (Desulfosporosinus, Clostridium).

  2. TITAN’S UPPER ATMOSPHERE FROM CASSINI/UVIS SOLAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Bénilan, Yves; Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T.

    2015-12-01

    Titan’s atmosphere is composed mainly of molecular nitrogen, methane being the principal trace gas. From the analysis of 8 solar occultations measured by the Extreme Ultraviolet channel of the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board Cassini, we derived vertical profiles of N{sub 2} in the range 1100–1600 km and vertical profiles of CH{sub 4} in the range 850–1300 km. The correction of instrument effects and observational effects applied to the data are described. We present CH{sub 4} mole fractions, and average temperatures for the upper atmosphere obtained from the N{sub 2} profiles. The occultations correspond to different times and locations, and an analysis of variability of density and temperature is presented. The temperatures were analyzed as a function of geographical and temporal variables, without finding a clear correlation with any of them, although a trend of decreasing temperature toward the north pole was observed. The globally averaged temperature obtained is (150 ± 1) K. We compared our results from solar occultations with those derived from other UVIS observations, as well as studies performed with other instruments. The observational data we present confirm the atmospheric variability previously observed, add new information to the global picture of Titan’s upper atmosphere composition, variability, and dynamics, and provide new constraints to photochemical models.

  3. Spectroscopic studies of U(VI) sorption at the kaolinite-water interface. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, H.A.; Parks, G.A.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Efficient use of U as a resource and safe handling, recycling and disposal of U-containing wastes require an understanding of the factors controlling the fate of U, where fate refers to the destination of U, typically expressed as an environmental medium or a process phase. The sorption process constitutes a change in elemental fate. Partitioning of an element from solution to a solid phase, or sorption, can be divided into three broad categories: adsorption, surface precipitation, and absorption. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), a type of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), offers the possibility for distinguishing among different modes of sorption by characterizing the atomic environment of the sorbing element. In this study, the authors use EXAFS to determine the structure of U(VI) sorption complexes at the kaolinite-water interface. In Chapter One, they present an overview of selected aspects of U structural chemistry as a basis for considering the structural environment of U at the solid-water interface. To evaluate the utility of XAS for characterization of the structural environment of U(VI) at the solid-water interface, they have carried out an in-depth analysis of XAS data from U(VI)-containing solid and solution model compounds, which they describe in Chapter Two. In Chapter three, they consider sorption of U by kaolinite as a means of effecting the removal of U from surface collection pond waters on the Rocky Flats Plant site in northern Colorado.

  4. Molecular nitrogen and methane density retrievals from Cassini UVIS dayglow observations of Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Evans, J. Scott; Lumpe, Jerry; Westlake, Joseph H.; Ajello, Joseph M.; Bradley, E. Todd; Esposito, Larry W.

    2015-02-01

    We retrieve number densities of molecular nitrogen (N2) and methane (CH4) from Titan's upper atmosphere using the UV dayglow. We use Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) limb observations from 800 to 1300 km of the N I 1493 Å and N II 1085 Å multiplets, both produced directly from photofragmentation of N2. UVIS N2 and CH4 densities are in agreement with measurements from Cassini's Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) from the same flyby if INMS densities are scaled up by a factor of 3.0 as reported in previous studies. Analysis of three Cassini flybys of Titan shows that (1) the CH4 homopause on Titan is between 900 and 1100 km, (2) upper atmospheric temperatures vary by less than 10 K over 6 h at the same geographic location and (3) from 1100 to 1700 local solar time temperatures also vary by less than 10 K. The capability of retrieving the global-scale composition from these data complements existing techniques and significantly advances the study of upper atmospheric variability at Titan and for any other atmosphere with a detectable UV dayglow.

  5. Cassini UVIS observations of Titan ultraviolet airglow intensity dependence with solar zenith angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, E. M.; Ajello, J. M.; Holsclaw, G. M.; West, R. A.; Esposito, L. W.; Bradley, E. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) observed the airglow (dayglow and nightglow) of Titan over a range of solar zenith angles (SZA) from 14 to 150° on five separate observations obtained between 2008 and 2012. The modeling of the solar cycle normalized UVIS observations indicates that a Chapman layer function provides a satisfactory fit to the intensity of the EUV and FUV airglow molecular emissions of the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band system (LBH a1Πg→X1>∑g+), the Carroll-Yoshino band system (c4'1>∑u+→X1>∑g+), and of several atomic multiplets of nitrogen (NI, II) as a function of SZA. This result shows that the strongest contribution to the Titan dayglow occurs by processes (photoelectrons and photodissociation) involving the solar EUV flux rather than magnetospheric particle precipitation that dominates emission excitation in the nightglow.

  6. Chemical speciation of adsorbed glycine on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeong Woo; James, Joanna N.; Sholl, David S.

    2011-07-01

    Experimental studies have reported that glycine is adsorbed on the Cu(110) and Cu(100) surfaces in its deprotonated form at room temperature, but in its zwitterionic form on Pd(111) and Pt(111). In contrast, recent density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicated that the deprotonated molecules are thermodynamically favored on Cu(110), Cu(100), and Pd(111). To explore the source of this disagreement, we have tested three possible hypotheses. Using DFT calculations, we first show that the kinetic barrier for the deprotonation reaction of glycine on Pd(111) is larger than on Cu(110) or Cu(100). We then report that the presence of excess hydrogen would have little influence on the experimentally observed results, especially for Pd(111). Lastly, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate that the aggregates of zwitterionic species on Pt(111) are energetically preferred to those of neutral species. Our results strongly suggest that the formation of aggregates with relatively large numbers of adsorbed molecules is favored under experimentally relevant conditions and that the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in these aggregates stabilize the zwitterionic species.

  7. Influence of dynamical conditions on the reduction of U(VI) at the magnetite-solution interface.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Boily, Jean-François; Buck, Edgar C; Skomurski, Frances N; Rosso, Kevin M; Cahill, Christopher L; Bargar, John R; Felmy, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    The heterogeneous reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by ferrous iron is believed to be a key process influencing the fate and transport of U in the environment. The reactivity of both sorbed and structural Fe(II) has been studied for numerous substrates, including magnetite. Published results from U(VI)-magnetite experiments have been variable, ranging from no reduction to clear evidence for the formation of U(IV). In this contribution, we used XAS and high resolution (+/-cryogenic) XPS to study the interaction of U(VI) with nanoparticulate magnetite. The results indicated that U(VI) was partially reduced to U(V) with no evidence of U(IV). However, thermodynamic calculations indicated that U phases with average oxidation states below (V) should have been stable, indicating that the system was not in redox equilibrium. A reaction pathway that involves incorporation and stabilization of U(V) and U(VI) into secondary phases is invoked to explain the observations. The results suggest an important and previously unappreciated role of U(V) in the fate and transport of uranium in the environment.

  8. Structural basis for the inhibition of AKR1B10 by the C3 brominated TTNPB derivative UVI2008.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Francesc X; Crespo, Isidro; Álvarez, Susana; Porté, Sergio; Giménez-Dejoz, Joan; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Mitschler, André; de Lera, Ángel R; Parés, Xavier; Podjarny, Alberto; Farrés, Jaume

    2017-02-01

    UVI2008, a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) β/γ agonist originated from C3 bromine addition to the parent RAR pan-agonist 4-[(E)-2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)-1-propenyl]benzoic acid (TTNPB), is also a selective inhibitor of aldo-keto reductase family member 1B10 (AKR1B10). Thus, it might become a lead drug for the design of compounds targeting both activities, as an AKR1B10 inhibitor and RAR agonist, which could constitute a novel therapeutic approach against cancer and skin-related diseases. Herein, the X-ray structure of the methylated Lys125Arg/Val301Leu AKR1B10 (i.e. AKME2MU) holoenzyme in complex with UVI2008 was determined at 1.5 Å resolution, providing an explanation for UVI2008 selectivity against AKR1B10 (IC50 = 6.1 μM) over the closely related aldose reductase (AR, IC50 = 70 μM). The carboxylic acid group of UVI2008 is located in the anion-binding pocket, at hydrogen-bond distance of catalytically important residues Tyr49 and His111. The inhibitor bromine atom can only fit in the wider active site of AKR1B10, mainly because of the native Trp112 side-chain orientation, not possible in AR. In AKR1B10, Trp112 native conformation, and thus UVI2008 binding, is facilitated through interaction with Gln114. IC50 analysis of the corresponding Thr113Gln mutant in AR confirmed this hypothesis. The elucidation of the binding mode of UVI2008 to AKR1B10, along with the previous studies on the retinoid specificity of AKR1B10 and on the stilbene retinoid scaffold conforming UVI2008, could indeed be used to foster the drug design of bifunctional antiproliferative compounds.

  9. Simulating adsorption of U(VI) under transient groundwater flow and hydrochemistry: Physical versus chemical nonequilibrium model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greskowiak, J.; Hay, M.B.; Prommer, H.; Liu, C.; Post, V.E.A.; Ma, R.; Davis, J.A.; Zheng, C.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled intragrain diffusional mass transfer and nonlinear surface complexation processes play an important role in the transport behavior of U(VI) in contaminated aquifers. Two alternative model approaches for simulating these coupled processes were analyzed and compared: (1) the physical nonequilibrium approach that explicitly accounts for aqueous speciation and instantaneous surface complexation reactions in the intragrain regions and approximates the diffusive mass exchange between the immobile intragrain pore water and the advective pore water as multirate first-order mass transfer and (2) the chemical nonequilibrium approach that approximates the diffusion-limited intragrain surface complexation reactions by a set of multiple first-order surface complexation reaction kinetics, thereby eliminating the explicit treatment of aqueous speciation in the intragrain pore water. A model comparison has been carried out for column and field scale scenarios, representing the highly transient hydrological and geochemical conditions in the U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford 300A site, Washington, USA. It was found that the response of U(VI) mass transfer behavior to hydrogeochemically induced changes in U(VI) adsorption strength was more pronounced in the physical than in the chemical nonequilibrium model. The magnitude of the differences in model behavior depended particularly on the degree of disequilibrium between the advective and immobile phase U(VI) concentrations. While a clear difference in U(VI) transport behavior between the two models was noticeable for the column-scale scenarios, only minor differences were found for the Hanford 300A field scale scenarios, where the model-generated disequilibrium conditions were less pronounced as a result of frequent groundwater flow reversals. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediments from a former mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sung Pil; Fox, Patricia M; Davis, James A; Campbell, Kate M; Hayes, Kim F; Long, Philip E

    2009-12-15

    A study of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediment samples from a former uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado, was conducted under oxic conditions as a function of pH, U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentration. Batch adsorption experiments were performed using <2 mm size sediment fractions, a sand-sized fraction, and artificial groundwater solutions prepared to simulate the field groundwater composition. To encompass the geochemical conditions of the alluvial aquifer at the site, the experimental conditions ranged from 6.8 x 10(-8) to 10(-5) M in [U(VI)](tot), 7.2 to 8.0 in pH, 3.0 x 10(-3) to 6.0 x 10(-3) M in [Ca(2+)], and 0.05 to 2.6% in partial pressure of carbon dioxide. Surface area normalized U(VI) adsorption K(d) values for the sand and <2 mm sediment fraction were similar, suggesting a similar reactive surface coating on both fractions. A two-site two-reaction, nonelectrostatic generalized composite surface complexation model was developed and successfully simulated the U(VI) adsorption data. The model successfully predicted U(VI) adsorption observed from a multilevel sampling well installed at the site. A comparison of the model with the one developed previously for a uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado, indicated that possible calcite nonequilibrium of dissolved calcium concentration should be evaluated. The modeling results also illustrate the importance of the range of data used in deriving the best fit model parameters.

  11. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediments from a former mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyun, S.P.; Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Campbell, K.M.; Hayes, K.F.; Long, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    A study of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediment samples from a former uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado, was conducted under oxic conditions as a function of pH, U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentration. Batch adsorption experiments were performed using <2mm size sediment fractions, a sand-sized fraction, and artificial groundwater solutions prepared to simulate the field groundwater composition. To encompass the geochemical conditions of the alluvial aquifer at the site, the experimental conditions ranged from 6.8 ?? 10-8 to 10-5 M in [U(VI)]tot, 7.2 to 8.0 in pH, 3.0 ?? 10-3 to 6.0 ?? 10 -3 M in [Ca2+], and 0.05 to 2.6% in partial pressure of carbon dioxide. Surface area normalized U(VI) adsorption Kd values for the sand and <2 mm sediment fraction were similar, suggesting a similar reactive surface coating on both fractions. A two-site two-reaction, nonelectrostatic generalized composite surface complexation model was developed and successfully simulated the U(VI) adsorption data. The model successfully predicted U(VI) adsorption observed from a multilevel sampling well installed at the site. A comparison of the model with the one developed previously for a uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado, indicated that possible calcite nonequilibrium of dissolved calcium concentration should be evaluated. The modeling results also illustrate the importance of the range of data used in deriving the best fit model parameters. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  12. Enhanced microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and U(VI) by different natural organic matter fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Baohua; Chen, Jie

    2003-10-01

    Although direct microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and U(VI) is known, few studies have examined the kinetics and the underlying mechanisms of the reduction of these contaminants by different natural organic matter (NOM) fractions in the presence or absence of microorganisms. In this study, NOM was found to chemically reduce Cr(VI) at pH 3, but the reduction rates were negligible at pH ˜7. The abiotic reduction of U(VI) by NOM was not observed, possibly because of the presence of small amounts of nitrate in the reactant solution. However, all NOM fractions, particularly the soil humic acid (HA), enhanced the bioreduction of Cr(VI) or U(VI) in the presence of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. The reduction rates varied greatly among NOM fractions with different chemical and structural properties: the polyphenolic-rich NOM-PP fraction appeared to be the most reactive in abiotically reducing Cr(VI) at a low pH, but soil HA was more effective in mediating the microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and U(VI) under anaerobic, circumneutral pH conditions. These observations are attributed to an increased solubility and conformational changes of the soil HA with pH and, more importantly, its relatively high contents of polycondensed and conjugated aromatic organic moieties. An important implication of this study is that, depending on chemical and structural properties, different NOM components may play different roles in enhancing the bioreduction of Cr(VI) and U(VI) by microorganisms. Polycondensed aromatic humic materials may be particularly useful in mediating the bioreduction and rapid immobilization of these contaminant metals in soil.

  13. Chemical reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) at the solid-water interface using natural and synthetic Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byong-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D; Barnett, Mark O; Roden, Eric E

    2005-08-01

    Abiotic reduction of 0.1 mM U(VI) by Fe(II) in the presence of synthetic iron oxides (biogenic magnetite, goethite, and hematite) and natural Fe(III) oxide-containing solids was investigated in pH 6.8 artificial groundwater containing 10 mM NaHCO3. In most experiments, more than 95% of added U(VI) was sorbed to solids. U(VI) was rapidly and extensively (> or = 80%) reduced in the presence of synthetic Fe(III) oxides and highly Fe(II) oxide-enriched (18-35 wt % Fe) Atlantic coastal plain sediments. In contrast, long-term (20-60 d) U(VI) reduction was less than 30% in suspensions of six other natural solids with relatively low Fe(III) oxide content (1-5 wt % Fe). Fe(II) sorption site density was severalfold lower on these natural solids (0.2-1.1 Fe(II) nm(-2)) compared tothe synthetic Fe(lII) oxides (1.6-3.2 Fe(II) nm(-2)), which may explain the poor U(VI) reduction in the natural solid-containing systems. Addition of the reduced form of the electron shuttling compound anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS; final concentration 2.5 mM) to the natural solid suspensions enhanced the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction, suggesting that AH2DS reduced U(VI) at surface sites where reaction of U(VI) with sorbed Fe(II) was limited. This study demonstrates that abiotic, Fe(II)-driven U(VI) reduction is likely to be less efficient in natural soils and sediments than would be inferred from studies with synthetic Fe(III) oxides.

  14. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on gear-pellet and honeycomb-pellet types of adsorbents containing A-type zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, A.; Munakata, K.; Hara, K.; Narita, S.; Sugiyama, T.; Kotoh, K.; Tanaka, M.; Uda, T.

    2015-03-15

    It is necessary to recover or process tritiated species that are extensively coexistent in nuclear fusion installations. A conventional way to recover tritium release to atmosphere is catalytic oxidation of tritiated species and adsorption of tritiated water vapor on adsorbents with high surface areas. Therefore, new adsorbents with low pressure loss and high surface areas need to be developed and utilized for such large-scale adsorption systems. In this study, attention was focused on new adsorbents, which are gear-type pellet MS5A adsorbent, gear-type pellet MS4A adsorbent and honeycomb-type pellet MS5A adsorbent. The adsorption characteristics of the new adsorbent were comparatively studied with conventional type of adsorbents (pellet-type MS5A adsorbent and pebble-type MS5A adsorbent), in terms of adsorption capacity, pressure loss and adsorption rate. It was found that the adsorption capacity of water vapor on the gear-type adsorbents is higher than that on a honeycomb-type adsorbent. The experimental breakthrough curves indicate that the adsorption rates of water vapor on gear-type and honeycomb-type adsorbents are smaller than that on conventional type adsorbents. Various adsorption models were also tested to correlate the experimental isotherms. It was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich model could properly correlate the experimental adsorption isotherms.

  15. Charge transfer efficiency in HST WFC3/UVIS: monitoring and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia M.; Anderson, Jay; Sosey, Megan L.; Bourque, Matthew; Martlin, Catherine; Kurtz, Heather; Shanahan, Clare; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Sabbi, Elena; WFC3 Team

    2017-01-01

    The UVIS channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) contains a 4096x4096 pixel e2v CCD array. The detectors have been performing well on-orbit but as expected, are exhibiting the cumulative effects of radiation damage. The result is a growing hot pixel population and declining charge transfer efficiency. We summarize the progression of the CTE losses, their effects on science data, and discuss two of the primary mitigation options: post-flash and a pixel-based CTE correction. The latter is now part of the automated WFC3 calibration pipeline in the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), providing observers with both standard and CTE-corrected data products.

  16. Cassini UVIS Observations of the Io Plasma Torus. 3; Observations of Temporal and Azimuthal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffl, A. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2006-01-01

    In this third paper in a series presenting observations by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) of the Io plasma torus, we show remarkable, though subtle, spatio-temporal variations in torus properties. The Io torus is found to exhibit significant, near sinusoidal variations in ion composition as a functions of azimuthal position. The azimuthal variation in composition is such that the mixing ratio of S II us strongly correlated with the mixing ratio of S III and the equatorial electron density and strongly anti-correlated with the mixing ratios of both S IV and O II and the equatorial electron temperature. Surprisingly, the azimuthal variation in ion composition is observed to have a period of 10.07 h -- 1.5% longer than the System III rotation period of Jupiter, yet 1.3% shorter than the System UV period defined by [Brown, M. E., 1995. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 21683-21696]. Although the amplitude of the azimuthal variation of S III and O II remained in the range of 2-5%, the amplitude of the S II and S IV compositional variation ranged between 5 and 25% during the UVIS observations. Furthermore, the amplitude of the azimuthal variations of S II and S IV appears to be modulated by its location in System III longitude, such that when the region of maximum S II mixing ration (minimum S IV mixing ratio) is aligned with a System III longitude of 200 deg +/-, the amplitude is a factor of 4 greater than when the variation is anti-aligned. This behavior can explain numerous, often apparently contradictory, observations of variations in the properties of the Io plasma torus with the System III and System IV coordinate systems.

  17. Acceleration of Microbially Mediated U(VI) Reduction at a Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Phil Long; Todd Anderson; Aaron Peacock; Steve Heald; Yun-Juan Chang; Dick Dayvault; Derek R. Lovley; C.T. Resch; Helen Vrionis; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; D.C. White

    2004-03-17

    A second field-scale electron donor amendment experiment was conducted in 2003 at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in Rifle, Colorado. The objective of the 2003 experiment (done in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy's UMTRA Groundwater Project) was to test the hypothesis that amendment of increased concentration of electron donor would result in an increased export of electron donor down gradient which in turn would create a larger zone of down-gradient U(VI) bioreduction sustained over a longer time period relative to the 2002 experiment (Anderson et al. 2003). During the first experiment (2002), {approx}3 mM acetate was amended to subsurface over a period of 3 months in a 15m by 18m by 2.5m volume comprised of 3 upgradient monitoring wells, 20 injection wells, and 15 down-gradient monitoring wells. After an initial one-month phase of metal reduction, bioavailable oxidized Fe was consumed near the injection gallery and the dominant terminal electron accepting process became sulfate reduction, rapidly consuming the injected acetate. For the 2003 experiment, we amended sufficient acetate ({approx}10 mM) to consume available sulfate and export acetate down-gradient where bioavailable oxidized Fe was still present. Data from the experiment indicate that acetate was exported further down gradient, resulting in a larger zone of microbial U(VI) reduction than for the 2002 experiment. Geohydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological data collected during the course of both experiments enable assessment of relative importance of a number of factors controlling the experimental outcomes. Companion posters by Anderson et al. and White et al. provide additional results.

  18. WFC3/UVIS External CTE Monitor: Single-Chip CTE Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosmeyer, C. M.; Baggett, S.

    2016-12-01

    We present the first results of single-chip measurements of charge transfer efficiency (CTE) in the UVIS channel of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). This test was performed in Cycle 20 in two visits. In the first visit a field in the star cluster NGC 6583 was observed. In a second visit, the telescope returned to the field, but rotated by 180 degrees and with a shift in pointing that allowed the same stars to be imaged, near and far from the amplifiers, on the same chip of the two-chip UVIS field of-view. This dataset enables a measurement of CTE loss on each separate chip. The current CTE monitor measures CTE loss as an average of the two chips because it dithers by a chip-height to obtain observations of the same sources near and far from the amplifiers, instead of the more difficult to-schedule 180-degree rotation. We find that CTE loss is worse on Chip 1 than on Chip 2 across all cases for which we had data: short and long exposures and w! ith and without the pixel-based CTE correction. In the best case, for long exposures with the CTE correction applied, the max difference between the two chip's flux losses is 3%/2048 pixels. This case should apply for most science observations where the background is 12 e-/pixel. In the worst case of low-background short exposures, e.g. those without post-flash, the max difference between the two chips is 17% flux loss/2048 pixels. Uncertainties are <0.01% flux loss/2048 pixels. Because of the two chips' different CTE loss rates, we will consider adding this test as part of the routine yearly monitor and creating a chip-specific CTE correction software.

  19. Ionospheric Convection in the Postnoon Auroral Oval: SuperDARN and Polar UVI Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, A.; Koustov, A.; Lyatsky, W.; Kangas, J.; Parks, G.; Chua, D.

    2002-01-01

    Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) observations, ultraviolet imaging from the Polar satellite (UVI), and particle precipitation data from DMSP satellites have been used to investigate the electrodynamics of the postnoon auroral oval in the Northern hemisphere. We show that: (1) For negative IMF By, the convection reversal (CR) was co-located with the maximum of auroral luminosity, but during positive IMF By the convection reversal was poleward of the auroral oval up to several degrees in latitude; (2) Postnoon auroral oval was associated with a large-scale upward field-aligned current (FAC) of the order of 6x10(exp -7). A m(exp -2) in magnitude (the FAC was inferred from the SuperDARN and UVI data). For negative IMF By, maximum of the auroral intensity coincides in latitude with the maximum of the upward field-aligned current. However, for positive IMF By. the maximum of the upward FAC was shifted to the poleward edge of the auroral oval; (3) In response to the IMF By turning from positive to negative, the maximum of the auroral luminosity did not change its position noticeably, but the position of the convection reversal changed considerably from 80-81 degs to about 76 degs MLAT, and the maximum of FAC moved from 77-78 degs to about 76 degs MLAT. Thus, after IMF By turns negative, both the FAC maximum and CR tend to coincide with the auroral maximum; (4) The IMF Bz positive deflection was followed by a decrease in both field-aligned current intensity and auroral luminosity. However, the decrease in the auroral luminosity lags behind the FAC decrease by about 12 min. Firstly, these observations allow us to suggest that the IMF By-related electric field can penetrate into the closed magnetosphere and produce convection and FAC changes in the region of the postnoon auroral oval. Secondly, we suggest that the interchange instability is a promising mechanism for the postnoon auroras.

  20. Similarity of the Surface Reactivity of Hydrous Ferric Oxide and Hematite: Sorption and Redox of U(VI) and Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Je-Hun Jang; Dempsey, Brian A.; Burgos, William D.; Yeh, George; Roden, Eric

    2004-03-17

    Hydrous Ferric Oxide (HFO) vs. Hematite--Thermodynamically distinctive bulk phases, but the surfaces could be similar due to hydration of the interface. Hypothesis--The surface of HFO is energetically similar to the surface of hematite. Objective--Compare the reactions of HFO and hematite with U(VI) and Fe(II). Experimental--The reactions of interests were (1) preparation of sub-micron hematite, (2) sorption of U(VI), and (3) redox of U(VI) and Fe(II) with HFO or hematite.

  1. Vibrational Studies of Adsorbate-Induced Reconstruction on Molybdenum Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopinski, Gregory Peter

    Adsorbate-induced rearrangement of the substrate structure strongly modifies the adsorbate-substrate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, leading to the complex behavior observed in many chemisorption systems. In this thesis the H/Mo(211), O/Mo(211) and Na/Mo(100) systems have been studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) to observe vibrations of the adsorbed atoms. The vibrational data is correlated with observations of the long-range order probed by LEED as well as the work function changes induced by adsorption. Adsorbate -induced substrate reconstruction plays an important role in all three of these systems. Studies of the coadsorption systems O+H/Mo(211) and Na+O/Mo(100) indicate how these effects can influence interactions between adsorbates. For H/Mo(211), above 1ML a (1 x 1) to (1 x 2) transition is observed and attributed to modification of the substrate periodicity. Below 1ML, H atoms are bridge bonded and induce local distortions of the substrate. The transition to the (1 x 2) phase involves the ordering of these displacements and occupation of three-fold sites partially populated by conversion of the bridge bonded species. This conversion accounts for the sawtooth-like coverage dependence of the work function. The structural model proposed for this system is also supported by the desorption parameters and partial molar entropy extracted from adsorption isobars. Oxygen adsorption on Mo(211) involves the occupation of multiple binding sites, with both the long-range order and the local geometry of the adsorbate phases strongly temperature dependent. Coadsorption of low coverages of oxygen and hydrogen leads to segregation of the two adsorbates which can be understood in terms of a substrate-mediated repulsive interaction between O and H. For Na/Mo(100), the frequency of the Na-Mo symmetric stretch mode does not shift with coverage although the mode intensity is strongly coverage dependent. The absence of a frequency shift

  2. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in Carbonate and Sulfate Minerals Crystallized from Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Morrison, Jessica M.; Wang, Zheming; Engelhard, Mark H.; Burns, Peter C.

    2015-02-15

    The neptunyl Np(V)O2 + and uranyl U(VI)O2 2+ ions are soluble in groundwater, although their interaction with minerals in the subsurface may impact their mobility. One mechanism for the immobilization of actinyl ions in the subsurface is coprecipitation in low-temperature minerals that form naturally, or that are induced to form as part of a remediation strategy. Important differences in the crystal-chemical behavior of the Np(V) neptunyl and U(VI) uranyl ions suggest their behavior towards incorporation into growing crystals may differ significantly. Using a selection of low temperature minerals synthesized in aqueous systems under ambient conditions, this study examines the factors that impact the structural incorporation of the Np(V) neptunyl and U(VI) uranyl ions in carbonate and sulfate minerals.

  3. Metal carbon bond energies for adsorbed hydrocarbons from calorimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Heike; Campbell, Charles T.; King, David A.

    2004-11-01

    Single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC) is a powerful new method for measuring adsorption and reaction energies. Particularly for hydrocarbons, where little or no information is available from either experiment or theory on well-defined surfaces, this method can provide crucially needed information. Assignment of the measured calorimetric heats to the appropriate surface reaction yields directly reaction heats and heats of formation of surface species. An important extension using these results is to derive values for metal-carbon bond energies in adsorbed hydrocarbon species. In this paper we review the definition of the bond dissociation energy for a surface species and discuss methodologies and limitations for calculating accurate values of this quantity from measured calorimetric data. As a step in establishing benchmark data for adsorbed hydrocarbons, we calculate a Pt-C σ bond strength, < D(Pt-C)>, of about 245 kJ/mol from data for ethylidyne on Pt{1 1 1}. Two independent methods, the quasiempirical valence bond (QVB) method and an average bond energy (ABE) method, were used to obtain this value, and the two values derived from these two approaches agree quite well. We also discuss the implications and applicability of this value of D(Pt-C) for other adsorbed hydrocarbons and on other Pt surfaces, and estimates of how this bond energy should differ when the C atom's ligands are different.

