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Sample records for adsorbed uvi species

  1. Role of U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter species

    SciTech Connect

    Lovely, Derrick

    2008-12-23

    Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium, and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms. Results from this study showed that the U(VI) sorption capacity of G. uraniireducens was relatively similar in simple solutions, such as sodium chloride or bicarbonate. However, this ability to sorb uranium significantly decreased in groundwater. This suggested that certain chemicals present in the groundwater were inhibiting the ability of cell components of Geobacter to adsorb uranium. It was hypothesized that uranium removal would also be diminished in the bicarbonate solution. However, this did not seem to be the case, as uranium was as easily removed in the bicarbonate solution as in the sodium chloride solution.

  2. Investigation of U(VI) Adsorption in Quartz-Chlorite Mineral Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Shang, Jianying; Jeon, Choong; Liu, Juan; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-08-25

    A batch and cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz-chlorite mixtures with variable mass ratios have been performed under field-relevant uranium concentrations (5x10-7 M and 5x10-6 M) in pH 8.1 synthetic groundwater. The U(VI) adsorption Kd values steadily increased as the mass fraction of chlorite increased, indicating preferential sorption to chlorite. For all mineral mixtures, U(VI) adsorption Kd values were lower than that calculated from the assumption of component additivity; The largest deviation occurred when the mass fractions of the two minerals were equal. U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite displayed characteristic individual fluorescence spectra that were not affected by mineral mixing. The spectra of U(VI) adsorbed within the mixtures could be simulated by one surface U(VI) species on quartz and two on chlorite. The fluorescence intensity decreased in a nonlinear manner as the adsorbed U(VI) concentration increased with increasing chlorite mass fraction – likely due to ill-defined fluorescence quenching by both structural Fe/Cr in chlorite, and trace amounts of solubilized and re-precipitated Fe/Cr in the aqueous phase. However, the fractional spectral intensities of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite followed the same trend of fractional adsorbed U(VI) concentration in each mineral phase; approximate linear correlations in the quartz:chlorite mass ratio ranges of 0.0 - 0.2 and 0.2 - 1.0, offering a method to estimate of U(VI) concentration distribution between the mineral components.

  3. U(VI) reduction to mononuclear U(IV) by Desulfitobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kelly E; Boyanov, Maxim I; Thomas, Sara H; Wu, Qingzhong; Kemner, Kenneth M; Löffler, Frank E

    2010-06-15

    The bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) affects uranium mobility and fate in contaminated subsurface environments and is best understood in Gram-negative model organisms such as Geobacter and Shewanella spp. This study demonstrates that U(VI) reduction is a common trait of Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium spp. Five different Desulfitobacterium isolates reduced 100 microM U(VI) to U(IV) in <10 days, whereas U(VI) remained soluble in abiotic and heat-killed controls. U(VI) reduction in live cultures was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis. Interestingly, although bioreduction of U(VI) is almost always reported to yield the uraninite mineral (UO(2)), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in the Desulfitobacterium cultures was not UO(2). The EXAFS data indicated that the U(IV) product was a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms closely surrounded by light element shells. This atomic arrangement likely results from inner-sphere bonds between U(IV) and C/N/O- or P/S-containing ligands, such as carbonate or phosphate. The formation of a distinct U(IV) phase warrants further study because the characteristics of the reduced material affect uranium stability and fate in the contaminated subsurface. PMID:20469854

  4. Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Boily, Jean F.; Xia, Yuanxian; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2011-05-15

    The adsorption and speciation of U(VI) was investigated on contaminated, fine grained sediment materials from the Hanford 300 area (SPP1 GWF) in simulated groundwater using cryogenic laser-induced U(VI) fluorescence spectroscopy combined with chemometric analysis. A series of reference minerals (montmorillonite, illite, Michigan chlorite, North Carolina chlorite, California clinochlore, quartz and synthetic 6-line ferrihydrite) was used for comparison that represents the mineralogical constituents of SPP1 GWF. Surface area-normalized Kd values were measured at U(VI) concentrations of 5x10-7 mol L-1 and 5x10-6 mol L-1, respectively, that displayed the following affinity series: 6-line-ferrihydrite > North Carolina chlorite ≈ California clinochlore > Michigan chlorite ≈ quartz > montmorillonite ≈ illite ≈ SPP1 GWF. Both time-resolved spectra and asynchronous two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis of SPP1 GWF at different delay times indicated that two major adsorbed U(VI) species were present in the sediment that resembled U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and phyllosilicates. Simulations of the normalized fluorescence spectra confirmed that the speciation of SPP1 GWF was best represented by a linear combination of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz (90%) and phyllosilicates (10%). However, the fluorescence quantum yield for U(VI) adsorbed on phyllosilicates was lower than quartz and, consequently, its fractional contribution to speciation may be underestimated. Spectral comparison with literature data suggested that U(VI) exists primarily as inner-sphere U(VI) complexes with surface silanol groups on quartz while U(VI) on phyllosilicates was consistent with the formation of surface U(VI) tricarbonate complexes.

  5. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  6. Determining individual mineral contributions to U(VI) adsorption in a contaminated aquifer sediment: A fluorescence spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Boily, Jean-François; Xia, Yuanxian; Resch, Tom C.; Moore, Dean A.; Liu, C.

    2011-05-01

    The adsorption and speciation of U(VI) was investigated on contaminated, fine grained sediment materials from the Hanford 300 area (SPP1 GWF) in simulated groundwater using cryogenic laser-induced U(VI) fluorescence spectroscopy combined with chemometric analysis. A series of reference minerals (montmorillonite, illite, Michigan chlorite, North Carolina chlorite, California clinochlore, quartz and synthetic 6-line ferrihydrite) was used for comparison that represents the mineralogical constituents of SPP1 GWF. Surface area-normalized Kd values were measured at U(VI) concentrations of 5 × 10 -7 and 5 × 10 -6 mol L -1 that displayed the following affinity series: 6-line-ferrihydrite > North Carolina chlorite ≈ California clinochlore > quartz ≈ Michigan chlorite > illite > montmorillonite. Both time-resolved spectra and asynchronous two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis of SPP1 GWF at different delay times indicated that two major adsorbed U(VI) species were present in the sediment that resembled U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and phyllosilicates. Simulations of the normalized fluorescence spectra confirmed that the speciation of SPP1 GWF was best represented by a linear combination of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz (90%) and phyllosilicates (10%). However, the fluorescence quantum yield for U(VI) adsorbed on phyllosilicates was lower than quartz and, consequently, its fractional contribution to speciation may be underestimated. Spectral comparison with literature data suggested that U(VI) exist primarily as inner-sphere complexes with surface silanol groups on quartz and as surface U(VI) tricarbonate complexes on phyllosilicates.

  7. Application of Brazilian kaolinite clay as adsorbent to removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution: Kinetic and thermodynamic of cation-basic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, Denis L.; Leidens, Victor L.; Viana, Rubia R.; Airoldi, Claudio

    2010-05-15

    The compound N{sup 1}-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route. The modified and natural kaolinite samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopic, X-ray diffraction, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C. The well-defined peaks obtained in the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum in the 5.0-62.1 ppm region confirmed the attachment of organic functional groups as pendant chains bonded into the porous clay. The ability of these materials to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation at room temperature and pH 4.0. The kinetic parameters analyzed by the Lagergren and Elovich models gave a good fit for a pseudo-second order reaction with k{sub 2} values 16.0 and 25.1 mmol g{sup -1} min{sup -1} ranges for natural and modified kaolinite clays, respectively. The energetic effects caused by metal ion adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations. - Graphical abstract: This investigation reports the use of original and modified kaolinites as alternative absorbents. The compound N-[3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route.

  8. Quantitative separation of monomeric U(IV) from UO2 in products of U(VI) reduction

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Daniel S.; Uster, Benjamin; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena I.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium to tetravalent uranium can be catalyzed by bacteria and minerals. The end-product of this reduction is often the mineral uraninite, which was long assumed to be the only product of U(VI) reduction. However, recent studies report the formation of other species including an adsorbed U(IV) species, operationally referred to as monomeric U(IV). The discovery of monomeric U(IV) is important because the species is likely to be more labile and more susceptible to reoxidation than uraninite. Because there is a need to distinguish between these two U(IV) species, we propose here a wet chemical method of differentiating monomeric U(IV) from uraninite in environmental samples. To calibrate the method, U(IV) was extracted from known mixtures of uraninite and monomeric U(IV) and testted using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Monomeric U(IV) was efficiently removed from biomass and Fe(II)-bearing phases by bicarbonate extraction, without affecting uraninite stability. After confirming that the method effectively separates monomeric U(IV) and uraninite, it is further evaluated for a system containing those reduced U species and adsorbed U(VI). The method provides a rapid complement, and in some cases alternative, to XAS analyses for quantifying monomeric U(IV), uraninite, and adsorbed U(VI) species in environmental samples. PMID:22540966

  9. Photoluminescence Enhancement of Adsorbed Species on Si Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Taketoshi; Maeda, Masanori; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2016-12-01

    We have fabricated Si nanoparticles from Si swarf using the beads milling method. The mode diameter of produced Si nanoparticles was between 4.8 and 5.2 nm. Si nanoparticles in hexane show photoluminescence (PL) spectra with peaks at 2.56, 2.73, 2.91, and 3.09 eV. The peaked PL spectra are attributed to the vibronic structure of adsorbed dimethylanthracene (DMA) impurity in hexane. The PL intensity of hexane with DMA increases by ~3000 times by adsorption on Si nanoparticles. The PL enhancement results from an increase in absorption probability of incident light by DMA caused by adsorption on the surface of Si nanoparticles. PMID:26744147

  10. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by indigenous bacteria in contaminated ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelouas, A.; Lu, Yongming; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, H. E.

    1998-12-01

    We report on bio-catalyzed reduction and immobilization of U(VI) species (0.25 mg/l to 235 mg/l) in ground water in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, sulfate and carbonate. We studied ground water from the uranium mill tailings site near Tuba City, Arizona (USA). Experiments with the ground water were conducted in the presence of the Navajo sandstone host rock. Uranium in solution is complexed by carbonate. Two indigenous denitrifying bacteria were identified Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. stutzeri, and one sulfate reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, also known as Fe(III)-reducer. S. putrefaciens can use U(VI) as an electron acceptor, instead of Fe(III). Ethanol was used as the organic carbon source. Microbially mediated reactions are sequential in the order of decreasing redox intensity. Metabolic reduction of nitrate to gaseous species (N 2, N 2O) was complete within 1 week at 16°C. The sulfate concentration remained constant. Some of the U(VI) coprecipitated with aragonite/calcite or was adsorbed on biomass during denitrification. Subsequently, the enzymatically catalyzed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was complete within 3 weeks but was accompanied by reduction of sulfate to sulfide. U(IV) precipitated as a uraninite solid solution (U, Ca)O 2, adhering to the bacteria. The final concentration in solution was ≤1 μg/l. U(VI) was not reduced by sulfide. Complexation of U(VI) by carbonate made its reduction by sulfide even slower than in pure water. The bio-catalyzed reaction is the faster process under the conditions given by the composition of the ground water.

  11. Surface Adsorbed Species: IR Studies of SO2 and H2S Adsorbed on Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalley, J. C.; Lamotte, J.; Saur, O.; Mohammed Saad, A. B.; Tripp, C.; Morrow, B. A.

    1985-12-01

    The adsorption of SO, on alumina leads to the formation of several species such as SO3=, HSO3- and coordinated SO2. In addition sulfates are produced under oxidizing conditions. However, definitive vibra- tional assignments are hampered by the paucity of data below 1000 cm-1 where alumina is strongly absorbing. On the other hand, silica is partially transparent at low frequencies and subtractive IR spectroscopy has permitted us to observe bands which are tentatively assigned to the SO bending modes of bisulfite (HSO3-, 635 cm-I) and disulfite (S2O5-, 660 cm-I) surface species on sodium promoted silica catalysts when SO and H2O are coadsorbed. H2S addition to a surface pretreated with SO2 gives rise to a new band at 680 cm-1 which is pos- sibly due to S2O3 orS2O on the surface. The results are discussed in terms of intermediates in the Claus process (2 H2S + SO2 + 3/n Sn + 2 H2O).

  12. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-03-14

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  13. Surface photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate: the role of adsorbed water in the formation of reduced nitrogen species on α-Fe2O3 particle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nanayakkara, Charith E; Jayaweera, Pradeep M; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Grassian, Vicki H

    2014-01-01

    The surface photochemistry of nitrate, formed from nitric acid adsorption, on hematite (α-Fe2O3) particle surfaces under different environmental conditions is investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following exposure of α-Fe2O3 particle surfaces to gas-phase nitric acid, a peak in the N1s region is seen at 407.4 eV; this binding energy is indicative of adsorbed nitrate. Upon broadband irradiation with light (λ > 300 nm), the nitrate peak decreases in intensity as a result of a decrease in adsorbed nitrate on the surface. Concomitant with this decrease in the nitrate coverage, there is the appearance of two lower binding energy peaks in the N1s region at 401.7 and 400.3 eV, due to reduced nitrogen species. The formation as well as the stability of these reduced nitrogen species, identified as NO(-) and N(-), are further investigated as a function of water vapor pressure. Additionally, irradiation of adsorbed nitrate on α-Fe2O3 generates three nitrogen gas-phase products including NO2, NO, and N2O. As shown here, different environmental conditions of water vapor pressure and the presence of molecular oxygen greatly influence the relative photoproduct distribution from nitrate surface photochemistry. The atmospheric implications of these results are discussed. PMID:24299394

  14. Nanopore reactive adsorbents for the high-efficiency removal of waste species

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2005-01-04

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g., metal, enzyme, etc., particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as ions, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  15. Rod-like cyanophenyl probe molecules nanoconfined to oxide particles: Density of adsorbed surface species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunza, Stefan; Frunza, Ligia; Ganea, Constantin Paul; Zgura, Irina; Brás, Ana Rita; Schönhals, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Surface layers have already been observed by broadband dielectric spectroscopy for composite systems formed by adsorption of rod-like cyanophenyl derivates as probe molecules on the surface of oxide particles. In this work, features of the surface layer are reported; samples with different amounts of the probe molecules adsorbed onto oxide (nano) particles were prepared in order to study their interactions with the surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to analyze the amount of loaded probe molecules. The density of the surface species ns was introduced and its values were estimated from quantitative Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with TGA. This parameter allows discriminating the composites into several groups assuming a similar interaction of the probe molecules with the hosts of a given group. An influence factor H is further proposed as the ratio of the number of molecules in the surface layer showing a glassy dynamics and the number of molecules adsorbed tightly on the surface of the support: It was found for aerosil composites and used for calculating the maximum filling degree of partially filled silica MCM-41 composites showing only one dielectric process characteristic for glass-forming liquids and a bulk behavior for higher filling degrees.

  16. Interrogation of surfaces for the quantification of adsorbed species on electrodes: oxygen on gold and platinum in neutral media.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Alpuche-Avilés, Mario A; Bard, Allen J

    2008-12-17

    We introduce a new in situ electrochemical technique based on the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) operating in a transient feedback mode for the detection and direct quantification of adsorbed species on the surface of electrodes. A SECM tip generates a titrant from a reversible redox mediator that reacts chemically with an electrogenerated or chemically adsorbed species at a substrate of about the same size as the tip, which is positioned at a short distance from it (ca.1 microm). The reaction between the titrant and the adsorbate provides a transient positive feedback loop until the adsorbate is consumed completely. The sensing mechanism is provided by the contrast between positive and negative feedback, which allows a direct quantification of the charge neutralized at the substrate. The proposed technique allows quantification of the adsorbed species generated at the substrate at a given potential under open circuit conditions, a feature not attainable with conventional electrochemical methods. Moreover, the feedback mode allows the tip to be both the titrant generator and detector, simplifying notably the experimental setup. The surface interrogation technique we introduce was tested for the quantification of electrogenerated oxides (adsorbed oxygen species) on gold and platinum electrodes at neutral pH in phosphate and TRIS buffers and with two different mediator systems. Good agreement is found with cyclic voltammetry at the substrate and with previous results in the literature, but we also find evidence for the formation of "incipient oxides" which are not revealed by conventional voltammetry. The mode of operation of the technique is supported by digital simulations, which show good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:19053403

  17. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) sorption to Hanford sediment with varying geochemical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-04-11

    A series of U(VI) adsorption experiments with varying pH, ionic strength, concentrations of dissolved U(VI) and carbonate was conducted to provide a more realistic database for U(VI) adsorption onto near-field vadose zone sediments at the proposed Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) on the Hanford Site. The distribution coefficient, Kd, for U(VI) in predicted “pure” glass leachate is 0 mL/g because the glass leachate has high sodium and carbonate concentrations and high pH. The zero adsorption result suggests that uranium will exhibit no retardation when the subsurface geochemistry is controlled by glass leachate. However, U(VI) can be sequestrated even when the pH, carbonate and sodium concentrations reached levels similar to “pure” glass leachate, because U(VI) coprecipitates with calcite. When glass leachate interacts with existing porewater or surrounding sediments, sorption is observed and the numerical value of the U(VI) Kd varies significantly. A non-electrostatic, general composite approach for surface complexation modeling was applied and a combination of two U(VI) surface species, monodentate (SOUO2+) and bidentate (SO2UO2(CO3)2-), simulated very well the measured U(VI) adsorption data. The general composite surface complexation model, compared to the constant or single-valued Kd model, more accurately predicted U(VI) adsorption under the varying geochemical conditions expected at the IDF.

  18. UVIS Stray Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Larry

    2009-07-01

    Structures outside the optical path of the detector FOV and the surfaces of optical elements could scatter significant light from bright sources onto the UVIS CCD. Such structures are oversized by typically a few mm relative to the FOV?s beam. The beam footprint of a source outside the FOV can overlap the edges of those structures, which will cause light to be scattered onto the detector. This on orbit test will: 1} verify that release of gravitational stress has not changed the detector mask by comparison with similar ground tests, 2} assess the far wing stray light from a sources outside the CCD FOV, 3} note any sources of stray light in the near and far field that were not noted during ground test, and 4} assess the surface brightness of the off-chip target PSF relative to the on-chip PSF.

  19. WFC3: UVIS Dark Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Biretta, John A.; Anderson, Jay; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Gunning, Heather C.; MacKenty, John W.

    2014-06-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a fourth-generation imaging instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), has exhibited excellent performance since its installation during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. The UVIS detector, comprised of two e2v CCDs, is one of two channels available on WFC3 and is named for its ultraviolet and visible light sensitivity. We present the various procedures and results of the WFC3/UVIS dark calibration, which monitors the health and stability of the UVIS detector, provides characterization of hot pixels and dark current, and produces calibration files to be used as a correction for dark current in science images. We describe the long-term growth of hot pixels and the impacts that UVIS Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses, postflashing, and proximity to the readout amplifiers have on the population. We also discuss the evolution of the median dark current, which has been slowly increasing since the start of the mission and is currently ~6 e-/hr/pix, averaged across each chip. We outline the current algorithm for creating UVIS dark calibration files, which includes aggressive cosmic ray masking, image combination, and hot pixel flagging. Calibration products are available to the user community, typically 3-5 days after initial processing, through the Calibration Database System (CDBS). Finally, we discuss various improvements to the calibration and monitoring procedures. UVIS dark monitoring will continue throughout and beyond HST’s current proposal cycle.

  20. Characterization of molecular and atomic species adsorbed on ferroelectric and semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath, Satyaveda Chavi

    In order to clarify the mechanisms behind the adsorption of atomic and molecular species adsorbed on ferroelectric surfaces, single crystalline lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN), 'Z-cut' along the (0001) plane, has been prepared, characterized and subsequently exposed to molecular and atomic species. 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystal was chosen as a polar molecule for our model system for this study. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface contact angles (CA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surface of LN as well as the nature of the liquid crystal films grown on the surface. Atomically flat LN surfaces were prepared as a support for monolayer thick, 8CB molecular domains. Also, for the purpose of gaining a fundamental understanding of low coverage interactions of metal atoms on ferroelectric surfaces, we choose to deposit gold onto the LN surface. These gold atomic layers were grown under UHV conditions and characterized. Understanding anchoring mechanisms and thin film organization for LC molecules and metal atoms on uniformly poled surfaces allows for a fuller appreciation of how molecular deposition of other polarizable molecules on patterned poled LN surfaces would occur as well as yielding greater insight on the atomic characteristics of metal on ferroelectric interfaces. Also, to reveal the mechanisms involved in the adsorption of organic aromatic molecules on high-index Si surfaces, thiophene (C4H 4S) and pyrrole (C4H5N) molecules were dosed on prepared Si(5 5 12)-2x1 surfaces as our experimental system. The Si(5 5 12) surface was prepared to produce a 2x1 reconstruction after which molecules were dosed at low exposure to observe the preferred adsorption sites on the surface. All surface preparation and experiments were performed in UHV and measurements of the surface before and after deposition were performed using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Fundamental

  1. The role of adsorbed hydroxyl species in the electrocatalytic carbon monoxide oxidation reaction on platinum.

    PubMed

    Kucernak, Anthony R; Offer, Gregory J

    2008-07-01

    The assumption that "OH(ads)" or other oxygen containing species is formed on polycrystalline or nanoparticulate platinum through a fast and reversible process at relatively low potentials is often made. In this paper we discuss the implications of this assumption and the difficulty in reconciling it with experimental phenomena. We show how presenting chrono-amperometric transients as log-log plots for potentials steps in the presence and absence of an adlayer of carbon monoxide on polycrystalline platinum is particularly useful in understanding the time evolution of the CO oxidation reaction. When using log-log plots a clear power law decay can be observed in the transients both in the presence and absence of an adlayer of carbon monoxide. We explain this as an extension of current theory, such that the rate determining step in both cases is the formation of a hydrogen bonded water-OH(ads) network, strongly influenced by anions, and that CO(ads) oxidation occurs, at least in part by the diffusion of OH(ads) through this network. We hypothesize that, at low potentials the formation of OH(ads) at active sites is fast and reversible but that transport of OH(ads) away from those sites may be rate limiting. The assumption that overall OH(ads) formation on platinum is fast and reversible is therefore highly dependent upon the platinum surface and the experimental conditions and it may not be appropriate for polycrystalline surfaces in sulfuric acid. Therefore, although the formation of OH(ads) on platinum in the absence of strongly adsorbing anions on 'ideal' surfaces is almost certainly fast and reversible, on realistic fuel cell relevant surfaces under non-ideal conditions this assumption cannot be made, and instead the formation of an OH(ads) adlayer may be somewhat slow and is associated with the formation of hydrogen bonded water-OH(ads) networks on the surface. We expect this to be a more realistic description for what occurs during CO(ads) oxidation on fuel cell

  2. Can the state of platinum species be unambiguously determined by the stretching frequency of an adsorbed CO probe molecule?

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Neyman, Konstantin M; Hadjiivanov, Konstantin I; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2016-08-10

    The paper addresses possible ambiguities in the determination of the state of platinum species by the stretching frequency of a CO probe, which is a common technique for characterization of platinum-containing catalytic systems. We present a comprehensive comparison of the available experimental data with our theoretical modeling (density functional) results of pertinent systems - platinum surfaces, nanoparticles and clusters as well as reduced or oxidized platinum moieties on a ceria support. Our results for CO adsorbed on-top on metallic Pt(0), with C-O vibrational frequencies in the region 2018-2077 cm(-1), suggest that a decrease of the coordination number of the platinum atom, to which CO is bound, by one lowers the CO frequency by about 7 cm(-1). This trend corroborates the Kappers-van der Maas correlation derived from the analysis of the experimental stretching frequency of CO adsorbed on platinum-containing samples on different supports. We also analyzed the effect of the charge of platinum species on the CO frequency. Based on the calculated vibrational frequencies of CO in various model systems, we concluded that the actual state of the platinum species may be mistaken based only on the measured value of the C-O vibrational frequency due to overlapping regions of frequencies corresponding to different types of species. In order to identify the actual state of platinum species one has to combine this powerful technique with other approaches. PMID:27444400

  3. Probing interactions between TiO 2 photocatalyst and adsorbing species using quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morand, R.; Noworyta, K.; Augustynski, J.

    2002-10-01

    Photoactivity of nanocrystalline TiO 2 films is shown to be strongly affected by the presence in aqueous solution of salicylic acid, known to form Ti(IV)salicylate surface complexes. In particular, the photooxidation of methanol - an effective hole scavenger - at TiO 2 appears to be in part, or even completely inhibited by the additions of increasing amounts of salicylic acid. The chemisorption of salicylic and also phthalic acid on TiO 2 was followed using quartz crystal microbalance, QCM. The observed resonant frequency changes of the quartz crystal bearing TiO 2 films, accompanying increasing additions of the benzoic acids to the contacting solutions, indicate large displacement of water as a consequence of the adsorbent-imparted hydrophobicity of the interface.

  4. U(VI) adsorption on aquifer sediments at the Hanford Site.

    PubMed

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F; Last, George V

    2007-08-15

    Aquifer sediments collected via split-spoon sampling in two new groundwater wells in the 200-UP-1 operable unit at the Hanford Site were characterized and showed typical Ringold Unit E Formation properties dominated by gravel and sand. High iron-oxide content in Fe oxide/clay coatings caused the highest U(VI) adsorption as quantified by batch K(d) values, indicating iron oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the 200-UP-1 sediments that affect U(VI) fate and mobility. Even though U(VI) adsorption on the gravel-sized fraction of the sediments is considered to be negligible, careful characterization should be conducted to determine U(VI) adsorption on gravel, because of presence of Fe oxides coatings and diffusion-controlled adsorption into the gravel particles' interior surfaces. A linear adsorption isotherm was observed up to 10(-6) M (238 microg/L) of total U(VI) concentration in batch U(VI) adsorption tests with varying total U(VI) concentrations in spiked groundwater. U(VI) adsorption decreased with increasing concentrations of dissolved carbonate, because strong anionic aqueous uranium-carbonate complexes formed at high pH and high alkalinity conditions. Noticeable uranium desorption hysteresis was observed in a flow-through column experiment, suggesting that desorption K(d) values for aged uranium-contaminated sediments at the Hanford Site can be larger than adsorption K(d) values determined in short-term laboratory experiments and slow uranium release from contaminated sediments into the groundwater is expected. PMID:17499879

  5. U(VI) adsorption on aquifer sediments at the Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F.; Last, George V.

    2007-08-01

    Aquifer sediments collected via split-spoon sampling in two new groundwater wells in the 200-UP-1 operable unit at the Hanford Site were characterized and showed typical Ringold Unit E Formation properties dominated by gravel and sand. High iron-oxide content in Fe oxide/clay coatings caused the highest U(VI) adsorption as quantified by batch Kd values, indicating iron oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the 200-UP-1 sediments that affect U(VI) fate and mobility. Even though U(VI) adsorption on the gravel-sized fraction of the sediments is considered to be negligible, careful characterization should be conducted to determine U(VI) adsorption on gravel, because of presence of Fe oxides coatings and diffusion-controlled adsorption into the gravel particles' interior surfaces. A linear adsorption isotherm was observed up to 10 - 6 M (238 μg/L) of total U(VI) concentration in batch U(VI) adsorption tests with varying total U(VI) concentrations in spiked groundwater. U(VI) adsorption decreased with increasing concentrations of dissolved carbonate, because strong anionic aqueous uranium-carbonate complexes formed at high pH and high alkalinity conditions. Noticeable uranium desorption hysteresis was observed in a flow-through column experiment, suggesting that desorption Kd values for aged uranium-contaminated sediments at the Hanford Site can be larger than adsorption Kd values determined in short-term laboratory experiments and slow uranium release from contaminated sediments into the groundwater is expected.

  6. Preconcentration of U(VI) ions on few-layered graphene oxide nanosheets from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guixia; Wen, Tao; Yang, Xin; Yang, Shubin; Liao, Jiali; Hu, Jun; Shao, Dadong; Wang, Xiangke

    2012-05-28

    Graphene oxide nanosheets have attracted multidisciplinary attention due to their unique physicochemical properties. Herein, few-layered graphene oxide nanosheets were synthesized from graphite using a modified Hummers method and were characterized by TEM, AFM, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, FTIR spectroscopy, TG-DTA and acid-base titrations. The prepared few-layered graphene oxide nanosheets were used as adsorbents for the preconcentration of U(VI) ions from large volumes of aqueous solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength and temperature. The sorption of U(VI) ions on the graphene oxide nanosheets was strongly dependent on pH and independent of the ionic strength, indicating that the sorption was mainly dominated by inner-sphere surface complexation rather than by outer-sphere surface complexation or ion exchange. The abundant oxygen-containing functional groups on the surfaces of the graphene oxide nanosheets played an important role in U(VI) sorption. The sorption of U(VI) on graphene oxide nanosheets increased with an increase in temperature and the thermodynamic parameters calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms suggested that the sorption of U(vi) on graphene oxide nanosheets was an endothermic and spontaneous process. The maximum sorption capacities (Q(max)) of U(VI) at pH 5.0 ± 0.1 and T = 20 °C was 97.5 mg g(-1), which was much higher than any of the currently reported nanomaterials. The graphene oxide nanosheets may be suitable materials for the removal and preconcentration of U(VI) ions from large volumes of aqueous solutions, for example, U(VI) polluted wastewater, if they can be synthesized in a cost-effective manner on a large scale in the future. PMID:22473651

  7. Uranium Isotopic Fractionation Induced by U(VI) Adsorption Onto Common Aquifer Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemison, N.; Johnson, T. M.; Shiel, A. E.; Lundstrom, C.

    2014-12-01

    Mining and processing of uranium (U) ore for nuclear energy and weapons has led to U contamination of groundwater. Reduction of soluble, mobile U(VI) to UO2 decreases uranium groundwater concentrations and is an important driver of natural and stimulated attenuation. 238U/235U measurements can be used to monitor and perhaps quantify U(VI) reduction; biological reduction of U(VI) has been shown to produce a ~1.0‰ isotopic fractionation in both laboratory and field settings, with the reduced product enriched in 238U. However, adsorption of U(VI) onto minerals may complicate the use of 238U/235U in this application; adsorption of U(VI) onto Mn oxides induces an isotopic fractionation of 0.2‰ with the sorbed U(VI) depleted in 238U. At present, the isotopic shift produced by adsorption of U(VI) onto other minerals has not yet been explored. This study measures U isotopic fractionation during adsorption onto goethite, birnessite, quartz, illite, and complex aquifer materials. In addition, the effect of U speciation on fractionation is also examined by adsorption of uranyl (UO22+), uranyl carbonato (such as UO2(CO3)22- and UO2(CO3)34-), and calcium uranyl carbonato (Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) and CaUO2(CO3)32-) ions to goethite and birnessite. Experiments are carried out with a multi-stage, batch approach, in which a U(VI)-bearing solution is exposed to three stages of adsorption, and the final solution is analyzed by a double-spike MC-ICP-MS method. This increases our ability to resolve among sorbents the extent of fractionation. Early results suggest that uranium adsorption to different minerals produces different isotopic fractionations, with quartz producing little to no fractionation (<0 .05‰), while goethite produces a 0.16‰ isotopic shift (adsorbed U(VI) depleted in 238U).

  8. In situ infrared study of adsorbed species during catalytic oxidation and carbon dioxide adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rajesh A.

    2005-11-01

    of the Ni-Re/CeO2 catalyst was reduced by only 20% in the presence of sulfur compared to a 50% reduction with the Ni/CeO 2 catalyst. These results show that Re not only promotes the water-gas shift reaction but also enhances the sulfur tolerance of the Ni/CeO2 catalyst. Novel amine based solid sorbents have been developed to capture CO 2 reversibly using temperature-swing adsorption process. The IR study shows that CO2 adsorbs on amine grafted SBA-15 to form carbonates and bicarbonates. Comparison of monoamine and diamine-grafted SBA-15 showed that diamine grafted SBA-15 provides almost twice the active sites for CO 2 adsorption. The adsorption of SO2 on the amine-grafted SBA-15 revealed that SO2 adsorbs irreversibly and the sorbent cannot be regenerated under normal operating conditions. Results of these studies can be used to enhance the overall conversion of CH4 to H2 thus lowering the cost of H2 product.

  9. Study of sorption-retarded U(VI) diffusion in Hanford silt/clay material

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Liu, Chongxuan; Ball, William P.

    2009-10-15

    A diffusion cell method was developed to measure the effective aqueous diffusion coefficient for U(VI) under strictly controlled chemical conditions within the inter-particle pores of silt/clay sediment from the DOE Hanford site, WA. "Inward-flux” diffusion studies were conducted in which U(VI) concentrations in both aqueous and solid phases were measured as a function of distance into the cell under conditions of constant concentration at the cell boundaries. A sequential extraction method was developed to measure sorbed U(VI) content in the solid phase, while accounting for the non-negligible extractable background U(VI). U(VI) diffusion data were found to be consistent with a model that assumed that: 1) a single effective aqueous diffusion coefficient could be used to simulate the coupled diffusion of various aqueous U(VI) species, and 2) the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) is appropriate for modeling the effects of sorption under the given experimental conditions. An effective aqueous diffusion coefficient (De) of 1.6x10^-6 cm2/s was obtained under conditions of pH 8.0 and calcite saturation that are relevant to the subsurface conditions at some regions of the Hanford site. The developed experimental techniques provide a practical approach for measuring effective aqueous U(VI) diffusivity in sorptive porous media.

  10. Ethylene and oxygen species adsorbed on a defect oxidized surface Ag(1 1 1) . Theoretical analysis by DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeev, Vasilii I.; Zhidomirov, Georgii M.

    2001-10-01

    We suggest a cluster model AS v→Ag12-3O of the oxidized surface Ag(1 1 1) with a defect. The defect is simulated by cationic vacancy V. Density functional theory (B3LYP/LANL1MB approximation) is used to calculate ethylene and oxygen adsorption on the regular (AS r) and defect (AS d) sites on the Ag(1 1 1). Oxygen interaction with site AS r produces atomic oxygen species (AS r-O). Oxygen adsorption on site AS d is accompanied by its association with subsurface oxygen atoms to form a quasimolecular structure of metal ozonide type -Ag-O-O ep-O-Ag-, containing electrophilic oxygen O ep. Energies of atomic oxygen binding to the regular and defect surfaces are found to be approximately equal. On the regular surface, ethylene forms a π-complex with binding energy Eπ(Ag-C 2H 4)=14.2 kcal/mol. On the defect surface, ethylene produces a metal-ethylene-peroxide cycle such as Ag-O-O-C 2H 4-Ag. Determined are the frequencies of normal vibration for ethylene and oxygen species, adsorbed on the regular and defect surfaces. In the case of associative oxygen species and complete isotope replacement 16O→ 18O, the main frequency at 1000 cm -1 shifts by Δν=57-61 cm -1, but this shift decreases to Δν=25-30 cm -1 for isotope mixtures 16O/ 18O. For the adsorbed species of ethylene-oxygen mixtures, IR spectra show the frequencies within which 170-180 cm -1 are associated with stretching of bond Ag-C. Frequencies at 300-490 cm -1 are assigned to mode ν(Ag-O) of the functional group Ag-O-O ep-O-Ag. The most intensive modes at 950 and 600 cm -1 are likely to stretching and bending of the functional groups containing the O-O-O and O-O-C bonds.

  11. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  12. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  13. UVIS CTE Monitor: Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noeske, Kai

    2010-09-01

    *** NOTE 2: 2ND CHANGE MAR 26 2011: VISIT 13 HAD FAILED. APPROVED FOR REPETITION. ****** NEW VISIT 14 IS IDENTICAL TO FORMER VISIT 13, WITH EXCEPTIONS THAT SOME SUBEXPOSURES ARE REMOVED. ****** SEE OBSERVING DESCRIPTION FOR DETAILS. ****** NOTE: THIS IS A CHANGED PHASE II PROPOSAL AFTER VISITS 1,2,7 HAD BEEN EXECUTED ****** CHANGES BECAME NECESSARY AFTER ANALYSIS OF INCOMING CALIBRATION DATA FROM 12379 AND 12348 ****** THIS REVISED PHASE II {submission 14FEB2011} ADDS THE EVALUATION OF CHARGE INJECTION***The changes amount to:1} dropping the 3rd epoch {August 2011} of external CTE monitoring {3 orbits}2} simplifying the CTE monitor observations in the second epoch {March 2011}, freeing up 1 orbit3} using the freed up orbits from 1} and 2}, together with two additional external orbits that we were granted, to thoroughly assess the data quality of charge - injected data under realistic observing setups.These charge-injected observations will be obtained during the 2nd epoch of the CTE monitor program, in the March 2011 window.------ Original Text prior to 14 Feb 2011 below this line -----------This program extends the Cycle 17 external CTE calibration {CAL/WFC3 ID 11924} program for WFC3/UVIS over Cycle 18. Targets are {i} the sparse cluster NGC 6791 observed in Cycle 17, to continue a consistent set of observations that allows to isolate the time evolution of the CTE, and {ii} a denser field in 47 Tuc {NGC 104}. The latter will provide data to measure the dependence of the CTE on field crowding. It will also provide a consistent comparison between the CTE evolution of WFC3/UVIS and that of ACS/WFC at the same time into the flight {1 year}, because ACS/WFC CTE data were based on 47 Tuc observations. Additional observations of 47 Tuc in the CVZ will provide a wide range of background levels to measure the background dependence of the UVIS CTE.Goals are {i} the continued monitoring of the time evolution of the WFC3/UVIS CTE, {ii} establishing the detector X

  14. Theoretical estimation for equilibrium Mo isotope fractionations between dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed complexes on (Fe,Mn)-oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Liu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Although Mo isotopes have been increasingly used as a paleoredox proxy in the study of paleo-oceanographic condition changes (Barling et al., 2001; Siebert et al., 2003, 2005,2006; Arnold et al., 2004; Poulson et al., 2006), some very basic aspects of Mo isotopes geochemistry have not been obtained yet. First, although there are several previous studies on equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors(Tossell,2005; Weeks et al.,2007; Wasylenki et al.,2008), these studies were dealing with situations in vacuum and we find unfortunately the solvation effects for Ge species in solution cannot be ignored. Therefore, accurate Ge fractionation factors are actually not determined yet. Second, except the dominant dissolved Mo species in seawater which is known as molybdate ion (MoO42-), the forms of possible other minor species remain elusive. Third, the Mo removal mechanisms from seawater are only known for the anoxia and euxinic conditions (e.g. Helz et al., 1996; Zheng et al., 2000), the Mo removal mechanism under oxic condition are still arguing. Fourth, the adsorption effects on Mo isotope fractionation are almost completely unknown. Especially, without the adsorption fractionation knowledge, it is difficult to understand many distinct fractionations found in a number of geologic systems and it is difficult to explain the exceptionally long residence time of Mo in seawater. Urey model or Bigeleisen-Mayer equation based theoretical method and the super-molecule clusters are used to precisely evaluate the fractionation factors. The B3LYP/(6-311+G(2df,p),LANL2DZ) level method is used for frequencies calculation. 24 water molecules are used to form the supermolecues surrounding the Mo species. At least 4 different conformers for each supermolecule are used to prevent the errors from the diversity of configurations in solution. This study provides accurate equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors between possible dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed Mo species on the

  15. Reduction of U(VI) Complexes by Anthraquinone Disulfonate: Experiment and Molecular Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, C.C.; Wang, Z.; Rosso, K.M.; Wagnon, K.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    2004-03-17

    Past studies demonstrate that complexation will limit abiotic and biotic U(VI) reduction rates and the overall extent of reduction. However, the underlying basis for this behavior is not understood and presently unpredictable across species and ligand structure. The central tenets of these investigations are: (1) reduction of U(VI) follows the electron-transfer (ET) mechanism developed by Marcus; (2) the ET rate is the rate-limiting step in U(VI) reduction and is the step that is most affected by complexation; and (3) Marcus theory can be used to unify the apparently disparate U(VI) reduction rate data and as a computational tool to construct a predictive relationship.

  16. U(VI) Adsorption on Aquifer Sediments at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F.; Last, George V.

    2007-08-15

    Aquifer core samples collected in three new groundwater wells in the 200-UP-1 operable unit at the Hanford Site were characterized and showed typical Ringold Formation Unit E dominated by gravel and sand. High iron-oxide content in iron (Fe) oxide/clay coatings caused the highest U(VI) adsorption as quantified by Kd values, indicating these hydrous iron oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the 200-UP-1 sediments that affect U(VI) fate and mobility. In batch adsorption tests with varying total U(VI) concentrations in spiked groundwater, a linear isotherm up to 1 ppm of total U(VI) concentration was observed. However, U(VI) adsorption decreased with increasing concentrations of dissolved carbonate, because strong anionic aqueous uranium-carbonate complexes formed at elevated pH and high carbonate conditions. A small amount of uranium desorption hysteresis was observed in a flow-through column experiment, suggesting that desorption Kd values for aged uranium-contaminated sediments at the Hanford Site can be larger than Kd values determined in short-term laboratory experiments and slow uranium release into the groundwater is expected.

  17. High performance of phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica for U(VI) sorption from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li-Yong; Liu, Ya-Lan; Shi, Wei-Qun; Lv, Yu-Long; Lan, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2011-07-28

    The renaissance of nuclear energy promotes increasing basic research on the separation and enrichment of nuclear fuel associated radionuclides. Herein, we report the first study for developing mesoporous silica functionalized with phosphonate (NP10) as a sorbent for U(VI) sorption from aqueous solution. The mesoporous silica was synthesized by co-condensation of diethylphosphatoethyltriethoxysilane (DPTS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), using cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as the template. The synthesized silica nanoparticles were observed to possess a mesoporous structure with a uniform pore diameter of 2.7 nm, and to have good stability and high efficiency for U(VI) sorption from aqueous solution. A maximum sorption capacity of 303 mg g(-1) and fast equilibrium time of 30 min were achieved under near neutral conditions at room temperature. The adsorbed U(VI) can be easily desorbed by using 0.1 mol L(-1) HNO(3), and the reclaimed mesoporous silica can be reused with no decrease of sorption capacity. In addition, the preconcentration of U(VI) from a 100 mL aqueous solution using the functionalized mesoporous silica was also studied. The preconcentration factor was found to be as high as 100, suggesting the vast opportunities of this kind of mesoporous silica for the solid-phase extraction and enrichment of U(VI). PMID:21681327

  18. Reaction of deuterium with olefins on nickel catalysts: evidence for adsorbed vinylic species

    SciTech Connect

    Mintsa-Eya, V.; Hilaire, L.; Choplin, A.; Touroude, R.; Gault, F.G.

    1983-08-01

    The interaction of deuterium with 1,2-dimethylcyclopentene, 2,3-dimethylcyclopentene, 1-methyl-2-methylenecyclopentane, 1,2-dimethylcyclobutene, 1-methyl-2-methylenecyclobutane, bicyclo(2,2,1)heptene, but-1-ene, and cis-but-2-ene was studied from -85 to 50/sup 0/C on nickel films in a static apparatus and on Ni/pumice in a flow system. Unexpected d/sub 3/ and d/sub 4/ molecules were obtained in the deuteration of bicyclo(2,2,1)heptene. The position of the double bond in the ring of the other cycloolefins was the main factor governing their behavior: in the deuteration of 1,2-dimethylcycloalkenes, the saturated products, especially the trans somers, were much more exchanged and the percentage of trans was lower than when the starting material consisted of the olefins with the double bond in 2,3 or exocyclic positions. The hyperfine distribution, obtained by microwave analysis, of the exchanged d/sub 1/ but-1-ene, revealed that the major part of the deuterium was introduced on C/sub 2/; the cis-trans isomerization was much faster than the double bond migration with the introduction of zero or one deuterium atom while the isomerized but-1-ene showed a multiple exchange up to d/sub 4/; in the isomerized d/sub 1/ but-1-ene, the deuterium atom was distributed on the three carbon atoms C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, C/sub 3/. Most of these results clearly show that the classical Horiuti-Polanyi mechanism is not the only one taking part in the reactions. The introduction of other intermediaries, sigma-vinylic, sigma-vinylic ..pi..-olefinic, and sigma-vinylic ..pi..-allylic species, provides a coherent explanation for all our findings. It is shown that nickel and iron behave in a very similar way. 5 tables.

  19. Inhibition of a U(VI)- and sulfate-reducing consortia by U(VI).

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jennifer L; Wu, Hsin-I; Gentile, Margaret E; Kitanidis, Peter K; Criddle, Craig S

    2007-09-15

    The stimulation of microbial U(VI) reduction is currently being investigated as a means to reduce uranium's mobility in groundwater, but little is known about the concentration at which U(VI) might inhibit microbial activity, or the effect of U(VI) on bacterial community structure. We investigated these questions with an ethanol-fed U(VI)- and sulfate-reducing enrichment developed from sediment from the site of an ongoing field biostimulation experiment at Area 3 of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC). Sets of triplicate enrichments were spiked with increasing concentrations of U(VI) (from 49 microm to 9.2 mM). As the U(VI) concentration increased to 224 microM, the culture's production of acetate from ethanol slowed, and at or above 1.6 mM U(VI) little acetate was produced over the time frame of the experiment. An uncoupling inhibition model was applied to the data, and the inhibition coefficient for U(VI), Ku, was found to be approximately 100 microM U(VI), or 24 mg/L, indicating the inhibitory effect is relevant at highly contaminated sites. Microbial community structure at the conclusion of the experiment was analyzed with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. T-RFs associated with Desulfovibrio-like organisms decreased in relative abundance with increasing U(VI) concentration, whereas Clostridia-like T-RFs increased. PMID:17948804

  20. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)-CO3/Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Cao, Xiaohong; Luo, Xuanping; Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai; Liu, Yunhai

    2015-12-30

    The influence of U(VI)-CO3 and Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (qe) and distribution constant (Kd) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the qe and Kd values of NZVI were 5-10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0-3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)-CO3 complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO-UO2CO3(-) or SO-UO2 (CO3)2(3-). XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment. PMID:26280584

  1. Haloes seen in UVIS reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Bradley, E. T.; Colwell, J. E.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-12-01

    UVIS SOI reflectance spectra show bright 'haloes' around the locations of some of the strongest resonances in Saturn's A ring (Esposito etal 2005). UV spectra constrain the size and composition of the icy ring particles (Bradley etal 2010, 2012). We investigate the Janus 4:3, 5:3, 6:5 and Mimas 5:3 inner Lindblad resonances as well as at the Mimas 5:3 vertical resonance (bending wave location). Models of ring particle regolith evolution (Elliott and Esposito 2010) indicate the deeper regolith is made of older and purer ice. The strong resonances can cause streamline crowding (Lewis and Stewart 2005) which damps the interparticle velocity, allowing temporary clumps to grow, which in turn increase the velocity, eroding the clumps and releasing smaller particles and regolith (see the predator-prey model of Esposito etal 2012). This cyclic behavior, driven by the resonant perturbation from the moon, can yield collision velocities at particular azimuths greater than 1m/sec, sufficient to erode the aggregates (Blum 2006), exposing older, purer materials. Thus, the radial location of the strongest resonances can be where we find both large aggregates and disrupted fragments, in a balance maintained by the periodic moon forcing. If this stirring exposes older, and purer ice, the velocity threshold for eroding the aggregates can explain why only the strongest Lindblad resonances show haloes. Diffusion can explain the morphology of these haloes, although they are not well-resolved spatially by UVIS. Spectra determine the relative contributions of particle size and purity at these locations, for comparison to estimates from the regolith evolution models.

  2. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  3. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-21

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53–75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  4. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53-75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  5. WFC3/UVIS 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, Susana E.; Mack, Jennifer; Bowers, Ariel; and the WFC3/UVIS2.0 Team

    2016-01-01

    WFC3 UVIS data processing pipeline has been improved to provide better precision by implementing chip dependent photometry and cte corrections. The two UVIS CCDs have different characteristics, different QE and different wavelength dependent response functions. Therefore, to improve the photometric precision, new flat fields, zero points, encircled energy curves and aperture corrections were generated. In this presentation we describe these changes, and their effects on data analysis, including using AstroDrizzle. CTE corrections are presented by S. Baggett at this meeting.

  6. Removal of uranium from aqueous solution by a low cost and high-efficient adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun-Hai; Wang, You-Qun; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Cao, Xiao-Hong; Nie, Wen-Bin; Li, Qin; Hua, Rong

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a low-cost and high-efficient carbonaceous adsorbent (HTC-COOH) with carboxylic groups was developed for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution compared with the pristine hydrothermal carbon (HTC). The structure and chemical properties of resultant adsorbents were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform-infrared spectra (FT-IR) and acid-base titration. The key factors (solution pH, contact time, initial U(VI) concentrations and temperature) affected the adsorption of U(VI) on adsorbents were investigated using batch experiments. The adsorption of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH was pH-dependent, and increased with temperature and initial ion concentration. The adsorption equilibrium of U(VI) on adsorbents was well defined by the Langmuir isothermal equation, and the monolayer adsorption capacity of HTC-COOH was found to be 205.8 mg/g. The kinetics of adsorption was very in accordance with the pseudo-second-order rate model. The adsorption processes of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH were endothermic and spontaneous in nature according to the thermodynamics of adsorption. Furthermore, HTC-COOH could selectively adsorption of U(VI) in aqueous solution containing co-existing ions (Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+). From the results of the experiments, it is found that the HTC-COOH is a potential adsorbent for effective removal of U(VI) from polluted water.

  7. WFC3 UVIS Crosstalk Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.; Hartig, G.; Cheung, E.

    2004-09-01

    This report summarizes the behavior of the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS channel crosstalk features seen in the first ground-test data from the integrated instrument. There appear to be two types of crosstalk: the first arises from sources at any exposure level (from a few DN up to saturation); the crosstalk from a source in one amp appears in the three other amps as mirror images of the source. The second type arises from highly saturated pixels only; in these cases, the crosstalk appears in the adjoining amp of the same CCD as the source. Both types of crosstalk are highly nonlinear, occur at very low levels (<10DN/ pixel at the default gain of 1.5), and depend upon the bias level, gain, and pixel binning settings. A software workaround to eliminate some of the crosstalk is currently in hand in the form of timing patterns with alternate clamp times. The hardware cause for some of the crosstalk, a common-mode noise susceptibility in the CCD electronics box, has been identified and successfully fixed in the non-flight hardware; the problem is expected to be fixed in the flight hardware later this year. Meanwhile, further tests are underway at the Detector Characterization Lab (DCL at GSFC) to explore additional possible causes of crosstalk in the camera head electronics.

  8. Reduction of U(VI) Incorporated in the Structure of Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Lazama Pacheco, Juan S.; Bargar, John R.; Shi, Zhi; Liu, Juan; Kovarik, Libor; Engelhard, Mark H.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-09-04

    U(VI) doped hematite was synthesized and exposed to two different organic reductants with E0 of 0.23 and 0.70 V. A combination of HAADF-TEM and EXAFS provided evidence that uranium was incorporated in hematite in uranate, likely octahedral coordination. XPS indicated that structurally incorporated U(VI) was reduced to U(V), whereas adsorbed U(VI) was reduced to U(IV). Specifically, the experiments indicate that U(V) was the dominant oxidation state of uranium in hematite around Eh -0.24 to -0.28 V and pH 7.7-8.6 for at least up to 5 weeks of reaction time. U(V), but not U(IV), was also detected in hematite at Eh +0.21 V (pH 7.1-7.3). The results support the hypothesis, based on previous experimental and theoretical work, that the stability field of U(V) is widened relative to U(IV) and U(VI) in uranate coordination environments where the coordination number of U is less than 8.

  9. Use of Ni/NixB Nanoparticles as a Novel Adsorbent for the Preconcentration of Mercury Species prior to Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometric Determination.

    PubMed

    Yayayürük, Onur; Henden, Emür

    2016-01-01

    A selective matrix separation/enrichment method, utilizing a simple batch procedure with nickel/nickel boride (Ni/NixB) nanoparticles was proposed for the determination of inorganic mercury(II), Hg(2+) and methyl mercury(I), CH3Hg(+) in waters prior to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). The Ni/NixB nanoparticles, were synthesized by the chemical reduction of Ni(II) to Ni/NixB. The novel adsorbent was selective to Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) species between pH values of 4 - 10. Both of the mercury species were recovered from the adsorbent using 1.0 mol L(-1) hot HNO3 with high efficiency. It was observed that the adsorbent selectively removed Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) from the bulk solution in the presence of several competitor ions (As(3+), Sb(3+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Fe(3+)) with ≥96% adsorption. The limit of detection (3σ above blank) was found to be 1.8 ng L(-1) with a preconcentration factor of 20. The validation of the method was tested through spike recovery experiments with several water samples (tap and seawater) at μg L(-1) concentration levels, and all recovery values were found to vary between 95 and 105%. PMID:27506713

  10. Kinetics of U(VI) reduction control kinetics of U(IV) reoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Senko, J.M.; Minyard, M.L.; Dempsey, B.A.; Roden, E.E.; Yeh, G.-T.; Burgos, W.D.

    2006-04-05

    For the in situ reductive immobilization of U to be an acceptable strategy for the removal of that element from groundwater, the long-term stability of U(IV) must be determined. Rates of biotransformation of Fe species influence the mineralogy of the resulting products (Fredrickson et al., 2003; Senko et al., 2005), and we hypothesize that the rate of U(VI) reduction influences the mineralogy of resultant U(IV) precipitates. We hypothesize that slower rates of U(VI) reduction will yield U(IV) phases that are more resistant to reoxidation, and will therefore be more stable upon cessation of electron donor addition. U(IV) phases formed by relatively slow reduction may be more crystalline or larger in comparison to their relatively rapidly-formed counterparts (Figure 1), thus limiting the reactivity of slowly-formed U(IV) phases toward various oxidants. The physical location of U(IV) precipitates relative to bacterial cells may also limit the reactivity of biogenic U(IV) phases. In this situation, we expect that precipitation of U(IV) within the bacterial cell may protect U(IV) from reoxidation by limiting physical contact between U(IV) and oxidants (Figure 1). We assessed the effect of U(VI) reduction rate on the subsequent reoxidation of biogenic U(IV) and are currently conducting column scale studies to determine whether U(VI) reduction rate can be manipulated by varying the electron donor concentration used to stimulate U(VI) reduction.

  11. Inhibition of U(VI) reduction by synthetic and natural pyrite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuanwei; Kang, Mingliang; Ma, Bin; Xie, Jinglin; Chen, Fanrong; Charlet, Laurent; Liu, Chunli

    2014-09-16

    Reductive precipitation is an effective method of attenuating the mobility of uranium (U) in subsurface environments. The reduction of U(VI) by synthetic and naturally occurring pyrite was investigated at pH 3.0-9.5. In contrast to thermodynamic calculations that were used to predict UO2(s) precipitation, a mixed U(IV) and U(VI) product (e.g., U3O8/U4O9/U3O7) was only observed at pH 6.21-8.63 and 4.52-4.83 for synthetic and natural pyrite, respectively. Under acidic conditions, the reduction of UO2(2+) by surface-associated Fe(2+) may not be favored because the mineral surface is nearly neutral or not negative enough. At high pH, the sorption of negatively charged U(VI) species is not favored on the negatively charged mineral surface. Thus, the redox reaction is not favored. Trace elements generally contained within the natural pyrite structure can affect the reactivity of pyrite and lead to a different result between the natural and synthetic pyrite. Because UO2(s) is extremely redox-sensitive toward U(VI), the observed UO2+x(s) phase reduction product indicates a surface reaction that is largely controlled by reaction kinetics and pyrite surface chemistry. These factors may explain why most laboratory experiments have observed incomplete U(VI) reduction on Fe(II)-bearing minerals. PMID:25148405

  12. Kinetics and dynamics of oxidation reactions involving an adsorbed CO species on bulk and supported platinum and copper-oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, M.P.

    1991-07-01

    The proposed research is an integrated experimental and modeling study of oxidation reactions involving CO as a key player -- be it a reactant, adsorbed intermediate, and/or partial oxidation product -- in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The reaction systems of interest in the project include CO, formaldehyde, and methanol oxidation by O{sub 2} and CO oxidation by NO, on both Pt and copper oxide catalysts. These reactions are of importance in automobile exhaust catalysis. There is a paucity of rate data in the literature for these important environmental control reactions. The goal of this research is to better understand the catalytic chemistry and kinetics of oxidations reactions involving CO as an adsorbed intermediate. Successfully meeting this goal requires an integration of basic kinetic measurements, in situ catalyst surface monitoring, kinetic modeling, and nonlinear mathematical tools.

  13. Abiotic U(VI) reduction by sorbed Fe(II) on natural sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2013-09-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the DOE Rifle field research site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 98% was oxidized at 7.3 μmol/g Fe and 41% at 39.6 μmol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a limited capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 μmol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present, possibly as oligomeric Fe(II) surface species. The degree of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)-loading above this level to a maximum of 18% and 36% U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 μmol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2-free systems [up to 44% and 54% at pH 7.2 (17.3 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 μmol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by sorbed Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in biostimulation experiments at the Rifle site, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction could play a significant role in field settings.

  14. Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U(IV) nanoprecipitates on the magnetite (111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, David M.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn

    2012-04-03

    Sequestration of uranium (U) by magnetite is a potentially important sink for U in natural and contaminated environments. However, molecular-scale controls which favor U(VI) uptake including both adsorption of U(VI) and reduction to U(VI) by magnetite remain poorly understood, in particular the role of U(VI)-CO3-Ca complexes in inhibiting U(VI) reduction. To investigate U uptake pathways on magnetite as a function of U(VI) aqueous speciation, we performed batch sorption experiments on (111) surfaces of natural single crystals under a range of solution conditions (pH 5 and 10; 0.1 mM U(VI); 1 mM NaCl; and with or without 0.5 mM CO3 and 0.1 mM Ca) and characterized surface-associated U using grazing incidence extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GI-EXAFS), grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the absence of both carbonate ([CO3]T, denoted here as CO3) and calcium (Ca), or in the presence of CO3 only, co-existing adsorption of U(VI) surface species and reduction to U(IV) occurs at both pH 5 and 10. In the presence of both CO3 and Ca, only adsorption of U(VI) occur. When U reduction occurs, nanoparticulate UO2 forms only within and adjacent to surface microtopographic features such as crystal boundaries and cracks. This result suggests that U reduction is limited to defect-rich surface regions. Further, at both pH 5 and 10 in the presence of both CO3 and Ca, U(VI)-CO3-Ca ternary surface species develop and U reduction is precluded. These findings extend the range of conditions under which U (VI)-CO3-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction.