  4. Redox Interactions of Tc(VII), U(VI), and Np(V) with Microbially Reduced Biotite and Chlorite.

    PubMed

    Brookshaw, Diana R; Pattrick, Richard A D; Bots, Pieter; Law, Gareth T W; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Mosselmans, J Fredrick W; Vaughan, David J; Dardenne, Kathy; Morris, Katherine

    2015-11-17

    Technetium, uranium, and neptunium are contaminants that cause concern at nuclear facilities due to their long half-life, environmental mobility, and radiotoxicity. Here we investigate the impact of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in biotite and chlorite and the role that this has in enhancing mineral reactivity toward soluble TcO4(-), UO2(2+), and NpO2(+). When reacted with unaltered biotite and chlorite, significant sorption of U(VI) occurred in low carbonate (0.2 mM) buffer, while U(VI), Tc(VII), and Np(V) showed low reactivity in high carbonate (30 mM) buffer. On reaction with the microbially reduced minerals, all radionuclides were removed from solution with U(VI) reactivity influenced by carbonate. Analysis by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) confirmed reductive precipitation to poorly soluble U(IV) in low carbonate conditions and both Tc(VII) and Np(V) in high carbonate buffer were also fully reduced to poorly soluble Tc(IV) and Np(IV) phases. U(VI) reduction was inhibited under high carbonate conditions. Furthermore, EXAFS analysis suggested that in the reaction products, Tc(IV) was associated with Fe, Np(IV) formed nanoparticulate NpO2, and U(IV) formed nanoparticulate UO2 in chlorite and was associated with silica in biotite. Overall, microbial reduction of the Fe(III) associated with biotite and chlorite primed the minerals for reductive scavenging of radionuclides: this has clear implications for the fate of radionuclides in the environment.

  5. Radiative transfer modelling for the NOMAD-UVIS instrument on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, D. G.; Patel, M. R.; Lewis, S. R.; Mason, J. P.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2013-09-01

    The NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) instrument is a 3-channel (2 IR, 1 UV/Vis) spectrometer due to fly on the 2016 ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission. A radiative transfer model for Mars has been developed providing synthetic spectra to simulate observations of the UVIS channel in both solar occultation and nadir viewing geometries. This will allow for the characterization and mitigation of the influence of dust on retrievals of ozone abundance.

  6. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Katsenovich, Yelena P.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel E.

    2012-05-01

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) release from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO2)(PO4)]2•3H2O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of the Arthrobacter oxydans G975 strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorous-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate (ranging between 1 and 10 mM) in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with the G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEM observations indicated that G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile culture-ware with inserts was used in non-contact dissolution experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest that G975 bacteria is able to enhance the release of U(VI) from autunite without direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the release of U(VI) from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.

  7. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Katsenovich, Yelena; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel

    2012-04-20

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) leaching from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4})]{sub 2} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding into important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of G975 Arthrobacter oxydans strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorus-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate ranging between 1-10 mM in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEM observations indicated G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile cultureware with inserts was used in non-contact bioleaching experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest the G975 bacteria is able to enhance U(VI) leaching from autunite without the direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the U(VI) bioleaching from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.

  8. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  9. Molecularly Imprinted Filtering Adsorbents for Odor Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Sho; Chiyomaru, You; Sassa, Fumihiro; Liu, Chuanjun; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    Versatile odor sensors that can discriminate among huge numbers of environmental odorants are desired in many fields, including robotics, environmental monitoring, and food production. However, odor sensors comparable to an animal’s nose have not yet been developed. An animal’s olfactory system recognizes odor clusters with specific molecular properties and uses this combinatorial information in odor discrimination. This suggests that measurement and clustering of odor molecular properties (e.g., polarity, size) using an artificial sensor is a promising approach to odor sensing. Here, adsorbents composed of composite materials with molecular recognition properties were developed for odor sensing. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the adsorbent materials, so specific polymeric materials with particular solubility parameters were chosen to adsorb odorants with various properties. The adsorption properties of the adsorbents could be modified by mixing adsorbent materials. Moreover, a novel molecularly imprinted filtering adsorbent (MIFA), composed of an adsorbent substrate covered with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer, was developed to improve the odor molecular recognition ability. The combination of the adsorbent and MIP layer provided a higher specificity toward target molecules. The MIFA thus provides a useful technique for the design and control of adsorbents with adsorption properties specific to particular odor molecules. PMID:27886070

  10. Experimental Study of U(VI) Release Kinetics from Aquifer Sediments from a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site (Rifle, Colorado, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, S.; Campbell, K. M.; Hayes, K. F.; Davis, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Uranium(VI) release kinetics from aquifer sediments from a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado was studied to understand uranium distribution within the sediments. The sediments were sampled at depths of 3.5-3.8 m in December 2004. The samples were air-dried, sieved, and the <2 mm fraction was collected and used in this study. Total uranium content in the sediments, determined by gamma-radiometry, was 4.1 μg/g sediment. The labile fraction of U(VI) in the sediments was determined using carbonate/bicarbonate extractions, which should cause complete desorption of U(VI) in the absence of mass transfer limitations. Carbonate/bicarbonate extraction of the sediments showed very slow release kinetics, with only 12 % of the labile U(VI) in the sediments being released during the first 96 hours of extraction. This is much less than found in a previous study at a different mill tailings site (Naturita, Colorado), in which more than 80 % of labile U(VI) was released during the same period of extraction. Up to two months of carbonate/bicarbonate extraction released 1 μg U(VI) per gram of Rifle sediment, which is 25 % of the total U in the sediment. Extraction with an artificial groundwater prepared to simulate the field groundwater chemistry showed 0.26 μg U/g sediment was released during the initial 94 hours of extraction, with a gradual increase of released U(VI) with time, while other major and minor elements (except Si) rapidly reached steady-state concentrations during the first few hours of reaction. Two hypotheses are under consideration to explain the slow U(VI) release kinetics: 1) colloidal clay fraction particles cementing larger grains of the sediments are creating nanoscale interparticle pores that act as a diffusion barrier to U(VI) desorption, and 2) a U(IV) solid phase exists whose oxidation and dissolution control the U(VI) release rate. To test the hypotheses, oxidation and extraction of the sediments have been conducted using oxidants

  11. WFC3/UVIS External CTE Monitor: 2016 Updates on Coefficients and Analysis Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosmeyer, C. M.; Baggett, S.

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of Hubble’s WFC3/UVIS detector has been monitored since 2009, using observations of star clusters NGC 104 and NGC 6791. We present here results from an updated analysis pipeline with an improved cross-identification of sources and a new capability to study CTE loss mitigation by use of flash levels 6 - 116 e-/pix. We measure flux loss due to CTE degradation as a function of source brightness, observation date, background level, and vertical distance from the readout amplifier with a 2nd degree polynomial, whose coefficients are provided to allow observers to estimate flux corrections for their point-source photometry. Current flux losses for images with the recommended minimum 12 e-/pix background are 5 - 15%, depending on source brightness. These losses are further reduced via use of the CTE-corrected images now available from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes. Within its overall growth, there appears to be a flattening in the CTE degradation rate that may be correlated with the Solar cycle maximum. The data reported here span from October 2009 to August 2016 and were calibrated with calwf3 v3.3.

  12. U(VI) oxygen polyhedra as pillars for building frameworks from uranophane-type layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouffret, Laurent; Rivenet, Murielle; Abraham, Francis

    2010-03-01

    Solid state chemistry of uranyl-containing inorganic compounds has been enriched recently by a multiplication of papers dealing with two and three dimensional inorganic materials. This paper is a review of the compounds structurally based on uranophane-type layers in uranyl silicates, phosphates, arsenates and vanadates systems. Depending on the nature and size of the metallic or organic cation used as charge compensators or structure directing agents, various geometric isomers are obtained and described herein. The cations occupy either the interlayer space between uranophane-type sheets or different types of cavities created by a three dimensional inorganic framework built from uranophane layers pillared by U(VI) and oxygen polyhedra. The number of UO6 or UO7 pillars by [(UO2)(XO4)] structural block units of the layer give a series of compounds with the following general formula A2y/n{(UO2)1-y[(UO2)(XO4)]2} with y=0,1/3,1/2 and 1.

  13. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; ...

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  14. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana R.; Warner, Marvin G.; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David G.; Mayes, Richard T.; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Addleman, Shane R.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Ken; Breier, Crystal; D'Alessandro, Evan

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing at Woods

  15. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  16. To-date spacecraft applications and demonstration testing results, and future product development for new molecular adsorber technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Shaun; Hansen, Patricia; Straka, Sharon; Chen, Philip; Triolo, Jack; Bettini, Ron; Carosso, Paolo; Carosso, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    The use of molecular adsorbers, in order to aid in the reduction of the spacecraft contamination levels, is discussed. Molecular adsorbers are characterized by an extremely large surface area, molecularly-porous substructure, and processing charged sites capable of retaining molecular contaminant species. Molecular adsorbers were applied on two Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions, as well as on the tropical rainfall measuring mission. The use of molecular adsorbers carries the potential for low cost, easy fabrication and integration of reliable means for reducing the contamination level around spacecraft.

  17. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  18. Results of testing various natural gas desulfurization adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelson, Gordon

    2004-06-01

    This article presents the results of testing many commercially available and some experimental sulfur adsorbents. The desired result of our testing was to find an effective method to reduce the quantity of sulfur in natural gas to less than 100 ppb volume (0.1 ppm volume). An amount of 100 ppb sulfur is the maximum limit permitted for Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The tested adsorbents include some that rely only on physical adsorption such as activated carbon, some that rely on chemisorption such as heated zinc oxide, and some that may use both processes. The testing was performed on an engineering scale with beds larger than those used for typical laboratory tests. All tests were done at about 3.45 barg (50 psig). The natural gas used for testing was from the local pipeline in Pittsburgh and averaged 6 ppm volume total sulfur. The primary sulfur species were dimethyl sulfide (DMS), isopropyl mercaptan, tertiary butyl mercaptan, and tetrahydrothiophene. Some tests required several months to achieve a sulfur breakthrough of the bed. It was found that DMS always came through a desulfurizer bed first, independent of adsorption process. Since the breakthrough of DMS always exceeds the 100 ppb SOFC sulfur limit before other sulfurs were detected, an index was created to rate the adsorbents in units of ppm DMS × absorbent bed volume. This index is useful for calculating the expected adsorbent bed lifetime before sulfur breakthrough when the inlet natural gas DMS content is known. The adsorbents that are included in these reports were obtained from suppliers in the United States, the Netherlands, Japan, and England. Three activated carbons from different suppliers were found to have identical performance in removing DMS. One of these activated carbons was operated at four different space velocities and again showed the same performance. When using activated carbon as the basis of comparison for other adsorbents, three high-performance adsorbents

  19. Tolerance and bioaccumulation of U(VI) by Bacillus mojavensis and its solid phase preconcentration by Bacillus mojavensis immobilized multiwalled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Sadin; Oduncu, M Kadir; Kilinc, Ersin; Soylak, Mustafa

    2017-02-01

    In this study, uranium(VI) tolerance and bioaccumulation were investigated by using thermo -tolerant Bacillus mojavensis. The level of U(VI) was measured by UV-VIS spectrophotometry. The minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) value of U(VI) was experimented. Bacterial growth was not affected in the presence of 1.0 and 2.5 mg/L U(VI) at 36 h and the growth was partially affected in the presence of 5 mg/L U(VI) at 24 h. What was obtained from this study is that there was diversity in the various periods of the growth phases of metal bioaccumulation capacity, which was shown by B. mojavensis. The maximum bioaccumulation capacities were found to be 12.8, 22.7, and 48.2 mg/g dried bacteria, at 24th hours at concentration of 1.0, 2.5 and 5 mg/L U(VI), respectively. In addition to these, U(VI) has been preconcentrated on B. mojavensis immobilized MWCNT. Several factors such as pH, flow rate of solution, amount of biosorbent and support materials, eluent type, concentration and volume, the matrix interference effect on retention have been studied, and extraction conditions were optimized. Preconcentration factor was achieved as 60. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were calculated as 0.74 and 2.47 μg/L. The biosorption capacity of immobilized B. mojavensis was calculated for U(VI) as 25.8 mg/g. The results demonstrated that the immobilized biosorbent column could be reused at least 30 cycles of biosorption and desorption with the higher than 95% recovery. FT-IR and SEM analysis were performed to understand the surface properties of B. mojavensis.

  20. Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 205 NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials (Web, free access)   The NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials is a free, web-based catalog of adsorbent materials and measured adsorption properties of numerous materials obtained from article entries from the scientific literature. Search fields for the database include adsorbent material, adsorbate gas, experimental conditions (pressure, temperature), and bibliographic information (author, title, journal), and results from queries are provided as a list of articles matching the search parameters. The database also contains adsorption isotherms digitized from the cataloged articles, which can be compared visually online in the web application or exported for offline analysis.

  1. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    DOEpatents

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  2. Picosecond adsorbate dynamics at condensed phase interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, T.W.; Chang, Y.J.; Martorell, J.

    1993-12-31

    Picosecond surface second harmonic generation has been used to probe a variety of elementary adsorbate reactions at liquid-solid interfaces. Electron transfer reactions at semiconductor-liquid junctions, geminate recombination of photogenerated free radical pairs and the orientational dynamics of dipolar adsorbates have all been explored in varying degrees of detail. These kinetic studies have led to a detailed analysis of adsorbate detection on the surface of non-centrosymmetric substrates as well as the use of total internal reflection geometries for signal enhancement from optically absorbing liquids. Particular emphasis has been placed on the static and dynamic characterization of adsorbate orientational distribution functions and how these are determined from the torque exerted on adsorbates by the angular part of the molecule-surface interaction potential.

  3. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  4. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications.

  5. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  6. Determination of uranium(VI) sorbed species in calcium silicate hydrate phases: a laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy and batch sorption study.

    PubMed

    Tits, Jan; Geipel, Gerhard; Macé, Nathalie; Eilzer, Manuela; Wieland, Erich

    2011-07-01

    Batch sorption experiments and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy investigations were carried out to study the U(VI) speciation in calcium silicate hydrates for varying chemical conditions representing both fresh and altered cementitious environments. U(VI) uptake was found to be fast and sorption distribution ratios (R(d) values) were very high indicating strong uptake by the C-S-H phases. In addition a strong dependence of pH and solid composition (Ca:Si mol ratio) was observed. U(VI) luminescence spectroscopy investigations showed that the U(VI) solid speciation continuously changed over a period up to 6 months in contrast to the fast sorption kinetics observed in the batch sorption studies. Decay profile analysis combined with factor analysis of series of spectra of U(VI)-C-S-H suspensions, recorded with increasing delay times, revealed the presence of four luminescent U(VI) species in C-S-H suspensions, in agreement with the batch sorption data. Along with the aqueous UO(2)(OH)(4)(2-) species and a Ca-uranate precipitate, two different sorbed species were identified which are either bound to silanol groups on the surface or incorporated in the interlayer of the C-S-H structure.

  7. Statistical study of Saturn's auroral electron properties with Cassini/UVIS FUV spectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, J.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A.; Pryor, W.; Lamy, L.; Ajello, J.

    2017-03-01

    About 2000 FUV spectra of different regions of Saturn's aurora, obtained with Cassini/UVIS from December 2007 to October 2014 have been examined. Two methods have been employed to determine the mean energy of the precipitating electrons. The first is based on the absorption of the auroral emission by hydrocarbons and the second uses the ratio between the brightness of the Lyman-α line and the H2 total UV emission (Lyα/H2), which is directly related to via a radiative transfer formalism. In addition, two atmospheric models obtained recently from UVIS polar occultations have been employed for the first time. It is found that the atmospheric model related to North observations near 70° latitude provides the results most consistent with constraints previously published. On a global point of view, the two methods provide comparable results, with mostly in the 7-17 keV range with the hydrocarbon method and in the 1-11 keV range with the Lyα/H2 method. Since hydrocarbons have been detected on ∼20% of the auroral spectra, the Lyα/H2 technique is more effective to describe the primary auroral electrons, as it is applicable to all spectra and allows an access to the lowest range of energies (≤5 keV), unreachable by the hydrocarbon method. The distribution of is found fully compatible with independent HST/ACS constraints (emission peak in the 840-1450 km range) and FUSE findings (emission peaking at pressure level ≤0.2 μbar). In addition, exhibits enhancements in the 3 LT-10 LT sector, consistent with SKR intensity measurements. An energy flux-electron energy diagram built from all the data points strongly suggests that acceleration by field-aligned potentials as described by Knight's theory is a main mechanism responsible for electron precipitation creating the aurora. Assuming a fixed electron temperature of 0.1 keV, a best-fit equatorial electron source population density of 3 × 103 m-3 is derived, which matches very well to the plasma

  8. Saturn's B Ring and Cassini Division from Cassini RSS, VIMS, and UVIS Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Richard; Colwell, Joshua; Nicholson, Phillip; Hedman, Matthew; Marouf, Essam; Rappaport, Nicole J.; McGhee, Colleen; Batista, A.; de Silva, A.; Flores, S.; Geiling, N.; Graves, K.; Guo, L.; Kee, L. Huang. Y.; Larson, K.; Moreno, J.; Mowla, L.; Nelson, E.; Pang, Z.; Sanchez, T.; Stephens, K.; Strother, C.; Judd, K.; Snyderman, R.; Stroud, D.; Youngblood, A.

    Saturn's B ring demarcates the inner edge of the dynamically fascinating Cassini Division, replete with eccentric and circular ringlets and gaps. We present kinematical models for ringlets and gaps in the Cassini Division, and the outer edge of the B ring, from more than 100 individual Cassini occultations using RSS, VIMS, and UVIS instruments. Recent investigations of the B ring outer edge and Cassini Division features, using two decades of Earth-based and spacecraft occultation measurements, show hints of regularity amidst the complexity of the region. Hedman et al. (2010), using Cassini VIMS stellar occultation data and Cassini RSS and historical data from French et al. (2010), found a quasi-regular spacing of ringlets and gaps, with inner edges of gaps measurably non-circular and outer edges nearly circular. They proposed a dynamical mechanism whereby the non-circular B ring edge resonantly controls the structure of the Cassini Division gaps. The shape of the B ring edge is dominated by an m=2 mode, controlled by Mimas, although the dynamical interaction is still poorly understood. Cassini ISS images show the presence of multiple modes, possibly transient (Spitale et al. 2010). The long time series of the present data set, densely sampling the Cassini orbital tour from 2005-2009, coupled with the Voyager 1 and 2 data from 1980 and 1981, the widely-observed 28 Sgr stellar occultation of 1989, and Hubble Space Telescope stellar occultations in 1991 and 1995, provide the opportunity to determine the orbital elements and precession rates of the non-circular Cassini Division features, and to compare multi-mode libration and circulation models for the B ring edge. These are essential ingredients for detailed tests of dynamical models for the structure of the Cassini Division and its possible connection to the B ring.

  9. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

    2014-06-03

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that “autunite-type” sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to “phosphuranylite-type” sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

  10. UVIS ring occultations show F ring feature location and optical depth correlated with Prometheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Esposito, L. W.; Albers, N.

    2010-05-01

    We find 24 statistically significant features in the F ring occultations using the High Speed Photometer (HSP) channel of the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS). These features are likely transient clumps of material embedded in the ring, each of which attenuates stellar signal during an occultation because the ring material is more densely packed at that location. In fact, two of these features are opaque, indicating they may be solid moonlets. Two trends are evident in the azimuthal location of these 24 F ring features with respect to that of Prometheus. First, the orbital locations of these features are mostly opposite Prometheus, as 11 of the 24 occupy the orbital region separated from Prometheus by 180° ± 20°. Second, average feature optical depth is maximum near the antipode of Prometheus in orbit. Our hypothesis is that these results show aggregation and disaggregation of clumps after Prometheus passes by. As Prometheus passes interior to the F ring, it encounters material once every synodic period, 68 days. Optical depth indicates density of ring material along the line of sight, so as material clumps together, we expect to see higher optical depths. Thus we infer that the encounter stimulates clumping of material that reaches a maximum 180° downstream. This may reinforce similar evidence that Ring-Moon interaction stimulates clumping in the F ring region from Cassini imaging (Beurle, et al., 2010) and at the B ring edge (Esposito, et al., 2010). Esposito, et al. (2010) suggest that the combined mass and velocity evolution of the ring system resembles a predator/prey model. This research was supported by the Cassini Project.

  11. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2014-12-22

    Two decimeter-scale 2D experiments were conducted in the proposed research. To the extent possible, the first experiment (2.44 m x 0.61 m x 10 cm) was be packed to reproduce the observed distributions of sediment size fractions in the subsurface at the tracer test site. Four size fractions of sediment (<125m, 125-250m, 250m to 2 mm, >2mm) were packed in the tank and the size fractions were placed in a sediment structure imitating pattern rather than the block pattern used in the previous experiments conducted with Naturita sediment. The second tank used the same total amount of sediment and proportions of the three size fractions used in the first experiment but was packed at larger geostatistical correlation lengths to evaluate how the scale of heterogeneity affects the upscaling results. This experiment was conducted with the goal of trying to determine how the upscaling would be affected by the diffusion path length associated with low permeability zones. The initial conditions in the tanks were based on observed field conditions. The influent was a synthetic groundwater that mimicked uncontaminated groundwater observed at the Naturita site. Samples were collected from side and end ports of the tank and were analyzed for U(VI), alkalinity, pH and major ions as was done in previous experiments. Each decimeter scale experiment was run for approximately 6 months and the experiments were run in parallel. Extensive premodeling occurred for both tanks and lasted the first year of the project.

  12. Biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate promoted by microbially-mediated phytate hydrolysis in contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salome, Kathleen R.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Webb, Samuel M.; Sobecky, Patricia A.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-01-01

    The bioreduction of uranium may immobilize a significant fraction of this toxic contaminant in reduced environments at circumneutral pH. In oxic and low pH environments, however, the low solubility of U(VI)-phosphate minerals also makes them good candidates for the immobilization of U(VI) in the solid phase. As inorganic phosphate is generally scarce in soils, the biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals via microbially-mediated organophosphate hydrolysis may represent the main immobilization process of uranium in these environments. In this study, contaminated sediments were incubated aerobically in two pH conditions to examine whether phytate, a naturally-occurring and abundant organophosphate in soils, could represent a potential phosphorous source to promote U(VI)-phosphate biomineralization by natural microbial communities. While phytate hydrolysis was not evident at pH 7.0, nearly complete hydrolysis was observed both with and without electron donor at pH 5.5, suggesting indigenous microorganisms express acidic phytases in these sediments. While the rate of hydrolysis of phytate generally increased in the presence of uranium, the net rate of inorganic phosphate production in solution was decreased and inositol phosphate intermediates were generated in contrast to similar incubations conducted without uranium. These findings suggest uranium stress enhanced the phytate-metabolism of the microbial community, while simultaneously inhibiting phosphatase production and/or activity by the indigenous population. Finally, phytate hydrolysis drastically decreased uranium solubility, likely due to formation of ternary sorption complexes, U(VI)-phytate precipitates, and U(VI)-phosphate minerals. Overall, the results of this study provide evidence for the ability of natural microbial communities to liberate phosphate from phytate in acidic sediments, possibly as a detoxification mechanism, and demonstrate the potential utility of phytate-promoted uranium

  13. Analysis of Cassini UVIS Extreme and Far Ultraviolet Observations of Saturn’s Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher D.; Koskinen, Tommi; Gronoff, Guillaume; Yung, Yuk L.; Esposito, Larry

    2015-11-01

    The atmosphere of Saturn is mainly composed of H2 and neutral atomic helium. The study of He 584 Å and H Lyman-α brightnesses is interesting as the EUV and FUV (Extreme and Far Ultraviolet) planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in its thermosphere. Time variation, asymmetries, and polar enhancement of the airglow are also possible and analysis already performed using the public archived Cassini mission data sets have shown we can solve some of the outstanding problems associated with these phenomena for Saturn.Specifically, we have (1) examined epochal eddy mixing disparities in the Saturnian upper atmosphere and quantify temporal mixing variations that may have occurred in the upper atmosphere of Saturn, as may be evidenced in Cassini mission data, (2) quantified any enhanced mixing in the auroral regions of Saturn, and (3) performed a robust study of Saturnian H Lyman-α brightness with the view to discover any longitudinal H Lyman-α planetary asymmetry or “bulge” across the disc such as was discovered by Voyager at Jupiter, indicative of the distribution of atomic H and accounting for the observed flux and any variations from the normal temperature profile.We have analyzed Cassini UVIS EUV and FUV airglow data from Saturn using sophisticated photochemical and radiative transfer models to investigate unexplained differences in the dynamical processes operating within its upper atmosphere. Powerful analysis techniques allow us to extract information on atmospheric mixing, temperatures, and temporal changes due to the solar and seasonal cycles from the variations in distribution and intensity of airglow emissions that result. We report on results of these efforts to date.

  14. Enhanced U(VI) bioreduction by alginate-immobilized uranium-reducing bacteria in the presence of carbon nanotubes and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weida; Feng, Yali; Tang, Xinhua; Li, Haoran; Du, Zhuwei; Yi, Aifei; Zhang, Xu

    2015-05-01

    Uranium-reducing bacteria were immobilized with sodium alginate, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The effects of different AQDS-CNTs contents, U(IV) concentrations, and metal ions on U(IV) reduction by immobilized beads were examined. Over 97.5% U(VI) (20 mg/L) was removed in 8 hr when the beads were added to 0.7% AQDS-CNTs, which was higher than that without AQDS-CNTs. This result may be attributed to the enhanced electron transfer by AQDS and CNTs. The reduction of U(VI) occurred at initial U(VI) concentrations of 10 to 100 mg/L and increased with increasing AQDS-CNT content from 0.1% to 1%. The presence of Fe(III), Cu(II) and Mn(II) slightly increased U(VI) reduction, whereas Cr(VI), Ni(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) significantly inhibited U(VI) reduction. After eight successive incubation-washing cycles or 8 hr of retention time (HRT) for 48 hr of continuous operation, the removal efficiency of uranium was above 90% and 92%, respectively. The results indicate that the AQDS-CNT/AL/cell beads are suitable for the treatment of uranium-containing wastewaters.

  15. Complexation of U(VI) with benzoic acid at variable temperatures (298-353 K): thermodynamics and crystal structures of U(VI)/benzoate complexes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqiu; Teat, Simon J; Zhang, Zhicheng; Luo, Shunzhong; Rao, Linfeng

    2016-01-07

    Thermodynamics of the U(VI) complexation with benzoic acid (HL) was studied by spectrophotometry at varied temperatures (298-353 K) with constant ionic strength (1.05 mol kg(-1) NaClO4). Two U(VI) benzoate complexes, UO2L(+) and UO2(OH)L(aq), were identified and their formation constants determined. The formation of both complexes is endothermic and driven exclusively by entropy. Two types of U(VI)/benzoate complex crystals were synthesized from aqueous solutions at different pH and ligand/metal ratios. Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry. One structure is a 1 : 3 U(VI) benzoate complex (Na[UO2(C7H5O2)3]·2H2O), each benzoate holding a bidentate coordination mode to U(VI) in the equatorial plane of UO2(2+). The other is a U(VI) hydroxobenzoate complex with unique μ3-OH bridging ([(UO2)2(C7H5O2)2(μ3-OH)2]·4H2O). In the structure, each UO2(2+) ion holds five coordination oxygens in its equatorial plane, two carboxylate oxygens from two benzoate ligands and three oxygens from three μ3-OH groups.

  16. Molecular separations with breathing metal-organic frameworks: modelling packed bed adsorbers.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Tom R C; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2016-03-14

    Various metal-organic framework (MOFs) adsorbents show peculiar adsorption behaviour as they can adopt different crystal phases, each phase with its own adsorption characteristics. Besides external stimuli such as temperature or light, different species of guest adsorbate can trigger a transition (breathing) of the host structure at a different pressure. Such phase transitions also occur during dynamic separations on a packed bed of adsorbent, where the concentrations of the adsorbates vary throughout axial column distance and time. This work presents a general strategy to model the adsorption behavior of such phase changing adsorbents during column separations and focuses on remarkable model predictions for pure components and binary mixtures in diluted and non-diluted conditions. During binary breakthrough experiments, the behaviour of flexible adsorbents is quite complex. A succession of complete or even partial phase transformations (resulting in phase coexistence) can occur during the adsorption process. A variety of unusual breakthrough profiles is observed for diluted binary mixtures. Simulations reveal at least five types of breakthrough profiles to emerge. The occurrence of these cases can be rationalized by the hodograph technique, combined with the phase diagram of the adsorbent. The remarkable experimental breakthrough profiles observed for ortho-xylene/ethylbenzene (diluted) and CO2/CH4 (non-diluted) separation on the flexible MIL-53 framework can be rationalized by application of the proposed model strategy.

  17. Heat transfer to the adsorbent in solar adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Papucik, Stefan; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with design and construction of solar adsorption cooling device and with heat transfer problem in adsorber. The most important part of adsorption cooling system is adsorber/desorber containing adsorbent. Zeolith (adsorbent) type was chosen for its high adsorption capacity, like a coolant was used water. In adsorber/desorber occur, at heating of adsorbent, to heat transfer from heat change medium to the adsorbent. The time required for heating of adsorber filling is very important, because on it depend flexibility of cooling system. Zeolith has a large thermal resistance, therefore it had to be adapted the design and construction of adsorber. As the best shows the tube type of adsorber with double coat construction. By this construction is ensured thin layer of adsorbent and heating is quick in all volume of adsorbent. The process of heat transfer was experimentally measured, but for comparison simulated in ANSYS, too.

  18. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  19. Direct observation of the photodegradation of anthracene and pyrene adsorbed onto mangrove leaves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Wu, Tun-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    An established synchronous fluorimetry method was used for in situ investigation of the photodegradation of pyrene (PYR) and anthracene (ANT) adsorbed onto fresh leaves of the seedlings of two mangrove species, Aegiceras corniculatum (L.) Blanco (Ac) and Kandelia obovata (Ko) in multicomponent mixtures (mixture of the ANT and PYR). Experimental results indicated that photodegradation was the main transformation pathway for both ANT and PYR in multicomponent mixtures. The amount of the PAHs volatilizing from the leaf surfaces and entering the inner leaf tissues was negligible. Over a certain period of irradiation time, the photodegradation of both PYR and ANT adsorbed onto the leaves of Ac and Ko followed first-order kinetics, with faster rates being observed on Ac leaves. In addition, the photodegradation rate of PYR on the leaves of the mangrove species in multicomponent mixtures was much slower than that of adsorbed ANT. Compared with the PAHs adsorbed as single component, the photodegradation rate of ANT adsorbed in multicomponent mixtures was slower, while that of PYR was faster. Moreover, the photodegradation of PYR and ANT dissolved in water in multicomponent mixtures was investigated for comparison. The photodegradation rate on leaves was much slower than in water. Therefore, the physical-chemical properties of the substrate may strongly influence the photodegradation rate of adsorbed PAHs.

  20. Direct Observation of the Photodegradation of Anthracene and Pyrene Adsorbed onto Mangrove Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Wu, Tun-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    An established synchronous fluorimetry method was used for in situ investigation of the photodegradation of pyrene (PYR) and anthracene (ANT) adsorbed onto fresh leaves of the seedlings of two mangrove species, Aegiceras corniculatum (L.) Blanco (Ac) and Kandelia obovata (Ko) in multicomponent mixtures (mixture of the ANT and PYR). Experimental results indicated that photodegradation was the main transformation pathway for both ANT and PYR in multicomponent mixtures. The amount of the PAHs volatilizing from the leaf surfaces and entering the inner leaf tissues was negligible. Over a certain period of irradiation time, the photodegradation of both PYR and ANT adsorbed onto the leaves of Ac and Ko followed first-order kinetics, with faster rates being observed on Ac leaves. In addition, the photodegradation rate of PYR on the leaves of the mangrove species in multicomponent mixtures was much slower than that of adsorbed ANT. Compared with the PAHs adsorbed as single component, the photodegradation rate of ANT adsorbed in multicomponent mixtures was slower, while that of PYR was faster. Moreover, the photodegradation of PYR and ANT dissolved in water in multicomponent mixtures was investigated for comparison. The photodegradation rate on leaves was much slower than in water. Therefore, the physical-chemical properties of the substrate may strongly influence the photodegradation rate of adsorbed PAHs. PMID:25144741

  1. Effect of adsorbed chlorine and oxygen on the shear strength of iron and copper junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Static-friction experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature on copper, iron, and steel contacts selectively contaminated with oxygen and chlorine in submonolayer amounts. The concentration of the adsorbates was determined with Auger electron spectroscopy and was measured relative to the saturation concentration of oxygen on iron (concentration, 1.0). The coefficient of static friction decreased with increasing adsorbate concentration; however, it was independent of the type of metal and the adsorbate species. The results compared satisfactorily with an extension of the junction growth theory to heterogeneous interfaces. The reduction in interfacial shear strength was measured by the ratio of the shear strength of the interface with an adsorbate concentration of 1.0 and the strength of the clean metal interface. This ratio was about 0.835 for all the systems tested.

  2. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  3. Chitin Adsorbents for Toxic Metals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Bhatnagar, Amit; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.; Kyzas, George Z.

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater treatment is still a critical issue all over the world. Among examined methods for the decontamination of wastewaters, adsorption is a promising, cheap, environmentally friendly and efficient procedure. There are various types of adsorbents that have been used to remove different pollutants such as agricultural waste, compost, nanomaterials, algae, etc., Chitin (poly-β-(1,4)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) is the second most abundant natural biopolymer and it has attracted scientific attention as an inexpensive adsorbent for toxic metals. This review article provides information about the use of chitin as an adsorbent. A list of chitin adsorbents with maximum adsorption capacity and the best isotherm and kinetic fitting models are provided. Moreover, thermodynamic studies, regeneration studies, the mechanism of adsorption and the experimental conditions are also discussed in depth. PMID:28067848

  4. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  5. IR investigations of surfaces and adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn Williams

    2001-12-10

    Synchrotron infrared reflection-absorption measurements on single crystal metal surfaces with adsorbates have led to the determination of many key parameters related to the bonding vibrational modes and the dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, energy couplings between electrons and adsorbate motion have been shown to be a dominant mechanism on metal surfaces. Excellent agreement has been obtained with calculations for many of the observations, and the synergy between theory and experiment has led to a deeper understanding of the roles of electrons and phonons in determining the properties of interfaces and their roles in phenomena as diverse as friction, lubrication, catalysis and adhesion. Nonetheless, as the experiments are pushed harder, to describe such effects as co-adsorbed systems, disagreements continue to challenge the theory and our comprehension also is still evolving.

  6. Comparison of sorption behavior of Th(IV) and U(VI) on modified impregnated resin containing quinizarin with that conventional prepared impregnated resin.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Saeid; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad

    2011-06-15

    This paper reports the results obtained by studying the ion-exchange properties of a new solvent impregnated resin (SIR), which was prepared by impregnation of quinizarin (1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone, QNZ) on Amberlite XAD-16 after nitration of the benzene rings present in its structure. The sorption behavior of Th(IV) and U(VI) on/in the modified SIR was compared with that of the SIR prepared via the conventional method. It was observed that sorption capacity and sorption rate of the modified SIR are significantly greater than the conventional one. The modified SIR was then applied to the extraction of Th(IV) and U(VI) ions at the presence of many co-existence metal ions. The results obtained denote on successful application of this new SIR to analysis of natural water samples spiked to Th(IV) and U(VI) ions.

  7. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  8. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  9. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1991-01-22

    This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

  10. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  11. Dynamic Succession of Groundwater Functional Microbial Communities in Response to Emulsified Vegetable Oil Amendment during Sustained In Situ U(VI) Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Wu, Wei-Min; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Gihring, Thomas; Zhang, Gengxin; Schadt, Chris W.; Watson, David; Jardine, Phil; Criddle, Craig S.; Brooks, Scott; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale field experiment demonstrated that a one-time amendment of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) reduced groundwater U(VI) concentrations for 1 year in a fast-flowing aquifer. However, little is known about how EVO amendment stimulates the functional gene composition, structure, and dynamics of groundwater microbial communities toward prolonged U(VI) reduction. In this study, we hypothesized that EVO amendment would shift the functional gene composition and structure of groundwater microbial communities and stimulate key functional genes/groups involved in EVO biodegradation and reduction of electron acceptors in the aquifer. To test these hypotheses, groundwater microbial communities after EVO amendment were analyzed using a comprehensive functional gene microarray. Our results showed that EVO amendment stimulated sequential shifts in the functional composition and structure of groundwater microbial communities. Particularly, the relative abundance of key functional genes/groups involved in EVO biodegradation and the reduction of NO3−, Mn(IV), Fe(III), U(VI), and SO42− significantly increased, especially during the active U(VI) reduction period. The relative abundance for some of these key functional genes/groups remained elevated over 9 months. Montel tests suggested that the dynamics in the abundance, composition, and structure of these key functional genes/groups were significantly correlated with groundwater concentrations of acetate, NO3−, Mn(II), Fe(II), U(VI), and SO42−. Our results suggest that EVO amendment stimulated dynamic succession of key functional microbial communities. This study improves our understanding of the composition, structure, and function changes needed for groundwater microbial communities to sustain a long-term U(VI) reduction. PMID:25862231

  12. Dynamic Succession of Groundwater Functional Microbial Communities in Response to Emulsified Vegetable Oil Amendment during Sustained In Situ U(VI) Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wu, Wei-Min; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Gihring, Thomas; Zhang, Gengxin; Schadt, Chris W; Watson, David; Jardine, Phil; Criddle, Craig S; Brooks, Scott; Marsh, Terence L; Tiedje, James M; Arkin, Adam P; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-06-15

    A pilot-scale field experiment demonstrated that a one-time amendment of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) reduced groundwater U(VI) concentrations for 1 year in a fast-flowing aquifer. However, little is known about how EVO amendment stimulates the functional gene composition, structure, and dynamics of groundwater microbial communities toward prolonged U(VI) reduction. In this study, we hypothesized that EVO amendment would shift the functional gene composition and structure of groundwater microbial communities and stimulate key functional genes/groups involved in EVO biodegradation and reduction of electron acceptors in the aquifer. To test these hypotheses, groundwater microbial communities after EVO amendment were analyzed using a comprehensive functional gene microarray. Our results showed that EVO amendment stimulated sequential shifts in the functional composition and structure of groundwater microbial communities. Particularly, the relative abundance of key functional genes/groups involved in EVO biodegradation and the reduction of NO3 (-), Mn(IV), Fe(III), U(VI), and SO4 (2-) significantly increased, especially during the active U(VI) reduction period. The relative abundance for some of these key functional genes/groups remained elevated over 9 months. Montel tests suggested that the dynamics in the abundance, composition, and structure of these key functional genes/groups were significantly correlated with groundwater concentrations of acetate, NO3 (-), Mn(II), Fe(II), U(VI), and SO4 (2-). Our results suggest that EVO amendment stimulated dynamic succession of key functional microbial communities. This study improves our understanding of the composition, structure, and function changes needed for groundwater microbial communities to sustain a long-term U(VI) reduction.

  13. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; Maher, Kate

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.

  14. Sorption behavior of U(VI) on phyllite: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Arnold, T; Zorn, T; Zänker, H; Bernhard, G; Nitsche, H

    2001-02-01

    The sorption of U(VI) onto low-grade metamorphic rock phyllite was modeled with the diffuse double layer model (DDLM) using the primary mineralogical constituents of phyllite, i.e. quartz, chlorite, muscovite, and albite, as input components, and as additional component, the poorly ordered Fe oxide hydroxide mineral, ferrihydrite. Ferrihydrite forms during the batch sorption experiment as a weathering product of chlorite. In this process, Fe(II), leached from the chlorite, oxidizes to Fe(III), hydrolyses and precipitates as ferrihydrite. The formation of ferrihydrite during the batch sorption experiment was identified by Mössbauer spectroscopy, showing a 2.8% increase of Fe(III) in the phyllite powder. The ferrihydrite was present as Fe nanoparticles or agglomerates with diameters ranging from 6 to 25 nm, with indications for even smaller particles. These Fe colloids were detected in centrifugation experiments of a ground phyllite suspension using various centrifugal forces. The basis for the successful interpretation of the experimental sorption data of uranyl(VI) on phyllite were: (1) the determination of surface complex formation constants of uranyl with quartz, chlorite, muscovite, albite, and ferrihydrite in individual batch sorption experiments, (2) the determination of surface acidity constants of quartz, chlorite, muscovite, and albite obtained from separate acid-base titration, (3) the determination of surface site densities of quartz, chlorite, muscovite, and albite evaluated independently of each other with adsorption isotherms, and (4) the quantification of the secondary phase ferrihydrite, which formed during the batch sorption experiments with phyllite. The surface complex formation constants and the protolysis constants were optimized by using the experimentally obtained data sets and the computer code FITEQL. Surface site densities were evaluated from adsorption isotherms at pH 6.5. The uranyl(VI) sorption onto phyllite was accurately modeled with

  15. Sorption behavior of U(VI) on phyllite: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Thuro; Zorn, T.; Zänker, H.; Bernhard, G.; Nitsche, H.

    2001-02-01

    The sorption of U(VI) onto low-grade metamorphic rock phyllite was modeled with the diffuse double layer model (DDLM) using the primary mineralogical constituents of phyllite, i.e. quartz, chlorite, muscovite, and albite, as input components, and as additional component, the poorly ordered Fe oxide hydroxide mineral, ferrihydrite. Ferrihydrite forms during the batch sorption experiment as a weathering product of chlorite. In this process, Fe(II), leached from the chlorite, oxidizes to Fe(III), hydrolyses and precipitates as ferrihydrite. The formation of ferrihydrite during the batch sorption experiment was identified by Mössbauer spectroscopy, showing a 2.8% increase of Fe(III) in the phyllite powder. The ferrihydrite was present as Fe nanoparticles or agglomerates with diameters ranging from 6 to 25 nm, with indications for even smaller particles. These Fe colloids were detected in centrifugation experiments of a ground phyllite suspension using various centrifugal forces. The basis for the successful interpretation of the experimental sorption data of uranyl(VI) on phyllite were: (1) the determination of surface complex formation constants of uranyl with quartz, chlorite, muscovite, albite, and ferrihydrite in individual batch sorption experiments, (2) the determination of surface acidity constants of quartz, chlorite, muscovite, and albite obtained from separate acid-base titration, (3) the determination of surface site densities of quartz, chlorite, muscovite, and albite evaluated independently of each other with adsorption isotherms, and (4) the quantification of the secondary phase ferrihydrite, which formed during the batch sorption experiments with phyllite. The surface complex formation constants and the protolysis constants were optimized by using the experimentally obtained data sets and the computer code FITEQL. Surface site densities were evaluated from adsorption isotherms at pH 6.5. The uranyl(VI) sorption onto phyllite was accurately modeled with

  16. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the removal of U(VI) by low cost agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Kausar, Abida; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; MacKinnon, Gillian

    2013-11-01

    In this research, biosorption efficiency of different agro-wastes was evaluated with rice husk showing maximum biosorption capacity among the selected biosorbents. Optimization of native, SDS-treated and immobilized rice husk adsorption parameters including pH, biosorbent amount, contact time, initial U(VI) concentration and temperature for maximum U(VI) removal was investigated. Maximum biosorption capacity for native (29.56 mg g(-1)) and immobilized biomass (17.59 mg g(-1)) was observed at pH 4 while SDS-treated biomass showed maximum removal (28.08 mg g(-1)) at pH 5. The Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlated best with the U(IV) biosorption equilibrium data for the 10-100 mg L(-1) concentration range. The kinetics of the reaction followed pseudo-second order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters like free energy (ΔG(0)) and enthalpy (ΔH°) confirmed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. Experiments to determine the regeneration capacity of the selected biosorbents and the effect of competing metal ions on biosorption capacity were also conducted. The biomass was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, surface area analysis, Fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. The study proved that rice husk has potential to treat uranium in wastewater.

  17. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

    2013-10-16

    Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

  18. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications.

  19. Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Wang, Zheming; Dixit, Suvasis; Steefel, Carl I; Saiz, Eduardo; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2009-04-01

    A saline-alkaline brine containing high concentration of U(VI) was accidentally spilled at the Hanford Site in 1951, introducing 10 tons of U into sediments under storage tank BX-102. U concentrations in the deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes increase with time, yet how the U has been migrating is not fully understood. We simulated the spill event in laboratory soil columns, followed by aging, and obtained spatially resolved U partitioning and speciation along simulated plumes. We found after aging, at apparent steady state, that the pore aqueous phase U concentrations remained surprisingly high (up to 0.022 M), in close agreement with the recently reported high U concentrations (up to 0.027 M) in the vadose zone plume (1). The pH values of aged pore liquids varying from 10 to 7, consistent with the measured pH of the field borehole sediments varying from 9.5 to 7.4 (2), from near the plume source to the plume front. The direct measurements of aged pore liquids together with thermodynamic calculations using a Pitzer approach revealed that UO2(CO3)3(4-) is the dominant aqueous U species within the plume body (pH 8-10), whereas Ca2UO2(CO3)3 and CaUO2(CO3)32- are also significant in the plume frontvicinity (pH 7-8), consistent with that measured from field borehole pore-waters (3). U solid phase speciation varies at different locations along the plume flow path and even within single sediment grains, because of location dependent pore and micropore solution chemistry. Our results suggest that continuous gravity-driven migration of the highly stable U02(CO3)34 in the residual carbonate and sodium rich tank waste solution is likely responsible for the detected growing U concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater.

  20. Hydration level dependence of the microscopic dynamics of water adsorbed in ultramicroporous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Yue, Yanfeng; Bahadur, Jitendra; Guo, Junjie; Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Melnichenko, Yuri B.

    2016-10-20

    Even when not functionalized intentionally, most carbon materials are not hydrophobic and readily adsorb water molecules from atmospheric water vapor. We have equilibrated an ultramicroporous carbon at several levels of relative humidity, thereby attaining various hydration levels. The water molecules were adsorbed on the pore walls (but did not fill completely the pore volume) and thus could be better described as hydration, or surface, rather than confined, water. We used quasielastic neutron scattering to perform a detailed investigation of the dependence of microscopic dynamics of these adsorbed water species on the hydration level and temperature. The behavior of hydration water in ultramicroporous carbon clearly demonstrates the same universal traits that characterize surface (hydration) water in other materials that are surface-hydrated. In addition, unless special treatment is intentionally applied to ultramicroporous carbon, the species filling its pores in various applications, ranging from hydrogen molecules to electrolytes, likely find themselves in contact with non-freezing water molecules characterized by rich microscopic dynamics.

  1. Sulfur removal from fuel using zeolites/polyimide mixed matrix membrane adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ligang; Wang, Andong; Dong, Meimei; Zhang, Yuzhong; He, Benqiao; Li, Hong

    2012-02-15

    A novel membrane adsorption process was proposed for the sulfur removal from fuels. The mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) adsorbents composed of polyimide (PI) and various Y zeolites were prepared. By the detailed characterization of FT-IR, morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of MMMs adsorbents, combining the adsorption and desorption behavior research, the process-structure-function relationship was discussed. Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show that the functional particles are incorporated into the three-dimensional network structure. MMMs adsorbents with 40% of zeolites content possess better physical properties, which was confirmed by mechanical strength and thermo stability analysis. Influence factors including post-treatment, content of incorporated zeolites, adsorption time, temperature, initial sulfur concentration as well as sulfur species on the adsorption performance of MMMs adsorbents have been evaluated. At 4 wt.% zeolites content, adsorption capacity for NaY/PI, AgY/PI and CeY/PI MMMs adsorbents come to 2.0, 7.5 and 7.9 mg S/g, respectively. And the regeneration results suggest that the corresponding spent membranes can recover about 98%, 90% and 70% of the desulfurization capacity, respectively. The distinct adsorption and desorption behavior of MMMs adsorbents with various functional zeolites was markedly related with their various binding force and binding mode with sulfur compounds.

  2. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  3. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  4. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  5. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  6. Solvent cleanup using base-treated silica gel solid adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Tallent, O.K.; Mailen, J.C.; Pannell, K.D.

    1984-06-01

    A solvent cleanup method using silica gel columns treated with either sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or lithium hydroxide (LiOH) has been investigated. Its effectiveness compares favorably with that of traditional wash methods. After treatment with NaOH solution, the gels adsorb HNO/sub 3/, dibutyl phosphate (DBP), UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, Pu/sup 4 +/, various metal-ion fission products, and other species from the solvent. Adsorption mechanisms include neutralization, hydrolysis, polymerization, and precipitation, depending on the species adsorbed. Sodium dibutyl phosphate, which partially distributes to the solvent from the gels, can be stripped with water; the stripping coefficient ranges from 280 to 540. Adsorption rates are diffusion controlled such that temperature effects are relatively small. Recycle of the gels is achieved either by an aqueous elution and recycle sequence or by a thermal treatment method, which may be preferable. Potential advantages of this solvent cleanup method are that (1) some operational problems are avoided and (2) the amount of NaNO/sub 3/ waste generated per metric ton of nuclear fuel reprocessed would be reduced significantly. 19 references, 6 figures, 12 tables.

  7. Réduction de U(VI) par le fer métallique: application à la dépollution des eaux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner; Nuttall, Eric; Gong, Weiliang

    1999-03-01

    We investigated the possibility of U(VI) reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe 0). We conducted batch experiments with granular iron and solutions containing 0.25 and 9.3 mg L -1 U(VI) at 24 °C. The solution pH ranges between 2 and 9. In all experiments uranium removal was complete within several hours to several days regardless of the pH value. The reduced uranium precipitated as poorly crystallized hydrated uraninite, UO 2. nH 2O. The reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by Fe 0 was found to be the principal mechanism of U removal from the solution. Other mechanisms such as U(VI) sorption on the newly formed Fe(III) hydroxides are insignificant. These results show that zero-valent iron can be used to remediate U-contaminated waters from uranium mines and mill tailings sites, the pH of which usually ranges between 2 and 9.

  8. Quest for Environmentally-Benign Ligands for Actinide Separations: Thermodynamic, Spectroscopic, and Structural Characterization of U(VI) Complexes with Oxa-Diamide and Related Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Teat, Simon J.; Liu, Guokui

    2009-01-05

    Complexation of U(VI) with N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TMOGA) and N,N-dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DMOGA) was studied in comparison with their dicarboxylate analog, oxydiacetic acid (ODA). Thermodynamic parameters, including stability constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation, were determined by spectrophotometry, potentiometry and calorimetry. Single-crystal X-ray diffractometry, EXAFS spectroscopy, FT-IR absorption and laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy were used to obtain structural information on the U(VI) complexes. Like ODA, TMOGA and DMOGA form tridentate U(VI) complexes, with three oxygen atoms (the amide, ether and/or carboxylate oxygen) coordinating to the linear UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} cation via the equatorial plane. The stability constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation all decrease in the order ODA > DMOGA > TMOGA, showing that the complexation is entropy driven and the substitution of a carboxylate group with an amide group reduces the strength of complexation with U(VI) due to the decrease in the entropy of complexation. The trend in the thermodynamic stability of the complexes correlates very well with the structural and spectroscopic data obtained by single crystal XRD, FT-IR and laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy.

  9. Promotion of CO oxidation on PdO(101) by adsorbed H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juhee; Pan, Li; Mehar, Vikram; Zhang, Feng; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the influence of adsorbed H2O on the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) using temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that water inhibits CO adsorption on PdO(101) by site blocking, but also provides a more facile pathway for CO oxidation compared with the bare oxide surface. In the presence of adsorbed H2O, the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) produces a CO2 TPRS peak that is centered at a temperature 50 K lower than the main CO2 TPRS peak arising from CO oxidation on clean PdO(101) ( 330 vs. 380 K). RAIRS shows that CO continues to adsorb on atop-Pd sites of PdO(101) when H2O is co-adsorbed, and provides no evidence of other reactive intermediates. DFT calculations predict that the CO oxidation mechanism follows the same steps for CO adsorbed on PdO(101) with and without co-adsorbed H2O, wherein an atop-CO species recombines with an oxygen atom from the oxide surface lattice. According to DFT, hydrogen bonding interactions with adsorbed H2O species stabilize the carboxyl-like transition structure and intermediate that result from the initial recombination of CO and O on the PdO(101) surface. This stabilization lowers the energy barrier for CO oxidation on PdO(101) by 10 kJ/mol, in good agreement with our experimental estimate.

  10. Molecular insights into the pH-dependent adsorption and removal of ionizable antibiotic oxytetracycline by adsorbent cyclodextrin polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Cai, Xiyun; Xiong, Weina; Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Haitong; Yang, Xianhai; Li, Chao; Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Effects of pH on adsorption and removal efficiency of ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) by environmental adsorbents are an area of debate, because of its dual mediation towards adsorbents and adsorbate. Here, we probe the pH-dependent adsorption of ionizable antibiotic oxytetracycline (comprising OTCH2 (+), OTCH(±), OTC(-), and OTC(2-)) onto cyclodextrin polymers (CDPs) with the nature of molecular recognition and pH inertness. OTCH(±) commonly has high adsorption affinity, OTC(-) exhibits moderate affinity, and the other two species have negligible affinity. These species are evidenced to selectively interact with structural units (e.g., CD cavity, pore channel, and network) of the polymers and thus immobilized onto the adsorbents to different extents. The differences in adsorption affinity and mechanisms of the species account for the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. The mathematical equations are derived from the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of quantitatively relating adsorption affinity of OTC at varying pH to adsorbent properties. A combination of the MLR analysis for OTC and molecular recognition of adsorption of the species illustrates the nature of the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. Based on this finding, γ-HP-CDP is chosen to adsorb and remove OTC at pH 5.0 and 7.0, showing high removal efficiency and strong resistance to the interference of coexisting components.

  11. Aminosilica materials as adsorbents for the selective removal of aldehydes and ketones from simulated bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Drese, Jeffrey H; Talley, Anne D; Jones, Christopher W

    2011-03-21

    The fast pyrolysis of biomass is a potential route to the production of liquid biorenewable fuel sources. However, degradation of the bio-oil mixtures due to reaction of oxygenates, such as aldehydes and ketones, reduces the stability of the liquids and can impact long-term storage and shipping. Herein, solid aminosilica adsorbents are described for the selective adsorptive removal of reactive aldehyde and ketone species. Three aminosilica adsorbents are prepared through the reaction of amine-containing silanes with pore-expanded mesoporous silica. A fourth aminosilica adsorbent is prepared through the ring-opening polymerization of aziridine from pore-expanded mesoporous silica. Adsorption experiments with a representative mixture of bio-oil model compounds are presented using each adsorbent at room temperature and 45 °C. The adsorbent comprising only primary amines adsorbs the largest amount of aldehydes and ketones. The overall reactivity of this adsorbent increases with increasing temperature. Additional aldehyde screening experiments show that the reactivity of aldehydes with aminosilicas varies depending on their chemical functionality. Initial attempts to regenerate an aminosilica adsorbent by acid hydrolysis show that they can be at least partially regenerated for further use.

  12. Effect of Humic Substances on the Trapping and Transformations of U(VI) by Ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublet, G.; Brown, G. E.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.; Janot, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Old Rifle DOE site in Colorado was a major site for milling uranium ore. U concentrations up to 1.8 uM persist in the Rifle aquifer, even after 'cleaning' the waste source of contaminations [1]. Understanding the behavior of U(VI) in this anthropogenically perturbed system is crucial for controlling the level of U contamination. Direct investigations of U speciation at this site have shown that U is associated with a wide variety of minerals as well as with natural organic matter (NOM) [2]. NOM has multiple functional groups which can be highly reactive with respect to aqueous metal ions, including actinides. Such interactions result in the formation of organo-mineral-metal (ternary) complexes and catalyze redox transformations; in addition, they can enhance mineral dissolution and metal transport [3,4,5]. In the complex soil/sediment system, aqueous, mineral, and organic phases are intimately mixed and their interactions are difficult to characterize by direct investigation [1]. The nanoparticulate iron hydroxide ferrihydrite (Fh), which is ubiquitous in many natural soils and highly reactive toward metal ions, is expected to significantly influence the fate of U in natural soils and is abundant in the subsurface at the Rifle site. NOM is also abundant at this site; however, little is known about the effect of NOM associated with ferrihydrite on the fate of U in such subsurface environments. To date, simple model systems composed mainly of two components (Fh and NOM) [6], (U and NOM or simple organic molecules) [7], or (Fh and U) [8,9], and more rarely composed of three components [10,11] have been studied in an effort to understand interactions among these components. In order to extend this earlier work to ternary systems, we have carried out batch reactions of U, a humic acid standard - Eliott soil humic acid (ESHA), and Fh under conditions that mimic those in the subsurface at Rifle. We have used U L3- and Fe K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy coupled

  13. Scattering properties of Saturn's rings in the far ultraviolet from Cassini UVIS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, E. Todd; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.

    2013-07-01

    We use Cassini UVIS data to determine the scattering properties of Saturn's ring particles in the FUV. We have replaced the scattering function from the classical Chandrasekhar single scattering radiative transfer equation for reflectance with a ring wake model for the A and B rings derived from stellar occultations. The free parameters in this model are the ring particle Bond albedo, AB, and the ring particle asymmetry parameter, g, which equals the cosine of the most probable scattering angle of a photon from a ring particle. The spectrum of Saturn's rings from 140 to 190 nm shows an absorption feature due to water ice shortward of 165 nm. We compare our model values for I/F to lit-side data at 155 nm and at 180 nm for regions in both the A and B rings. We used the unmodified Chandrasekhar model for the C ring and Cassini Division, and in all cases we determined AB and g in the FUV for the first time. Values of AB vary between 0.04 and 0.091 at 180 nm and between 0.012 and 0.019 at 155 nm. The variations across the ring of AB at 180 nm is consistent with a greater abundance of non-ice contaminant in the C ring and Cassini Division and a minimum in contaminant abundance in the outer B ring. There is little variation in AB at 155 nm across the rings, which suggests that the reflectance of the water ice and non-water ice material shortward of the 165 nm absorption edge are about the same. Values of g vary between -0.68 and -0.78 at 180 nm and between -0.63 and -0.77 at 155 nm showing that the ring particles are highly backscattering in the FUV. We find that the wavelength of the absorption feature varies with ring region and viewing geometry indicating a different photon mean path length, L, through the outer layer of the ring particle (Bradley, E.T., Colwell, J.E., Esposito, L.W., Cuzzi, J.N., Tollerud, H., Chambers, L. [2010]. Icarus 206 (2), 458-466). We compared I/F from 152 to 185 nm to a radiative transfer spectral model developed by Shkuratov et al

  14. [Ability of typical greenery shrubs of Beijing to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 ].