  15. Ultraviolet Observations of Phoebe from the Cassini UVIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Hansen, Candice J.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of Saturn's distant moon Phoebe were made at far-ultraviolet (FUV) (1100-1900 A) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) (600-1100 A) wavelengths by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) during the Cassini spacecraft flyby on June 11, 2004. These are the first UV spectra of Phoebe and the first detection of water ice on a Solar System surface using FUV wavelengths. The characteristics of water ice in the FUV are presented, and Hapke models are used to interpret the spectra in terms of composition and grain size; the use of both areal and intimate mixing models is explored. Non-ice species used in these models include carbon, ice tholin, Triton tholin, poly-HCN and kerogen. Satisfactory disk-integrated fits are obtained for intimate mixtures of approx.10% H2O plus a non-ice species. Spatially resolved regions of higher (approx.20%) and lower (approx.5%) H2O ice concentrations are also detected. Phoebe does not display any evidence of volatile activity. Upper limits on atomic oxygen and carbon are 5 x 10(exp 11) and 2 x 10(exp 12) atoms/sq. cm, respectively, for solar photon scattering. The UVIS detection of water ice on Phoebe, and the ice amounts detected, are consistent with IR measurements and contribute to the evidence for a Phoebe origin in the outer Solar System rather than in the main asteroid belt.

  16. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  17. Diffusion of U(VI) in Opalinus Clay: Influence of temperature and humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, C.; Van Loon, L. R.; Jakob, A.; Steudtner, R.; Schmeide, K.; Sachs, S.; Bernhard, G.

    2013-05-01

    The diffusion of U(VI) (c0 = 1 × 10-6 mol/L) in compacted Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri underground laboratory, Switzerland, was studied in the absence and presence of humic acid (10 mg/L) at two different temperatures (25 °C, 60 °C) under anaerobic conditions. As background electrolyte synthetic Opalinus Clay pore water (pH 7.6, I = 0.36 mol/L) was used. The diffusion-accessible porosity, ɛ, was determined for each Opalinus Clay bore core sample by through-diffusion experiments with tritiated water (HTO) before the U(VI) diffusion experiments were carried out. The values for the effective diffusion and distribution coefficients De and Kd obtained for U(VI) and humic acid at 25 °C as well as at 60 °C showed that humic acid has no significant influence on the U(VI) diffusion. The diffusion profiles of humic acid in Opalinus Clay at 25 and 60 °C indicate the contributions of two different humic acid particle size fractions (<1 kDa and 10-100 kDa). The small-sized humic acid fraction diffused through the whole Opalinus Clay samples at both temperatures within the 3 month duration of the U(VI) diffusion experiments. At 60 °C, diffusion profiles of two different U(VI) species were observed. In a separate experiment the U(VI) speciation in the source reservoir solution at 60 °C was analyzed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray detector. The two diffusion profiles could be attributed to an unknown colloidal and a known aquatic U(VI) species (Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq)). The diffusion results showed that the interaction of U(VI) and of the large-sized humic acid colloid fraction with the clay is stronger at 60 °C. An increase of Kd from 0.025 ± 0.003 m3/kg at 25 °C to 0.25 ± 0.05 m3/kg for U(VI)colloidal at 60 °C was determined. In addition, the value for De of U(VI) increased with increasing temperature. Using the De values at 25 and 60 °C, a preliminary

  18. Adsorption of U(VI) on sericite in the presence of Bacillus subtilis: A combined batch, EXAFS and modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yubing; Zhang, Rui; Ding, Congcong; Wang, Xiangxue; Cheng, Wencai; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-05-01

    The effect of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) on the adsorption of U(VI) onto sericite was investigated using batch, EXAFS and modeling techniques. The batch adsorption indicated that the increased adsorption of U(VI) on sericite + B. subtilis systems at pH < 5.0 was predominantly attributed to the formation of inner-sphere complexes between U(VI) and surface functional groups of B. subtilis, whereas the inhibited adsorption was observed at pH > 6.0 due to the combination of deprotonated carboxyl groups of B. subtilis with the hydroxyl of sericite. The slightly enhanced adsorption of U(VI) on sericite + B. subtilis with increasing CO2 contents at pH < 6.0 was ascribed to the electrostatic attraction between positively charged U(VI) species (UO22+ species) and negatively charged surface of sericite + B. subtilis, whereas the U(VI) adsorption sharply decreased at pH > 7.0 owing to electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged sericite + B. subtilis and negatively charged U(VI) species such as UO2(OH)3- or UO2(CO3)22- species. According to EXAFS analysis, the increased adsorption mechanism of U(VI) on sericite + B. subtilis at pH 4.0 was attributed to the formation of U-P shell, whereas the bidentate inner-sphere surface complexes was also observed at pH 7.0 due to the formation of U-C shell (2.92 Å) and/or U-Si/Al (3.18 Å) shell. Under the range of allowable error, the pH-dependent and isothermal adsorption of U(VI) on sericite + B. subtilis can be fitted by surface complexation modeling using ion exchange and surface complexation reaction by using equilibrium parameters obtained from each binary systems. These findings are important to understand the fate and transport of U(VI) on the mineral-bacteria ternary systems in the near-surface environment.

  19. Low temperature equilibrium isotope fractionation and isotope exchange kinetics between U(IV) and U(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangli; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the uranium (U) isotope ratio 238U/235U provide an emerging redox proxy in environmental and paleoredox studies, but many key parameters concerning U isotope fractionation are still poorly constrained. Here we report the equilibrium isotopic fractionation between dissolved U(IV) and dissolved U(VI), and rates of isotope exchange between solid-phase U(IV) and dissolved U(VI). We conducted one experiment at high concentration [35 mM U(IV) and 32 mM U(VI)] and low pH (0.2) in hydrochloric acid media at room temperature to determine the equilibrium isotopic fractionation between dissolved U(IV) and dissolved U(VI). Isotopic equilibrium was reached in about 19 days under such experimental conditions. The equilibrium isotope fractionation was determined to be 1.64 ± 0.16‰, with U(IV) being enriched in 238U relative to U(VI). Applicability of the determined equilibrium fractionation is discussed. We also conducted a set of experiments to determine isotopic exchange rates between dissolved U(VI) and nanouraninite U(IV) under conditions closer to those in natural system, with lower concentrations and neutral pH. The exchange rate was found to conform to the rate law R = k[U(VI)]adsorbed, in which R is the isotopic exchange rate (μM day-1); k is the rate constant determined to be 0.21 day-1; and [U(VI)]adsorbed is the concentration of U(VI) adsorbed to nanouraninite (μM). Our results, combined with consideration of the variables controlling U(VI)-U(IV) contact in natural settings, indicate that the timescale for significant isotope equilibration varies depending on environmental conditions, mostly uranium concentrations. In natural uncontaminated sediments with low uranium concentrations, equilibration is expected to occur on a timescale of hundreds to thousands of years. In contrast, in U-contaminated aquifers with high U concentrations, significant equilibration could occur on timescales of weeks to years.

  20. Products of abiotic U(VI) reduction by biogenic magnetite and vivianite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, Harish; Alessi, Daniel S.; Suvorova, Elena I.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Dippon, Urs; Kappler, Andreas; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2011-05-01

    Reductive immobilization of uranium by the stimulation of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been investigated as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. In those environments, DMRB may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, such as ferric iron which can lead to the formation of reactive biogenic Fe(II) phases. These biogenic phases could potentially mediate abiotic U(VI) reduction. In this work, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was used to synthesize two biogenic Fe(II)-bearing minerals: magnetite (a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxide) and vivianite (an Fe(II)-phosphate). Analysis of abiotic redox interactions between these biogenic minerals and U(VI) showed that both biogenic minerals reduced U(VI) completely. XAS analysis indicates significant differences in speciation of the reduced uranium after reaction with the two biogenic Fe(II)-bearing minerals. While biogenic magnetite favored the formation of structurally ordered, crystalline UO 2, biogenic vivianite led to the formation of a monomeric U(IV) species lacking U-U associations in the corresponding EXAFS spectrum. To investigate the role of phosphate in the formation of monomeric U(IV) such as sorbed U(IV) species complexed by mineral surfaces, versus a U(IV) mineral, uranium was reduced by biogenic magnetite that was pre-sorbed with phosphate. XAS analysis of this sample also revealed the formation of monomeric U(IV) species suggesting that the presence of phosphate hinders formation of UO 2. This work shows that U(VI) reduction products formed during in situ biostimulation can be influenced by the mineralogical and geochemical composition of the surrounding environment, as well as by the interfacial solute-solid chemistry of the solid-phase reductant.

  1. Interactions between Silicon Oxide Nanoparticles (SONPs) and U(VI) Contaminations: Effects of pH, Temperature and Natural Organic Matters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanyu; Li, Ping; Pan, Duoqiang; Yin, Zhuoxin; Fan, Qiaohui; Wu, Wangsuo

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between contaminations of U(VI) and silicon oxide nanoparticles (SONPs), both of which have been widely used in modern industry and induced serious environmental challenge due to their high mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity, were studied under different environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and natural organic matters (NOMs) by using both batch and spectroscopic approaches. The results showed that the accumulation process, i.e., sorption, of U(VI) on SONPs was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength, demonstrating that possible outer- and/or inner-sphere complexes were controlling the sorption process of U(VI) on SONPs in the observed pH range. Humic acid (HA), one dominated component of NOMs, bounded SONPs can enhance U(VI) sorption below pH~4.5, whereas restrain at high pH range. The reversible sorption of U(VI) on SONPs possibly indicated that the outer-sphere complexes were prevalent at pH 5. However, an irreversible interaction of U(VI) was observed in the presence of HA (Fig 1). It was mainly due to the ternary SONPs-HA-U(VI) complexes (Type A Complexes). After SONPs adsorbed U(VI), the particle size in suspension was apparently increased from ~240 nm to ~350 nm. These results showed that toxicity of both SONPs and U(VI) will decrease to some extent after the interaction in the environment. These findings are key for providing useful information on the possible mutual interactions among different contaminants in the environment. PMID:26930197

  2. Interactions between Silicon Oxide Nanoparticles (SONPs) and U(VI) Contaminations: Effects of pH, Temperature and Natural Organic Matters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hanyu; Li, Ping; Pan, Duoqiang; Yin, Zhuoxin; Fan, Qiaohui; Wu, Wangsuo

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between contaminations of U(VI) and silicon oxide nanoparticles (SONPs), both of which have been widely used in modern industry and induced serious environmental challenge due to their high mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity, were studied under different environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and natural organic matters (NOMs) by using both batch and spectroscopic approaches. The results showed that the accumulation process, i.e., sorption, of U(VI) on SONPs was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength, demonstrating that possible outer- and/or inner-sphere complexes were controlling the sorption process of U(VI) on SONPs in the observed pH range. Humic acid (HA), one dominated component of NOMs, bounded SONPs can enhance U(VI) sorption below pH~4.5, whereas restrain at high pH range. The reversible sorption of U(VI) on SONPs possibly indicated that the outer-sphere complexes were prevalent at pH 5. However, an irreversible interaction of U(VI) was observed in the presence of HA (Fig 1). It was mainly due to the ternary SONPs-HA-U(VI) complexes (Type A Complexes). After SONPs adsorbed U(VI), the particle size in suspension was apparently increased from ~240 nm to ~350 nm. These results showed that toxicity of both SONPs and U(VI) will decrease to some extent after the interaction in the environment. These findings are key for providing useful information on the possible mutual interactions among different contaminants in the environment. PMID:26930197

  3. Identification and quantification of oxygen species adsorbed on Pt(111) single-crystal and polycrystalline Pt electrodes by photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Mitsui, Satoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2009-02-17

    We have positively identified oxygen species on Pt(111) single-crystal and polycrystalline Pt electrodes in N2-purged 0.1 M HF solution by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with an electrochemical cell. Four oxygen species (Oad, OHad, and two types of water molecules) were distinguished. The binding energies of each species were nearly constant over the whole potential region and independent of the single- or polycrystalline electrodes. The coverages, however, varied considerably and were dependent on the electrode potential. We have for the first time demonstrated clear differences in the surface oxidation processes for Pt(111) and polycrystalline Pt electrodes. PMID:19152331

  4. UVIS tungsten lamp cross-check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia

    2009-07-01

    This proposal will verify the operation of the spare UVIS channel calsystem tungsten lamp. Internal flatfields will be obtained in one filter from each of the twelve filter wheels, providing an initial baseline and comparison for those taken with the primary lamp {WF09, 11422}. Filters for this proposal were chosen based upon a balance of multiple factors: reasonable countrate with calsystem tungsten lamp {no long exposure times}, science priority of the filter, overall coverage of UVIS wavelength regime, and slot location in the wheel. Exposures will be taken in the default full-frame, four-amp, unbinned readout mode.This proposal corresponds to the spare lamp portion of SMOV activity id WFC3-09.

  5. WFC3 SS Uvis SOFA Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    2012-10-01

    Part of side switch activities.This proposal will verify the operation of all SOFA filter wheels using the default calsystem tungsten lamp. Internal flatfields will be obtained in one filter from each of the twelve filter wheels, establishing an initial baseline over a broad wavelength range. Subsequent proposals {e.g., WF18, proposal 13206} will obtain full internal flatfield coverage in all UVIS filters. Filters for this proposal were chosen based upon a balance of multiple factors: reasonable countrate with calsystem tungsten lamp {no long exposure times}, science priority of the filter, overall coverage of UVIS wavelength regime, and slot location in the wheel. Exposures will be taken in the default full-frame, four-amp, unbinned readout mode.ID: WF09a

  6. WFC3 SS UVIS Spare Tungsten Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    2012-10-01

    Part of side switch activities.This proposal will verify the operation of the spare UVIS channel calsystem tungsten lamp. Internal flatfields will be obtained in one filter from each of the twelve filter wheels, providing an initial baseline and comparison for those taken with the primary lamp {WF09}. Filters for this proposal were chosen based upon a balance of multiple factors: reasonable countrate with calsystem tungsten lamp {no long exposure times}, science priority of the filter, overall coverage of UVIS wavelength regime, and slot location in the wheel. Exposures will be taken in the default full-frame, four-amp, unbinned readout mode.This proposal corresponds to the spare lamp portion of SS SMOV activity ID: WF09b

  7. The hydrophobic character of nonsulfide mineral surfaces as influenced by double-bond reactions of adsorbed unsaturated collector species

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    A unique in-situ sampling technique has been developed which allowed for real-time analysis of surfactant adsorption processes on mineral single crystals. This technique couples FT-IR spectroscopy and internal reflection spectroscopy (FT-IR/IRS) and the mineral single crystal is referred to as a reactive'' internal reflect element (IRE). The single crystal is reactive in the sense that the adsorption occurs directly upon the surface of the IRE, which also serves to transmit IR electromagnetic radiation. The in-situ FT-IR/IRS method was previously demonstrated for the fluorite (CaF{sub 2})/oleate flotation system. Information obtained from this system included adsorption density (from mid- and near-infrared spectra), adsorption state and reactivity of adsorbed collector, and alkyl chain conformational analysis. In the second budget period, similar analyses have been performed for three other mineral systems. These systems are as follows: Insoluble Oxides: sapphire ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})/sodium dodecylsulfate; Soluble Salts: sylvite (KCl)/n-octylamine; and Semisoluble Salts: calcite (CaCO{sub 3})/sodium oleate and fluorite (CaF{sub 2})/sodium oleate.

  8. Effects of water hardness and existence of adsorbent on toxic surface tension of surfactants for aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Oya, Masaru; Orito, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Yusuke; Iizuka, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the effectiveness of surface tension on surfactants risk assessment. gamma(tox) was defined as surface tension at a point where acute aquatic toxicity of a surfactant emerges. Oryzias latipes, Daphnia magna, and Podocopida were used for acute aquatic toxicity test of 7 surfactants and 3 detergents. Gamma(tox)values were plotted on surface tension curves, and the effect of water hardness on toxicity and surface tension were examined. Results showed that gamma(tox) varies greatly by kind of surfactant or detergent. Therefore, aquatic toxicity cannot only be explained by surface tension. The change of aquatic toxicity with varying water hardness, however, could be explained by the change of surface tension. Aquatic toxicity of LAS (Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonate) increased and aquatic toxicity of SOAP decreased with an increase of water hardness, but both gamma(tox), values were constant. Aquatic toxicity was decreased by an addition of mud soil as adsorbent into surfactant solution. The toxicity change can be explained by the surface tension since gamma(tox) value of solution with and without mud soil were equal. These results showed that the change of aquatic toxicity of a surfactant caused by water property, such as water hardness, could be explained by the change of surface tension. PMID:17898487

  9. Study of Hg(II) species removal from aqueous solution using hybrid ZnCl2-MCM-41 adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raji, F.; Pakizeh, M.

    2013-10-01

    A novel ZnCl2-MCM-41 adsorbent was prepared by method of solvent dispersion in toluene and characterized using XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, FTIR and TGA techniques. The synthesized ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent possessed high specific surface area (602.3 m2 g-1), narrow pore size distribution (2.37 nm) and total pore volume (0.46 cm3 g-1). The hybrid sorbent was applied for the removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution under different experimental conditions by varying contact time, initial concentration of Hg(II), pH, presence of interfering ions and solution temperature. It was found that amount of Hg(II) sorption increased with enhancement of Hg(II) initial concentration, contact time and pH but decreased as the temperature increased. Optimum conditions obtained were 20 °C, pH 10 and contact time of 30 min. Effects of foreign anions and cations on Hg(II) removal were studied and it was found that chloride ion affected strongly on adsorption. For experimental data the Langmuir isotherm showed a better fit and maximum adsorption capacity was obtained 204.1 mg g-1 for an initial concentration range 2-50 mg L-1. From the D-R isotherm, the mean free energy was calculated as 9.128 kJ mol-1 indicating that the sorption of Hg(II) was taken place by chemical reaction.

  10. Phthalocyaninato complexes with peripheral alkylthio chains: disk-like adsorbate species for the vertical anchoring of ligands on gold surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Siemeling, Ulrich; Schirrmacher, Christian; Glebe, Ulrich; Bruhn, Clemens; Baio, Joe E.; Árnadóttir, Líney; Castner, David G.; Weidner, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Thin metalorganic films were prepared on gold by self-assembly of thioether-functionalised phthalocyaninato complexes from solution. The phthalocyaninato ligands used contain eight peripheral, β-positioned, alkylthio substituents SR (1a: R = n-C8H17, 1b: R = n-C12H25), which serve as headgroups for surface binding and promote lateral assembly, while the disk-like phthalocyaninato core offers the scope for the attachment of axial ligands to the adsorbed molecules. This process was mimicked by coordination of pyridine (Py) to [Zn(1a)] and [Zn(1b)], respectively. The crystal structures of the products [Zn(1a)(Py)] and [Zn(1b)(Py)] were determined. The crystal structures of 4,5-bis(octylthio)phthalodinitrile and 4,5-bis(dodecylthio)phthalodinitrile were also determined. The films fabricated from [Mn(1a)Cl] and [Mn(1b)Cl] on gold were characterised by XPS, ToF-SIMS and NEXAFS spectroscopy, which revealed the presence of well-defined and homogeneous self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), whose constituents are bound to the substrate by thioether–gold linkages. The orientation of the macrocycles is predominantly parallel to the surface. Strong electronic interaction of the manganese(III) centre with the substrate leads to Cl loss upon adsorption and its reduction to MnII. PMID:21857743

  11. Characterization of UVIS traps with CI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbi, Elena

    2013-10-01

    The charge transfer efficiency {CTE} of the WFC3/UVIS channel is declining as damage from radiation is accumulating. The impact of CTE losses on scientific data can be mitigated by removing the charge-trailing at pixel level. This program is designed to identify and characterize the traps responsible for the charge losses and to monitor the grouth of the trap number with time.

  12. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-10-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U(VI

  13. Ion-imprinted silica adsorbent modified diffusive gradients in thin films technique: Tool for speciation analysis of free lead species.

    PubMed

    Sui, Dian-Peng; Chen, Hua-Xia; Liu, Lin; Liu, Ming-Xuan; Huang, Cong-Cong; Fan, Hong-Tao

    2016-02-01

    A new diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) device, using Pb(II) ion-imprinted silica (IIS) as the binding agents and commercial cellulose acetate dialysis (CAD) membrane as the diffusion layer (CAD/IIS-DGT), has been developed and evaluated for sampling and measurement of free Pb(II) species. The CAD/IIS-DGT devices were successfully applied to the measurement of free Pb(II) species in synthetic solutions, in natural freshwaters and in industrial wastewaters. The CAD/IIS-DGT provides reliable results over pH range of 4.5-6.5 and a wide range of ionic strength from 1.0×10(-3) to 0.7 mol L(-1). The concentrations of the free Pb(II) species in synthetic solution containing different concentrations of ligands measured by CAD/IIS-DGT showed a good agreement with the value measured by Pb-ion selective electrode. Field deployments of the CAD/IIS-DGT devices allowed accurate measurements of the concentrations of free Pb(II) species. PMID:26653451

  14. U(VI) behaviour in hyperalkaline calcite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kurt F.; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Swinburne, Adam N.; Bots, Pieter; Shaw, Samuel; Natrajan, Louise S.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.; Livens, Francis R.; Morris, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of U(VI) in hyperalkaline fluid/calcite systems was studied over a range of U(VI) concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM to 42.0 μM) and in two high pH systems, young and old synthetic cement leachate in batch sorption experiments. These systems were selected to be representative of young- (pH 13.3) and old-stage (pH 10.5) leachate evolution within a cementitious geological disposal facility. Batch sorption experiments, modelling, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electron microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering and luminescence spectroscopy were used to define the speciation of U(VI) across the systems of study. At the lowest concentrations (5.27 × 10-5 μM 232U(VI)) significant U removal was observed for both old and young cement leachates, and this was successfully modelled using a first order kinetic adsorption modelling approach. At higher concentrations (>4.20 μM) in the young cement leachate, U(VI) showed no interaction with the calcite surface over an 18 month period. Small angle X-ray scattering techniques indicated that at high U concentrations (42.0 μM) and after 18 months, the U(VI) was present in a colloidal form which had little interaction with the calcite surface and consisted of both primary and aggregated particles with a radius of 7.6 ± 1.1 and 217 ± 24 Å, respectively. In the old cement leachate, luminescence spectroscopy identified two surface binding sites for U(VI) on calcite: in the system with 0.21 μM U(VI), a liebigite-like Ca2UO2(CO3)3 surface complex was identified; at higher U(VI) concentrations (0.42 μM), a second binding site of undetermined coordination was identified. At elevated U(VI) concentrations (>2.10 μM) in old cement leachate, both geochemical data and luminescence spectroscopy suggested that surface mediated precipitation was controlling U(VI) behaviour. A focused ion beam mill was used to create a section across the U(VI) precipitate-calcite interface. Transmission electron

  15. Release of contaminant U(VI) from soils

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zuoping; Wan, Jiamin

    2003-08-20

    The retention, mobility, and bio-availability of U(VI) incontaminated soils depend strongly on release of U(VI). Laboratory batchexperiments were performed to evaluate the factors controlling therelease of U(VI) from contaminated soil at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. We foundthat the ionic strength of the extraction solution strongly affectsrelease of U(VI). Increase in ionic strength shows a strong effect onU(VI) release as indicated by the increase in release rates andassociated release of U(VI) concentrations. We also found that the ratioof solution volume to solid mass (V/M) has a significant impact on therelease of U(VI). Increase in the V/M ratio shows a negligible effect onthe U(VI) release over a 4-day period. However, at Day 30 and Day 120,larger V/M ratios cause greater U(VI) release. The maximum U(VI)concentrations observed in the release experiments are in the range ofschoepite estimated under conditions relevant to the experiments,suggesting that schoepite solubility primarily controls the U(VI)release, but that solubilization and desorption effects cannot bedistinguished using macroscopic methods.

  16. ADSORPTION AND TRANSPORT OF U(VI) IN SUBSURFACE MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    U(VI) adsorption and transport in three natural, heterogeneous subsurface media were investigated in batch and column experiments. The rate of U(VI) adsorption to the natural samples was rapid over the first few hours of the experiments, and then slowed appreciably after twenty-f...

  17. Rate-limited U(VI) desorption during a small-scale tracer test in a heterogeneous uranium-contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Hay, Michael B.; Conrad, Mark E.; Campbell, Kate M.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.

    2012-05-01

    A tracer test was performed at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site to assess the effect of addition of bicarbonate on U(VI) desorption from contaminated sediments in the aquifer and to compare equilibrium and rate-limited reactive transport model descriptions of mass transfer limitations on desorption. The tracer test consisted of injection of a 37 mM NaHCO3solution containing conservative tracers followed by down-gradient sampling of groundwater at various elevations and distances from the point of injection. Breakthrough curves show that dissolved U(VI) concentrations increased 1.2-2.6-fold above background levels, resulting from increases in bicarbonate alkalinity (from injectate solution) and Ca concentrations (from cation exchange). In general, more U(VI) was mobilized in shallower zones of the aquifer, where finer-grained sediments and higher solid phase U content were found compared to deeper zones. An equilibrium-based reactive transport model incorporating a laboratory-based surface complexation model derived from the same location predicted the general trends in dissolved U(VI) during the tracer test but greatly overpredicted the concentrations of U(VI), indicating that the system was not at equilibrium. Inclusion of a multirate mass transfer model successfully simulated the nonequilibrium desorption behavior of U(VI). Local sediment properties such as sediment texture (weight percent <2 mm), surface area, cation exchange capacity, and adsorbed U(VI) were heterogeneous at the meter scale, and it was important to incorporate these values into model parameters in order to produce accurate simulations.

  18. Characterization of silver-kaolinite (AgK): an adsorbent for long-lived (129)I species.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Sivachidambaram; Rao, Sudhakar M

    2016-01-01

    Bentonite is a preferred buffer and backfill material for deep geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). Bentonite does not retain anions by virtue of its negatively charged basal surface. Imparting anion retention ability to bentonite is important to enable the expansive clay to retain long-lived (129)I (iodine-129; half-life = 16 million years) species that may escape from the HLW geological repository. Silver-kaolinite (AgK) material is prepared as an additive to improve the iodide retention capacity of bentonite. The AgK is prepared by heating kaolinite-silver nitrate mix at 400 °C to study the kaolinite influence on the transition metal ion when reacting at its dehydroxylation temperature. Thermo gravimetric-Evolved Gas Detection analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy and electron probe micro analysis indicated that silver occurs as AgO/Ag2O surface coating on thermally reacting kaolinite with silver nitrate at 400 °C. PMID:27026839

  19. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  20. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P. L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2012-06-01

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  1. Haloes Seen In UVIS Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Bradley, E.; Colwell, J.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-10-01

    UVIS SOI reflectance spectra show bright ‘haloes’ around the locations of some of the strongest resonances in Saturn’s A ring (Esposito etal 2005). UV spectra constrain the size and composition of the icy ring particles (Bradley etal 2010, 2012). We investigate the Janus 4:3, 5:3, 6:5 and Mimas 5:3 inner Lindblad resonances as well as at the Mimas 5:3 vertical resonance (bending wave location). Models of ring particle regolith evolution (Elliott and Esposito 2010) indicate the deeper regolith is made of older and purer ice. The strong resonances cause streamline crowding (Lewis and Stewart 2005) which damps the interparticle velocity, allowing temporary clumps to grow, which in turn increase the velocity, eroding the clumps and releasing smaller particles and regolith (see the predator-prey model of Esposito etal 2012). This cyclic behavior, driven by the resonant perturbation from the moon, can yield collision velocities greater than 1m/sec, sufficient to erode the aggregates (Blum 2006), exposing older, purer materials. Thus, the radial location of the strongest resonances can be where we find both large aggregates and disrupted fragments, in a balance maintained by the periodic moon forcing. If this stirring exposes older, and purer ice, the velocity threshold for eroding the aggregates can explain why only the strongest Lindblad resonances show haloes. UVIS spectra can determine the relative contributions of particle size and purity at these locations, for comparison to estimates from the regolith evolution models.

  2. The hydrophobic character of nonsulfide mineral surfaces as influenced by double-bond reactions of adsorbed unsaturated collector species. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    The primary goal of this research is to improve the flotation efficiency of nonsulfide mineral systems by establishing the fundamental features of collector adsorption reactions and developing appropriate chemical control strategies. In situ real-time FR-IR/IRS measurements, nonequilibrium electrophoresis, vacuum flotation, contact-angle goniometry, and laser Raman spectroscopy have been used to accomplish this goal. These experimental techniques have led to the determination of important information concerning collector adsorption phenomena in each nonsulfide mineral system. For example, the demonstration of polymerization of adsorbed unsaturated surfactant species has added a new dimension to semi-soluble salt flotation chemistry and may have more general utility. Furthermore, refinement of the in situ FT-IR/IRS analysis has been accomplished particularly for the examination of surfactant aggregation phenomena at nonsulfide mineral surfaces. Finally, the significance of the lattice ion hydration theory has been demonstrated by nonequilibrium electrophoretic mobility measurements, and the new results will provide a better basis for the understanding of soluble-salt flotation phenomena.

  3. Role of U(VI) Adsorption in U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter Species.

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-03-09

    Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms.

  4. Influence of magnetite stoichiometry on U(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Gorski, Christopher A; Boyanov, Maxim I; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Kemner, Kenneth M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-01-17

    Hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) can be reduced enzymatically by various microbes and abiotically by Fe(2+)-bearing minerals, including magnetite, of interest because of its formation from Fe(3+) (oxy)hydroxides via dissimilatory iron reduction. Magnetite is also a corrosion product of iron metal in suboxic and anoxic conditions and is likely to form during corrosion of steel waste containers holding uranium-containing spent nuclear fuel. Previous work indicated discrepancies in the extent of U(VI) reduction by magnetite. Here, we demonstrate that the stoichiometry (the bulk Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ratio, x) of magnetite can, in part, explain the observed discrepancies. In our studies, magnetite stoichiometry significantly influenced the extent of U(VI) reduction by magnetite. Stoichiometric and partially oxidized magnetites with x ≥ 0.38 reduced U(VI) to U(IV) in UO(2) (uraninite) nanoparticles, whereas with more oxidized magnetites (x < 0.38) and maghemite (x = 0), sorbed U(VI) was the dominant phase observed. Furthermore, as with our chemically synthesized magnetites (x ≥ 0.38), nanoparticulate UO(2) was formed from reduction of U(VI) in a heat-killed suspension of biogenic magnetite (x = 0.43). X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy results indicate that reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is coupled to oxidation of Fe(2+) in magnetite. The addition of aqueous Fe(2+) to suspensions of oxidized magnetite resulted in reduction of U(VI) to UO(2), consistent with our previous finding that Fe(2+) taken up from solution increased the magnetite stoichiometry. Our results suggest that magnetite stoichiometry and the ability of aqueous Fe(2+) to recharge magnetite are important factors in reduction of U(VI) in the subsurface. PMID:22148359

  5. Astrometric Correction for WFC3/UVIS Lithographic-Mask Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhurina-Platais, V.; Hammer, D.; Dencheva, N.; Hack, W.

    2013-07-01

    Observations of the central field in Cen taken with large dither patterns and over a large range of HST roll-angles exposed through F606W UVIS filter hav e been used to examine the lithographic-mask pattern imprinted on the WFC3/UVIS detec tor during the manufacturing process. This detector defect introduces fine-scale astrome tric errors at the level of about 0.2 pixel with a complicated spatial structure across the WFC3/ UVIS CCD chips. The fine-scale solution was utilized to construct a 2-D look-up table for co rrection of the WFC3/UVIS lithographic-mask pattern. The astrometric errors due to th is detector defect have been cor- rected down to the ~ 0.05 pixel level. The derived 2-D look-up table can be interpol ated at any point in the WFC3/UVIS image by ST software DrizzlePac / AstroDrizzle. The main results of these calibrations are: 1) new polynomial coefficien ts of geometric distortion for 14 calibrated UVIS filters in the form of Instrument Distortion Co rrection Table (IDCTAB file) were improved to account for the lithographic-mask pattern i n the WFC3/UVIS detector; 2) new derived look-up table in the form of a D2IMFILE, which sig nificantly improves (30-60%) the fine-scale structure in the WFC3/UVIS geometric distorti on; 3) geometric distortion cou- pled with the D2IMFILE and new improved IDCTAB can now be succ essfully corrected to the precision level of ~ 0.05 pixel (2 mas) for the UVIS detector.

  6. Experimental and Modeling Study of Sorption-Retarded U(VI) Diffusion in a Hanford Silt/Clay Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Liu, C.; Ball, W. P.

    2008-12-01

    Two types of "inward-flux" diffusion cell systems immersed in finite- and infinite- volume liquid systems were designed to study U(VI) diffusion in a silt/clay size Hanford sediment material at pH 8.0 (±0.1) and in equilibrium with calcite solids and atmospheric CO2. U(VI) concentrations at the cell boundaries were monitored during the cell operation, and the spatial profiles of U(VI) concentrations in both the pore water and the solid phase in the cell media were measured at the end of the cell operation. Results show that while sorption equilibrium was maintained in the "infinite-volume" cell system, strong non-equilibrium occurred in the cells of the "finite-volume" systems, where desorption from solids near the cell-solution interface was important. Rate limitations to sorption and desorption were also independently measured in batch sorption and desorption experiments. A distributed first-order rate model was applied to model U(VI) sorption/desorption kinetics in the batch and the two types of diffusion cell systems. Sensitivity analysis on the modeling confirmed that local equilibrium of sorption was reasonably valid for the infinite-volume system, but less valid for the finite-volume case, presumably because of the greater importance of desorption, and/or the lower U(VI) in the finite-volume system. With proper accounting for non-equilibrium sorption, both types of cells provided good experimental measure of effective diffusion rates. The use of tritiated water (HTO) tracer provided independent measurement of the tortuosity factor, allowing calculation of molecular diffusion coefficients for the dominant U(VI) species, principally Ca2(UO2)(CO3)30 and Ca(UO2)(CO3)32-.

  7. Cryogenic Laser Induced U(VI) Fluorescence Studies of a U(VI) Substituted Natural Calcite: Implications to U(VI) Speciation in Contaminated Hanford Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; McKinley, James P.; Smith, Steven C.

    2005-04-14

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and imaging spectromicroscopy (TRLFISM) were used to examine the chemical speciation of uranyl in contaminated subsurface sediments from the Hanford Site, Washington. Spectroscopic measurements for contaminant U(VI) were compared to those from a natural, uranyl-bearing calcite (NUC) that had been found via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to include uranyl in the same coordination environment as calcium (1). Spectral deconvolution of TRLFS measurements on the NUC revealed the unexpected presence of two distinct chemical environments consistent with published spectra of U(VI)-substituted synthetic calcite and aragonite. Apparently, some U(VI) substitution sites in calcite distorted to exhibit a local, more energetically favorable aragonite structure. TRLFS measurements of the Hanford sediments were similar to the NUC in terms of peak positions and intensity, despite a small CaCO3 content (<0.1 to 3.2 mass%). Spectral deconvolution of the sediment measurements also revealed the presence of U(VI) in calcite and aragonite structural environments. TRLFISM measurements at multiple locations in the different sediments displayed only minor variation indicating a uniform speciation pattern. Collectively, the measurements implied that waste U(VI), long-resident beneath the sampled disposal pond (32 y), had co-precipitated within newly formed carbonates. These results have major implications for the solubility and fate of the contaminated U(VI).

  8. Spectroscopic study on the role of TiO{sub 2} in the adsorption of Eu(III) and U(VI) on silica surfaces in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Hee-Jung Park, Kyoung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Enhanced adsorption of Eu(III) and U(VI) onto TiO{sub 2}-coated silica. • Enhanced Eu(III) luminescence and lifetime on TiO{sub 2}-coated silica. • Energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} of TiO{sub 2}-coated silica to Eu(III) in solutions. - Abstract: To determine the effects of TiO{sub 2} on the adsorption of actinides onto mineral surfaces in groundwater, silica was partially coated with TiO{sub 2}, and Eu(III) and U(VI) were individually adsorbed from separate 0.1 mM concentration solutions. The TiO{sub 2}-coated silica showed higher Eu(III) and U(VI) adsorption capacities for increasing amounts of TiO{sub 2} coated on the silica surfaces, and thus the existence of TiO{sub 2} can decrease the mobility of Eu(III) and U(VI) contaminants. In luminescence studies, it was found that TiO{sub 2} considerably enhanced the luminescence of the adsorbed Eu(III) indicating that TiO{sub 2}–Eu(III) forms surface complexes which may decrease the number of water molecules at the inner sphere of Eu(III), but this was not observed for U(VI). An energy transfer from the TiO{sub 2} to the Eu(III) was confirmed in this case of amorphous TiO{sub 2}-coated silica in Eu(III) solutions, and an increase of the luminescence lifetime of Eu(III) for increasing concentrations of coated TiO{sub 2} was also observed.

  9. The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Fanbing; Cheng, Yangjian; Lin, Zhang; Guan, Xiong

    2015-10-30

    The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains was investigated in the present work. Our data showed that the bacteria isolated from uranium mine possessed highly accumulation ability to U(VI), and the maximum accumulation capacity was around 400 mg U/g biomass (dry weight). X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analyzes indicated that the U(VI) was adsorbed on the bacterial surface firstly through coordinating with phosphate, CH2 and amide groups, and then needle-like amorphous uranium compounds were formed. With the extension of time, the extracellular crystalline substances were disappeared, but some particles were appeared in the intracellular region, and these particles were characterized as tetragonal-uramphite. Moreover, the disrupted experiment indicated that the cell-free extracts had better uranium-immobilization ability than cell debris. Our findings provided the understanding of the uranium transformation process from amorphous uranium to crystalline uramphite, which would be useful in the regulation of uranium immobilization process. PMID:26026850

  10. Upper Atmospheric Density Retrievals from UVIS Dayglow Observations of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Evans, J. S.; Ajello, J. M.; Bradley, E. T.; Meier, R. R.; Westlake, J. H.; Waite, J. H.

    2012-10-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan’s dayside limb on multiple occasions between 2007-2012. The airglow observations reveal the same variety of EUV (600-1150 λ) and FUV (1150-1900 λ) emissions arising from photoelectron impact and photofragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N2) on Earth. Through spectral analysis we extract radiance profiles for each set of UVIS limb emissions in the EUV and FUV, which are attenuated by methane (CH4). Using a terrestrial airglow model adapted to Titan, we derive the N2 and CH4 density profiles using the prescribed solar irradiance for the relevant Cassini orbit and compare the calculated radiance profiles directly with observations. We find that the Titan airglow can be explained by solar driven processes to within the uncertainties of the UVIS observations. Fluctuations in the observed airglow between flybys suggest compositional changes in the background atmosphere. The source of these compositional changes is not yet known, although the interaction of Titan with Saturn’s magnetosphere has been implicated as an important contributing factor. Here we use unique UVIS airglow observations over Titan’s disk to quantify compositional fluctuations with latitude and local time. We furthermore compare N2 and CH4 densities retrieved from the UVIS airglow to in situ observations by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and discuss how the UVIS and INMS variations may be related to Titan’s varying plasma environment.

  11. Kinetics of Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase U(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong Hun; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-10-01

    Sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH ?1.5H2O) was used to assess the kinetics of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) by a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. The bioreduction kinetics was studied with Na-boltwoodite in suspension or within alginate beads. Concentrations of U(VI)tot and cell number were varied to evaluate the coupling of U(VI) dissolution, diffusion, and microbial activity. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 6.8 buffered with PIPES. Microscopic and spectroscopic analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) collectively indicated that solid phase U(VI) was first dissolved and diffused out of grain interiors before it was reduced on bacterial surfaces and/or within the periplasm. The kinetics of solid phase U(VI) bioreduction was well described by a coupled model of bicarbonate-promoted dissolution of Na-boltwoodite, intraparticle uranyl diffusion, and Monod type bioreduction kinetics with respect to dissolved U(VI) concentration. The results demonstrated the intimate coupling of biological, chemical, and physical processes in microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI).

  12. Cassini UVIS Observations Show Active Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L.; Colwell, J. E.; UVIS Team

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) is part of the remote sensing payload of the NASA/ESA Cassini spacecraft. This spectrograph includes channels for extreme UV and far UV spectroscopic imaging, high speed photometry of stellar occultations, solar EUV occultation, and a hydrogen/deuterium absorption cell. We report our initial results from UVIS observations of Saturn's rings. Dynamic interactions between neutrals, ions, rings, moons and meteoroids produce a highly structured and time variable Saturn system Oxygen in the Saturn system dominates the magnetosphere. Observed fluctuations indicate close interactions with plasma sources. Stochastic events in the E ring may be the ultimate source. The spectral signature of water ice is seen on Phoebe and in Saturn's rings. Water ice is mixed non-uniformly with darker constituents. The high structure of the UV ring reflectance argues that collisional transport dominates ballistic transport in darkening the rings. Our preliminary results support the idea that rings are recycled fragments of moons: the current processes are more important than history and initial conditions. The spectra along the UVIS SOI radial scan indicate varying amounts of water ice. In the A ring, the ice fraction increases outward to a maximum at the outer edge. This large-scale variation is consistent with initially pure ice that has suffered meteoritic bombardment over the age of the Solar system (Cuzzi and Estrada 1998). We also see variations over scales of 1000 - 3000 km, which cannot be explained by this mechanism. Ballistic transport of spectrally neutral extrinsic pollutants from meteoroids striking the rings has a typical throw distance of 6000 km (Durisen et al 1989), too long to explain this finer structure. We propose a class of smaller renewal events, in which a small moon residing within the rings is shattered by an external impactor (Colwell and Esposito 1993, Barbara and Esposito 2002, Esposito and Colwell 2003). The

  13. Identification of Simultaneous U(VI) Sorption Complexes and U(IV) Nanoprecipitates on the Magnetite (111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, David M.; Chatman, Shawn M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2012-05-10

    Sequestration of uranium (U) by magnetite is a potentially important sink for U in natural and contaminated environments. However, molecular-scale controls that favor U(VI) uptake including both adsorption of U(VI) and reduction to U(IV) by magnetite remain poorly understood, in particular, the role of U(VI)-CO{sub 3}-Ca complexes in inhibiting U(VI) reduction. To investigate U uptake pathways on magnetite as a function of U(VI) aqueous speciation, we performed batch sorption experiments on (111) surfaces of natural single crystals under a range of solution conditions (pH 5 and 10; 0.1 mM U(VI); 1 mM NaNO{sub 3}; and with or without 0.5 mM CO{sub 3} and 0.1 mM Ca) and characterized surface-associated U using grazing incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GI-EXAFS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the absence of both carbonate ([CO{sub 3}]T, denoted here as CO{sub 3}) and calcium (Ca), or in the presence of CO{sub 3} only, coexisting adsorption of U(VI) surface species and reduction to U(IV) occurs at both pH 5 and 10. In the presence of both Ca and CO{sub 3}, only U(VI) adsorption (VI) occurs. When U reduction occurs, nanoparticulate UO{sub 2} forms only within and adjacent to surface microtopographic features such as crystal boundaries and cracks. This result suggests that U reduction is limited to defect-rich surface regions. Further, at both pH 5 and 10 in the presence of both CO{sub 3} and Ca, U(VI)-CO{sub 3}-Ca ternary surface species develop and U reduction is inhibited. These findings extend the range of conditions under which U(VI)-CO{sub 3}-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction.

  14. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in carbonate and sulfate minerals crystallized from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balboni, Enrica; Morrison, Jessica M.; Wang, Zheming; Engelhard, Mark H.; Burns, Peter C.

    2015-02-01

    . The time-resolved spectra of calcite indicate multiple coordination environments about the uranyl unit, with the spectra of the longer-lived components displaying similarities with uranyl-incorporated aragonite. The luminescence spectrum of uranyl-bearing celestine is consistent with a uranyl unit coordinated by monodentate sulfate groups. Anglesite synthesized in the presence of uranyl shows no luminescence, whereas the spectra of gypsum and cerussite suggest uranyl surface adsorption or precipitation of secondary uranyl minerals on the mineral surfaces. Our findings indicate that geometrical constraints of the Np(V) and U(VI) species in solution, together with the crystallographic steric constraints of the host material, affect preferential uptake in the mineral structures studied. Calcium and strontium appear to be favorable incorporation sites for both U(VI) and Np(V) in aragonite and strontianite. In calcite, Np(V) incorporation is strongly favored over U(VI), whereas in gypsum incorporation of neither actinyl ion occurs. Substitution of actinyl ions was also not observed for lead, in either the carbonate or sulfate minerals studied.

  15. WFC3 SMOV Proposal 11419: UVIS Gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.; Borders, T.

    2009-11-01

    This report summarizes the gain results obtained from the SMOV UVIS Detector Functional program, proposal #11419. Based on internal calibration flatfields, the gain at the nominal 1.5 setting was measured at 1.61, 1.61, 1.63, and 1.62 e-/DN, with errors <0.01 e- /DN, for quadrants A, B, C, and D, respectively. These values are ~3% higher than those measured in ground test images and to date have been stable on-orbit: a preliminary mea- surement of the recent Cycle 17 gain data (proposal 11906, PI Pavlovsky) yielded gains within 1% or better of the SMOV values. The off-nominal gain settings are restricted parameters and unavailable for general use, however, the SMOV proposal obtained data to check these settings on-orbit relative to the nominal 1.5 setting. The values for the off-nominal gains were measured at 1.04, 1.02, 1.04, 1.04 e-/DN and at 2.17, 2.12, 2.17, 2.16 e-/DN for the gain 1.0 and gain 2.0 settings. The exposure times for the gain 4.0 images were erroneously set too low to allow a determination of that setting; the observations were not repeated.

  16. Influence of Mn oxides on the reduction of U(VI) by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Duff, Martine C.; Hunter, David; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2002-09-16

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) enzymatically reduce Fe(III), Mn(III/IV), U(VI), and other polyvalent metals during anaerobic respiration. Previous investigations of the bacterial reduction of U(VI) in the presence of goethite (a-FeOOH) found that, in spite of potential competition as an electron acceptor, goethite had little impact on the bacterial reduction of U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Mn(III/IV) oxides are also electron acceptors for DMRB but are stronger oxidants than Fe(III) oxides. Differences in the solubility of oxidized Mn and U challenges predictions of their biogeochemical behavior during redox cycling. The potential for Mn oxides to modify the biogeochemical behavior of U during reduction by a subsurface bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was investigated using synthetic Mn(III/IV) oxides [pyrolusite ({beta}-MnO{sub 2}), bixbyite (Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and K{sup +}-birnessite (K{sub 4}Mn{sub 14}O{sub 27} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O)]. In the absence of bacteria, pyrolusite and bixbyite oxidized biogenic uraninite (UO{sub 2}(s)) to soluble U(VI) species, with bixbyite being the most rapid oxidant. The Mn(III/IV) oxides lowered the bioreduction rate of U(VI) relative to rates in their absence, or in the presence of gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] added as a non-redox reactive surface. Evolved Mn(II) increased with increasing initial U(VI) concentration in the biotic experiments, indicating that valence cycling of U facilitated the reduction of Mn(III/IV). Despite an excess of the Mn oxide, 43-100% of the initial U was bioreduced after extended incubation. Analysis of thin sections of bacterial-Mn oxide suspensions revealed that the reduced U resided in the periplasmic space of the bacterial cells. In the absence of Mn(III/IV) oxides, UO{sub 2}(s) accumulated as copius fine-grained particles external to the cell. These results indicate that the presence of Mn(III/IV) oxides may impede the biological reduction of U(VI) in subsoils and sediments?.

  17. Proposal for a modification of the UVI risk scale.

    PubMed

    Zaratti, Francesco; Piacentini, Rubén D; Guillén, Héctor A; Cabrera, Sergio H; Liley, J Ben; McKenzie, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    The standardisation of UV information to the public through the UV Index (UVI) has been hugely beneficial since its endorsement by multiple international agencies more than 10 years ago. It has now gained widespread acceptance, and UVI values are available throughout the world from satellite instruments, ground-based measurements, and from forecasts based on model calculations. These have been useful for atmospheric scientists, health professionals (skin and eye specialists), and the general public. But the descriptors and health messages associated with the UVI scale are targeted towards European skin types and UV regimes, and are not directly applicable to the population living closer to the equator, especially for those in the high-altitude Altiplano region of South America. This document arose from discussions at the Latin American Society of Photobiology and Photomedicine's Congress, which was held in Arequipa, Peru, in November 2013. A major outcome of the meeting was the Arequipa Accord, which is intended as a unifying document to ensure co-ordination of UV and health research decisions in Latin America. A plank of that agreement was the need to tailor the UVI scale to make it more relevant to the region and its population. Here we make some suggestions to improve the international applicability of the UVI scale. PMID:24728468

  18. WFC3/UVIS Charge Transfer Efficiency 2009-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.; Gosmeyer, C.; Noeske, K.

    2015-03-01

    Observations of the globular cluster Ω Cen taken with the WFC3/UVIS F606W over a 5-year time period have been used to create a standard astrometric c atalog in the central region of this cluster. The newly created catalog is then used to examine th e linear part of the WFC3/UVIS distortion solution and to search for variations of the astro metric X&Y scale over time. The variations of the X&Y scale over time have been examined with X&Y positions derived from single UVIS drizzled images, based on Kozhurina-Platais (2 014) geometric distortion solution in the form of the reference IDCTAB file for ST software DrizzleP ac/AstroDrizzle and ST OPUS pipe-line. The main results of this examination are: 1) over the 5-year time period of WFC3 operations, the WFC3/UVIS distortion is found to be tim e-independent; 2) there is no sudden or extreme fluctuations in the WFC3/UVIS astrometri c scale; 3) the geometric distortion solution over this period time is accurate at the l evel of ± 2 mas. 5R 2015wfc..rept....3B

  19. Cassini UVIS observations of Titan nightglow spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; West, Robert A.; Gustin, Jacques; Larsen, Kristopher; Stewart, A. Ian F.; Esposito, Larry W.; McClintock, William E.; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; Bradley, E. Todd

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we present the first nightside EUV and FUV airglow limb spectra of Titan showing molecular emissions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed photon emissions of Titan's day and night limb-airglow and disk-airglow on multiple occasions, including during an eclipse observation. The 71 airglow observations analyzed in this paper show EUV (600-1150 Å) and FUV (1150-1900 Å) atomic multiplet lines and band emissions arising from either photoelectron induced fluorescence and solar photo-fragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N2) or excitation by magnetosphere plasma. The altitude of the peak UV emissions on the limb during daylight occurred inside the thermosphere at the altitude of the topside ionosphere (near 1000 km altitude). However, at night on the limb, a subset of emission features, much weaker in intensity, arise in the atmosphere with two different geometries. First, there is a twilight photoelectron-excited glow that persists with solar depression angle up to 25-30 degrees past the terminator, until the solar XUV shadow height passes the altitude of the topside ionosphere (1000-1200 km). The UV twilight glow spectrum is similar to the dayglow but weaker in intensity. Second, beyond 120° solar zenith angle, when the upper atmosphere of Titan is in total XUV darkness, there is indication of weak and sporadic nightside UV airglow emissions excited by magnetosphere plasma collisions with ambient thermosphere gas, with similar N2 excited features as above in the daylight or twilight glow over an extended altitude range.

  20. Development of magnetic graphene oxide adsorbent for the removal and preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) species from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Rashidi Nodeh, Hamid; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Ali, Imran; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2016-05-01

    New-generation adsorbent, Fe3O4@SiO2/GO, was developed by modification of graphene oxide (GO) with silica-coated (SiO2) magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4). The synthesized adsorbent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The developed adsorbent was used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from environmental waters prior to ICP-MS analysis. Fe3O4@SiO2/GO provided high adsorption capacities, i.e., 7.51 and 11.46 mg g(-1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively, at pH 4.0. Adsorption isotherm, kinetic, and thermodynamic were investigated for As(III) and As(V) adsorption. Preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) were studied using magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) method at pH 9.0 as the adsorbent showed selective adsorption for As(III) only in pH range 7-10. MSPE using Fe3O4@SiO2/GO was developed with good linearities (0.05-2.0 ng mL(-1)) and high coefficient of determination (R (2) = 0.9992 and 0.9985) for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) (3× SD/m, n = 3) obtained were 7.9 pg mL(-1) for As(III) and 28.0 pg mL(-1) for As(V). The LOD obtained is 357-1265× lower than the WHO maximum permissible limit of 10.0 ng mL(-1). The developed MSPE method showed good relative recoveries (72.55-109.71 %) and good RSDs (0.1-4.3 %, n = 3) for spring water, lake, river, and tap water samples. The new-generation adsorbent can be used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from water samples successfully. The adsorbent removal for As(III) is better than As(V). PMID:26850098

  1. The hydrophobic character of nonsulfide mineral surfaces as influenced by double-bond reactions of adsorbed unsaturated collector species. Progress report, 15 December 1992--14 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1993-07-01

    Different collector adsorption phenomena including adsorption density, adsorption state, and conformation have been examined for soluble salt, semi-soluble salt and insoluble oxide mineral systems. In the case of the soluble salt system, the influence of crystal lattice defects on the surface charge of KCl and its flotation response was studied. In the case of semi-soluble salt minerals, the behavior of fatty acid collectors adsorbed at the surfaces of calcite and fluorite was determined by in-situ Fourier transform infrared internal reflection spectroscopy (FT-IR/IRS), multichannel laser Raman spectroscopy (MLRS), and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) techniques. Finally, changes in the hydrophobic character of the insoluble oxide mineral surfaces of sapphire and quartz were examined with respect to the aggregative nature of the adsorbed collector phase. A number of papers and presentations were prepared from this research and these contributions are listed at the end of this progress report.

  2. Variability in Saturn's upper atmosphere from Cassini/UVIS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Strobel, D. F.; West, R. A.; Yelle, R. V.

    2015-10-01

    We present new density and temperature profiles based on more than 20 stellar occultations by Saturn's upper atmosphere observed simultaneously by the EUV and FUV channels of the Cassini/UVIS instrument. With these results, more than 40 stellar and solar occultations from Cassini/UVIS [1, 2, 3] and 6 occultations from Voyager/UVS [4] have now been analyzed. The results provide valuable constraints on models of chemistry, dynamics and thermal structure in the upper atmosphere. They are also required to plan for the end of the Cassini mission.

  3. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-06-05

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

  4. Kinetic Desorption and Sorption of U(VI) During Reactive Transport in a Contaminated Hanford Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Qafoku, Odeta; Smith, Steven C.

    2005-05-12

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate U(VI) desorption and sorption kinetics in a sand-textured, contaminated (22.7 µmol kg-1) capillary fringe sediment that had experienced long-term exposure to U(VI). The clay fraction mineralogy of the sediment was dominated by montmorillonite, muscovite, vermiculite, and chlorite. Saturated column experiments were performed under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of the Hanford site where uranyl–carbonate and calcium–uranyl–carbonate complexes dominate aqueous speciation. A U(VI) free solution was used to study U(VI) desorption in columns where different flow rates were applied. Uranium(VI) sorption was studied after the desorption of labile contaminant U(VI) using different U(VI) concentrations in the leaching solution. Strong kinetic behavior was observed for both U(VI) desorption and sorption. Although U(VI) is semi–mobile in mildly alkaline, calcareous subsurface environments, our results showed substantial U(VI) sorption, significant retardation during transport, and atypical breakthrough curves with extended tailing. A distributed rate model was applied to describe the effluent data and to allow comparisons between the desorption rate of contaminant U(VI) with the rate of short-term U(VI) sorption. Desorption was the slower process. Our results suggest that U(VI) release and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer system from which the sediment was obtained are kinetically controlled.

  5. The effect of temperature on the speciation of U(VI) in sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

    2008-09-15

    Sulfate, one of the inorganic constituents that could be present in the nuclear waste repository, forms complexes with U(VI) and affects its migration in the environment. Results show that the complexation of U(VI) with sulfate is enhanced by the increase in temperature. The effect of temperature on the complexation and speciation of U(VI) in sulfate solutions is discussed.

  6. Operational Definitions and Implementation of WFC3 UVIS Subarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupie, O.; Robinson, M.; Welty, A.; Baggett, W.; McKinney, M.

    2002-12-01

    This technical memo describes the implementation of WFC3 UVIS channel subarrays. The capability described herein allows for both user-defined subarrays and a set of fixed subarray apertures. The precedent and experience for such an implementation are the ACS and STIS instruments.

  7. Transient F Ring Dust Features in Cassini UVIS Solar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. M.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Attree, N.; Murray, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from an investigation of the variable particle size distribution in Saturn's dynamic F ring. We analyze 13 solar occultations observed by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS), of which 4 occultations show a clear signature of diffracted sunlight. The magnitude and scattering angle of the diffraction signal suggest the presence of a significant population of micron-sized dust particles; however, the lack of a detection of diffracted light in other solar occultations implies that such a population is transient or spatially variable. Initial comparisons with images from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) suggest that a diffraction signal is detected in UVIS occultations that coincide with a recent collisional event in the F ring core, as seen in the ISS images. This implies that such events release a significant population of dust, which can then be measured by the diffraction signature in the UVIS data. We use a forward-modeling approach to place constraints on the particle size distribution of the F ring during each solar occultation. We present these measurements of the size distribution and our comparisons of the F ring dust population as measured by UVIS with the ISS images of the ring.

  8. Improvement of the Valencia region ultraviolet index (UVI) forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, I.; Marín, M. J.; Pastor, F.; Estrela, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    The CEAM Foundation (Valencia, Spain) has developed an operational ultraviolet index (UVI) forecasting system based on the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model. The main objective of this system is to provide the general public with a tool to minimize the impact of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which can cause important human health problems. The system presented in this paper has been developed in collaboration with the Environment Department of the Regional Government of Valencia, and it replaces the one running until 2007. The new system substitutes the previously used Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) observed data with the total ozone column data forecasted from the Global Forecasting System (GFS) model. This has allowed the forecasting period to be increased from only 1 day in the original system to 3 days, with daily updates. The UVI forecast presented herein uses maps to show the hourly daytime evolution of the UV index on selected locations as well as the maximum UVI expected in the area of interest for the following 3 days (D, D+1, and D+2). The locations selected correspond to measurement stations equipped with erythemal radiation instruments. The UVI forecast information, the erythemal radiation experimental data, and other outreach information are supplied to the public through both the CEAM Meteorology and Climatology Program Web page and the Environment Department of the Regional Government of Valencia Web page.

  9. {sup 129}Xe magic-angle spinning spectra of xenon in zeolite NaA direct observation of mixed clusters of co-adsorbed species.