    PubMed

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yun-qi; Zhang, Hui-lan; Yang, Song-nan; Li, Ang

    2014-09-01

    Four typical types of green shrubs of Beijing (Euonymus japonicus, Buxus microphylla, Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea, Taxus cuspidate cv. nana) were selected to study their capacities in adsorbing and arresting PM2.5 using both field observations and air chamber simulations. Concurrently, in order to analyze the pollution characteristics of Beijing in winter and spring, the PM2.5 concentrations of December 2012 to May 2013 were collected. Experimental results showed that: From the gas chamber experiments, the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 was in the order of Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea > Buxus microphylla > Taxus cuspidate cv. nana > Euonymus japonicus, mainly due to the differences in leaf characteristics; Outside measurement results showed that the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 was ranked as Buxus microphylla > Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea > Taxus cuspidate cv. nana > Euonymus japonicus. Chamber simulation and outdoor observation showed that Buxus microphylla and Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea had strong ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5; Meanwhile, the slight differences between the chamber simulation and outdoor observation results might be related to plant structure. Compared to tree species, the planting condition of shrub species was loose, and it greened quickly; By analyzing the Beijing PM2.5 concentration values in winter and spring, it was found that the PM2.5 concentration was particularly high in the winter of Beijing, and evergreen shrubs maintained the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5.

  15. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    reactivity of surface-adsorbed catechol contrasts prior observations which found thin films of pure catechol unreactive with NO2, indicating that thin films do not always serve as reliable models for surface-adsorbed species.

  16. An electrokinetic study on a synthetic adsorbent of crystalline calcium silicate hydrate and its mechanism of endotoxin removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Zhang, John P; Smith, Timothy R; Hurst, William E; Sulpizio, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    A synthetic, disposable adsorbent of crystalline calcium silicate hydrate, LRA product by Advanced Minerals Corp., has been found highly effective for endotoxin removal from aqueous solutions. Endotoxin removal by this adsorbent is greatly enhanced by the addition of an electrolyte, such as NaCl or Tris-HCl. The electrophoretic method has been used to study the mechanism of endotoxin adsorption. In many cases, adding the electrolyte increases the magnitude of negative zeta potential of the adsorbent in water, while endotoxin adsorption reduces the magnitude. It is hypothesized that ion-exchange between monovalent cations from the aqueous phase and Ca2+ ions near the surface of the adsorbent shift zeta potential of the adsorbent to the more negative direction. It is further hypothesized that endotoxins form cationic species through binding between its phosphate groups and Ca2+ ions dissolved from the adsorbent. The adsorption of endotoxins in the form of cationic species is enhanced by the increased negative zeta potential of the adsorbent when an electrolyte is added.

  17. Application of maghemite nanoparticles as sorbents for the removal of Cu(II), Mn(II) and U(VI) ions from aqueous solution in acid mine drainage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etale, Anita; Tutu, Hlanganani; Drake, Deanne C.

    2016-06-01

    The adsorptive removal of Cu(II), Mn(II) and U(VI) by maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated under acid mine drainage (AMD) conditions to assess NP potential for remediating AMD-contaminated water. The effects of time, NP and metal concentration, as well as manganese and sulphate ions were quantified at pH 3. Adsorption of all three ions was rapid, and equilibrium was attained in 5 min or less. 56 % of Cu, 53 % of Mn and 49 % of U were adsorbed. In addition, adsorption efficiencies were enhanced by ≥10 % in the presence of manganese and sulphate ions, although Cu sorption was reduced in 1:2 Cu-to-Mn solutions. Adsorption also increased with pH: 86 % Cu, 62 % Mn and 77 % U were removed from solution at pH 9 and increasing initial metal concentrations. Increasing NP concentrations did not, however, always increase metal removal. Kinetics data were best described by a pseudo-second-order model, implying chemisorption, while isotherm data were better fitted by the Freundlich model. Metal removal by NPs was then tested in AMD-contaminated surface and ground water. Removal efficiencies of up to 46 % for Cu and 54 % for Mn in surface water and 8 % for Cu and 50 % for Mn in ground water were achieved, confirming that maghemite NPs can be applied for the removal of these ions from AMD-contaminated waters. Notably, whereas sulphates may increase adsorption efficiencies, high Mn concentrations in AMD will likely inhibit Cu sorption.

  18. Measuring Particle Sizes from Diffraction Spikes at Saturn’s Ring Edges with Cassini UVIS Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Tracy M.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-10-01

    The sharp edges that define many of the boundaries in Saturn’s rings enable the detection of diffracted starlight by small particles during stellar occultations. As the occulted star is revealed in a gap or beyond the outer edge of the rings, the direct stellar signal is augmented by an additional signal due to the scattered light from the particles in the nearby edge. The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on Cassini has detected strong diffraction signals throughout Saturn’s A ring in 50-75% of the one hundred and thirty stellar occultations analyzed thus far. We measure the radial extent and the strength of the diffraction signals at the Encke Gap edges, the Keeler Gap edges, and the outer edge of the A ring in the UVIS occultation data. The radial extent of the signal is determined by the size of the smallest particles and the number of those particles determines the amplitude of the signal. We therefore use the measurements to place a lower limit on the particle size and to constrain the fractional optical depth due to these small particles. The diffraction signals extend radially from several meters to tens of kilometers beyond the ring edges, indicating significant populations of centimeter and millimeter-sized particles. We find more prominent diffraction signals in the Keeler Gap edges and the outer edge of the A ring than in the Encke Gap edges which suggests a decrease in particle size toward the outer edge of the A ring. We will present the results of a study of the small particle population at ring edges with azimuthal distance from the embedded ringmoons Pan (Encke Gap) and Daphnis (Keeler Gap) and the conclusions from our analysis of the size and abundance of particles in these three regions of the outer A ring.

  19. POLAR-UVI and other Coordinated Observations of a Traveling Convection Vortex Event Observed on 24 July 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Baker, J. B.; Ridley, A. J.; Sitar, R. J.; Papitashvili, V. O.; Cumnock, J.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    Coordinated analysis of data from the POLAR UVI instrument, ground magnetometers, incoherent scatter radar, solar wind monitors IMP-8 and WIND, and DMSP satellite is focused on a traveling convection vortex (TCV) event on 24 July 1966. Starting at 10:48 UT, ground magnetometers in Greenland and eastern Canada measure pulsations consistent with the passing overhead of a series of alternating TCV field-aligned current pairs. Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar measures strong modulation of the strength and direction of ionospheric plasma flow, The magnetometer pulsations grow in magnitude over the next hour, peaking in intensity at 11:39 UT, at which time the UVI instrument measures a localized intensification of auroral emissions over central and western Greenland. Subsequent images show the intensification grow in strength and propagate westward (tailward) until approximately 11:58 UT at which time the emissions fade. These observations are consistent with the westward passage of two pairs of moderately intense TCVs over central Greenland followed by a third very intense TCV pair. The intensification of auroral emissions at 11:39 UT is associated with the trailing vortex of the third TCV pair, thought to be the result of an upward field-aligned current. Measurements of the solar wind suggest that a pressure change may be responsible for triggering the first two pairs of TCVS, and that a subsequent sudden change in orientation of the IMF may have produced the intensification of the third TCV pair and the associated aurora] brightening. DMSP particle data indicate that the TCVs occur on field lines which map to the boundary plasma sheet or outer edge of the low latitude boundary layer.

  20. Determination of maximal amount of minor gases adsorbed in a shale sample by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Hu, Hui-Chao; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Pan, Lei; Xiao, Xian-Ming

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we present a novel method for determining the maximal amount of ethane, a minor gas species, adsorbed in a shale sample. The method is based on the time-dependent release of ethane from shale samples measured by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC). The study includes a mathematical model for fitting the experimental data, calculating the maximal amount gas adsorbed, and predicting results at other temperatures. The method is a more efficient alternative to the isothermal adsorption method that is in widespread use today.

  1. Quantitative adsorbate structure determination for quasicrystals using x-ray standing waves.

    PubMed

    Diehl, R D; Li, H I; Su, S Y; Mayer, A; Stanisha, N A; Ledieu, J; Lovelock, K R J; Jones, Robert G; Deyko, A; Wearing, L H; McGrath, R; Chaudhuri, A; Woodruff, D P

    2014-09-05

    The quantitative structure determination of adsorbed species on quasicrystal surfaces has so far appeared to present insurmountable problems. The normal incidence standing x-ray wave field technique offers a simple solution, without extensive data sets or large computations. Its application to quasicrystals raises several conceptual difficulties that are related to the phase problem in x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate their solution for the case of Si atoms adsorbed on the decagonal Co-rich modification of the Al-Co-Ni quasicrystal to determine the local structure, comprising 6-atom clusters in particular hollow sites.

  2. Quantitative Adsorbate Structure Determination for Quasicrystals Using X-Ray Standing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, R. D.; Li, H. I.; Su, S. Y.; Mayer, A.; Stanisha, N. A.; Ledieu, J.; Lovelock, K. R. J.; Jones, Robert G.; Deyko, A.; Wearing, L. H.; McGrath, R.; Chaudhuri, A.; Woodruff, D. P.

    2014-09-01

    The quantitative structure determination of adsorbed species on quasicrystal surfaces has so far appeared to present insurmountable problems. The normal incidence standing x-ray wave field technique offers a simple solution, without extensive data sets or large computations. Its application to quasicrystals raises several conceptual difficulties that are related to the phase problem in x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate their solution for the case of Si atoms adsorbed on the decagonal Co-rich modification of the Al-Co-Ni quasicrystal to determine the local structure, comprising 6-atom clusters in particular hollow sites.

  3. Development and testing of molecular adsorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulas that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  4. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  5. Dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle solar adsorption refrigerator using two adsorbent-adsorbate pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Hajji, A. ); Worek, W. ); Lavan, Z. )

    1991-05-01

    In this paper a dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle, solar adsorption refrigerator is presented. The instantaneous and daily system performance are studied using two adsorbent-adsorbate pairs, Zeolite 13X-Water and Chabazite-Methanol. The effect of design and operating parameters, including inert material thermal capacitance, matrix porosity, and evaporation and condenser temperatures on the solar and cycle coefficients of performance are evaluated.

  6. Chemical and structural characterization of copper adsorbed on mosses (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    González, Aridane G; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Adamo, Paola; Pokrovsky, Oleg S

    2016-05-05

    The adsorption of copper on passive biomonitors (devitalized mosses Hypnum sp., Sphagnum denticulatum, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachythecium rutabulum) was studied under different experimental conditions such as a function of pH and Cu concentration in solution. Cu assimilation by living Physcomitrella patents was also investigated. Molecular structure of surface adsorbed and incorporated Cu was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Devitalized mosses exhibited the universal adsorption pattern of Cu as a function of pH, with a total binding sites number 0.05-0.06 mmolg(dry)(-1) and a maximal adsorption capacity of 0.93-1.25 mmolg(dry)(-1) for these devitalized species. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) fit of the first neighbor demonstrated that for all studied mosses there are ∼4.5 O/N atoms around Cu at ∼1.95 Å likely in a pseudo-square geometry. The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis demonstrated that Cu(II)-cellulose (representing carboxylate groups) and Cu(II)-phosphate are the main moss surface binding moieties, and the percentage of these sites varies as a function of solution pH. P. patens exposed during one month to Cu(2+) yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu-S(CN) complexes, suggesting metabolically-controlled reduction of adsorbed and assimilated Cu(2+).

  7. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  8. Dynamics of Molecules Adsorbed in Zeolitic Systems: Neutron Scattering and MD Simulation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Sharma, V. K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2011-07-01

    Zeolites represent a class of technologically important materials because of their characteristic properties of molecular sieving and catalysis, which makes them indispensable in the petroleum industries. While the catalytic properties depend upon many factors, a major role is played by the dynamics of hydrocarbon gases. In order to be able to tailor make these materials for use in industry for catalytic and sieving purposes, it is important to understand the dynamical properties of the guest molecules adsorbed in the zeolitic materials. It is of interest to study the effects of size and shape of guest molecules and also the host zeolitic structure, governing the diffusion mechanism of the adsorbed species. Here we report the results of Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of two hydrocarbons namely acetylene and propylene adsorbed in two structurally different zeolites Na-Y and ZSM-5.

  9. Field- and Laboratory-Scale Evaluation of Uranium Sequestration: The Role of Sulfur and Iron Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criddle, C.; Wu, W.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S.; Kitanidis, P. K.; Du, X.; Boonchayaanant, B.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past decade, field and laboratory studies have revealed the critical role of sulfur and iron species in uranium sequestration. Pilot-scale studies of in-situ U(VI) reduction were conducted at a site adjacent to the former S3 ponds (source zone) of the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Research Center, Oak Ridge, TN. The site contains uranium concentrations up to 800 mg/kg in soil and 250 μM (60 mg/L) in groundwater. In field tests, flushing and pH adjustment decreased aqueous U concentrations by more than 1000 fold from 30-40 to ~1 mg/L. Ethanol addition stimulated microbial reduction of U(VI) and decreased U concentrations below the U.S. EPA maximum contaminant level for drinking water (30 ppb). U(VI) reduction was concomitant with iron(III)- and sulfate respiration. Spectroscopic analyses indicated sequential changes in the solid-associated uranium: U(VI) initially bound to mineral-surface and organic-bound complexes containing phosphate and carbonate, or as hydroxide and phosphate precipitates, was reduced mainly to a U(IV)-Fe complex. The U(IV) was stable under anaerobic conditions, but partially remobilized upon exposure to oxygen. In separate experiments, nitrate was injected into a reduced region of the subsurface containing previously immobilized U(IV). The nitrate was reduced to nitrite, ammonium, and nitrogen gas; sulfide levels decreased; and Fe(II) levels increased then deceased. Re-reduction of oxidized sediments released Fe(II) and soluble U(VI), suggesting that the decrease in soluble U during reoxidation was due to U(VI) sorption to Fe(III) oxides. Follow-up laboratory studies established that both biotically-generated hydrogen sulfide and soluble ferrous iron species reduce U(VI). For a sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Oak Ridge site, microbially-generated sulfide could explain the observed rate of U(VI) reduction. Laboratory studies established that soluble Fe(II) was able to reduce soluble U(VI) at rapid rates when

  10. Influences of Dilute Organic Adsorbates on the Hydration of Low-Surface-Area Silicates.

    PubMed

    Sangodkar, Rahul P; Smith, Benjamin J; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J; Roberts, Lawrence R; Funkhouser, Gary P; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2015-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of dilute quantities of certain organic molecules and water at silicate surfaces strongly influence the rates of silicate dissolution, hydration, and crystallization. Here, we determine the molecular-level structures, compositions, and site-specific interactions of adsorbed organic molecules at low absolute bulk concentrations on heterogeneous silicate particle surfaces at early stages of hydration. Specifically, dilute quantities (∼0.1% by weight of solids) of the disaccharide sucrose or industrially important phosphonic acid species slow dramatically the hydration of low-surface-area (∼1 m(2)/g) silicate particles. Here, the physicochemically distinct adsorption interactions of these organic species are established by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced solid-state NMR techniques. These measurements provide significantly improved signal sensitivity for near-surface species that is crucial for the detection and analysis of dilute adsorbed organic molecules and silicate species on low-surface-area particles, which until now have been infeasible to characterize. DNP-enhanced 2D (29)Si{(1)H}, (13)C{(1)H}, and (31)P{(1)H} heteronuclear correlation and 1D (29)Si{(13)C} rotational-echo double-resonance NMR measurements establish hydrogen-bond-mediated adsorption of sucrose at distinct nonhydrated and hydrated silicate surface sites and electrostatic interactions with surface Ca(2+) cations. By comparison, phosphonic acid molecules are found to adsorb electrostatically at or near cationic calcium surface sites to form Ca(2+)-phosphonate complexes. Although dilute quantities of both types of organic molecules effectively inhibit hydration, they do so by adsorbing in distinct ways that depend on their specific architectures and physicochemical interactions. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNP-enhanced NMR techniques to measure and assess dilute adsorbed molecules and their molecular interactions on low

  11. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  12. Quantitative analysis of adsorbate concentrations by diffuse reflectance FT-IR.

    PubMed

    Sirita, Jinda; Phanichphant, Sukon; Meunier, Frederic C

    2007-05-15

    Fully quantitative analyses of DRIFTS data are required when the surface concentrations and the specific rate constants of reaction (or desorption) of adsorbates are needed to validate microkinetic models. The relationship between the surface coverage of adsorbates and various functions derived from the signal collected by DRIFTS is discussed here. The Kubelka-Munk and pseudoabsorbance (noted here as absorbance, for the sake of brevity) transformations were considered, since those are the most commonly used functions when data collected by DRIFTS are reported. Theoretical calculations and experimental evidence based on the study of CO adsorption on Pt/SiO2 and formate species adsorbed on Pt/CeO2 showed that the absorbance (i.e., = log 1/R', with R' = relative reflectance) is the most appropriate, yet imperfect, function to give a linear representation of the adsorbate surface concentration in the examples treated here, for which the relative reflectance R' is typically > 60%. When the adsorbates lead to a strong signal absorption (e.g., R' < 60%), the Kubelka-Munk function is actually more appropriate. The absorbance allows a simple correction of baseline drifts, which often occur during time-resolved data collection over catalytic materials. Baseline corrections are markedly more complex in the case of the other mathematical transforms, including the function proposed by Matyshak and Krylov (Catal. Today 1995, 25, 1-87), which has been proposed as an appropriate representation of surface concentrations in DRIFTS spectroscopy.

  13. Characteristics of Microorganism's Fouling on Lithium Adsorbents in Okgye Harbor, Gangneung, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Yoon, H.; Kong, M.; Yoon, B.; Ryu, J.; Chung, K.; Kim, B.

    2013-12-01

    Marine microorganisms bring about serious ramification for nautical industry such as marine construction. Interaction of bacteria and phytoplankton causes biofouling to marine environments. To understand the marine microorganism's reaction on the inorganic surface, the experimental work carried out in pilot plant for lithium recovery field at Okgye Harbor, Gangneung, Korea through seasonal interval. To inquiry into the surface's effect for lithium recovery adsorbents by bacterial communities and phytoplankton, disk type inorganic adsorbents were immersed in same site at depth of 5 m for 7 days, 14 days and 21 days. Culturable marine bacteria were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Also, size and shape of marine organisms and the adsorption circumstance were investigated by SEM and CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscope). At longer exposure time of adsorbents, increase the bacterial number of individual. Vibrio sp., represented dominant species of biofouling after 21 days and marine phytoplankton increased 7 times after 7 days. Size of phytoplankton were about 50 ~ 100 μm in 0.25 mm2 area of lithium adsorbents. To increase lithium recovery rate of lithium adsorbents and to minimize the biofouling effects, it is necessary to conduct consistently field monitoring. Acknowledgments This research was supported by the national research project titled 'The Development of Technology for Extraction of Resources Dissolved in Seawater' of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) funded by the Ministry of Ocean and Fisheries.

  14. Desorption of isopropyl alcohol from adsorbent with non-thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Chen Han; Pan, Kuan Lun; Yu, Sheng Jen; Yan, Shaw Yi; Chang, Moo Been

    2016-11-24

    Effective desorption of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) from adsorbents with non-thermal plasma is developed. In this system, IPA is effectively adsorbed with activated carbon while dielectric barrier discharge is applied to replace the conventional thermal desorption process to achieve good desorption efficiency, making the treatment equipment smaller in size. Various adsorbents including molecular sieves and activated carbon are evaluated for IPA adsorption capacity. The results indicate that BAC has the highest IPA adsorption capacity (280.31 mg IPA/g) under the operating conditions of room temperature, IPA of 400 ppm, and residence time of 0.283 s among 5 adsorbents tested. For the plasma desorption process, the IPA selectivity of 89% is achieved with BAC as N2 is used as desorbing gas. In addition, as air or O2 is used as desorbing gas, the IPA desorption concentration is reduced, because air and O2 plasmas generate active species to oxidize IPA to form acetone, CO2, and even CO. Furthermore, the results of the durability test indicate that the amount of IPA desorbed increases with increasing desorption times and plasma desorption process has a higher energy efficiency if compared with thermal desorption. Overall, this study indicates that non-thermal plasma is a viable process for removing VOCs to regenerate adsorbent.

  15. Adsorption kinetics and intermolecular interactions of CO adsorbed on Cu(100) by transient laser reflection-absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borguet, E.; Dai, H.L.

    1993-12-31

    IR and visible transient laser spectroscopic techniques have been developed to probe adsorption/desorption kinetics and intermolecular interactions of the CO/Cu(100) system. Vibrational spectroscopy, in general, can provide information about the nature of species adsorbed on surfaces e.g. chemical identity, site, orientation and concentration. In the presence of a few percent of CO adsorbed at step/defect sites, the spectra of the CO adsorbed on the terrace sites are greatly perturbed through dynamic-dipole coupling. This perturbation depends strongly on the intermolecular distance and the short-range order of the adsorbates. An analysis of this dynamic-dipole coupling reveals that the local arrangement of adsorbates is dominant by repulsive nearest-neighbor interactions. Successful modeling of the observed lineshapes allows the populations at each site to be determined at all coverages. The authors have also observed non-resonant adsorbate induced changes in both the IR and visible reflectance for a number of different adsorbates. This provides a simple and sensitive optical means of studying adsorption and desorption kinetics.

  16. Analytical supercritical fluid extraction of adsorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Wright, C.W.; Gale, R.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The use of supercritical fluids for the analytical extraction of semivolatile and higher molecular weight materials from various adsorbent and particulate matrices was investigated. Instrumentation was designed to allow gram quantities of the matrix to be extracted at pressures up to 400 bar and temperatures to 235 /sup 0/C with collection of the effluent in a sealed liquid-nitrogen-cooled flask. Carbon dioxide, isobutane, and methanol modified (20 mol %) carbon dioxide fluid systems were evaluated and compared to liquid Soxhlet extraction. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) provided very rapid (approx. =30 min) extraction with comparable efficiency to the Soxhlet methods, and both more rapid and more efficient extractions appear feasible. The more polar carbon dioxide-methanol fluid system gave higher extraction efficiencies for the more polar adsorbates and the isobutane system was more efficient for the higher molecular weight and less polar compounds.

  17. Efficient adsorbate transport on graphene by electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velizhanin, Kirill; Solenov, Dmitry

    2012-02-01

    Chemical functionalization of the surface of graphene holds promise for various applications ranging from nanoelectronics to surface catalysis and nano-assembling. In many practical situations it would be beneficial to be able to propel adsorbates along the graphene sheet in a controlled manner. We propose to use electromigration as an efficient means to transport adsorbates along the graphene surface. Within the tight-binding approximation for graphene, parametrized by density functional theory calculations, we estimate the contributions of the direct force and the electron wind force to the drift velocity of electromigration and demonstrate that the electromigration can be rather efficient. In particular, we show that the drift velocity of atomic oxygen covalently bound to graphene can reach up to 4 cm/s for realistic graphene samples. Further, we discuss ways to dynamically, i.e., during experiment, control the efficiency of electromigration by charging and/or local heating of graphene.

  18. Sand consolidation methods using adsorbable catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R. H.

    1985-04-23

    Methods are provided for selectively consolidating sand grains within a subterranean formation. First an acidic zirconium salt catalyst, such as ZrOCl/sub 2/, Zr(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/, or ZrCl/sub 4/, is injected into the subterranean formation, wherein the acidic salt catalyst is adsorbed to the surface of the sand grains. Next a polymerizable resin composition such as furfuryl alcohol oligomer is introduced into the well formation. Polymerization of the resin occurs upon exposure to the elevated well temperatures and contact with the acid salt catalyst adsorbed to the sand grains. The polymerized resin serves to consolidate the surfaces of the sand grains while retaining permeability through the pore spaces. An ester of a weak organic acid is included with the resin compositions to control the extent of a polymerization by consuming the water by-product formed during the polymerization reaction.

  19. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.

  20. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  1. Remediation of AMD using industrial waste adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Nuur Hani Bte; Yaacob, Wan Zuhairi Wan

    2016-11-01

    The study investigates the characteristic of industrial waste as adsorbents and its potential as heavy metals absorbents in AMD samples. The AMD sample was collected from active mine pond and the pH was measured in situ. The metal contents were analyzed by ICP-MS. The AMD water was very acidic (pH< 3.5), and the average heavy metals content in AMD were high especially in Fe (822.029 mg/l). Fly ash was found to be the most effective absorbent material containing high percentage of CaO (57.24%) and SiO2 (13.88%), followed by ladle furnace slag containing of high amount of CaO (51.52%) and Al2O3 (21.23%), while biomass ash consists of SiO2 (43.07%) and CaO (12.97%). Tank analysis display a huge changes due to pH value change from acidity to nearly neutral phases. After 50 days, fly ash remediation successfully increase the AMD pH values from pH 2.57-7.09, while slag change from acidity to nearly alkaline phase from pH 2.60-7.3 and biomass has change to pH 2.54-6.8. Fly ash has successfully remove Fe, Mn, Cu, and Ni. Meanwhile, slag sample displays as an effective adsorbent to adsorb more Pb and Cd in acid mine drainage.

  2. Local anesthetics adsorbed onto infusion balloon.

    PubMed

    Mizogami, Maki; Tsuchiya, Hironori; Takakura, Ko

    2004-09-01

    We compared the adsorption of different local anesthetics onto infusion balloons and studied one of the possible mechanisms for adsorption. After injection of lidocaine, bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine solutions (1 mM each; pH 7.4) into balloons of 100-mL volume, their concentrations in effluents flowing out at 4 mL/h were determined over time by high-performance liquid chromatography. All were adsorbed in a structure-dependent manner, and the concentration decreased by 6%-14% within 5 min. Bupivacaine was most strongly adsorbed, followed by lidocaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. QX-314, a quaternary ammonium derivative of lidocaine, was only weakly adsorbed compared with the parent compound lidocaine. The extent of adsorption of local anesthetics was related to their hydrophobicity (evaluated by reversed-phase chromatography) and was much more at pH 7.4 than at pH 6.0. A hydrophobic interaction with balloon materials appears to be responsible for the adsorption of local anesthetics. When infusion balloons are used for the continuous administration of local anesthetics, attention should be paid to the possibility that their actual concentrations in effluents are smaller than those present when they are initially prepared.

  3. Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wang, Zheming; Dixit, Suvasis; Steefel, Carl; Saiz, Eduardo; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2009-02-01

    A saline-alkaline brine containing high concentrations of U(VI) was accidentally spilled at the Hanford Site in 1951, introducing 10 tons of U into sediments under storage tank BX-102. U concentrations in the deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes increase with time, yet how the U has been migrating is not fully understood. We simulated the spill event in laboratory soil columns, followed by aging, and obtained spatially resolved U partitioning and speciation along simulated plumes. We found after aging, at apparent steady state, that the pore aqueous phase U concentrations remained surprisingly high (up to 0.022 M), in close agreement with the recently reported high U concentrations (up to 0.027 M) in the vadose zone plume (1). The pH values of aged pore liquids varying from 10 to 7, consistent with the measured pH of the field borehole sediments varying from 9.5 to 7.4 (2), from near the plume source to the plume front. The direct measurements of aged pore liquids together with thermodynamic calculations using a Pitzer approach revealed that UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {sup 4-} is the dominant aqueous U species within the plume body (pH 8-10), while Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} and CaUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 2-} are also significant in the plume front vicinity (pH 7-8), consistent with that measured from field borehole porewaters (3). U solid phase speciation varies at different locations along the plume flow path and even within single sediment grains, because of location dependent pore and micropore solution chemistry. Our results suggest that high geochemical stability of UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-} in the original carbonate and sodium rich waste solution permits its continues migration and the field observed increases of U concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater.

  4. In Situ Investigation the Photolysis of the PAHs Adsorbed on Mangrove Leaf Surfaces by Synchronous Solid Surface Fluorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Wu, Tun-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    An established synchronous solid surface fluorimetry (S-SSF) was utilized for in situ study the photolysis processes of anthracene (An) and pyrene (Py) adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of Kandelia obovata seedlings (Ko) and Aegiceras corniculata (L.) Blanco seedlings (Ac). Experimental results demonstrated that the photolysis of An and Py adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of two mangrove species under the laboratory conditions, followed first-order kinetics with their photolysis rates in the order of Ac>Ko. In addition, with the same amount of substances, the photolysis rate of An adsorbed on the same mangrove leaf surfaces was much faster than the adsorbed Py. In order to investigate further, the photolysis processes of An and Py in water were also studied for comparison. And the photolysis of An and Py in water also followed first-order kinetics. Moreover, for the same initial amount, the photolysis rate of the PAH in water was faster than that adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of two mangrove species. Therefore, photochemical behaviors of PAHs were dependent not only on their molecular structures but also the physical-chemical properties of the substrates on which they are adsorbed. PMID:24404158

  5. Extraction of Am(III), Eu(III) and U(VI) from perchloric acid and mixtures of acids by dialkyl-(diaryl) [diethylcarbamoylmethyl] phosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chmutova, M.K.; Litvina, M.N.; Nesterova, N.P.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Kabachnik, M.I.

    1992-07-01

    Extraction of Am(III), and Eu(III) and U(VI) from perchloric acid solutions by dialkyl(diaryl) [diethyl-carbamoylmethyl] phosphine oxides (CMPO) has been investigated. It has been shown that elements are extracted more effectively from perchloric acid solutions than from nitric acid. An `anomalous aryl effect` increases sufficiently in perchloric media as compared with nitric media. Solvate numbers of elements also increase in perchloric acid, they being extremely high for aryl-substituted reagents and not so high for alkyl-substituted compounds. It has been shown that in HNO{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4} solutions the value of `anomalous aryl effect` directly depends on the difference in values of element solvate numbers in complexes with aryl- and alkyl-substituted CMPO. Am(III), Eu(III) and U(VI) are not practically extracted from phosphoric and sulphuric acids by CMPO solutions. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. HST/WFC3 Characteristics: gain, post-flash stability, UVIS low-sensitivity pixels, persistence, IR flats and bad pixel table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, Heather C.; Baggett, Sylvia; Gosmeyer, Catherine M.; Long, Knox S.; Ryan, Russell E.; MacKenty, John W.; Durbin, Meredith

    2015-08-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Installed in May 2009, WFC3 is comprised of two observational channels covering wavelengths from UV/Visible (UVIS) to infrared (IR); both have been performing well on-orbit. We discuss the gain stability of both WFC3 channel detectors from ground testing through present day. For UVIS, we detail a low-sensitivity pixel population that evolves during the time between anneals, but is largely reset by the annealing procedure. We characterize the post-flash LED lamp stability, used and recommended to mitigate CTE effects for observations with less than 12e-/pixel backgrounds. We present mitigation options for IR persistence during and after observations. Finally, we give an overview on the construction of the IR flats and provide updates on the bad pixel table.

  7. Coumarin-modified microporous-mesoporous Zn-MOF-74 showing ultra-high uptake capacity and photo-switched storage/release of U(VI) ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Wang, Lin Lin; Gong, Le Le; Feng, Xue Feng; Luo, Ming Biao; Luo, Feng

    2016-07-05

    Driven by an energy crisis but consequently puzzled by various environmental problems, uranium, as the basic material of nuclear energy, is now receiving extensive attentions. In contrast to numerous sorbents applied in this field, metal-organic framework (MOFs), as a renovated material platform, has only recently been developed. How to improve the adsorption capacity of MOF materials towards U(VI) ions, as well as taking advantage of the nature of these MOFs to design photo-switched behaviour for photo-triggered storage/release of U(VI) ions are at present urgent problems and great challenges to be solved. Herein, we show a simple and facile method to target the goal. Through coordination-based post-synthetic strategy, microporous- mesoporous Zn-MOF-74 was easily functionalized by grafting coumarin on coordinatively unsaturated Zn(II) centers, yielding a series of coumarin-modified Zn-MOF-74 materials. The obtained samples displayed ultra-high adsorption capacity for U(VI) ions from water at pH value of 4 with maximum adsorption capacities as high as 360 mg/g (the record value in MOFs) and a remarkable photo-switched capability of 50 mg/g at pH value of 4. To the best of knowledge, and in contrast to the well-known photo-switched behaviour towards CO2, dye (propidium iodide), as well as fluorescence observed in MOFs, this is the first study that shows a photo-switched behaviour towards radioactive U(VI) ions in aqueous solution.

  8. ToF-SIMS and XPS Characterization of Protein Films Adsorbed onto Bare and Sodium Styrenesulfonate-Grafted Gold Substrates.

    PubMed

    Foster, Rami N; Harrison, Elisa T; Castner, David G

    2016-04-05

    The adsorption of single-component bovine serum albumin (BSA), bovine fibrinogen (Fgn), and bovine immunoglobulin G (IgG) films as well as multicomponent bovine plasma films onto bare and sodium styrenesulfonate (NaSS)-grafted gold substrates was characterized. The adsorption isotherms, measured via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, showed that at low solution concentrations all three single-component proteins adsorb with higher affinity onto gold surfaces compared to NaSS surfaces. However, at higher concentrations, NaSS surfaces adsorb the same or more total protein than gold surfaces. This may be because proteins that adsorb onto NaSS undergo structural rearrangements, resulting in a larger fraction of irreversibly adsorbed species over time. Still, with the possible exception of BSA adsorbed onto gold, neither surface appeared to have saturated at the highest protein solution concentration studied. Principal component (PC) analysis of amino acid mass fragments from time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectra distinguished between the same protein adsorbed onto NaSS and gold surfaces, suggesting that proteins adsorb differently on NaSS and gold surfaces. Explored further using peak ratios for buried/surface amino acids for each protein, we found that proteins denature more on NaSS surfaces than on gold surfaces. Also, using peak ratios for asymmetrically distributed amino acids, potential structural differences were postulated for BSA and IgG adsorbed onto NaSS and gold surfaces. PC modeling, used to track changes in plasma adsorption with time, suggests that plasma films on NaSS and Au surfaces become more Fgn-like with increasing adsorption time. However, the PC models included only three proteins, where plasma is composed of hundreds of proteins. Therefore, while both gold and NaSS appear to adsorb more Fgn with time, further study is required to confirm that this is representative of the final state of the plasma films.

  9. Kinetic Controls on the Desorption/Dissolution of Sorbed U(VI) and their Influence on Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Chongxuan Liu; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; McKinley, James P.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Davis, James A.

    2006-04-05

    source to groundwater. (2) Measure desorption/dissolution rates of sorbed U(VI), quantify controlling factors, and develop descriptive kinetic models to provide a scientific basis to forecast U(VI) fluxes to groundwater, future plume dynamics, and long-term contaminant attenuation. (3) Establish reaction networks and determine geochemically/ physically realistic reaction parameters to drive state-of-the-art reactive transport modeling of U in vadose zone pore fluids and groundwater.

  10. Multi-Instrument Analysis of a Traveling Convection Vortex Event on July 24, 1996 Coordinated with the Polar UVI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitar, R. J.; Clauer, C. R.; Baker, J. B.; Ridley, A. J.; Cumnock, J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    We present the analysis of a coordinated set of observations from the POLAR Ultraviolet Imager (UVI), ground magnetometers, incoherent scatter radar, solar wind monitors, DMSP and GOES satellites, focused on a traveling convection vortex (TCV) event on 24th July 1996. Starting at approximately 10:48 UT, around magnetometers in Greenland and northern Canada observe pulsations consistent with the passing overhead of a series of alternating TCV filed-aligned current pairs. Azimuthal scans by the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar located near Kangerlussuaq (formerly Sondrestrom), Greenland, at this time show strong modulation in the strength and direction of ionospheric plasma flow. The magnetometer pulsations grow in magnitude over the next hour, peaking in intensity at 11:39 UT, at which time images form the UVI instrument show a localized intensification of auroral emissions over central and western Greenland. Subsequent images show the intensification grow in strength and propagate westward (tailward) until approximately 11:58 UT at which time the intensification fades. These observations are consistent with the westward passage of two pairs of moderately intense TCVs over central Greenland followed by a third very intense TCV pair. The intensification of auroral emissions at 11:39 UT is associated with the trailing vortex of the third TCV pair, thought to be the result of an upward field aligned current. The modulated flow observed by the radar is the result of the strong electric fields associated with the impulsive TCV related field aligned current systems as they pass through the field of view of the radar. Measurements of the solar wind from the V;IND and IMP-8 spacecraft suggest that a pressure change may be responsible for triggering the first two pairs of TCVS, and that a subsequent sudden change in the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field may have produced the intensification of the third TCV pair and the associated auroral brightening

  11. Methods for Estimating Adsorbed Uranium(VI) and Distribution Coefficients of Contaminated Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.; Meece, D.E.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the quantity of U(VI) that participates in sorption/desorption processes in a contaminated aquifer is an important task when investigating U migration behavior. U-contaminated aquifer sediments were obtained from 16 different locations at a former U mill tailings site at Naturita, CO (U.S.A.) and were extracted with an artificial groundwater, a high pH sodium bicarbonate solution, hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, and concentrated nitric acid. With an isotopic exchange method, both a KD value for the specific experimental conditions as well as the total exchangeable mass of U(VI) was determined. Except for one sample, KD values determined by isotopic exchange with U-contaminated sediments that were in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 agreed within a factor of 2 with KD values predicted from a nonelectrostatic surface complexation model (NEM) developed from U(VI) adsorption experiments with uncontaminated sediments. The labile fraction of U(VI) and U extracted by the bicarbonate solution were highly correlated (r2 = 0.997), with a slope of 0.96 ?? 0.01. The proximity of the slope to one suggests that both methods likely access the same reservoir of U(VI) associated with the sediments. The results indicate that the bicarbonate extraction method is useful for estimating the mass of labile U(VI) in sediments that do not contain U(IV). In-situ KD values calculated from the measured labile U(VI) and the dissolved U(VI) in the Naturita alluvial aquifer agreed within a factor of 3 with in-situ K D values predicted with the NEM and groundwater chemistry at each well.

  12. Methods for estimating adsorbed uranium(VI) and distribution coefficients of contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Matthias; Curtis, Gary P; Meece, David E; Davis, James A

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the quantity of U(VI) that participates in sorption/desorption processes in a contaminated aquifer is an important task when investigating U migration behavior. U-contaminated aquifer sediments were obtained from 16 different locations at a former U mill tailings site at Naturita, CO (U.S.A.) and were extracted with an artificial groundwater, a high pH sodium bicarbonate solution, hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, and concentrated nitric acid. With an isotopic exchange method, both a KD value for the specific experimental conditions as well as the total exchangeable mass of U(VI) was determined. Except for one sample, KD values determined by isotopic exchange with U-contaminated sediments that were in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 agreed within a factor of 2 with KD values predicted from a nonelectrostatic surface complexation model (NEM) developed from U(VI) adsorption experiments with uncontaminated sediments. The labile fraction of U(VI) and U extracted by the bicarbonate solution were highly correlated (r2 = 0.997), with a slope of 0.96 +/- 0.01. The proximity of the slope to one suggests that both methods likely access the same reservoir of U(VI) associated with the sediments. The results indicate that the bicarbonate extraction method is useful for estimating the mass of labile U(VI) in sediments that do not contain U(IV). In-situ KD values calculated from the measured labile U(VI) and the dissolved U(VI) in the Naturita alluvial aquifer agreed within a factor of 3 with in-situ KD values predicted with the NEM and groundwater chemistry at each well.

  13. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-07

    A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 µM) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 µM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis of (C6N2H14)2(UVI2UIVO4F12), a mixed-valent one-dimensional uranium oxyfluoride.

    PubMed

    Allen, S; Barlow, S; Halasyamani, P S; Mosselmans, J F; O'Hare, D; Walker, S M; Walton, R I

    2000-08-21

    A new hybrid organic-inorganic mixed-valent uranium oxyfluoride, (C6N2H14)2(U3O4F12), UFO-17, has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions using uranium dioxide as the uranium source, hydrofluoric acid as mineralizer, and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane as template. The single-crystal X-ray structure was determined. Crystals of UFO-17 belonged to the orthorhombic space group Cmcm (no. 63), with a = 14.2660(15) A, b = 24.5130(10) A, c = 7.201(2) A, and Z = 4. The structure reveals parallel uranium-containing chains of two types: one type is composed of edge-sharing UO2F5 units; the other has a backbone of edge-sharing UF8 units, each sharing an edge with a pendant UO2F5 unit. Bond-valence calculations suggest the UF8 groups contain UIV, while the UO2F5 groups contain UVI. EXAFS data give results consistent with the single-crystal X-ray structure determination, while comparison of the uranium LIII-edge XANES of UFO-17 with that of related UIV and UVI compounds supports the oxidation-state assignment. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements on UFO-17 and a range of related hybrid organic-inorganic uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) fluorides and oxyfluorides further support the formulation of UFO-17 as a mixed-valent UIV/UVI compound.

  15. Liquid-liquid extraction of Pu(IV), U(VI) and Am(III) using malonamide in room temperature ionic liquid as diluent.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Venkatesan, K A; Srinivasan, T G; Vasudeva Rao, P R

    2012-06-30

    The extraction behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III) from nitric acid medium by a solution of N,N-dimethyl-N,N-dioctyl-2-(2-hexyloxyethyl)malonamide (DMDOHEMA) in the room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (C(4)mimNTf(2)), was studied. The distribution ratio of these actinides in DMDOHEMA/C(4)mimNTf(2) was measured as a function of various parameters such as the concentration of nitric acid, DMDOHEMA, NTf(2)(-), alkyl chain length of ionic liquid. The extraction of actinides in the absence of DMDOHEMA was insignificant and the distribution ratio achieved in conjunction with C(4)mimNTf(2), was remarkable. The separation factor of U(VI) and Pu(IV) achieved with the use of DMDOHEMA, ionic liquid was compared with Am(III) and other fission products. The stoichiometry of the metal-solvate was determined to be 1:2 for U(VI) and Pu(IV) and 1:3 for Am(III).

  16. Negatively charged ions on Mg(0001) surfaces: appearance and origin of attractive adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Su-Ting; Todorova, Mira; Freysoldt, Christoph; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2014-09-26

    Adsorption of electronegative elements on a metal surface usually leads to an increase in the work function and decrease in the binding energy as the adsorbate coverage rises. Using density-functional theory calculations, we show that Cl adsorbed on a Mg(0001) surface complies with these expectations, but adsorption of {N,O,F} causes a decrease in the work function and an increase in the binding energy. Analyzing the electronic structure, we show that the presence of a highly polarizable electron spill-out in front of Mg(0001) causes this unusual adsorption behavior and is responsible for the appearance of a hitherto unknown net-attractive lateral electrostatic interaction between same charged adsorbates.

  17. In situ ATR and DRIFTS studies of the nature of adsorbed CO₂ on tetraethylenepentamine films.

    PubMed

    Wilfong, Walter Christopher; Srikanth, Chakravartula S; Chuang, Steven S C

    2014-08-27

    CO2 adsorption/desorption onto/from tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) films of 4, 10, and 20 μm thicknesses were studied by in situ attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) techniques under transient conditions. Molar absorption coefficients for adsorbed CO2 were used to determine the CO2 capture capacities and amine efficiencies (CO2/N) of the films in the DRIFTS system. Adsorption of CO2 onto surface and bulk NH2 groups of the 4 μm film produced weakly adsorbed CO2, which can be desorbed at 50 °C by reducing the CO2 partial pressure. These weakly adsorbed CO2 exhibit low ammonium ion intensities and could be in the form of ammonium-carbamate ion pairs and zwitterions. Increasing the film thickness enhanced the surface amine-amine interactions, resulting in strongly adsorbed ion pairs and zwitterions associated with NH and NH2 groups of neighboring amines. These adsorbed species may form an interconnected surface network, which slowed CO2 gas diffusion into and diminished access of the bulk amine groups (or amine efficiency) of the 20 μm film by a minimum of 65%. Desorption of strongly adsorbed CO2 comprising the surface network could occur via dissociation of NH3(+)/NH2(+)···NH2/NH ionic hydrogen bonds beginning from 60 to 80 °C, followed by decomposition of NHCOO(-)/NCOO(-) at 100 °C. These results suggest that faster CO2 diffusion and adsorption/desorption kinetics could be achieved by thinner layers of liquid or immobilized amines.

  18. The Uranium from Seawater Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Overview of Marine Testing, Adsorbent Characterization, Adsorbent Durability, Adsorbent Toxicity, and Deployment Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Chris J.; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana R.; Warner, Marvin G.; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David G.; Mayes, Richard T.; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Addleman, R. Shane; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Ken; Breier, Crystal; D’Alessandro, Evan

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 ± 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 ± 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage

  19. Spectrophotometric and Calorimetric Studies of U(VI) Complexation with Sulfate at 25-70oC

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2008-10-30

    Sulfate, one of the inorganic constituents in the groundwater of nuclear waste repository, could affect the migration of radioactive materials by forming complexes. Spectrophotometric and microcalorimetric titrations were performed to identify the U(VI)/sulfate complexes and determine the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of complexation at 25-70 C. Results show that U(VI) forms moderately strong complexes with sulfate, i.e., UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) and UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2-}, in this temperature range and the complexes become stronger as the temperature is increased: 2-fold and 10-fold increases in the stability constants of UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) and UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}{sub 2}{sup 2-}), respectively, when the temperature is increased from 25 C to 70 C. The complexation is endothermic and entropy-driven, showing typical characteristics of inner-sphere complexation and 'hard acid'/'hard base' interactions. The thermodynamic trends are discussed in terms of dehydration of both the cation (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) and the anion (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) as well as the effect of temperature on the structure of water.

  20. Distortion of the pixel grid in HST WFC3/UVIS and ACS/WFC CCD detectors and its astrometric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Mackenty, John; Golimovski, David; Sirianni, Marco; Borncamp, David; Anderson, Jay; Grogin, Norman

    2016-07-01

    The geometric distortion of the CCD detectors used in the Hubble Space TelescopeWide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instruments is characterized by both large and fine-scale distortions. The large-scale distortion, due to the complexity of the HST optical assembly, can be modeled by a high-order polynomial. The majority of fine-distortion is inherent to the CCD detectors themselves, which manifests itself as fine-scale, correlated systematic offsets in the residuals from the best-fit polynomial solution. Such systematic offsets across the CCD chip introduce astrometric errors at the level of about 0.1 pix (up to 1.5 μm within the 15 μm pixels). These fine-scale and low-amplitude distortions apparently arise from the spatial irregularities in the pixel grid. For the WFC3/UVIS CCD chips, there is a clear pattern of periodic skew in the lithographic-mask stencil imprinted onto the detector. Similar irregularities in the pixel grid of ACS/WFC CCD chips are even more pronounced by the narrow (68×2048 pixel) lithographic-mask stencil. To remove these distortions, a 2-D correction in the form of a look-up table has been developed using HST images of very dense stellar fields. The post-correction of fine-scale astrometric errors can be removed down to the level of 0.01 pix (0.15 μm) or better.

  1. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  2. Recovery of Technetium Adsorbed on Charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Mark D.; Metz, Lori A.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2006-05-01

    Two methods capable of near complete recovery of technetium adsorbed on charcoal are presented. The first involves liquid extraction of the technetium from the charcoal by hot 4M nitric acid. An average recovery of 98% (n=3) is obtained after three rounds of extraction. The second method involves dry ashing with air in a quartz combustion tube at 400-450 C. This method yields an average recovery of 96% (n=5). Other thermal methods were attempted, but resulted in reduced recovery and incomplete material balance

  3. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, Susan M.; Löffler, Frank; Ritalahti, Kirsti; Sayler, Gary; Layton, Alice; Hettich, Robert

    2015-08-31

    The overall goal for this funded project was to develop and exploit environmental metaproteomics tools to identify biomarkers for monitoring microbial activity affecting U speciation at U-contaminated sites, correlate metaproteomics profiles with geochemical parameters and U(VI) reduction activity (or lack thereof), elucidate mechanisms contributing to U(VI) reduction, and provide remediation project managers with additional information to make science-based site management decisions for achieving cleanup goals more efficiently. Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the microbiology contribution to metal and radionuclide reduction, the cellular components, pathway(s), and mechanisms involved in U trans-formation remain poorly understood. Recent advances in (meta)proteomics technology enable detailed studies of complex samples, including environmental samples, which differ between sites and even show considerable variability within the same site (e.g., the Oak Ridge IFRC site). Additionally, site-specific geochemical conditions affect microbial activity and function, suggesting generalized assessment and interpretations may not suffice. This research effort integrated current understanding of the microbiology and biochemistry of U(VI) reduction and capitalize on advances in proteomics technology made over the past few years. Field-related analyses used Oak Ridge IFRC field ground water samples from locations where slow-release substrate biostimulation has been implemented to accelerate in situ U(VI) reduction rates. Our overarching hypothesis was that the metabolic signature in environmental samples, as deciphered by the metaproteome measurements, would show a relationship with U(VI) reduction activity. Since metaproteomic and metagenomic characterizations were computationally challenging and time-consuming, we used a tiered approach that combines database mining, controlled laboratory studies, U(VI) reduction activity measurements, phylogenetic

  4. Storage stability of ketones on carbon adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Prado, C; Alcaraz, M J; Fuentes, A; Garrido, J; Periago, J F

    2006-09-29

    Activated coconut carbon constitutes the more widely used sorbent for preconcentration of volatile organic compounds in sampling workplace air. Water vapour is always present in the air and its adsorption on the activated carbon surface is a serious drawback, mainly when sampling polar organic compounds, such as ketones. In this case, the recovery of the compounds diminishes; moreover, ketones can be decomposed during storage. Synthetic carbons contain less inorganic impurities and have a lower capacity for water adsorption than coconut charcoal. The aim of this work was to evaluate the storage stability of various ketones (acetone, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone and cyclohexanone) on different activated carbons and to study the effect of adsorbed water vapour under different storage conditions. The effect of storage temperature on extraction efficiencies was significant for each ketone in all the studied sorbents. Recovery was higher when samples were stored at 4 degrees C. The results obtained for storage stability of the studied ketones showed that the performance of synthetic carbons was better than for the coconut charcoals. The water adsorption and the ash content of the carbons can be a measure of the reactive sites that may chemisorb ketones or catalize their decomposition. Anasorb 747 showed good ketone stability at least for 7 days, except for cyclohexanone. After 30-days storage, the stability of the studied ketones was excellent on Carboxen 564. This sorbent had a nearly negligible ash content and the adsorbed water was much lower than for the other sorbents tested.

  5. Optimizing heterosurface adsorbent synthesis for liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovskii, S. Yu.; Serdan, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural and geometric parameters of a silica matrix (SM) for the synthesis of heterosurface adsorbents (HAs) are optimized. Modification is performed by shielding the external surfaces of alkyl-modified silica (AS) using human serum albumin and its subsequent crosslinking. The structural and geometric characteristics of the SM, AS, and HA are measured via low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. It is found that the structural characteristics of AS pores with diameters D < 6 nm do not change during HA synthesis, while the volume of pores with diameters of 6 nm < D < 9 nm shrinks slightly due to the adsorption of albumin in the pore orifices. It is established that the volume of pores with diameters D > 9 nm reduces significantly due to adsorption of albumin. It is concluded that silica gel with a maximum pore size distribution close to 5 nm and a minimal proportion of pores with D > 9 nm is optimal for HA synthesis; this allows us to achieve the greatest similarity between the chromatographic retention parameters for HA and AS. The suitability of the synthesized adsorbents for analyzing drugs in biological fluids through direct sample injection is confirmed by chromatography. It was found that the percentage of the protein fraction detected at the outlet of the chromatographic column is 98%.

  6. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  7. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W. -P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  8. Role(s) of adsorbed water in the surface chemistry of environmental interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-04-18

    The chemistry of environmental interfaces such as oxide and carbonate surfaces under ambient conditions of temperature and relative humidity is of great interest from many perspectives including heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry, heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, sensor technology, corrosion science, and cultural heritage science. As discussed here, adsorbed water plays important roles in the reaction chemistry of oxide and carbonate surfaces with indoor and outdoor pollutant molecules including nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, ozone and organic acids. Mechanisms of these reactions are just beginning to be unraveled and found to depend on the details of the reaction mechanism as well as the coverage of water on the surface. As discussed here, adsorbed water can: (i) alter reaction pathways and surface speciation relative to the dry surface; (ii) hydrolyze reactants, intermediates and products; (iii) enhance surface reactivity by providing a medium for ionic dissociation; (iv) inhibit surface reactivity by blocking sites; (v) solvate ions; (vi) enhance ion mobility on surfaces and (vii) alter the stability of surface adsorbed species. In this feature article, drawing on research that has been going on for over a decade on the reaction chemistry of oxide and carbonate surfaces under ambient conditions of temperature and relative humidity, a number of specific examples showing the multi-faceted roles of adsorbed water are presented.

  9. Capturing the Local Adsorption Structures of Carbon Dioxide in Polyamine-Impregnated Mesoporous Silica Adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shing-Jong; Hung, Chin-Te; Zheng, Anmin; Lin, Jen-Shan; Yang, Chun-Fei; Chang, Yu-Chi; Deng, Feng; Liu, Shang-Bin

    2014-09-18

    Interactions between amines and carbon dioxide (CO2) are essential to amine-functionalized solid adsorbents for carbon capture, and an in-depth knowledge of these interactions is crucial to adsorbent design and fabrication as well as adsorption/desorption processes. The local structures of CO2 adsorbed on a tetraethylenepentamine-impregnated mesoporous silica SBA-15 were investigated by solid-state (13)C{(14)N} S-RESPDOR MAS NMR technique and theoretical DFT calculations. Two types of adsorption species, namely, secondary and tertiary carbamates as well as distant ammonium groups were identified together with their relative concentrations and relevant (14)N quadrupolar parameters. Moreover, a dipolar coupling of 716 Hz was derived, corresponding to a (13)C-(14)N internuclear distance of 1.45 Å. These experimental data are in excellent agreement with results obtained from DFT calculations, revealing that the distribution of surface primary and secondary amines readily dictates the CO2 adsorption/desorption properties of the adsorbent.

  10. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1994-04-05

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

  11. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, Gunnar I.; Dietz, Russell N.

    1994-01-01

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

  12. The role of vdW interactions in coverage dependent adsorption energies of atomic adsorbates on Pt(111) and Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, Hari; Kitchin, John R.

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption, a fundamental process in heterogeneous catalysis is known to be dependent on the adsorbate-adsorbate and surface-adsorbate bonds. van der Waals (vdW) interactions are one of the types of interactions that have not been examined thoroughly as a function of adsorbate coverage. In this work we quantify the vdW interactions for atomic adsorbates on late transition metal surfaces, and determine how these long range forces affect the coverage dependent adsorption energies. We calculate the adsorption energies of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, fluorine, bromine and chlorine species on Pt(111) and Pd(111) at coverages ranging from 1/4 to 1 ML using the BEEF-vdW functional. We observe that adsorption energies remain coverage dependent, and this coverage dependence is shown to be statistically significant. vdW interactions are found to be coverage dependent, but more significantly, they are found to be dependent on molecular properties such as adsorbate size, and consequently, correlate with the adsorbate effective nuclear charge. We observe that these interactions account for a reduction in the binding energy of the system, due to the destabilizing attractive interactions between the adsorbates which weaken its bond with the surface.

  13. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  14. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides.

    PubMed

    Bagus, Paul S; Nelin, Connie J; Ilton, Eugene S

    2013-12-28

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  15. Testing of chemically treated adsorbent air purifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.J. . Dept. of Atmospheric Science and Applied Technology); Kinkead, D.A. )

    1993-07-01

    New highly sensitive continuous monitors permit testing of air filters at parts-per-billion contaminant concentrations. This article describes testing of air purification filters intended for use in the National Archives 2 building in College Park, Maryland, using a test procedure that simulates the actual conditions of use. This test demonstrates both the effectiveness of the adsorbers at low contaminant levels, and the capability of existing instruments for conducting such tests. ASHRAE TC 2.3 (Gaseous Air Contaminants and Gas Contaminant Removal Equipment) is currently sponsoring research projects (follow-on studies to ASHRAE Project RP-674) aimed at developing a standard that will test and rate the performance of different types of gas phase air purification equipment at low concentrations. The work detailed in this article represents a first of this type of testing and a technical benchmark that may aid in the further development of ASHRAE gas phase performance standards.