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, A. K.; Jameson, C. J.; de Dios, A. C.; Oldfield, E.; Gerald, R. E., II; Turner, G. L.; Chemical Engineering; Loyola Univ.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Univ. of Illinois; Spectral Data Services, Inc.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first demonstration that the individual {sup 129}Xe resonances corresponding to Xe{sub n} (n = 1-8) clusters inside the {alpha}-cages of zeolite NaA can be narrowed under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Under these high-resolution conditions we also observe upon addition of Kr the individual peaks corresponding to mixed clusters, Xe{sub n}Kr{sub m}, inside the a-cages, which will allow the first direct determination of the distribution of co-adsorbates in a microporous solid. Under MAS the chemical shifts of the Xe{sub n} clusters are shown to be highly sensitive to 'disorder' in the zeolite and provides new, quantitative information about the presence of {alpha}-cages of several types.

  10. Complexation of U(VI) with 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonicAcid (HEDPA) in Acidic to Basic Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W A; Rao, L; Zanonato, P; Garnov, A; Powell, B A; Nash, K L

    2007-01-24

    Complexation of U(VI) with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in acidic to basic solutions has been studied with multiple techniques. A number of 1:1 (UO{sub 2}H{sub 3}L), 1:2 (UO{sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 and -1) and 2:2 ((UO{sub 2}){sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 1, 0 and -1) complexes form, but the 1:2 complexes are the major species in a wide pH range. Thermodynamic parameters (formation constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation) were determined by potentiometry and calorimetry. Data indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with HEDPA is exothermic, favored by the enthalpy of complexation. This is in contrast to the complexation of U(VI) with dicarboxylic acids in which the enthalpy term usually is unfavorable. Results from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and {sup 31}P NMR have confirmed the presence of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:2 U(VI)-HEDPA complexes.

  11. U(VI) reduction at the nano, meso and meter scale: concomitant transition from simpler to more complex biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, H.; Hochella, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Reduction of aqueous hexavalent U(VI) to the sparingly soluble nanoparticulate mineral uraninite [UO2] represents a promising strategy for the in situ immobilization of uranium in contaminated subsurface sediments and groundwater. Studies related to uranium reduction have been extensively carried out at various scales ranging from nano to meso to the meter scale with varying degrees of success. While nanoscale processes involving simple two-electron transfer reactions such as enzymatic microbial U(VI) reduction results in biogenic UO2 formation, mesoscale processes involving minerals and U(VI) are a step up in complexity and have shown varying results ranging from partial uranium reduction to the formation of mixed U(IV)/U(V) species. Although nano- and meso-scale biogeochemical processes have been helpful in predicting the contaminant dynamics at the meter scale, their occurrence is not necessarily apparent in soils and aquifers given the enormous volume of contaminated groundwater to be remediated, among other factors. The formation and long-term stability of biologically reduced uranium at the meter scale is also determined in addition by the complex interplay of aqueous geochemistry, hydrology, soil and sediment mineralogy and microbial community dynamics. For instance, indigenous subsurface microbes often encounter multiple electron acceptors in heterogeneous environments during biostimulation and can catalyze the formation of various reactive biogenic minerals. In such cases, abiotic interactions between U(VI) and reactive biogenic minerals is potentially important because the success of a remediation strategy is contingent upon the speciation of reduced uranium. This presentation will give an overview of uranium reduction ranging from simple nanoscale biological processes to increasingly complex meso and meter scale processes involving abiotic interactions between aqueous uranium and nano-biogenic minerals and the effect of mineralogy and aqueous

  12. Effect of phosphate on U(VI) sorption to montmorillonite: Ternary complexation and precipitation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh S.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated. Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This work

  13. The hydrophobic character of nonsulfide mineral surfaces as influenced by double-bond reactions of adsorbed unsaturated collector species. Progress report, 15 December 1990--14 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    A unique in-situ sampling technique has been developed which allowed for real-time analysis of surfactant adsorption processes on mineral single crystals. This technique couples FT-IR spectroscopy and internal reflection spectroscopy (FT-IR/IRS) and the mineral single crystal is referred to as a ``reactive`` internal reflect element (IRE). The single crystal is reactive in the sense that the adsorption occurs directly upon the surface of the IRE, which also serves to transmit IR electromagnetic radiation. The in-situ FT-IR/IRS method was previously demonstrated for the fluorite (CaF{sub 2})/oleate flotation system. Information obtained from this system included adsorption density (from mid- and near-infrared spectra), adsorption state and reactivity of adsorbed collector, and alkyl chain conformational analysis. In the second budget period, similar analyses have been performed for three other mineral systems. These systems are as follows: Insoluble Oxides: sapphire ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})/sodium dodecylsulfate; Soluble Salts: sylvite (KCl)/n-octylamine; and Semisoluble Salts: calcite (CaCO{sub 3})/sodium oleate and fluorite (CaF{sub 2})/sodium oleate.

  14. CASSINI UVIS STELLAR OCCULTATION OBSERVATIONS OF SATURN's RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. G.; Pettis, D.; Bradley, E. T.; Esposito, L. W.; Sremcevic, M.

    2010-12-15

    The Cassini spacecraft's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) includes a high-speed photometer (HSP) that has observed more than 100 stellar occultations by Saturn's rings. Here, we document a standardized technique applied to the UVIS-HSP ring occultation datasets delivered to the Planetary Data System as higher level data products. These observations provide measurements of ring structure that approaches the scale of the largest common ring particles ({approx}5 m). The combination of multiple occultations at different viewing geometries enables reconstruction of the three-dimensional structure of the rings. This inversion of the occultation data depends on accurate calibration of the data so that occultations of different stars taken at different times and under different viewing conditions can be combined to retrieve ring structure. We provide examples of the structure of the rings as seen from several occultations at different incidence angles to the rings, illustrating changes in the apparent structure with viewing geometry.

  15. HST/WFC3: Improvements to the UVIS Dark Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Baggett, Sylvia M.; WFC3 Team

    2016-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS detector, comprised of two e2v CCDs, exhibits an inherent dark current (in the absence of any illumination) presently measured at ~7 e-/hr and increasing at ~1 e-/hr/yr. Additionally, detector degradation due to on-orbit radiation damage generates a continuously increasing though small population of hot pixels (dark current exceeding 54 e-/hr, currently ~4% of each chip). We present the results of the WFC3/UVIS dark calibration, which provides calibration files used as a correction for these detector characteristics. We also discuss the impacts that Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses and detector post-flashing have on the hot pixel population, as well as various improvements to the calibration procedure that were introduced in the CALWF3 v3.3 pipeline.

  16. The WFC3/UVIS Reference Files : 2. Biases and Darks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, A. R.; Baggett, S.; Bushouse, H.; Sabbi, E.

    2008-09-01

    Bias and dark reference files for the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS flight detector were assembled from ground data acquired in the final thermal vacuum campaign at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). These represent the first generation of reference files for the UVIS channel and will serve to calibrate the on-orbit data from the early phase of the fourth Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV4). In this report, we present our methodology for assembling the bias and dark reference data, tabulate the resulting reference files, and discuss their overall features. We also discuss the assignment of their data quality flags. The most up-to-date reference files are available on the STScI WFC3 Web site.

  17. Importance of c-Type cytochromes for U(VI) reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Coppi, Maddalena V; Korenevsky, Anton A; DiDonato, Laurie N; Sullivan, Sara A; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Leang, Ching; Butler, Jessica E; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lovley, Derek R

    2007-01-01

    Background In order to study the mechanism of U(VI) reduction, the effect of deleting c-type cytochrome genes on the capacity of Geobacter sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI) with acetate serving as the electron donor was investigated. Results The ability of several c-type cytochrome deficient mutants to reduce U(VI) was lower than that of the wild type strain. Elimination of two confirmed outer membrane cytochromes and two putative outer membrane cytochromes significantly decreased (ca. 50–60%) the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI). Involvement in U(VI) reduction did not appear to be a general property of outer membrane cytochromes, as elimination of two other confirmed outer membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcC, had very little impact on U(VI) reduction. Among the periplasmic cytochromes, only MacA, proposed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane to the periplasm, appeared to play a significant role in U(VI) reduction. A subpopulation of both wild type and U(VI) reduction-impaired cells, 24–30%, accumulated amorphous uranium in the periplasm. Comparison of uranium-accumulating cells demonstrated a similar amount of periplasmic uranium accumulation in U(VI) reduction-impaired and wild type G. sulfurreducens. Assessment of the ability of the various suspensions to reduce Fe(III) revealed no correlation between the impact of cytochrome deletion on U(VI) reduction and reduction of Fe(III) hydroxide and chelated Fe(III). Conclusion This study indicates that c-type cytochromes are involved in U(VI) reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The data provide new evidence for extracellular uranium reduction by G. sulfurreducens but do not rule out the possibility of periplasmic uranium reduction. Occurrence of U(VI) reduction at the cell surface is supported by the significant impact of elimination of outer membrane cytochromes on U(VI) reduction and the lack of correlation between periplasmic uranium accumulation and the capacity for uranium reduction

  18. Revisiting Uvis Observations of the Enceladus Water Vapor Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) onboard Cassini spacecraft observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume and separate jets emitting from the southern pole of Enceladus [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume. These observations provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument. Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) are used to model the plume of Enceladus including an option to add multiple jet sources to the general background plume. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. Jet sources can differ in production rate and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along Tiger stripes [Porco et al. 2014]. We applied the spatial distribution of the sources observed by ISS in our models. The output of the models are the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densitioes derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets.

  19. The Composition and Structure of Enceladus' Plume from a Cassini UVIS Observation of a Solar Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Shemansky, D. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, I.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed an occultation of the sun by Enceladus’ water vapor plume on May 18, 2010. UVIS used its extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channel for this new observation, to detect absorptions in the wavelength range 55 to 110 nm. Molecular nitrogen and water vapor have absorptions in this range. The N2 b(3,0) line is at 97.2 nm, extinguishing the solar H Lyman gamma emission. Cassini’s Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) detected a species with an atomic mass of 28 amu, which could be CO, C2H4 or N2 [1, 2]. Definitive UVIS detection of N2 was important to clear up this ambiguity, and this was an important goal of the observation, as the presence or lack of N2 is key to models of the geochemistry in the interior [3, 4, 5]. UVIS did not detect N2 and we set an upper limit for the column density of 3 x 10^13 cm^-2. The absorption features in the spectrum are best fit by a water vapor column density of 0.9 x 10^16 cm^-2. This column density is in family with previous UVIS measurements from stellar occultations in 2005 and 2007 at far ultraviolet wavelengths, suggesting that Enceladus’ activity has been stable for the last 5 years [6, 7]. We used fluctuations in the signal to probe the structure of the gas jets again, as was analyzed in the 2007 occultation of zeta Orionis [7]. Gas jets are correlated to the dust jets detected by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem [8]. The path of the sun cut through the jets horizontally at an altitude above the limb of ~15 km at the closest point. The resolution of the solar occultation is higher than the stellar occultation, and collimation of the gas jets observed in the solar occultation is greater than estimated in 2007. The observed collimation allows us to derive a mach number of ~4 for the ratio of the vertical velocity in the jet to the thermal velocity of the plume gas. The new opportunity afforded by this solar occultation is used to further model the structure and

  20. Reaction of U-VI with titanium-substituted magnetite: Influence of Ti on U-IV speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Latta, Drew; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2013-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent uranium (UVI) to less soluble tetravalent uranium (UIV) through enzymatic or abiotic redox reactions has the potential to alter U mobility in subsurface environments. As a ubiquitous natural mineral, magnetite (Fe3O4) is of interest because of its ability to act as a rechargeable reductant for UVI. Natural magnetites are often impure with titanium, and structural Fe3+ replacement by TiIV yields a proportional increase in the relative Fe2+ content in the metal sublattice to maintain bulk charge neutrality. In the absence of oxidation, the Ti content sets the initial bulk Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio (R). Here, we demonstrate that Ti-doped magnetites (Fe3 xTixO4) reduce UVI to UIV. The UVI-Fe2+ redox reactivity was found to be controlled directly by R, but was otherwise independent of Ti content (xTi). However, in contrast to previous studies with pure magnetite where UVI was reduced to nanocrystalline uraninite (UO2), the presence of structural Ti (xTi = 0.25 0.53) results in the formation of UIV species that lack the bidentate U-O2-U bridges of uraninite. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic analysis indicated that the titanomagnetite-bound UIV phase has a novel UIV-Ti binding geometry, different from the coordination of UIV in the mineral brannerite (UIVTi2O6). The observed UIV-Ti coordination at a distance of 3.43 Å suggests a binuclear corner-sharing adsorption/incorporation UIV complex with the solid phase. Furthermore, we explored the effect of oxidation (decreasing R) and solids-to-solution ratio on the reduced UIV phase. The formation of the non-uraninite UIV-Ti phase appears to be controlled by availability of surface Ti sites, rather than R. Our work highlights a previously unrecognized role of Ti in the environmental chemistry of UIV and suggests that further work to characterize the long-term stability of UIV phases formed in the presence of Ti is warranted.

  1. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  2. Green approach for ultratrace determination of divalent metal ions and arsenic species using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and mercapto-modified graphene oxide nanosheets as a novel adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Sitko, Rafal; Janik, Paulina; Zawisza, Beata; Talik, Ewa; Margui, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi

    2015-03-17

    A new method based on dispersive microsolid phase extraction (DMSPE) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) is proposed for multielemental ultratrace determination of heavy metal ions and arsenic species. In the developed methodology, the crucial issue is a novel adsorbent synthesized by grafting 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on a graphene oxide (GO) surface. Mercapto-modified graphene oxide (GO-SH) can be applied in quantitative adsorption of cobalt, nickel, copper, cadmium, and lead ions. Moreover, GO-SH demonstrates selectivity toward arsenite in the presence of arsenate. Due to such features of GO-SH nanosheets as wrinkled structure and excellent dispersibility in water, GO-SH seems to be ideal for fast and simple preconcentration and determination of heavy metal ions using methodology based on DMSPE and TXRF measurement. The suspension of GO-SH was injected into an analyzed water sample; after filtration, the GO-SH nanosheets with adsorbed metal ions were redispersed in a small volume of internal standard solution and deposited onto a quartz reflector. The high enrichment factor of 150 allows obtaining detection limits of 0.11, 0.078, 0.079, 0.064, 0.054, and 0.083 ng mL(-1) for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), As(III), Cd(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Such low detection limits can be obtained using a benchtop TXRF system without cooling media and gas consumption. The method is suitable for the analysis of water, including high salinity samples difficult to analyze using other spectroscopy techniques. Moreover, GO-SH can be applied to the arsenic speciation due to its selectivity toward arsenite. PMID:25707847

  3. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  4. Kinetic desorption and sorption of U(VI) during reactive transport in a contaminated Hanford sediment.

    PubMed

    Qafoku, Nikolla P; Zachara, John M; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L; Qafoku, Odeta S; Smith, Steven C

    2005-05-01

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate U(VI) desorption and sorption kinetics in a sand-textured, U(VI)-contaminated (22.7 micromol kg(-1)) capillary fringe sediment from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. Saturated column experiments were performed under mildly alkaline conditions representative of the Hanford site where uranyl-carbonate and calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes dominate aqueous speciation. A U(VI)-free solution was used to study contaminant U(VI) desorption in columns where different flow rates were applied. Sorbed, contaminant U(VI) was partially labile (11.8%), and extended leaching times and water volumes were required for complete desorption of the labile fraction. Uranium-(VI) sorption was studied after the desorption of labile, contaminant U(VI) using different U(VI) concentrations in the leaching solution. Strong kinetic effects were observed for both U(VI) sorption and desorption, with half-life ranging from 8.5 to 48.5 h for sorption and from 39.3 to 150 h for desorption. Although U(VI) is semi-mobile in mildly alkaline, subsurface environments, we observed substantial U(VI) adsorption, significant retardation during transport, and atypical breakthrough curves with extended tailing. A distributed rate model was applied to describe the effluent data and to allow comparisons between the desorption rate of contaminant U(VI) with the rate of shortterm U(VI) sorption. Desorption was the slower process. We speculate that the kinetic behavior results from transport or chemical phenomena within the phyllosilicate-dominated fine fraction present in the sediment. Our results suggest that U(VI) release and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer system from which the sediment was obtained are kinetically controlled. PMID:15926566

  5. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-05

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  6. U(VI) Reduction in Sulfate-Reducing Subsurface Sediments Amended with Ethanol or Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Brandon J.; Wu, Tao; Findlay, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted with subsurface sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the potential for reduction of U(VI) under sulfate-reducing conditions with either ethanol or acetate as the electron donor. The results showed extensive U(VI) reduction in sediments supplied with either electron donor, where geochemical and microbiological analyses demonstrated active sulfate reduction. PMID:23624470

  7. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, J.; Haggerty, R.; Stoliker, D.L.; Kent, D.B.; Istok, J.D.; Greskowiak, J.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  9. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation / Biobarriers- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Wood

    2007-01-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides represent some of the most challenging remediation problems confronting the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. In situ remediation of these contaminants by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been proposed as a potential cost effective remediation strategy. The primary focus of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the fluxes of electron acceptors, electron donors, and other species can be controlled to maximize the transfer of reductive equivalents to the aqueous and solid phases. The proposed research is unique in the NABIR portfolio in that it focuses on (i) the role of flow and transport in the initiation of biostimulation and the successful sequestration of metals and radionuclides [specifically U(VI)], (ii) the subsequent reductive capacity and stability of the reduced sediments produced by the biostimulation process, and (iii) the potential for altering the growth of biomass in the subsurface by the addition of specific metabolic uncoupling compounds. A scientifically-based understanding of these phenomena are critical to the ability to design successful bioremediation schemes. The laboratory research will employ Shewanella putrefaciens (CN32), a facultative DMRB that can use Fe(III) oxides as a terminal electron acceptor. Sediment-packed columns will be inoculated with this organism, and the reduction of U(VI) by the DMRB will be stimulated by the addition of a carbon and energy source in the presence of Fe(III). Separate column experiments will be conducted to independently examine: (1) the importance of the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by biogenic Fe(II); (2) the influence of the transport process on Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization, with emphasis on methods for controlling the fluxes of aqueous species to maximize uranium reduction; (3) the reductive capacity of biologically-reduced sediments (with respect to re-oxidation by convective fluxes of O2 and NO3-) and

  10. Influence of Dynamical Conditions on the Reduction of UVI at the Magnetite-Solution Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Boily, Jean F.; Buck, Edgar C.; Skomurski, Frances N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Bargar, John R.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2010-01-14

    The heterogeneous reduction of UVI to UIV by ferrous iron is a potentially key process influencing the fate and transport of U in the environment. The reactivity of both sorbed and structural FeII has been studied for numerous substrates, including magnetite. The results from UVI-magnetite experiments have been variable, ranging from no reduction to clear evidence for the formation of UIV. In this contribution, we used XAS and high resolution (+cryogenic) XPS to study the interaction of UVI with nano-particulate magnetite. The results indicated that UVI was partially reduced to UV with no evidence of UIV. However, thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed-valence U phases with average oxidation states below (V) should have been stable, indicating that the system was not in redox equilibrium. A reaction pathway that involves incorporation of U and stabilization of UV and UVI in secondary phases is invoked to explain the observations.

  11. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-07-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  12. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  13. WFC3/UVIS Dark Current Calibration and Detector Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Biretta, John A.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Anderson, Jay; MacKenty, John W.; WFC3 Team

    2015-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument that was installed during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. The WFC3/UVIS detector, comprised of two e2v CCDs, exhibits an inherent dark current (in the absence of any illumination) presently measured at ~6 e-/hr. In addition, detector degradation due to on-orbit radiation damage generates a continuously increasing though small population of hot pixels (dark current exceeding 54 e-/hr, ~4% of each chip) as well as 'sink' pixels (pixels which contain a large number of charge traps). We present the procedures and results of the WFC3/UVIS dark calibration, which provides calibration files used as a correction for these detector characteristics. We discuss the impacts that Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses and detector post-flashing have on the hot pixel population and overall calibration, as well as the plans for flagging the 'sink' pixels in the calibration pipeline. Finally, we discuss various improvements to the calibration procedure that will increase the accuracy of dark current and hot pixel measurements.

  14. Effects of Bacillus subtilis on the reduction of U(VI) by nano-Fe0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Sun, Yubing; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-09-01

    The effects of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis, a typical model bacterium) on the reduction of U(VI) by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nano-Fe0) were investigated using batch techniques. The reaction products were analysed using spectroscopic techniques, and a kinetics model was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of U(VI) reduction by nano-Fe0. The presence of B. subtilis enhanced the U(VI) sorption rate at pH 3.5-9.5 but inhibited the reduction rate of U(VI) to U(IV) at pH > 4.5. According to the FTIR and XRD analysis, the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was inhibited due to the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes between the oxygen-containing functional groups of B. subtilis or extracellular polymeric substances with the Fe(II)/Fe(III) generated by nano-Fe0, which blocked electron transport from the Fe0 core to U(VI). Based on the EXAFS analysis, a fitting of U-Fe shell at ∼3.44 Å revealed inner-sphere bidentate complexes between uranyl and the oxide film of nano-Fe0. For the nano-Fe0 + B. subtilis system, the U-Fe shell (at ∼3.44 Å) and the U-C/P shell (at ∼2.90 Å) further indicated the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes. The kinetics model supported that U(VI) reduction was triggered by U(VI) sorption on the oxide shell of nano-Fe0. The XPS and XANES analyses showed that reductive precipitation was the main mechanism of U(VI) removal by nano-Fe0, whereas the sorption process dominated the removal of U(VI) in the presence of B. subtilis, which was further demonstrated by TEM images.

  15. CTR diffraction and grazing-incidence EXAFS study of U(VI) adsorption onto α-Al 2O 3 and α-Fe 2O 3 (11¯02) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Trainor, Thomas P.; Eng, Peter J.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2005-07-01

    Evaluation of the long-term health risks of uranium contamination in soils, sediments, and groundwater requires a fundamental understanding of the various processes affecting subsurface transport of uranium, including adsorption processes at mineral/water interfaces. In this study, the sites of binding and surface complexation of U(VI) adsorbed on the (11¯02) surfaces of α-Al 2O 3 and α-Fe 2O 3 have been determined using crystal truncation rod (CTR) diffraction and grazing incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) spectroscopy. The available binding sites on the (11¯02) surfaces were constrained through bond valence and steric analyses. On both surfaces, U(VI) forms uranyl-carbonato ternary complexes to surface oxygens that are singly coordinated to aluminum or iron. On the α-Al 2O 3 (11¯02) surface, a monodentate complex results, whereas on the α-Fe 2O 3 (11¯02) surface, the binding is bidentate to adjacent singly coordinated oxygen sites (i.e., binuclear). Differences in protonation of the singly coordinated oxygen atoms, surface charging, U(VI) aqueous speciation, substrate structure, or the electronic structure of surface functional groups may be the cause of these differences in adsorption geometry. Both XPS and CTR diffraction reveal higher U(VI) surface coverages on the α-Fe 2O 3 (11¯02) surface than on the α-Al 2O 3 (11¯02) surface. This difference cannot be the result of differences in defect concentration alone as CTR diffraction is not sensitive to U(VI) sorbed to defect sites, implying that the α-Fe 2O 3 (11¯02) surface has an intrinsically higher affinity for U(VI). The surface complexes observed in this study are different from the bidentate, mononuclear complexes typically derived for U(VI) on powdered aluminum- and iron-(oxyhydr)oxides and clay minerals using U L III-edge EXAFS spectroscopy. However, the presence of monodentate, mononuclear and bidentate, binuclear complexes may have been overlooked in past EXAFS

  16. Interaction of CPR5 with Cell Cycle Regulators UVI4 and OSD1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhilong; Hua, Jian

    2014-01-01

    The impact of cell cycle on plant immunity was indicated by the enhancement of disease resistance with overexpressing OSD1 and UVI4 genes that are negative regulators of cell cycle controller APC (anaphase promoting complex). CPR5 is another gene that is implicated in cell cycle regulation and plant immunity, but its mode of action is not known. Here we report the analysis of genetic requirement for the function of UVI4 and OSD1 in cell cycle progression control and in particular the involvement of CPR5 in this regulation. We show that the APC activator CCS52A1 partially mediates the function of OSD1 and UVI4 in female gametophyte development. We found that the cpr5 mutation suppresses the endoreduplication defect in the uvi4 single mutant and partially rescued the gametophyte development defect in the osd1 uvi4 double mutant while the uvi4 mutation enhances the cpr5 defects in trichome branching and plant disease resistance. In addition, cyclin B1 genes CYCB1;1, CYCB1;2, and CYCB1;4 are upregulated in cpr5. Therefore, CPR5 has a large role in cell cycle regulation and this role has a complex interaction with that of UVI4 and OSD1. This study further indicates an intrinsic link between plant defense responses and cell cycle progression. PMID:24945150

  17. Comparing approaches for simulating the reactive transport of U(VI) in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, G.P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The reactive transport of U(VI) in a well-characterized shallow alluvial aquifer at a former U(VI) mill located near Naturita, CO, was predicted for comparative purposes using a surface complexation model (SCM) and a constant K d approach to simulate U(VI) adsorption. The ground water at the site had U(VI) concentrations that ranged from 0.01 to 20 ??M, alkalinities that ranged from 2.5 to 18 meq/L, and a nearly constant pH of 7.1. The SCM used to simulate U(VI) adsorption was previously determined independently using laboratory batch adsorption experiments. Simulations obtained using the SCM approach were compared with simulations that used a constant K d approach to simulate adsorption using previously determined site-specific K d values. In both cases, the ground water flow and transport models used a conceptual model that was previously calibrated to a chloride plume present at the site. Simulations with the SCM approach demonstrated that the retardation factor varied temporally and spatially because of the differential transport of alkalinity and dissolved U(VI) and the nonlinearity of the U(VI) adsorption. The SCM model also simulated a prolonged slow decline in U(VI) concentration, which was not simulated using a constant K d model. Simulations using the SCM approach and the constant K d approach were similar after 20 years of transport but diverged significantly after 60 years. The simulations demonstrate the need for site-specific geochemical information on U(VI) adsorption to produce credible simulations of future transport. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  18. The effect of Paecilomyces catenlannulatus on removal of U(VI) by illite.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengbo; Gao, Zhimou; Li, Xiaoyu; Fang, Lejin

    2014-11-01

    The effect of Paecilomyces catenlannulatus (P. catenlannulatus) on removal of U(VI) onto illite as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, and solution concentration was conducted by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics indicated that the removal of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus can be fitted by pseudo-second order kinetic model very well. The removal of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus increased with increasing pH from 1.0 to 7.0, whereas the decrease of U(VI) adsorption on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus was observed at pH > 7.5. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus can be simulated by the double diffuse model under various pH conditions. The ionic strength-dependent experiments showed that the removal of U(VI) on illite was outer-sphere surface complexation, whereas the inner-sphere surface complexation predominated the U(VI) adsorption onto illite coated P. catenlannulatus at pH 5.0-7.0. The maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus calculated from Langmuir model at pH 5.0 and T = 298 K was 46.729 and 54.347 mg/g, respectively, revealing enhanced adsorption of U(VI) on illite coated P. catenlannulatus. This paper highlights the effect of microorganism on the removal of radionuclides from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution management. PMID:24998746

  19. The effect of organic and inorganic aqueous uranium speciation on U(VI) bioavailability to an aquatic invertebrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C.; Croteau, M. N.; Campbell, K. M.; Cain, D.; Aiken, G.

    2015-12-01

    Growing world-wide demand for uranium (U) as an energy source has raised concerns of the human and ecological risks of U extraction and processing in the United States. Because of limited information on the relationship between U speciation and bioavailability, particularly in aquatic animals, we are characterizing U uptake by a model freshwater invertebrate (the snail Lymnaea stagnalis). This species grazes on biofilms and is thus key in the trophic transfer of contaminants through aquatic food webs. We determined the bioavailability of dissolved U(VI) over a range of water hardness, pH (6 to 8), and the presence of dissolved natural organic matter (NOM) as a competing ligand, to test the effect of aqueous speciation on uptake. Bioavailability was assessed using U uptake rate constants (kuw) derived from a kinetic bioaccumulation model. Dissolved U (1 to 1000 nM) was bioavailable over the range of geochemical conditions tested with kuw (L/g/d) decreasing with increasing dissolved Ca and with increasing pH. For example, kuw decreased from 1.6 to 0.3 as dissolved Ca was increased from 0.04 to 1.5 mM, suggesting competition between bioavailable U(VI) species and strong ternary calcium uranyl carbonato complexes. At pH 7.5 in synthetic moderately hard freshwater, kuw decreased from 0.22 in the absence of NOM to 0.07 in the presence of a hydrophobic acid NOM isolate of high aromaticity (SUVA = 5) consistent with strong aqueous complexation of U(VI) by the NOM. The co-variance of U uptake and aqueous U species distribution is being analyzed to determine which U species are bioavailable. U speciation in systems with NOM is calculated using conditional U-NOM binding constants derived by equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange methodology. The bioavailability of dietborne U is being tested since dietary metal uptake prevails for many aquatic species. These experiments include addition of ferrihydrite with U sorbed, both in the presence and absence of NOM, and mixed with diet.

  20. HST WFC3/UVIS: charge transfer efficiency monitoring and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia M.; Sosey, Megan L.; Anderson, Jay; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; Bajaj, Varun; Khandrika, Harish G.; Martlin, Catherine; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Sabbi, Elena; WFC3 Team

    2016-01-01

    The harsh low-earth orbit environment is known to damage CCD devices and the HST WFC3/UVIS camera is no exception. One consequence of the radiation damage is charge-transfer efficiency (CTE) loss over time. We summarize the level of the CTE losses, the effect on science data, and the pre- and post-observation mitigation options available. Among them is the pixel-based CTE correction, which has been incorporated into the HST automatic data processing pipeline. The pipeline now provides both standard and CTE-corrected data products; observers with older data can re-retrieve their images via the the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to obtain the new products.

  1. Solution thermodynamics and structures of biscatecholamide complexes of Fe(III) and U(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Gohdes, J.W.; Reilly, S.D.; Pecha, A.W.; Neu, M.P.

    1996-12-31

    We have studied the solution and solid-state complexes of a bis-catecholamide ligand, 2-LICAMS, with Fe(III) and U(VI). The first protonation constant was found to be pK{sub al} = 14.2(3) using {sup 1}H NMR titrations. Subsequent protonation constants were determined by potentiometric titration in 0.1 M TMAOTf at 25{degrees}C to be pK{sub a2} = 11.2(1), pK{sub 13} =6.5(1), pK{sub a4}= 5.9(1). Ligand-metal formation constants, {Beta}{sub mlh}, were found to be log {beta}{sub 110} = 31.4(2), log {beta}{sub 111} = 31.7(2), log {beta}{sub 112} = 34.9(2), and log {beta}11.1 = 18.0(1) for uranium(VI). To discriminate between monomeric or dimeric species models which both fit the potentiometric titration data, we isolated the hydroxide species and determined its single-crystal X-ray structure and EXAFS. The structure consists of a dimeric, bis-hydroxide bridged iron core which is spanned by two ligands. This study of solution equilibria indicates a higher stability for iron complexes of 2-LICAMS relative to uranyl complexes.

  2. Aqueous U(VI) interaction with magnetite nanoparticles in a mixed flow reactor system: HR-XANES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidchenko, I.; Heberling, F.; Kvashnina, KO; Finck, N.; Schild, D.; Bohnert, E.; Schäfer, T.; Rothe, J.; Geckeis, H.; Vitova, T.

    2016-05-01

    The redox variations and changes in local atomic environment of uranium (U) interacted with the magnetite nanoparticles were studied in a proof of principle experiment by the U L3 and M4 edges high energy resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure (HR-XANES) technique. We designed and applied a mixed flow reactor (MFR) set-up to maintain dynamic flow conditions during U-magnetite interactions. Formation of hydrolyzed, bi- and poly-nuclear U species were excluded by slow continuous injection of U(VI) (10-6 M) and pH control integrated in the MFR set-up. The applied U HR-XANES technique is more sensitive to minor changes in the U redox states and bonding compared to the conventional XANES method. Major U(VI) contribution in uranyl type of bonding is found in the magnetite nanoparticles after three days operation time of the MFR. Indications for shortening of the U-Oaxial bond length for the magnetite compared to the maghemite system are present too.

  3. Spectrophotometric Investigation of U(VI) Chloride Complexation in the NaCl/NaClO{sub 4} System

    SciTech Connect

    Paviet-Hartmann, P.; Lin, M.R.; Runde, W.H.

    1998-11-30

    Post closure radioactive release scenarios from geologic salt formation, such as the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant)(USA) include hydrologic transport of radionuclides through a chloride saturated aquifer. Consequently, the understanding of actinide solution chemistry in brines is essential for modeling requiring accurate knowledge of the interaction between AnO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and chloride ions. Complexation constants of two U(VI) chloride species, UO{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}{sup 0}, have been intensively studied for about 40 years using different methods. However, large uncertainties reflect the general difficulty in determining accurate stability constants of weak complexes. In order to model the behavior of U(VI) in brines, we studied the formation of its chloride complexes by UV-Vis spectroscopy as a function of the NaCl concentration at 25 C. The experiments were performed at constant ionic strength by varying the concentration ratio of NaCl and NaClO{sub 4}. Deconvolution resulted in single component absorption spectra for UO{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}{sup 0}. The apparent stability constants of UO{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}{sup 0} are at different ionic strengths and the experimental data are used to parameterize using the SIT approach.

  4. A spectroscopic study on U(VI) biomineralization in cultivated Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms isolated from granitic aquifers.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk-Bärsch, Evelyn; Lütke, Laura; Moll, Henry; Bok, Frank; Steudtner, Robin; Rossberg, André

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between the Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilm and U(VI) were studied using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In EXAFS studies, the formation of a stable uranyl phosphate mineral, similar to autunite (Ca[UO2]2[PO4]2•2-6H2O) or meta-autunite (Ca[UO2]2[PO4]2•10-12H2O) was observed. This is the first time such a biomineralization process has been observed in P. fluorescens. Biomineralization occurs due to phosphate release from the cellular polyphosphate, likely as a cell's response to the added uranium. It differs significantly from the biosorption process occurring in the planktonic cells of the same strain. TRLFS studies of the uranium-contaminated nutrient medium identified aqueous Ca2UO2(CO3)3 and UO2(CO3)3 (4-) species, which in contrast to the biomineralization in the P. fluorescens biofilm, may contribute to the transport and migration of U(VI). The obtained results reveal that biofilms of P. fluorescens may play an important role in predicting the transport behavior of uranium in the environment. They will also contribute to the improvement of remediation methods in uranium-contaminated sites. PMID:25318416

  5. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-12-31

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination.

  6. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2015-01-28

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  7. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  8. Ultraviolet irradiation induces autofluorescence enhancement via production of reactive oxygen species and photodecomposition in erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xian; Pan, Leiting; Wang, Zhenhua; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Xinzheng; Rupp, Romano A.; Xu, Jingjun

    2010-06-11

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has a significant influence on human health. In this study, human erythrocytes were exposed to UV light to investigate the effects of UV irradiation (UVI) on autofluorescence. Our results showed that high-dose continuous UVI enhanced erythrocyte autofluorescence, whereas low-dose pulsed UVI alone did not have this effect. Further, we found that H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, one type of reactive oxygen species (ROS), accelerated autofluorescence enhancement under both continuous and pulsed UVI. In contrast, continuous and pulsed visible light did not result in erythrocyte autofluorescence enhancement in the presence or absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Moreover, NAD(P)H had little effect on UVI-induced autofluorescence enhancement. From these studies, we conclude that UVI-induced erythrocyte autofluorescence enhancement via both UVI-dependent ROS production and photodecomposition. Finally, we present a theoretical study of this autofluorescence enhancement using a rate equation model. Notably, the results of this theoretical simulation agree well with the experimental data further supporting our conclusion that UVI plays two roles in the autofluorescence enhancement process.

  9. Study of sorption-retarded U(VI) diffusion in Hanford silt/clay material.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Liu, Chongxuan; Ball, William P

    2009-10-15

    A diffusion cell method was applied to measure the effective pore diffusion coefficient (Dp) for U(VI) under strictly controlled chemical conditions in a silt/clay sediment from the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site, WA. "Inward-flux" diffusion studies were conducted in which [U(VI)] in both aqueous and solid phases was measured as a function of distance in the diffusion cell under conditions of constant concentration at the cell boundaries. A sequential extraction method was developed to measure sorbed contaminant U(VI) in the solid phase containing extractable background U(VI). The effect of sorption kinetics on U(VI) interparticle diffusion was evaluated by comparing sorption-retarded diffusion models with sorption described either as equilibrium or intraparticle diffusion-limited processes. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that (1) a single pore diffusion coefficient can simulate the diffusion of total aqueous U(VI), and (2) the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) is appropriate for modeling sorption-retarded diffusion under the given experimental conditions. Dp of 1.6-1.7 x 10(-6) cm2/s was estimated in aqueous solution at pH 8.0 and saturated with respect to calcite, as relevant to some subsurface regions of the Hanford site. PMID:19921882

  10. Aerosol properties in Titan's upper atmosphere from UVIS airglow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Koskinen, Tommi; Royer, Emilie; Rannou, Pascal; West, Robert A.

    2015-11-01

    Multiple Cassini observations reveal that the abundant aerosol particles in Titan's atmosphere are formed at high altitudes, particularly in the thermosphere [1]. They subsequently fall towards the lower atmosphere, and in their path, their size, shape, and population change in reflection to the variable atmospheric conditions.Although multiple observations can help us retrieve information for the aerosol properties in the lower atmosphere [2], we have limited knowledge for their properties in the altitude range between their formation region in the thermosphere, and the upper region of the main haze layer. UVIS is one of a few instruments that can probe this part of the atmosphere and allow for the retrieval of the aerosol properties.Here we analyze observations of atmospheric airglow that demonstrate the signature of N2 emissions and light scattering from aerosol particles, at different altitudes above 500 km [3]. We fit these observations with a combined model of N2 airglow [4] and atmospheric scattering by gases and aerosols that allows us to separate the pure scattering component and retrieve the aerosol size (distribution) and density. We particularly focus on observations from the T32 flyby that probed high southern latitudes in 2007 and combine good altitude resolution with high signal to noise ratio. We combine these with observations at different phase angles and observing geometry conditions (nadir vs. limb) in order to set better constraints on the aerosol properties.Our preliminary results demonstrate an increase in the average particle size with decreasing altitude in the atmosphere, from about 10 nm at 800 km to ~50 nm at 500 km, and an extinction profile at 185 nm wavelength, similar to the profile derive from UVIS occultation measurements at lower latitudes [5].[1] Lavvas et al. 2013. PNAS, doi/10.1073/pnas.1217059110, and references therein.[2] Tomasko et al. 2008, PSS, 56, p.669; Bellucci et al. 2009, Icarus 201, p.198[3] Ajello et al. 2008, GRL

  11. Investigation of interaction between U(VI) and carbonaceous nanofibers by batch experiments and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Changlun; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-12-15

    Carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) were synthesized using tellurium nanowires as a template and using glucose as carbon source by the hydrothermal carbonization method. The sorption capacity and mechanism of U(VI) on CNFs were investigated by a combination of batch sorption experiments, the double layer model (DLM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sorption edges were modeled well by considering the following surface complexes: SOUO2(+), SOUO2OH, SOUO2(OH)2(-) and SOUO2(OH)3(2-) on the strong site as well as XOUO2OH and XOUO2(+) on the weak one (S and X represent surface). The sorption isotherms could be well fitted by the DLM parameters. The difference between type A (SOUO2OH and XOUO2OH) and type B (SOUO2(+) and XOUO2(+)) was observed in XPS because the former species are of low binding energy while the latter are of high one. Desorption and recycle experiments showed that CNFs had good reusability and stability in the present of common sodium salts within five rounds. When co-existing with montmorillonite, CNFs could extract the sorbed uranium onto their surface by a pseudo-second order kinetic process. As a new sort of environmental functional nanomaterials, CNFs should be paid more attention in the area of separation and wastewater remediation. PMID:26342973

  12. Characterization of U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments with slow-degrading electron donor source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Watson, D. B.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Earles, J.; Phillips, J.; Kelly, S. D.; Boyanov, M.; Kemner, K. M.; Schadt, C.; Criddle, C. S.; Jardine, P. M.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    In order to select sustainable, high efficiency and cost effective electron donor source, oleate and emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) were tested uranium (VI) reduction in comparison with ethanol in microcosms using uranium contaminated sediments and groundwater from the US DOE Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site. The effect of initial sulfate concentration on U(VI) reduction was also tested. Both oleate and EVO were effective electron donor sources for U(VI) reduction. Accumulation of acetate as a major product and the removal of aqueous U(VI) were observed and were associated with sulfate reduction. Both oleate and EVO supported U(VI) reduction but at slower rates with a comparable but slightly lower extent of reduction than ethanol. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The extent of U(VI) reduction in solid phase was negatively influenced by aqueous calcium concentration. The majority of electrons of the three substrates were consumed by sulfate reduction, Fe(III) reduction, and methanogenesis. Initial U(VI) concentration in the aqueous phase increased with increased sulfate concentration (1 versus 5 mM), likely due to U(VI) desorption from the solid phase. At the higher initial sulfate concentration more U(VI) was reduced and fewer electrons were used in methanogenesis. Analysis of bacterial and archeal populations using 16S rRNA gene libraries showed a significant increase in Deltaproteobacteria after biostimulation. The microbial community structures developed with oleate and EVO were significantly distinct from those developed with ethanol. Bacteria similar to Desulforegula spp. was predominant for oleate and EVO degradation but were not observed in ethanol-amended microcosms. Known U(VI)-reducing bacteria in the microcosms amended with the three electron donor sources included iron(III) reducing Geobacter spp. but in lower abundances than sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio spp. The

  13. Amazon kaolinite functionalized with diethylenetriamine moieties for U(VI) removal: thermodynamic of cation-basic interactions.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Denis L; Leidens, Victor L; Viana, Rúbia R; Airoldi, Claudio

    2010-08-15

    The compound N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine (MPDET) was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface (KLT) by heterogeneous route. The modified and natural kaolinite clay samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), N(2) adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, ion exchange capacities, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of (29)Si and (13)C. The well-defined peaks obtained in the (13)C NMR spectrum in the 5.0-62.1 ppm region confirmed the attachment of organic functional groups as pendant chains bonded into the porous clay. The adsorption of uranyl on natural (KLT) and modified (KLT(MPDET)) kaolinite clays was investigated as a function of the solution pH, metal concentration, temperature, and ionic strength. The ability of these materials to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation at room temperature and pH 4.0. The maximum number of moles adsorbed was determined to be 8.37 x 10(-3) and 13.87 x 10(-3) mmol g(-1) for KLT and KLT(MPDET) at 298 K, respectively. The energetic effects (Delta(int)H, Delta(int)G, and Delta(int)S) caused by metal cations adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations. PMID:20478656

  14. Characterization of the holographic imaging grating of GOMOS UVIS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeffe, Jussi; Saari, Heikki K.; Astola, Heikki; Rainio, Kari; Mazuray, Lorand; Pierot, Dominique; Craen, Pierre; Gruslin, Michel; Lecat, Jean-Herve; Bonnemason, Francis; Flamand, Jean; Thevenon, Alain

    1996-11-01

    A Finnish-French group has proposed an imaging spectrometer- based instrument for the ENVISAT Earth observation satellite of ESA, which yields a global mapping of the vertical profile of ozone and other related atmospheric gases. The GOMOS instrument works by measuring the UV-visible spectrum of a star that is occulting behind the Earth's atmosphere. The prime contractor of GOMOS is Matra Marconi Space France. The focal plane optics are designed and manufactured by Spacebel Instrumentation S.A. and the holographic grating by Jobin-Yvon. VTT Automation, Measurement Technology has participated in the GOMOS studies since 1989 and is presently responsible for the verification tests of the imaging quality and opto-mechanical interfaces of the holographic imaging grating of GOMOS. The UVIS spectrometer of GOMOS consists of a holographic, aberration corrected grating and of a CCD detector. The alignment of the holographic grating needs as an input very accurate knowledge of the mechanical interfaces. VTT Automation has designed, built and tested a characterization system for the holographic grating. This system combines the accurate optical imaging measurements with the absolute knowledge of the geometrical parameters at the accuracy of plus or minus 10 micrometers which makes the system unique. The developed system has been used for two breadboard gratings and the qualification model grating. The imaging quality results and their analysis together with alignment procedure utilizing of the knowledge of mechanical interfaces is described.

  15. The variability of Saturn's thermosphere from Cassini/UVIS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Tommi; Sandel, Bill R.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2014-11-01

    We present temperature and density profiles that we retrieved from 17 stellar occultations obtained by the Cassini UVIS instrument. These results complement our previous analysis of 15 solar occultations by Saturn’s upper atmosphere. We find that the exospheric temperature ranges from 370 K to 550 K, in agreement with our previous results. The temperature appears to increase with latitude from the equator to the poles by 100 - 150 K, a trend that is also evident in the pressure level altitudes that we derive from the data. We also find evidence for the expansion of the thermosphere by about 500 km between 2005 and 2011 at low to mid northern latitudes. This expansion is probably caused by significant warming of the lower thermosphere that anti-correlates with solar activity. We also present a comparison of our results with the newly available reanalysis of the Voyager UVS results (Vervack and Moses, 2014), and discuss the results in the context of energy deposition and dynamics in Saturn’s upper atmosphere.

  16. Global Auroral Energy Deposition Derived from Polar UVI Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Elsen, R.; Parks, G. K.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Germany, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of the transfer of energy and momentum to the ionosphere from the solar wind is one of the main objectives of the ISTP program. Global measurement of auroral energy deposition derived from observations of the longer wavelength LBH band emissions made by the Ultraviolet Imager on the Polar spacecraft is one of the key elements in this satellite and ground-based instrument campaign. These "measurements" are inferred by combining information from consecutive images using different filters and have a time resolution on the average of three minutes and are made continuously over a 5 to 8 hour period during each 18 hour orbit of the Polar spacecraft. The energy deposition in the ionosphere from auroral electron precipitation augments are due to Joule heating associated with field aligned currents. Assuming conjugacy of energy deposition between the two hemispheres the total energy input to the ionosphere through electron precipitation can be determined at high time resolution. Previously, precipitating particle measurements along the tracks of low altitude satellites provided only local measurements and the global energy precipitation could be inferred through models but not directly measured. We use the UVI images for the entire month of January 1997 to estimate the global energy deposition at high time resolution. We also sort the energy deposition into sectors to find possible trends, for example, on the dayside and nightside, or the dawn and dusk sides.

  17. Removal of adsorbed gases with CO2 snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    1991-09-01

    During the outgassing of orbiting astronomical observatories, the condensation of molecular species on optical surfaces can create difficulties for astronomers. The problem is particularly severe in ultraviolet astronomy where the adsorption of only a few atomic layers of some substances can be very damaging. In this paper the removal of adsorbed atomic layers using carbon dioxide snow is discussed. The rate of removal of adsorbed layers of isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF, and deionized distilled water on Teflon substrates was experimentally determined. The removal of fingerprints (containing fatty acids such as stearic acid) from optical surfaces is also demonstrated. The presence and rate of removal of the multilayers was monitored by detecting the molecular dipole field of adsorbed molecular species. For isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF (trichlorotrifluoroethane), and water adsorbed multilayers were removed in under 1.5 seconds. Fingerprint removal was much more difficult and required 20 seconds of spraying with a mixture of carbon dioxide snow flakes and atomized microdroplets of isopropyl alcohol.

  18. Macroscopic and Microscopic Investigation of U(VI) and Eu(III) Adsorption on Carbonaceous Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yubing; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Xiangxue; Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Yu, Shu-Hong; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-04-19

    The adsorption mechanism of U(VI) and Eu(III) on carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated using batch, IR, XPS, XANES, and EXAFS techniques. The pH-dependent adsorption indicated that the adsorption of U(VI) on the CNFs was significantly higher than the adsorption of Eu(III) at pH < 7.0. The maximum adsorption capacity of the CNFs calculated from the Langmuir model at pH 4.5 and 298 K for U(VI) and Eu(III) were 125 and 91 mg/g, respectively. The CNFs displayed good recyclability and recoverability by regeneration experiments. Based on XPS and XANES analyses, the enrichment of U(VI) and Eu(III) was attributed to the abundant adsorption sites (e.g., -OH and -COOH groups) of the CNFs. IR analysis further demonstrated that -COOH groups were more responsible for U(VI) adsorption. In addition, the remarkable reducing agents of the R-CH2OH groups were responsible for the highly efficient adsorption of U(VI) on the CNFs. The adsorption mechanism of U(VI) on the CNFs at pH 4.5 was shifted from inner- to outer-sphere surface complexation with increasing initial concentration, whereas the surface (co)precipitate (i.e., schoepite) was observed at pH 7.0 by EXAFS spectra. The findings presented herein play an important role in the removal of radionuclides on inexpensive and available carbon-based nanoparticles in environmental cleanup applications. PMID:26998856

  19. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  20. Bicarbonate impact on U(VI) bioreduction in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Chris; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al., 2003; Williams et al., 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al., 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer sediments desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ∼3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction in the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in

  1. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gordon E.

    2003-06-01

    In order to apply predictive reactive transport models to the Hanford site, detailed knowledge of the speciation of contaminants is required. Important speciation parameters include: (1) oxidation state; (2) the local molecular structure surrounding contaminant elements; (3) the type and binding of a contaminant ion sorption complex (if adsorbed); (4) the type(s) of phase within which a contaminant is structurally incorporated [e.g., present in a three-dimensional precipitate(s)]; (5) the phase associations of a contaminant; (6) the microscopic distribution of a contaminant within sediments and soils. In the present study, we have used synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopic methods to study the speciation of U and Cu in contaminated soil and sediment samples from the Hanford Site. To complement and complete our initial XAFS investigation of U speciation in contaminated vadose zone sediments below tank BX-102, we have also performed mXRD studies of two sediment sample to identify the specific U(VI)-silicate phase present. Samples from the 300 Area were examined by mSXRF to determine the microscopic distribution and element associations of Cu and U. These samples were also analyzed by U LIII- and Cu K-edge XAFS spectroscopy to determine the chemical speciation of these elements. Conclusions to Date (1) Uranium occurs primarily as sodium-boltwoodite [Na2(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2-3H2O] in the BX-102 sediment samples. (2) The dissolution kinetics of sodium-boltwoodite will be a major control on the future transport of U beneath tank BX-102. (3) In the 300 Area soils and sediments, uranium occurs as U(VI) and copper as Cu(II). (4) U and Cu are often found together or adjacent to one another; however, these elements don?t appear to be spatially associated with Fe. (5) U appears to be bound to carbonate groups, and is likely contained in a CaCO3 mineral (calcite or aragonite). (6) It is unclear what phase(s) Cu is bound to or associate with, although the data are consistent with an

  2. Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2013-09-15

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 μmol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 μmol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 μmol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 μmol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 μmol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

  3. Impact of phosphate on U(VI) immobilization in the presence of goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhas; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2010-11-01

    Past mining, processing, and waste disposal activities have left a legacy of uranium-contaminated soil and groundwater. Phosphate addition to subsurface environments can potentially immobilize U(VI) in-situ through interactions with uranium at mineral-water interfaces. Phosphate can induce the precipitation of low solubility U(VI)-phosphates, and it may enhance or inhibit U(VI) adsorption to iron(III) (oxy)hydroxide surfaces. Such surfaces may also facilitate the heterogeneous nucleation of U(VI)-phosphate precipitates. The interactions among phosphate, U(VI), and goethite (α-FeOOH) were investigated in a year-long series of experiments at pH 4. Reaction time, total U(VI), total phosphate, and the presence and absence of goethite were systematically varied to determine their effects on the extent of U(VI) uptake and the dominant uranium immobilization mechanism. Dissolved U(VI) and phosphate concentrations were interpreted within a reaction-based modeling framework that included dissolution-precipitation reactions and a surface complexation model to account for adsorption. The best available thermodynamic data and past surface complexation models were integrated to form an internally consistent framework. Additional evidence for the uptake mechanisms was obtained using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The formation and crystal growth of a U(VI)-phosphate phase, most likely chernikovite, UO 2HPO 4·4H 2O (s), occurred rapidly for initially supersaturated suspensions both with and without goethite. Nucleation appears to occur homogeneously for almost all conditions, even in the presence of goethite, but heterogeneous nucleation was likely at one condition. The U(VI)-phosphate solids exhibited metastability depending on the TOTU:TOTP ratio. At the highest phosphate concentration studied (130 μM), U(VI) uptake was enhanced due to the likely formation of a ternary surface complex for low (˜1 μM) to intermediate (˜10 μM) TOTU concentrations and

  4. Bioreduction of U(VI) and stability of immobilized uranium under suboxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Ding, De-xin; Li, Shi-mi; Tan, Xiang; Li, Guang-yue; Wang, Yong-dong; Xu, Fei

    2016-04-01

    In order to study the bioreduction of U(VI) and stability of immobilized uranium under suboxic conditions, microcosm were amended with ethanol, lactate and glucose, and incubated under suboxic conditions. During the incubation, total dissolved U in amended microcosms decreased from 0.95 mg/L to 0.03 mg/L. Pyrosequencing results showed that, the proportion of anaerobic microorganisms capable of reducing U(VI) under suboxic conditions was small compared with that under anoxic conditions; the proportion of aerobic and facultative anaerobic microorganisms capable of consuming the dissolved oxygen was large; and some of the facultative anaerobic microorganisms could reduce U(VI). These results indicated that different microbial communities were responsible for the bioreduction of U(VI) under suboxic and anoxic conditions. After the electron donors were exhausted, total dissolved U in the amended microcosms remained unchanged, while the U(VI)/U(IV) ratio in the solid phase of sediments increased obviously. This implied that the performance of bioreduction of the U(VI) can be maintained under suboxic condition. PMID:26854555

  5. A representative retinoid X receptor antagonist UVI3003 induced teratogenesis in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liang; Xu, Ting; Li, Daoji; Zhou, Junliang

    2015-03-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) interfering activity has been detected in different water resources. To study RXR disruptor-induced toxicological effects on vertebrates, embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to a representative RXR antagonist UVI3003. Results showed that the teratogenic index (LC50 /EC50 ) of UVI3003 was as high as 5.4. UVI3003 induced multiple malformations of embryos, including deformed fins, reduced brains, small jaws, bent tails and edema in hearts, the degree of which became more severe with increasing exposure concentration. Although no significant difference was observed in the hatching rates between the exposure group and control, the whole body length was significantly reduced by 6.5% and 8.9% when exposed to 200 and 300 µg l(-1) of UVI3003, respectively. The heart rate also significantly decreased by 8.8-50.2% during exposure. Further experiments revealed that the pharyngula stage was the most sensitive development phase in terms of embryo response to UVI3003. The results demonstrated severe teratogenicity of RXR antagonist in zebrafish embryos and provided important data for ecotoxicological evaluation of RXR antagonists. PMID:25186191

  6. U(VI) Sequestration in Hydroxyapatite Produced by Microbial Glycerol 3-Phosphate Metabolism▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for removal of U(VI) from solution via precipitation of U(VI)-bearing calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) minerals coupled to microbial hydrolysis of glycerol phosphate compounds. We evaluated this process in circumneutral-pH groundwater from Area 2 of the U.S. Department of Energy Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Area 2 groundwater contains high concentrations of dissolved calcium (ca. 4 mM), and thus, release of phosphate during glycerol phosphate metabolism has the potential to create conditions favorable for U(VI) sequestration in Ca-P minerals. Microbial enumeration and isolation studies verified the presence of aerobic and nitrate-reducing glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P)-metabolizing microorganisms in Area 2 sediments. Coprecipitation of U(VI) with Ca-P minerals coupled to microbial G3P hydrolysis was demonstrated in artificial groundwater under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions. Transmission electron microscopy analysis and mineral-washing experiments demonstrated that U(VI) was incorporated into the structure of the insoluble Ca-P mineral hydroxyapatite [Ca5(PO4)3OH]. Our results support the idea that U(VI) can be effectively removed from solution in contaminated aquifers through stimulation of microbial organophosphate metabolism. PMID:19633115

  7. Effects of sulfate ligand on uranyl carbonato surface species on ferrihydrite surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Yuji; Fuller, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding uranium (U) sorption processes in permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are critical in modeling reactive transport for evaluating PRB performance at the Fry Canyon demonstration site in Utah, USA. To gain insight into the U sequestration mechanism in the amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide (AFO)-coated gravel PRB, U(VI) sorption processes on ferrihydrite surfaces were studied in 0.01 M Na2SO4 solutions to simulate the major chemical composition of U-contaminatedgroundwater (i.e., [SO42-]~13 mM L-1) at the site. Uranyl sorption was greater at pH 7.5 than that at pH 4 in both air- and 2% pCO2-equilibrated systems. While there were negligible effects of sulfate ligands on the pH-dependent U(VI) sorption (<24 h) in both systems, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis showed sulfate ligand associated U(VI) surface species at the ferrihydrite–water interface. In air-equilibrated systems, binary and mono-sulfate U(VI) ternary surface species co-existed at pH 5.43. At pH 6.55–7.83, a mixture of mono-sulfate and bis-carbonato U(VI) ternary surface species became more important. At 2% pCO2, there was no contribution of sulfate ligands on the U(VI) ternary surface species. Instead, a mixture of bis-carbonato inner-sphere (38%) and tris-carbonato outer-sphere U(VI) ternary surface species (62%) was found at pH 7.62. The study suggests that the competitive ligand (bicarbonate and sulfate) coordination on U(VI) surface species might be important in evaluating the U solid-state speciation in the AFO PRB at the study site where pCO2 fluctuates between 1 and 2 pCO2%.

  8. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Kinetics and dynamics of oxidation reactions involving an adsorbed CO species on bulk and supported platinum and copper-oxide. First year annual report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, M.P.

    1991-07-01

    The proposed research is an integrated experimental and modeling study of oxidation reactions involving CO as a key player -- be it a reactant, adsorbed intermediate, and/or partial oxidation product -- in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The reaction systems of interest in the project include CO, formaldehyde, and methanol oxidation by O{sub 2} and CO oxidation by NO, on both Pt and copper oxide catalysts. These reactions are of importance in automobile exhaust catalysis. There is a paucity of rate data in the literature for these important environmental control reactions. The goal of this research is to better understand the catalytic chemistry and kinetics of oxidations reactions involving CO as an adsorbed intermediate. Successfully meeting this goal requires an integration of basic kinetic measurements, in situ catalyst surface monitoring, kinetic modeling, and nonlinear mathematical tools.

  10. Pilot-Scale In Situ Bioremediation of Uranium in a Highly Contaminated Aquifer. 2. Reduction of U(VI and Geochemical Control of U(VI) Bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weimin; Carley, Jack M; Gentry, Terry J; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Fienen, Michael; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Yan, Hui; Carroll, Sue L; Pace, Molly; Nyman, Jennifer L; Luo, Jian; Fields, Matthew Wayne; Hickey, Robert; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Cirpka, Olaf; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig

    2006-07-01

    In situ microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to sparingly soluble U(IV) was evaluated at the site of the former S-3 Ponds in Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center, Oak Ridge, TN. After establishing conditions favorable for bioremediation (Wu, et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 3988-3995), intermittent additions of ethanol were initiated within the conditioned inner loop of a nested well recirculation system. These additions initially stimulated denitrification of matrix-entrapped nitrate, but after 2 months, aqueous U levels fell from 5 to {approx}1 {micro}M and sulfate reduction ensued. Continued additions sustained U(VI) reduction over 13 months. X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy (XANES) confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV) within the inner loop wells, with up to 51%, 35%, and 28% solid-phase U(IV) in sediment samples from the injection well, a monitoring well, and the extraction well, respectively. Microbial analyses confirmed the presence of denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and iron-reducing bacteria in groundwater and sediments. System pH was generally maintained at less than 6.2 with low bicarbonate level (0.75-1.5 mM) and residual sulfate to suppress methanogenesis and minimize uranium mobilization. The bioavailability of sorbed U(VI) was manipulated by addition of low-level carbonate (<5 mM) followed by ethanol (1-1.5 mM). Addition of low levels of carbonate increased the concentration of aqueous U, indicating an increased rate of U desorption due to formation of uranyl carbonate complexes. Upon ethanol addition, aqueous U(VI) levels fell, indicating that the rate of microbial reduction exceeded the rate of desorption. Sulfate levels simultaneously decreased, with a corre sponding increase in sulfide. When ethanol addition ended but carbonate addition continued, soluble U levels increased, indicating faster desorption than reduction. When bicarbonate addition stopped, aqueous U

  11. Pilot-scale in situ bioremedation of uranium in a highly contaminated aquifer. 2. Reduction of u(VI) and geochemical control of u(VI) bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Min; Carley, Jack; Gentry, Terry; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A; Fienen, Michael; Mehlhorn, Tonia; Yan, Hui; Caroll, Sue; Pace, Molly N; Nyman, Jennifer; Luo, Jian; Gentile, Margaret E; Fields, Matthew W; Hickey, Robert F; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David; Cirpka, Olaf A; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig S

    2006-06-15

    In situ microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to sparingly soluble U(IV) was evaluated at the site of the former S-3 Ponds in Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center, Oak Ridge, TN. After establishing conditions favorable for bioremediation (Wu, et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 3988-3995), intermittent additions of ethanol were initiated within the conditioned inner loop of a nested well recirculation system. These additions initially stimulated denitrification of matrix-entrapped nitrate, but after 2 months, aqueous U levels fell from 5 to approximately 1 microM and sulfate reduction ensued. Continued additions sustained U(VI) reduction over 13 months. X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy (XANES) confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV) within the inner loop wells, with up to 51%, 35%, and 28% solid-phase U(IV) in sediment samples from the injection well, a monitoring well, and the extraction well, respectively. Microbial analyses confirmed the presence of denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and iron-reducing bacteria in groundwater and sediments. System pH was generally maintained at less than 6.2 with low bicarbonate level (0.75-1.5 mM) and residual sulfate to suppress methanogenesis and minimize uranium mobilization. The bioavailability of sorbed U(VI) was manipulated by addition of low-level carbonate (< 5 mM) followed by ethanol (1-1.5 mM). Addition of low levels of carbonate increased the concentration of aqueous U, indicating an increased rate of U desorption due to formation of uranyl carbonate complexes. Upon ethanol addition, aqueous U(VI) levels fell, indicating that the rate of microbial reduction exceeded the rate of desorption. Sulfate levels simultaneously decreased, with a corresponding increase in sulfide. When ethanol addition ended but carbonate addition continued, soluble U levels increased, indicating faster desorption than reduction. When bicarbonate addition stopped

  12. SERS effect of isonicotinic acid adsorbed on a copper electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Lucia K.; Sala, O.

    1987-11-01

    The surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of isonicotinic acid adsorbed on a copper electrode were obtained in order to verify their dependence on the type of electrolyte solution, pH and applied potential. The results are discussed considering the most characteristic bands of the species (protonated or nonprotonated) in the ring nitrogen and in the carboxylic group. In specifically adsorbed electrolytes (Cl - and mainly I -) the completely protonated species is more stabilized on the electrode surface than it is in non-specifically adsorbed anions (ClO -4), because of the formation of ion pairs with the coadsorbed halide ions. For more negative potentials, even at low pH values, the spectra are characteristic of the nonprotonated species.

  13. A Shape-Based Technique for Aurora Oval Segmentation From UVI Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, C.; Newman, T. S.; Germany, G.

    2005-12-01

    A new shape-based method for segmenting the auroral oval from NASA POLAR Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) data is presented. The POLAR mission has produced millions of UVI images, making automated auroral segmentation a beneficial and critical early processing step in analysis of high-latitude ionosphere-thermopshere-magnetosphere (ITM) coupling using auroral images. Past approaches to automatically or semi-automatically segment the auroral oval from UVI imagery include various types of thresholding, histogram-based K-means, and neural network methods. The existing approaches are generally not robust due to the high noise level, the low level of intensity contrast, and the day glow present in some UVI images. A common shortcoming of existing methods is incomplete detection of the auroral oval for some images. In some cases, existing methods can even fail to detect any part of the oval. The method introduced here is more robust to the challenges of the UVI imagery. Recently, we have demonstrated that the auroral oval's shape in UVI images is well-modelled as an elliptic arc. The segmentation method introduced here exploits this finding; we allow shape knowledge to guide auroral processing. The method involves use of a linear least-squares based shape parameter binning approach that operates on pixels determined from an image-specific thresholding step. The binning approach utilizes a modified randomized Hough Transform scheme that is also fast (faster than conventional binning schemes). The approach treats the inner and outer auroral oval boundaries separately and also incorporates heuristics that allow robust differentiation of appropriate inner and outer boundaries. The new method has been tested on more than 1000 aurora images. Results indicate that the method is highly reliable, even in the presence of high image noise, low contrast, and moderate levels of day glow.

  14. WFC3 SMOV Proposal 11450: The Photometric Performance and Calibration of WFC3/UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalirai, J. S.; MacKenty, J.; Rajan, A.; Baggett, S.; Bohlin, R.; Brown, T.; Deustua, S.; Kimble, R. A.; Riess, A.; Sabbi, E.

    2009-11-01

    We present the photometric calibration of the UVIS camera on WFC3. Following successful instal- lation during Servicing Mission 4, we began a primary calibration program to measure the photo- metric zero points of 37 high priority filters on the UVIS1 CCD. Additional secondary observations obtained as a part of the UVIS Contamination Monitor Program with both UVIS1 and UVIS2 are also analyzed (CAL11426 - Baggett et al. 2009). All measurements are made from a set of high signal-to-noise imaging observations of the white dwarf standards GD 153 (primary program) and GRW+70d5824 (secondary program). We find that the total system throughput of both CCDs is significantly better than expected from the Thermal Vacuum 3 (TV3) testing campaign, with effi- ciency gains of ~10% at the blue and red ends of the spectral coverage, and ~20% near the central wavelength, 5500 Å. Repeat visits in a subset of filters separated by approximately 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month indicate photometric stability in the measured counts to better than 0.5%. We update the Exposure Time Calculator (ETC) with these preliminary results by fitting a smooth curve (2nd order polynomial) to the ratios of the efficiency gains over previous predictions, in the medium and wide band filters. This polynomial is interpolated at a fine wavelength grid and multiplied into the SYNPHOT throughput routines. We also provide photometric zero points for the UVIS camera in three photometric systems, STMAG, ABMAG, and VEGAMAG. A much more detailed Cycle 17 calibration plan, including observations targeting multiple primary standards, and with all filters on both CCDs, begins in October 2009.

  15. Elucidating Geochemical and Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction Via Soil Sterilization at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, T. L.; Jardine, P. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Ginder-Vogel, M. A.; Fendorf, S. E.; Baldwin, M. E.

    2005-12-01

    The adsorption and reduction of U(VI) onto sterilized and nonsterilized soil from the Oak Ridge Reservation was studied to distinguish biogeochemical versus geochemical effects on metal reduction. The Oak Ridge soil under investigation is a saprolite sequence of interbedded weathered shale and limestone obtained at the capillary fringe with a pH near 7.6. Experiments were conducted on unaltered soils as well as subsamples of the soil that were pre-treated to remove free oxides and/or organic matter. Soils were sterilized by either steam sterilization at 1210C or by γ-irradiation using a Cobalt-60 source with a γ-ray dosage of 20kGy. Sterile and nonsterile U(VI) batch experiments were completed aerobically over a reaction time of 400 hours. The reactions were buffered using 25mM HEPES and NaHCO3. Initial U(VI) concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 10 ppm. The effects of sterilization on bacterial population, soil mineralogy, pH, ζ-potential, cation exchange capacity, redox potential, and soil organic matter (SOM) were identified. Sterilization by irradiation was >99.99% efficient and steam sterilization was approximately 99% efficient. Major mineralogy, soil pH, and clay mineral ζ-potential were unaffected by the sterilization techniques. The cation exchange capacity of the irradiated soils decreased from 40 to 30 cmolc/kg. Sterilization by irradiation caused some degradation of the SOM, as determined by UV-VIS, however the results were practically insignificant due to the small quantity of SOM in the Oak Ridge soil (<0.1%). The redox potential of the soil before and after sterilization is being tested. Results indicate that the removal of U(VI) from solution onto untreated soils was significantly increased in soil sterilized by γ-irradiation compared to nonsterilized soil and suggests that geochemical processes, rather than biogeochemical processes, controlled U(VI) sorption/reduction in these soils. Results of experiments completed using soils pre-treated with H2

  16. U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, David M.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn

    2012-04-03

    Sorption of contaminants onto mineral surfaces is an important process that can restrict their transport in the environment. In the current study, uranium (U) uptake on magnetite (111) was measured as a function of time and solution composition (pH, [CO3]T, [Ca]) under continuous batch-flow conditions. We observed, in real-time and in situ, adsorption and reduction of U(VI) and subsequent growth of UO2 nanoprecipitates using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and newly developed batch-flow U LIII-edge grazing-incidence x-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge structure (GI-XANES) spectroscopy. U(VI) reduction occurred with and without CO3 present, and coincided with nucleation and growth of particles; maximum sorption loadings were 23 mol m-2 (pH 5) and 27 mol m-2 (pH 10). The U sorption loading was lower when Ca and CO3 were both present and during experiments in which no U(VI) reduction occurred; the maximum U sorption loading was 17 mol m-2 (pH 5 and 10). In situ batch-flow AFM data indicated that UO2 particles achieved a maximum height of 4-5 nm after about 8 hours of exposure, yet lateral growth as aggregates continued up to 300 nm. U uptake is therefore divided into three-stages; (1) initial adsorption of U(VI), (2) reduction of U(VI) to UO2 nanoprecipitates at surface-specific sites after 2-3 hours of exposure, and (3) completion of U(VI) reduction after 6-8 hours, with continuing slow adsorption of U(VI). U(VI) reduction also corresponded to detectable increases in Fe released to solution and surface topography changes, indicating that reduction is coupled to Fe(II) availability at or from the magnetite (111) surface. In addition to providing molecular-scale details about U sorption on magnetite, this work also presents novel advances for collecting surface sensitive molecular-scale information in real-time under batch-flow conditions.

  17. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome c3

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2003-06-01

    The project, ''Reduction of U(VI) and toxic metals by Desulfovibrio cytochrome c3'', is designed to obtain spectroscopic information for or against a functional interaction of cytochrome c3 and uranium in the whole cells. That is, is the cytochrome c3 the uranium reductase? Our approach has been to start with purified cytochrome and determine any unique spectral disturbances during electron flow to U(VI). Then we will attempt to identify these signals emanating from cells actively reducing uranium. This project is being carried out in collaboration with Dr. William Woodruff at the Los Alamos National Laboratory where the spectral experiments are being carried out.

  18. Using High Performance Computing to Understand Roles of Labile and Nonlabile U(VI) on Hanford 300 Area Plume Longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.; Hammond, Glenn E.

    2012-07-28

    Evolution of a hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] plume at the Hanford 300 Area bordering the Columbia River is investigated to evaluate the roles of labile and nonlabile forms of U(VI) on the longevity of the plume. A high fidelity, three-dimensional, field-scale, reactive flow and transport model is used to represent the system. Richards equation coupled to multicomponent reactive transport equations are solved for times up to 100 years taking into account rapid fluctuations in the Columbia River stage resulting in pulse releases of U(VI) into the river. The peta-scale computer code PFLOTRAN developed under a DOE SciDAC-2 project is employed in the simulations and executed on ORNL's Cray XT5 supercomputer Jaguar. Labile U(VI) is represented in the model through surface complexation reactions and its nonlabile form through dissolution of metatorbernite used as a surrogate mineral. Initial conditions are constructed corresponding to the U(VI) plume already in place to avoid uncertainties associated with the lack of historical data for the waste stream. The cumulative U(VI) flux into the river is compared for cases of equilibrium and multirate sorption models and for no sorption. The sensitivity of the U(VI) flux into the river on the initial plume configuration is investigated. The presence of nonlabile U(VI) was found to be essential in explaining the longevity of the U(VI) plume and the prolonged high U(VI) concentrations at the site exceeding the EPA MCL for uranium.

  19. Influence of ammonium availability on expression of nifD and amtB genes during biostimulation of a U(VI) contaminated aquifer: implications for U(VI) removal and monitoring the metabolic state of Geobacteraceae

    SciTech Connect

    Mouser, Paula J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, Hila; Holmes, Dawn E.; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2009-03-25

    The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by 2 orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 ?M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels, whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical and physiological interactions at the field scale in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

  20. HST/WFC3 UVIS Detector: Dark, Charge Transfer Efficiency, and Point Spread Function Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Anderson, Jay; Baggett, Sylvia; Bowers, Ariel; MacKenty, John W.; Sahu, Kailash C.

    2015-08-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that was installed during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. As one of two channels available on WFC3, the UVIS detector is comprised of two e2v CCDs and is sensitive to ultraviolet and visible light. Here we provide updates to the characterization and monitoring of the UVIS performance and stability. We present the long-term growth of the dark current and the hot pixel population, as well as the evolution of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE). We also discuss updates to the UVIS dark calibration products, which are used to correct for dark current in science images. We examine the impacts of CTE losses and outline some techniques to mitigate CTE effects during and after observation by use of post-flash and pixel-based CTE corrections. Finally, we summarize an investigation of WFC3/UVIS Point Spread Functions (PSFs) and their potential use for characterizing the focus of the instrument.

  1. Reduction of U(VI) incorporated in the structure of hematite.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Pacheco, Juan S Lezama; Bargar, John R; Shi, Zhi; Liu, Juan; Kovarik, Libor; Engelhard, Mark H; Felmy, Andrew R

    2012-09-01

    U(VI) doped hematite was synthesized and exposed to two different organic reductants with E(0) of 0.23 and 0.70 V. A combination of HAADF-TEM and EXAFS provided evidence that uranium was incorporated in hematite in uranate, likely octahedral coordination. XPS indicated that structurally incorporated U(VI) was reduced to U(V), whereas non-incorporated U(VI) was reduced to U(IV). Specifically, the experiments indicate that U(V) was the dominant oxidation state of uranium in hematite around Eh -0.24 to -0.28 V and pH 7.7-8.6 for at least up to 5 weeks of reaction time. U(V), but not U(IV), was also detected in hematite at Eh +0.21 V (pH 7.1-7.3). The results support the hypothesis, based on previous experimental and theoretical work, that the stability field of U(V) is widened relative to U(IV) and U(VI) in uranate coordination environments where the coordination number of U is less than 8. PMID:22834714

  2. Compositional Variations from UVIS Observations of Titan's Dayglow and Comparisons with in situ INMS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, M. H.; Evans, J. S.; Ajello, J. M.; Bradley, E. T.; Meier, R. R.; Westlake, J. H.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan’s dayside limb on multiple occasions between 2007 and 2011. The airglow observations reveal the same variety of EUV (600-1150Å) and FUV (1150-1900Å) emissions arising from photoelectron excitation and photofragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N2) on Earth. Through spectral analysis we extract radiance profiles for each set of UVIS limb emissions in the EUV and FUV, which are attenuated by methane (CH4). Using a terrestrial airglow model adapted to Titan, we derive the N2 and CH4 density profiles using the prescribed solar irradiance for the relevant Cassini orbit and compare the calculated radiance profiles directly with observations. We find that the UVIS airglow observations can be explained by solar driven processes, although fluctuations in the observed airglow between flybys suggest compositional changes in the background atmosphere. We compare the compositional variations inferred from the UVIS airglow to in situ observations by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) from the same Titan orbit and discuss how the variations may be related to Titan’s varying plasma environment.

  3. Microbial reduction of U(VI) under alkaline conditions: implications for radioactive waste geodisposal.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adam J; Morris, Katherine; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Charnock, John M; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2014-11-18

    Although there is consensus that microorganisms significantly influence uranium speciation and mobility in the subsurface under circumneutral conditions, microbiologically mediated U(VI) redox cycling under alkaline conditions relevant to the geological disposal of cementitious intermediate level radioactive waste, remains unexplored. Here, we describe microcosm experiments that investigate the biogeochemical fate of U(VI) at pH 10-10.5, using sediments from a legacy lime working site, stimulated with an added electron donor, and incubated in the presence and absence of added Fe(III) as ferrihydrite. In systems without added Fe(III), partial U(VI) reduction occurred, forming a U(IV)-bearing non-uraninite phase which underwent reoxidation in the presence of air (O2) and to some extent nitrate. By contrast, in the presence of added Fe(III), U(VI) was first removed from solution by sorption to the Fe(III) mineral, followed by bioreduction and (bio)magnetite formation coupled to formation of a complex U(IV)-bearing phase with uraninite present, which also underwent air (O2) and partial nitrate reoxidation. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed that Gram-positive bacteria affiliated with the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes dominated in the post-reduction sediments. These data provide the first insights into uranium biogeochemistry at high pH and have significant implications for the long-term fate of uranium in geological disposal in both engineered barrier systems and the alkaline, chemically disturbed geosphere. PMID:25231875

  4. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation/Bioba

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Brian D.

    2004-06-01

    The research in FY04 was focused in five specific topics: (1) U(VI) sorption on microbially and abiotically reduced sediments, (2) oxidation of biogenic U(IV) in presence of Fe(II), (3) U(VI) reduction by reduced sediments, (4) kinetics of U(VI) sorption on natural sediments under conditions of flow, and (5) NMR imaging of S. onidensis biofilms in porous media. Two manuscripts are currently in review, and another five (or four?) manuscripts are currently in preparation for submission.

  5. Probing the interaction of U(vi) with phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Eva C; Mason, Harris E; Shusterman, Jennifer A; Bruchet, Anthony; Nitsche, Heino

    2016-06-21

    The fundamental interaction of U(vi) with diethylphosphatoethyl triethoxysilane functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous silica is studied by macroscopic batch experiments and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. DPTS-functionalized silica has been shown to extract U(vi) from nitric acid solutions at or above pH 3. Extraction is dependent on pH and ionic strength. Single-pulse (31)P NMR on U(vi) contacted samples revealed that U(vi) only interacts with a fraction of the ligands present on the surface. At pH 4 the U(vi) extraction capacity of the material is limited to 27-37% of the theoretical capacity, based on ligand loading. We combined single pulse (31)P NMR on U(vi)-contacted samples with batch studies to measure a ligand-to-metal ratio of approximately 2 : 1 at pH 3 and 4. Batch studies and cross-polarization NMR measurements reveal that U(vi) binds to deprotonated phosphonate and/or silanol sites. We use (31)P-(31)P DQ-DRENAR NMR studies to compare the average dipolar coupling between phosphorus spins for both U(vi)-complexed and non-complexed ligand environments. These measurements reveal that U(vi) extraction is not limited by inadequate surface distribution of ligands, but rather by low stability of the surface phosphonate complex. PMID:27265020

  6. The U(VI) speciation influenced by a novel Paenibacillus isolate from Mont Terri Opalinus clay.

    PubMed

    Lütke, Laura; Moll, Henry; Bachvarova, Velina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-05-21

    Bacterial cell walls have a high density of ionizable functional groups available for U(VI) binding, hence have a great potential to affect the speciation of this contaminant in the environment. The studied strain of the genus Paenibacillus is a novel isolate originating from the Mont Terri Opalinus clay formations (Switzerland) which are currently investigated as a potential host rock for future nuclear waste storage. U(VI) binding to the cell surface functional groups was studied by potentiometry combined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Four bacterial U(VI) surface complexes were identified: R-COO-UO2(+), R-O-PO3-UO2, R-O-PO3H-UO2(+), and (R-O-PO3)2-UO2(2-). The corresponding complex stability constants were calculated to be 5.33 ± 0.08, 8.89 ± 0.04, 12.92 ± 0.05, and 13.62 ± 0.08, respectively. Hence UO2(2+) displays a moderate to strong interaction with the bacterial surface functional groups. In the acidic pH range (pH 3) UO2(2+) binding onto the cell envelope is governed by coordination to hydrogen phosphoryl sites. Upon increasing the pH an increasing coordination of UO2(2+) to carboxylic and deprotonated phosphoryl sites was found. At a pH greater than 7 uranyl hydroxides dominate the speciation. Additionally the bacteria-mediated release of inorganic phosphate in dependence on [U(VI)] at different pH values was studied to assess the influence of phosphate release on U(VI) mobilization. PMID:23508301

  7. U(VI) Reduction by Diverse Outer Surface c-Type Cytochromes of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Janet J.; Comolli, Luis R.; Csencsits, Roseann; Janot, Noemie; Flanagan, Kelly A.; Gray, Arianna S.; Leang, Ching; Izallalen, Mounir; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    Early studies with Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested that outer-surface c-type cytochromes might play a role in U(VI) reduction, but it has recently been suggested that there is substantial U(VI) reduction at the surface of the electrically conductive pili known as microbial nanowires. This phenomenon was further investigated. A strain of G. sulfurreducens, known as Aro-5, which produces pili with substantially reduced conductivity reduced U(VI) nearly as well as the wild type, as did a strain in which the gene for PilA, the structural pilin protein, was deleted. In order to reduce rates of U(VI) reduction to levels less than 20% of the wild-type rates, it was necessary to delete the genes for the five most abundant outer surface c-type cytochromes of G. sulfurreducens. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy demonstrated that whereas 83% ± 10% of the uranium associated with wild-type cells correspond to U(IV) after 4 h of incubation, with the quintuple mutant, 89% ± 10% of uranium was U(VI). Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy revealed that wild-type cells did not precipitate uranium along pili as previously reported, but U(IV) was precipitated at the outer cell surface. These findings are consistent with those of previous studies, which have suggested that G. sulfurreducens requires outer-surface c-type cytochromes but not pili for the reduction of soluble extracellular electron acceptors. PMID:23934497

  8. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  9. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; Nicora, C.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Long, P.E.; Lipton, M.S.

    2010-02-15

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  10. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lovely, Derek R.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  11. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  12. Surface Complexation Modeling of U(VI) Adsorption onto Savannah River Site Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Denham, M.; Davis, J.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) was a U.S. Department of Energy facility for plutonium production during the Cold War. Waste plumes containing low-level radioactivity and acidic waste solutions were discharged to a series of unlined seepage basins in the F-Area of the SRS from 1955 to 1988. Although the site has undergone many years of active remediation, the groundwater remains acidic, and the concentrations of U and other radionuclides are still significantly higher than their Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs). The objective of this effort is to understand and predict U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes through developing surface complexation models (SCMs). Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to evaluate U adsorption behavior over the pH range of 3.0 to 9.5. Ten sorbent samples were selected including six contaminated sediment samples from three boreholes drilled within the plume and along the groundwater flow direction, two uncontaminated (pristine) sediment samples from a borehole outside of the plume, and two reference minerals, goethite and kaolinite (identified as the dominant minerals in the clay size fraction of the F-Area sediments). The results show that goethite and kaolinite largely control U partitioning behavior. In comparison with the pristine sediment, U(VI) adsorption onto contaminated sediments exhibits adsorption edges shifted toward lower pH by about 1.0 unit (e.g., from pH≈4.5 to pH≈3.5). We developed a SCMs based component additivity (CA) approach, which can successfully predict U(VI) adsorption onto uncontaminated SRS sediments. However, application of the same SCMs based CA approach to contaminated sediments resulted in underestimates of U(VI) adsorption at acidic pH conditions. The model sensitivity analyses indicate that both goethite and kaolinite surfaces co-contributed to U(VI) adsorption under acidic pH conditions. In particular, the exchange sites of clay minerals might play an important role in adsorption of U(VI) at p

  13. High performance of phosphate-functionalized graphene oxide for the selective adsorption of U(VI) from acidic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Li, Jiaxing; Wang, Xiangxue; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-11-01

    In this study, phosphate-functionalized graphene oxide (PGO) was prepared by grafting triethyl phosphite onto the surface of GO using Arbuzov reaction. The as-prepared PGO was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and Zeta potential. The application of the PGO to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was investigated with a maximum adsorption capacity of 251.7 mg/g at pH = 4.0 ± 0.1 and T = 303 K. The adsorption mechanism was also investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, indicating a chemical adsorption of U(VI) on PGO surface. Moreover, experimental results gave a better removal efficiency toward U(VI) on PGO surface than other heavy metal ions at acidic solution, indicating the selective extraction of U(VI) from environmental pollutants.

  14. Deriving the Structure and Composition of Enceladus’ Plume from Cassini UVIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Esposito, Larry; Colwell, Josh; Hendrix, Amanda; Portyankina, Ganna; Shemansky, Don; West, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed 4 stellar and one solar occultation by Enceladus’ water vapor plume. The July 2005 occultation observation established that water is the primary constituent of the plume [1], and allowed us to calculate the flux of water coming from the plume; the 2007 occultation showed super-sonic jets of gas imbedded within the plume [2]. The solar occultation observation set upper limits for N2 as a constituent of the plume and provided higher resolution data on the jets [3]. On 19 October 2011, epsilon and zeta Orionis were simultaneously occulted by the plume. The stars were in separate pixels on the detector, separated by 24 mrad, or ~20 km, with the lower altitude star (epsilon Orionis) 18 km above the limb at its closest point. The profile at two altitudes shows evidence for a new gas jet location, possibly between dust jet #50 and #51 identified in [4].Results from the assemblage of these data sets, with implications for the composition and vertical structure of the plume and jets, will be described. Gas being expelled from the “tiger stripe” fissures is largely on a vertical escape trajectory away from Enceladus. Upper limits are set for water vapor near the limb at latitudes well away from the south pole at 3 x 1015 cm-2. Upper limits are set for the amount of ethylene and H2 in the plume, two species of interest to the chemistry of the plume [5]. No hydrogen or oxygen emission features have been observed from Enceladus’ water vapor plume, in contrast to the purported plumes at Europa, probably due to the very different plasma environment at Saturn. Data have now been processed consistently for all occultations with slightly different results for water vapor supply to the Saturn magnetosphere than previously reported. Overall, eruptive activity has been steady to within ~20% from 2005 to 2011.References: [1] Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422 (2006). Hansen, C. J. et al., Nature 456:477 (2008

  15. UVIS CCD EPER CTE measurements performed during the April 2007 Ambient Calibration campaign (SMS UV02S01)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robberto, Massimo

    The UVIS spare detector (UVIS build 2) has been installed in WFC3 and used for a short ambient ground test campaign in April 2007. Tests have been performed using the Extended Pixel Edge Response (EPER) measure of the Charge Transfer Efficiency. In this ISR I describe the methods and results of the test. The Charge Transfer Efficiency appears to be higher than 99.9999%, in agreement with previous DCL measures.

  16. Photodecomposition of chloromethanes adsorbed on silica surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausloos, P.; Rebbert, R. E.; Glasgow, L.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation of CCl4, CFCl3, and CF2Cl2 in the presence of C2H6 in vessels containing silica sand or fused quartz tubing results in the formation of chlorine-containing products. The formation of these compounds occurs at wavelengths extending up to approximately 400 nm, that is, at wavelengths well beyond the absorption threshold of the chloromethanes in the gas phase. It is suggested that CCl4 adsorbed on silica surfaces photodissociates to yield CCl3 and CCl2 species. The poor material balance obtained in these experiments indicates that several of the chlorine-containing fragments are strongly adsorbed on the surface. At a CCl4 pressure of 13 Pa (0.1 torr), photolysis with 366 nm light in the presence of sand results in the decomposition of one molecule for every 10,000 photons striking the surface. Under otherwise identical conditions, the photon-induced breadkdown of CFCl3 and CF2Cl2 is respectively only 10% or 3% as efficient.

  17. Probing the interaction of U(VI) with phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uribe, Eva C.; Mason, Harris E.; Shusterman, Jennifer A.; Bruchet, Anthony; Nitsche, Heino

    2016-05-30

    The fundamental interaction of U(VI) with diethylphosphatoethyl triethoxysilane functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous silica is studied by macroscopic batch experiments and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. DPTS-functionalized silica has been shown to extract U(VI) from nitric acid solutions at or above pH 3. Extraction is dependent on pH and ionic strength. Single-pulse 31P NMR on U(VI) contacted samples revealed that U(VI)only interacts with a fraction of the ligands present on the surface. At pH 4 the U(VI) extraction capacity of the material is limited to 27–37% of the theoretical capacity, based on ligand loading. We combined single pulse 31P NMR on U(VI)-contacted samples withmore » batch studies to measure a ligand-to-metal ratio of approximately 2 : 1 at pH 3 and 4. Batch studies and cross-polarization NMR measurements reveal that U(VI) binds to deprotonated phosphonate and/or silanol sites. We use 31P–31P DQ-DRENAR NMR studies to compare the average dipolar coupling between phosphorus spins for both U(VI)-complexed and non-complexed ligand environments. Furthermore, these measurements reveal that U(VI) extraction is not limited by inadequate surface distribution of ligands, but rather by low stability of the surface phosphonate complex.« less

  18. Isotopic and Geochemical Tracers for U(VI) Reduction and U Mobility at an in Situ Recovery U Mine.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T; Christensen, John N; DePaolo, Donald J; Reimus, Paul W; Heikoop, Jeffrey M; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M; House, Brian M; Hartmann, Matt; Maher, Kate

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Postmining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers (238)U/(235)U (δ(238)U), (234)U/(238)U activity ratio, and (34)S/(32)S (δ(34)S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ(238)U in Rosita groundwater varies from +0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ(238)U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ(238)U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic (234)U/(238)U activity ratio and δ(34)S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites. PMID:25909757

  19. Boreal winter comparison of auroral images from Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, J. F.; Germany, G.; Maddox, W.; Fillingim, M.; Parks, G.; Mende, S.

    2004-12-01

    Same-scene images made with Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV are compared for the boreal winter of 2000-2001. The results of the comparison are used to determine whether the use of both instruments could lead to a better evaluation of the average precipitation and total energy input than with either one individually. These results are a part of a broader investigation to quantitatively compare conjugate images using both instruments and to correlate observed asymmetries with solar wind and seasonal parameters.

  20. HST/WFC3: Evolution of the UVIS Channel's Charge Transfer Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosmeyer, Catherine; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Anderson, Jay; WFC3 Team

    2016-06-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) contains both an IR and a UVIS channel. After more than six years on orbit, the UVIS channel performance remains stable; however, on-orbit radiation damage has caused the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of UVIS's two CCDs to degrade. This degradation is seen as vertical charge 'bleeding' from sources during readout and its effect evolves as the CCDs age. The WFC3 team has developed software to perform corrections that push the charge back to the sources, although it cannot recover faint sources that have been bled out entirely. Observers can mitigate this effect in various ways such as by placing sources near the amplifiers, observing bright targets, and by increasing the total background to at least 12 electrons, either by using a broader filter, lengthening exposure time, or post-flashing. We present results from six years of calibration data to re-evaluate the best level of total background for mitigating CTE loss and to re-verify that the pixel-based CTE correction software is performing optimally over various background levels. In addition, we alert observers that CTE-corrected products are now available for retrieval from MAST as part of the CALWF3 v3.3 pipeline upgrade.

  1. Microbial community changes in response to ethanol or methanol amendments for U(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Brandt, Craig C; Madden, Andrew S; Drake, Meghan M; Kostka, Joel E; Akob, Denise M; Küsel, Kirsten; Palumbo, Anthony V

    2010-09-01

    Microbial community responses to ethanol, methanol, and methanol plus humics amendments in relationship to U(VI) bioreduction were studied in laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments and ground water from a uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, TN. The type of carbon source added, the duration of incubation, and the sampling site influenced the bacterial community structure upon incubation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated that (i) bacterial communities found in ethanol- and methanol-amended samples with U(VI) reduction were similar due to the presence of Deltaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria (members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae); (ii) methanol-amended samples without U(VI) reduction exhibited the lowest diversity and the bacterial community contained 69.2 to 92.8% of the family Methylophilaceae; and (iii) the addition of humics resulted in an increase of phylogenetic diversity of Betaproteobacteria (Rodoferax, Polaromonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylophilales, and unclassified) and Firmicutes (Desulfosporosinus and Clostridium). PMID:20601514

  2. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on gear-pellet and honeycomb-pellet types of adsorbents containing A-type zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, A.; Munakata, K.; Hara, K.; Narita, S.; Sugiyama, T.; Kotoh, K.; Tanaka, M.; Uda, T.

    2015-03-15

    It is necessary to recover or process tritiated species that are extensively coexistent in nuclear fusion installations. A conventional way to recover tritium release to atmosphere is catalytic oxidation of tritiated species and adsorption of tritiated water vapor on adsorbents with high surface areas. Therefore, new adsorbents with low pressure loss and high surface areas need to be developed and utilized for such large-scale adsorption systems. In this study, attention was focused on new adsorbents, which are gear-type pellet MS5A adsorbent, gear-type pellet MS4A adsorbent and honeycomb-type pellet MS5A adsorbent. The adsorption characteristics of the new adsorbent were comparatively studied with conventional type of adsorbents (pellet-type MS5A adsorbent and pebble-type MS5A adsorbent), in terms of adsorption capacity, pressure loss and adsorption rate. It was found that the adsorption capacity of water vapor on the gear-type adsorbents is higher than that on a honeycomb-type adsorbent. The experimental breakthrough curves indicate that the adsorption rates of water vapor on gear-type and honeycomb-type adsorbents are smaller than that on conventional type adsorbents. Various adsorption models were also tested to correlate the experimental isotherms. It was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich model could properly correlate the experimental adsorption isotherms.

  3. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  4. Vibrational Studies of Adsorbate-Induced Reconstruction on Molybdenum Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopinski, Gregory Peter

    Adsorbate-induced rearrangement of the substrate structure strongly modifies the adsorbate-substrate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, leading to the complex behavior observed in many chemisorption systems. In this thesis the H/Mo(211), O/Mo(211) and Na/Mo(100) systems have been studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) to observe vibrations of the adsorbed atoms. The vibrational data is correlated with observations of the long-range order probed by LEED as well as the work function changes induced by adsorption. Adsorbate -induced substrate reconstruction plays an important role in all three of these systems. Studies of the coadsorption systems O+H/Mo(211) and Na+O/Mo(100) indicate how these effects can influence interactions between adsorbates. For H/Mo(211), above 1ML a (1 x 1) to (1 x 2) transition is observed and attributed to modification of the substrate periodicity. Below 1ML, H atoms are bridge bonded and induce local distortions of the substrate. The transition to the (1 x 2) phase involves the ordering of these displacements and occupation of three-fold sites partially populated by conversion of the bridge bonded species. This conversion accounts for the sawtooth-like coverage dependence of the work function. The structural model proposed for this system is also supported by the desorption parameters and partial molar entropy extracted from adsorption isobars. Oxygen adsorption on Mo(211) involves the occupation of multiple binding sites, with both the long-range order and the local geometry of the adsorbate phases strongly temperature dependent. Coadsorption of low coverages of oxygen and hydrogen leads to segregation of the two adsorbates which can be understood in terms of a substrate-mediated repulsive interaction between O and H. For Na/Mo(100), the frequency of the Na-Mo symmetric stretch mode does not shift with coverage although the mode intensity is strongly coverage dependent. The absence of a frequency shift

  5. Method And Apparatus For Regenerating Nox Adsorbers

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, J. Joshua; Endicott, Dennis L.; Faulkner, Stephen A.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-03-28

    Methods and apparatuses for regenerating a NOx adsorber coupled with an exhaust of an engine. An actuator drives a throttle valve to a first position when regeneration of the NOx adsorber is desired. The first position is a position that causes the regeneration of the NOx adsorber. An actuator drives the throttle valve to a second position while regeneration of the NOx adsorber is still desired. The second position being a position that is more open than the first position and operable to regenerate a NOx adsorber.

  6. Electrochemical and spectroscopic evidence on the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S.; Antonio, Mark R.; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J.; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces has been considered as a one-step two electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated the mechanisms of uranium reduction by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4 . The one electron reduction of U(VI) was first confirmed using the cyclic voltammetry method. Formation of nano-size uranium precipitates on the surface of magnetite at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials were observed by in situ electrochemical AFM. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from 0.1 ~ 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) showed the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The highest amount of U(V) relative to U(VI) was prepared at 0.7 V, where the longest average U–Oaxial distance of 2.05 ± 0.01 Å was evident in the same sample revealed by EXAFS analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of 0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) did not disproportionate but stabilized on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(VI)/U(V) solids.

  7. Adsorption and desorption of U(VI) on functionalized graphene oxides: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yubing; Yang, Shubin; Chen, Yue; Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-04-01

    The adsorption and desorption of U(VI) on graphene oxides (GOs), carboxylated GOs (HOOC-GOs), and reduced GOs (rGOs) were investigated by batch experiments, EXAFS technique, and computational theoretical calculations. Isothermal adsorptions showed that the adsorption capacities of U(VI) were GOs > HOOC-GOs > rGOs, whereas the desorbed amounts of U(VI) were rGOs > GOs > HOOC-GOs by desorption kinetics. According to EXAFS analysis, inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of U(VI) on GOs and HOOC-GOs at pH 4.0, whereas outer-sphere surface complexation of U(VI) on rGO was observed at pH 4.0, which was consistent with surface complexation modeling. Based on the theoretical calculations, the binding energy of [G(···)UO2](2+) (8.1 kcal/mol) was significantly lower than those of [HOOC-GOs(···)UO2](2+) (12.1 kcal/mol) and [GOs-O(···)UO2](2+) (10.2 kcal/mol), suggesting the physisorption of UO2(2+) on rGOs. Such high binding energy of [GOs-COO(···)UO2](+) (50.5 kcal/mol) revealed that the desorption of U(VI) from the -COOH groups was much more difficult. This paper highlights the effect of the hydroxyl, epoxy, and carboxyl groups on the adsorption and desorption of U(VI), which plays an important role in designing GOs for the preconcentration and removal of radionuclides in environmental pollution cleanup applications. PMID:25761122

  8. Solubility data for U(VI) hydroxide and Np(IV) hydrous oxide: application of MCC-3 methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, K.M.; Rai, D.; Fulton, R.W.; Strickert, R.G.

    1984-10-01

    Experiments based on a modified MCC-3S test method were conducted to investigate the solubility of U(VI) hydroxide (the mineral schoepite) and Np(IV) hydrous oxide at ambient temperature. The solubility of U(VI) hydroxide was investigated in carbonate-free, oxidizing aqueous solutions in the pH range of 3 to 11. The measured concentrations of dissolved U confirm the amphoteric behavior of U(VI) hydroxide solid and the importance of anionic U(VI) hydroxyl complexes in accurately calculating the solubilities of U(VI) solids under basic pH conditions. the effect of fluoride complexation on the solubility of Np(IV) hydrous oxide was studied in carbonate-free, near-neutral to alkaline solutions that contained 100 ppM total F. For solutions in which sodium dithionite (Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 4/) and metallic Fe were used as reducing agents, the addition of 100 ppM F had no measurable effect on the solubility of Np(IV) hydrous oxide.

  9. Effect of Subgrid Heterogeneity on Scaling Geochemical and Biogeochemical Reactions: A Case of U(VI) Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Shan, Huimei; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-04

    The effect of subgrid heterogeneity in sediment properties on the rate of uranyl[U(VI)] desorption was investigated using a sediment collected from the US Department of Energy Hanford site. The sediment was sieved into 7 grain size fractions that each exhibited different U(VI) desorption properties. Six columns were assembled using the sediment with its grain size fractions arranged in different spatial configurations to mimic subgrid heterogeneity in reactive transport properties. The apparent rate of U(VI) desorption varied significantly in the columns. Those columns with sediment structures leading to preferential transport had much lower rates of U(VI) desorption than those with relatively homogeneous transport. Modeling analysis indicated that the U(VI) desorption model and parameters characterized from well-mixed reactors significantly over-predicted the measured U(VI) desorption in the columns with preferential transport. A dual domain model, which operationally separates reactive transport properties into two subgrid domains improved the predictions significantly. A similar effect of subgrid heterogeneity, albeit at a less degree, was observed for denitrification, which also occurred in the columns. The results imply that subgrid heterogeneity is an important consideration in extrapolating reaction rates from the laboratory to field.

  10. Structural characterization of adsorbed helical and beta-sheet peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Newton Thangadurai

    Adsorbed peptides on surfaces have potential applications in the fields of biomaterials, tissue engineering, peptide microarrays and nanobiotechnology. The surface region, the "biomolecular interface" between a material and the biological environment, plays a crucial role in these applications. As a result, characterization of adsorbed peptide structure, especially with respect to identity, concentration, spatial distribution, conformation and orientation, is important. The present research employs NEXAFS (near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy) and SFG (sum frequency generation spectroscopy) to provide information about the adsorbed peptide structure. Soft X-ray NEXAFS is a synchrotron-based technique which typically utilizes polarized X-rays to interrogate surfaces under ultra-high vacuum conditions. SFG is a non-linear optical technique which utilizes a combination of a fixed visible and a tunable infrared laser beams to generate a surface-vibrational spectrum of surface species. SFG has the added advantage of being able to directly analyze the surface-structure at the solid-liquid interface. The main goals of the present research were twofold: characterize the structure of adsorbed peptides (1) ex situ using soft X-ray NEXAFS, and (2) in situ using non-linear laser spectroscopy (SFG). Achieving the former goal involved first developing a comprehensive characterization of the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen k-edge NEXAFS spectra for amino acids, and then using a series of helical and beta-sheet peptides to demonstrate the sensitivity of polarization-dependent NEXAFS to secondary structure of adsorbed peptides. Characterizing the structure of adsorbed peptides in situ using SFG involved developing a model system to probe the solid-liquid interface in situ; demonstrating the ability to probe the molecular interactions and adsorbed secondary structure; following the time-dependent ordering of the adsorbed peptides; and establishing the ability to obtain

  11. Effectiveness of U(VI) Bioremediation by DMRB in Dual Porosity Soils Explored via Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, B. E.; Barry, A.; Gerhard, J. I.

    2006-12-01

    The use of naturally present dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) is a promising bioremediation option for uranium-contaminated sites. DMRB activity is typically stimulated by introducing an organic carbon source into the subsurface, resulting in bioreduction of highly soluble U(VI) to immobile U(IV). While this process has been demonstrated in the laboratory for simple systems, it is important to understand how its effectiveness is influenced by a variety of natural and engineered processes expected in typical applications. Biogeochemical reactive transport models provide a valuable means for investigating the performance of and parameter sensitivities of these complex systems. A new one-dimensional model for DMRB bioreduction of U(VI) was developed in PHREEQC. The model includes multiple redox processes, U(VI) sorption, and both single and dual porosity domains. The model was applied to a variety of real-site parameterized scenarios in order to explore the impact of (i) modeling approaches, (ii) expected natural variability inherent in porous media systems, and (iii) engineering options for implementation. Examples of the first include diverse approaches to modeling active biomass (1st order vs. non-growth Monod vs. Monod with growth; multiple microbial communities vs. a single community). Examples of the second include diffusion-limited mass transfer between the advective flow region and the immobile micro-matrix region through variations in region porosities, bioreduction rates and mass transfer rate coefficients, as well as aquifer mineralogy. Examples of the third include organic carbon injection regimes (quantity and duration) and their impact on U(IV) reoxidation. These suites of simulations provide valuable insight into key system sensitivities that will guide further model development and upscaling to field scale.

  12. Aqueous Complexation Reactions Governing the Rate and Extent of Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Scott C. Brooks; Wenming Dong; Sue Carroll; James K. Fredrickson; Kenneth M. Kemner; Shelly D. Kelly

    2006-06-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. In addition, the work plan is designed to: (1) Generate fundamental scientific understanding on the relationship between U(VI) chemical speciation and its susceptibility to biogeochemical reduction reactions. (2) Elucidate the controls on the rate and extent of contaminant reactivity. (3) Provide new insights into the aqueous and solid speciation of U(VI)/U(IV) under representative groundwater conditions.

  13. Particle Sizes in Saturn’s Rings from Diffraction Signals in Cassini UVIS Occultation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Tracy M.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.; Attree, Nicholas O.; Murray, Carl D.

    2015-11-01

    Since its arrival at Saturn in 2004, the Cassini spacecraft has illuminated many aspects of the planet’s extensive ring system, including its vast range of particle sizes. Constraints on the particle size distribution are critical for understanding the evolution of the ring system. Our investigation focuses on modeling diffraction signals in occultation data from the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) to measure the population of the smallest particles in Saturn’s rings.Occultation data from Cassini’s Radio Science Subsystem and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer also provide measurements of the size distribution. The amount of light diffracted by the occulting particles is a reflection of the ratio of the wavelength of light and the radius of the particles. We can utilize the diffraction signals at different wavelengths measured by different instruments to describe the particle size distribution of Saturn’s rings.The UVIS wavelength bandpass, 51.2-180 nm, is the shortest of these instruments, making it most sensitive to the smallest particles. We model the diffraction signals detected in stellar occultation data at ring edges and find that Saturn’s outer A ring lacks any significant population of sub-mm particles, but the average size of the smallest particles decreases from ~1.5 cm at the Encke Gap to ~4 mm at the outer edge of the A ring. Diffraction spikes have also been identified at the edge of the B ring and at sharp edges of ringlets in the C ring and Cassini Division, suggestive of mm-sized particles throughout the rings. We analyze solar occultations by the F ring and sporadically detect diffracted light, indicating the population of sub-mm particles responsible for the diffraction is transient or spatially variable. Comparisons with images from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem suggest that these diffraction signals coincide with nearby collisional events in the F ring core. This may indicate that such events release

  14. Modeling of the Enceladus water vapor jets for interpreting UVIS star and solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the Cassini mission is jets emitting from the southern pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The composition of the jets is water vapor and salty ice grains with traces of organic compounds. Jets, merging into a wide plume at a distance, are observed by multiple instruments on Cassini. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along “tiger stripes” [Porco et al. 2014]. There is a recent controversy on the question if some of these jets are “optical illusion” caused by geometrical overlap of continuous source eruptions along the “tiger stripes” in the field of view of ISS [Spitale et al. 2015]. The Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume of Enceladus. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. These observations directly provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument and could help distinguish between the presence of only localized or also continuous sources. We use Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model the plume of Enceladus with multiple (or continuous) jet sources. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. The models result in the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densities derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets. The specific geometry of the UVIS observations helps to estimate the production rates and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted by the individual jets.Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422-1425 (2006); Hansen, C. J. et al, GRL 38:L11202 (2011

  15. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  16. Can microbially-generated hydrogen sulfide account for the rates of U(VI) reduction by a sulfate-reducing bacterium?

    SciTech Connect

    Boonchayaanant, Benjaporn; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei; Ortiz, Monica E; Criddle, Craig

    2010-01-01

    In situ remediation of uranium contaminated soil and groundwater is attractive because a diverse range of microbial and abiotic processes reduce soluble and mobile U(VI) to sparingly soluble and immobile U(IV). Often these processes are linked. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), for example, enzymatically reduce U(VI) to U(IV), but they also produce hydrogen sulfide that can itself reduce U(VI). This study evaluated the relative importance of these processes for Desulfovibrio aerotolerans, a SRB isolated from a U(VI)-contaminated site. For the conditions evaluated, the observed rate of SRB-mediated U(VI) reduction can be explained by the abiotic reaction of U(VI) with the microbially-generated H{sub 2}S. The presence of trace ferrous iron appeared to enhance the extent of hydrogen sulfide-mediated U(VI) reduction at 5 mM bicarbonate, but had no clear effect at 15 mM. During the hydrogen sulfide-mediated reduction of U(VI), a floc formed containing uranium and sulfur. U(VI) sequestered in the floc was not available for further reduction.

  17. Quasiparticle excitations of adsorbates on doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Dillon; Karrasch, Christoph; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jiong; Omrani, Arash A.; Brar, Victor; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wu, Qiong; Corsetti, Fabiano; Mostofi, Arash; Kawakami, Roland K.; Moore, Joel; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Mike

    Adsorbed atoms and molecules can modify the electronic structure of graphene, but in turn it is also possible to control the properties of adsorbates via the graphene substrate. In my talk, I will discuss the electronic structure of F4-TCNQ molecules on doped graphene and present a first-principles based theory of quasiparticle excitations that captures the interplay of doping-dependent image charge interactions between substrate and adsorbate and electron-electron interaction effects on the molecule. The resulting doping-dependent quasiparticle energies will be compared to experimental scanning tunnelling spectra. Finally, I will also discuss the effects of charged adsorbates on the electronic structure of doped graphene.

  18. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; et al

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore » an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  19. Adsorption characteristics of U(VI) on Fe(III)Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxides synthesized at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyangsig; Jo, Ho Young; Lee, Young Jae; Kim, Geon-Young

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the adsorption behavior of U(VI) on (oxy)hydroxides synthesized at different temperatures (25 and 75 °C) was investigated. Four (oxy)hydroxides were synthesized by drying slurries of Fe(III) and Fe(III)Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxide in a vacuum desiccator (25 °C) or in an oven (75 °C). Batch adsorption tests were conducted using the (oxy)hydroxides thus synthesized and groundwater containing uranium ions. In general, the U(VI) removal fraction significantly increased with increasing pH from 3 to 5, remained constant with increasing pH from 5 to 9, and decreased at pH greater than 9, regardless of the type of (oxy)hydroxides and solid-to-liquid ratio. The effect of pH on the U(VI) removal fraction was more significant at a low solid-to-liquid ratio. The oven-dried Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide exhibited a U(VI) removal fraction lower than that of the vacuum-dried one, whereas the oven-dried Fe(III)Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxide exhibited a U(VI) removal fraction higher than that exhibited by the vacuum-dried one. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis results indicated that the difference in the U(VI) removal fraction is attributed to the dissolution and precipitation of the Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide during oven drying and dehydration of the Fe(III)Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxide during oven drying. PMID:27060782

  20. Electrochemical and Spectroscopic Evidence on the One-Electron Reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on Magnetite.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S; Antonio, Mark R; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces is often considered a one-step two-electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one-electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated reduction pathways of uranium by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4. Cyclic voltammetry confirms the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V). Formation of nanosize uranium precipitates on the magnetite surface at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials are observed by in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from -0.1 to -0.9 V (E(0)(U(VI)/U(V))= -0.135 V vs Ag/AgCl) show the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The sample with the highest U(V)/U(VI) ratio was prepared at -0.7 V, where the longest average U-O(axial) distance of 2.05 ± 0.01 Å was evident in the same sample revealed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of -0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) does not disproportionate but stabilizes on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(V)/U(VI) solids. PMID:25893535

  1. A Mixed-Valent Uranium Phosphonate Framework Containing U(IV) , U(V) , and U(VI).

    PubMed

    Chen, Lanhua; Zheng, Tao; Bao, Songsong; Zhang, Linjuan; Liu, Hsin-Kuan; Zheng, Limin; Wang, Jianqiang; Wang, Yaxing; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2016-08-16

    It is shown that U(V) O2 (+) ions can reside at U(VI) O2 (2+) lattice sites during mild reduction and crystallization process under solvothermal conditions, yielding a complicated and rare mixed-valent uranium phosphonate compound that simultaneously contains U(IV) , U(V) , and U(VI) . The presence of uranium with three oxidation states was confirmed by various characterization techniques, including X-ray crystallography, X-ray photoelectron, electron paramagnetic resonance, FTIR, UV/Vis-NIR absorption, and synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetism measurements. PMID:27356283

  2. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediments from a former mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, S. P.; Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Campbell, Kate M.; Hayes, Kim F.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-12-15

    U(VI) adsorption by two aquifer sediment samples was studied under oxic conditions as a function of pH, U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentration. Background-A (BKG-A) sediment was collected upstream of a former uranium mill-tailings site at Rifle, Colorado, and Little Rusty Composite (LRC) was collected on site but with low U contamination. Batch adsorption experiments were performed using artificial groundwater solutions prepared to simulate the field groundwater composition in equilibrium with specific partial pressures of carbon dioxide. To encompass the geochemical conditions of the alluvial aquifer at the site, the experimental conditions ranged from 6.8×10-8 to 10-5 M in [U(VI)]tot, 7.2 to 8.0 in pH, 3.0×10-3 to 6.0×10-3 M in [Ca2+], and 0.05 to 2.6% in partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The sediment was extracted with a dilute bicarbonate/carbonate solution to determine the background labile U(VI) already present in the sediment. A semi-empirical surface complexation model was developed to describe U(VI) adsorption using FITEQL4. The non-electrostatic, generalized composite surface complexation model successfully simulated U(VI) adsorption over the range of groundwater conditions at the Old Rifle site, using a two-site, two-reaction fitting scheme. The sensitivity of model parameters to background U(VI) concentration on the two samples was evaluated. U(VI) adsorption experiments were also performed using a sand fraction of BKG-A separated through repeated sonication and wet-sieving. Surface area normalized Kd for the bulk and sand fraction indicated similar reactivity for both. The surface complexation model developed in this work is expected to contribute to the prediction of fate and transport of U(VI) in the alluvial aquifer at the Old Rifle site, and to assist in the simulation of biostimulation field experiments performed at the site.

  3. To-date spacecraft applications and demonstration testing results, and future product development for new molecular adsorber technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Shaun; Hansen, Patricia; Straka, Sharon; Chen, Philip; Triolo, Jack; Bettini, Ron; Carosso, Paolo; Carosso, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    The use of molecular adsorbers, in order to aid in the reduction of the spacecraft contamination levels, is discussed. Molecular adsorbers are characterized by an extremely large surface area, molecularly-porous substructure, and processing charged sites capable of retaining molecular contaminant species. Molecular adsorbers were applied on two Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions, as well as on the tropical rainfall measuring mission. The use of molecular adsorbers carries the potential for low cost, easy fabrication and integration of reliable means for reducing the contamination level around spacecraft.

  4. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; et al

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  5. The Uranium from Seawater Program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T; Bonheyo, George; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana; Warner, Marvin G; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David; Mayes, Richard T; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas; Addleman, Shane R; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Dr. Ken; Breier, Crystalline; D'Alessandro, Dr. Evan

    2016-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory s (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing at Woods Hole

  6. Cassini UVIS Results from Occultations of Stars by Saturn's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Hendrix, A.

    2009-09-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed occultations of stars by Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea and Iapetus. Stellar occultations are a sensitive probe for gases and have been extremely valuable for understanding the composition (predominantly water), flux and structure of Enceladus’ plume [1, 2]. More recently we have been looking for trace gases in the plume such as ethylene and methanol. A much-anticipated solar occultation will be observed next year to quantify the existence and amount of N2. At Tethys and Iapetus upper limits are set for the column densities of local volatiles (water, O2, CO2, and CO), all of which have absorption features at far ultraviolet wavelengths. The Rhea occultation data, in addition to setting upper limits on surrounding gases, have been analyzed to look for the presence of the debris disk reported by Cassini's MIMI instrument [3]. No material was detected with 2 sigma certainty, however the low optical depth of the material suggests that the probability of its detection by UVIS is < 1 in 1000. An occultation of epsilon Canis Majoris by Dione will take place in September 2009. Results of that occultation will be presented. This work was partially supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [1] Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422 (2006). [2] Hansen, C. J. et al., Nature 456 (2008). [3] Jones, G. H. et al., Science 319:1380 (2008).

  7. WFC3: Understanding and Mitigating UVIS Charge Transfer Efficiency Losses and IR Persistence Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia M.; Anderson, J.; Long, K. S.; MacKenty, J. W.; Noeske, K.; Biretta, J. A.; WFC3 Team

    2014-01-01

    A panchromatic instrument, Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) contains a UVIS channel with a 4096x4096 pixel e2v CCD array as well as an IR channel with a 1014x1014 Rockwell Scientific HgCdTe focal plane array (FPA). Both detectors have been performing well on-orbit since the installation of the instrument in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009. However, as expected, the harsh low-earth orbit environment has been damaging the UVIS CCDs, resulting in a progressive loss of charge transfer efficiency (CTE) over time. We summarize the magnitude of the CTE losses, the effect on science data, and the pre- and post-observation mitigation options available. The IR FPA does not suffer from accumulating radiation damage but it does exhibit persistence i.e. an after-glow from sources in previous exposures, an anomaly commonly seen in these types of IR arrays. We summarize the characteristics of persistence in WFC3, suggest methods for reducing the effects during observation planning, and describe the calibration products which are available via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) for addressing persistence in IR science data.

  8. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI).

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040+/-0.010 and 0.055+/-0.015 g gdry (-1), respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0 x 10(14) mol 1(-1) Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment. PMID:15381325

  9. Microbial Community Changes in Response to Ethanol or Methanol Amendments for U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Brandt, Craig C; Madden, Andrew; Drake, Meghan M; Kostka, Joel; Akob, Denise M.; Kusel, Kirsten; Palumbo, Anthony Vito

    2010-01-01

    Microbial community responses to ethanol, methanol and methanol + humics amendments in relationship to uranium bioremediation were studied in laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments and ground water from a uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ethanol addition always resulted in uranium reduction at rate of 0.8-1.0 mol l-1 d-1 while methanol addition did so occasionally at rate 0.95 mol l-1 d-1. The type of carbon source added, the duration of incubation, and the sampling site influenced the bacterial community structure upon incubation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated (1) bacterial communities found in ethanol- and methanol-amended samples with U(VI) reduction were similar due to presence of -Proteobacteria, and -Proteobacteria (members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae); (2) methanol-amended samples without U(VI) reduction exhibited the lowest diversity and the bacterial community contained 69.2-92.8% of the family Methylophilaceae; and (3) the addition of humics resulted in an increase of phylogenetic diversity of -Proteobacteria (Rodoferax, Polaromonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylophilales, unclassified) and Firmicutes (Desulfosporosinus, Clostridium).