  16. The condensation of water on adsorbed viruses.

    PubMed

    Alonso, José María; Tatti, Francesco; Chuvilin, Andrey; Mam, Keriya; Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Bittner, Alexander M

    2013-11-26

    The wetting and dewetting behavior of biological nanostructures and to a greater degree single molecules is not well-known even though their contact with water is the basis for all biology. Here, we show that environmental electron microscopy (EM) can be applied as a means of imaging the condensation of water onto viruses. We captured the formation of submicrometer water droplets and filaments on single viral particles by environmental EM and by environmental transmission EM. The condensate structures are compatible with capillary condensation between adsorbed virus particles and with known droplet shapes on patterned surfaces. Our results confirm that such droplets exist down to <50 nm. The viruses preserved their shape after a condensation/evaporation cycle as expected from their stability in air and water. Moreover we developed procedures that overcome problems of beam damage and of resolving structures with a low atomic number.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Capture Adsorbents: Chemistry and Methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Byun, Jeehye; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2016-12-21

    Excess carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions and their inevitable consequences continue to stimulate hard debate and awareness in both academic and public spaces, despite the widespread lack of understanding on what really is needed to capture and store the unwanted CO2 . Of the entire carbon capture and storage (CCS) operation, capture is the most costly process, consisting of nearly 70 % of the price tag. In this tutorial review, CO2 capture science and technology based on adsorbents are described and evaluated in the context of chemistry and methods, after briefly introducing the current status of CO2 emissions. An effective sorbent design is suggested, whereby six checkpoints are expected to be met: cost, capacity, selectivity, stability, recyclability, and fast kinetics.

  18. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  19. Influence of pH, layer charge location and crystal thickness distribution on U(VI) sorption onto heterogeneous dioctahedral smectite.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Vanessa; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Algarra, Manuel; Rocha, Fernando; Bobos, Iuliu

    2016-11-05

    The UO2(2+) adsorption on smectite (samples BA1, PS2 and PS3) with a heterogeneous structure was investigated at pH 4 (I=0.02M) and pH 6 (I=0.2M) in batch experiments, with the aim to evaluate the influence of pH, layer charge location and crystal thickness distribution. Mean crystal thickness distribution of smectite crystallite used in sorption experiments range from 4.8nm (sample PS2), to 5.1nm (sample PS3) and, to 7.4nm (sample BA1). Smaller crystallites have higher total surface area and sorption capacity. Octahedral charge location favor higher sorption capacity. The sorption isotherms of Freundlich, Langmuir and SIPS were used to model the sorption experiments. The surface complexation and cation exchange reactions were modeled using PHREEQC-code to describe the UO2(2+) sorption on smectite. The amount of UO2(2+) adsorbed on smectite samples decreased significantly at pH 6 and higher ionic strength, where the sorption mechanism was restricted to the edge sites of smectite. Two binding energy components at 380.8±0.3 and 382.2±0.3eV, assigned to hydrated UO2(2+) adsorbed by cation exchange and by inner-sphere complexation on the external sites at pH 4, were identified after the U4f7/2 peak deconvolution by X-photoelectron spectroscopy. Also, two new binding energy components at 380.3±0.3 and 381.8±0.3eV assigned to AlOUO2(+) and SiOUO2(+) surface species were observed at pH 6.

  20. Validation of satellite-based noontime UVI with NDACC ground-based instruments: influence of topography, environment and satellite overpass time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogniez, Colette; Auriol, Frédérique; Deroo, Christine; Arola, Antti; Kujanpää, Jukka; Sauvage, Béatrice; Kalakoski, Niilo; Riku Aleksi Pitkänen, Mikko; Catalfamo, Maxime; Metzger, Jean-Marc; Tournois, Guy; Da Conceicao, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Spectral solar UV radiation measurements are performed in France using three spectroradiometers located at very different sites. One is installed in Villeneuve d'Ascq, in the north of France (VDA). It is an urban site in a topographically flat region. Another instrument is installed in Observatoire de Haute-Provence, located in the southern French Alps (OHP). It is a rural mountainous site. The third instrument is installed in Saint-Denis, Réunion Island (SDR). It is a coastal urban site on a small mountainous island in the southern tropics. The three instruments are affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and carry out routine measurements to monitor the spectral solar UV radiation and enable derivation of UV index (UVI). The ground-based UVI values observed at solar noon are compared to similar quantities derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, onboard the Aura satellite) and the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2, onboard the Metop-A satellite) measurements for validation of these satellite-based products. The present study concerns the period 2009-September 2012, date of the implementation of a new OMI processing tool. The new version (v1.3) introduces a correction for absorbing aerosols that were not considered in the old version (v1.2). Both versions of the OMI UVI products were available before September 2012 and are used to assess the improvement of the new processing tool. On average, estimates from satellite instruments always overestimate surface UVI at solar noon. Under cloudless conditions, the satellite-derived estimates of UVI compare satisfactorily with ground-based data: the median relative bias is less than 8 % at VDA and 4 % at SDR for both OMI v1.3 and GOME-2, and about 6 % for OMI v1.3 and 2 % for GOME-2 at OHP. The correlation between satellite-based and ground-based data is better at VDA and OHP (about 0.99) than at SDR (0.96) for both space-borne instruments. For all

  1. Decrease of U(VI) Immobilization Capability of the Facultative Anaerobic Strain Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 under Anoxic Conditions Due to Strongly Reduced Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of a facultative anaerobic bacterial isolate named Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 with U(VI) were studied under oxic and anoxic conditions in order to assess the influence of the oxygen-dependent cell metabolism on microbial uranium mobilization and immobilization. We demonstrated that aerobically and anaerobically grown cells of Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 accumulate uranium from aqueous solutions under acidic conditions (pH 2 to 6), under oxic and anoxic conditions. A combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods revealed that the speciation of U(VI) associated with the cells of the strain depend on the pH as well as on the aeration conditions. At pH 2 and pH 3, uranium was exclusively bound by organic phosphate groups provided by cellular components, independently on the aeration conditions. At higher pH values, a part (pH 4.5) or the total amount (pH 6) of the dissolved uranium was precipitated under oxic conditions in a meta-autunite-like uranyl phosphate mineral phase without supplying an additional organic phosphate substrate. In contrast to that, under anoxic conditions no mineral formation was observed at pH 4.5 and pH 6, which was clearly assigned to decreased orthophosphate release by the cells. This in turn was caused by a suppression of the indigenous phosphatase activity of the strain. The results demonstrate that changes in the metabolism of facultative anaerobic microorganisms caused by the presence or absence of oxygen can decisively influence U(VI) biomineralization. PMID:25157416

  2. Acceleration of Field-Scale Bioreduction of U(VI) in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer: Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Phil

    2005-04-20

    Uranium mill tailings sites provide access to uranium-contaminated groundwater at sites that are shallow and low hazard, making it possible to address the following scientific objectives: (1) Determine the dominant electron accepting processes at field sites with long-term metal/rad contamination; (2) Define the biogeochemical transformations that may be important to either natural or accelerated bioremediation under field conditions; and (3) Examine the potential for using biostimulation (electron donor addition) to accelerate reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) at the field scale.

  3. Hydration level dependence of the microscopic dynamics of water adsorbed in ultramicroporous carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, Eugene; Yue, Yanfeng; Bahadur, Jitendra; ...

    2016-10-20

    Even when not functionalized intentionally, most carbon materials are not hydrophobic and readily adsorb water molecules from atmospheric water vapor. We have equilibrated an ultramicroporous carbon at several levels of relative humidity, thereby attaining various hydration levels. The water molecules were adsorbed on the pore walls (but did not fill completely the pore volume) and thus could be better described as hydration, or surface, rather than confined, water. We used quasielastic neutron scattering to perform a detailed investigation of the dependence of microscopic dynamics of these adsorbed water species on the hydration level and temperature. The behavior of hydration watermore » in ultramicroporous carbon clearly demonstrates the same universal traits that characterize surface (hydration) water in other materials that are surface-hydrated. In addition, unless special treatment is intentionally applied to ultramicroporous carbon, the species filling its pores in various applications, ranging from hydrogen molecules to electrolytes, likely find themselves in contact with non-freezing water molecules characterized by rich microscopic dynamics.« less

  4. Metal adsorbent for alkaline etching aqua solutions of Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Masao; Ueki, Yuji; Seko, Noriaki; Takeda, Toshihide; Kawano, Shin-ichi

    2012-08-01

    High performance adsorbent is expected to be synthesized for the removal of Ni and Cu ions from strong alkaline solution used in the surface etching process of Si wafer. Fibrous adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induce emulsion graft polymerization onto polyethylene nonwoven fabric and subsequent amination. The reaction condition was optimized using 30 L reaction vessel and nonwoven fabric, 0.3 m width and 18 m long. The resulting fibrous adsorbent was evaluated by 48 wt% NaOH and KOH contaminated with Ni and Cu ions, respectively. The concentration levels of Ni and Cu ions was reduced to less than 1 μg/kg (ppb) at the flow rate of 10 h-1 in space velocity. The life of adsorbent was 30 times higher than that of the commercialized resin. This novel adsorbent was commercialized as METOLATE® since the ability of adsorption is remarkably higher than that of commercial resin used practically in Si wafer processing.

  5. Potassium Niobate Nanolamina: A Promising Adsorbent for Entrapment of Radioactive Cations from Water

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Yang, Dongjiang; Sun, Cuihua; Liu, Long; Yang, Shuanglei; (Alec) Jia, Yi; Cai, Rongsheng; Yao, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Processing and managing radioactive waste is a great challenge worldwide as it is extremely difficult and costly; the radioactive species, cations or anions, leaked into the environment are a serious threat to the health of present and future generations. We report layered potassium niobate (K4Nb6O17) nanolamina as adsorbent to remove toxic Sr2+, Ba2+ and Cs+ cations from wastewater. The results show that K4Nb6O17 nanolamina can permanently confine the toxic cations within the interlayer spacing via a considerable deformation of the metastable layered structure during the ion exchange process. At the same time, the nanolaminar adsorbent exhibits prompt adsorption kinetics, high adsorption capacity and selectivity, and superior acid resistance. These merits make it be a promising material as ion exchanger for the removal of radioactive cations from wastewater. PMID:25472721

  6. Influence of adsorbed fluids on the rolling contact deformation of MgO single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.

    1977-01-01

    Basic phenomena associated with rolling contact deformation were studied using MgO as a model bearing material. A hardened steel ball was rolled on MgO single crystals in slow-speed reciprocating motion and in high-speed circular motion. The resulting deformation was studied by dislocation etch-pit techniques. The presence of adsorbed fluids, such as silicone oil, white mineral oil, and toluene, with slow-speed sliding caused a dramatic change in slip mode and premature surface spalling compared with similar experiments in air or under water. In contrast, dimethyl formamide inhibited these slip processes. The results are consistent with the dependence of dislocation mobility on adsorbed species. High-speed hydrodynamic rolling with mineral oil lubrication produced a different slip phenomena entirely from the slow-speed rolling. The slip bands resembled those produced in tensile tests, and all slip apparently initiated at subsurface sites.

  7. Interactions of NO2 with sewage sludge based composite adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2008-06-15

    Interactions of NO2 present in most air were analyzed at room temperature on composite sewage sludge-derived adsorbents. They consist of carbonaceous and inorganic phases with the majority of the latter. The adsorption capacity was evaluated using the dynamic breakthrough experiments. The materials before and after NO2 exposure were characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis and FTIR. The results showed differences in the surface activities of sludge-derived materials towards immobilization and reduction of nitric dioxide. Nitrates and nitrite are the main products of surface reactions. This is linked to the presence of active oxides and hydroxides, which are formed when the surface is exposed to water. The highest activity of the sample pyrolyzed at 650 degrees C is owing to the high content of those species formed as a result of decomposition of inorganic salts (likely chlorides, sulfates and phosphates) during thermal treatment. When sludge is pyrolyzed at 950 degrees C those oxides are engaged in stable mineral phases formed in solid-state reactions, which limits the surface activity towards NO2 retention. The reactivity of the high temperature pyrolyzed samples can be linked to the physical adsorption of water. In a water film nitrous and nitric acid can be formed and they can further react with inorganic and carbonaceous phases to the limited extent.

  8. Sol-gel synthesized adsorbents for mercury(II), chromium(III) and cobalt(II) separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kwan-Hyun

    Novel organo-ceramic adsorbents are synthesized and characterized for mercury(II), chromium(III) and cobalt(II) separations from aqueous streams. Mercury(II) adsorption on thiol functional adsorbents (SOL-AD-IV) is studied for two systems: (1) coal-fired utility plant scrubber water, and (2) acidic nuclear wastes. To exemplify the removal of mercury from these systems, simulants are prepared and used. Results show that the mercury adsorption capacity is higher than reported in the literature. In addition, the adsorbent exhibits high adsorption capacity even at 4 M HNO3. In column operation, flow rates as high as 1100 BV/h could be employed with effluent concentrations reaching below 0.06 mug/L. This adsorbent is found to exhibit superior mercury adsorption characteristics with a demonstrated long life cycle. Chromium(III) and cobalt(II) adsorption is evaluated using phosphonic acid (SOL-PHONIC) and phosphinic acid (SOL-PHINIC) functional adsorbents synthesized via sol-gel processing by co-condensation of clusters of functional precursor (FPS) and cross-linking (CA) silanes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to examine the evolution of oligomeric species with hydrolysis and condensation reaction times. The effects of both the FPS and CA oligomeric species on the physicochemical properties of the resulting adsorbent materials are evaluated and explained in terms of structural and adsorption capacity characteristics. The adsorbents are further characterized by solid-state NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the incorporation of the FPS and the nature of the functional groups in the adsorbent matrix. SOL-PHONIC is employed for the removal of chromium, and both SOL-PHONIC and SOL-PHINIC are employed for the removal of cobalt. Results show that chromium and cobalt adsorptions are solution pH dependent. Cobalt adsorption tests evaluated using the two adsorbents show that SOL-PHONIC exhibits a higher selectivity towards cobalt over nickel. The adsorption

  9. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  10. Identification of the Active Species in Photochemical Hole Scavenging Reactions of Methanol on TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-11-03

    Molecular and dissociative methanol adsorption species were prepared on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces to study photocatalytic oxidation of methanol in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Adsorbed methoxy groups (CH3O-) were found to be the photoactive form of adsorbed methanol converted to adsorbed formaldehyde and a surface OH group by hole-mediated C-H bond cleavage. These results suggest that adsorbed methoxy is the effective hole scavenger in photochemical reactions involving methanol.

  11. Formation Process of Eosin Y-Adsorbing ZnO Particles by Electroless Deposition and Their Photoelectric Conversion Properties.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Satoshi; Nishikiori, Hiromasa; Mizusaki, Hideaki; Wagata, Hajime; Teshima, Katsuya

    2015-06-03

    The thin films consisting of crystalline ZnO particles were prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide electrodes by electroless deposition. The particles were deposited from an aqueous solution containing zinc nitrate, dimethyamine-borane, and eosin Y at 328 K. As the Pd particles were adsorbed on the substrate, not only the eosin Y monomer but also the dimer and debrominated species were rapidly adsorbed on the spherical ZnO particles, which were aggregated and formed secondary particles. On the other hand, in the absence of the Pd particles, the monomer was adsorbed on the flake-shaped ZnO particles, which vertically grew on the substrate surface and had a high crystallinity. The photoelectric conversion efficiency was higher for the ZnO electrodes containing a higher amount of the monomer during light irradiation.

  12. Feasibility of fullerene waste as carbonaceous adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, T.G.; Garg, S.; Rixey, W.G.

    1996-03-01

    This note investigates using the waste soot generated in fullerene manufacture as an adsorbent. Both oven-dried and air-activated samples of waste soot are compared with three commercially available powdered activated carbons (PACs): Nuchar-SA, HDH, and Calgon-RC. Three model compounds were chosen for adsorption tests--TCE, Benzene, and Phenol--representing a small branched molecule, a small nonpolar ring molecule, and relatively polar ring molecule. Additionally, the effectiveness of total organic carbon (TOC) removal from wastewater was evaluated. Oven-dried soot performed poorly as compared to the commercial carbons, but activation of the waste soot for 60 min at 450 C in air resulted in an activated carbon (aFWS) with properties similar to those of commercially available PACs. The aFWS performed better than one would predict from the typical characterization measures of iodine number, molasses number, and methylene blue number. The data for phenol suggest some functional groups are created during the activation of the waste soot. These results show that large-scale fullerene manufacturing can be a zero-waste industry, because its primary waste product can be converted into a useful material.

  13. Photoreduction of methylviologen adsorbed on silver

    SciTech Connect

    Feilchenfeld, H.; Chumanov, G.; Cotton, T.M. |

    1996-03-21

    Methylviologen adsorbed on a roughened silver electrode is reduced to its cation radical upon irradiation with laser light at liquid nitrogen temperature. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra were obtained with different excitation wavelengths between 406 and 752 nm and compared to those obtained at room temperature in an electrochemical cell under potential control. From two-color experiments, in which one laser frequency was used to generate the radical and a second to excite the SERS spectra, it was determined that radical formation occurs mainly with excitation in the blue spectral region. A comparison of the SERS spectra of the dication and cation radical forms of methylviologen with their solution spectra suggests that the former interacts more strongly with the surface than the latter. The cation radical appears to be stable for several hours in liquid nitrogen but has a short lifetime at room temperature. Two mechanisms for the photoreduction are discussed: plasmon-assisted electron transfer from the metal to the methylviologen dication and formation of a resonance charge transfer complex. The current experimental data are insufficient to determine the particular role of these mechanisms. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  14. NASA Applications of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a new, innovative technology that was developed to reduce the risk of molecular contamination on spaceflight applications. Outgassing from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, and potting compounds, pose a significant threat to the spacecraft and the lifetime of missions. As a coating made of highly porous inorganic materials, MAC offers impressive adsorptive capabilities that help capture and trap contaminants. Past research efforts have demonstrated the coating's promising adhesion performance, optical properties, acoustic durability, and thermal stability. These results advocate its use near or on surfaces that are targeted by outgassed materials, such as internal optics, electronics, detectors, baffles, sensitive instruments, thermal control coatings, and vacuum chamber test environments. The MAC technology has significantly progressed in development over the recent years. This presentation summarizes the many NASA spaceflight applications of MAC and how the coatings technology has been integrated as a mitigation tool for outgassed contaminants. For example, this sprayable paint technology has been beneficial for use in various vacuum chambers for contamination control and hardware bake-outs. The coating has also been used in small instrument cavities within spaceflight instrument for NASA missions.

  15. DBPs removal in GAC filter-adsorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkeun; Kang, Byeongsoo

    2008-01-01

    A rapid sand filter and granular activated carbon filter-adsorber (GAC FA) were compared in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and disinfection by-products (DBPs) removal. A water treatment plant (WTP) that had a high ammonia concentration and DOC in raw water, which, in turn, led to a high concentration of DBPs because of a high dose of pre-chlorination, was investigated. To remove DBPs and DOC simultaneously, a conventional rapid sand filter had been retrofitted to a GAC FA at the Buyeo WTP in Korea. The overall removal efficiency of DBPs and DOC was higher in the GAC FA than in the sand filter, as expected. Breakthrough of trihalomethanes (THMs) was noticed after 3 months of GAC FA operation, and then removal of THMs was minimal (<10%). On the other hand, the removal efficiency of five haloacetic acids (HAA(5)) in the GAC FA was better than that of THMs, though adsorption of HAA(5) decreased rapidly after 3.5 months of GAC FA operation. And then, gradual improvement (>90%) in HAA(5) removal efficiency was again observed, which could be attributed to biodegradation. At the early stage of GAC FA operation, HAA(5) removal was largely due to physical adsorption, but later on biodegradation appeared to prevail. Biodegradation of HAA(5) was significantly influenced by water temperature. Similar turbidity removal was noticed in both filters, while better manganese removal was confirmed in the sand filter rather than in the GAC FA.

  16. Imaging the wave functions of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F Stefan; Ramsey, Michael G; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-01-14

    The basis for a quantum-mechanical description of matter is electron wave functions. For atoms and molecules, their spatial distributions and phases are known as orbitals. Although orbitals are very powerful concepts, experimentally only the electron densities and -energy levels are directly observable. Regardless whether orbitals are observed in real space with scanning probe experiments, or in reciprocal space by photoemission, the phase information of the orbital is lost. Here, we show that the experimental momentum maps of angle-resolved photoemission from molecular orbitals can be transformed to real-space orbitals via an iterative procedure which also retrieves the lost phase information. This is demonstrated with images obtained of a number of orbitals of the molecules pentacene (C22H14) and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (C24H8O6), adsorbed on silver, which are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. The procedure requires no a priori knowledge of the orbitals and is shown to be simple and robust.

  17. Microfungal alkylation and volatilization of selenium adsorbed by goethite.

    PubMed

    Peitzsch, Mirko; Kremer, Daniel; Kersten, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Selenium adsorbed in the oxyanionic form by Fe-oxides like goethite is considered of benefit for long-term stabilization of (79)Se under near field conditions of radionuclide waste disposal sites. However, microbe-mediated volatilization of the uranium fission product (79)Se has not yet been considered for risk assessment based on the use of the water-solid distribution coefficient K(D). We have performed incubation experiments in a ternary system selenium-microbe-goethite and show that mycobiota including the common black microfungi genera Alternaria alternata are capable of volatilizing the Se even if immobilized by goethite. The microfungi were incubated in a standardized nutrient broth suspension with 10 g L(-1) of the oxide target under defined conditions. Volatile organic selenium (VOSe) species formed in the head space of the culture flasks were sampled and measured directly by a cryotrapping cryofocusing gas chromatographic system coupled with ICP-MS detection (CT-CF-GC-ICP-MS). Alkylated VOSe species were found at the tens to hundreds ng m(-3) levels dominated by dimethyl selenide (DMSe) and dimethyl diselenide (DMDSe). The total amount of DMSe released into the 80-mL headspace volume within the 21 days of incubation was up to 1.12 +/- 0.17 nmol and 0.48 +/- 0.12 nmol for systems without and with goethite amendment, respectively. Alkylation rates of up to 0.1 mumol Se per day and g biomass cannot be neglected as a potential fission product mobilization pathway, unless the inherent radioactivity is proven to prevent any such microbial activity on the long-term. Otherwise it may lead to an onsite accumulation of (79)Se through evapoconcentration in the enclosed underground caverns.

  18. HC3N and C4H2 low temperature VUV photoabsorption cross sections: application to their observation in Titan's atmosphere by UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Ferradaz, T.; Fray, N.; Jolly, A.; Schwell, M.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    To interpret observations of Titan's high atmosphere obtained by the UV spectrometer UVIS on board the CASSINI spacecraft, the photoabsorption cross sections of molecules are needed. A critical review of the absorption coefficient available in the vacuum ultraviolet domain (VUV: 110-210 nm) for organic molecules present or expected to be present in Titan's atmosphere, showed a critical lack of data. In particular, many absorption cross sections have never been measured at low temperature. The lack is even greater for molecules not commercially available since, even at room temperature, absolute absorption coefficients are not available or erroneous. A new specific absorption cell has thus been designed to measure the absorption cross sections in the VUV range at low temperature characteristic of Titan's atmosphere. We have measured HC3N and C4H2 spectra using the Berlin synchrotron facility (BESSY) to obtain new absorption coefficients in the 110 to 190 nm range, at the low temperature representative of Titan's atmosphere. The effect of the temperature on the spectra will be discussed. And, an application to the interpretation of VUV observations of Titan's atmosphere obtained by UVIS will be presented.

  19. Monitoring and toxicity evaluation of phytoplankton on lithium manganese oxide adsorbents at lithium recovery pilot plant field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H. O.; Kim, J. A.; Kim, J. C.; Chung, K. S.; Ryu, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    For recovery of rare mineral resources such as lithium or boron from seawater, the lithium adsorbent material have been made by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and pilot plant was conducted in Okgye Harbor, Gangneung, Korea. The application of lithium adsorbent in pilot plant, it is important to consider the impact on the marine environment. Especially phytoplankton communities are important marine microorganism to represent marine primary product. At the same time, phytoplankton is possible to induce the decrease of lithium recovery rate due to cause of biofouling to surfaces of lithium adsorbents. Therefore long-term and periodic monitoring of phytoplankton is necessary to understand the environmental impact and biofouling problems near the lithium pilot plant. The abundance and biomass of phytoplankton have been evaluated through monthly interval sampling from February 2013 to May 2015. Abundance and species diversity of phytoplankton went up to summer from winter. When lithium adsorbents were immersing to seawater, eco-toxicities of released substances were determined using Microtox with bioluminescence bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The adsorbents were soaked in sterilized seawater and aeration for 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14 days intervals under controlled temperature. Maximum EC50 concentration was 61.4% and this toxicity was showed in more than 10 days exposure.

  20. Enhanced CO2 adsorptive performance of PEI/SBA-15 adsorbent using phosphate ester based surfactants as additives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dandan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Haiqiang; Weng, Xiaole; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a series of polyetherimide/SBA-15: 2-D hexagonal P6mm, Santa Barbara USA (PEI/SBA-15) adsorbents modified by phosphoric ester based surfactants (including tri(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (BEP) and trimethyl phosphonoacetate (TMPA)) were prepared for CO2 adsorption. Experimental results indicated that the addition of TEP and BEP had positive effects on CO2 adsorption capacity over PEI/SBA-15. In particular, the CO2 adsorption amount could be improved by around 20% for 45PEI-5TEP/SBA-15 compared to the additive-free adsorbent. This could be attributed to the decrease of CO2 diffusion resistance in the PEI bulk network due to the interactions between TEP and loaded PEI molecules, which was further confirmed by adsorption kinetics results. In addition, it was also found that the cyclic performance of the TEP-modified adsorbent was better than the surfactant-free one. This could be due to two main reasons, based on the results of in situ DRIFT and TG-DSC tests. First and more importantly, adsorbed CO2 species could be desorbed more rapidly over TEP-modified adsorbent during the thermal desorption process. Furthermore, the enhanced thermal stability after TEP addition ensured lower degradation of amine groups during adsorption/desorption cycles.

  1. Speciation of adsorbed yttrium and rare earth elements on oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Wojciech; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

    2008-08-01

    The distribution of yttrium and the rare earth elements (YREE) between natural waters and oxide mineral surfaces depends on adsorption reactions, which in turn depend on the specific way in which YREE are coordinated to mineral surfaces. Recent X-ray studies have established that Y 3+ is adsorbed to the rutile (1 1 0) surface as a distinctive tetranuclear species. However, the hydrolysis state of the adsorbed cation is not known from experiment. Previous surface complexation models of YREE adsorption have suggested two to four cation hydrolysis states coexisting on oxide surfaces. In the present study, we investigate the applicability of the X-ray results to rare earth elements and to several oxides in addition to rutile using the extended triple-layer surface complexation model. The reaction producing a hydrolyzed tetranuclear surface species 4>SOH+M+2HO=(>SOH)2_M(OH)2++4H was found to account for a significant fraction of the adsorbed Y 3+, La 3+, Nd 3+, Gd 3+, and Yb 3+ on rutile, hematite, alumina and silica over wide ranges of pH and ionic strength. Where adsorption data were available as a function of surface coverage for hematite and silica, an additional reaction involving a mononuclear species could be used to account for the higher surface coverages. However, it is also possible that some of the higher surface coverage data refer to surface precipitation rather than adsorption. The results of the present study provide an internally consistent basis for describing YREE adsorption which could be used to investigate more complex systems in which YREE compete both in aqueous solution and on mineral surfaces with alkaline earths and ligands such as carbonate, sulfate, chloride and organic species, in order to build a predictive adsorption model applicable to natural waters.

  2. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  3. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  4. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  5. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  6. Adsorption of globular proteins on locally planar surfaces. II. Models for the effect of multiple adsorbate conformations on adsorption equilibria and kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Minton, A P

    1999-01-01

    Equilibrium and kinetic models for nonspecific adsorption of proteins to planar surfaces are presented. These models allow for the possibility of multiple interconvertible surface conformations of adsorbed protein. Steric repulsion resulting in area exclusion by adsorbed molecules is taken into account by treating the adsorbate as a thermodynamically nonideal two-dimensional fluid. In the equilibrium model, the possibility of attractive interactions between adsorbed molecules is taken into account in a limited fashion by permitting one of the adsorbed species to self-associate. Calculated equilibrium adsorption isotherms exhibit apparent high-affinity and low-affinity binding regions, corresponding respectively to adsorption of ligand at low fractional area occupancy in an energetically favorable side-on conformation and conversion at higher fractional area occupancy of the side-on conformation to an entropically favored end-on conformation. Adsorbate self-association may lead to considerable steepening of the adsorption isotherm, compensating to a variable extent for the broadening effect of steric repulsion. Kinetic calculations suggest that in the absence of attractive interactions between adsorbate molecules, the process of adsorption may be highly "stretched" along the time axis, rendering the attainment of adsorption equilibrium in the context of conventional experiments problematic. PMID:9876132

  7. Novel adhesive properties of poly(ethylene-oxide) adsorbed nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wenduo

    Solid-polymer interfaces play crucial roles in the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology and are the confluence of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. There is now growing evidence that polymer chains irreversibly adsorb even onto weakly attractive solid surfaces, forming a nanometer-thick adsorbed polymer layer ("adsorbed polymer nanolayers"). It has also been reported that the adsorbed layers greatly impact on local structures and properties of supported polymer thin films. In this thesis, I aim to clarify adhesive and tribological properties of adsorbed poly(ethylene-oxide) (PEO) nanolayers onto silicon (Si) substrates, which remain unsolved so far. The adsorbed nanolayers were prepared by the established protocol: one has to equilibrate the melt or dense solution against a solid surface; the unadsorbed chains can be then removed by a good solvent, while the adsorbed chains are assumed to maintain the same conformation due to the irreversible freezing through many physical solid-segment contacts. I firstly characterized the formation process and the surface/film structures of the adsorbed nanolayers by using X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Secondly, to compare the surface energy of the adsorbed layers with the bulk, static contact angle measurements with two liquids (water and glycerol) were carried out using a optical contact angle meter equipped with a video camera. Thirdly, I designed and constructed a custom-built adhesion-testing device to quantify the adhesive property. The experimental results provide new insight into the microscopic structure - macroscopic property relationship at the solid-polymer interface.