  10. A New Statistical Convection Model Derived from SuperDARN and Polar UVI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Liou, K.

    2001-12-01

    Since the inception of the SuperDARN concept of coordinated multi-radar observations of ionospheric convection in 1993 a vast database of primary measurements has been accumulated. Following on earlier work with data collected from the Goose Bay radar in the pre-SuperDARN era, we have applied this database to the statistical characterization of the global pattern of high-latitude convection. For a subset of the measurements it is possible to order the velocity according to the geometry of the UVI auroral oval as this is inferred from observations with the Polar UVI instrument. In this talk we will review the derivation of the new convection model and discuss the results of sorting by solar wind and auroral geometry. We find that certain features, obscured in the usual bin-averaging approach, are more pronounced when proper account is taken of the variability of structures in the convection pattern. We compare with previous work and discuss the application of the new model in situations where information on the auroral geometry is present, absent, or can be reasonably inferred from proxy observations.

  11. A New Statistical Convection Model Derived from SuperDARN and Polar UVI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Liou, K.; Shepherd, S. G.

    2002-05-01

    Since the inception of the SuperDARN concept of coordinated multi-radar observations of ionospheric convection in 1993 a vast database of primary measurements has been accumulated. Following on earlier work with data collected from the Goose Bay radar in the pre-SuperDARN era, we have applied this database to the statistical characterization of the global pattern of high-latitude convection. For a subset of the measurements it is possible to order the velocity according to the geometry of the UVI auroral oval as this is inferred from observations with the Polar UVI instrument. In this talk we will review the derivation of the new convection model and discuss the results of sorting by solar wind and auroral geometry. We find that certain features, obscured in the usual bin-averaging approach, are more pronounced when proper account is taken of the variability of structures in the convection pattern. We compare with previous work and discuss the application of the new model in situations where information on the auroral geometry is present, absent, or can be reasonably inferred from proxy observations.

  12. Cassini UVIS Observations of the Io Plasma Torus. 4; Modeling Temporal and Azimuthal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffl, A. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this fourth paper in a series, we present a model of the remarkable temporal and azimuthal variability of the Io plasma torus observed during the Cassini encounter with Jupiter. Over a period of three months, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed a dramatic variaton in the average torus composition. Superimposed on this long-term variation, is a 10.07-hour periodicity caused by azimuthal variation in plasma composition subcorotating relative to System III longitude. Quite surprisingly, the amplitude of the azimuthal variation appears to be modulated at the beat frequency between the System III period and the observed 10.07-hour period. Previously, we have successfully modeled the months-long compositional change by supposing a factor of three increase in the amount of material supplied to Io's extended neutral clouds. Here, we extend our torus chemistry model to include an azimuthal dimension. We postulate the existence of two azimuthal variations in the number of superthermal electrons in the torus: a primary variation that subcorotates with a period of 10.07 hours and a secondary variation that remains fixed in System III longitude. Using these two hot electron variations, our model can reproduce the observed temporal and azimuthal variations observed by Cassini UVIS.

  13. Spectroscopic studies of U(VI) sorption at the kaolinite-water interface. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, H.A.; Parks, G.A.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Efficient use of U as a resource and safe handling, recycling and disposal of U-containing wastes require an understanding of the factors controlling the fate of U, where fate refers to the destination of U, typically expressed as an environmental medium or a process phase. The sorption process constitutes a change in elemental fate. Partitioning of an element from solution to a solid phase, or sorption, can be divided into three broad categories: adsorption, surface precipitation, and absorption. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), a type of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), offers the possibility for distinguishing among different modes of sorption by characterizing the atomic environment of the sorbing element. In this study, the authors use EXAFS to determine the structure of U(VI) sorption complexes at the kaolinite-water interface. In Chapter One, they present an overview of selected aspects of U structural chemistry as a basis for considering the structural environment of U at the solid-water interface. To evaluate the utility of XAS for characterization of the structural environment of U(VI) at the solid-water interface, they have carried out an in-depth analysis of XAS data from U(VI)-containing solid and solution model compounds, which they describe in Chapter Two. In Chapter three, they consider sorption of U by kaolinite as a means of effecting the removal of U from surface collection pond waters on the Rocky Flats Plant site in northern Colorado.

  14. Molecular nitrogen and methane density retrievals from Cassini UVIS dayglow observations of Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Evans, J. Scott; Lumpe, Jerry; Westlake, Joseph H.; Ajello, Joseph M.; Bradley, E. Todd; Esposito, Larry W.

    2015-02-01

    We retrieve number densities of molecular nitrogen (N2) and methane (CH4) from Titan's upper atmosphere using the UV dayglow. We use Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) limb observations from 800 to 1300 km of the N I 1493 Å and N II 1085 Å multiplets, both produced directly from photofragmentation of N2. UVIS N2 and CH4 densities are in agreement with measurements from Cassini's Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) from the same flyby if INMS densities are scaled up by a factor of 3.0 as reported in previous studies. Analysis of three Cassini flybys of Titan shows that (1) the CH4 homopause on Titan is between 900 and 1100 km, (2) upper atmospheric temperatures vary by less than 10 K over 6 h at the same geographic location and (3) from 1100 to 1700 local solar time temperatures also vary by less than 10 K. The capability of retrieving the global-scale composition from these data complements existing techniques and significantly advances the study of upper atmospheric variability at Titan and for any other atmosphere with a detectable UV dayglow.

  15. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  16. In vitro binding of zearalenone to different adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Dante J; Di Marco, Liliana; Oliver, Guillermo; Bardón, Alicia

    2005-03-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a potent estrogenic metabolite produced by some Fusarium species. No treatment has been successfully employed to get rid of the ZEA contained in foods. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability (adsorptive power) of five adsorbents--activated carbon, bentonite, talc, sandstone, and calcium sulfate--to trap ZEA in vitro. Activated carbon was the best adsorbent, binding 100% ZEA (pH 3 and 7.3) at 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1% dose levels. Bentonite, talc,and calcium sulfate were less efficient than activated carbon but still could bind ZEA to some extent. On the other hand, sandstone was inactive in the experimental conditions employed. Our results indicate that activated carbon could be a good candidate for detoxification of ZEA present in foods. PMID:15771192

  17. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  18. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications. PMID:27124722

  19. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    SciTech Connect

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  20. Separation of the attractive and repulsive contributions to the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions of polar adsorbates on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Deng-Sung

    2015-11-01

    Dissociative adsorption of H2O, NH3, CH3OH and CH3NH2 polar molecules on the Si(100) surface results in a 1:1 mixture of two adsorbates (H and multi-atomic fragment A = OH, NH2, CH3O, CH3NH, respectively) on the surface. By using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption geometry, the total energies and the charge densities for various possible ordered structures of the mixed adsorbate layer have been found. Analyzing the systematic trends in the total energies unveils concurrently the nearest-neighbor interactions ENN and the next nearest-neighbor interactions ENNN between two polar adsorbates A. In going from small to large polar adsorbates, ENN's exhibit an attractive-to-repulsive crossover behavior, indicating that they include competing attractive and repulsive contributions. Exploration of the charge density distributions allows the estimation of the degree of charge overlapping between immediately neighboring A's, the resulting contribution of the steric repulsions, and that of the attractive interactions to the corresponding ENN's. The attractive contributions to nearest neighboring adsorbate-adsorbate interactions between the polar adsorbates under study are shown to result from hydrogen bonds or dipole-dipole interactions.

  1. Solubility data for U(VI) hydroxide and Np(IV) hydrous oxide: application of MCC-3 methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, K.M.; Rai, D.; Fulton, R.W.; Strickert, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments based on a modified MCC-3S test method were conducted to investigate the solubility of U(VI) hydroxide (the mineral schoepite) and Np(IV) hydrous oxide at ambient temperature. The solubility of U(VI) hydroxide was investigated in carbonate-free, oxidizing aqueous solutions in the pH range of 3 to 11. The measured concentrations of dissolved U confirm the amphoteric behavior of U(VI) hydroxide solid and the importance of anionic U(VI) solids under basic pH conditions. The effect of fluoride complexation on the solubility of Np(IV) hydrous oxide was studied in carbonate-free, near-neutral to alkaline solutions that contained 100 ppm total F. For solutions in which sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4) and metallic Fe were used as reducing agents, the addition of 100 ppm F had no measurable effect on the solubility of Np(IV) hydrous oxide. 20 references, 1 figure.

  2. Bioreduction of U(VI) in groundwater under anoxic conditions from a decommissioned in situ leaching uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Ding, De-xin; Li, Shi-mi; Hu, Nan; Xu, Fei; Li, Guang-yue; Wang, Yong-dong

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether the U(VI) in groundwater under anoxic conditions at a decommissioned in situ leaching (ISL) uranium mine could be bioreduced, groundwater samples containing suspended sediments were taken from the mine, experimental setup was fabricated, and the jar containing the groundwater in the setup was amended with ethanol and incubated under anoxic conditions. The variations of pH, chemical oxygen demand, nitrate, sulfate, U(VI), and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were monitored during the incubation. U(VI) concentration dropped to 0.043 mg/L when the stimulated microorganisms were active, and it then increased to 0.835 mg/L within 10 days after the metabolism of the stimulated microorganisms was inhibited. The DO variation was observed in the amended jar during the incubation, and the metabolism of the stimulated microorganisms was found to affect the DO concentration. Firmicutes were found to be dominant in the sediments in the amended jar through the 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. The results indicate that it is possible to bioreduce U(VI) in the groundwater under anoxic conditions at the decommissioned ISL uranium mine by adding carbon source into it without removing the oxygen from it. PMID:25341364

  3. Effects of antagonist of retinoid X receptor (UVI3003) on morphology and gene profile of Xenopus tropicalis embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingmin; Shi, Huahong; Zhu, Pan; Hu, Lingling; Wu, Lijiao; Yang, Yi; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2014-07-01

    We exposed Xenopus tropicalis embryos to a selective antagonist of retinoid X receptor (UVI3003). UVI3003 induced multiple malformations at the concentrations of 200-1000 μg/L after 48 h exposure. The most prominent malformations affected brains, eyes, cement gland and fins. UVI3003 also induced variable and divergent malformations at 250-1500 μg/L after 0-24 and 24-48 h exposure. Microarray analysis showed that seven genes (rps15, serp2, fmr1, cyp2e1, lrrc9, ugtla6 and LOC100490188) were differentially regulated in all three treatment groups after 0-24h exposure. The most significantly affected pathway was galactose metabolism. In 24-48 h exposure groups, 18 genes were differentially regulated, mainly comprising components of the PPAR signaling pathway. These results suggested that UVI3003 is teratogenic in amphibian embryos. Differential gene expression suggests that galactose metabolism and PPAR signaling pathways may provide underlying mechanistic detail accounting for the observed malformations. PMID:24950139

  4. Influence of dynamical conditions on the reduction of U(VI) at the magnetite-solution interface.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Boily, Jean-François; Buck, Edgar C; Skomurski, Frances N; Rosso, Kevin M; Cahill, Christopher L; Bargar, John R; Felmy, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    The heterogeneous reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by ferrous iron is believed to be a key process influencing the fate and transport of U in the environment. The reactivity of both sorbed and structural Fe(II) has been studied for numerous substrates, including magnetite. Published results from U(VI)-magnetite experiments have been variable, ranging from no reduction to clear evidence for the formation of U(IV). In this contribution, we used XAS and high resolution (+/-cryogenic) XPS to study the interaction of U(VI) with nanoparticulate magnetite. The results indicated that U(VI) was partially reduced to U(V) with no evidence of U(IV). However, thermodynamic calculations indicated that U phases with average oxidation states below (V) should have been stable, indicating that the system was not in redox equilibrium. A reaction pathway that involves incorporation and stabilization of U(V) and U(VI) into secondary phases is invoked to explain the observations. The results suggest an important and previously unappreciated role of U(V) in the fate and transport of uranium in the environment. PMID:20039748

  5. Influence of Calcite Solids and Dissolved Calcium on U(VI) Sorption and Desorption in Hanford Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.; Stone, Alan T.; Bai, Jing; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming

    2004-03-29

    We have investigated U(VI) sorption and desorption with batch experiments conducted on core samples from the Hanford, WA, site as well as on sub-fractions of these materials and laboratory-grade calcite. In these studies, [U(VI)] was varied between 10- 7 and 10-5 and pH between 7.2 to 10, at constant I (=0.05) and constant PCO2 (10-3.5 atm), using water that was saturated with respect to calcite. A carbonate-free (acetic acid- treated) fraction of silt/clay material showed higher sorption than untreated material, suggesting that carbonates block access to higher affinity sites. Of particular interest was that U(VI) sorption on untreated material was maximum at pH=8.4, with substantially less sorption at lower and higher pH and in contrast to results from calcite free studies, which show strong sorption at pH {approx} 5 to 8. U(VI) speciation results suggest that aqueous-phase Ca2UO2(CO3)3 was the source of the otherwise unexpectedly low sorption at pH <8.4.

  6. Analysis of Adsorbate-Adsorbate and Adsorbate-Adsorbent Interactions to Decode Isosteric Heats of Gas Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Madani, S Hadi; Sedghi, Saeid; Biggs, Mark J; Pendleton, Phillip

    2015-12-21

    A qualitative interpretation is proposed to interpret isosteric heats of adsorption by considering contributions from three general classes of interaction energy: fluid-fluid heat, fluid-solid heat, and fluid-high-energy site (HES) heat. Multiple temperature adsorption isotherms are defined for nitrogen, T=(75, 77, 79) K, argon at T=(85, 87, 89) K, and for water and methanol at T=(278, 288, 298) K on a well-characterized polymer-based, activated carbon. Nitrogen and argon are subjected to isosteric heat analyses; their zero filling isosteric heats of adsorption are consistent with slit-pore, adsorption energy enhancement modelling. Water adsorbs entirely via specific interactions, offering decreasing isosteric heat at low pore filling followed by a constant heat slightly in excess of water condensation enthalpy, demonstrating the effects of micropores. Methanol offers both specific adsorption via the alcohol group and non-specific interactions via its methyl group; the isosteric heat increases at low pore filling, indicating the predominance of non-specific interactions. PMID:26538339

  7. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  8. Cassini UVIS Solar Zenith Angle Studies of Titan Dayglow Based on N2 High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, Joseph; West, Robert; Holsclaw, Greg; Royer, Emilie; Heays, Alan; Bradley, Todd; Stevens, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed photon emissions of Titan’s day and night limb-airglow on multiple occasions, including during an eclipse observation. On one occasion the UVIS made a Solar Zenith Angle (SZA) study of the Titan limb dayglow (2011 DOY 171) from about 70 to 95 degrees SZA. The UV intensity variation observations of the N2 photoelectron excited spectral features from the EUV (563-118.2 nm) and FUV (111.5-191.2nm) sub-systems followed a Chapman function. For other observations at night on the limb, the emission features are much weaker in intensity. Beyond 120 deg SZA, when the upper atmosphere of Titan below 1200 km is in total XUV darkness, there is an indication of weak and sporadic night side UV airglow emission excited by magnetosphere plasma collisions with ambient thermosphere gas, with similar N2 excited features as above in the daylight or twilight glow over an extended altitude range. We have analyzed the UVIS airglow spectra with models based on high resolution laboratory electron impact induced fluorescence spectra. We have measured high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by electron impact at 20 and 100 eV. Molecular emission was observed to vibrationally-excited ground state levels as high as v''=17, from the a 1Πg , b 1Πu, and b‧ 1Σu+ excited valence states and the Rydberg series c‧n+1 1Σu+, cn 1Πu and o 1Πu for n between 3 and 9. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N2 electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets. Their emission cross sections were measured.The blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a model which solves the coupled-Schroedinger equation

  9. Predictive ability of four auroral precipitation models as evaluated using Polar UVI global images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P. T.; Sotirelis, T.; Liou, K.; Lee, A. R.; Wing, S.; Green, J.; Redmon, R.

    2010-12-01

    Auroral precipitation models have been valuable tools for several decades, but it has been difficult to estimate their objective accuracy. The use of global UV imagers, which make relatively instantaneous estimates of hemispheric auroral power, provides one approach forward. We present the first such validation and quantitative comparison of auroral precipitation models. Specifically, we correlated Polar UVI images with the predictions of four precipitation models. These are the Hardy Kp model, the Brautigam IMF-based model, the Evans nowcast model currently used at NOAA, and OVATION Prime, recently introduced by Newell and colleagues. Because calibration uncertainties exist for all particle detectors, and for imagers as well, we focus on correlation coefficients rather than the absolute magnitudes. To minimize dayglow, the nightside precipitating power (1800-0600 MLT) is considered and only for cases where that entire region is within the Polar UVI field of view. Also, only instances where each model has a prediction are considered (i.e., there must be IMF data, and there must be a NOAA satellite pass within the last 1 h). Altogether, 27,613 1 min ("instantaneous") images satisfied these criteria from 1996 to 1997. The four models investigated predict roughly half the variance in auroral power. From least to best at predicting instantaneous auroral power, the results are Brautigam IMF model (r = 0.68, r2 = 46%); Evans nowcast model (r = 0.70, r2 = 49%); Hardy Kp model (r = 0.72, r2 = 52%); and OVATION Prime IMF (r = 0.75, r2 = 56%). We also considered 1 h averages of UVI images. All four models improved, but the nowcast jumped from third to first: Brautigam IMF (r = 0.69, r2 = 48%); Hardy Kp (r = 0.74, r2 = 55%); OVATION Prime IMF (r = 0.76, r2 = 58%); Evans nowcast (r = 0.77, r2 = 59%). The nowcast approach benefits most from hourly averaging because at times more than one satellite pass is available. In principle, with enough satellites, the nowcast approach

  10. Surface complexation of U(VI) on goethite (α-FeOOH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, David M.; Peacock, Caroline L.; Hubbard, Christopher G.

    2008-01-01

    Sorption of U(VI) to goethite is a fundamental control on the mobility of uranium in soil and groundwater. Here, we investigated the sorption of U on goethite using EXAFS spectroscopy, batch sorption experiments and DFT calculations of the energetics and structures of possible surface complexes. Based on EXAFS spectra, it has previously been proposed that U(VI), as the uranyl cation UO22+, sorbs to Fe oxide hydroxide phases by forming a bidentate edge-sharing (E2) surface complex, >Fe(OH)2UO2(H2O)n. Here, we argue that this complex alone cannot account for the sorption capacity of goethite (α-FeOOH). Moreover, we show that all of the EXAFS signal attributed to the E2 complex can be accounted for by multiple scattering. We propose that the dominant surface complex in CO2-free systems is a bidentate corner-sharing (C2) complex, (>FeOH)2UO2(H2O)3 which can form on the dominant {101} surface. However, in the presence of CO2, we find an enhancement of UO2 sorption at low pH and attribute this to a (>FeO)CO2UO2 ternary complex. With increasing pH, U(VI) desorbs by the formation of aqueous carbonate and hydroxyl complexes. However, this desorption is preceded by the formation of a second ternary surface complex (>FeOH)2UO2CO3. The three proposed surface complexes, (>FeOH)2UO2(H2O)3, >FeOCO2UO2, and (>FeOH)2UO2CO3 are consistent with EXAFS spectra. Using these complexes, we developed a surface complexation model for U on goethite with a 1-pK model for surface protonation, an extended Stern model for surface electrostatics and inclusion of all known UO2-OH-CO3 aqueous complexes in the current thermodynamic database. The model gives an excellent fit to our sorption experiments done in both ambient and reduced CO2 environments at surface loadings of 0.02-2.0 wt% U.

  11. Site blocking effects on adsorbed polyacrylamide conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherson, Brett A.

    The use of polymers as flocculating additives is a common practice in many manufacturing environments. However, exactly how these polymers interact with surfaces is relatively unknown. One specific topic which is thought to be very important to flocculation is an adsorbed polymer's conformation. Substantial amounts of previous work, mainly using simulations, have been performed to elucidate the theory surrounding adsorbed polymer conformations. Yet, there is little experimental work which directly verifies current theory. In order to optimize the use of polymer flocculants in industrial applications, a better understanding of an adsorbed polymer's conformation on a surface beyond theoretical simulations is necessary. This work looks specifically at site blocking, which has a broad impact on flocculation, adsorption, and surface modification, and investigated its effects on the resulting adsorbed polymer conformation. Experimental methods which would allow direct determination of adsorbed polymer conformational details and be comparable with previous experimental results were first determined or developed. Characterization of an adsorbed polymer's conformation was then evaluated using dynamic light scattering, a currently accepted experimental technique to examine this. This commonly used technique was performed to allow the comparison of this works results with past literature. Next, a new technique using atomic force microscopy was developed, building on previous experimental techniques, to allow the direct determination of an adsorbed polymer's loop lengths. This method also was able to quantify changes in the length of adsorbed polymer tails. Finally, mesoscopic simulation was attempted using dissipative particle dynamics. In order to determine more information about an adsorbed polymer's conformation, three different environmental factors were analyzed: an adsorbed polymer on a surface in water, an adsorbed polymer on a surface in aqueous solutions of varying

  12. Simulating adsorption of U(VI) under transient groundwater flow and hydrochemistry: Physical versus chemical nonequilibrium model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greskowiak, J.; Hay, M.B.; Prommer, H.; Liu, C.; Post, V.E.A.; Ma, R.; Davis, J.A.; Zheng, C.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled intragrain diffusional mass transfer and nonlinear surface complexation processes play an important role in the transport behavior of U(VI) in contaminated aquifers. Two alternative model approaches for simulating these coupled processes were analyzed and compared: (1) the physical nonequilibrium approach that explicitly accounts for aqueous speciation and instantaneous surface complexation reactions in the intragrain regions and approximates the diffusive mass exchange between the immobile intragrain pore water and the advective pore water as multirate first-order mass transfer and (2) the chemical nonequilibrium approach that approximates the diffusion-limited intragrain surface complexation reactions by a set of multiple first-order surface complexation reaction kinetics, thereby eliminating the explicit treatment of aqueous speciation in the intragrain pore water. A model comparison has been carried out for column and field scale scenarios, representing the highly transient hydrological and geochemical conditions in the U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford 300A site, Washington, USA. It was found that the response of U(VI) mass transfer behavior to hydrogeochemically induced changes in U(VI) adsorption strength was more pronounced in the physical than in the chemical nonequilibrium model. The magnitude of the differences in model behavior depended particularly on the degree of disequilibrium between the advective and immobile phase U(VI) concentrations. While a clear difference in U(VI) transport behavior between the two models was noticeable for the column-scale scenarios, only minor differences were found for the Hanford 300A field scale scenarios, where the model-generated disequilibrium conditions were less pronounced as a result of frequent groundwater flow reversals. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Simulating adsorption of U(VI) under transient groundwater flow and hydrochemistry – Physical versus non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Greskowiak, Janek; Hay, Michael B.; Prommer, Henning; Liu, Chongxuan; Post, Vincent; Ma, Rui; Davis, James A.; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.

    2011-08-03

    Coupled intra-grain diffusional mass-transfer and non-linear surface complexation processes play an important role for the transport behaviour of U(VI) in contaminated aquifers. Two alternative model approaches for simulating these coupled processes have been analysed and compared: (i) the physical non-equilibrium approach that explicitly accounts for aqueous speciation and instantaneous surface complexation reactions in the intra-grain regions and approximates the diffusive mass exchange between the immobile intra-grain pore water and the advective pore water as multi-rate 1st-order mass transfer and (ii) the chemical non-equilibrium approach that approximates the diffusion-limited intra-grain surface complexation reactions by a set of multiple 1st-order surface complexation reaction kinetics, thereby eliminating the explicit treatment of aqueous speciation in the intra grain pore water. Model comparison has been carried out for column and field scale scenarios, representing the highly transient hydrological and geochemical conditions in the U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford 300A site, Washington, USA. It was found that the response of apparent U(VI) adsorption/desorption kinetic behaviour to hydrogeochemically induced changes in U(VI) sorption strength is more pronounced in the physical than in the chemical non-equilibrium model. The magnitude of the differences in model behaviour depends particularly on the degree of disequilibrium between the advective and immobile phase U(VI) concentrations. While a clear difference in U(VI) transport behaviour between the two models was noticeable for the column-scale scenarios, only minor differences were found for the Hanford 300A field scale scenarios, where the model-generated disequilibrium conditions were less pronounced as a result of high frequent groundwater flow reversals.

  14. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediments from a former mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyun, S.P.; Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Campbell, K.M.; Hayes, K.F.; Long, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    A study of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediment samples from a former uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado, was conducted under oxic conditions as a function of pH, U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentration. Batch adsorption experiments were performed using <2mm size sediment fractions, a sand-sized fraction, and artificial groundwater solutions prepared to simulate the field groundwater composition. To encompass the geochemical conditions of the alluvial aquifer at the site, the experimental conditions ranged from 6.8 ?? 10-8 to 10-5 M in [U(VI)]tot, 7.2 to 8.0 in pH, 3.0 ?? 10-3 to 6.0 ?? 10 -3 M in [Ca2+], and 0.05 to 2.6% in partial pressure of carbon dioxide. Surface area normalized U(VI) adsorption Kd values for the sand and <2 mm sediment fraction were similar, suggesting a similar reactive surface coating on both fractions. A two-site two-reaction, nonelectrostatic generalized composite surface complexation model was developed and successfully simulated the U(VI) adsorption data. The model successfully predicted U(VI) adsorption observed from a multilevel sampling well installed at the site. A comparison of the model with the one developed previously for a uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado, indicated that possible calcite nonequilibrium of dissolved calcium concentration should be evaluated. The modeling results also illustrate the importance of the range of data used in deriving the best fit model parameters. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  15. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  16. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  17. States of water adsorbed on perindopril crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. A.; Khmelevskaya, V. S.; Bogdanov, N. Yu.; Gorchakov, K. A.

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between the structural state of adsorbed water, the crystal structure of the substances, and the solubility of the perindopril salt C19H32N2O5 · C4H11N in water was studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The high-frequency shift of the stretching vibrations of adsorbed water and the solubility depend on the crystal structure of the drug substance. A reversible chemical reaction occurred between the adsorbed water and the perindopril salt.

  18. Direct Observation of the Photodegradation of Anthracene and Pyrene Adsorbed onto Mangrove Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Wu, Tun-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    An established synchronous fluorimetry method was used for in situ investigation of the photodegradation of pyrene (PYR) and anthracene (ANT) adsorbed onto fresh leaves of the seedlings of two mangrove species, Aegiceras corniculatum (L.) Blanco (Ac) and Kandelia obovata (Ko) in multicomponent mixtures (mixture of the ANT and PYR). Experimental results indicated that photodegradation was the main transformation pathway for both ANT and PYR in multicomponent mixtures. The amount of the PAHs volatilizing from the leaf surfaces and entering the inner leaf tissues was negligible. Over a certain period of irradiation time, the photodegradation of both PYR and ANT adsorbed onto the leaves of Ac and Ko followed first-order kinetics, with faster rates being observed on Ac leaves. In addition, the photodegradation rate of PYR on the leaves of the mangrove species in multicomponent mixtures was much slower than that of adsorbed ANT. Compared with the PAHs adsorbed as single component, the photodegradation rate of ANT adsorbed in multicomponent mixtures was slower, while that of PYR was faster. Moreover, the photodegradation of PYR and ANT dissolved in water in multicomponent mixtures was investigated for comparison. The photodegradation rate on leaves was much slower than in water. Therefore, the physical-chemical properties of the substrate may strongly influence the photodegradation rate of adsorbed PAHs. PMID:25144741

  19. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  20. Optical and radiometric models of the NOMAD instrument part I: the UVIS channel.

    PubMed

    Vandaele, Ann C; Willame, Yannick; Depiesse, Cédric; Thomas, Ian R; Robert, Séverine; Bolsée, David; Patel, Manish R; Mason, Jon P; Leese, Mark; Lesschaeve, Stefan; Antoine, Philippe; Daerden, Frank; Delanoye, Sofie; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eddy; Ristic, Bojan; Lopez-Moreno, José-Juan; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Team, Nomad

    2015-11-16

    The NOMAD instrument has been designed to best fulfil the science objectives of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission that will be launched in 2016. The instrument is a combination of three channels that cover the UV, visible and IR spectral ranges and can perform solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. In this series of two papers, we present the optical models representing the three channels of the instrument and use them to determine signal to noise levels for different observation modes and Martian conditions. In this first part, we focus on the UVIS channel, which will sound the Martian atmosphere using nadir and solar occultation viewing modes, covering the 200-650nm spectral range. High SNR levels (>1000) can easily be reached for wavelengths higher than 300nm both in solar occultation and nadir modes when considering binning. Below 300nm SNR are lower primarily because of the lower signal and the impact of atmospheric absorption. PMID:26698484

  1. Acceleration of Microbially Mediated U(VI) Reduction at a Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Phil Long; Todd Anderson; Aaron Peacock; Steve Heald; Yun-Juan Chang; Dick Dayvault; Derek R. Lovley; C.T. Resch; Helen Vrionis; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; D.C. White

    2004-03-17

    A second field-scale electron donor amendment experiment was conducted in 2003 at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in Rifle, Colorado. The objective of the 2003 experiment (done in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy's UMTRA Groundwater Project) was to test the hypothesis that amendment of increased concentration of electron donor would result in an increased export of electron donor down gradient which in turn would create a larger zone of down-gradient U(VI) bioreduction sustained over a longer time period relative to the 2002 experiment (Anderson et al. 2003). During the first experiment (2002), {approx}3 mM acetate was amended to subsurface over a period of 3 months in a 15m by 18m by 2.5m volume comprised of 3 upgradient monitoring wells, 20 injection wells, and 15 down-gradient monitoring wells. After an initial one-month phase of metal reduction, bioavailable oxidized Fe was consumed near the injection gallery and the dominant terminal electron accepting process became sulfate reduction, rapidly consuming the injected acetate. For the 2003 experiment, we amended sufficient acetate ({approx}10 mM) to consume available sulfate and export acetate down-gradient where bioavailable oxidized Fe was still present. Data from the experiment indicate that acetate was exported further down gradient, resulting in a larger zone of microbial U(VI) reduction than for the 2002 experiment. Geohydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological data collected during the course of both experiments enable assessment of relative importance of a number of factors controlling the experimental outcomes. Companion posters by Anderson et al. and White et al. provide additional results.

  2. Ionospheric Convection in the Postnoon Auroral Oval: SuperDARN and Polar UVI Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, A.; Koustov, A.; Lyatsky, W.; Kangas, J.; Parks, G.; Chua, D.

    2002-01-01

    Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) observations, ultraviolet imaging from the Polar satellite (UVI), and particle precipitation data from DMSP satellites have been used to investigate the electrodynamics of the postnoon auroral oval in the Northern hemisphere. We show that: (1) For negative IMF By, the convection reversal (CR) was co-located with the maximum of auroral luminosity, but during positive IMF By the convection reversal was poleward of the auroral oval up to several degrees in latitude; (2) Postnoon auroral oval was associated with a large-scale upward field-aligned current (FAC) of the order of 6x10(exp -7). A m(exp -2) in magnitude (the FAC was inferred from the SuperDARN and UVI data). For negative IMF By, maximum of the auroral intensity coincides in latitude with the maximum of the upward field-aligned current. However, for positive IMF By. the maximum of the upward FAC was shifted to the poleward edge of the auroral oval; (3) In response to the IMF By turning from positive to negative, the maximum of the auroral luminosity did not change its position noticeably, but the position of the convection reversal changed considerably from 80-81 degs to about 76 degs MLAT, and the maximum of FAC moved from 77-78 degs to about 76 degs MLAT. Thus, after IMF By turns negative, both the FAC maximum and CR tend to coincide with the auroral maximum; (4) The IMF Bz positive deflection was followed by a decrease in both field-aligned current intensity and auroral luminosity. However, the decrease in the auroral luminosity lags behind the FAC decrease by about 12 min. Firstly, these observations allow us to suggest that the IMF By-related electric field can penetrate into the closed magnetosphere and produce convection and FAC changes in the region of the postnoon auroral oval. Secondly, we suggest that the interchange instability is a promising mechanism for the postnoon auroras.

  3. Cassini UVIS Observations of the Io Plasma Torus. 3; Observations of Temporal and Azimuthal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffl, A. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2006-01-01

    In this third paper in a series presenting observations by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) of the Io plasma torus, we show remarkable, though subtle, spatio-temporal variations in torus properties. The Io torus is found to exhibit significant, near sinusoidal variations in ion composition as a functions of azimuthal position. The azimuthal variation in composition is such that the mixing ratio of S II us strongly correlated with the mixing ratio of S III and the equatorial electron density and strongly anti-correlated with the mixing ratios of both S IV and O II and the equatorial electron temperature. Surprisingly, the azimuthal variation in ion composition is observed to have a period of 10.07 h -- 1.5% longer than the System III rotation period of Jupiter, yet 1.3% shorter than the System UV period defined by [Brown, M. E., 1995. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 21683-21696]. Although the amplitude of the azimuthal variation of S III and O II remained in the range of 2-5%, the amplitude of the S II and S IV compositional variation ranged between 5 and 25% during the UVIS observations. Furthermore, the amplitude of the azimuthal variations of S II and S IV appears to be modulated by its location in System III longitude, such that when the region of maximum S II mixing ration (minimum S IV mixing ratio) is aligned with a System III longitude of 200 deg +/-, the amplitude is a factor of 4 greater than when the variation is anti-aligned. This behavior can explain numerous, often apparently contradictory, observations of variations in the properties of the Io plasma torus with the System III and System IV coordinate systems.

  4. IR investigations of surfaces and adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn Williams

    2001-12-10

    Synchrotron infrared reflection-absorption measurements on single crystal metal surfaces with adsorbates have led to the determination of many key parameters related to the bonding vibrational modes and the dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, energy couplings between electrons and adsorbate motion have been shown to be a dominant mechanism on metal surfaces. Excellent agreement has been obtained with calculations for many of the observations, and the synergy between theory and experiment has led to a deeper understanding of the roles of electrons and phonons in determining the properties of interfaces and their roles in phenomena as diverse as friction, lubrication, catalysis and adhesion. Nonetheless, as the experiments are pushed harder, to describe such effects as co-adsorbed systems, disagreements continue to challenge the theory and our comprehension also is still evolving.

  5. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  6. Examining Adsorbed Polymer Conformations with Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Maria; Chennaoui, Mourad; Wong, Janet; Tribology Group, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Team

    2011-03-01

    The conformation of adsorbed polymers can have significant impact on their properties such as dynamics and elasticity as well as their ability to take part in reactions with other molecules. Experimental research to determine adsorbed polymer conformation has relied mainly on atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. During an AFM scan, the contact between the scanning probe and the polymer could affect the polymer conformation, particularly where parts of the polymer might have formed projected loops and tails. In this work, conformations of model polymers are examined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The advantage of TIRFM over AFM is that TIRFM is a non contact technique. Lambda DNA labelled along its length with fluorescent probes was adsorbed in a projected 2D -- 3D state. With TIRFM, the relationship between intensity and depth was used as a basis to determine how the conformation of the adsorbed polymers evolved with time using our custom algorithm.

  7. Dispersed-phase adsorbents for biotechnology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of adsorbent material has been developed in which very small adsorbent particles are entrapped in a hydrocolloidal gel matrix that is formed into small, monodisperse spherical beads. Examples of applications of this type of material include dispersed, hydrous transition metal oxides that can be used for the retention of biocatalysts, such as enzymes, and certain microorganisms or microbial fragments that can be dispersed into the gel matrix to accumulate and isolate various dissolved metals. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  9. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  10. Mesoporous Silica: A Suitable Adsorbent for Amines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous silica with KIT-6 structure was investigated as a preconcentrating material in chromatographic systems for ammonia and trimethylamine. Its adsorption capacity was compared to that of existing commercial materials, showing its increased adsorption power. In addition, KIT-6 mesoporous silica efficiently adsorbs both gases, while none of the employed commercial adsorbents did. This means that KIT-6 Mesoporous silica may be a good choice for integrated chromatography/gas sensing micro-devices. PMID:20628459

  11. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  12. Thiophilic adsorbents for RIA and ELISA procedures.

    PubMed

    Oscarsson, S; Chaga, G; Porath, J

    1991-10-25

    Three types of agarose derivatives have been prepared and investigated as adsorbents for radioimmunoassay and ELISA analysis. The analytical systems were evaluated using beta 2 microglobulin as a model. After a competitive reaction between the immunocomponents in solution, the formed immune complexes were adsorbed onto the adsorbent in the presence of 0.5 M potassium sulfate in 0.1 M Tris, pH 7.5. The binding constant between the interaction site on human IgG and the adsorbent 3-(2-pyridylthio)-2-hydroxypropylagarose (Py-S-gel) was determined to be 1.5 x 10(7) M-1 and the binding capacity was 20 mg/ml gel. The immune complex was desorbed by deleting potassium sulfate from the buffer, and only 0.5% of the total applied protein remained after washing the adsorbent with 0.5 M NaOH. The same adsorbent can be used repetitively with different systems. PMID:1940385

  13. Photochemistry of Nitrate Adsorbed on Mineral Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gankanda, A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust particles in the atmosphere are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides including HNO3 and NO2. Although nitrate ion is a well-studied chromophore in natural waters, the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on mineral dust particles is yet to be fully explored. In this study, wavelength dependence of the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on different model components of mineral dust aerosol has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Al2O3, TiO2 and NaY zeolite were used as model systems to represent non-photoactive oxides, photoactive semiconductor oxides and porous materials respectively, present in mineral dust aerosol. In this study, adsorbed nitrate is irradiated with 254 nm, 310 nm and 350 nm narrow band light. In the irradiation with narrow band light, NO2 is the only detectable gas-phase product formed from nitrate adsorbed on Al2O3 and TiO2. The NO2 yield is highest at 310 nm for both Al2O3 and TiO2. Unlike Al2O3 and TiO2, in zeolite, adsorbed nitrate photolysis to nitrite is observed only at 310 nm during narrow band irradiation. Moreover gas phase products were not detected during nitrate photolysis in zeolite at all three wavelengths. The significance of these differences as related to nitrate photochemistry on different mineral dust components will be highlighted.

  14. Mediated electron transfer between Fe(II) adsorbed onto hydrous ferric oxide and a working electrode.

    PubMed

    Klein, Annaleise R; Silvester, Ewen; Hogan, Conor F

    2014-09-16

    The redox properties of Fe(II) adsorbed onto mineral surfaces have been highly studied over recent years due to the wide range of environmental contaminants that react with this species via abiotic processes. In this work the reactivity of Fe(II) adsorbed onto hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) has been studied using ferrocene (bis-cyclopentadienyl iron(II); Fc) derivatives as electron shuttles in cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments. The observed amplification of the ferrocene oxidation peak in CV is attributed to reaction between the electrochemically generated ferrocenium (Fc(+)) ion and adsorbed Fe(II) species in a catalytic process (EC' mechanism). pH dependence studies show that the reaction rate increases with Fe(II) adsorption and is maintained in the absence of aqueous Fe(2+), providing strong evidence that the electron transfer process involves the adsorbed species. The rate of reaction between Fc(+) and adsorbed Fe(II) increases with the redox potential of the ferrocene derivative, as expected, with bimolecular rate constants in the range 10(3)-10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The ferrocene-mediated electrochemical method described has considerable promise in the development of a technique for measuring electron-transfer rates in geochemical and environmental systems. PMID:25157830

  15. Determining the Desorption Kinetics of U(VI) from Contaminated Sediments Under Complex and Changing Solution Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, M. B.; Curtis, G. P.; Johnson, K. J.; Greskowiak, J.; Davis, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Uranium(VI) transport in contaminated sediments is strongly controlled by the thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption on mineral surfaces. Many studies on natural sediments and synthetic mineral phases have demonstrated the dependence of U(VI) sorption equilibrium on aqueous chemical conditions, with alkalinity, pH, ionic strength, and Ca concentration of particular importance in many natural systems. Desorption of U(VI) from contaminated sediments from DOE sites in Hanford, WA, Rifle, CO, and Naturita, CO also exhibits a significant kinetic limitation, with timescales of several weeks to months required to reach desorption equilibrium in some cases. This kinetic limitation is believed to be due to diffusion in intragranular pore space, which includes small fractures within grains and pores within clay aggregates and grain coatings. Development of appropriate reactive transport models that can be applied to predict the fate and transport of U(VI) in contaminated aquifers relies on accurately quantifying sorption equilibrium and kinetics at the grain scale, which vary from site to site based on sediment characteristics. This analysis typically involves laboratory batch- and column-scale adsorption/desorption experiments performed under a variety of chemical conditions to fully constrain surface complexation and kinetic models, requiring a constant set of chemical conditions over the duration of the experiment. In practice, however, this can be difficult in experiments aiming to quantify long-term kinetics (weeks to months time scale), due to slow ion exchange, mineral dissolution/precipitation, and redox processes. Long-term changes in solution conditions affect U(VI) sorption equilibrium, making it necessary to determine model parameters for U(VI) surface complexation, diffusion kinetics, and chemical weathering/ion exchange processes simultaneously from a given data set. We will present kinetic surface complexation model results obtained for size

  16. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications. PMID:27131811

  17. Micro- and Nano-scale Diffusion Domains Acting as Kinetic Controls for U(VI) Release to the Hanford 300-Area Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D. L.; Hay, M. B.; Davis, J. A.; Zachara, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The 300-Area of the Hanford reservation, a cold-war era nuclear processing facility, is plagued by long-term elevated concentrations of U(VI) in the underlying aquifer. While the sediment U(VI) concentration is relatively low, it continues to act as a source and sink for the contaminant, allowing for persistent groundwater concentrations well above the maximum contamination limit (MCL). Simple Kd modeling of the attenuation of U(VI) in the aquifer predicted that groundwater U(VI) concentrations would decrease to below the drinking water standard by the year 2002. However, grain-scale morphology of the aquifer material suggests that intra-grain flow paths and mineral coatings, in which sorption complexes and precipitates formed over years of waste disposal, provide a significant kinetic constraint that slows groundwater flushing of the sediments. In order to quantify the impact of diffusion kinetics on the release of U(VI), high-resolution, non-reactive tracer studies were conducted on vadose zone sediments in both column and batch reactors. Systems were equilibrated for long time scales with tritated artificial groundwater and then flushed with flow and stop-flow events included for columns. Previously collected U(VI) release data from batch dissolution/desorption studies is compared with tritium tracer diffusion kinetics as well as porosimetry and detailed microscopy characterization. The micro-scale and nano-scale diffusion regimes, including intra-granular regions as well as mineral coatings, represent a significant potential long-term source of contaminant U(VI). Understanding the physical kinetic limitations coupled with the complex chemistry of U(VI) sorption processes within natural systems is an important step forward in providing information to strengthen field-scale reactive transport simulations.

  18. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in Carbonate and Sulfate Minerals Crystallized from Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Morrison, Jessica M.; Wang, Zheming; Engelhard, Mark H.; Burns, Peter C.

    2015-02-15

    The neptunyl Np(V)O2 + and uranyl U(VI)O2 2+ ions are soluble in groundwater, although their interaction with minerals in the subsurface may impact their mobility. One mechanism for the immobilization of actinyl ions in the subsurface is coprecipitation in low-temperature minerals that form naturally, or that are induced to form as part of a remediation strategy. Important differences in the crystal-chemical behavior of the Np(V) neptunyl and U(VI) uranyl ions suggest their behavior towards incorporation into growing crystals may differ significantly. Using a selection of low temperature minerals synthesized in aqueous systems under ambient conditions, this study examines the factors that impact the structural incorporation of the Np(V) neptunyl and U(VI) uranyl ions in carbonate and sulfate minerals.

  19. Adsorbate modification of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of ferromagnetic fcc {110} surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, D. S. D.; Jenkins, Stephen J.

    2011-03-01

    We identify trends in structural, electronic, and magnetic modifications that occur on ferromagnetic {110} surfaces upon varying either the substrate material or the adsorbate species. First, we have modeled the adsorption of several first-row p-block elements on the surface of fcc Co{110} at two coverages [0.5 and 1.0 monolayer (ML)]. All adsorbates were found to expand the distance between the first and second substrate layers and to contract the distance between the second and third layers. The energetic location of a characteristic trough in the density-of-d-states difference plot correlates with the direction of the adsorbate magnetic coupling to the surface, and a trend of antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic coupling to the surface was observed across the elements from boron to fluorine. A high fluorine adatom coverage (1.0 ML) was found to enhance the surface spin magnetic moment by 11%. Second, we also calculate and contrast adsorption of 0.5 and 1.0 ML of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen adatoms on fcc iron, cobalt, and nickel {110} surfaces and compare the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of these systems. Carbon and nitrogen are found to couple antiferromagnetically, and oxygen ferromagnetically, to all surfaces. It was found that antiferromagnetically coupled adsorbates retained their largest spin moment values on iron, whereas ferromagnetically coupled adsorbates possessed their lowest moments on this surface. The strongly localized influence of these adsorbates is clearly illustrated in partial density-of-states plots for the surface atoms.

  20. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Katsenovich, Yelena P.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel E.

    2012-05-01

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) release from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO2)(PO4)]2•3H2O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of the Arthrobacter oxydans G975 strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorous-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate (ranging between 1 and 10 mM) in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with the G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEM observations indicated that G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile culture-ware with inserts was used in non-contact dissolution experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest that G975 bacteria is able to enhance the release of U(VI) from autunite without direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the release of U(VI) from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.

  1. Redox Interactions of Tc(VII), U(VI), and Np(V) with Microbially Reduced Biotite and Chlorite.

    PubMed

    Brookshaw, Diana R; Pattrick, Richard A D; Bots, Pieter; Law, Gareth T W; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Mosselmans, J Fredrick W; Vaughan, David J; Dardenne, Kathy; Morris, Katherine

    2015-11-17

    Technetium, uranium, and neptunium are contaminants that cause concern at nuclear facilities due to their long half-life, environmental mobility, and radiotoxicity. Here we investigate the impact of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in biotite and chlorite and the role that this has in enhancing mineral reactivity toward soluble TcO4(-), UO2(2+), and NpO2(+). When reacted with unaltered biotite and chlorite, significant sorption of U(VI) occurred in low carbonate (0.2 mM) buffer, while U(VI), Tc(VII), and Np(V) showed low reactivity in high carbonate (30 mM) buffer. On reaction with the microbially reduced minerals, all radionuclides were removed from solution with U(VI) reactivity influenced by carbonate. Analysis by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) confirmed reductive precipitation to poorly soluble U(IV) in low carbonate conditions and both Tc(VII) and Np(V) in high carbonate buffer were also fully reduced to poorly soluble Tc(IV) and Np(IV) phases. U(VI) reduction was inhibited under high carbonate conditions. Furthermore, EXAFS analysis suggested that in the reaction products, Tc(IV) was associated with Fe, Np(IV) formed nanoparticulate NpO2, and U(IV) formed nanoparticulate UO2 in chlorite and was associated with silica in biotite. Overall, microbial reduction of the Fe(III) associated with biotite and chlorite primed the minerals for reductive scavenging of radionuclides: this has clear implications for the fate of radionuclides in the environment. PMID:26488884

  2. Effects of the Anaerobic Respiration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the Stability of Extracellular U(VI) Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shenghua; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (VI) is considered to be one of the most widely dispersed and problematic environmental contaminants, due in large part to its high solubility and great mobility in natural aquatic systems. We previously reported that under anaerobic conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown in medium containing uranyl acetate rapidly accumulated long, extracellular, ultrafine U(VI) nanofibers composed of polycrystalline chains of discrete meta-schoepite (UO3·2H2O) nanocrystallites. Wild-type MR-1 finally transformed the uranium (VI) nanofibers to uranium (IV) nanoparticles via further reduction. In order to investigate the influence of the respiratory chain in the uranium transformation process, a series of mutant strains lacking a periplasmic cytochrome MtrA, outer membrane (OM) cytochrome MtrC and OmcA, a tetraheme cytochrome CymA anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane, and a trans-OM protein MtrB, were tested in this study. Although all the mutants produced U(VI) nanofibers like the wild type, the transformation rates from U(VI) nanofibers to U(IV) nanoparticles varied; in particular, the mutant with deletion in tetraheme cytochrome CymA stably maintained the uranium (VI) nanofibers, suggesting that the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 is probably involved in the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers, which might be easily treated via the physical processes of filtration or flocculation for the remediation of uranium contamination in sediments and aquifers, as well as the recovery of uranium in manufacturing processes. PMID:23719584

  3. Effects of the anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shenghua; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (VI) is considered to be one of the most widely dispersed and problematic environmental contaminants, due in large part to its high solubility and great mobility in natural aquatic systems. We previously reported that under anaerobic conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown in medium containing uranyl acetate rapidly accumulated long, extracellular, ultrafine U(VI) nanofibers composed of polycrystalline chains of discrete meta-schoepite (UO(3)·2H2O) nanocrystallites. Wild-type MR-1 finally transformed the uranium (VI) nanofibers to uranium (IV) nanoparticles via further reduction. In order to investigate the influence of the respiratory chain in the uranium transformation process, a series of mutant strains lacking a periplasmic cytochrome MtrA, outer membrane (OM) cytochrome MtrC and OmcA, a tetraheme cytochrome CymA anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane, and a trans-OM protein MtrB, were tested in this study. Although all the mutants produced U(VI) nanofibers like the wild type, the transformation rates from U(VI) nanofibers to U(IV) nanoparticles varied; in particular, the mutant with deletion in tetraheme cytochrome CymA stably maintained the uranium (VI) nanofibers, suggesting that the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 is probably involved in the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers, which might be easily treated via the physical processes of filtration or flocculation for the remediation of uranium contamination in sediments and aquifers, as well as the recovery of uranium in manufacturing processes. PMID:23719584

  4. Simultaneous adsorption and reduction of U(VI) on reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yubing; Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangke

    2014-09-15

    The reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO) composites were synthesized by chemical deposition method and were characterized by SEM, high resolution TEM, Raman and potentiometric acid-base titrations. The characteristic results showed that the nZVI nanoparticles can be uniformly dispersed on the surface of rGO. The removal of U(VI) on nZVI/rGO composites as a function of contact time, pH and U(VI) initial concentration was investigated by batch technique. The removal kinetics of U(VI) on nZVI and nZVI/rGO were well simulated by a pseudo-first-order kinetic model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. The presence of rGO on nZVI nanoparticles increased the reaction rate and removal capacity of U(VI) significantly, which was attributed to the chemisorbed OH(-) groups of rGO and the massive enrichment of Fe(2+) on rGO surface by XPS analysis. The XRD analysis revealed that the presence of rGO retarded the transformation of iron corrosion products from magnetite/maghemite to lepidocrocite. According to the fitting of EXAFS spectra, the UC (at ∼2.9Å) and UFe (at ∼3.2Å) shells were observed, indicating the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes on nZVI/rGO composites. Therefore, the nZVI/rGO composites can be suitable as efficient materials for the in-situ remediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater in the environmental pollution management. PMID:25194557

  5. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Katsenovich, Yelena; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel

    2012-04-20

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) leaching from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4})]{sub 2} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding into important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of G975 Arthrobacter oxydans strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorus-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate ranging between 1-10 mM in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEM observations indicated G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile cultureware with inserts was used in non-contact bioleaching experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest the G975 bacteria is able to enhance U(VI) leaching from autunite without the direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the U(VI) bioleaching from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.

  6. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  7. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  8. Modeling Reduction of Uranium U(VI) under Variable Sulfate Concentrations by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spear, John R.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics for the reduction of sulfate alone and for concurrent uranium [U(VI)] and sulfate reduction, by mixed and pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at 21 ± 3°C were studied. The mixed culture contained the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris along with a Clostridium sp. determined via 16S ribosomal DNA analysis. The pure culture was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 7757). A zero-order model best fit the data for the reduction of sulfate from 0.1 to 10 mM. A lag time occurred below cell concentrations of 0.1 mg (dry weight) of cells/ml. For the mixed culture, average values for the maximum specific reaction rate, Vmax, ranged from 2.4 ± 0.2 μmol of sulfate/mg (dry weight) of SRB · h−1) at 0.25 mM sulfate to 5.0 ± 1.1 μmol of sulfate/mg (dry weight) of SRB · h−1 at 10 mM sulfate (average cell concentration, 0.52 mg [dry weight]/ml). For the pure culture, Vmax was 1.6 ± 0.2 μmol of sulfate/mg (dry weight) of SRB · h−1 at 1 mM sulfate (0.29 mg [dry weight] of cells/ml). When both electron acceptors were present, sulfate reduction remained zero order for both cultures, while uranium reduction was first order, with rate constants of 0.071 ± 0.003 mg (dry weight) of cells/ml · min−1 for the mixed culture and 0.137 ± 0.016 mg (dry weight) of cells/ml · min−1 (U0 = 1 mM) for the D. desulfuricans culture. Both cultures exhibited a faster rate of uranium reduction in the presence of sulfate and no lag time until the onset of U reduction in contrast to U alone. This kinetics information can be used to design an SRB-dominated biotreatment scheme for the removal of U(VI) from an aqueous source. PMID:10966381

  9. Molecular Insights into the pH-Dependent Adsorption and Removal of Ionizable Antibiotic Oxytetracycline by Adsorbent Cyclodextrin Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Cai, Xiyun; Xiong, Weina; Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Haitong; Yang, Xianhai; Li, Chao; Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Effects of pH on adsorption and removal efficiency of ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) by environmental adsorbents are an area of debate, because of its dual mediation towards adsorbents and adsorbate. Here, we probe the pH-dependent adsorption of ionizable antibiotic oxytetracycline (comprising OTCH2+, OTCH±, OTC−, and OTC2−) onto cyclodextrin polymers (CDPs) with the nature of molecular recognition and pH inertness. OTCH± commonly has high adsorption affinity, OTC− exhibits moderate affinity, and the other two species have negligible affinity. These species are evidenced to selectively interact with structural units (e.g., CD cavity, pore channel, and network) of the polymers and thus immobilized onto the adsorbents to different extents. The differences in adsorption affinity and mechanisms of the species account for the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. The mathematical equations are derived from the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of quantitatively relating adsorption affinity of OTC at varying pH to adsorbent properties. A combination of the MLR analysis for OTC and molecular recognition of adsorption of the species illustrates the nature of the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. Based on this finding, γ-HP-CDP is chosen to adsorb and remove OTC at pH 5.0 and 7.0, showing high removal efficiency and strong resistance to the interference of coexisting components. PMID:24465975

  10. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Shi, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

  11. Method for modifying trigger level for adsorber regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.

    2010-05-25

    A method for modifying a NO.sub.x adsorber regeneration triggering variable. Engine operating conditions are monitored until the regeneration triggering variable is met. The adsorber is regenerated and the adsorbtion efficiency of the adsorber is subsequently determined. The regeneration triggering variable is modified to correspond with the decline in adsorber efficiency. The adsorber efficiency may be determined using an empirically predetermined set of values or by using a pair of oxygen sensors to determine the oxygen response delay across the sensors.

  12. Reactions of the feldspar surface with metal ions: Sorption of Pb(II), U(VI) and Np(V), and surface analytical studies of reaction with Pb(II) and U(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardon, Emmanuelle S.; Bosbach, Dirk; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Lyon, Ian C.; Marquardt, Christian; Römer, Jürgen; Schild, Dieter; Vaughan, David J.; Wincott, Paul L.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Livens, Francis R.

    2008-01-01

    Feldspar minerals are thermodynamically unstable in the near-surface environment and their surfaces are well known to react readily with aqueous solutions, leading to incongruent dissolution at low pH values, but congruent dissolution at neutral and high pH values. Interactions with mineral surfaces are an important control on the environmental transport of trace elements and detrital feldspars are abundant in soils and sediments. However, the interactions of metal ions in solution with the reacting feldspar surface have not been widely explored. The interactions of Pb(II), U(VI) and Np(V) ions with the feldspar surface have therefore been studied. Lead is taken up by the microcline surface at pH 6 and 10, but no uptake could be measured at pH 2. There was measurable uptake of Pb(II) on the plagioclase surface at pH 2, 6 and 10. Uptake always increased with pH. In most conditions, Pb(II) reacts through cation exchange process although, at high pH, a discrete phase, probably hydrocerrusite, is observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) to precipitate on the plagioclase surface. Supersaturation with hydrocerrusite in these conditions is expected from thermodynamic calculations. Uptake of uranyl ion (UO22+), generally through surface complex formation, could only be measured at pH 6 and 10. At pH 6 and an initial U(VI) concentration above 21.0 μM, precipitation of becquerelite (Ca[(UO2)3O2(OH)3]2·8H2O), identified by AFM and characterised by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, is observed on plagioclase. The U(VI) concentration range in which becquerelite precipitation begins (dissolved U(VI) 1-5 μM) is consistent with that predicted from thermodynamic modelling. On plagioclase feldspar, secondary ion mass spectrometry showed diffusion of uranium into the altered surface layer. Uptake of the neptunyl ion (Np(V)) was found at pH 6 and 10 for microcline and at pH 2, 6 and 10 for plagioclase, and was generally lower than uptake of

  13. Promotion of CO oxidation on PdO(101) by adsorbed H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juhee; Pan, Li; Mehar, Vikram; Zhang, Feng; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the influence of adsorbed H2O on the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) using temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that water inhibits CO adsorption on PdO(101) by site blocking, but also provides a more facile pathway for CO oxidation compared with the bare oxide surface. In the presence of adsorbed H2O, the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) produces a CO2 TPRS peak that is centered at a temperature ~ 50 K lower than the main CO2 TPRS peak arising from CO oxidation on clean PdO(101) (~ 330 vs. 380 K). RAIRS shows that CO continues to adsorb on atop-Pd sites of PdO(101) when H2O is co-adsorbed, and provides no evidence of other reactive intermediates. DFT calculations predict that the CO oxidation mechanism follows the same steps for CO adsorbed on PdO(101) with and without co-adsorbed H2O, wherein an atop-CO species recombines with an oxygen atom from the oxide surface lattice. According to DFT, hydrogen bonding interactions with adsorbed H2O species stabilize the carboxyl-like transition structure and intermediate that result from the initial recombination of CO and O on the PdO(101) surface. This stabilization lowers the energy barrier for CO oxidation on PdO(101) by ~ 10 kJ/mol, in good agreement with our experimental estimate.

  14. [Ability of typical greenery shrubs of Beijing to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 ].

    PubMed

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yun-qi; Zhang, Hui-lan; Yang, Song-nan; Li, Ang

    2014-09-01

    Four typical types of green shrubs of Beijing (Euonymus japonicus, Buxus microphylla, Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea, Taxus cuspidate cv. nana) were selected to study their capacities in adsorbing and arresting PM2.5 using both field observations and air chamber simulations. Concurrently, in order to analyze the pollution characteristics of Beijing in winter and spring, the PM2.5 concentrations of December 2012 to May 2013 were collected. Experimental results showed that: From the gas chamber experiments, the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 was in the order of Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea > Buxus microphylla > Taxus cuspidate cv. nana > Euonymus japonicus, mainly due to the differences in leaf characteristics; Outside measurement results showed that the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 was ranked as Buxus microphylla > Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea > Taxus cuspidate cv. nana > Euonymus japonicus. Chamber simulation and outdoor observation showed that Buxus microphylla and Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea had strong ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5; Meanwhile, the slight differences between the chamber simulation and outdoor observation results might be related to plant structure. Compared to tree species, the planting condition of shrub species was loose, and it greened quickly; By analyzing the Beijing PM2.5 concentration values in winter and spring, it was found that the PM2.5 concentration was particularly high in the winter of Beijing, and evergreen shrubs maintained the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5. PMID:25518685

  15. Aminosilica materials as adsorbents for the selective removal of aldehydes and ketones from simulated bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Drese, Jeffrey H; Talley, Anne D; Jones, Christopher W

    2011-03-21

    The fast pyrolysis of biomass is a potential route to the production of liquid biorenewable fuel sources. However, degradation of the bio-oil mixtures due to reaction of oxygenates, such as aldehydes and ketones, reduces the stability of the liquids and can impact long-term storage and shipping. Herein, solid aminosilica adsorbents are described for the selective adsorptive removal of reactive aldehyde and ketone species. Three aminosilica adsorbents are prepared through the reaction of amine-containing silanes with pore-expanded mesoporous silica. A fourth aminosilica adsorbent is prepared through the ring-opening polymerization of aziridine from pore-expanded mesoporous silica. Adsorption experiments with a representative mixture of bio-oil model compounds are presented using each adsorbent at room temperature and 45 °C. The adsorbent comprising only primary amines adsorbs the largest amount of aldehydes and ketones. The overall reactivity of this adsorbent increases with increasing temperature. Additional aldehyde screening experiments show that the reactivity of aldehydes with aminosilicas varies depending on their chemical functionality. Initial attempts to regenerate an aminosilica adsorbent by acid hydrolysis show that they can be at least partially regenerated for further use. PMID:21246749

  16. Dimensionally Frustrated Diffusion towards Fractal Adsorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2007-12-01

    Diffusion towards a fractal adsorber is a well-researched problem with many applications. While the steady-state flux towards such adsorbers is known to be characterized by the fractal dimension (DF) of the surface, the more general problem of time-dependent adsorption kinetics of fractal surfaces remains poorly understood. In this Letter, we show that the time-dependent flux to fractal adsorbers (1

  17. Standoff Spectroscopy of Surface Adsorbed Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Despite its immediate applications, selective detection of trace quantities of surface adsorbed chemicals, such as explosives, without physically collecting the sample molecules is a challenging task. Standoff spectroscopic techniques offer an ideal method of detecting chemicals without using a sample collection step. Though standoff spectroscopic techniques are capable of providing high selectivity, their demonstrated sensitivities are poor. Here we describe standoff detection of trace quantities of surface adsorbed chemicals using two quantum cascade lasers operated simultaneously, with tunable wavelength windows that match with absorption peaks of the analytes. This standoff method is a variation of photoacoustic spectroscopy, where scattered light from the sample surface is used for exciting acoustic resonance of the detector. We demonstrate a sensitivity of 100 ng/cm{sup 2} and a standoff detection distance of 20 m for surface adsorbed analytes such as explosives and tributyl phosphate.

  18. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    reactivity of surface-adsorbed catechol contrasts prior observations which found thin films of pure catechol unreactive with NO2, indicating that thin films do not always serve as reliable models for surface-adsorbed species.

  19. Quantitative toxicoproteomic analysis of zebrafish embryos exposed to a retinoid X receptor antagonist UVI3003.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liang; Yu, Jianlan; Shi, Huahong; Xia, Liang; Xin, Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Heng; Luo, Ji; Jin, Wenhai; Li, Daoji; Zhou, Junliang

    2015-09-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) antagonists, including some environmental endocrine disruptors, have a teratogenic effect on vertebrate embryos. To investigate the toxicological mechanism on the protein expression level, a quantitative proteomic study was conducted to analyze the proteome alterations of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos exposed to gradient concentrations of a representative RXR antagonist UVI3003. Using isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling coupled nano high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano HPLC-MS/MS), in total 6592 proteins were identified, among which 195 proteins were found to be differentially expressed by more than a two-fold change in exposed groups compared with the control. Gene ontology analysis showed that these differential proteins were mostly involved in anatomical structure development, biosynthetic process, ion binding and oxidoreductase activity. Moreover, the biological pathways of translation, lipoprotein metabolism, cell survival and gluconeogenesis were intensively inhibited after exposure. Some significantly downregulated proteins such as apolipoprotein A-I and vitellogenin and upregulated proteins such as calcium activated nucleotidase 1b, glutathione S-transferase and glucose 6-dehydrogenases showed a strong dose-dependent response. The results provided new insight into the molecular details of RXR antagonist-induced teratogenicity and added novel information of pathways and potential biomarkers for evaluation of RXR interfering activity. PMID:25581642

  20. High-Precision Calibration of the WFC3/UVIS Geometric Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The geometric distortion solution for WFC3/UVIS is known in most filters to better than 0.01 pixels from the analysis of pointed data. Astrometric data taken with spatial scans suggest that residuals from this solution have typical magitudes of 0.003-0.005 pixels, and correlate on scales of 50-100 pixels. These deviations also appear to be stable in time, and therefore can be calibrated using apropriate data. This proposal aims at improving the calibration of local deviations from astrometric solution via spatial scans. The observations target two regions with high density of bright stars at several different large-scale dithers to obtain a dense coverage of high S/N trails over the majority of the detector. The data will be used to obtain a static correction to the distortion solution that can be used to improve the geometric distortion solution. The open clusters M 67 and M 48 have been selected to provide the highest density of stars of the right brightness for F606W (M 67) and F621M and F673N (M 48); these are the recommended filters for optimal extraction of astrometric information, depending on the brightness of the target.

  1. FUV and UVIS observations of circumnuclear star clusters in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Aida; Chandar, Rupali; Leitherer, Claus

    2011-01-01

    We analyze archival HST/STIS/FUV-MAMA imaging and spectroscopy of 13 compact star clusters within the circumnuclear starburst region of M83, the closest such example. We compare the observed spectra with semi-empirical models, which are based on an empirical library of Galactic O and B stars observed with IUE, and with theoretical models, which are based on a new theoretical UV library of hot massive stars computed with WM-Basic. The models were generated with Starburst99 for metallicities of Z=0.020 and Z=0.040, and for stellar IMFs with upper mass limits of 10, 30, 50, and 100 M_⊙. We estimate the ages and masses of the clusters from the best fit model spectra, and find that the ages derived from the semi-empirical and theoretical models agree within a factor of 1.2 on average. A comparison of the spectroscopic age estimates with values derived from HST/WFC3/UVIS multi-band photometry shows a similar level of agreement for all but one cluster. The clusters have a range of ages from about 2 to 20 Myr, and do not appear to have an age gradient along M83's starburst. Clusters with strong P-Cygni profiles have masses of a few ×10^4 M_⊙, seem to have formed stars more massive than 30 M_⊙, and are consistent with a Kroupa IMF from 0.1-100 M_⊙.

  2. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption Modeling from Batch Scale to Decimeter Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, R.; Hay, M. B.; Miller, A. W.; Kohler, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Davis, J. A.; Curtis, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium (VI) is a contaminant of concern in several groundwater aquifers at many former uranium mills and processing facilities. Understanding the migration of U(VI) is important in assessing the risk of groundwater contamination and the efficacy of treatment options. Accurate prediction of field-scale migration is difficult because often key model parameters such as adsorption equilibrium and rate parameters are determined in batch scale experiments. These parameters need to be upscaled when used to simulate larger scale simulations. To better understand the impact of scale on transport, this research incorporates previous batch scale experimental data in the interpretation of decimeter scale tank experiments involving uranium desorption. In the decimeter scale experiments, different grain size fractions were used to create porous media systems with known physical and chemical heterogeneity. Tracer results allowed hydraulic parameters to be calibrated independently of chemical equilibrium parameters. Geochemical observations were used to evaluate alternative adsorption and mass transfer models with varying complexity. Surface complexation models derived from batch experiments were evaluated under different decimeter scale model conditions. A two dimensional reactive transport model was calibrated to the decimeter scale experiments and the model reproduced the observed transport. The flux-averaged concentrations exiting the tank were also reproduced by a one dimensional model that included a dual porosity formulation to account for heterogeneity. The decimeter scale model calibrations help determine the effectiveness of these methods of reducing complexity, which can later be applied to improve predictions of tracer and site scale systems.

  3. Desorption-induced recombination-cationization of metal-adsorbate adducts from sulfur precovered Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, R. A.; Tatarchuk, B. J.

    1990-03-01

    Temperature programmed static secondary ion mass spectrometry (TPSS) studies of pyrrole, furan and water on sulfur precovered Ru(0001) reveal significant increases in the coverage corrected adduct yield when these species desorb from the surface in an autocatalytic fashion. This effect has been attributed to an enhancement in the recombination-cationization rate which occurs when sputtered-ruthenium species contact desorbed organics just after leaving the surface. Adsorbates which do not undergo autocatalytic/explosive desorption do not exhibit this effect.

  4. Determination of maximal amount of minor gases adsorbed in a shale sample by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Hu, Hui-Chao; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Pan, Lei; Xiao, Xian-Ming

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for determining the maximal amount of ethane, a minor gas species, adsorbed in a shale sample. The method is based on the time-dependent release of ethane from shale samples measured by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC). The study includes a mathematical model for fitting the experimental data, calculating the maximal amount gas adsorbed, and predicting results at other temperatures. The method is a more efficient alternative to the isothermal adsorption method that is in widespread use today. PMID:24411088

  5. Unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertel, E.

    1991-11-01

    Experimental work on unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems on metallic substrates is reviewed with emphasis on recent developments. The first part is devoted to molecular adsorbates. Weakly chemisorbed hydrocarbons are briefly discussed. An exhaustive inverse photoemission (IPE) study of the CO bond to the transition metals Ni, Pb, and Pt is presented. Adsorbed NO is taken as an example to demonstrate the persisting discrepancies in the interpretation of IPE spectra. Atomic adsorbates are discussed in the second part. The quantum well state model is applied to interpret the surface states in reconstructing and non-reconstructing adsorption systems of alkali metals and hydrogen. A recent controversy on the unoccupied electronic states of the Cu(110)/O p(2×1) surface is critically reviewed. The quantum well state model is then compared to tight binding and local-density-functional calculations of the unoccupied bands and the deficiencies of the various approaches are pointed out. Finally, the relation between the surface state model and more chemically oriented models of surface bonding is briefly discussed.

  6. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  7. Activated carbon adsorbents from waste tires for air quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C.M.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.; Hsi, H.C.

    1999-07-01

    This study evaluates methodologies for utilizing waste tire rubber to produce carbonaceous adsorbents for use in air quality control operations. Such an approach provides a two-fold environmental and economic benefit. A recycling path is developed for waste tire rubber and new adsorbents are produced from a low cost feedstock for use in environmentally-related operations. Bench-scale and pilot-scale quantities of tire-derived activated carbon (TDAC) were produced from waste tire rubber. Raw tire rubber samples and devolatilized tire char were obtained from several US vendors. The raw samples were analyzed using proximate, ultimate, and elemental analyses. Batches of activated carbon samples were prepared using a bench-scale fixed-tubular reactor to prepare {approximately}10 g samples and a fluidized-bed reactor to prepare {approximately}100 g quantities. About 25 kg of activated carbon was also produced at a pilot-scale commercial facility. The resulting TDACs were then characterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77K. The sample surface areas were determined by the BET method, and the pore size distribution (PSD) was evaluated using the BJH model, and a 3-D PSD model. Performance of the TDACs was evaluated in their ability to remove gaseous mercury species from simulated power-plant flue-gas streams, and for the removal of organic compounds (e.g., acetone and 1,1,1-trichloroethane) from flowing gas streams.

  8. Chemical and structural characterization of copper adsorbed on mosses (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    González, Aridane G; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Adamo, Paola; Pokrovsky, Oleg S

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of copper on passive biomonitors (devitalized mosses Hypnum sp., Sphagnum denticulatum, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachythecium rutabulum) was studied under different experimental conditions such as a function of pH and Cu concentration in solution. Cu assimilation by living Physcomitrella patents was also investigated. Molecular structure of surface adsorbed and incorporated Cu was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Devitalized mosses exhibited the universal adsorption pattern of Cu as a function of pH, with a total binding sites number 0.05-0.06 mmolg(dry)(-1) and a maximal adsorption capacity of 0.93-1.25 mmolg(dry)(-1) for these devitalized species. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) fit of the first neighbor demonstrated that for all studied mosses there are ∼4.5 O/N atoms around Cu at ∼1.95 Å likely in a pseudo-square geometry. The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis demonstrated that Cu(II)-cellulose (representing carboxylate groups) and Cu(II)-phosphate are the main moss surface binding moieties, and the percentage of these sites varies as a function of solution pH. P. patens exposed during one month to Cu(2+) yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu-S(CN) complexes, suggesting metabolically-controlled reduction of adsorbed and assimilated Cu(2+). PMID:26852210

  9. Dynamics of Molecules Adsorbed in Zeolitic Systems: Neutron Scattering and MD Simulation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.; Sharma, V. K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2011-07-15

    Zeolites represent a class of technologically important materials because of their characteristic properties of molecular sieving and catalysis, which makes them indispensable in the petroleum industries. While the catalytic properties depend upon many factors, a major role is played by the dynamics of hydrocarbon gases. In order to be able to tailor make these materials for use in industry for catalytic and sieving purposes, it is important to understand the dynamical properties of the guest molecules adsorbed in the zeolitic materials. It is of interest to study the effects of size and shape of guest molecules and also the host zeolitic structure, governing the diffusion mechanism of the adsorbed species. Here we report the results of Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of two hydrocarbons namely acetylene and propylene adsorbed in two structurally different zeolites Na-Y and ZSM-5.

  10. Influences of Dilute Organic Adsorbates on the Hydration of Low-Surface-Area Silicates.

    PubMed

    Sangodkar, Rahul P; Smith, Benjamin J; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J; Roberts, Lawrence R; Funkhouser, Gary P; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2015-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of dilute quantities of certain organic molecules and water at silicate surfaces strongly influence the rates of silicate dissolution, hydration, and crystallization. Here, we determine the molecular-level structures, compositions, and site-specific interactions of adsorbed organic molecules at low absolute bulk concentrations on heterogeneous silicate particle surfaces at early stages of hydration. Specifically, dilute quantities (∼0.1% by weight of solids) of the disaccharide sucrose or industrially important phosphonic acid species slow dramatically the hydration of low-surface-area (∼1 m(2)/g) silicate particles. Here, the physicochemically distinct adsorption interactions of these organic species are established by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced solid-state NMR techniques. These measurements provide significantly improved signal sensitivity for near-surface species that is crucial for the detection and analysis of dilute adsorbed organic molecules and silicate species on low-surface-area particles, which until now have been infeasible to characterize. DNP-enhanced 2D (29)Si{(1)H}, (13)C{(1)H}, and (31)P{(1)H} heteronuclear correlation and 1D (29)Si{(13)C} rotational-echo double-resonance NMR measurements establish hydrogen-bond-mediated adsorption of sucrose at distinct nonhydrated and hydrated silicate surface sites and electrostatic interactions with surface Ca(2+) cations. By comparison, phosphonic acid molecules are found to adsorb electrostatically at or near cationic calcium surface sites to form Ca(2+)-phosphonate complexes. Although dilute quantities of both types of organic molecules effectively inhibit hydration, they do so by adsorbing in distinct ways that depend on their specific architectures and physicochemical interactions. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNP-enhanced NMR techniques to measure and assess dilute adsorbed molecules and their molecular interactions on low

  11. Natural Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii by Adsorbed Chromosomal DNA: Role of Adsorbed DNA Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, N.; Zilles, J.; Nguyen, H.

    2008-12-01

    Recent increases in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms and the accompanying public health concerns result both from the widespread use of antibiotics and from the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among microorganisms. To understand the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and identify efficient measures to minimize these transfers, an interdisciplinary approach was used to identify physical and chemical factors that control the fate and biological availability of extracellular DNA. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to study extracellular DNA adsorption and the conformation of the adsorbed DNA on silica and natural organic matter (NOM) surfaces. Solution chemistry was varied systematically to investigate the role of adsorbed DNA conformation on transformation. Gene transfer was assessed under the same conditions using natural transformation of chromosomal DNA into the soil bacteria Azotobacter vinelandii. DNA adsorbed to both silica and NOM surfaces has a more compact and rigid conformation in the presence of Ca2+ compared to Na+. Extracellular DNA adsorbed on silica and NOM surfaces transformed A. vinelandii. The transformation efficiency of adsorbed DNA was up to 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of dissolved DNA. Preliminary results suggest that the presence of Ca2+ in groundwater (e.g. hardness) reduces the availability of adsorbed DNA for transformation.

  12. Analysis of Cassini UVIS Extreme and Far Ultraviolet Observations of Saturn’s Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher D.; Koskinen, Tommi; Gronoff, Guillaume; Yung, Yuk L.; Esposito, Larry

    2015-11-01

    The atmosphere of Saturn is mainly composed of H2 and neutral atomic helium. The study of He 584 Å and H Lyman-α brightnesses is interesting as the EUV and FUV (Extreme and Far Ultraviolet) planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in its thermosphere. Time variation, asymmetries, and polar enhancement of the airglow are also possible and analysis already performed using the public archived Cassini mission data sets have shown we can solve some of the outstanding problems associated with these phenomena for Saturn.Specifically, we have (1) examined epochal eddy mixing disparities in the Saturnian upper atmosphere and quantify temporal mixing variations that may have occurred in the upper atmosphere of Saturn, as may be evidenced in Cassini mission data, (2) quantified any enhanced mixing in the auroral regions of Saturn, and (3) performed a robust study of Saturnian H Lyman-α brightness with the view to discover any longitudinal H Lyman-α planetary asymmetry or “bulge” across the disc such as was discovered by Voyager at Jupiter, indicative of the distribution of atomic H and accounting for the observed flux and any variations from the normal temperature profile.We have analyzed Cassini UVIS EUV and FUV airglow data from Saturn using sophisticated photochemical and radiative transfer models to investigate unexplained differences in the dynamical processes operating within its upper atmosphere. Powerful analysis techniques allow us to extract information on atmospheric mixing, temperatures, and temporal changes due to the solar and seasonal cycles from the variations in distribution and intensity of airglow emissions that result. We report on results of these efforts to date.

  13. A multi-scale magnetotail reconnection event at Saturn and associated flows: Cassini/UVIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radioti, A.; Grodent, D.; Jia, X.; Gérard, J.-C.; Bonfond, B.; Pryor, W.; Gustin, J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Jackman, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    We present high-resolution Cassini/UVIS (Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph) observations of Saturn's aurora during May 2013 (DOY 140-141). The observations reveal an enhanced auroral activity in the midnight-dawn quadrant in an extended local time sector (∼02 to 05 LT), which rotates with an average velocity of ∼45% of rigid corotation. The auroral dawn enhancement reported here, given its observed location and brightness, is most probably due to hot tenuous plasma carried inward in fast moving flux tubes returning from a tail reconnection site to the dayside. These flux tubes could generate intense field-aligned currents that would cause aurora to brighten. However, the origin of tail reconnection (solar wind or internally driven) is uncertain. Based mainly on the flux variations, which do not demonstrate flux closure, we suggest that the most plausible scenario is that of internally driven tail reconnection which operates on closed field lines. The observations also reveal multiple intensifications within the enhanced region suggesting an x-line in the tail, which extends from 02 to 05 LT. The localised enhancements evolve in arc and spot-like small scale features, which resemble vortices mainly in the beginning of the sequence. These auroral features could be related to plasma flows enhanced from reconnection which diverge into multiple narrow channels then spread azimuthally and radially. We suggest that the evolution of tail reconnection at Saturn may be pictured by an ensemble of numerous narrow current wedges or that inward transport initiated in the reconnection region could be explained by multiple localised flow burst events. The formation of vortical-like structures could then be related to field-aligned currents, building up in vortical flows in the tail. An alternative, but less plausible, scenario could be that the small scale auroral structures are related to viscous interactions involving small-scale reconnection.

  14. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

    2014-06-03

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that “autunite-type” sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to “phosphuranylite-type” sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

  15. Thermodynamic stabilities of U(VI) minerals: Estimated and observed relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Gibbs free energies of formation ({Delta}G{degree}{sub f}) for several structurally related U(VI) minerals are estimated by summing the Gibbs energy contributions from component oxides. The estimated {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values are used to construct activity-activity (stability) diagrams, and the predicted stability fields are compared with observed mineral occurrences and reaction pathways. With some exceptions, natural occurrences agree well with the mineral stability fields estimated for the systems SiO{sub 2}-CaO-UO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}-CaO-UO{sub 3}H{sub 2}O, providing confidence in the estimated thermodynamic values. Activity-activity diagrams are sensitive to small differences in {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values, and mineral compositions must be known accurately, including structurally bound H{sub 2}O. The estimated {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values are not considered reliable for a few minerals for two major reasons: (1) the structures of the minerals in question are not closely similar to those used to estimate the {Delta}G{sub f}* values of the component oxides, and/or (2) the minerals in question are exceptionally fine grained, leading to large surface energies that increase the effective mineral solubilities. The thermodynamic stabilities of uranium(VI) minerals are of interest for understanding the role of these minerals in controlling uranium concentrations in oxidizing groundwaters associated with uranium ore bodies, uranium mining and mill tailings and geological repositories for nuclear waste.

  16. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A

    2014-06-01

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicated that "autunite-type" sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to "phosphuranylite-type" sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases. PMID:24754743

  17. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  18. Isolation and analyses of uranium tolerant Serratia marcescens strains and their utilization for aerobic uranium U(VI) bioadsorption.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakshak; Acharya, Celin; Joshi, Santa Ram

    2011-08-01

    Enrichment-based methods targeted at uranium-tolerant populations among the culturable, aerobic, chemo-heterotrophic bacteria from the subsurface soils of Domiasiat (India's largest sandstone-type uranium deposits, containing an average ore grade of 0.1 % U(3)O(8)), indicated a wide occurrence of Serratia marcescens. Five representative S. marcescens isolates were characterized by a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their relatedness to S. marcescens ATCC 13880 (≥99.4% similarity). Biochemical characteristics and random amplified polymorphic DNA profiles revealed significant differences among the representative isolates and the type strain as well. The minimum inhibitory concentration for uranium U(VI) exhibited by these natural isolates was found to range from 3.5-4.0 mM. On evaluation for their uranyl adsorption properties, it was found that all these isolates were able to remove nearly 90-92% (21-22 mg/L) and 60-70% (285-335 mg/L) of U(VI) on being challenged with 100 μM (23.8 mg/L) and 2 mM (476 mg/L) uranyl nitrate solutions, respectively, at pH 3.5 within 10 min of exposure. his capacity was retained by the isolates even after 24 h of incubation. Viability tests confirmed the tolerance of these isolates to toxic concentrations of soluble uranium U(VI) at pH 3.5. This is among the first studies to report uranium-tolerant aerobic chemoheterotrophs obtained from the pristine uranium ore-bearing site of Domiasiat. PMID:21887639

  19. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  20. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.

  1. Computer simulations of adsorbed liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Greg D.; Cleaver, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    The structures adopted by adsorbed thin films of Gay-Berne particles in the presence of a coexisting vapour phase are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The films are adsorbed at a flat substrate which favours planar anchoring, whereas the nematic-vapour interface favours normal alignment. On cooling, a system with a high molecule-substrate interaction strength exhibits substrate-induced planar orientational ordering and considerable stratification is observed in the density profiles. In contrast, a system with weak molecule-substrate coupling adopts a director orientation orthogonal to the substrate plane, owing to the increased influence of the nematic-vapour interface. There are significant differences between the structures adopted at the two interfaces, in contrast with the predictions of density functional treatments of such systems.

  2. Estimates of Production Rates for Comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) Derived from Polar UVI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasojevic, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Parks, G. K.

    2004-12-01

    During April and May of 2004, the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) onboard the Polar spacecraft was in the unique position to observe two comets near their perihelion: C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR). Using its suite of four far ultraviolet filters, UVI is able to observe atomic oxygen emissions at 130.4 nm and atomic carbon emissions at 156.1 nm and 165.7 nm. The photon flux is directly related to the production rates for these atoms. From the oxygen and carbon production rates, we are able to estimate the production rates of CO, OH, and water. Initial analysis shows that both comets are very dim in the far ultraviolet and are not easily detected by UVI. We are able to derive upper limits to the production rates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of observations of these comets in the far ultraviolet region.

  3. Simulations of noble gases adsorbed on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiga, Sidi; Gatica, Silvina

    2014-03-01

    We present results of Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of adsorption of Kr, Ar and Xe on a suspended graphene sheet. We compute the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction by a Lennard-Jones potential. We adopt a hybrid model for the graphene-adsorbate force; in the hybrid model, the potential interaction with the nearest carbon atoms (within a distance rnn) is computed with an atomistic pair potential Ua; for the atoms at r>rnn, we compute the interaction energy as a continuous integration over a carbon uniform sheet with the density of graphene. For the atomistic potential Ua, we assume the anisotropic LJ potential adapted from the graphite-He interaction proposed by Cole et.al. This interaction includes the anisotropy of the C atoms on graphene, which originates in the anisotropic π-bonds. The adsorption isotherms, energy and structure of the layer are obtained and compared with experimental results. We also compare with the adsorption on graphite and carbon nanotubes. This research was supported by NSF/PRDM (Howard University) and NSF (DMR 1006010).

  4. Orbital tomography for highly symmetric adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtmüller, B.; Willenbockel, M.; Reinisch, E. M.; Ules, T.; Bocquet, F. C.; Soubatch, S.; Puschnig, P.; Koller, G.; Ramsey, M. G.; Tautz, F. S.; Kumpf, C.

    2012-10-01

    Orbital tomography is a new and very powerful tool to analyze the angular distribution of a photoemission spectroscopy experiment. It was successfully used for organic adsorbate systems to identify (and consequently deconvolute) the contributions of specific molecular orbitals to the photoemission data. The technique was so far limited to surfaces with low symmetry like fcc(110) oriented surfaces, owing to the small number of rotational domains that occur on such surfaces. In this letter we overcome this limitation and present an orbital tomography study of a 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetra-carboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer film adsorbed on Ag(111). Although this system exhibits twelve differently oriented molecules, the angular resolved photoemission data still allow a meaningful analysis of the different local density of states and reveal different electronic structures for symmetrically inequivalent molecules. We also discuss the precision of the orbital tomography technique in terms of counting statistics and linear regression fitting algorithm. Our results demonstrate that orbital tomography is not limited to low-symmetry surfaces, a finding which makes a broad field of complex adsorbate systems accessible to this powerful technique.

  5. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; Maher, Kate

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.

  6. Dynamic Succession of Groundwater Functional Microbial Communities in Response to Emulsified Vegetable Oil Amendment during Sustained In Situ U(VI) Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Wu, Wei-Min; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Gihring, Thomas; Zhang, Gengxin; Schadt, Chris W.; Watson, David; Jardine, Phil; Criddle, Craig S.; Brooks, Scott; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale field experiment demonstrated that a one-time amendment of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) reduced groundwater U(VI) concentrations for 1 year in a fast-flowing aquifer. However, little is known about how EVO amendment stimulates the functional gene composition, structure, and dynamics of groundwater microbial communities toward prolonged U(VI) reduction. In this study, we hypothesized that EVO amendment would shift the functional gene composition and structure of groundwater microbial communities and stimulate key functional genes/groups involved in EVO biodegradation and reduction of electron acceptors in the aquifer. To test these hypotheses, groundwater microbial communities after EVO amendment were analyzed using a comprehensive functional gene microarray. Our results showed that EVO amendment stimulated sequential shifts in the functional composition and structure of groundwater microbial communities. Particularly, the relative abundance of key functional genes/groups involved in EVO biodegradation and the reduction of NO3−, Mn(IV), Fe(III), U(VI), and SO42− significantly increased, especially during the active U(VI) reduction period. The relative abundance for some of these key functional genes/groups remained elevated over 9 months. Montel tests suggested that the dynamics in the abundance, composition, and structure of these key functional genes/groups were significantly correlated with groundwater concentrations of acetate, NO3−, Mn(II), Fe(II), U(VI), and SO42−. Our results suggest that EVO amendment stimulated dynamic succession of key functional microbial communities. This study improves our understanding of the composition, structure, and function changes needed for groundwater microbial communities to sustain a long-term U(VI) reduction. PMID:25862231

  7. A Field-Scale Reactive Transport Model for U(VI) Migration Influenced by Coupled Multirate Mass Transfer and Surface Complexation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Prommer, Henning; Greskowiak, Janek; Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Rockhold, Mark L.

    2010-05-06

    A field-scale reactive transport model was developed that incorporates laboratory-characterized U(VI) surface complexation reactions (SCR) and multi-rate mass transfer processes, and field-measured hydrogeochemical conditions at Department of Energy, Hanford 300A site, Washington, where an Integrated Field Research Challenge project is ongoing. The model was used to assess the importance of multi-rate mass transfer processes on sorption-retarded U(VI) reactive transport at the 300A site and to evaluate the effect of variable geochemical conditions on U(VI) plume migration caused by dynamic river stage fluctuations at the east side of the site. Model simulations revealed a complex spatio-temporal variations of groundwater geochemistry that affects U(VI) speciation, adsorption, and plume migration. In general, the river water intrusion enhances uranium adsorption and lowers groundwater aqueous uranium concentration as a result of river water dilution that decreases aqueous carbonate concentration, which subsequently weakens aqueous U(VI)-carbonate complexation and enhances U(VI)-surface complexation. The simulations also found that SCR-retarded U migration becomes more dynamic and more in sync with the groundwater flow field when multi-rate mass transfer processes are involved. Strong U(VI) adsorption was simulated at the 300A site based on the field-measured hydrogeochemical conditions, suggesting a slow dissipation of U(VI) plume, a phenomenon consistent with the observation at the site. Uranium breakthrough curves at selected observation points and the mass changes over time in the simulation indicate that uranium adsorption/desorption never attains steady state as a result of both the highly dynamic flow field and the chemistry variations caused by river water intrusion. Thus, the multi-rate SCM model appears to be a crucial feature for future reactive transport simulations of uranium at the 300A site.

  8. Sorption behavior of U(VI) on phyllite: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Arnold, T; Zorn, T; Zänker, H; Bernhard, G; Nitsche, H

    2001-02-01

    The sorption of U(VI) onto low-grade metamorphic rock phyllite was modeled with the diffuse double layer model (DDLM) using the primary mineralogical constituents of phyllite, i.e. quartz, chlorite, muscovite, and albite, as input components, and as additional component, the poorly ordered Fe oxide hydroxide mineral, ferrihydrite. Ferrihydrite forms during the batch sorption experiment as a weathering product of chlorite. In this process, Fe(II), leached from the chlorite, oxidizes to Fe(III), hydrolyses and precipitates as ferrihydrite. The formation of ferrihydrite during the batch sorption experiment was identified by Mössbauer spectroscopy, showing a 2.8% increase of Fe(III) in the phyllite powder. The ferrihydrite was present as Fe nanoparticles or agglomerates with diameters ranging from 6 to 25 nm, with indications for even smaller particles. These Fe colloids were detected in centrifugation experiments of a ground phyllite suspension using various centrifugal forces. The basis for the successful interpretation of the experimental sorption data of uranyl(VI) on phyllite were: (1) the determination of surface complex formation constants of uranyl with quartz, chlorite, muscovite, albite, and ferrihydrite in individual batch sorption experiments, (2) the determination of surface acidity constants of quartz, chlorite, muscovite, and albite obtained from separate acid-base titration, (3) the determination of surface site densities of quartz, chlorite, muscovite, and albite evaluated independently of each other with adsorption isotherms, and (4) the quantification of the secondary phase ferrihydrite, which formed during the batch sorption experiments with phyllite. The surface complex formation constants and the protolysis constants were optimized by using the experimentally obtained data sets and the computer code FITEQL. Surface site densities were evaluated from adsorption isotherms at pH 6.5. The uranyl(VI) sorption onto phyllite was accurately modeled with

  9. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

    2013-10-16

    Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

  10. The Host Galaxies of LoBAL QSOs at Low z: A Perspective from HST UVIS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behn, Wyatt Alan; Lazarova, Mariana; Canalizo, Gabriela

    2016-06-01

    We present GALFIT models of a complete optically-selected volume-limited sample of Low-Ionization Broad Absorption Line QSOs (LoBALs) in the redshift range 0.5-0.6 observed with HST WFC3 UVIS F475W. We investigate the morphologies in the rest frame u which map the younger stellar populations. In addition, we present statistics on the number of neighborhood galaxies within 150 kpc and possible trends between clustering and host galaxy properties. This sample of LoBALs is selected from QSOs characterized by their extreme blue-shifted absorption in the Mg II line—which is a signature of high velocity winds towards the observer. Only ~1-3% of optically selected QSOs are LoBALs. Their low fraction could be explained by their orientation or by a short period of outflow manifest in all QSOs during their lifetime. We aim to better understand the possibility of the evolutionary model by studying their morphologies in detail. Previous work on this sample, from images with F125W filter (rest frame i), shows that at least 60% of these objects exhibit signs of recent merger activity. We complement those results with our results from the UVIS observations and neighborhood clustering statistics.

  11. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the removal of U(VI) by low cost agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Kausar, Abida; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; MacKinnon, Gillian

    2013-11-01

    In this research, biosorption efficiency of different agro-wastes was evaluated with rice husk showing maximum biosorption capacity among the selected biosorbents. Optimization of native, SDS-treated and immobilized rice husk adsorption parameters including pH, biosorbent amount, contact time, initial U(VI) concentration and temperature for maximum U(VI) removal was investigated. Maximum biosorption capacity for native (29.56 mg g(-1)) and immobilized biomass (17.59 mg g(-1)) was observed at pH 4 while SDS-treated biomass showed maximum removal (28.08 mg g(-1)) at pH 5. The Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlated best with the U(IV) biosorption equilibrium data for the 10-100 mg L(-1) concentration range. The kinetics of the reaction followed pseudo-second order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters like free energy (ΔG(0)) and enthalpy (ΔH°) confirmed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. Experiments to determine the regeneration capacity of the selected biosorbents and the effect of competing metal ions on biosorption capacity were also conducted. The biomass was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, surface area analysis, Fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. The study proved that rice husk has potential to treat uranium in wastewater. PMID:23787279

  12. U(VI) biosorption by bi-functionalized Pseudomonas putida @ chitosan bead: Modeling and optimization using RSM.

    PubMed

    Sohbatzadeh, Hozhabr; Keshtkar, Ali Reza; Safdari, Jaber; Fatemi, Faezeh

    2016-08-01

    In this work, Pseudomonas putida cells immobilized into chitosan beads (PICB) were synthesized to investigate the impact of microorganism entrapment on biosorption capacity of prepared biosorbent for U(VI) biosorption from aqueous solutions. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on Central Composite Design (CCD) was utilized to evaluate the performance of the PICB in comparison with chitosan beads (CB) under batch mode. Performing experiments under optimal condition sets viz. pH 5, initial U(VI) concentration 500mg/L, biosorbent dosage 0.4g/L and 20wt.% bacterial cells showed that the observed biosorption capacity enhanced by 1.27 times from 398mg/g (CB) to 504mg/g (PICB) that confirmed the effectiveness of cells immobilization process. FTIR and potentiometric titration were then utilized to characterize the prepared biosorbents. While the dominant functional group in the binding process was NH3(+) (4.78meq/g) in the CB, the functional groups of NH3(+), NH2, OH, COOH (6.00meq/g) were responsible for the PICB. The equilibrium and kinetic studies revealed that the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model were in better fitness with the CB and PICB experimental data. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the PICB could be a suitable biosorbent for uranium (VI) biosorption from aqueous solutions. PMID:27180295

  13. Effect of anthropogenic organic complexants on the solubility of Ni, Th, U(IV) and U(VI).

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Edgar, M; Beattie, T; Warwick, P; Evans, N D M; Read, D

    2015-12-30

    The influence of anthropogenic organic complexants (citrate, EDTA and DTPA from 0.005 to 0.1M) on the solubility of nickel(II), thorium(IV) and uranium (U(IV) and U(VI)) has been studied. Experiments were carried out in 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2 solutions, representing the high pH conditions anticipated in the near field of a cementitious intermediate level radioactive waste repository. Results showed that Ni(II) solubility increased by 2-4 orders of magnitude in the presence of EDTA and DTPA and from 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in the case of citrate. Citrate had the greatest effect on the solubility of Th(IV) and U(IV)/(VI). XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the precipitates are largely amorphous; only in the case of Ni(II), is there some evidence of incipient crystallinity, in the form of Ni(OH)2 (theophrastite). A study of the effect of calcium suggests that U(VI) and Ni(II) may form metal-citrate-OH complexes stabilised by Ca(2+). Thermodynamic modelling underestimates the concentrations in solution in the presence of the ligands for all the elements considered here. Further investigation of the behaviour of organic ligands under hyperalkaline conditions is important because of the use of the thermodynamic constants in preparing the safety case for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:26253235

  14. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  15. Field- and Laboratory-Scale Evaluation of Uranium Sequestration: The Role of Sulfur and Iron Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criddle, C.; Wu, W.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S.; Kitanidis, P. K.; Du, X.; Boonchayaanant, B.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past decade, field and laboratory studies have revealed the critical role of sulfur and iron species in uranium sequestration. Pilot-scale studies of in-situ U(VI) reduction were conducted at a site adjacent to the former S3 ponds (source zone) of the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Research Center, Oak Ridge, TN. The site contains uranium concentrations up to 800 mg/kg in soil and 250 μM (60 mg/L) in groundwater. In field tests, flushing and pH adjustment decreased aqueous U concentrations by more than 1000 fold from 30-40 to ~1 mg/L. Ethanol addition stimulated microbial reduction of U(VI) and decreased U concentrations below the U.S. EPA maximum contaminant level for drinking water (30 ppb). U(VI) reduction was concomitant with iron(III)- and sulfate respiration. Spectroscopic analyses indicated sequential changes in the solid-associated uranium: U(VI) initially bound to mineral-surface and organic-bound complexes containing phosphate and carbonate, or as hydroxide and phosphate precipitates, was reduced mainly to a U(IV)-Fe complex. The U(IV) was stable under anaerobic conditions, but partially remobilized upon exposure to oxygen. In separate experiments, nitrate was injected into a reduced region of the subsurface containing previously immobilized U(IV). The nitrate was reduced to nitrite, ammonium, and nitrogen gas; sulfide levels decreased; and Fe(II) levels increased then deceased. Re-reduction of oxidized sediments released Fe(II) and soluble U(VI), suggesting that the decrease in soluble U during reoxidation was due to U(VI) sorption to Fe(III) oxides. Follow-up laboratory studies established that both biotically-generated hydrogen sulfide and soluble ferrous iron species reduce U(VI). For a sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Oak Ridge site, microbially-generated sulfide could explain the observed rate of U(VI) reduction. Laboratory studies established that soluble Fe(II) was able to reduce soluble U(VI) at rapid rates when

  16. Conformational properties of an adsorbed charged polymer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Ho; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2005-06-01

    The behavior of a strongly charged polymer adsorbed on an oppositely charged surface of a low-dielectric constant is formulated by the functional integral method. By separating the translational, conformational, and fluctuational degrees of freedom, the scaling behaviors for both the height of the polymer and the thickness of the diffusion layer are determined. Unlike the results predicted by scaling theory, we identified the continuous crossover from the weak compression to the compression regime. All the analytical results are found to be consistent with Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, an alternative (operational) definition of a charged polymer adsorption is proposed. PMID:16089715

  17. Recovery of Technetium Adsorbed on Charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Mark D.; Metz, Lori A.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2006-05-01

    Two methods capable of near complete recovery of technetium adsorbed on charcoal are presented. The first involves liquid extraction of the technetium from the charcoal by hot 4M nitric acid. An average recovery of 98% (n=3) is obtained after three rounds of extraction. The second method involves dry ashing with air in a quartz combustion tube at 400-450 C. This method yields an average recovery of 96% (n=5). Other thermal methods were attempted, but resulted in reduced recovery and incomplete material balance

  18. Lead removal with adsorbing colloid flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Thackston, E.L.; Wilson, D.J.; Hanson, J.S.; Miller, D.L. Jr.

    1980-02-01

    A process that removes lead from industrial waste by adsorbing colloid foam flotation has been designed and demonstrated. A system of ferric chloride and sodium lauryl sulfate, both relatively inexpensive chemicals, gave good performance with optimum dosages of sodium lauryl sulfate at 40 mg/l and trivalent iron at 150 mg/l. With optimum chemical and hydraulic conditions, the pilot plant was able to produce effluents with lead concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/l. The process may be especially attractive where space for heavy metals removal equipment is extremely limited.

  19. Electron-Stimulated Oxidation of Thin Water Films Adsorbed on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Christopher D.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2007-11-08

    Electron-stimulated reactions in thin (< 3 monolayer, ML) water films adsorbed on TiO2(110) are investigated. For electron fluences less than ~1×1016 e-/cm2, irradiation with 100 eV electrons results in electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of atomic and molecular hydrogen, but no measurable O2. The ESD leaves adsorbed hydroxyls which oxidize the TiO2(110) surface and change the post-irradiation TPD spectra of the remaining water in characteristic ways. The species remaining on the TiO2(110) after irradiation of adsorbed water films are apparently similar to those produced without irradiation by co-dosing water and O2. Annealing above ~600 K reduces the oxidized surfaces, and water TPD spectra characteristic of ion sputtered and annealed TiO2(110) are recovered. The rate of electron-stimulated “oxidation” of the water films is proportional to the coverage of water in the first layer for coverages less than 1 ML. However, higher coverages suppress this reaction. When thin water films are irradiated, the rate of electron-stimulated oxidation is independent of the initial oxygen vacancy concentration, as is the final oxidized state achieved at high electron fluences. To explain the results, we propose that electron excitation of water molecules adsorbed on Ti4+ sites leads to desorption of hydrogen atoms and leaves an OH adsorbed at the site. If hydroxyls are present in the bridging oxygen rows, these react with the OH’s on the Ti4+ sites to reform water and heal the oxygen vacancy associated with the bridging OH. Once the bridge bonded hydroxyls have been eliminated, further irradiation increases the concentration of OH’s in the Ti4+ rows leading to the creation of species which block sites in the Ti4+ rows, perhaps H2O2 and/or HO2.

  20. Quest for Environmentally-Benign Ligands for Actinide Separations: Thermodynamic, Spectroscopic, and Structural Characterization of U(VI) Complexes with Oxa-Diamide and Related Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Teat, Simon J.; Liu, Guokui

    2009-01-05

    Complexation of U(VI) with N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TMOGA) and N,N-dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DMOGA) was studied in comparison with their dicarboxylate analog, oxydiacetic acid (ODA). Thermodynamic parameters, including stability constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation, were determined by spectrophotometry, potentiometry and calorimetry. Single-crystal X-ray diffractometry, EXAFS spectroscopy, FT-IR absorption and laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy were used to obtain structural information on the U(VI) complexes. Like ODA, TMOGA and DMOGA form tridentate U(VI) complexes, with three oxygen atoms (the amide, ether and/or carboxylate oxygen) coordinating to the linear UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} cation via the equatorial plane. The stability constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation all decrease in the order ODA > DMOGA > TMOGA, showing that the complexation is entropy driven and the substitution of a carboxylate group with an amide group reduces the strength of complexation with U(VI) due to the decrease in the entropy of complexation. The trend in the thermodynamic stability of the complexes correlates very well with the structural and spectroscopic data obtained by single crystal XRD, FT-IR and laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy.

  1. Optimizing heterosurface adsorbent synthesis for liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovskii, S. Yu.; Serdan, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural and geometric parameters of a silica matrix (SM) for the synthesis of heterosurface adsorbents (HAs) are optimized. Modification is performed by shielding the external surfaces of alkyl-modified silica (AS) using human serum albumin and its subsequent crosslinking. The structural and geometric characteristics of the SM, AS, and HA are measured via low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. It is found that the structural characteristics of AS pores with diameters D < 6 nm do not change during HA synthesis, while the volume of pores with diameters of 6 nm < D < 9 nm shrinks slightly due to the adsorption of albumin in the pore orifices. It is established that the volume of pores with diameters D > 9 nm reduces significantly due to adsorption of albumin. It is concluded that silica gel with a maximum pore size distribution close to 5 nm and a minimal proportion of pores with D > 9 nm is optimal for HA synthesis; this allows us to achieve the greatest similarity between the chromatographic retention parameters for HA and AS. The suitability of the synthesized adsorbents for analyzing drugs in biological fluids through direct sample injection is confirmed by chromatography. It was found that the percentage of the protein fraction detected at the outlet of the chromatographic column is 98%.

  2. Nitric oxide releasing material adsorbs more fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Lantvit, Sarah M; Barrett, Brittany J; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-11-01

    One mechanism of the failure of blood-contacting devices is clotting. Nitric oxide (NO) releasing materials are seen as a viable solution to the mediation of surface clotting by preventing platelet activation; however, NO's involvement in preventing clot formation extends beyond controlling platelet function. In this study, we evaluate NO's effect on factor XII (fibrinogen) adsorption and activation, which causes the initiation of the intrinsic arm of the coagulation cascade. This is done by utilizing a model plasticized poly(vinyl) chloride (PVC), N-diazeniumdiolate system and looking at the adsorption of fibrinogen, an important clotting protein, to these surfaces. The materials have been prepared in such a way to eliminate changes in surface properties between the control (plasticized PVC) and composite (NO-releasing) materials. This allows us to isolate NO release and determine the effect on the adsorption of fibrinogen, to the material surface. Surprisingly, it was found that an NO releasing material with a surface flux of 17.4 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) showed a significant increase in the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed to the material surface compared to one with a flux of 13.0 ± 1.6 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) and the control (2334 ± 496, 226 ± 99, and 103 ±31% fibrinogen adsorbed of control, respectively). This study suggests that NO's role in controlling clotting is extended beyond platelet activation. PMID:23554300

  3. Adsorbents as antiendotoxin agents in experimental colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, K R; Anderson, N H; McCaigue, M D; Erwin, P J; Halliday, M I; Rowlands, B J

    1993-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa protects the body from a large reservoir of intraluminal pathogenic bacteria and endotoxins. This mucosal barrier is disrupted by the inflammation and ulceration of inflammatory bowel disease and may permit the absorption of toxic bacterial products. Systemic endotoxaemia has been demonstrated in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and correlates with the extent and activity of disease. In this study the efficacy of absorbents as antiendotoxin agents in a hapten induced rat model of colitis is investigated. Induction of colitis was associated with systemic endotoxaemia. Enteral administration of terra fullonica and kaolin, but not of charcoal, significantly reduced systemic endotoxaemia (terra fullonica 4.2 (1.40) pg/ml; kaolin 5.29 (1.86) pg/ml; charcoal 32.7 (16.6) pg/ml; water 39.8 (12.6) pg/ml). Data expressed as mean (SE). With increasing severity of colitis, there was a decreasing ability of adsorbent therapy (terra fullonica) to control systemic endotoxaemia. Enteral administration of adsorbents controls gut derived systemic endotoxaemia in experimental colitis in animals and may be a useful antiendotoxin treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:8432452

  4. Block copolymer adsorbed layers on solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Mani; Jiang, Naisheng; Gowd, Bhoje; Endoh, Maya; Koga, Tadanori

    Block copolymer thin films offer a simple and effective route to fabricate highly ordered periodic microdomain structures. The fundamental, yet unsolved question is whether these highly oriented microdomain structures persist even near an impenetrable solid wall. We here report the adsorbed structures of polystyrene-block-poly (4-vinylpyridine) (PS-block-P4VP, Mw = 41,000, PS (weight fraction =0.81) formed on planar silicon substrates. Perpendicularly aligned cylindrical microdomains were created by solvent vapor annealing (Gowd et al., Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 7753), and the adsorbed layer was derived by solvent leaching with chloroform, a good solvent for the polymers and thereafter characterized by using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray reflectivity. The results showed that both PS and P4VP chains lie flat on the substrate, forming a microphase-separated structure (MSS) without long-range order. Moreover, a spin-coated PS-block-P4VP thin film annealed under vacuum at 190 °C showed similar MSS on the substrate, indicating the generality of the interfacial polymer structure. Details will be discussed in the presentation. NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  5. Mimetite Formation from Goethite-Adsorbed Ions.

    PubMed

    Kleszczewska-Zębala, Anna; Manecki, Maciej; Bajda, Tomasz; Rakovan, John; Borkiewicz, Olaf J

    2016-06-01

    Bioavailability of arsenic in contaminated soils and wastes can be reduced to insignificant levels by precipitation of mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl. The objective of this study is to elucidate mechanisms of the reaction between solution containing lead ions and arsenates adsorbed on synthetic goethite (AsO4-goethite), or arsenate ions in the solution and goethite saturated with adsorbed Pb (Pb-goethite). These reactions, in the presence of Cl, result in rapid crystallization of mimetite. Formation of mimetite is faster than desorption of AsO4 but slower than desorption of Pb from the goethite surface. Slow desorption of arsenates from AsO4-goethite results in heterogeneous precipitation and formation of mimetite incrustation on goethite crystals. Desorption of lead from Pb-goethite is at least as fast as diffusion and advection of AsO4 and Cl in suspension allowing for homogeneous crystallization of mimetite in intergranular solution. Therefore, the mechanism of nucleation is primarily driven by the kinetics of constituent supply to the saturation front, rather than by the thermodynamics of nucleation. The products of the reactions are well documented using microscopy methods such as scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PMID:27329315

  6. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers.

    PubMed

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-21

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role. PMID:27353115

  7. Investigation of drug-porous adsorbent interactions in drug mixtures with selected porous adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Madieh, Shadi; Simone, Michael; Wilson, Wendy; Mehra, Dev; Augsburger, Larry

    2007-04-01

    The adsorption of drugs onto porous substrates may prove to be a convenient method by which to enhance the dissolution rate of certain poorly water-soluble drugs in body fluids. The purpose of this research is to provide a better understanding of the type of interactions occurring between drugs and certain pharmaceutically acceptable porous adsorbents that leads to enhanced drug dissolution rates. The interactions between ibuprofen (acidic drug), acetaminophen (acidic drug), dipyridamole (basic drug), and the porous adsorbents used (calcium silicate and silica gel) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). DSC and PXRD results indicated a significant loss of crystallinity of both ibuprofen and acetaminophen but not dipyridamole. In the case of ibuprofen, FTIR results indicated the ionization of the carboxylic group based on the shift in the FTIR carboxylic band. Dissolution of ibuprofen from its mixtures with porous adsorbents was found to be significantly higher compared to the neat drug, whereas dipyridamole dissolution from its mixtures with porous adsorbents was not significantly different from that of the neat drug. PMID:17221849

  8. Equilibrium molecular theory of two-dimensional adsorbate drops on surfaces of heterogeneous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2016-08-01

    A molecular statistical theory for calculating the linear tension of small multicomponent droplets in two-dimensional adsorption systems is developed. The theory describes discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a scale comparable to molecular size) and continuous distributions of molecules (at short distances inside cells) in their translational and vibrational motions. Pair intermolecular interaction potentials (the Mie type potential) in several coordination spheres are considered. For simplicity, it is assumed that distinctions in the sizes of mixture components are slight and comparable to the sizes of adsorbent adsorption centers. Expressions for the pressure tensor components inside small droplets on the heterogeneous surface of an adsorbent are obtained, allowing calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of a vapor-fluid interface, including linear tension. Problems in refining the molecular theory are discussed: describing the properties of small droplets using a coordination model of their structure, considering the effect an adsorbate has on the state of a near-surface adsorbent region, and the surface heterogeneity factor in the conditions for the formation of droplets.

  9. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  10. Effect of Humic Substances on the Trapping and Transformations of U(VI) by Ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublet, G.; Brown, G. E.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.; Janot, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Old Rifle DOE site in Colorado was a major site for milling uranium ore. U concentrations up to 1.8 uM persist in the Rifle aquifer, even after 'cleaning' the waste source of contaminations [1]. Understanding the behavior of U(VI) in this anthropogenically perturbed system is crucial for controlling the level of U contamination. Direct investigations of U speciation at this site have shown that U is associated with a wide variety of minerals as well as with natural organic matter (NOM) [2]. NOM has multiple functional groups which can be highly reactive with respect to aqueous metal ions, including actinides. Such interactions result in the formation of organo-mineral-metal (ternary) complexes and catalyze redox transformations; in addition, they can enhance mineral dissolution and metal transport [3,4,5]. In the complex soil/sediment system, aqueous, mineral, and organic phases are intimately mixed and their interactions are difficult to characterize by direct investigation [1]. The nanoparticulate iron hydroxide ferrihydrite (Fh), which is ubiquitous in many natural soils and highly reactive toward metal ions, is expected to significantly influence the fate of U in natural soils and is abundant in the subsurface at the Rifle site. NOM is also abundant at this site; however, little is known about the effect of NOM associated with ferrihydrite on the fate of U in such subsurface environments. To date, simple model systems composed mainly of two components (Fh and NOM) [6], (U and NOM or simple organic molecules) [7], or (Fh and U) [8,9], and more rarely composed of three components [10,11] have been studied in an effort to understand interactions among these components. In order to extend this earlier work to ternary systems, we have carried out batch reactions of U, a humic acid standard - Eliott soil humic acid (ESHA), and Fh under conditions that mimic those in the subsurface at Rifle. We have used U L3- and Fe K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy coupled

  11. Saturn's Rings Particle and Clump Sizes from Cassini UVIS Occultation Statistics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Cooney, J.; Esposito, L. W.; Sremcevic, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed stellar occultations by Saturn's rings with sampling intervals of 1 and 2 ms using its High Speed Photometer (HSP). At this high measurement tempo, the radial separation between subsequent points is typically ~10 m. This enables us to study differences in the statistical properties of the occultation data over small radial scales in the rings. Two regions that lead to the same mean stellar signal (identical optical depth) may have very different variances in that same signal. If each area in the rings sampled by an individual measurement has the same distribution of particles, then the stellar signal received from each area will be the same, and the variance in the data will be entirely due to Poisson counting statistics. If, however, there are significant fluctuations in the number of particles from one area to the next, then the variance will be much larger, though the mean signal received for all points could be the same. There will be large fluctuations from point to point in the number of particles blocking the stellar signal for a given optical depth if the number of particles in each sampled area is small which in turn corresponds to larger particle sizes for a given optical depth. The variance in the data is thus proportional to the mean cross-sectional area of the particles or clumps of particles. This idea was first applied to Saturn's rings with data from the Voyager PPS stellar occultation by Showalter and Nicholson (1990, Icarus 87, 285-306). The Cassini HSP data are obtained at a much higher spatial resolution enabling us to study differences in effective particle sizes over much smaller spatial scales in the rings. The excess variance observed in the HSP stellar occultations reveals different particle populations or clump sizes in different ring regions. The C ring plateaus exhibit smaller (by a factor of 2) sizes than the background C ring. The inner B ring is characterized by smaller

  12. Application of maghemite nanoparticles as sorbents for the removal of Cu(II), Mn(II) and U(VI) ions from aqueous solution in acid mine drainage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etale, Anita; Tutu, Hlanganani; Drake, Deanne C.

    2014-06-01

    The adsorptive removal of Cu(II), Mn(II) and U(VI) by maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated under acid mine drainage (AMD) conditions to assess NP potential for remediating AMD-contaminated water. The effects of time, NP and metal concentration, as well as manganese and sulphate ions were quantified at pH 3. Adsorption of all three ions was rapid, and equilibrium was attained in 5 min or less. 56 % of Cu, 53 % of Mn and 49 % of U were adsorbed. In addition, adsorption efficiencies were enhanced by ≥10 % in the presence of manganese and sulphate ions, although Cu sorption was reduced in 1:2 Cu-to-Mn solutions. Adsorption also increased with pH: 86 % Cu, 62 % Mn and 77 % U were removed from solution at pH 9 and increasing initial metal concentrations. Increasing NP concentrations did not, however, always increase metal removal. Kinetics data were best described by a pseudo-second-order model, implying chemisorption, while isotherm data were better fitted by the Freundlich model. Metal removal by NPs was then tested in AMD-contaminated surface and ground water. Removal efficiencies of up to 46 % for Cu and 54 % for Mn in surface water and 8 % for Cu and 50 % for Mn in ground water were achieved, confirming that maghemite NPs can be applied for the removal of these ions from AMD-contaminated waters. Notably, whereas sulphates may increase adsorption efficiencies, high Mn concentrations in AMD will likely inhibit Cu sorption.

  13. Application of maghemite nanoparticles as sorbents for the removal of Cu(II), Mn(II) and U(VI) ions from aqueous solution in acid mine drainage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etale, Anita; Tutu, Hlanganani; Drake, Deanne C.