  8. Mysterious Lattice Rotations in Adsorbed Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Renee D.

    1997-03-01

    Lattice rotations due to a mismatch in structure have been observed in film growth for many years, probably beginning in the 1930's with the Nishiyama-Wasserman and Kurdjumov-Sachs orientations observed when fcc(111) films grow on bcc(110) surfaces, or vice versa. Early analysis of this problem was carried out with the aid of Moiré patterns and the observation that the preferred lattice orientations are those which maximize the Moiré fringe spacing. Later energy calculations indicated that the structures which were predicted by the the Moiré technique actually do correspond to energy minima. Epitaxial rotation in adsorbed monolayers is a conceptually simpler problem since in principle it involves only two planes of atoms, and it was first observed in 1977 for Ar on a graphite surface(C. G. Shaw, M. D. Chinn, S. C. Fain, Jr. Phys. Rev. Lett. 41 (1978) 955.). This observation came only a few months after a new theory, based on the expected elastic behavior of an overlayer, was developed by A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague(A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague, Phys. Rev. Lett. 38 (1977) 1286.), and the agreement with the experimental results was remarkable. It was later shown that a few symmetry principles similar to those used for the film growth studies sometimes can also predict the observed structures. However, the situation for incommensurate layers physisorbed on metal surfaces currently looks bleak. None of the existing theories or models appears to describe the experimental results. New data for physisorbed gases on metal surfaces will be presented, along with some half-baked (and probably wrong) ideas for what might be happening. This work was supported by NSF.

  9. In situ DRIFTS-MS studies on the oxidation of adsorbed NH3 by NOx over a Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haiyang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2013-04-30

    DRIFT spectroscopy combined with mass spectrometry was used to investigate the oxidation of adsorbed ammonia by NO2, NO+O2 and NO2+O2 on a copper ion exchanged SSZ 13 (Cu-SSZ-13) zeolite. Compared with both NO2 and NO, the adsorption of ammonia is much stronger on the Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite. Two adsorbed ammonia species were found over the Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite studied here; notably ammonia on Brönsted acid sites (proton) and ammonia on Lewis acid sites (copper ions). These adsorbed ammonia species present different activity profiles and selectivity to N2 during NH3 oxidation. The results obtained suggest that ammonia adsorbed onto copper ions in Cu-SSZ-13 are more active at low temperatures than proton-adsorbed NH3, and give rise to a higher selectivity to N2. The formation of N2O is associated primarily with the reaction of NOx with proton-adsorbed NH3 via the formation and subsequent thermal decomposition of NH4NO3. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Portions of this work were performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  10. Miscibility of Hydrocarbon and Fluorocarbon Surfactants in Adsorbed Film and Micelle.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Masumi; Nomura, Teruko; Matsuki, Hitoshi; Kaneshina, Shoji; Aratono, Makoto

    2001-02-01

    We investigated the miscibility of nonionic hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants in the adsorbed film and the micelle by surface tension measurements of the aqueous solution. The combination of tetraethyleneglycol monodecyl ether (C10E4) and tetraethyleneglycol mono-1,1,7-trihydrododecafluoroheptyl ether (FC7E4) was chosen because they have the same hydrophilic groups and about the same surface activity. The extent of nonideal mixing was estimated quantitatively in terms of the excess Gibbs energy in the adsorbed film g(H,E) and that in the micelle g(M,E). The excess area per adsorbed molecule, A(H,E), was also evaluated and discussed. The ionic hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon mixed surfactant systems, lithium dodecyl sulfate (LiDS)/lithium perfluorooctane sulfonate (LiFOS) and lithium tetradecyl sulfate (LiTS)/LiFOS systems are also investigated from the standpoint of excess Gibbs energy and excess area. It is also clearly shown that the regular solution approach does not fit in the systems that contain ionic species. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Turning things downside up: Adsorbate induced water flipping on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Greg A. E-mail: bruce.kay@pnnl.gov; Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kay, Bruce D. E-mail: bruce.kay@pnnl.gov

    2014-11-14

    We have examined the adsorption of the weakly bound species N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and Kr on the (√(37)×√(37))R25.3{sup ∘} water monolayer on Pt(111) using a combination of molecular beam dosing, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. In contrast to multilayer crystalline ice, the adsorbate-free water monolayer is characterized by a lack of dangling OH bonds protruding into the vacuum (H-up). Instead, the non-hydrogen-bonded OH groups are oriented downward (H-down) to maximize their interaction with the underlying Pt(111) substrate. Adsorption of Kr and O{sub 2} have little effect on the structure and vibrational spectrum of the “√(37)” water monolayer while adsorption of both N{sub 2}, and CO are effective in “flipping” H-down water molecules into an H-up configuration. This “flipping” occurs readily upon adsorption at temperatures as low as 20 K and the water monolayer transforms back to the H-down, “√(37)” structure upon adsorbate desorption above 35 K, indicating small energy differences and barriers between the H-down and H-up configurations. The results suggest that converting water in the first layer from H-down to H-up is mediated by the electrostatic interactions between the water and the adsorbates.

  12. Turning things downside up: Adsorbate induced water flipping on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Gregory A.; Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-11-14

    We have examined the adsorption of the weakly bound species N2, O2, CO and Kr on the water monolayer on Pt(111) using a combination of molecular beam dosing, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In contrast to multilayer crystalline ice, the adsorbate-free water monolayer is characterized by a lack of dangling OH bonds protruding into the vacuum (H-up). Instead, the non-hydrogen-bonded OH groups are oriented downward (H-down) to maximize their interaction with the underlying Pt(111) substrate. Adsorption of Kr and O2 have little effect on the structure and vibrational spectrum of the “ ” water monolayer while adsorption of both N2, and CO are effective in “flipping” H-down water molecules into an H-up configuration. This “flipping” occurs readily upon adsorption at temperatures as low as 20 K and the water monolayer transforms back to the H-down, “ ” structure upon adsorbate desorption above 35 K, indicating small energy differences and barriers between the H-down and H-up configurations. The results suggest that converting water in the first layer from H-down to H-up is mediated by the electrostatic interactions between the water and the adsorbates.

  13. Molecular adsorbates as probes of the local properties of doped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Van Dong; Joucken, Frédéric; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Sporken, Robert; Santos, Maria Cristina dos; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Graphene-based sensors are among the most promising of graphene’s applications. The ability to signal the presence of molecular species adsorbed on this atomically thin substrate has been explored from electric measurements to light scattering. Here we show that the adsorbed molecules can be used to sense graphene properties. The interaction of porphyrin molecules with nitrogen-doped graphene has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations. Molecular manipulation was used to reveal the surface below the adsorbed molecules allowing to achieve an atomic-scale measure of the interaction of molecules with doped graphene. The adsorbate’s frontier electronic states are downshifted in energy as the molecule approaches the doping site, with largest effect when the molecule sits over the nitrogen dopant. Theoretical calculations showed that, due to graphene’s high polarizability, the adsorption of porphyrin induces a charge rearrangement on the substrate similar to the image charges on a metal. This charge polarization is enhanced around nitrogen site, leading to an increased interaction of molecules with their image charges on graphene. Consequently, the molecular states are stabilized and shift to lower energies. These findings reveal the local variation of polarizability induced by nitrogen dopant opening new routes towards the electronic tuning of graphene. PMID:27097555

  14. Effects of ammonium application rate on uptake of soil adsorbed amino acids by rice*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiao-chuang; Ma, Qing-xu; Wu, Liang-huan; Zhu, Lian-feng; Jin, Qian-yu

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, excessive use of chemical nitrogen (N) fertilizers has resulted in the accumulation of excess ammonium (NH4 +) in many agricultural soils. Though rice is known as an NH4 +-tolerant species and can directly absorb soil intact amino acids, we still know considerably less about the role of high exogenous NH4 + content on rice uptake of soil amino acids. This experiment examined the effects of the exogenous NH4 + concentration on rice uptake of soil adsorbed glycine in two different soils under sterile culture. Our data showed that the sorption capacity of glycine was closely related to soils’ physical and chemical properties, such as organic matter and cation exchange capacity. Rice biomass was significantly inhibited by the exogenous NH4 + content at different glycine adsorption concentrations. A three-way analysis of variance demonstrated that rice glycine uptake and glycine nutritional contribution were not related to its sorption capacity, but significantly related to its glycine:NH4 + concentration ratio. After 21-d sterile cultivation, the rice uptake of adsorbed glycine accounted for 8.8%‒22.6% of rice total N uptake, which indicates that soil adsorbed amino acids theoretically can serve as an important N source for plant growth in spite of a high NH4 + application rate. However, further studies are needed to investigate the extent to which this bioavailability is realized in the field using the 13C, 15N double labeling technology.

  15. Light harvesting, energy transfer and electron cycling of a native photosynthetic membrane adsorbed onto a gold surface.

    PubMed

    Magis, Gerhard J; den Hollander, Mart-Jan; Onderwaater, Willem G; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil; Aartsma, Thijs J; Frese, Raoul N

    2010-03-01

    Photosynthetic membranes comprise a network of light harvesting and reaction center pigment-protein complexes responsible for the primary photoconversion reactions: light absorption, energy transfer and electron cycling. The structural organization of membranes of the purple bacterial species Rb. sphaeroides has been elucidated in most detail by means of polarized light spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Here we report a functional characterization of native and untreated membranes of the same species adsorbed onto a gold surface. Employing fluorescence confocal spectroscopy and light-induced electrochemistry we show that adsorbed membranes maintain their energy and electron transferring functionality. Gold-adsorbed membranes are shown to generate a steady high photocurrent of 10 microA/cm(2) for several minutes and to maintain activity for up to three days while continuously illuminated. The surface-adsorbed membranes exhibit a remarkable functionality under aerobic conditions, even when exposed to light intensities well above that of direct solar irradiation. The component at the interface of light harvesting and electron cycling, the LH1 complex, displays exceptional stability, likely contributing to the robustness of the membranes. Peripheral light harvesting LH2 complexes show a light intensity dependent decoupling from photoconversion. LH2 can act as a reversible switch at low-light, an increased emitter at medium light and photobleaches at high light.

  16. Method of coating aluminum substrates with solid adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.R.; McKeon, M.J.; Cohen, A.P.; Behan, A.S.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a method of coating a surface of an aluminum substrate with a layer of solid adsorbent selected from the group consisting of crystalline molecular sieves, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof. It comprises heating the surface in an oxygen containing atmosphere to a temperature of at least about 200{degrees} C and sufficient to enable bonding of the solid adsorbent to the surface, contacting the heated surface with a slurry comprising the adsorbent and a binder selected from the group consisting of volclay, kaolin, sepiolite, attapulgite, silicates, aluminates, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof in a suspending liquid to form a slurry-coated surface, and removing sufficient liquid to form an adsorbent coating thereon.

  17. Radiation grafted adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Nasef, Mohamed; Ting, T. M.; Abbasi, Ali; Layeghi-moghaddam, Alireza; Sara Alinezhad, S.; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation induced grafting (RIG) is acquired to prepare a number of adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications using a single route involving RIG of glycidymethacrylate (GMA) onto polyethylene-polypropylene (PE-PP) non-woven fabric. The grafted fabric was subjected to one of three functionalization reactions to impart desired ionic characters. This included treatment with (1) N-dimethyl-D-glucamine, (2) triethylamine and (3) triethylamine and alkalisation with KOH. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to study the changes in chemical and physical structures of the obtained fibrous adsorbents. The potential applications of the three adsorbents for removal of boron from solutions, capturing CO2 from CO2/N2 mixtures and catalysing transesterification of triacetin/methanol to methyl acetate (biodiesel) were explored. The obtained fibrous adsorbents provide potential alternatives to granular resins for the investigated applications and require further development.

  18. Trace contaminant studies of HSC adsorbent. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yieh, D. T. N.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of fifteen trace contaminants on HSC (polyethylenimine coated acrylic ester) adsorbent were experimentally investigated with the following two objectives: to test the removal potential and the adsorption reversibility of the selected trace contaminants, and to test the effect a preadsorbed trace contaminant has on the CO2 adsorption capacity. The experimental method for acquiring the adsorption equilibrium data used is based on the volumetric (or displacement) concept of vacuum adsorption. From the experimental results, it was found that the HSC adsorbent has good adsorption potential for contaminants of alcohol compounds, esters, and benzene compounds; whereas, adsorption of ketone compounds, oxidizing and reducing agents are detrimental to the adsorbent. In addition, all liquid contaminants reduce the CO2 capacity of HSC adsorbent.

  19. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  20. Oil palm biomass as an adsorbent for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Many industries discharge untreated wastewater into the environment. Heavy metals from many industrial processes end up as hazardous pollutants of wastewaters.Heavy metal pollution has increased in recent decades and there is a growing concern for the public health risk they may pose. To remove heavy metal ions from polluted waste streams, adsorption processes are among the most common and effective treatment methods. The adsorbents that are used to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media have both advantages and disadvantages. Cost and effectiveness are two of the most prominent criteria for choosing adsorbents. Because cost is so important, great effort has been extended to study and find effective lower cost adsorbents.One class of adsorbents that is gaining considerable attention is agricultural wastes. Among many alternatives, palm oil biomasses have shown promise as effective adsorbents for removing heavy metals from wastewater. The palm oil industry has rapidly expanded in recent years, and a large amount of palm oil biomass is available. This biomass is a low-cost agricultural waste that exhibits, either in its raw form or after being processed, the potential for eliminating heavy metal ions from wastewater. In this article, we provide background information on oil palm biomass and describe studies that indicate its potential as an alternative adsorbent for removing heavy metal ions from wastewater. From having reviewed the cogent literature on this topic we are encouraged that low-cost oil-palm-related adsorbents have already demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants.Because cost is so important to those who choose to clean waste streams by using adsorbents, the use of cheap sources of unconventional adsorbents is increasingly being investigated. An adsorbent is considered to be inexpensive when it is readily available, is environmentally friendly, is cost-effective and be effectively used in economical processes. The

  1. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  2. Structure of water adsorbed on a single graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, M. C.; Martí, J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the result of molecular-dynamics simulations of water adsorbed on top of a single graphene layer at temperatures between 25 and 50°C . The analysis of the energy per particle and the density profiles indicate that the behavior of the adsorbed liquid is similar to the case of multiple graphene layers (graphite) with the only difference being the values of configurational energy. Other structural properties, such as stability ranges, hydrogen bond distributions, and molecular orientations are also presented.

  3. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun

    2013-08-28

    This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as sorbents for gaseous iodine. Work was conducted in fiscal year 2012 to demonstrate the feasibility of converting Sn2S3 chalcogel without iodine into a glass. This current document summarizes the work conducted in fiscal year 2013 to assess the consolidation potential of non-oxide aerogels with adsorbed iodine. The Sn2S3 and Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels were selected for study. The first step in the process for these experiments was to load them with iodine (I2). The I2 uptake was ~68 mass% for Sn2S3 and ~50 mass% for Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of both sets of sorbents showed that metal-iodide complexes were formed during adsorption, i.e., SnI4 for Sn2S3 and SbI3 for Sb13.5Sn5S20. Additionally, metal-sulfide-iodide complexes were formed, i.e., SnSI for Sn2S3 and SbSI for Sb13.5Sn5S20. No XRD evidence for unreacted iodine was found in any of these samples. Once the chalcogels had reached maximum adsorption, the consolidation potential was assessed. Here, the sorbents were heated for consolidation in vacuum-sealed quartz vessels. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogel was heated both (1) in a glassy carbon crucible within a fused quartz tube and (2) in a single-containment fused quartz tube. The Sn2S3 chalcogel was only heated in a single-containment fused quartz tube. In both cases with the single-containment fused quartz experiments, the material consolidated nicely. However, in both cases, there were small fractions of metal iodides not incorporated into the final product as well as fused quartz particles within the melt due to the sample attacking the quartz wall during the heat treatment. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 did not appear to attack the glassy carbon crucible so, for future experiments, it would be ideal to apply a coating, such as pyrolytic graphite, to the inner walls of the fused quartz vessel to prevent

  4. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  5. Evaluation of a cesium adsorbent grafted with ammonium 12-molybdophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuya; Seko, Noriaki; Amada, Haruyo; Kasai, Noboru; Saiki, Seiichi; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Ueki, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    A fibrous cesium (Cs) adsorbent was developed using radiation-induced graft polymerization with a cross-linked structure containing a highly stable adsorption ligand. The ligand, ammonium 12-molybdophosphate (AMP), was successfully introduced onto the fibrous polyethylene trunk material. The resulting Cs adsorbent contained 36% nonwoven fabric polyethylene (NFPE), 1% AMP, 2% triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and 61% glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The adsorbent's Cs adsorption capacity was evaluated using batch and column tests. It was determined that the adsorbent could be used in a wide pH range. The amount of desorbed molybdenum, which can be used as an estimate for AMP stability on the Cs adsorbent, was minimized at the standard drinking water pH range of 5.8-8.6. Based from the inspection on the adherence of these results to the requirements set forth by the Food Sanitation Act by a third party organization, it can be concluded that the developed Cs adsorbent can be safely utilized for drinking water.

  6. Enhancing adsorption of U(VI) onto EDTA modified L. cylindrica using epichlorohydrin and ethylenediamine as a bridge

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shouzheng; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Benefiting from strong coordination ability and unique vascular structure, EDTA modified L. cylindrica opens up an alternative way for uranium recovery from seawater. However, limitations, such as poor adsorption capacity and slow adsorption rate due to low graft ratio of EDTA via one-step esterification block its practical application. Here, a strategy for increasing the graft ratio is proposed in order to improve the adsorption performance. The strategy initially involves immobilization of epichlorohydrin (EPI) onto L. cylindrica and then ethylenediamine (EDA) is introduced via facile ring-opening reaction. EPI and EDA serve as a bridge between L. cylindrica and EDTA. The graft ratio is promoted (15.01 to 21.44%) contributing to the smaller steric hindrance of EPI and EDA than EDTA and improvement in adsorption performance. In addition, the adsorbent prepared by the new strategy exhibits excellent adsorption properties in simulated seawater. PMID:28272435

  7. Enhancing adsorption of U(VI) onto EDTA modified L. cylindrica using epichlorohydrin and ethylenediamine as a bridge.

    PubMed

    Su, Shouzheng; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun

    2017-03-08

    Benefiting from strong coordination ability and unique vascular structure, EDTA modified L. cylindrica opens up an alternative way for uranium recovery from seawater. However, limitations, such as poor adsorption capacity and slow adsorption rate due to low graft ratio of EDTA via one-step esterification block its practical application. Here, a strategy for increasing the graft ratio is proposed in order to improve the adsorption performance. The strategy initially involves immobilization of epichlorohydrin (EPI) onto L. cylindrica and then ethylenediamine (EDA) is introduced via facile ring-opening reaction. EPI and EDA serve as a bridge between L. cylindrica and EDTA. The graft ratio is promoted (15.01 to 21.44%) contributing to the smaller steric hindrance of EPI and EDA than EDTA and improvement in adsorption performance. In addition, the adsorbent prepared by the new strategy exhibits excellent adsorption properties in simulated seawater.

  8. Enhancing adsorption of U(VI) onto EDTA modified L. cylindrica using epichlorohydrin and ethylenediamine as a bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shouzheng; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Benefiting from strong coordination ability and unique vascular structure, EDTA modified L. cylindrica opens up an alternative way for uranium recovery from seawater. However, limitations, such as poor adsorption capacity and slow adsorption rate due to low graft ratio of EDTA via one-step esterification block its practical application. Here, a strategy for increasing the graft ratio is proposed in order to improve the adsorption performance. The strategy initially involves immobilization of epichlorohydrin (EPI) onto L. cylindrica and then ethylenediamine (EDA) is introduced via facile ring-opening reaction. EPI and EDA serve as a bridge between L. cylindrica and EDTA. The graft ratio is promoted (15.01 to 21.44%) contributing to the smaller steric hindrance of EPI and EDA than EDTA and improvement in adsorption performance. In addition, the adsorbent prepared by the new strategy exhibits excellent adsorption properties in simulated seawater.

  9. Properties of synthetic ferrihydrite as an amino acid adsorbent and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Matrajt, G; Blanot, D

    2004-03-01

    Ferrihydrite, an iron oxide hydroxide, is found in all kinds of environments, from hydrothermal hot springs to extraterrestrial materials. It has been shown that this material is nanoporous, and because of its high surface area, it has outstanding adsorption properties and in some cases catalysis properties. In this work we studied the adsorption properties of ferrihydrite with respect to amino acids. Samples of pure ferrihydrite were synthesised and exposed to solutions of amino acids including both proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous species. These experiments revealed important characteristics of this mineral as both an adsorbent of amino acids and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

  10. Utility of adsorbents in the purification of drinking water: a review of characterization, efficiency and safety evaluation of various adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Shashi Prabha; Gopal, Krishna; Bersillon, J L

    2009-05-01

    Clean drinking water is one of the implicit requisites fora healthy human population. However the growing industrialization and extensive use of chemicals for various concerns, has increased the burden of unwanted pollutants in the drinking water of developing countries like India. The entry of potentially hazardous substances into the biota has been magnifying day by day. In the absence of a possible stoppage of these, otherwise, useful chemicals, the only way to maintain safer water bodies is to develop efficient purifying technologies. One such immensely beneficial procedure that has been in use is that of purification of water using 'adsorbents'. Indigenous minerals and natural plants products have potential for removing many pollutants viz. fluoride, arsenic, nitrate, heavy metals, pesticides as well as trihalomethanes. Adsorbents which are derived from carbon, alumina, zeolite, clay minerals, iron ores, industrial by products, and natural products viz. parts of the plants, herbs and algal biomass offer promising potential of removal. In the recent years attention has been paid to develop process involving screening/pretreatment/activation/impregnation using alkalies, acids, alum, lime, manganese dioxide, ferric chloride and other chemicals which are found to enhance their adsorbing efficiency. Chemical characterization of these adsorbents recapitulates the mechanism of the process. It is imperative to observe that capacities of the adsorbents may vary depending on the characteristics, chemical modifications and concentration of the individual adsorbent. Removal kinetics is found to be based on the experimental conditions viz. pH, concentration of the adsorbate, quantity of the adsorbent and temperature. It is suggested that isotherm model is suitable tool to assess the adsorption capacities in batch and column modes. Safety evaluation and risk assessment of the process/products may be useful to provide guidelines for its sustainable disposal.

  11. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dods, Stewart R; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2015-01-09

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000CV/h (2s and 0.3s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12mgBSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21mglysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20mgBSA/mL and 27mglysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000CV/h. For compression loads of 5MPa and 10MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an uncompressed adsorbent, compressions of 1, 5

  12. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Stewart R.; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10 MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000 CV/h (2 s and 0.3 s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12 mg BSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21 mg lysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1 MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20 mg BSA/mL and 27 mg lysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1 MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000 CV/h. For compression loads of 5 MPa and 10 MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1 MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an

  13. Elution by Le Chatelier's principle for maximum recyclability of adsorbents: applied to polyacrylamidoxime adsorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater.

    PubMed

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Vukovic, Sinisa; Dai, Sheng

    2016-05-28

    Amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents have attracted interest within the last decade due to their high adsorption capacities for uranium and other rare earth metals from seawater. The ocean contains an approximated 4-5 billion tons of uranium and even though amidoxime-based adsorbents have demonstrated the highest uranium adsorption capacities to date, they are still economically impractical because of their limited recyclability. Typically, the adsorbed metals are eluted with a dilute acid solution that not only damages the amidoxime groups (metal adsorption sites), but is also not strong enough to remove the strongly bound vanadium, which decreases the adsorption capacity with each cycle. We resolved this challenge by incorporating Le Chatelier's principle to recycle adsorbents indefinitely. We used a solution with a high concentration of amidoxime-like chelating agents, such as hydroxylamine, to desorb nearly a 100% of adsorbed metals, including vanadium, without damaging the metal adsorption sites and preserving the high adsorption capacity. The method takes advantage of knowing the binding mode between the amidoxime ligand and the metal and mimics it with chelating agents that then in a Le Chatelier's manner removes metals by shifting to a new chemical equilibrium. For this reason the method is applicable to any ligand-metal adsorbent and it will make an impact on other extraction technologies.

  14. Energy loss in gas-surface dynamics: Electron-hole pair and phonon excitation upon adsorbate relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of electron and phonon degrees of freedom on the relaxation dynamics of adsorption processes in gas-surface systems by using ab initio molecular dynamics that incorporates an electronic friction force (AIMDEF). As representative cases we have chosen three systems with different adsorption energies and adsorbate-to-surface atom mass ratios: H on Pd(1 0 0), N on Ag(1 1 1), and N2 on Fe(1 1 0). We show, through inspection of the total energies and trajectories of the hot adsorbates on the surface, that electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations dominate relaxation of the light gas species, while the phonon channel is dominant for the heavy species. In the latter case e-h pairs become more important at the final thermalization stages.

  15. Biogeochemical Modeling of In Situ U(VI) Reduction and Immobilization with Emulsified Vegetable Oil as the Electron Donor at a Field Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Parker, J.; Wu, W.; Schadt, C. W.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.; Orifrc Team

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive biogeochemical model was developed to quantitatively describe the coupled hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological processes that occurred following injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor to immobilize U(VI) at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site (ORIFRC) in Tennessee. The model couples the degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, hydrogen and acetate, reduction of nitrate, manganese, ferrous iron, sulfate and uranium, and methanoganesis with growth of multiple microbial groups. The model describes the evolution of geochemistry and microbial populations not only in the aqueous phase as typically observed, but also in the mineral phase and therefore enables us to evaluate the applicability of rates from the literature for field scale assessment, estimate the retention and degradation rates of EVO and LCFA, and assess the influence of the coupled processes on fate and transport of U(VI). Our results suggested that syntrophic bacteria or metal reducers might catalyze LCFA oxidation in the downstream locations when sulfate was consumed, and competition between methanogens and others for electron donors and slow growth of methanogen might contribute to the sustained reducing condition. Among the large amount of hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological parameter values, the initial biomass, and the interactions (e.g., inhibition) of the microbial functional groups, and the rate and extent of Mn and Fe oxide reduction appear as the major sources of uncertainty. Our model provides a platform to conduct numerical experiments to study these interactions, and could be useful for further iterative experimental and modeling investigations into the bioreductive immobiliztion of radionuclide and metal contaminants in the subsurface.

  16. N-body ray-tracing modeling of Saturn's rings for analysis of UVIS/VIMS optical depths and CIRS temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda; Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Richardson, Derek C.

    2016-10-01

    Various observations of Saturn's A and B rings indicate that ring particles are highly compacted near the mid-plane, making non-uniform structures. Such structures complicate deduction of properties of individual ring particles characterized by, for example, the albedo and the size distribution. Modeling using N-body simulations and ray-tracing calculations is one of the most promising approaches to understanding the dense rings of Saturn. We are developing a ray-tracing code that is applicable to analysis of UVIS/VIMS optical depths and CIRS temperatures. In the presentation, we report optical depth profiles of dense rings produced by large-scale N-body simulations (Ballouz et al. 2016; in preparation) and compare them with those from UVIS/VIMS occultation observations. Ballouz et al. (2016) find that prominent overstability wakes are produced at B ring locations either if the internal density is low and/or the friction forces are strong enough. For low internal density cases, the photometric optical depths become as high as those for the B ring, but rings are not necessarily most transparent when the line of sight is aligned to overstability wakes, in contrast to observations of the outer B ring (Colwell et al. 2007). For cases with high internal density and strong friction, rings become most transparent when the line of sight is roughly aligned to overstability wakes, but the photometric optical depths become much lower than the observed values due to highly transparent inter-wake gaps. These facts may indicate that small particles not considered in the simulations fill inter-wake gaps. We also report the progress of code modifications for analysis of CIRS temperature data. For calculations of the energy balance of ring particles, effects due to multiply scattered photometric light and to mutual heating between ring particles are added to the code.

  17. Extracting Uranium from Seawater: Promising AF Series Adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Chris J.; Kuo, L. -J.; Gill, G.; Wood, J. R.; Dai, S.