    2016-06-01

    The adsorptive removal of Cu(II), Mn(II) and U(VI) by maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated under acid mine drainage (AMD) conditions to assess NP potential for remediating AMD-contaminated water. The effects of time, NP and metal concentration, as well as manganese and sulphate ions were quantified at pH 3. Adsorption of all three ions was rapid, and equilibrium was attained in 5 min or less. 56 % of Cu, 53 % of Mn and 49 % of U were adsorbed. In addition, adsorption efficiencies were enhanced by ≥10 % in the presence of manganese and sulphate ions, although Cu sorption was reduced in 1:2 Cu-to-Mn solutions. Adsorption also increased with pH: 86 % Cu, 62 % Mn and 77 % U were removed from solution at pH 9 and increasing initial metal concentrations. Increasing NP concentrations did not, however, always increase metal removal. Kinetics data were best described by a pseudo-second-order model, implying chemisorption, while isotherm data were better fitted by the Freundlich model. Metal removal by NPs was then tested in AMD-contaminated surface and ground water. Removal efficiencies of up to 46 % for Cu and 54 % for Mn in surface water and 8 % for Cu and 50 % for Mn in ground water were achieved, confirming that maghemite NPs can be applied for the removal of these ions from AMD-contaminated waters. Notably, whereas sulphates may increase adsorption efficiencies, high Mn concentrations in AMD will likely inhibit Cu sorption.

  14. Role(s) of adsorbed water in the surface chemistry of environmental interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-04-18

    The chemistry of environmental interfaces such as oxide and carbonate surfaces under ambient conditions of temperature and relative humidity is of great interest from many perspectives including heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry, heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, sensor technology, corrosion science, and cultural heritage science. As discussed here, adsorbed water plays important roles in the reaction chemistry of oxide and carbonate surfaces with indoor and outdoor pollutant molecules including nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, ozone and organic acids. Mechanisms of these reactions are just beginning to be unraveled and found to depend on the details of the reaction mechanism as well as the coverage of water on the surface. As discussed here, adsorbed water can: (i) alter reaction pathways and surface speciation relative to the dry surface; (ii) hydrolyze reactants, intermediates and products; (iii) enhance surface reactivity by providing a medium for ionic dissociation; (iv) inhibit surface reactivity by blocking sites; (v) solvate ions; (vi) enhance ion mobility on surfaces and (vii) alter the stability of surface adsorbed species. In this feature article, drawing on research that has been going on for over a decade on the reaction chemistry of oxide and carbonate surfaces under ambient conditions of temperature and relative humidity, a number of specific examples showing the multi-faceted roles of adsorbed water are presented. PMID:23417201

  15. Swelling induced regeneration of TiO2-impregnated chitosan adsorbents under visible light.

    PubMed

    Yang, Limin; Jiang, Lei; Hu, Di; Yan, Qingyun; Wang, Zhi; Li, Sisi; Chen, Cheng; Xue, Qi

    2016-04-20

    Since only the molecules that are in direct contact with the TiO2 surface undergo photosensitization, it is challenging to regenerate the TiO2-impregnated chitosan (TIC) adsorbent beads under visible light. This study focused on the role of chitosan swelling properties. It was found that dye-loaded TIC adsorbent exhibited a pH-dependent swelling owing to protonation/deprotonation of free amino groups on chitosan chains. In the acidic medium (pH<6.0), the adsorbent underwent a 'smart' phase transition from a dry contracted state to a hydrated swollen state, and its physicochemical properties were also significantly changed, which eventually enabled the photosensitized oxidation of dye. This swelling induced regeneration was further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The involvement of oxygen radical species (O2(-)/HOO and OH) was also confirmed with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Moreover, the adsorption effectiveness of TIC adsorbent was mostly recovered after six regeneration cycles. PMID:26876871

  16. A 13C NMR study of the adsorbed states of CO on Rh dispersed on Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, T. M.; Yates, J. T.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1980-07-01

    The results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been analyzed with respect to previous infrared studies of CO adsorbed on Rh dispersed on Al2O3 to quantify the site distribution and to describe the adsorbed state. The 13C NMR spectra account for all the 13CO adsorbed on a 2.2% Rh on Al2O3 substrate. Although the spectra from the different adsorbed states of CO overlap, the line shapes may be separated into two components based on differences in the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times. These two components have been assigned to the 13CO dicarbonyl formed on single Rh atoms and to 13CO adsorbed on Rh rafts. The component attributed to the CO adsorbed on the raft sites is further separated into linear and bridged CO state contributions based on chemical shift information, yielding a quantitative distribution of the three adsorbed states of CO on Rh. The 13CO distribution is used to estimate the molar integrated intensities of the infrared spectrum of 13CO on Rh at high coverage and to determine the degree of dispersion of Rh on the Al2O3. The 13C NMR line shapes of CO adsorbed on Rh are different from the powder pattern of Rh2Cl2(CO)4. It is suggested that the line shape of the dicarbonyl surface species is narrowed to a Lorentzian curve by reorientation at the site and the line shape of CO on the Rh rafts is modulated by exchange between sites on a single raft. The 13C relaxation time distribution provides further evidence for the existence of isolated Rh atoms on the Al2O3 surface.

  17. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W. -P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  18. Methods for Estimating Adsorbed Uranium(VI) and Distribution Coefficients of Contaminated Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.; Meece, D.E.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the quantity of U(VI) that participates in sorption/desorption processes in a contaminated aquifer is an important task when investigating U migration behavior. U-contaminated aquifer sediments were obtained from 16 different locations at a former U mill tailings site at Naturita, CO (U.S.A.) and were extracted with an artificial groundwater, a high pH sodium bicarbonate solution, hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, and concentrated nitric acid. With an isotopic exchange method, both a KD value for the specific experimental conditions as well as the total exchangeable mass of U(VI) was determined. Except for one sample, KD values determined by isotopic exchange with U-contaminated sediments that were in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 agreed within a factor of 2 with KD values predicted from a nonelectrostatic surface complexation model (NEM) developed from U(VI) adsorption experiments with uncontaminated sediments. The labile fraction of U(VI) and U extracted by the bicarbonate solution were highly correlated (r2 = 0.997), with a slope of 0.96 ?? 0.01. The proximity of the slope to one suggests that both methods likely access the same reservoir of U(VI) associated with the sediments. The results indicate that the bicarbonate extraction method is useful for estimating the mass of labile U(VI) in sediments that do not contain U(IV). In-situ KD values calculated from the measured labile U(VI) and the dissolved U(VI) in the Naturita alluvial aquifer agreed within a factor of 3 with in-situ K D values predicted with the NEM and groundwater chemistry at each well.

  19. Fundamental characteristics of synthetic adsorbents intended for industrial chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tadashi; Isobe, Eiji

    2004-05-14

    With the aim of obtaining comprehensive information on the selection of synthetic adsorbents for industrial applications, effect of pore and chemical structure of industrial-grade synthetic adsorbents on adsorption capacity of several pharmaceutical compounds was investigated. For relatively low molecular mass compounds, such as cephalexin, berberine chloride and tetracycline hydrochloride, surface area per unit volume of polystyrenic adsorbents dominated the equilibrium adsorption capacity. On the contrary, effect of pore size of the polystyrenic adsorbents on the equilibrium adsorption capacity was observed for relatively high molecular mass compounds, such as rifampicin, Vitamin B12 and insulin. Polystyrenic adsorbent with high surface area and small pore size showed small adsorption capacity for relatively high molecular mass compounds, whereas polystyrenic adsorbent with relatively small surface area but with large pore size showed large adsorption capacity. Effect of chemical structure on the equilibrium adsorption capacity of several pharmaceutical compounds was also studied among polystyrenic, modified polystyrenic and polymethacrylic adsorbents. The modified polystyrenic adsorbent showed larger adsorption capacity for all compounds tested in this study due to enhanced hydrophobicity. The polymethacrylic adsorbent possessed high adsorption capacity for rifampicin and insulin, but it showed lower adsorption capacity for the other compounds studied. This result may be attributed to hydrogen bonding playing major role for the adsorption of compounds on polymethacrylic adsorbent. Furthermore, column adsorption experiments were operated to estimate the effect of pore characteristics of the polystyrenic adsorbents on dynamic adsorption behavior, and it is found that both surface area and pore size of the polystyrenic adsorbents significantly affect the dynamic adsorption capacity as well as flow rate. PMID:15139411

  20. The role of vdW interactions in coverage dependent adsorption energies of atomic adsorbates on Pt(111) and Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, Hari; Kitchin, John R.

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption, a fundamental process in heterogeneous catalysis is known to be dependent on the adsorbate-adsorbate and surface-adsorbate bonds. van der Waals (vdW) interactions are one of the types of interactions that have not been examined thoroughly as a function of adsorbate coverage. In this work we quantify the vdW interactions for atomic adsorbates on late transition metal surfaces, and determine how these long range forces affect the coverage dependent adsorption energies. We calculate the adsorption energies of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, fluorine, bromine and chlorine species on Pt(111) and Pd(111) at coverages ranging from 1/4 to 1 ML using the BEEF-vdW functional. We observe that adsorption energies remain coverage dependent, and this coverage dependence is shown to be statistically significant. vdW interactions are found to be coverage dependent, but more significantly, they are found to be dependent on molecular properties such as adsorbate size, and consequently, correlate with the adsorbate effective nuclear charge. We observe that these interactions account for a reduction in the binding energy of the system, due to the destabilizing attractive interactions between the adsorbates which weaken its bond with the surface.

  1. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1994-04-05

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

  2. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, Gunnar I.; Dietz, Russell N.

    1994-01-01

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

  3. Video STM Studies of Adsorbate Diffusion at Electrochemical Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansel, T.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2006-01-01

    Direct in situ studies of the surface diffusion of isolated adsorbates at an electrochemical interface by high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (video STM) are presented for sulfide adsorbates on Cu(100) in HCl solution. As revealed by a quantitative statistical analysis, the adsorbate motion can be described by thermally activated hopping between neighboring adsorption sites with an activation energy that increases linearly with electrode potential by 0.50 eV per V. This can be explained by changes in the adsorbate dipole moment during the hopping process and contributions from coadsorbates.

  4. High-Precision Proper Motion Measurements of the Stars in the Field of SN 1572 with WFC3/UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar

    2011-10-01

    We propose to refine the space-velocity measurements of the stars in the central region of SNR 1572, one of the historical Galactic Type Ia supernova remnants. A single-orbit visit with the WFC3/UVIS would allow, in combination with the previous ACS/WFC images obtained in 2003-2005, an astrometric precision of less than 0.05 mas, almost one order of magnitude better than our previous result. Precise knowledge of the kinematics of all of the stars in the region is crucial for determining which one might be the surviving binary companion of the supernova. A precise reconstruction of the parameters of the binary system that gave rise to the supernova would then be possible, complementing the existing observations both from the ground and with the HST, which span the last fourteen years.

  5. Linear transport models for adsorbing solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.; Jury, W. A.

    1993-04-01

    A unified linear theory for the transport of adsorbing solutes through soils is presented and applied to analyze movement of napropamide through undisturbed soil columns. The transport characteristics of the soil are expressed in terms of the travel time distribution of the mobile phase which is then used to incorporate local interaction processes. This approach permits the analysis of all linear transport processes, not only the small subset for which a differential description is known. From a practical point of view, it allows the direct use of measured concentrations or fluxes of conservative solutes to characterize the mobile phase without first subjecting them to any model. For complicated flow regimes, this may vastly improve the identification of models and estimation of their parameters for the local adsorption processes.

  6. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A. Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-01

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role.The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth

  7. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desoprtion Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, William P.

    2004-12-01

    In order to apply predictive reactive transport models to the Hanford site, detailed knowledge of the speciation of contaminants is required. Important speciation parameters include: (1) oxidation state; (2) the local molecular structure surrounding contaminant elements; (3) the type and binding of a contaminant ion sorption complex (if adsorbed); (4) the type(s) of phase within which a contaminant is structurally incorporated [e.g., present in a three-dimensional precipitate(s)]; (5) the phase associations of a contaminant; (6) the microscopic distribution of a contaminant within sediments and soils. In the present study, we have used synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopic methods to study the speciation of U and Cu in contaminated soil and sediment samples from the Hanford Site. To complement and complete our initial XAFS investigation of U speciation in contaminated vadose zone sediments below tank BX-102, we have also performed mXRD studies of two sediment sample to identify the specific U(VI)-silicate phase present. Samples from the 300 Area were examined by mSXRF to determine the microscopic distribution and element associations of Cu and U. These samples were also analyzed by U LIII- and Cu K-edge XAFS spectroscopy to determine the chemical speciation of these elements.

  8. Method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Dong, Wenming; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2011-03-15

    Acidic uranium (U) groundwater plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/year) show that desorption of U and HA were nondetectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH ≤ 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results indicate that HA-treatment is a promising in situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost-effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface. PMID:21319737

  9. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  10. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of new acridine based fluorophore adsorbed on silver electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Elena V.; Myund, Liubov A.; Denisova, Anna S.

    2015-10-01

    4,5-Bis(N,N-di(2-hydroxyethyl)iminomethyl)acridine (BHIA) is a new acridine based fluoroionophore and a highly-selective sensor for cadmium ion. The direct interaction of the aromatic nitrogen atom with a surface is impossible since there are bulky substituents in the 4,5-positions of the acridine fragment. Nevertheless BHIA molecule shows a reliable SERS spectrum while adsorbed on a silver electrode. The analysis of SERS spectra pH dependence reveals that BHIA species adsorbed on a surface can exist in both non-protonated and protonated forms. The adsorption of BHIA from alkaline solution is accompanied by carbonaceous species formation at the surface. The intensity of such "carbon bands" turned out to be related with the supporting electrolyte (KCl) concentration. Upon lowering the electrode potential the SERS spectra of BHIA do not undergo changes but the intensity of bands decreases. This indicates that the adsorption mechanism on the silver surface is realized via aromatic system of acridine fragment. In case of such an adsorption mechanism the chelate fragment of the BHIA molecule is capable of interaction with the solution components. Addition of Cd2+ ions to a system containing BHIA adsorbed on a silver electrode in equilibrium with the solution leads to the formation of BHIA/Cd2+ complex which desorption causes the loss of SERS signal.

  11. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of new acridine based fluorophore adsorbed on silver electrode.

    PubMed

    Solovyeva, Elena V; Myund, Liubov A; Denisova, Anna S

    2015-10-01

    4,5-Bis(N,N-di(2-hydroxyethyl)iminomethyl)acridine (BHIA) is a new acridine based fluoroionophore and a highly-selective sensor for cadmium ion. The direct interaction of the aromatic nitrogen atom with a surface is impossible since there are bulky substituents in the 4,5-positions of the acridine fragment. Nevertheless BHIA molecule shows a reliable SERS spectrum while adsorbed on a silver electrode. The analysis of SERS spectra pH dependence reveals that BHIA species adsorbed on a surface can exist in both non-protonated and protonated forms. The adsorption of BHIA from alkaline solution is accompanied by carbonaceous species formation at the surface. The intensity of such "carbon bands" turned out to be related with the supporting electrolyte (KCl) concentration. Upon lowering the electrode potential the SERS spectra of BHIA do not undergo changes but the intensity of bands decreases. This indicates that the adsorption mechanism on the silver surface is realized via aromatic system of acridine fragment. In case of such an adsorption mechanism the chelate fragment of the BHIA molecule is capable of interaction with the solution components. Addition of Cd(2+) ions to a system containing BHIA adsorbed on a silver electrode in equilibrium with the solution leads to the formation of BHIA/Cd(2+) complex which desorption causes the loss of SERS signal. PMID:25956332

  12. Identification of the Active Species in Photochemical Hole Scavenging Reactions of Methanol on TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-11-03

    Molecular and dissociative methanol adsorption species were prepared on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces to study photocatalytic oxidation of methanol in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Adsorbed methoxy groups (CH3O-) were found to be the photoactive form of adsorbed methanol converted to adsorbed formaldehyde and a surface OH group by hole-mediated C-H bond cleavage. These results suggest that adsorbed methoxy is the effective hole scavenger in photochemical reactions involving methanol.

  13. SORPTION PROPERTIES OF MODEL COMPOUNDS ON C18 ADSORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bonded silica adsorbent Bondapak-C18 was evaluated for removing organic matter from secondary sewage effluents and from solutions of pure organic compounds. The adsorbent is hydrophobic and its behavior with water samples may be erratic unless first wet with a solvent. Howeve...

  14. Development of a Desulfurization Strategy for a NOx Adsorber Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Tomazic, Dean

    2000-08-20

    Improve NOx regeneration calibration developed in DECSE Phase I project to understand full potential of NOx adsorber catalyst over a range of operating temperatures. Develop and demonstrate a desulfurization process to restore NOx conversion efficiency lost to sulfur contamination. Investigate effect of desulfurization process on long-term performance of the NOx adsorber catalyst.

  15. Momentum resolved electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution, a new technique, probing the low frequency motion of adsorbed molecules on single crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahner, J.; Mocuta, D.; Yates, J.T. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    A new technique, momentum resolved electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution (ESDIAD), provides a method for taking snapshots of the zero-point position and lateral momentum of particles adsorbed on crystalline surfaces. By employing state-of-the-art electronics and computer technology it is possible to record for each desorbing particle the desorption direction together with the flight time. High momentum and directional resolved images are obtained, with time-of-flight resolution in the picosecond range and data acquisition rates up to 100 kHz. This enables us to deconvolute spatial and momentum contributions to the ESDIAD pattern and to map the low frequency motion of the adsorbed particles. These maps reflect the adsorbate interactions with the substrate and with neighboring species on the substrate. For selected examples it is demonstrated that by measuring the three dimensional momentum vector for each desorbing particle it is possible to probe the lowest energy states of adsorbed species, as well as to measure the momentum distribution when the adsorbed species gains thermal energy. Such information can be used as a basis for thinking about anisotropies in lateral motion of particles on surfaces. One major opportunity involves the study of dissimilar chemisorbed species which, when imaged together in momentum and real space, give new insights into the first stages of interaction between the species, leading ultimately to a chemical reaction. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  16. Potassium Niobate Nanolamina: A Promising Adsorbent for Entrapment of Radioactive Cations from Water

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Yang, Dongjiang; Sun, Cuihua; Liu, Long; Yang, Shuanglei; (Alec) Jia, Yi; Cai, Rongsheng; Yao, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Processing and managing radioactive waste is a great challenge worldwide as it is extremely difficult and costly; the radioactive species, cations or anions, leaked into the environment are a serious threat to the health of present and future generations. We report layered potassium niobate (K4Nb6O17) nanolamina as adsorbent to remove toxic Sr2+, Ba2+ and Cs+ cations from wastewater. The results show that K4Nb6O17 nanolamina can permanently confine the toxic cations within the interlayer spacing via a considerable deformation of the metastable layered structure during the ion exchange process. At the same time, the nanolaminar adsorbent exhibits prompt adsorption kinetics, high adsorption capacity and selectivity, and superior acid resistance. These merits make it be a promising material as ion exchanger for the removal of radioactive cations from wastewater. PMID:25472721

  17. An ATR-FTIR study of different phosphonic acids adsorbed onto boehmite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenobi, María C.; Luengo, Carina V.; Avena, Marcelo J.; Rueda, Elsa H.

    2010-04-01

    An ATR-FTIR study of the vibrational spectra of N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) aminomethylphosphonic acid (BHAMP), 1-hydroxyethane-1,1'-diphosphonic acid (HEDP) and nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) adsorbed onto boehmite is presented. The study was performed in the pH range from 5 to 9, and bands assignments are given in the 1200-900 cm -1 wavenumber range, where the bands associated with various P-O(H) vibrations can be found. The three phosphonic acids adsorb onto boehmite by forming inner-sphere surface complexes. ATR-FTIR data indicates the presence of both protonated and deprotonated mononuclear surface species. In all cases, the surface-bound ions undergo protonation reactions as pH is decreased. The results are in good agreement with previously proposed surface complexation models.

  18. An ATR-FTIR study of different phosphonic acids adsorbed onto boehmite.

    PubMed

    Zenobi, María C; Luengo, Carina V; Avena, Marcelo J; Rueda, Elsa H

    2010-04-01

    An ATR-FTIR study of the vibrational spectra of N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) aminomethylphosphonic acid (BHAMP), 1-hydroxyethane-1,1'-diphosphonic acid (HEDP) and nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) adsorbed onto boehmite is presented. The study was performed in the pH range from 5 to 9, and bands assignments are given in the 1200-900 cm(-1) wavenumber range, where the bands associated with various P-O(H) vibrations can be found. The three phosphonic acids adsorb onto boehmite by forming inner-sphere surface complexes. ATR-FTIR data indicates the presence of both protonated and deprotonated mononuclear surface species. In all cases, the surface-bound ions undergo protonation reactions as pH is decreased. The results are in good agreement with previously proposed surface complexation models. PMID:20129815

  19. Infrared study of pyridine adsorbed on unpromoted and promoted sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.; Keogh, R.A.; Alerasool, S.; Zalewski, D.J.; Day, D.E.; Doolin, P.K.

    1999-04-01

    Infrared spectra of pyridine adsorbed on zirconia and Pt-zirconia exhibited bands consistent with Lewis acid sites. Sulfated zirconia, after heating at 400 C, exhibited bands indicating about equal amounts of Lewis (L) and Broensted (B) acid sites; the B/L ratio decreased with increasing reactivation temperature to become essentially zero after reactivation at 600 C. In contrast, both Pt and Fe/Mn promoted sulfated zirconia exhibited B/L ratios that increased slightly with increasing reactivation temperature. It is proposed that pyridine reacts with a Lewis acid site to produce an adsorbed pyridone-type surface species with the concurrent generation of a proton. The superior performance of the promoted sulfated zirconia catalyst is believed to arise from its ability to generate Broensted acid sites.

  20. Influence of adsorbed fluids on the rolling contact deformation of MgO single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.

    1977-01-01

    Basic phenomena associated with rolling contact deformation were studied using MgO as a model bearing material. A hardened steel ball was rolled on MgO single crystals in slow-speed reciprocating motion and in high-speed circular motion. The resulting deformation was studied by dislocation etch-pit techniques. The presence of adsorbed fluids, such as silicone oil, white mineral oil, and toluene, with slow-speed sliding caused a dramatic change in slip mode and premature surface spalling compared with similar experiments in air or under water. In contrast, dimethyl formamide inhibited these slip processes. The results are consistent with the dependence of dislocation mobility on adsorbed species. High-speed hydrodynamic rolling with mineral oil lubrication produced a different slip phenomena entirely from the slow-speed rolling. The slip bands resembled those produced in tensile tests, and all slip apparently initiated at subsurface sites.

  1. Kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, H.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M.G. Rao and A.K. Gupta was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for both the cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 2}/s were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively.

  2. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-01

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  3. Kinetic Study of Lead Adsorption to Composite Biopolymer Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Seki; Suzuki

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M. G. Rao and A. K. Gupta (Chem. Eng. J. 24, 181, 1982) was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for the both cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 x 10(-6) and 7 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049553

  4. Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wang, Zheming; Dixit, Suvasis; Steefel, Carl; Saiz, Eduardo; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2009-02-01

    A saline-alkaline brine containing high concentrations of U(VI) was accidentally spilled at the Hanford Site in 1951, introducing 10 tons of U into sediments under storage tank BX-102. U concentrations in the deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes increase with time, yet how the U has been migrating is not fully understood. We simulated the spill event in laboratory soil columns, followed by aging, and obtained spatially resolved U partitioning and speciation along simulated plumes. We found after aging, at apparent steady state, that the pore aqueous phase U concentrations remained surprisingly high (up to 0.022 M), in close agreement with the recently reported high U concentrations (up to 0.027 M) in the vadose zone plume (1). The pH values of aged pore liquids varying from 10 to 7, consistent with the measured pH of the field borehole sediments varying from 9.5 to 7.4 (2), from near the plume source to the plume front. The direct measurements of aged pore liquids together with thermodynamic calculations using a Pitzer approach revealed that UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {sup 4-} is the dominant aqueous U species within the plume body (pH 8-10), while Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} and CaUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 2-} are also significant in the plume front vicinity (pH 7-8), consistent with that measured from field borehole porewaters (3). U solid phase speciation varies at different locations along the plume flow path and even within single sediment grains, because of location dependent pore and micropore solution chemistry. Our results suggest that high geochemical stability of UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-} in the original carbonate and sodium rich waste solution permits its continues migration and the field observed increases of U concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater.

  5. Formation Process of Eosin Y-Adsorbing ZnO Particles by Electroless Deposition and Their Photoelectric Conversion Properties.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Satoshi; Nishikiori, Hiromasa; Mizusaki, Hideaki; Wagata, Hajime; Teshima, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    The thin films consisting of crystalline ZnO particles were prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide electrodes by electroless deposition. The particles were deposited from an aqueous solution containing zinc nitrate, dimethyamine-borane, and eosin Y at 328 K. As the Pd particles were adsorbed on the substrate, not only the eosin Y monomer but also the dimer and debrominated species were rapidly adsorbed on the spherical ZnO particles, which were aggregated and formed secondary particles. On the other hand, in the absence of the Pd particles, the monomer was adsorbed on the flake-shaped ZnO particles, which vertically grew on the substrate surface and had a high crystallinity. The photoelectric conversion efficiency was higher for the ZnO electrodes containing a higher amount of the monomer during light irradiation. PMID:25978089

  6. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  7. Imaging the wave functions of adsorbed molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F. Stefan; Ramsey, Michael G.; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The basis for a quantum-mechanical description of matter is electron wave functions. For atoms and molecules, their spatial distributions and phases are known as orbitals. Although orbitals are very powerful concepts, experimentally only the electron densities and -energy levels are directly observable. Regardless whether orbitals are observed in real space with scanning probe experiments, or in reciprocal space by photoemission, the phase information of the orbital is lost. Here, we show that the experimental momentum maps of angle-resolved photoemission from molecular orbitals can be transformed to real-space orbitals via an iterative procedure which also retrieves the lost phase information. This is demonstrated with images obtained of a number of orbitals of the molecules pentacene (C22H14) and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (C24H8O6), adsorbed on silver, which are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. The procedure requires no a priori knowledge of the orbitals and is shown to be simple and robust. PMID:24344291

  8. Mesoporous carbon nanomaterials as environmental adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pranav K; Gan, Lihua; Liu, Mingxian; Rao, Nageswara N

    2014-02-01

    The transportation and diffusion of the guest objects or molecules in the porous carbon nanomaterials can be facilitated by reducing the pathway and resistance. The reduced pathway depends on the porous nature of carbon nanomaterials. Classification of porous carbon materials by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has given a new opportunity to design the pores as per their applicability and to understand the mobility of ions, atoms, and molecules in the porous network of carbon materials and also advanced their countless applicability. However, synthesis of carbon nanomaterials with a desired porous network is still a great challenge. Although, remarkable developments have taken place in the recent years, control over the pores size and/or hierarchical porous architectures, especially in the synthesis of carbon nanospheres (CNSs) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMCs) is still intriguing. The micro and mesoporous CNSs and OMCs have been prepared by a variety of procedures and over a wide range of compositions using various different surfactant templates and carbon precursors etc. The mechanisms of formation of micromesopore in the CNSs and OMCs are still evolving. On the other hand, the urge for adsorbents with very high adsorption capacities for removing contaminants from water is growing steadily. In this review, we address the state-of-the-art synthesis of micro and mesoporous CNSs and OMCs, giving examples of their applications for adsorptive removals of contaminants including our own research studies. PMID:24749459

  9. NASA Applications of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a new, innovative technology that was developed to reduce the risk of molecular contamination on spaceflight applications. Outgassing from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, and potting compounds, pose a significant threat to the spacecraft and the lifetime of missions. As a coating made of highly porous inorganic materials, MAC offers impressive adsorptive capabilities that help capture and trap contaminants. Past research efforts have demonstrated the coating's promising adhesion performance, optical properties, acoustic durability, and thermal stability. These results advocate its use near or on surfaces that are targeted by outgassed materials, such as internal optics, electronics, detectors, baffles, sensitive instruments, thermal control coatings, and vacuum chamber test environments. The MAC technology has significantly progressed in development over the recent years. This presentation summarizes the many NASA spaceflight applications of MAC and how the coatings technology has been integrated as a mitigation tool for outgassed contaminants. For example, this sprayable paint technology has been beneficial for use in various vacuum chambers for contamination control and hardware bake-outs. The coating has also been used in small instrument cavities within spaceflight instrument for NASA missions.

  10. Morphological characterization of furfuraldehyde resins adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Monteiro, S.N.; D`Almeida, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Sugar cane is one of the most traditional plantation cultivated crops in large areas in Brazil. The State University of the North of Rio de Janeiro, UENF, is currently engaged in a program aimed to exploit the potentialities of sugar cane industry as a self sustained non-polluting enterprise. One of the projects being carried out at the UENF is the transformation of sugar cane bagasse in precursor materials for the industry of furan derivatives such as the furfuraldehyde resins obtained by acid catalysis. The possibility of employing acid catalyzed furfuraldehyde resins as selective adsorbents has arisen during a comprehensive study of physical-chemical adsorption properties of these materials. The morphology of these resins depend on the synthesis method. Scanning Electron Microscopic studies of these materials which were synthesized, in bulk (FH-M) and solution (FH-D), showed differences in surface density and particle size. Using mercury porosimeter techniques and BET adsorption methods, it was found different pore size distributions and a decrement in surface area when solvent was employed in the synthesis process. By thermogravimetric analysis it was found similar weight losses (6%) of water adsorption and a small differences in thermal stabilities.

  11. Enhanced CO2 adsorptive performance of PEI/SBA-15 adsorbent using phosphate ester based surfactants as additives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dandan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Haiqiang; Weng, Xiaole; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a series of polyetherimide/SBA-15: 2-D hexagonal P6mm, Santa Barbara USA (PEI/SBA-15) adsorbents modified by phosphoric ester based surfactants (including tri(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (BEP) and trimethyl phosphonoacetate (TMPA)) were prepared for CO2 adsorption. Experimental results indicated that the addition of TEP and BEP had positive effects on CO2 adsorption capacity over PEI/SBA-15. In particular, the CO2 adsorption amount could be improved by around 20% for 45PEI-5TEP/SBA-15 compared to the additive-free adsorbent. This could be attributed to the decrease of CO2 diffusion resistance in the PEI bulk network due to the interactions between TEP and loaded PEI molecules, which was further confirmed by adsorption kinetics results. In addition, it was also found that the cyclic performance of the TEP-modified adsorbent was better than the surfactant-free one. This could be due to two main reasons, based on the results of in situ DRIFT and TG-DSC tests. First and more importantly, adsorbed CO2 species could be desorbed more rapidly over TEP-modified adsorbent during the thermal desorption process. Furthermore, the enhanced thermal stability after TEP addition ensured lower degradation of amine groups during adsorption/desorption cycles. PMID:26702962

  12. Monitoring and toxicity evaluation of phytoplankton on lithium manganese oxide adsorbents at lithium recovery pilot plant field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H. O.; Kim, J. A.; Kim, J. C.; Chung, K. S.; Ryu, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    For recovery of rare mineral resources such as lithium or boron from seawater, the lithium adsorbent material have been made by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and pilot plant was conducted in Okgye Harbor, Gangneung, Korea. The application of lithium adsorbent in pilot plant, it is important to consider the impact on the marine environment. Especially phytoplankton communities are important marine microorganism to represent marine primary product. At the same time, phytoplankton is possible to induce the decrease of lithium recovery rate due to cause of biofouling to surfaces of lithium adsorbents. Therefore long-term and periodic monitoring of phytoplankton is necessary to understand the environmental impact and biofouling problems near the lithium pilot plant. The abundance and biomass of phytoplankton have been evaluated through monthly interval sampling from February 2013 to May 2015. Abundance and species diversity of phytoplankton went up to summer from winter. When lithium adsorbents were immersing to seawater, eco-toxicities of released substances were determined using Microtox with bioluminescence bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The adsorbents were soaked in sterilized seawater and aeration for 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14 days intervals under controlled temperature. Maximum EC50 concentration was 61.4% and this toxicity was showed in more than 10 days exposure.

  13. HST/WFC3 Characteristics: gain, post-flash stability, UVIS low-sensitivity pixels, persistence, IR flats and bad pixel table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, Heather C.; Baggett, Sylvia; Gosmeyer, Catherine M.; Long, Knox S.; Ryan, Russell E.; MacKenty, John W.; Durbin, Meredith

    2015-08-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Installed in May 2009, WFC3 is comprised of two observational channels covering wavelengths from UV/Visible (UVIS) to infrared (IR); both have been performing well on-orbit. We discuss the gain stability of both WFC3 channel detectors from ground testing through present day. For UVIS, we detail a low-sensitivity pixel population that evolves during the time between anneals, but is largely reset by the annealing procedure. We characterize the post-flash LED lamp stability, used and recommended to mitigate CTE effects for observations with less than 12e-/pixel backgrounds. We present mitigation options for IR persistence during and after observations. Finally, we give an overview on the construction of the IR flats and provide updates on the bad pixel table.

  14. Coumarin-modified microporous-mesoporous Zn-MOF-74 showing ultra-high uptake capacity and photo-switched storage/release of U(VI) ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Wang, Lin Lin; Gong, Le Le; Feng, Xue Feng; Luo, Ming Biao; Luo, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Driven by an energy crisis but consequently puzzled by various environmental problems, uranium, as the basic material of nuclear energy, is now receiving extensive attentions. In contrast to numerous sorbents applied in this field, metal-organic framework (MOFs), as a renovated material platform, has only recently been developed. How to improve the adsorption capacity of MOF materials towards U(VI) ions, as well as taking advantage of the nature of these MOFs to design photo-switched behaviour for photo-triggered storage/release of U(VI) ions are at present urgent problems and great challenges to be solved. Herein, we show a simple and facile method to target the goal. Through coordination-based post-synthetic strategy, microporous- mesoporous Zn-MOF-74 was easily functionalized by grafting coumarin on coordinatively unsaturated Zn(II) centers, yielding a series of coumarin-modified Zn-MOF-74 materials. The obtained samples displayed ultra-high adsorption capacity for U(VI) ions from water at pH value of 4 with maximum adsorption capacities as high as 360mg/g (the record value in MOFs) and a remarkable photo-switched capability of 50mg/g at pH value of 4. To the best of knowledge, and in contrast to the well-known photo-switched behaviour towards CO2, dye (propidium iodide), as well as fluorescence observed in MOFs, this is the first study that shows a photo-switched behaviour towards radioactive U(VI) ions in aqueous solution. PMID:26954473

  15. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  16. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  17. From adsorption to condensation: the role of adsorbed molecular clusters.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubian, Sima; Zandavi, Seyed Hadi; Ward, C A

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of heptane vapour on a smooth silicon substrate with a lower temperature than the vapour is examined analytically and experimentally. An expression for the amount adsorbed under steady state conditions is derived from the molecular cluster model of the adsorbate that is similar to the one used to derive the equilibrium Zeta adsorption isotherm. The amount adsorbed in each of a series of steady experiments is measured using a UV-vis interferometer, and gives strong support to the amount predicted to be adsorbed. The cluster distribution is used to predict the subcooling temperature required for the adsorbed vapour to make a disorder-order phase transition to become an adsorbed liquid, and the subcooling temperature is found to be 2.7 ± 0.4 K. The continuum approach for predicting the thickness of the adsorbed liquid film originally developed by Nusselt is compared with that measured and is found to over-predict the thickness by three-orders of magnitude. PMID:27426944

  18. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  19. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  20. Novel adhesive properties of poly(ethylene-oxide) adsorbed nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wenduo

    Solid-polymer interfaces play crucial roles in the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology and are the confluence of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. There is now growing evidence that polymer chains irreversibly adsorb even onto weakly attractive solid surfaces, forming a nanometer-thick adsorbed polymer layer ("adsorbed polymer nanolayers"). It has also been reported that the adsorbed layers greatly impact on local structures and properties of supported polymer thin films. In this thesis, I aim to clarify adhesive and tribological properties of adsorbed poly(ethylene-oxide) (PEO) nanolayers onto silicon (Si) substrates, which remain unsolved so far. The adsorbed nanolayers were prepared by the established protocol: one has to equilibrate the melt or dense solution against a solid surface; the unadsorbed chains can be then removed by a good solvent, while the adsorbed chains are assumed to maintain the same conformation due to the irreversible freezing through many physical solid-segment contacts. I firstly characterized the formation process and the surface/film structures of the adsorbed nanolayers by using X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Secondly, to compare the surface energy of the adsorbed layers with the bulk, static contact angle measurements with two liquids (water and glycerol) were carried out using a optical contact angle meter equipped with a video camera. Thirdly, I designed and constructed a custom-built adhesion-testing device to quantify the adhesive property. The experimental results provide new insight into the microscopic structure - macroscopic property relationship at the solid-polymer interface.

  1. Kinetic Controls on the Desorption/Dissolution of Sorbed U(VI) and their Influence on Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Chongxuan Liu; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; McKinley, James P.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Davis, James A.

    2006-04-05

    source to groundwater. (2) Measure desorption/dissolution rates of sorbed U(VI), quantify controlling factors, and develop descriptive kinetic models to provide a scientific basis to forecast U(VI) fluxes to groundwater, future plume dynamics, and long-term contaminant attenuation. (3) Establish reaction networks and determine geochemically/ physically realistic reaction parameters to drive state-of-the-art reactive transport modeling of U in vadose zone pore fluids and groundwater.

  2. Multi-Instrument Analysis of a Traveling Convection Vortex Event on July 24, 1996 Coordinated with the Polar UVI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitar, R. J.; Clauer, C. R.; Baker, J. B.; Ridley, A. J.; Cumnock, J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    We present the analysis of a coordinated set of observations from the POLAR Ultraviolet Imager (UVI), ground magnetometers, incoherent scatter radar, solar wind monitors, DMSP and GOES satellites, focused on a traveling convection vortex (TCV) event on 24th July 1996. Starting at approximately 10:48 UT, around magnetometers in Greenland and northern Canada observe pulsations consistent with the passing overhead of a series of alternating TCV filed-aligned current pairs. Azimuthal scans by the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar located near Kangerlussuaq (formerly Sondrestrom), Greenland, at this time show strong modulation in the strength and direction of ionospheric plasma flow. The magnetometer pulsations grow in magnitude over the next hour, peaking in intensity at 11:39 UT, at which time images form the UVI instrument show a localized intensification of auroral emissions over central and western Greenland. Subsequent images show the intensification grow in strength and propagate westward (tailward) until approximately 11:58 UT at which time the intensification fades. These observations are consistent with the westward passage of two pairs of moderately intense TCVs over central Greenland followed by a third very intense TCV pair. The intensification of auroral emissions at 11:39 UT is associated with the trailing vortex of the third TCV pair, thought to be the result of an upward field aligned current. The modulated flow observed by the radar is the result of the strong electric fields associated with the impulsive TCV related field aligned current systems as they pass through the field of view of the radar. Measurements of the solar wind from the V;IND and IMP-8 spacecraft suggest that a pressure change may be responsible for triggering the first two pairs of TCVS, and that a subsequent sudden change in the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field may have produced the intensification of the third TCV pair and the associated auroral brightening

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of (C6N2H14)2(UVI2UIVO4F12), a mixed-valent one-dimensional uranium oxyfluoride.

    PubMed

    Allen, S; Barlow, S; Halasyamani, P S; Mosselmans, J F; O'Hare, D; Walker, S M; Walton, R I

    2000-08-21

    A new hybrid organic-inorganic mixed-valent uranium oxyfluoride, (C6N2H14)2(U3O4F12), UFO-17, has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions using uranium dioxide as the uranium source, hydrofluoric acid as mineralizer, and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane as template. The single-crystal X-ray structure was determined. Crystals of UFO-17 belonged to the orthorhombic space group Cmcm (no. 63), with a = 14.2660(15) A, b = 24.5130(10) A, c = 7.201(2) A, and Z = 4. The structure reveals parallel uranium-containing chains of two types: one type is composed of edge-sharing UO2F5 units; the other has a backbone of edge-sharing UF8 units, each sharing an edge with a pendant UO2F5 unit. Bond-valence calculations suggest the UF8 groups contain UIV, while the UO2F5 groups contain UVI. EXAFS data give results consistent with the single-crystal X-ray structure determination, while comparison of the uranium LIII-edge XANES of UFO-17 with that of related UIV and UVI compounds supports the oxidation-state assignment. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements on UFO-17 and a range of related hybrid organic-inorganic uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) fluorides and oxyfluorides further support the formulation of UFO-17 as a mixed-valent UIV/UVI compound. PMID:11196771

  4. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Bulbul; Cao, Bin; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-01-01

    A facultative iron-reducing [Fe(III)-reducing] Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes [Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid and Fe(III)-citrate] but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 μM) of either of the electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 μM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We also found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ∼7:3 in PIPES [piperazine-N,N′-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid)] and ∼1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments. PMID:22961903

  5. Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. strain 300A, isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bulbul; Cao, Bin; McLean, Jeffrey S; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-01

    A facultative iron-reducing [Fe(III)-reducing] Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes [Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid and Fe(III)-citrate] but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 μM) of either of the electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 μM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We also found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ∼7:3 in PIPES [piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid)] and ∼1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments. PMID:22961903

  6. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-07

    A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 µM) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 µM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

  7. Alkylammonium montmorillonites as adsorbents for organic vapors from air

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, M.; Purnell, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Montmorillonite clays may be modified by the exchange of the inorganic interlayer cations with alkylammonium ions, resulting in a fixed internal porosity. The pore size and shape depend on the nature of the alkylammonium ion. A number of different ions were used to prepare adsorbents with varying properties, and these were examined for their potential application to sampling organic vapors in air. Characterization involved determination of nitrogen and water contents, surface area, interlayer spacing, thermal stability, and breakthrough volumes of organic vapors. The adsorbent that showed the most promise (tetramethylammonium montmorillonite (TMA)) was further evaluated for use as an adsorbent in both thermal- and solvent-desorable sampling systems.

  8. In situ DRIFTS-MS studies on the oxidation of adsorbed NH3 by NOx over a Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haiyang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2013-04-30

    DRIFT spectroscopy combined with mass spectrometry was used to investigate the oxidation of adsorbed ammonia by NO2, NO+O2 and NO2+O2 on a copper ion exchanged SSZ 13 (Cu-SSZ-13) zeolite. Compared with both NO2 and NO, the adsorption of ammonia is much stronger on the Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite. Two adsorbed ammonia species were found over the Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite studied here; notably ammonia on Brönsted acid sites (proton) and ammonia on Lewis acid sites (copper ions). These adsorbed ammonia species present different activity profiles and selectivity to N2 during NH3 oxidation. The results obtained suggest that ammonia adsorbed onto copper ions in Cu-SSZ-13 are more active at low temperatures than proton-adsorbed NH3, and give rise to a higher selectivity to N2. The formation of N2O is associated primarily with the reaction of NOx with proton-adsorbed NH3 via the formation and subsequent thermal decomposition of NH4NO3. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Portions of this work were performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  9. UV-enhanced exchange of O{sub 2} with H{sub 2}O adsorbed on TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, D.S.; Falconer, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet light dramatically increases the rate of isotope exchange between gas-phase O{sub 2} and water adsorbed on TiO{sub 2} at room temperature, but it does not affect the rate of CO{sub 2}-water exchange. Both ethanol and acetaldehyde, when coadsorbed with H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, dramatically decrease the rate of O{sub 2} exchange, but not CO{sub 2} exchange, with adsorbed H{sub 2}{sup 18}O. The decrease is attributed to a combination of competition for adsorbed oxygen between exchange and photocatalytic oxidation of the adsorbed organic and blocking of the oxygen adsorption sites by the organic. The same oxygen species participate in O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}{sup 18}O exchange and photocatalytic oxidation.

  10. Turning things downside up: Adsorbate induced water flipping on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Greg A. E-mail: bruce.kay@pnnl.gov; Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kay, Bruce D. E-mail: bruce.kay@pnnl.gov

    2014-11-14

    We have examined the adsorption of the weakly bound species N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and Kr on the (√(37)×√(37))R25.3{sup ∘} water monolayer on Pt(111) using a combination of molecular beam dosing, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. In contrast to multilayer crystalline ice, the adsorbate-free water monolayer is characterized by a lack of dangling OH bonds protruding into the vacuum (H-up). Instead, the non-hydrogen-bonded OH groups are oriented downward (H-down) to maximize their interaction with the underlying Pt(111) substrate. Adsorption of Kr and O{sub 2} have little effect on the structure and vibrational spectrum of the “√(37)” water monolayer while adsorption of both N{sub 2}, and CO are effective in “flipping” H-down water molecules into an H-up configuration. This “flipping” occurs readily upon adsorption at temperatures as low as 20 K and the water monolayer transforms back to the H-down, “√(37)” structure upon adsorbate desorption above 35 K, indicating small energy differences and barriers between the H-down and H-up configurations. The results suggest that converting water in the first layer from H-down to H-up is mediated by the electrostatic interactions between the water and the adsorbates.

  11. Effects of ammonium application rate on uptake of soil adsorbed amino acids by rice*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiao-chuang; Ma, Qing-xu; Wu, Liang-huan; Zhu, Lian-feng; Jin, Qian-yu

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, excessive use of chemical nitrogen (N) fertilizers has resulted in the accumulation of excess ammonium (NH4 +) in many agricultural soils. Though rice is known as an NH4 +-tolerant species and can directly absorb soil intact amino acids, we still know considerably less about the role of high exogenous NH4 + content on rice uptake of soil amino acids. This experiment examined the effects of the exogenous NH4 + concentration on rice uptake of soil adsorbed glycine in two different soils under sterile culture. Our data showed that the sorption capacity of glycine was closely related to soils’ physical and chemical properties, such as organic matter and cation exchange capacity. Rice biomass was significantly inhibited by the exogenous NH4 + content at different glycine adsorption concentrations. A three-way analysis of variance demonstrated that rice glycine uptake and glycine nutritional contribution were not related to its sorption capacity, but significantly related to its glycine:NH4 + concentration ratio. After 21-d sterile cultivation, the rice uptake of adsorbed glycine accounted for 8.8%‒22.6% of rice total N uptake, which indicates that soil adsorbed amino acids theoretically can serve as an important N source for plant growth in spite of a high NH4 + application rate. However, further studies are needed to investigate the extent to which this bioavailability is realized in the field using the 13C, 15N double labeling technology.

  12. Magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube iron nanocomposites as adsorbents and antibacterial agents for water purification.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook; Garg, Vijayendra K

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges of the 21st century is to provide clean and affordable water through protecting source and purifying polluted waters. This review presents advances made in the synthesis of carbon- and iron-based nanomaterials, graphene-carbon nanotubes-iron oxides, which can remove pollutants and inactivate virus and bacteria efficiently in water. The three-dimensional graphene and graphene oxide based nanostructures exhibit large surface area and sorption sites that provide higher adsorption capacity to remove pollutants than two-dimensional graphene-based adsorbents and other conventional adsorbents. Examples are presented to demonstrate removal of metals (e.g., Cu, Pb, Cr(VI), and As) and organics (e.g., dyes and oil) by grapheme-based nanostructures. Inactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species (e.g., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) is also shown. A mechanism involving the interaction of adsorbents and pollutants is briefly discussed. Magnetic graphene-based nanomaterials can easily be separated from the treated water using an external magnet; however, there are challenges in implementing the graphene-based nanotechnology in treating real water. PMID:26498500

  13. Molecular adsorbates as probes of the local properties of doped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Van Dong; Joucken, Frédéric; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Sporken, Robert; Santos, Maria Cristina dos; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Graphene-based sensors are among the most promising of graphene’s applications. The ability to signal the presence of molecular species adsorbed on this atomically thin substrate has been explored from electric measurements to light scattering. Here we show that the adsorbed molecules can be used to sense graphene properties. The interaction of porphyrin molecules with nitrogen-doped graphene has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations. Molecular manipulation was used to reveal the surface below the adsorbed molecules allowing to achieve an atomic-scale measure of the interaction of molecules with doped graphene. The adsorbate’s frontier electronic states are downshifted in energy as the molecule approaches the doping site, with largest effect when the molecule sits over the nitrogen dopant. Theoretical calculations showed that, due to graphene’s high polarizability, the adsorption of porphyrin induces a charge rearrangement on the substrate similar to the image charges on a metal. This charge polarization is enhanced around nitrogen site, leading to an increased interaction of molecules with their image charges on graphene. Consequently, the molecular states are stabilized and shift to lower energies. These findings reveal the local variation of polarizability induced by nitrogen dopant opening new routes towards the electronic tuning of graphene. PMID:27097555

  14. Turning things downside up: Adsorbate induced water flipping on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Gregory A.; Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-11-14

    We have examined the adsorption of the weakly bound species N2, O2, CO and Kr on the water monolayer on Pt(111) using a combination of molecular beam dosing, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In contrast to multilayer crystalline ice, the adsorbate-free water monolayer is characterized by a lack of dangling OH bonds protruding into the vacuum (H-up). Instead, the non-hydrogen-bonded OH groups are oriented downward (H-down) to maximize their interaction with the underlying Pt(111) substrate. Adsorption of Kr and O2 have little effect on the structure and vibrational spectrum of the “ ” water monolayer while adsorption of both N2, and CO are effective in “flipping” H-down water molecules into an H-up configuration. This “flipping” occurs readily upon adsorption at temperatures as low as 20 K and the water monolayer transforms back to the H-down, “ ” structure upon adsorbate desorption above 35 K, indicating small energy differences and barriers between the H-down and H-up configurations. The results suggest that converting water in the first layer from H-down to H-up is mediated by the electrostatic interactions between the water and the adsorbates.

  15. Molecular adsorbates as probes of the local properties of doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Dong; Joucken, Frédéric; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Sporken, Robert; Santos, Maria Cristina Dos; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-based sensors are among the most promising of graphene’s applications. The ability to signal the presence of molecular species adsorbed on this atomically thin substrate has been explored from electric measurements to light scattering. Here we show that the adsorbed molecules can be used to sense graphene properties. The interaction of porphyrin molecules with nitrogen-doped graphene has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations. Molecular manipulation was used to reveal the surface below the adsorbed molecules allowing to achieve an atomic-scale measure of the interaction of molecules with doped graphene. The adsorbate’s frontier electronic states are downshifted in energy as the molecule approaches the doping site, with largest effect when the molecule sits over the nitrogen dopant. Theoretical calculations showed that, due to graphene’s high polarizability, the adsorption of porphyrin induces a charge rearrangement on the substrate similar to the image charges on a metal. This charge polarization is enhanced around nitrogen site, leading to an increased interaction of molecules with their image charges on graphene. Consequently, the molecular states are stabilized and shift to lower energies. These findings reveal the local variation of polarizability induced by nitrogen dopant opening new routes towards the electronic tuning of graphene.

  16. Investigation of the Transformation of Uranium under Iron-Reducing Conditions: Reduction of UVI by Biogenic FeII/FeIII Hydroxide (Green Rust)

    SciTech Connect

    Edward O’Loughlin; Michelle Scherer; Kenneth Kemner; Shelly Kelly

    2004-03-17

    hypotheses: (1) The formation of GRs by dissimilatory Fe{sup III} reduction is controlled by Fe{sup III} speciation, solution composition, and microbial physiology. (2) The chemical composition and structural properties of biogenic GRs are variable and depend on the conditions under which they were formed. (3) The rate of U{sup VI} reduction by biogenic GRs varies depending on their chemical composition and structure, particularly with respect to the Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup III} ratio and the nature of the interlayer anions. (4) The rate of U{sup VI} reduction by a given biogenic GR is affected by the solution composition (e.g., pH, uranium concentration, the concentration of carbonate and other ligands, and the presence of other potential oxidants). Moreover, the solution composition affects both the speciation of U{sup VI} and U{sup IV} and the stability of the GR. (5) The reduction of UVI to UIV can be coupled to dissimilatory FeIII reduction under conditions that promote the formation of biogenic GR and other reactive Fe{sup II} species. The results of this research will increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in Fe{sup III}-reducing environments. This information has direct applications to understanding contaminant transport and the development of in situ bioremediation technologies for treatment of subsurface U contamination.

  17. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Constance J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in particular the U4f level, has been widely used to elucidate the chemical state of uranium in various materials. In large part, previous experimental work has relied on comparing the U4f spectra of an unknown to some “standard” or using qualitative intuitive judgments on the expected behavior of the primary lines and satellite structures as a function of oxidation state and bonding environment. Such approaches are useful and can be sufficiently robust to make defensible claims. Nonetheless, there is no quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics that control satellite structures or even the shape of the primary peaks. To address this issue, we used a rigorous, strictly ab initio theoretical approach to investigate the U(4f) XPS of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our theoretical studies are based on the electronic structures of embedded cluster models, where bonding between U and O is explicitly incorporated. We demonstrate that treatment of the many-body character of the cluster wavefunctions is essential to correctly model and interpret the U4f XPS. Here we definitively show that shake configurations, where an electron is transferred from a dominantly O2p bonding orbital into dominantly 5f or 6d antibonding orbitals, are indeed responsible for the major satellite features. Based on this rigorous theoretical framework, it is possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and the chemistry of the material.

  18. Spectrophotometric and Calorimetric Studies of U(VI) Complexation with Sulfate at 25-70oC

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2008-10-30

    Sulfate, one of the inorganic constituents in the groundwater of nuclear waste repository, could affect the migration of radioactive materials by forming complexes. Spectrophotometric and microcalorimetric titrations were performed to identify the U(VI)/sulfate complexes and determine the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of complexation at 25-70 C. Results show that U(VI) forms moderately strong complexes with sulfate, i.e., UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) and UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2-}, in this temperature range and the complexes become stronger as the temperature is increased: 2-fold and 10-fold increases in the stability constants of UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) and UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}{sub 2}{sup 2-}), respectively, when the temperature is increased from 25 C to 70 C. The complexation is endothermic and entropy-driven, showing typical characteristics of inner-sphere complexation and 'hard acid'/'hard base' interactions. The thermodynamic trends are discussed in terms of dehydration of both the cation (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) and the anion (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) as well as the effect of temperature on the structure of water.

  19. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  20. Radiation grafted adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Nasef, Mohamed; Ting, T. M.; Abbasi, Ali; Layeghi-moghaddam, Alireza; Sara Alinezhad, S.; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation induced grafting (RIG) is acquired to prepare a number of adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications using a single route involving RIG of glycidymethacrylate (GMA) onto polyethylene-polypropylene (PE-PP) non-woven fabric. The grafted fabric was subjected to one of three functionalization reactions to impart desired ionic characters. This included treatment with (1) N-dimethyl-D-glucamine, (2) triethylamine and (3) triethylamine and alkalisation with KOH. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to study the changes in chemical and physical structures of the obtained fibrous adsorbents. The potential applications of the three adsorbents for removal of boron from solutions, capturing CO2 from CO2/N2 mixtures and catalysing transesterification of triacetin/methanol to methyl acetate (biodiesel) were explored. The obtained fibrous adsorbents provide potential alternatives to granular resins for the investigated applications and require further development.

  1. SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION OF PARTICULATE AND ADSORBENT MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a summary of work performed by PNL on the extraction of semivolatile organic materials (SVOCs), for example, polynuclear aromatic compounds, from various adsorbents and environmental matrices, using supercritical fluids (SCFs) as extractants. The results of the work...

  2. Anomalous thermal denaturing of proteins adsorbed to nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichroeb, J. H.; Forrest, J. A.; Ngai, V.; Jones, L. W.

    2006-09-01

    We have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) to monitor the structural changes that accompany thermal denaturing of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed onto gold nanospheres of size 5nm-60nm. The effect of the protein on the LSPR was monitored by visible extinction spectroscopy. The position of the resonance is affected by the conformation of the adsorbed protein layer, and as such can be used as a very sensitive probe of thermal denaturing that is specific to the adsorbed protein. The results are compared to detailed calculations and show that full calculations can lead to significant increases in knowledge where gold nanospheres are used as biosensors. Thermal denaturing on spheres with diameter > 20 nm show strong similarity to bulk calorimetric studies of BSA in solution. BSA adsorbed on nanospheres with d ⩽ 15nm shows a qualitative difference in behavior, suggesting a sensitivity of denaturing characteristics on local surface curvature. This may have important implications for other protein-nanoparticle interactions.

  3. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  4. Trace contaminant studies of HSC adsorbent. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yieh, D. T. N.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of fifteen trace contaminants on HSC (polyethylenimine coated acrylic ester) adsorbent were experimentally investigated with the following two objectives: to test the removal potential and the adsorption reversibility of the selected trace contaminants, and to test the effect a preadsorbed trace contaminant has on the CO2 adsorption capacity. The experimental method for acquiring the adsorption equilibrium data used is based on the volumetric (or displacement) concept of vacuum adsorption. From the experimental results, it was found that the HSC adsorbent has good adsorption potential for contaminants of alcohol compounds, esters, and benzene compounds; whereas, adsorption of ketone compounds, oxidizing and reducing agents are detrimental to the adsorbent. In addition, all liquid contaminants reduce the CO2 capacity of HSC adsorbent.

  5. New insights into perfluorinated adsorbents for analytical and bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Nicola; Guzzinati, Roberta; Catani, Martina; Massi, Alessandro; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorinated (F-) adsorbents are generally prepared by bonding perfluoro-functionalized silanes to silica gels. They have been employed for a long time essentially as media for solid-phase extraction of F-molecules or F-tagged molecules in organic chemistry and heterogeneous catalysis. More recently, this approach has been extended to proteomics and metabolomics. Owing to their unique physicochemical properties, namely fluorophilicity and proteinophilicity, and a better understanding of some fundamental aspects of their behavior, new applications of F-adsorbents in the field of environmental science and bio-affinity studies can be envisaged. In this article, we revisit the most important features of F-adsorbents by focusing, in particular, on some basic information that has been recently obtained through (nonlinear) chromatographic studies. Finally, we try to envisage new applications and possibilities that F-adsorbents will allow in the near future. PMID:25358910

  6. Adsorption of β-galactosidase on silica and aluminosilicate adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Dobryakova, I. V.; Pilipenko, O. S.

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that adsorption of β-galactosidase of Aspergillus oryzae fungi on mesoporous and biporous silica and aluminosilicate adsorbents and the rate of the process grow along with the diameter of the pores of the adsorbent. It is found that the shape of the adsorption isotherms changes as well, depending on the texture of the adsorbent: the Michaelis constant rises from 0.3 mM for the enzyme in solution to 0.4-0.5 mM for the enzyme on a surface in the hydrolysis of o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside. It is concluded that β-galactosidase displays its maximum activity on the surface of biporous adsorbents.