    2016-04-20

    A new family of high-surface-area polyethylene fiber adsorbents named the AF series was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series adsorbents were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/comonomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154-354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44 M KOH at 80 °C followed by screening at ORNL with sodium-based synthetic aqueous solution, spiked with 8 ppm uranium. The uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170 to 200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/comonomer molar ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through column experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning times at 80 °C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1 and 3 h of KOH conditioning at 80 °C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 1 to 3 h at 80 °C resulted in a 22-27% decrease in uranium adsorption capacity in seawater.

  18. Removal of arsenic from groundwater by granular titanium dioxide adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sunbaek; Patel, Manish; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2005-07-01

    A novel granular titanium dioxide (TiO2) was evaluated for the removal of arsenic from groundwater. Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent and the effect of anions on arsenic removal. Batch experimental results showed that more arsenate [As(V)] was adsorbed on TiO2 than arsenite [As(III)] in US groundwater at pH 7.0. The adsorption capacities for As(V) and As(III) were 41.4 and 32.4 mgg(-1) TiO2, respectively. However, the adsorbent had a similar adsorption capacity for As(V) and As(III) (approximately 40 mgg(-1)) when simulated Bangladesh groundwater was used. Silica (20 mgl(-1)) and phosphate (5.8 mgl(-1)) had no obvious effect on the removal of As(V) and As(III) by TiO2 at neutral pH. Point-of-entry (POE) filters containing 3 l of the granular adsorbent were tested for the removal of arsenic from groundwater in central New Jersey, USA. Groundwater was continuously passed through the filters at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 3 min. Approximately 45,000 bed volumes of groundwater containing an average of 39 microgl(-1) of As(V) was treated by the POE filter before the effluent arsenic concentration increased to 10 microgl(-1). The total treated water volumes per weight of adsorbent were about 60,000 l per 1 kg of adsorbent. The field filtration results demonstrated that the granular TiO2 adsorbent was very effective for the removal of arsenic in groundwater.

  19. The heterogeneous interaction of HOCl with solid KBr substrates: the catalytic role of adsorbed halogens.

    PubMed

    Santschi, Ch; Rossi, M J

    2005-07-07

    The heterogeneous reactivity of HOCl on solid KBr at ambient temperature has been studied using a Knudsen flow reactor. On solid KBr steady-state uptake experiments reveal the formation of Br- and Cl-containing reaction products formed in secondary reactions such as Br(2), BrCl, HOBr, BrOCl, Cl(2) and Cl(2)O with the latter two predominating in the late stages of the reaction. The uptake coefficient gamma spanning a range between 0.15 and 1 x 10(-3) and product yields of HOCl strongly depend on the nature of the solid sample, whether grain, ground grain or thin sprayed film, as well as on sample processing such as pumping and/or heating. Furthermore, the presence of adsorbed halogen species such as Br(2)(a) are crucial for the kinetics of the reaction of HOCl with solid KBr substrates. The presence of surface-adsorbed water (SAW) leads to deactivation of KBr whereas mechanical stress such as grinding leads to the formation of surface defects that become reaction centers. Desorption of SAW at T > 620 K induces high reactivity of the KBr sample at ambient temperature. A reaction mechanism encompassing all significant observations including unusual autocatalytic activity is given as there is no direct reaction of HOCl with solid KBr. It stresses the importance of adsorbed Br-containing species such as Br(2)(a) and HBr(a) that initiate the heterogeneous chemistry of HOCl on solid KBr in the presence of SAW. The role of surface acidity and SAW for the extent of reaction is emphasized.

  20. Lipid monolayers and adsorbed polyelectrolytes with different degrees of polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Thomas; Ahrens, Heiko; Lawrenz, Frank; Gröning, Andreas; Nestler, Peter; Günther, Jens-Uwe; Helm, Christiane A

    2014-06-17

    Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) of different molecular weight M(w) is adsorbed to oppositely charged DODAB monolayers from dilute solutions (0.01 mmol/L). PSS adsorbs flatly in a lamellar manner, as is shown by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction (exception: PSS with M(w) below 7 kDa adsorbs flatly disordered to the liquid expanded phase). The surface coverage and the separation of the PSS chains are independent of PSS M(w). On monolayer compression, the surface charge density increases by a factor of 2, and the separation of the PSS chains decreases by the same factor. Isotherms show that on increase of PSS M(w) the transition pressure of the LE/LC (liquid expanded/liquid condensed) phase transition decreases. When the contour length exceeds the persistence length (21 nm), the transition pressure is low and constant. For low-M(w) PSS (<7 kDa) the LE/LC transition of the lipids and the disordered/ordered transition of adsorbed PSS occur simultaneously, leading to a maximum in the contour length dependence of the transition enthalpy. These findings show that lipid monolayers at the air/water interface are a suitable model substrate with adjustable surface charge density to study the equilibrium conformation of adsorbed polyelectrolytes as well as their interactions with a model membrane.

  1. Synthesis of arsenic graft adsorbents in pilot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Kasai, Noboru; Shibata, Takuya; Aketagawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Makikatsu; Yoshii, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Yasuhiko; Seko, Noriaki

    2012-08-01

    Synthesis of arsenic (As) adsorbents in pilot scale was carried out with a synthesizing apparatus by radiation-induced graft polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate phosphoric acid monomer (PA), which consists of phosphoric acid mono- (50%) and di- (50%) ethyl methacrylate esters onto a nonwoven cotton fabric (NCF), and following chemical modification by contact with a zirconium (Zr) solution. The apparatus which was equipped with reaction tanks, a washing tank and a pump can produce up to 0.3 m×14 m size of the As(V) adsorbent in one reaction. A degree of grafting of 150% was obtained at an irradiation dose of 20 kGy with 5% of PA solution mixed with deionized water for 1 h at 40 °C. Finally, after Zr(IV) was loaded onto a NCF with 5 mmol/L of Zr(IV) solution, the graft adsorbent for the removal of As(V) was achieved in pilot-scale. The adsorbent which was synthesized in pilot scale was evaluated in batch mode adsorption with 1 ppm (mg/l) of As(V) solution for 2 h at room temperature. As a result, the adsorption capacity for As(V) was 0.02 mmol/g-adsorbent.

  2. Natural material adsorbed onto a polymer to enhance immune function

    PubMed Central

    Reinaque, Ana Paula Barcelos; França, Eduardo Luzía; Scherer, Edson Fredulin; Côrtes, Mayra Aparecida; Souto, Francisco José Dutra; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, we produced poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microspheres of different sizes and adsorbing a medicinal plant mixture, and verified their effect in vitro on the viability, superoxide production, and bactericidal activity of phagocytes in the blood. Methods The medicinal plant mixture was adsorbed onto PEG microspheres and its effects were evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Results Adsorption of the herbal mixture onto the PEG microspheres was achieved and the particles were internalized by phagocytes. PEG microspheres bearing the adsorbed herbal mixture stimulated superoxide release, and activated scavenging and microbicidal activity in phagocytes. No differences in functional activity were observed when the phagocytes were not incubated with PEG microspheres bearing the adsorbed herbal mixture. Conclusion This system may be useful for the delivery of a variety of medicinal plants and can confer additional protection against infection. The data reported here suggest that a polymer adsorbed with a natural product is a treatment alternative for enhancing immune function. PMID:22956861

  3. Dynamics of adsorbed polymers on attractive homogeneous surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing-Hui; Luo, Meng-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors of polymer chains adsorbed on an attractive, homogeneous surface are studied by using dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The translational diffusion coefficient Dxy parallel to the surface decreases as the intra-polymer attraction strength EPP or the polymer-surface attraction strength EPS increases. The rotational relaxation time τR increases with EPS, but the dependence of τR on EPP is dependent on the adsorption state of the polymer. We find that τR decreases with increasing EPP for a partially adsorbed polymer but it increases with EPP for a fully adsorbed polymer. Scaling relations Dxy ~ N−α and τR ~ Nβ are found for long polymers. The scaling exponent α is independent of EPS for long polymers but increases with EPP from α = 1.06 at EPP = 0. While β ≈ 2.7 is also roughly independent of EPS for the adsorbed polymer at EPP = 0, but β increases with EPS at EPP > 0. Moreover, we find that β always decreases with increasing EPP. Our results reveal different effects of the attractive surface on the diffusion and rotation of adsorbed polymers. PMID:27849002

  4. Anaerobic microbial mobilization and biotransformation of arsenate adsorbed onto activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A; Cortinas, Irail; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Teresa Moreira, Maria; Kopplin, Mike; Jay Gandolfi, A

    2005-01-01

    Due to the enactment of a stricter drinking water standard for arsenic in the United States, larger quantities of arsenic will be treated resulting in larger volumes of treatment residuals. The current United States Environmental Protection Agency recommendation is to dispose spent adsorbent residuals from arsenic treatment into non-hazardous municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The potential of microorganisms to alter the speciation affecting the mobility of arsenic in the disposal environment is therefore a concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the potential of an anaerobic microbial consortium to biologically mobilize arsenate (As(V)) adsorbed onto activated alumina (AA), a common adsorbent used for treating arsenic in drinking water. Three anaerobic columns (0.27 l) packed with 100 g dry weight of AA containing 0.657 mg adsorbed As(V) (expressed as arsenic) per gram dry weight were continuously flushed with synthetic landfill leachate for 257 days. The fully biologically active column was inoculated with methanogenic anaerobic sludge (10 g volatile suspended solids l(-1) column) and was operated with a mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the feed (2.5 g chemical oxygen demand l(-1) feed). At the end of the experiment, 37% of the arsenic was removed from the column, of which 48% was accounted for by arsenical species identified in the column effluent. The most important form of arsenic eluted was arsenite (As(III)), accounting for nearly all of the identified arsenic in periods of high mobilization. Additionally, two methylated metabolites, methylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid were observed. Mobilization of arsenic is attributed to the biological reduction of As(V) to As(III) since literature data indicates that As(III) is more weakly adsorbed to AA compared to As(V). Batch and continuous assays confirmed that VFA, present in landfill leachates, served as an electron donating substrate supporting enhanced rates of As(V) reduction to As

  5. Adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions using TiO2 and titanate nanotube adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Muñoz, María-José; Arencibia, Amaya; Cerro, Luis; Pascual, Raquel; Melgar, Álvaro

    2016-03-01

    Titania and titanate nanotubes were evaluated as adsorbents for the removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution. Commercial titanium dioxide (TiO2-P25, Evonik), a synthesized anatase sample obtained by the sol-gel method (TiO2-SG) and titanate nanotubes (TNT) prepared via hydrothermal treatment were compared. Mercury adsorption was analysed by kinetic and equilibrium experiments, studying the influence of pH and the type of adsorbents. The kinetics of Hg(II) adsorption on titania and titanate nanotubes could be well described by the pseudo-second order model. It was found that the process is generally fast with small differences between adsorbents, which cannot be explained by their dissimilarities in textural properties. Equilibrium isotherm data were best fitted with the Sips isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacities of Hg(II) were achieved with titanate nanotubes sample, whereas between both titania samples, TiO2-SG exhibited the highest mercury uptake. For all adsorbents, adsorption capacities were enhanced as pH was increased, achieving at pH 10 Hg(II) adsorption capacities of 100, 121, and 140 mg g-1 for TiO2-P25, TiO2-SG, and TNT, respectively. Differences between samples were discussed in terms of their crystalline phase composition and chemical nature of both, mercury species and surface active sites.

  6. Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating and Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Kenneth M.; Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed two unique coating formulations that will keep surfaces clean and sanitary and contain contaminants.The Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating, modeled after the self-cleaning, water-repellant lotus leaf, disallows buildup of dust, dirt, water, and more on surfaces. This coating, has been successfully tested on painted, aluminum, glass, silica, and some composite surfaces, could aid in keeping medical assets clean.The Molecular Adsorber Coating is a zeolite-based, sprayable molecular adsorber coating, designed to prevent outgassing in materials in vacuums. The coating works well to adsorb volatiles and contaminates in manufacturing and processing, such as in pharmaceutical production. The addition of a biocide would also aid in controlling bacteria levels.

  7. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, Harvey R.; Fanslow, Glenn E.

    1983-01-01

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed.

  8. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, H.R.; Fanslow, G.E.

    1983-12-20

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed. 8 figs.

  9. NMR study of n-dodecane adsorbed on graphite.

    PubMed

    Alba, M D; Castro, M A; Clarke, S M; Perdigón, A C

    2003-05-01

    In this brief contribution we demonstrate that 1H and 2H NMR spectroscopy can be an effective method of investigating adsorption from liquids at the solid-liquid interface. The method is illustrated here with the adsorption of a simple alkane adsorbed on graphite, in particular the system n-dodecane and graphite at coverages of 1 and 5 monolayers. Static single-pulse proton nuclear magnetic resonance and static quadrupolar echo deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were recorded for both coverages. The experimental NMR results presented here show features clearly consistent with earlier calorimetric and neutron scattering work and demonstrate the formation of solid adsorbed layers that coexist with the bulk adsorbate with both isotopes. This ability to probe both deuterated and protonated materials simultaneously illustrates that this experimental approach can be readily extended to investigate the adsorption behaviour of multicomponent mixtures.

  10. Adsorption of lead ions on composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1996-04-01

    A fundamental study about the application of biopolymers to the recovery of lead from dilute solution was carried out. A membranous composite biopolymer adsorbent containing two kind of biopolymers, alginic acid (AA) and humic acid (HA), was prepared. HA, which has high solubility in water, was almost completely immobilized in the adsorbent by a combination of calcium alginate gel and activated carbon powder. A general model for complexation between divalent metal ions and acidic sites on biopolymers was applied to explain the adsorption mechanism of lead on the adsorbent (HA-M). The results showed that the complexation constants and the complexation capacities of lead-AA and lead-HA systems were scarcely influenced by immobilization.

  11. ESR spectra of VO2+ ions adsorbed on calcium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Oniki, T; Doi, Y

    1983-07-01

    The ESR spectra of oxovanadium(IV) ions, (VO2+), adsorbed on hydroxyapatite(OHAp), fluorhydroxyapatite(FHAp), Mg-containing tricalcium phosphate(Mg-TCP), .octacalcium phosphate (OCP), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and amorphous calcium phosphate(ACP) were measured at room temperature. The ESR parameters of VO2+ adsorbed on these compounds were slightly different from one another and accordingly, the ESR technique by use of VO2+ was useful for an analysis of the calcium phosphates precipitated from supersaturated solutions. The ESR parameters of VO2+ adsorbed on ACP and Mg-TCP were found to be very similar to each other, suggesting that ACP and TCP resemble each other in the structure of their crystal surfaces.

  12. Adsorbent selection for endosulfan removal from water environment.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Y; Dikshit, A K

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to select a low cost adsorbing material for the removal of endosulfan [C,C'-(1,4,5,6,7,7-hexachloro-8,9,10- trinorborn-5-en-2,3-ylene)(dimethylsulphite)] from water. Various low cost adsorbents like wood charcoal, kimberlite tailings, silica, macro fungi sojar caju were tried with activated charcoal as reference material. The above materials were selected from various sources encompassing organic, inorganic, clayey, and biological sources. For the selection of suitable adsorbent for endosulfan uptake, maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax) was chosen as the parameter. Kinetic profiles of removal were generated for all the materials to assess the equilibrium time. Equilibrium studies were carried out for all materials to assess the adsorption equilibrium model that they followed. The model that gave the best correlation coefficient by linear regression analysis, was adopted for the calculation of Qmax of the corresponding adsorbent material. Using linearised forms of equilibrium models like Langmuir, BET, and Freundlich, maximum adsorptive capacities were determined. Activated charcoal showed the best adsorptive capacity with Qmax of 2.145 mg/g followed by wood charcoal 1.773 mg/g, sojar caju 1.575 mg/g, kimberlite tailings 0.8821 mg/g, and silica 0.3231 mg/g. Albeit activated charcoal gave better performance, it was not considered as a candidate material because of its high cost. Wood charcoal was the next best adsorbent with Qmax 1.773 mg/g. Therefore, wood charcoal was chosen as the best material for endosulfan removal. The study of physical and chemical characteristics of wood charcoal revealed that it is a potential adsorbent and can even be improved further.

  13. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure–function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  14. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.

  15. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; ...

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8more » ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.« less

  16. Structure and dynamics of highly adsorbed semiflexible polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Cheng, Shiwang; Kumar, Rajeev; Goswami, Monojoy; Sokolov, Alexie; Sumpter, Bobby

    2015-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of melts of semi-flexible polymer chains in the presence of an adsorbing substrate. For polymer chains located far from the substrate the chain conformations follow the worm-like chain model, in contrast to the reflected Gaussian conformation near the substrate. This is demonstrated in the chain center-of-mass distribution normal to the substrate and the probability of a polymer chain ends to be the closest to the substrate. Both quantities agree with Silberberg's derivation for an ideal chain in the presence of a reflecting wall. We characterized the adsorbed chains and counted the number of loops and tails. For stiff chains, a tail and an adsorbed segment dominate the chain conformation of the adsorbed layer. Also, the mean-square end-to-end distance normal to the substrate is proportional to the normal component of the mean-square end-to-end distance of the tails. The tails do not follow the worm-like chain model and exhibit a stretched conformation. This picture for the adsorbed layer is akin to the ``polydisperse pseudobrush'' envisioned by Guiselin. We probe the dynamics of the segments by calculating the layer (z-)resolved intermediate coherent collective dynamics structure factor, S(q,t,z), for q values equivalent to the bond length. The segment dynamics is slower for stiffer chains. In the adsorbed layer, dynamics is slowed down and can be described by two relaxation times. Department of Energy, Office of Science DE-AC05-00OR227.

  17. The reactivity of CO2 with K atoms adsorbed on MgO powders.

    PubMed

    Preda, Gloria; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Chiesa, Mario; Giamello, Elio

    2009-10-01

    In this combined quantum chemical and EPR study we have investigated the formation of CO(2)(-) radicals by contact of CO(2) molecules with a K precovered MgO surface. K atoms have been deposited on polycrystalline MgO samples, and then exposed to CO(2). The typical EPR signal of the isolated K atoms disappears when the reaction with CO(2) takes place and a new paramagnetic species attributed to CO(2)(-) is observed. DFT cluster model calculations show that there is a spontaneous electron transfer from the adsorbed K atom to the CO(2) molecule, with formation of K(+)CO(2)(-) surface complexes. These species have the same electronic characteristics and spin distribution of gas-phase M(+)CO(2)(-) (M = Li, Na, K) molecules, but are stabilized by the presence of the ionic surface. The most stable MgO sites where the adsorption of CO(2) occurs and the computed EPR properties are discussed.

  18. Random registry shifts in quasi-one-dimensional adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, J.; Erwin, S. C.; Hansmann, M.; Song, Z.; Rotenberg, E.; Kevan, S. D.; Hellberg, C. S.; Horn, K.

    2003-02-01

    The apparent contradiction of one-dimensional adsorbate chains on Si(111) having a 3×2 unit cell and yet a 3×1 diffraction pattern is resolved for the example of Ba/Si(111)-(3×2). Random registry shifts between adsorbate chains are observed in tunneling microscopy, with very short interchain correlation lengths. Fourier analysis provides a natural explanation for a pseudo-(3×1) diffraction pattern. Within density-functional theory such registry shifts can occur with essentially negligible energy cost, leading to entropy-driven, virtually perfect disorder. Substrate states of high symmetry and one-dimensional character are inferred to promote this phenomenon.

  19. Ordering and phase separation of adsorbed binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahale, N. K.; Cole, M. W.

    1986-10-01

    The ground state energy is calculated for mixtures adsorbed on graphite and Ag surfaces. The graphite case considers noble gases adsorbed in a commensurate array, while for Ag the substrate is ignored except for its mediation of the interatomic interaction. The balance between alternative possible structures is sensitive to the assumed interaction, for which realistic potential models are employed. Comparison is made with predictions based on simple combining rules. The cases of Ar mixtures with N 2 or CO on graphite are treated, including both herringbone and pinwheel structures for the N 2. Finite temperature behavior is described qualitatively.

  20. Random registry shifts in quasi-one-dimensional adsorbate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, J.; Erwin, S.C.; Hansmann, M.; Song, Z.; Rotenberg, E.; Kevan, S.D.; Hellberg, C.S.; Horn, K.

    2003-02-18

    The apparent contradiction of one-dimensional adsorbate chains on Si(111) having a 3x2 unit cell and yet a 3x1 diffraction pattern is resolved for the example of Ba/Si(111)-(3x2). Random registry shifts between adsorbate chains are observed in tunneling microscopy, with very short interchain correlation lengths. Fourier analysis provides a natural explanation for a pseudo-(3x1) diffraction pattern. Within density-functional theory such registry shifts can occur with essentially negligible energy cost, leading to entropy-driven, virtually perfect disorder. Substrate states of high symmetry and one-dimensional character are inferred to promote this phenomenon.

  1. Mass transport of adsorbates near a discontinuous structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, E.; Ying, S. C.; Elder, K. R.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study the mass transport dynamics of an adsorbed layer near a discontinuous incommensurate striped-honeycomb phase transition via numerical simulations of a coarse-grained model focusing on the motion of domain walls rather than individual atoms. Following an initial step profile created in the incommensurate striped phase, an intermediate hexagonal incommensurate phase nucleates and grows, leading to a bifurcation into two sharp profiles propagating in opposite directions as opposed to broad profiles induced by atomic diffusive motion. Our results are in agreement with recent numerical simulations of a microscopic model as well as experimental observations for the Pb/Si(111) adsorbate system.

  2. Fast and efficient protein purification using membrane adsorber systems.

    PubMed

    Suck, Kirstin; Walter, Johanna; Menzel, Frauke; Tappe, Alexander; Kasper, Cornelia; Naumann, Claudia; Zeidler, Robert; Scheper, Thomas

    2006-02-10

    The purification of proteins from complex cell culture samples is an essential step in proteomic research. Traditional chromatographic methods often require several steps resulting in time consuming and costly procedures. In contrast, protein purification via membrane adsorbers offers the advantage of fast and gentle but still effective isolation. In this work, we present a new method for purification of proteins from crude cell extracts via membrane adsorber based devices. This isolation procedure utilises the membranes favourable pore structure allowing high flow rates without causing high back pressure. Therefore, shear stress to fragile structures is avoided. In addition, mass transfer takes place through convection rather than diffusion, thus allowing very rapid separation processes. Based on this membrane adsorber technology the separation of two model proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and immungluboline G (IgG) is shown. The isolation of human growth hormone (hGH) from chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture supernatant was performed using a cation exchange membrane. The isolation of the enzyme penicillin acylase from the crude Escherichia coli supernatant was achieved using an anion exchange spin column within one step at a considerable purity. In summary, the membrane adsorber devices have proven to be suitable tools for the purification of proteins from different complex cell culture samples.

  3. RADIOLYSIS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE ADSORBED STATE

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, J.W.; Allen, A.O.

    1961-10-01

    >A method of forming branch chained hydrocarbons by means of energetic penetrating radiation is described. A solid zeolite substrate is admixed with a cobalt ion and is irradiated with a hydrocarbon adsorbed therein. Upon irradiation with gamma rays, there is an increased yield of branched and lower molecular straight chain compounds. (AEC)

  4. Activity of alkaline phosphatase adsorbed and grafted on "polydopamine" films.

    PubMed

    Ball, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation of dopamine in slightly basic solutions and in the presence of oxygen as an oxidant allows for the deposition of dopamine-eumelanin ("polydopamine") films on almost all kinds of materials allowing for an easy secondary functionalization. Molecules carrying nucleophilic groups like thiols and amines can be easily grafted on those films. Herein we show that alkaline phosphatase (ALP), as a model enzyme, adsorbs to "polydopamine" films and part of the adsorbed enzyme is rapidly desorbed in contact with Tris buffer. However a significant part of the enzyme remains irreversibly adsorbed and keeps some enzymatic activity for at least 2 weeks whereas ALP adsorbed on quartz slides is rapidly and quantitatively deactivated. In addition we estimated the Michaelis constant Km of the enzyme irreversibly bound to the "polydopamine" film. The Michaelis constant, and hence the affinity constant between paranitrophenol phosphate and ALP are almost identical between the enzyme bound on the film and the free enzyme in solution. Complementarily, it was found that "polydopamine" films display some phosphatase like catalytic activity.

  5. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AI series adsorbents

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; ...

    2015-11-10

    A series of adsorbent (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole/mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with higher degree of grafting which ranges from 110 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 10 wt% hydroxylamine at 80 C for 72 hours. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged frommore » 171-187 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. The performance of the adsorbents for uranium adsorption in natural seawater was also carried out using flow-through-column at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The three hours KOH conditioning was better for higher uranium uptake than one hour. The adsorbent AI11 containing AN and VPA at the mole ration of 3.52, emerged as the potential candidate for higher uranium adsorption (3.35 g-U/Kg-ads.) after 56 days of exposure in the seawater in the flow-through-column. The rate vanadium adsorption over uranium was linearly increased throughout the 56 days exposure. The total vanadium uptake was ~5 times over uranium after 56 days.« less

  6. Extracting Uranium from Seawater: Promising AI Series Adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, R. T.; Janke, C. J.; Kuo, L. -J.; Gill, G.; Wood, J. R.; Dai, S.

    2016-04-20

    A new series of adsorbents (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole to mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with high degrees of grafting (DOG) varying from 110 to 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 5 wt % hydroxylamine at 80 °C for 72 h. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44 M KOH at 80 °C followed by screening at ORNL with prescreening brine spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacities in prescreening ranged from 171 to 187 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of percent DOG. The performance of the adsorbents with respect to uranium adsorption in natural seawater was also investigated using flow-throughcolumn testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Three hours of KOH conditioning led to higher uranium uptake than 1 h of conditioning. The adsorbent AI11, containing AN and VPA at the mole ratio of 3.52, emerged as the potential candidate for the highest uranium adsorption (3.35 g-U/kg-ads.) after 56 days of exposure in seawater flow-through-columns. The rate of vanadium adsorption over uranium linearly increased throughout the 56 days of exposure. The total mass of vanadium uptake was ~5 times greater than uranium after 56 days.

  7. Enhanced encapsulation of metoprolol tartrate with carbon nanotubes as adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garala, Kevin; Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-12-01

    A highly water-soluble antihypertensive drug, metoprolol tartrate (MT), was selected as a model drug for preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-impregnated ethyl cellulose (EC) microspheres. The present investigation was aimed to increase encapsulation efficiency of MT with excellent adsorbent properties of MWCNTs. The unique surface area, stiffness, strength and resilience of MWCNTs have drawn much anticipation as carrier for highly water-soluble drugs. Carbon nanotubes drug adsorbate (MWCNTs:MT)-loaded EC microspheres were further optimized by the central composite design of the experiment. The effects of independent variables (MWCNTs:MT and EC:adsorbate) were evaluated on responses like entrapment efficiency (EE) and t 50 (time required for 50% drug release). The optimized batch was compared with drug alone EC microspheres. The results revealed high degree of improvement in encapsulation efficiency for MWCNTs:MT-loaded EC microspheres. In vitro drug release study exhibited complete release form drug alone microspheres within 15 h, while by the same time only 50-60% drug was released for MWCNTs-impregnated EC microspheres. The optimized batch was further characterized by various instrumental analyses such as scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results endorse encapsulation of MWCNTs:MT adsorbate inside the matrix of EC microspheres, which might have resulted in enhanced encapsulation and sustained effect of MT. Hence, MWCNTs can be utilized as novel carriers for extended drug release and enhanced encapsulation of highly water-soluble drug, MT.

  8. EVALUATING VARIOUS ADSORBENTS AND MEMBRANES FOR REMOVING RADIUM FROM GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted in Lemont, Ill., to evaluate specific adsorbents and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes for removing radium from groundwater. A radium-selective complexer and barium-sulfate-loaded alumina appeared to have the best potential for low-cost adsorption of ra...

  9. Complexation of trace metals by adsorbed natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and solution speciation of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were studied in model systems containing colloidal alumina particles and dissolved natural organic matter. At equilibrium a significant fraction of the alumina surface was covered by adsorbed organic matter. Cu(II) was partitioned primarily between the surface-bound organic matter and dissolved Cu-organic complexes in the aqueous phase. Complexation of Cu2+ with the functional groups of adsorbed organic matter was stronger than complexation with uncovered alumina surface hydroxyls. It is shown that the complexation of Cu(II) by adsorbed organic matter can be described by an apparent stability constant approximately equal to the value found for solution phase equilibria. In contrast, Cd(II) adsorption was not significantly affected by the presence of organic matter at the surface, due to weak complex formation with the organic ligands. The results demonstrate that general models of trace element partitioning in natural waters must consider the presence of adsorbed organic matter. ?? 1984.

  10. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Baoliang; Tao, Shu; Chiou, Cary T

    2003-09-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insightto interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a