  7. Chromium(VI) removal via reduction-sorption on bi-functional silica adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, Nataliya; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Walcarius, Alain

    2013-04-15

    Organically-modified silica gels bearing mercaptopropyl and ethylenediaminetriacetate groups (SiO2-SH/ED3A) have been used for reduction and subsequent sequestration of Cr(VI) species. The uptake mechanism involves Cr(VI) reduction by thiol groups (SH) and further immobilization of the so-generated Cr(III) species via complexation to the ethylenediaminetriacetate moieties (ED3A). The most appropriate pH range (1-3) for complete Cr(VI) reduction-sorption by SiO2-SH/ED3A originates from the balance between full reduction of Cr(VI) by SH, requiring low pH values, and quantitative complexation of Cr(III) by ED3A, which is favored in less acidic media. Such bi-functional adsorbents are considerably more effective at removal of Cr(VI) than those simply modified with thiol groups alone. The whole reduction-sorption process was characterized by fast kinetics, thus permitting efficient use of the SiO2-SH/ED3A adsorbent in dynamic conditions (column experiments). Monitoring the amount of immobilized chromium species on the solid was achieved using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Studying the influence of ionic strength and presence of heavy metals revealed few interference on Cr(VI) removal. PMID:23500426

  8. Oil palm biomass as an adsorbent for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Many industries discharge untreated wastewater into the environment. Heavy metals from many industrial processes end up as hazardous pollutants of wastewaters.Heavy metal pollution has increased in recent decades and there is a growing concern for the public health risk they may pose. To remove heavy metal ions from polluted waste streams, adsorption processes are among the most common and effective treatment methods. The adsorbents that are used to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media have both advantages and disadvantages. Cost and effectiveness are two of the most prominent criteria for choosing adsorbents. Because cost is so important, great effort has been extended to study and find effective lower cost adsorbents.One class of adsorbents that is gaining considerable attention is agricultural wastes. Among many alternatives, palm oil biomasses have shown promise as effective adsorbents for removing heavy metals from wastewater. The palm oil industry has rapidly expanded in recent years, and a large amount of palm oil biomass is available. This biomass is a low-cost agricultural waste that exhibits, either in its raw form or after being processed, the potential for eliminating heavy metal ions from wastewater. In this article, we provide background information on oil palm biomass and describe studies that indicate its potential as an alternative adsorbent for removing heavy metal ions from wastewater. From having reviewed the cogent literature on this topic we are encouraged that low-cost oil-palm-related adsorbents have already demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants.Because cost is so important to those who choose to clean waste streams by using adsorbents, the use of cheap sources of unconventional adsorbents is increasingly being investigated. An adsorbent is considered to be inexpensive when it is readily available, is environmentally friendly, is cost-effective and be effectively used in economical processes. The

  9. Oxygen Photochemistry on TiO2(110): Recyclable, Photoactive Oxygen Produced by Annealing Adsorbed O2

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.

    2011-11-03

    Photon-stimulated reactions between chemisorbed and physisorbed oxygen on TiO2(110) are investigated. Experiments using O2 isotopologues show that UV irradiation results in the exchange of atoms between chemisorbed and physisorbed oxygen. Annealing chemisorbed oxygen to {approx}350 K maximizes these exchange reactions, while dissociatively adsorbing oxygen on TiO2(110) at 300 - 350 K does not lead to reactions with physisorbed O2. After annealing to 350 K, the exchange products photodesorb in the plane perpendicular to the bridge-bonded oxygen rows at an angle of 45{sup o}. In contrast, the chemisorbed O2 photodesorbs normal to the surface. Remarkably, the chemisorbed species is stable under multiple cycles of UV irradiation with physisorbed O2. The active atoms in the chemisorbed species can be changed from 18O to 16O and then back to 18O via the exchange reactions. The results show that annealing oxygen adsorbed on TiO2(110) to {approx}350 K produces a stable chemical species with interesting photochemical properties. Possible forms for the photoactive species include O2 adsorbed in a bridging oxygen vacancy or tetraoxygen.

  10. NiO(111) nanosheets as efficient and recyclable adsorbents for dye pollutant removal from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhi; Chen, Lifang; Hu, Juncheng; Richards, Ryan

    2009-07-01

    Semiconductor single-crystalline polar NiO(111) nanosheets with well-defined hexagonal holes have been investigated for application in dye adsorption and combustion processes. With regard to adsorption technologies, high surface area metal oxides have an advantage over activated carbon in that the adsorbed species can be combusted and the adsorbent reused in the case of metal oxides while regeneration of activated carbon remains challenging and thus the adsorbent/adsorbate system must be disposed of. Here, three typical textile dyes, reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin red, were studied for removal from wastewater with two NiO systems and activated carbon. These studies revealed that the NiO(111) nanosheets exhibited much more favorable adsorptive properties than conventionally prepared nickel oxide powder (CP-NiO) obtained from thermal decomposition of nickel nitrate. The maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on NiO(111) nanosheets reached 30.4 mg g-1, 35.15 mg g-1 and 22 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid, respectively, while the maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on CP-NiO were only 8.4, 13.2 and 12 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid. To simulate the adsorption isotherm, two commonly employed models, the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms, were selected to explicate the interaction of the dye and NiO(111). The isotherm evaluations revealed that the Langmuir model demonstrated better fit to experimental equilibrium data than the Freundlich model. The maximum predicted adsorption capacity was 36.1 mg g-1. In addition, adsorption kinetic data of NiO(111) followed a pseudo-second-order rate for congo red. These studies infer that NiO(111) nanosheets possess desirable properties for application in adsorption and combustion applications.

  11. Determination of Points of Zero Charge of Natural and Treated Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiruddin Khan, M.; Sarwar, Anila

    Although particle size and its measurement are intuitively familiar to particle technologists, the concept of point of zero charge (pzc) is less widely understood and applied. This is unfortunate since it is at least as fundamentally important as particle size in determining the behavior of particulate materials, especially those with sizes in the colloidal range below a micrometer. pzc is related to the charge on the surface of the particle and strongly depends on the pH of the material; so it influences a wide range of properties of colloidal materials, such as their stability, interaction with electrolytes, suspension rheology, and ion exchange capacity. The pH dependence of surface charges was quantified for four different adsorbent-aqueous solution interfaces. The points of zero charge were determined for activated charcoal, granite sand, lakhra coal, and ground corn cob materials using three methods: (1) the pH drift method, measuring pH where the adsorbent behaves as a neutral specie; (2) potentiometric titration, measuring the adsorption of H+ and OH- on surfaces in solutions of varying ionic strengths; (3) direct assessment of the surface charge via nonspecific ion adsorption as a function of pH. The intrinsic acidity constants for acid and base equilibria, pK a1 s and pK a2 s, were also calculated. Lakhra coal was found to have the lowest pzc value among all other adsorbents studied owing to the presence of a large amount of humus material. The results were used to explain general connections among points of zero charges, cation exchange capacity, and base saturation % of adsorbents.

  12. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  13. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun

    2013-08-28

    This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as sorbents for gaseous iodine. Work was conducted in fiscal year 2012 to demonstrate the feasibility of converting Sn2S3 chalcogel without iodine into a glass. This current document summarizes the work conducted in fiscal year 2013 to assess the consolidation potential of non-oxide aerogels with adsorbed iodine. The Sn2S3 and Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels were selected for study. The first step in the process for these experiments was to load them with iodine (I2). The I2 uptake was ~68 mass% for Sn2S3 and ~50 mass% for Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of both sets of sorbents showed that metal-iodide complexes were formed during adsorption, i.e., SnI4 for Sn2S3 and SbI3 for Sb13.5Sn5S20. Additionally, metal-sulfide-iodide complexes were formed, i.e., SnSI for Sn2S3 and SbSI for Sb13.5Sn5S20. No XRD evidence for unreacted iodine was found in any of these samples. Once the chalcogels had reached maximum adsorption, the consolidation potential was assessed. Here, the sorbents were heated for consolidation in vacuum-sealed quartz vessels. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogel was heated both (1) in a glassy carbon crucible within a fused quartz tube and (2) in a single-containment fused quartz tube. The Sn2S3 chalcogel was only heated in a single-containment fused quartz tube. In both cases with the single-containment fused quartz experiments, the material consolidated nicely. However, in both cases, there were small fractions of metal iodides not incorporated into the final product as well as fused quartz particles within the melt due to the sample attacking the quartz wall during the heat treatment. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 did not appear to attack the glassy carbon crucible so, for future experiments, it would be ideal to apply a coating, such as pyrolytic graphite, to the inner walls of the fused quartz vessel to prevent

  14. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, Susan M.; Löffler, Frank; Ritalahti, Kirsti; Sayler, Gary; Layton, Alice; Hettich, Robert

    2015-08-31

    The overall goal for this funded project was to develop and exploit environmental metaproteomics tools to identify biomarkers for monitoring microbial activity affecting U speciation at U-contaminated sites, correlate metaproteomics profiles with geochemical parameters and U(VI) reduction activity (or lack thereof), elucidate mechanisms contributing to U(VI) reduction, and provide remediation project managers with additional information to make science-based site management decisions for achieving cleanup goals more efficiently. Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the microbiology contribution to metal and radionuclide reduction, the cellular components, pathway(s), and mechanisms involved in U trans-formation remain poorly understood. Recent advances in (meta)proteomics technology enable detailed studies of complex samples, including environmental samples, which differ between sites and even show considerable variability within the same site (e.g., the Oak Ridge IFRC site). Additionally, site-specific geochemical conditions affect microbial activity and function, suggesting generalized assessment and interpretations may not suffice. This research effort integrated current understanding of the microbiology and biochemistry of U(VI) reduction and capitalize on advances in proteomics technology made over the past few years. Field-related analyses used Oak Ridge IFRC field ground water samples from locations where slow-release substrate biostimulation has been implemented to accelerate in situ U(VI) reduction rates. Our overarching hypothesis was that the metabolic signature in environmental samples, as deciphered by the metaproteome measurements, would show a relationship with U(VI) reduction activity. Since metaproteomic and metagenomic characterizations were computationally challenging and time-consuming, we used a tiered approach that combines database mining, controlled laboratory studies, U(VI) reduction activity measurements, phylogenetic

  15. Evaluation of a cesium adsorbent grafted with ammonium 12-molybdophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuya; Seko, Noriaki; Amada, Haruyo; Kasai, Noboru; Saiki, Seiichi; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Ueki, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    A fibrous cesium (Cs) adsorbent was developed using radiation-induced graft polymerization with a cross-linked structure containing a highly stable adsorption ligand. The ligand, ammonium 12-molybdophosphate (AMP), was successfully introduced onto the fibrous polyethylene trunk material. The resulting Cs adsorbent contained 36% nonwoven fabric polyethylene (NFPE), 1% AMP, 2% triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and 61% glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The adsorbent's Cs adsorption capacity was evaluated using batch and column tests. It was determined that the adsorbent could be used in a wide pH range. The amount of desorbed molybdenum, which can be used as an estimate for AMP stability on the Cs adsorbent, was minimized at the standard drinking water pH range of 5.8-8.6. Based from the inspection on the adherence of these results to the requirements set forth by the Food Sanitation Act by a third party organization, it can be concluded that the developed Cs adsorbent can be safely utilized for drinking water.

  16. Application of Silver Impregnated Iodine Adsorbent to Nuclear Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Tomotaka; Kondo, Yoshikazu; Funabashi, Kiyomi

    Radioactive iodine is one of the most important nuclides to be prevented for release from nuclear facilities and many facilities have off-gas treatment systems to minimize the volatile nuclides dispersion to the environment. Silver impregnated inorganic adsorbents were known as inflammable and stable fixing materials for iodine and the authors started to develop 25 years ago a kind of inorganic adsorbent that has better capability compared with conventional ones. Aluminum oxide (Alumina) was selected as a carrier material and silver nitrate as an impregnated one. Pore diameters were optimized to avoid the influence of impurities such as humidity in the off-gas stream at lower temperatures. Experiments and improvements were alternately conducted for the new adsorbent. The tests were carried out in various conditions to confirm the performance of the developed adsorbent, which clarified its good ability to remove iodine. Silver nitrate impregnated alumina adsorbent (AgA) has about twice the capacity for iodine adsorption and higher iodine removal efficiency at relatively high humidity than conventional ones. The AgA chemically and stably fixes radioactive iodine and fits the storage and disposal of used adsorbent. AgA is now and will be applied to nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants, and research facilities.

  17. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  18. Control of acid gases using a fluidized bed adsorber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Bo-Chin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Yeh, Chia-Lin

    2003-08-01

    During incineration, secondary pollutants such as acid gases, organic compounds, heavy metals and particulates are generated. Among these pollutants, the acid gases, including sulfur oxides (SO(x)) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), can cause corrosion of the incinerator piping and can generate acid rain after being emitted to the atmosphere. To address this problem, the present study used a novel combination of air pollution control devices (APCDs), composed of a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter. The major objective of the work is to demonstrate the performance of a fluidized bed adsorber for removal of acid gases from flue gas of an incinerator. The adsorbents added in the fluidized bed adsorber were mainly granular activated carbon (AC; with or without chemical treatment) and with calcium oxide used as an additive. The advantages of a fluidized bed reactor for high mass transfer and high gas-solid contact can enhance the removal of acid gases when using a dry method. On the other hand, because the fluidized bed can filter particles, fine particles prior to and after passing through the fluidized bed adsorber were investigated. The competing adsorption on activated carbon between different characteristics of pollutants was also given preliminary discussion. The results indicate that the removal efficiencies of the investigated acid gases, SO(2) and HCl, are higher than 94 and 87%, respectively. Thus, a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter has the potential to replace conventional APCDs, even when there are other pollutants at the same time. PMID:12935758

  19. Influence of pH, layer charge location and crystal thickness distribution on U(VI) sorption onto heterogeneous dioctahedral smectite.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Vanessa; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Algarra, Manuel; Rocha, Fernando; Bobos, Iuliu

    2016-11-01

    The UO2(2+) adsorption on smectite (samples BA1, PS2 and PS3) with a heterogeneous structure was investigated at pH 4 (I=0.02M) and pH 6 (I=0.2M) in batch experiments, with the aim to evaluate the influence of pH, layer charge location and crystal thickness distribution. Mean crystal thickness distribution of smectite crystallite used in sorption experiments range from 4.8nm (sample PS2), to 5.1nm (sample PS3) and, to 7.4nm (sample BA1). Smaller crystallites have higher total surface area and sorption capacity. Octahedral charge location favor higher sorption capacity. The sorption isotherms of Freundlich, Langmuir and SIPS were used to model the sorption experiments. The surface complexation and cation exchange reactions were modeled using PHREEQC-code to describe the UO2(2+) sorption on smectite. The amount of UO2(2+) adsorbed on smectite samples decreased significantly at pH 6 and higher ionic strength, where the sorption mechanism was restricted to the edge sites of smectite. Two binding energy components at 380.8±0.3 and 382.2±0.3eV, assigned to hydrated UO2(2+) adsorbed by cation exchange and by inner-sphere complexation on the external sites at pH 4, were identified after the U4f7/2 peak deconvolution by X-photoelectron spectroscopy. Also, two new binding energy components at 380.3±0.3 and 381.8±0.3eV assigned to AlOUO2(+) and SiOUO2(+) surface species were observed at pH 6. PMID:27285596

  20. Gold recovery from low concentrations using nanoporous silica adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aledresse, Adil

    The development of high capacity adsorbents with uniform porosity denoted 5%MP-HMS (5% Mercaptopropyl-Hexagonal Mesoporous Structure) to extract gold from noncyanide solutions is presented. The preliminary studies from laboratory simulated noncyanide gold solutions show that the adsorption capacities of these materials are among the highest reported. The high adsorption saturation level of these materials, up to 1.9 mmol/g (37% of the adsorbent weight) from gold chloride solutions (potassium tetrachloroaurate) and 2.9 mmol/g (57% of the adsorbent weight) from gold bromide solutions (potassium tetrabromoaurate) at pH = 2, is a noteworthy feature of these materials. This gold loading from [AuC4]- and [AuBr4 ]- solutions corresponds to a relative Au:S molar ratio of 2.5:1 and 3.8:1, respectively. These rates are significantly higher than the usual 1:1 (Au:S) ratio expected for metal ion binding with the material. The additional gold ions loaded have been spontaneously reduced to metallic gold in the mesoporous material. Experimental studies indicated high maximum adsorptions of gold as high as 99.9% recovery. Another promising attribute of these materials is their favourable adsorption kinetics. The MP-HMS reaches equilibrium (saturation) in less than 1 minute of exposure in gold bromide and less than 10 minutes in gold chloride. The MP-HMS materials adsorption is significantly improved by agitation and the adsorption capacity of Au (III) ions increases with the decrease in pH. The recovery of adsorbed gold and the regeneration of spent adsorbent were investigated for MP-HMS adsorbent. The regenerated adsorbent (MP-HMS) maintained its adsorption capacity even after repeated use and all the gold was successfully recovered from the spent adsorbent. For the fist time, a promising adsorbent system has been found that is capable of effectively concentrating gold thiosulphate complexes, whereas conventional carbon-inpulp (CIP) and carbon-in-leach (CIL) systems fail. The

  1. Utility of adsorbents in the purification of drinking water: a review of characterization, efficiency and safety evaluation of various adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Shashi Prabha; Gopal, Krishna; Bersillon, J L

    2009-05-01

    Clean drinking water is one of the implicit requisites fora healthy human population. However the growing industrialization and extensive use of chemicals for various concerns, has increased the burden of unwanted pollutants in the drinking water of developing countries like India. The entry of potentially hazardous substances into the biota has been magnifying day by day. In the absence of a possible stoppage of these, otherwise, useful chemicals, the only way to maintain safer water bodies is to develop efficient purifying technologies. One such immensely beneficial procedure that has been in use is that of purification of water using 'adsorbents'. Indigenous minerals and natural plants products have potential for removing many pollutants viz. fluoride, arsenic, nitrate, heavy metals, pesticides as well as trihalomethanes. Adsorbents which are derived from carbon, alumina, zeolite, clay minerals, iron ores, industrial by products, and natural products viz. parts of the plants, herbs and algal biomass offer promising potential of removal. In the recent years attention has been paid to develop process involving screening/pretreatment/activation/impregnation using alkalies, acids, alum, lime, manganese dioxide, ferric chloride and other chemicals which are found to enhance their adsorbing efficiency. Chemical characterization of these adsorbents recapitulates the mechanism of the process. It is imperative to observe that capacities of the adsorbents may vary depending on the characteristics, chemical modifications and concentration of the individual adsorbent. Removal kinetics is found to be based on the experimental conditions viz. pH, concentration of the adsorbate, quantity of the adsorbent and temperature. It is suggested that isotherm model is suitable tool to assess the adsorption capacities in batch and column modes. Safety evaluation and risk assessment of the process/products may be useful to provide guidelines for its sustainable disposal. PMID:20120453

  2. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Stewart R.; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10 MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000 CV/h (2 s and 0.3 s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12 mg BSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21 mg lysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1 MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20 mg BSA/mL and 27 mg lysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1 MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000 CV/h. For compression loads of 5 MPa and 10 MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1 MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an

  3. DFT study of isocyanate chemisorption on Cu(100): Correlation between substrate-adsorbate charge transfer and intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belelli, Patricia G.; Garda, Graciela R.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.

    2011-07-01

    The adsorption of isocyanate (- NCO) species on Cu(100) was studied using the density functional theory (DFT) and the periodic slab model. The calculations indicate that at low and intermediate coverages NCO adsorbs preferentially on bridge and hollow sites. Work function and dipole moment changes show a significant negative charge transfer from Cu to NCO. The resulting charged NCO species interact repulsively among themselves being these dipole-dipole interactions particularly intensive when they are adsorbed in adjacent sites. Consequently, isocyanates tend to be separated from each other generating the vacant sites required for the dissociation to N and CO. This condition for NCO dissociation has been suggested in the past from experimental observations. A comparison was also performed with the NCO adsorption on Pd(100). In particular, the calculated minimal energy barrier for NCO dissociation was found to be higher on Cu(100) than on Pd(100) in accord with the well known higher NCO stability on Cu(100).

  4. Elution by Le Chatelier's principle for maximum recyclability of adsorbents: applied to polyacrylamidoxime adsorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater.

    PubMed

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Vukovic, Sinisa; Dai, Sheng

    2016-05-28

    Amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents have attracted interest within the last decade due to their high adsorption capacities for uranium and other rare earth metals from seawater. The ocean contains an approximated 4-5 billion tons of uranium and even though amidoxime-based adsorbents have demonstrated the highest uranium adsorption capacities to date, they are still economically impractical because of their limited recyclability. Typically, the adsorbed metals are eluted with a dilute acid solution that not only damages the amidoxime groups (metal adsorption sites), but is also not strong enough to remove the strongly bound vanadium, which decreases the adsorption capacity with each cycle. We resolved this challenge by incorporating Le Chatelier's principle to recycle adsorbents indefinitely. We used a solution with a high concentration of amidoxime-like chelating agents, such as hydroxylamine, to desorb nearly a 100% of adsorbed metals, including vanadium, without damaging the metal adsorption sites and preserving the high adsorption capacity. The method takes advantage of knowing the binding mode between the amidoxime ligand and the metal and mimics it with chelating agents that then in a Le Chatelier's manner removes metals by shifting to a new chemical equilibrium. For this reason the method is applicable to any ligand-metal adsorbent and it will make an impact on other extraction technologies. PMID:27117598

  5. Adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode: An in situ IR spectroscopy search for adsorbed reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary As part of a mechanistic study of the electrooxidation of C1 molecules we have systematically investigated the dissociative adsorption/oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode under experimental conditions optimizing the chance for detecting weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates. Employing in situ IR spectroscopy in an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-FTIRS) with p-polarized IR radiation to further improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and using low reaction temperatures (3 °C) and deuterium substitution to slow down the reaction kinetics and to stabilize weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates, we could detect an IR absorption band at 1660 cm−1 characteristic for adsorbed formyl intermediates. This assignment is supported by an isotope shift in wave number. Effects of temperature, potential and deuterium substitution on the formation and disappearance of different adsorbed species (COad, adsorbed formate, adsorbed formyl), are monitored and quantified. Consequences on the mechanism for dissociative adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde are discussed. PMID:24991512

  6. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, J. K.; Kostandarithes, H. M.; Li, S. W.; Plymale, A. E.; Daly, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO2 and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH2DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml−1) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms. PMID:10788374

  7. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  8. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO{sub 2} and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH{sub 2}DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml{sup {minus}1}) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

  9. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, J K; Kostandarithes, H M; Li, S W; Plymale, A E; Daly, M J

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO(2) and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH(2)DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml(-1)) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms. PMID:10788374

  10. Modeling and Analysis of the Electrokinetic Mass Transport and Adsorption Mechanisms of a Charged Adsorbate in Capillary Electrochromatography Systems Employing Charged Nonporous Adsorbent Particles.

    PubMed

    Grimes, B. A.; Liapis, A. I.

    2001-02-01

    Mass-transfer systems based on electrokinetic phenomena (i.e., capillary electrochromatography (CEC)) have shown practical potential for becoming powerful separation methods for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. A dynamic mathematical model, consisting of the momentum balance and the Poisson equations, as well as the unsteady-state continuity expressions for the cation and anion of the background electrolyte and of a positively charged analyte (adsorbate), is constructed and solved to determine quantitatively the electroosmotic velocity, the electrostatic potential, the concentration profiles of the charged species in the double layer and in the electroneutral core region of the fluid in the interstitial channels for bulk flow in the packed chromatographic column, and the axial current density profiles as the adsorbate adsorbs onto the negatively charged fixed sites on the surface of the nonporous particles packed in the chromatographic column. The frontal analysis mode of operation is simulated in this work. The results obtained from model simulations provide significant physical insight into and understanding of the development and propagation of the dynamic profile of the concentration of the adsorbate (analyte) and indicate that sharp, highly resolved adsorption fronts and large amounts of adsorbate in the adsorbed phase for a given column length can be obtained under the following conditions: (i) The ratio, gamma(2, 0), of the electroosmotic velocity of the mobile liquid phase at the column entrance after the adsorption front has passed the column entrance to the electrophoretic velocity of the anion is very close to -1. The structure of the equations of the model and model simulations indicate that a stable adsorption front cannot develop when gamma(2, 0) is less than -1 unless the value of the mobility of the cation is less than the value of the mobility of the analyte, which may be a rare occurrence in practical CEC systems. (ii) The ratio of

  11. [DSC and FTIR study of adsorbed lysozyme on hydrophobic surface].

    PubMed

    Lei, Zu-meng; Geng, Xin-peng; Dai, Li; Geng, Xin-du

    2008-09-01

    During a process of hen egg white lysozyme adsorption and folding on a moderately hydrophobic surface (PEG-600), the effects of salt((NH4)2SO4) concentrations, surface coverage and denaturant (guanidine hydrochloride, GuHCl) concentrations on thermal stability and the changes in the molecular conformation of adsorbed native and denatured lysozyme without aqueous solution were studied with a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) with FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that temperature due to endothermic peaks was reduced and the disturbance increased at higher temperature with the increase in salt concentration and surface coverage of adsorbed protein. beta-Sheet and beta-Turn stucture increased while alpha-Helix structure decreased after the adsorption. The peaks corresponding to both C-C stretching frequency in 1400-1425 cm(-1) and amide I band frequency in 1650-1670 cm(-1) of adsorbed denatured lysozyme can be detected in FTIR spectra while that due to amide I band frequency of adsorbed native lysozyme almost can't be observed. Adsorption resulted in structural loss of adsorbed native lysozyme, whose performance was less stable. PMID:19093560

  12. Synthesis of arsenic graft adsorbents in pilot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Kasai, Noboru; Shibata, Takuya; Aketagawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Makikatsu; Yoshii, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Yasuhiko; Seko, Noriaki

    2012-08-01

    Synthesis of arsenic (As) adsorbents in pilot scale was carried out with a synthesizing apparatus by radiation-induced graft polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate phosphoric acid monomer (PA), which consists of phosphoric acid mono- (50%) and di- (50%) ethyl methacrylate esters onto a nonwoven cotton fabric (NCF), and following chemical modification by contact with a zirconium (Zr) solution. The apparatus which was equipped with reaction tanks, a washing tank and a pump can produce up to 0.3 m×14 m size of the As(V) adsorbent in one reaction. A degree of grafting of 150% was obtained at an irradiation dose of 20 kGy with 5% of PA solution mixed with deionized water for 1 h at 40 °C. Finally, after Zr(IV) was loaded onto a NCF with 5 mmol/L of Zr(IV) solution, the graft adsorbent for the removal of As(V) was achieved in pilot-scale. The adsorbent which was synthesized in pilot scale was evaluated in batch mode adsorption with 1 ppm (mg/l) of As(V) solution for 2 h at room temperature. As a result, the adsorption capacity for As(V) was 0.02 mmol/g-adsorbent.

  13. High capacity cryogel-type adsorbents for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naveen Kumar; Dsouza, Roy N; Grasselli, Mariano; Fernández-Lahore, Marcelo

    2014-08-15

    Cryogel bodies were modified to obtain epoxy groups by graft-copolymerization using both chemical and gamma irradiation initiation techniques. The free epoxy adsorbents were reacted further to introduce diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) functionalities. The resulting weak anion-exchange cryogel adsorbents showed dynamic binding capacities of ca. 27±3mg/mL, which was significantly higher than previously reported for this type of adsorbent material. Gamma irradiated grafting initiation showed a 4-fold higher capacity for proteins than chemical grafting initiation procedures. The phosphate capacity for these DEAE cryogels was 119mmol/L and also showed similar column efficiency as compared to commercial adsorbents. The large pores in the cryogel structure ensure convective transport of the molecules to active binding sites located on the polymer-grafted surface of cryogels. However, as cryogels have relatively large pores (10-100μm), the BET area available for surface activation is low, and consequently, the capacity of the cryogels is relatively low for biomolecules, especially when compared to commercial beaded adsorbents. Nevertheless, we have shown that gamma ray mediated surface grafting of cryogel matrices greatly enhance their functional and adsorptive properties. PMID:24980092

  14. Adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions using TiO2 and titanate nanotube adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Muñoz, María-José; Arencibia, Amaya; Cerro, Luis; Pascual, Raquel; Melgar, Álvaro

    2016-03-01

    Titania and titanate nanotubes were evaluated as adsorbents for the removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution. Commercial titanium dioxide (TiO2-P25, Evonik), a synthesized anatase sample obtained by the sol-gel method (TiO2-SG) and titanate nanotubes (TNT) prepared via hydrothermal treatment were compared. Mercury adsorption was analysed by kinetic and equilibrium experiments, studying the influence of pH and the type of adsorbents. The kinetics of Hg(II) adsorption on titania and titanate nanotubes could be well described by the pseudo-second order model. It was found that the process is generally fast with small differences between adsorbents, which cannot be explained by their dissimilarities in textural properties. Equilibrium isotherm data were best fitted with the Sips isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacities of Hg(II) were achieved with titanate nanotubes sample, whereas between both titania samples, TiO2-SG exhibited the highest mercury uptake. For all adsorbents, adsorption capacities were enhanced as pH was increased, achieving at pH 10 Hg(II) adsorption capacities of 100, 121, and 140 mg g-1 for TiO2-P25, TiO2-SG, and TNT, respectively. Differences between samples were discussed in terms of their crystalline phase composition and chemical nature of both, mercury species and surface active sites.

  15. Decrease of U(VI) immobilization capability of the facultative anaerobic strain Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 under anoxic conditions due to strongly reduced phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of a facultative anaerobic bacterial isolate named Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 with U(VI) were studied under oxic and anoxic conditions in order to assess the influence of the oxygen-dependent cell metabolism on microbial uranium mobilization and immobilization. We demonstrated that aerobically and anaerobically grown cells of Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 accumulate uranium from aqueous solutions under acidic conditions (pH 2 to 6), under oxic and anoxic conditions. A combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods revealed that the speciation of U(VI) associated with the cells of the strain depend on the pH as well as on the aeration conditions. At pH 2 and pH 3, uranium was exclusively bound by organic phosphate groups provided by cellular components, independently on the aeration conditions. At higher pH values, a part (pH 4.5) or the total amount (pH 6) of the dissolved uranium was precipitated under oxic conditions in a meta-autunite-like uranyl phosphate mineral phase without supplying an additional organic phosphate substrate. In contrast to that, under anoxic conditions no mineral formation was observed at pH 4.5 and pH 6, which was clearly assigned to decreased orthophosphate release by the cells. This in turn was caused by a suppression of the indigenous phosphatase activity of the strain. The results demonstrate that changes in the metabolism of facultative anaerobic microorganisms caused by the presence or absence of oxygen can decisively influence U(VI) biomineralization. PMID:25157416

  16. Decrease of U(VI) Immobilization Capability of the Facultative Anaerobic Strain Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 under Anoxic Conditions Due to Strongly Reduced Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of a facultative anaerobic bacterial isolate named Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 with U(VI) were studied under oxic and anoxic conditions in order to assess the influence of the oxygen-dependent cell metabolism on microbial uranium mobilization and immobilization. We demonstrated that aerobically and anaerobically grown cells of Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 accumulate uranium from aqueous solutions under acidic conditions (pH 2 to 6), under oxic and anoxic conditions. A combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods revealed that the speciation of U(VI) associated with the cells of the strain depend on the pH as well as on the aeration conditions. At pH 2 and pH 3, uranium was exclusively bound by organic phosphate groups provided by cellular components, independently on the aeration conditions. At higher pH values, a part (pH 4.5) or the total amount (pH 6) of the dissolved uranium was precipitated under oxic conditions in a meta-autunite-like uranyl phosphate mineral phase without supplying an additional organic phosphate substrate. In contrast to that, under anoxic conditions no mineral formation was observed at pH 4.5 and pH 6, which was clearly assigned to decreased orthophosphate release by the cells. This in turn was caused by a suppression of the indigenous phosphatase activity of the strain. The results demonstrate that changes in the metabolism of facultative anaerobic microorganisms caused by the presence or absence of oxygen can decisively influence U(VI) biomineralization. PMID:25157416

  17. Temperature-induced ordering of metal/adsorbate structures at electrochemical interfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, C. A.; Thompson, P.; Cormack, M.; Brownrigg, A.; Fowler, B.; Strmcnik, D.; Stamenkovic, V.; Greeley, J.; Menzel, A.; You, H.; Markovic, N. M.; Univ. Liverpool; Paul Scherrer Inst.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of temperature changes in water-based electrolytes on the atomic structure at the electrochemical interface has been studied using in situ surface X-ray scattering (SXS) in combination with cyclic voltammetry. Results are presented for the potential-dependent surface reconstruction of Au(100), the adsorption and ordering of bromide anions on the Au(100) surface, and the adsorption and oxidation of CO on Pt(111) in pure HClO{sub 4} and in the presence of anions. These systems represent a range of structural phenomena, namely metal surface restructuring and ordering transitions in both nonreactive spectator species and reactive adsorbate layers. The key effect of temperature appears to be in controlling the kinetics of the surface reactions that involve oxygenated species, such as hydroxyl adsorption and oxide formation. The results indicate that temperature effects should be considered in the determination of structure-function relationships in many important electrochemical systems.

  18. Temperature-induced ordering of metal/adsorbate structures at electrochemical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Christopher A; Thompson, Paul; Cormack, Michael; Brownrigg, Alexander; Fowler, Ben; Strmcnik, Dusan; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Greeley, Jeff; Menzel, Andreas; You, Hoydoo; Marković, Nenad M

    2009-06-10

    The influence of temperature changes in water-based electrolytes on the atomic structure at the electrochemical interface has been studied using in situ surface X-ray scattering (SXS) in combination with cyclic voltammetry. Results are presented for the potential-dependent surface reconstruction of Au(100), the adsorption and ordering of bromide anions on the Au(100) surface, and the adsorption and oxidation of CO on Pt(111) in pure HClO(4) and in the presence of anions. These systems represent a range of structural phenomena, namely metal surface restructuring and ordering transitions in both nonreactive spectator species and reactive adsorbate layers. The key effect of temperature appears to be in controlling the kinetics of the surface reactions that involve oxygenated species, such as hydroxyl adsorption and oxide formation. The results indicate that temperature effects should be considered in the determination of structure-function relationships in many important electrochemical systems. PMID:19489644

  19. Adsorption of lead ions on composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1996-04-01

    A fundamental study about the application of biopolymers to the recovery of lead from dilute solution was carried out. A membranous composite biopolymer adsorbent containing two kind of biopolymers, alginic acid (AA) and humic acid (HA), was prepared. HA, which has high solubility in water, was almost completely immobilized in the adsorbent by a combination of calcium alginate gel and activated carbon powder. A general model for complexation between divalent metal ions and acidic sites on biopolymers was applied to explain the adsorption mechanism of lead on the adsorbent (HA-M). The results showed that the complexation constants and the complexation capacities of lead-AA and lead-HA systems were scarcely influenced by immobilization.

  20. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, Harvey R.; Fanslow, Glenn E.

    1983-01-01

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed.

  1. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, H.R.; Fanslow, G.E.

    1983-12-20

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed. 8 figs.

  2. Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating and Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Kenneth M.; Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed two unique coating formulations that will keep surfaces clean and sanitary and contain contaminants.The Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating, modeled after the self-cleaning, water-repellant lotus leaf, disallows buildup of dust, dirt, water, and more on surfaces. This coating, has been successfully tested on painted, aluminum, glass, silica, and some composite surfaces, could aid in keeping medical assets clean.The Molecular Adsorber Coating is a zeolite-based, sprayable molecular adsorber coating, designed to prevent outgassing in materials in vacuums. The coating works well to adsorb volatiles and contaminates in manufacturing and processing, such as in pharmaceutical production. The addition of a biocide would also aid in controlling bacteria levels.

  3. High-performances carbonaceous adsorbents for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weigang; Fierro, Vanessa; Aylon, E.; Izquierdo, M. T.; Celzard, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) with controlled microporosity have been prepared and their H2 storage performances have been tested in a gravimetric device. Such adsorbents are natural Chinese anthracites chemically activated with alkaline hydroxides, NaOH or KOH. Outstanding total storage capacities of hydrogen, as high as 6.6wt.% equivalent to excess capacity of 6.2 wt.%, have been obtained at 4MPa for some of these adsorbents. These values of hydrogen adsorption are among the best, if not the highest, ever published so far in the open literature. They are well above those of some commercial materials, e.g. Maxsorb-3, considered as a reference of high-performance adsorbent for hydrogen adsorption. Such exceptional storage capacities may be ascribed to a higher volume of micropores (< 2nm).

  4. A high-capacity hydrophobic adsorbent for human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Belew, M; Peterson, E A; Porath, J

    1985-12-01

    A simple method, based on salting out hydrophobic interaction chromatography, for the efficient removal of trace amounts of serum albumin from partially purified protein preparations is described. The method is also successfully applied for the purification of albumin from Cohn fraction IV, a by-product obtained from the commercial fractionation of human serum proteins by the ethanol precipitation procedure. About 70% of the adsorbed albumin can be eluted by buffer of low ionic strength and can thus be lyophilized directly, if required. The adsorbent can be used for several cycles of adsorption and desorption without affecting its selectivity or capacity. Its adsorption properties and capacity for serum albumin are compared with those of the commercially available adsorbent Blue Sepharose CL-6B. PMID:3879424

  5. Polar/Tide Observations of Field Aligned O(+) Flows at 5000 km Altitude over the Auroral Regions in Comparison to UVI Auroral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Benjamin Adam; Craven, Paul D.; Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.; Giles, Barbara L.; Parks, G. K.; Pollock, Craig J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of thermal O(+) ion parameters from the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) on POLAR obtained near 5000 km altitude are compared with auroral images from the Ultra Violet Imager (UVI), for southern perigee passes. Ion parameters, including parallel velocity, density, and flux are combined with simultaneous auroral images to investigate relationships between their properties and the structure and brightness of the auroral forms. Results indicate field aligned upflowing O(+) ions over bright auroral regions and downward flows over dark regions. These and other relationships will be presented for several POLAR passes when both ion measurements and auroral images are observed under favorable conditions for comparison.

  6. Acceleration of Field-Scale Bioreduction of U(VI) in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer: Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Phil

    2005-04-20

    Uranium mill tailings sites provide access to uranium-contaminated groundwater at sites that are shallow and low hazard, making it possible to address the following scientific objectives: (1) Determine the dominant electron accepting processes at field sites with long-term metal/rad contamination; (2) Define the biogeochemical transformations that may be important to either natural or accelerated bioremediation under field conditions; and (3) Examine the potential for using biostimulation (electron donor addition) to accelerate reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) at the field scale.

  7. Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaO/Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Mei, Donghai; Yi, Cheol-Woo; Weaver, Jason F.; Szanyi, Janos

    2010-12-02

    The formation of adsorbed O (Oad) species and their reactivities in CO oxidation on BaO/Pt(111) (at two BaO coverages) were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), infrared reflection absorption (IRA) and X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectroscopies. In neither of these two systems was the Pt(111) surface completely covered with BaO. On the system with lower BaO coverage (~45 % of the Pt(111) surface is covered by BaO), two different Oad species form following the adsorption of O2 at 300 K: O adsorbed on BaO-free Pt(111) sites (OPt) and at the Pt-BaO interface (Oint). On the system with higher BaO coverage (~60 % of the Pt(111) surface is covered by BaO), two types of Oint are seen at the Pt-BaO interface. The desorption of OPt from the BaO-free portion of the Pt(111) surface gives an O2 desorption peak with a maximum desorption rate at ~690 K. Migration of Oint to the Pt(111) sites and their recombinative desorption give two explosive desorption features at ~760 and ~790 K in the TPD spectrum. The reactivities of these Oad species with CO to form CO2 follow their sequence of desorption; i.e., the OPt associated with the BaO-free Pt(111) surface, which desorbs at 690 K, reacts first with CO, followed by the Oint species at the Pt-BaO interface (first the one that desorbs at ~760 K and finally the one that is bound the most strongly to the interface, and desorbs at ~790 K). This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  8. Adsorbent selection for endosulfan removal from water environment.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Y; Dikshit, A K

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to select a low cost adsorbing material for the removal of endosulfan [C,C'-(1,4,5,6,7,7-hexachloro-8,9,10- trinorborn-5-en-2,3-ylene)(dimethylsulphite)] from water. Various low cost adsorbents like wood charcoal, kimberlite tailings, silica, macro fungi sojar caju were tried with activated charcoal as reference material. The above materials were selected from various sources encompassing organic, inorganic, clayey, and biological sources. For the selection of suitable adsorbent for endosulfan uptake, maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax) was chosen as the parameter. Kinetic profiles of removal were generated for all the materials to assess the equilibrium time. Equilibrium studies were carried out for all materials to assess the adsorption equilibrium model that they followed. The model that gave the best correlation coefficient by linear regression analysis, was adopted for the calculation of Qmax of the corresponding adsorbent material. Using linearised forms of equilibrium models like Langmuir, BET, and Freundlich, maximum adsorptive capacities were determined. Activated charcoal showed the best adsorptive capacity with Qmax of 2.145 mg/g followed by wood charcoal 1.773 mg/g, sojar caju 1.575 mg/g, kimberlite tailings 0.8821 mg/g, and silica 0.3231 mg/g. Albeit activated charcoal gave better performance, it was not considered as a candidate material because of its high cost. Wood charcoal was the next best adsorbent with Qmax 1.773 mg/g. Therefore, wood charcoal was chosen as the best material for endosulfan removal. The study of physical and chemical characteristics of wood charcoal revealed that it is a potential adsorbent and can even be improved further. PMID:10048207

  9. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure-function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  10. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure–function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  11. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.

  12. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8more » ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.« less

  13. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, James D; Halada, Gary P; Jha, Prashant; Phillips, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI), U(V), U(IV), U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG), and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO) with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V)- and U(IV)-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI) and U(IV) rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules) are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids. PMID:19689800

  14. Surface characterization of adsorbed asphaltene on a stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, W. A.; Taylor, S. D.

    2007-05-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize a single layer of adsorbed asphaltene on a metallic surface. The deposits were created by immersing a stainless steel disc into a dilute asphaltene solution with either toluene or dichloromethane as the solvent, although the toluene solution allowed for better control of the adsorbed asphaltene layer and less atmospheric oxygen contamination. The analyses for C 1s, S 2p3/2, N 1s and O 1s photoemission peaks indicated that different functional groups are present in the asphaltene layer including carboxylic, pyrrolic, pyridininc, thiophenic and sulfite, with slight differences in their binding energies.

  15. AQUATIC PHOTOLYSIS OF OXY-ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON GOETHITE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.

    1985-01-01

    Organic materials that will not absorb light at wavelengths longer than 295 nanometers (the solar wavelength cutoff) may nevertheless, undergo electron transfer reactions initiated by light. These reactions occur when the organic materials are adsorbed as ligand complexes to the surface of iron oxy-hydroxide (goethite). The adsorbed materials can be either inner or outer coordination sphere complexes. Goethite was chosen as the iron oxyhydroxide surface because it has the highest thermodynamic stability of any of the oxyhydroxides in water and it can be synthesized easily, with high purity.

  16. Adsorbed liposome deformation studied with quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reviakine, Ilya; Gallego, Marta; Johannsmann, Diethelm; Tellechea, Edurne

    2012-02-01

    Deformation of surface-adsorbed liposomes is an important parameter that governs the kinetics of their transformations, but one that is very difficult to measure in the case of nm-size liposomes. We investigate the deformation of dimyristoyl phosphatidyl choline liposomes by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as a function of temperature and show that it follows the dependence of this lipid's bending modulus on temperature, as expected from theoretical considerations. To corroborate our approach, we model QCM response from adsorbed liposomes by explicitly considering their shape and mechanical properties.

  17. Carbon adsorbents from products of solid fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pokonova, Yu.V.; Grabovskii, A.I.

    1995-01-10

    Total shale phenols (mixture of alkylresorcinols) or their solution in commercial-grade furfural can be used for forming carbon adsorbents with high mechanical strength (up to 97%), high microporosity (up to 0.41 cm{sup 3}{center_dot}cm{sup -3}), and higher sorption capacity. Samples with medium burnout exhibit higher selectivity (than those molded from conventional wood tar) in the recovery of noble metals from multicomponent metal salt solutions. In these parameters they surpass commercial adsorbents as well. Samples with low burnout exhibit high selectivity and separation ability with respect to gas mixtures.

  18. Adsorbed water and CO on Pt electrode modified with Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futamata, Masayuki; Luo, Liqiang

    Highly sensitive ATR-SEIRA spectroscopy was exploited to elucidate water, CO and electrolyte anions adsorbed on the Ru modified Pt film electrode. CO on Ru domains was oxidized below ca. +0.3 V, followed by pronounced water adsorption. Since the oxidation potential of CO on Pt domain was significantly reduced compared to bare Pt, these water molecules on Ru obviously prompt CO oxidation on adjacent Pt surface as consistent with the bifunctional mechanism. Diffusion of adsorbate from Ru to Pt surfaces was indicated in dilute CH 3OH solution by spectral changes with potential.

  19. Affinity Adsorbents Based on Carriers Activated by Epoxy-compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyashchitskii, B. A.; Kuznetsov, P. V.

    1984-10-01

    The review is devoted to the synthesis and applications of affinity adsorbents based on carriers activated by epoxy-compounds. The methods for the introduction of epoxy-groups into carriers of different chemical types are discussed and conditions for the immobilisation of three-dimensional spacers and low-molecular-weight and polymeric ligands on carriers containing epoxy-groups are considered. Data are presented on the properties and applications of adsorbents of this type in affinity chromatography. The bibliography includes 144 references.

  20. Hydrogen molecule on lithium adsorbed graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Gaganpreet, Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structure calculations for the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on lithium (Li) decorated and pristine graphene have been studied systematically using SIESTA code [1] within the framework of the first-principle DFT under the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)[2], including spin polarization. The energy of adsorption of hydrogen molecule on graphene is always enhanced by the presence of co-adsorbed lithium. The most efficient adsorption configuration is when H2 is lying parallel to lithium adsorbed graphene which is in contrast to its adsorption on pristine graphene (PG) where it prefers perpendicular orientation.

  1. A [sup 13]C NMR study of ethylene adsorbed on reduced and oxygen-covered Ag surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plischke, J.K.; Benesi, A.J.; Vannice, M.A. )

    1992-11-01

    [sup 13]C-enriched ethylene was adsorbed on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag particles dispersed on [eta]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] on O-covered Ag exhibited an upfield shift of [minus]20 ppm relative to gas-phase C[sub 2]H[sub 4], whereas a narrower line and smaller shift of [minus]5 ppm occurred for C[sub 2]H[sub 4] reversibly adsorbed on reduced Ag. In addition to the resonance at 103 ppm for irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4], CP/MAS NMR spectra also gave resonances at 179, 170, 164, 159, and 19 ppm for the O-covered Ag sample. The CP/MAS spectrum for Ag acetate powder clearly identified the 179- and 19-ppm peaks as those associated with the carboxyl and methyl carbons of the acetate anion, and the peaks at 159, 164, and 170 ppm were assigned to oxalate, formate, and carbonate (or possibly acetic anhydride) species, respectively, based on previous studies. When heated to 473 K the adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] disappeared and only acetate and oxalate groups were observed, and continued heating to 573 K removed almost all resonances. No C[sub 2]H[sub 4]O was unambiguously detected, thus with this unpromoted Ag catalyst utilizing a high-surface-area alumina the observable surface species appeared to be those associated with complete combustion, with acetate and oxalate predominating during reaction. These results directly confirm the presence of an Ag acetate species which has been proposed previously to be an intermediate in complete combustion, and the presence of the other three species support earlier tentative assignments based on IR and TPR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts at 61, 28, and 13 ppm were indicative of alkoxy species formed on Bronsted-acid sites on the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] surface. 58 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Decomposition of NO over [Co]-ZSM-5 zeolite: Effect of co-adsorbed O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.; McCarty, J.G.

    1998-09-10

    The decomposition of NO over four Co-containing ZSM-5 zeolites and Pr, Ga-, and Cu-exchanged ZSM-5 zeolites was investigated using the isotope labeled {sup 15}N{sup 18}O and a temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The authors found that [Co]-ZSM-5 that contains Co in the framework had the highest activity for NO decomposition, almost an order of magnitude greater than that previously reported for a zeolite catalyst, namely Cu-ZSM-5 obtained under steady-state conditions. The phenomenally high activity of [Co]-ZSM-5 is due to the unique incorporation of Co{sup 2+} in the siliceous MFI structure. For all the catalysts investigated, co-adsorption of NO and O{sub 2} led to a substantial increase in the amount of NO{sub x} adsorbed. However, the adsorbed species were not necessarily NO{sub 2} as reported by others. The authors believe that the interaction between adsorbed NO{sub x} species and O{sub 2} is responsible for enhancing the rate of NO{sub x} decomposition. It is obvious that the framework Co{sup 2+} behaves very differently from Co{sup 2+} in the countercation position and from extra-framework CoO such as that supported on or dispersed on the surface of silicalite also having the same MFI structure.

  3. Neutron Reflectometry Studies of the Adsorbed Structure of the Amelogenin, LRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Perez-Salas, Ursula; Masica, David L.; Philo, John; Krueger, Susan; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-03-21

    Amelogenins make up over 90 percent of the protein present during enamel formation and have been demonstrated to be critical in proper enamel development, but the mechanism governing this control is not well understood. Leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the charged regions from the full protein thought to control crystal regulation. In this work, we utilized neutron reflectivity (NR) to investigate the structure and orientation of LRAP adsorbed from solutions onto molecularly smooth COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) surfaces. Sedimentation velocity experiments revealed that LRAP is primarily a monomer in saturated calcium phosphate (SCP) solutions (0.15 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. LRAP adsorbed as ~33 Å thick layers at ~70% coverage as determined by NR. Rosetta simulations of the dimensions of LRAP in solution (37 Å diameter) indicate that the NR determined z dimension is consistent with an LRAP monomer. Sedimentation velocity experiments and Rosetta simulation show that the LRAP monomer has an extended, asymmetric shape in solution. The NR data suggests that the protein is not completely extended on the surface, having some degree of structure away from the surface. A protein orientation with the C-terminal and inner N-terminal region (~8-24)) located near the surface is consistent with the higher scattering length density (SLD) and higher protein hydration found near the surface by NR. This work presents new information on the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP in solution and adsorbed onto surfaces. It also presents further evidence that the monomeric species may be an important functional form of amelogenin proteins.

  4. Neutron Reflectometry Studies of the Adsorbed Structure of the Amelogenin, LRAP

    PubMed Central

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Perez-Salas, Ursula; Masica, David L.; Philo, John; Kienzle, Paul; Krueger, Susan; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Gray, Jeffrey L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    Amelogenins make up over 90 percent of the protein present during enamel formation and have been demonstrated to be critical in proper enamel development, but the mechanism governing this control is not well understood. Leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the charged regions from the full protein thought to control crystal regulation. In this work, we utilized neutron reflectivity (NR) to investigate the structure and orientation of LRAP adsorbed from solutions onto molecularly smooth COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) surfaces. Sedimentation velocity (SV) experiments revealed that LRAP is primarily a monomer in saturated calcium phosphate (SCP) solutions (0.15 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. LRAP adsorbed as ~32 Å thick layers at ~70% coverage as determined by NR. Rosetta simulations of the dimensions of LRAP in solution (37 Å diameter) indicate that the NR determined z dimension is consistent with an LRAP monomer. SV experiments and Rosetta simulation show that the LRAP monomer has an extended, asymmetric shape in solution. The NR data suggests that the protein is not completely extended on the surface, having some degree of structure away from the surface. A protein orientation with the C-terminal and inner N-terminal region (residues ~8–24) located near the surface is consistent with the higher scattering length density (SLD) found near the surface by NR. This work presents new information on the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP in solution and adsorbed onto surfaces. It also presents further evidence that the monomeric species may be an important functional form of amelogenin proteins. PMID:23477285

  5. Electron energy loss and thermal desorption spectroscopy of pyridine adsorbed on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Grassian, V.H.; Muetterties, E.L.

    1986-10-23

    The chemisorption behavior of pyridine (NC/sub 5/H/sub 5/) on a Pt(111) surface has been examined by using thermal desorption and electron energy loss spectroscopy as a function of adsorption temperature. The vibrational spectrum of pyridine adsorbed to room temperature on this surface shows intense loss peaks in the specular direction from vibrational modes which can be characterized as in-plane stretching and bending modes. This vibrational spectrum has been interpreted as the formation of an ..cap alpha..-pyridyl species (NC/sub 5/H/sub 4/) on the surface. The pyridyl moiety is bonded to the platinum surface through the nitrogen and one of the ..cap alpha..-carbon atoms with the pyridyl plane perpendicular to the metal surface. When pyridine is adsorbed at low temperature (120 K), it bonds to the surface through both the nitrogen atom and the ..pi.. and ..pi../sup */ orbitals of the pyridine ring. As the crystal is warmed to 260 K, at saturation coverage, approximately 50% of the molecules desorb as molecular pyridine. The remaining pyridine molecules partially decompose on the surface to form an ..cap alpha..-pyridyl fragment. The electron energy loss spectra of pyridine adsorbed at both low and room temperature is compared to the infrared spectra of two osmium cluster compounds: Os/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/(NC/sub 5/H/sub 5/), a pyridine complex, and HOs/sub 3/(CO)/sup 18/NC/sub 5/H/sub 4/), a pyridyl complex.

  6. Influence of H- and OH-adsorbates on the ethanol oxidation reaction--a DEMS study.

    PubMed

    Bach Delpeuch, Antoine; Chatenet, Marian; Rau, Maria Sol; Cremers, Carsten

    2015-04-28

    The ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) was investigated by potentiodynamic techniques on Pt/C, Rh/C, Pt-Rh/C, Pt-SnO2/C and Pt-Rh-SnO2/C by differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) in a flow cell system. Prior to the cyclic voltammetries, adsorption of H- and OH-species was carried out by chronoamperometry at Ead = 0.05 and 1 V vs. RHE, respectively, in order to examine their influence on the EOR on the different electrocatalysts. For the sake of comparison, another adsorption potential was chosen at Ead = 0.3 V vs. RHE, in the double layer region (i.e. in the absence of such adsorbates). For this study, 20 wt% electrocatalysts were synthesized using a modified polyol method and were physically characterized by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When comparing the first and second cycles of the cyclic voltammograms (CVs) on Pt/C and Pt-SnO2/C, the presence of Had on the electrocatalyst surface seems to hinder the initiation of the ethanol electrooxidation, whereas the reaction onset potential is shifted negatively with the presence of OH-adsorbates. In contrast to them, the EOR on Rh/C is enhanced when the electrocatalyst surface is covered with Had and is inhibited after adsorption at Ead = 0.3 and 1 V vs. RHE. Finally, on Pt-Rh/C and Pt-Rh-SnO2/C, neither the H- nor OH-adsorbates do impact the EOR initiation. The lowest EOR onset was recorded on Pt-SnO2/C and Pt-Rh-SnO2/C electrocatalysts. The CO2 currency efficiency (CCE) was also determined for each electrocatalyst and demonstrated higher values on Pt-Rh-SnO2/C. PMID:25820025

  7. RADIOLYSIS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE ADSORBED STATE

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, J.W.; Allen, A.O.

    1961-10-01

    >A method of forming branch chained hydrocarbons by means of energetic penetrating radiation is described. A solid zeolite substrate is admixed with a cobalt ion and is irradiated with a hydrocarbon adsorbed therein. Upon irradiation with gamma rays, there is an increased yield of branched and lower molecular straight chain compounds. (AEC)

  8. Ozonation of isoproturon adsorbed on silica particles under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflieger, Maryline; Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran

    2012-12-01

    The results on heterogeneous ozonation of a phenylurea pesticide, isoproturon, under atmospheric conditions are presented for the first time in the present study. The study was carried out using an experimental device previously adopted and validated for the heterogeneous reactivity of organics toward ozone (Pflieger et al., 2011). Isoproturon was adsorbed on silica particles via a liquid-to-solid equilibrium with a load far below a monolayer (0.02% by weight/surface coverage of 0.5%). The rate constants were estimated by measuring the consumption of the organic (dark, T = 26 °C, RH < 1%). The experimental data were fitted by both the modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood and the Eley-Rideal patterns, resulting in atmospheric lifetimes of heterogeneous ozonation of 4 and 6 days, respectively (for 40 ppb of O3). Parameters, such as the number and the quantity of pesticides adsorbed on the solid support, which can significantly influence the heterogeneous kinetics, were investigated as well. The results obtained suggest that the organic compound is adsorbed in multilayer aggregates on the aerosol even though submonolayer coverage is assumed. The presence of a second herbicide, trifluralin, together with isoproturon on the aerosol surface does not affect the kinetics of ozonation, indicating that both compounds are adsorbed on different surface sites of silica particles.

  9. Chitosan membrane adsorber for low concentration copper ion removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Li, Yanxiang; Li, Haigang; Yang, Chuanfang

    2016-08-01

    Thin chitosan membranes with symmetric and interconnected pore structure were prepared using silica as porogen, and their physical properties including pore structure, pore size distribution, porosity and water affinity were analyzed. The membrane showed a maximum Cu(II) adsorption capacity of 87.5mg/g in static adsorption, and the adsorption fitted pseudo-second order kinetics and Toth adsorption isotherm. The membranes were then stacked in layers as an adsorber to remove small concentration Cu(II) from water dynamically. At feed concentration of 5mg/L, the adsorber could retain Cu(II) effectively when its thickness reached over 200μm, and the performance was further improved by using more membranes layers. Within a certain limit, the adsorber showed a 'flow-independent' loading behavior, an indication of fast mass transfer inside the membrane. The adsorption process was correlated well with bed depth service time (BDST) model, Thomas model and Yoon and Nelson model, and the adsorber was also found to be regenerable and re-usable. PMID:27112875

  10. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AI series adsorbents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-10

    A series of adsorbent (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole/mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with higher degree of grafting which ranges from 110 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 10 wt% hydroxylamine at 80 C for 72 hours. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged frommore » 171-187 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. The performance of the adsorbents for uranium adsorption in natural seawater was also carried out using flow-through-column at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The three hours KOH conditioning was better for higher uranium uptake than one hour. The adsorbent AI11 containing AN and VPA at the mole ration of 3.52, emerged as the potential candidate for higher uranium adsorption (3.35 g-U/Kg-ads.) after 56 days of exposure in the seawater in the flow-through-column. The rate vanadium adsorption over uranium was linearly increased throughout the 56 days exposure. The total vanadium uptake was ~5 times over uranium after 56 days.« less

  11. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AI series adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-10

    A series of adsorbent (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole/mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with higher degree of grafting which ranges from 110 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 10 wt% hydroxylamine at 80 C for 72 hours. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated s