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Sample records for adsorbed water vapor

  1. Adsorption/Desorption Behavior Of Water Vapor In An Adsorbent Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Kodama, Akio

    Desiccant cooling system can be driven with a low temperature heat such as around 80°C obtained from exhaust gas and so on. Among the configuration of the cooling cycle, honeycomb rotary adsorber is the most important part to achieve higher cooling performance. By means of computer simulation, angular and axial distributions of the amount of adsorbed water, air humidity, air temperature and adsorbent temperature inside the desiccant rotor at various operating conditions were investigated. In the mathematical model, lumped mass transfer coefficient was used and its value were derived from the fitting with experimental results to improve the reliability of discussion about the simultaneous heat/mass transfer in the desiccant rotor. It was found that the part of honeycomb rotary adsorber which is close to the regeneration air inlet cannot work well as an adsorbent at higher regeneration temperature regardless of outside air condition and regeneration air humidity. On the other hand, since the driving force was extremely low throughout all the axial positions, water vapor was adsorbed gradually at the whole axial position of rotor under a lower regeneration temperature. Consequently, this study could clarify the importance of the optimization of the rotor in terms of its length depending on the operating and air conditions.

  2. Adsorption/Desorption Behavior of Water Vapor in an Adsorbent Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Kodama, Akio

    To clarify the operating and design concept of desiccant rotor, which is a most important component of an adsorptive desiccant cooling process, adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor has been investigated by means of computer simulation. Mass transfer coefficient in the mathematical model could be related to cycle time by applying the penetration theory. Considering this relationship, influences of the rotation speed of the desiccant rotor, process / regeneration air velocity and their velocity ratio were investigated. It was found that the optimum rotation speed tended to disappear when the regeneration air temperature was low and its humidity was considerably small compared to the process inlet air, since the product air condition approached to regeneration air condition as the rotation speed increased. Decrease of the dehumidifying performance was observed at higher air velocity and the corresponding higher rotation speed since the adsorbent rotor was not fully regenerated due to shorter regeneration time and shorter residence time of process / regeneration air in the adsorbent rotor prevented the mass transfer between air and adsorbent. It was also found that the dehumidifying performance was not improved even though the adsorbent was fully regenerated by higher regeneration air velocity as the sensible heat transferred from the regeneration zone via adsorbent itself increased and disturbed adsorption.

  3. Adsorption / Desorption Behavior of Water Vapor in an Adsorbent Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor onto desiccant rotor has been investigated to improve the desiccant cooling system by means of computer simulation. In this paper, we paid attention to the relationship between the equilibrium amount of water adsorbed onto the desiccant material and the relative humidity, that is adsorption isotherm as a principal characteristic feature of adsorbent. Considering actual adsorbents, five types of adsorption isotherms were assumed to clarify the influence of adsorption isotherm on the dehumidifying performance. After the investigation on the influences of some operating conditions on the dehumidifying performance at each selected adsorption isotherm, it was found that higher dehumidifying performance and reduction of length of desiccant rotor could be achieved by selecting appropriate adsorption isotherm. It was also predicted that S-shaped adsorption isotherm which is raised sharply at relative humidity around 15 % could produce the lowest air humidity at regeneration air temperature 80 °C. Moreover influence of the intraparticle diffusion coefficient which significantly influence on the adsorption / desorption rate was discussed choosing two adsorption isotherm from the above five isotherms. It seems that effective range of the intraparticle diffusion coefficient for the significant improvement of the dehumidifying performance was strongly influenced by the shape of adsorption isotherm.

  4. Measurement of Emissivity of Water Vapor Adsorbents with Infrared Radiation Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Akai, Takafumi; Mitani, Tadafumi

    One of the aims in this study is a development of a numerical analysis model to evaluate a desiccant dehumidifier which regenerates with concentration of solar ray. Inside of a desiccant rotor, in addition to convective heat transfer between airflow and adsorbent surface, radiative heat transfers from one adsorbent surface to another. As a matter of course, absorption and transmission of solar ray on the adsorbent surface occur. It is necessary to measure the emissivity, reflectivity, absorptivity and transmissivity. This paper presents the measurement of emissivity of vapor adsorbents. The measuring apparatus consists of an infrared radiation thermometer. Emissivity was measured in some temperature and humidity conditions. It was clarified that the emissivity decreased with the increase of relative humidity of adsorbent. The emissivity of silica gel particle was less than about 25% in high relative humidity condition compared with dry condition. An empirical formula was presented to predict an influence of the equilibrium adsorption on the emissivity. Moreover, it was clarified that the influence of the equilibrium adsorption on the emissivity of a sheet of adsorbent rotor was negligible.

  5. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on gear-pellet and honeycomb-pellet types of adsorbents containing A-type zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, A.; Munakata, K.; Hara, K.; Narita, S.; Sugiyama, T.; Kotoh, K.; Tanaka, M.; Uda, T.

    2015-03-15

    It is necessary to recover or process tritiated species that are extensively coexistent in nuclear fusion installations. A conventional way to recover tritium release to atmosphere is catalytic oxidation of tritiated species and adsorption of tritiated water vapor on adsorbents with high surface areas. Therefore, new adsorbents with low pressure loss and high surface areas need to be developed and utilized for such large-scale adsorption systems. In this study, attention was focused on new adsorbents, which are gear-type pellet MS5A adsorbent, gear-type pellet MS4A adsorbent and honeycomb-type pellet MS5A adsorbent. The adsorption characteristics of the new adsorbent were comparatively studied with conventional type of adsorbents (pellet-type MS5A adsorbent and pebble-type MS5A adsorbent), in terms of adsorption capacity, pressure loss and adsorption rate. It was found that the adsorption capacity of water vapor on the gear-type adsorbents is higher than that on a honeycomb-type adsorbent. The experimental breakthrough curves indicate that the adsorption rates of water vapor on gear-type and honeycomb-type adsorbents are smaller than that on conventional type adsorbents. Various adsorption models were also tested to correlate the experimental isotherms. It was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich model could properly correlate the experimental adsorption isotherms.

  6. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Alkylammonium montmorillonites as adsorbents for organic vapors from air

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, M.; Purnell, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Montmorillonite clays may be modified by the exchange of the inorganic interlayer cations with alkylammonium ions, resulting in a fixed internal porosity. The pore size and shape depend on the nature of the alkylammonium ion. A number of different ions were used to prepare adsorbents with varying properties, and these were examined for their potential application to sampling organic vapors in air. Characterization involved determination of nitrogen and water contents, surface area, interlayer spacing, thermal stability, and breakthrough volumes of organic vapors. The adsorbent that showed the most promise (tetramethylammonium montmorillonite (TMA)) was further evaluated for use as an adsorbent in both thermal- and solvent-desorable sampling systems.

  8. Pillared Interlayered Clays as Adsorbents of Gases and Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, J.; Pinto, M. L.

    This chapter reviews recent works where porous materials prepared from clays, particularly pillared interlayered clays (PILCs), were studied as gas phase adsorbents. It also includes the cases which used the adsorption of gases and vapors for the nanotextural characterization of the materials, other than the usual low temperature nitrogen adsorption. This is, for instance, the case of the adsorption of molecules of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with various dimensions and shapes, which can be used as probe molecules for the characterization of the porosity or concerning the topic of the VOCs abatement. A similar situation occurs with water adsorption, whose results can be informative not only on the desiccant properties of the materials but also on their surface chemistry. A more recent line of studies of adsorption by materials prepared from clays, namely, the hydrocarbon purification from natural gas or biogas, was also addressed.

  9. Water vapor pressure calculation.

    PubMed

    Hall, J R; Brouillard, R G

    1985-06-01

    Accurate calculation of water vapor pressure for systems saturated with water vapor can be performed using the Goff-Gratch equation. A form of the equation that can be adapted for computer programming and for use in electronic databases is provided. PMID:4008425

  10. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  11. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  12. Thermodynamic formalism of water uptakes on solid porous adsorbents for adsorption cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Baichuan; Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2014-05-19

    This Letter presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the amount of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and silica gel for the development of an advanced adsorption chiller. This formalism is developed from the rigor of the partition distribution function of each water vapor adsorptive site on adsorbents and the condensation approximation of adsorptive water molecules and is validated with experimental data. An interesting and useful finding has been established that the proposed model is thermodynamically connected with the pore structures of adsorbent materials, and the water vapor uptake highly depends on the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero surface coverage and the adsorptive sites of the adsorbent materials. Employing the proposed model, the thermodynamic trends of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents can be estimated.

  13. Water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, R.; Mcilrath, T.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of measuring atmospheric water vapor by means of a tunable lidar operated from the space shuttle. The specific method evaluated was differential absorption, a two-color method in which the atmospheric path of interest is traversed by two laser pulses. Results are reported.

  14. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  15. States of water adsorbed on perindopril crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. A.; Khmelevskaya, V. S.; Bogdanov, N. Yu.; Gorchakov, K. A.

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between the structural state of adsorbed water, the crystal structure of the substances, and the solubility of the perindopril salt C19H32N2O5 · C4H11N in water was studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The high-frequency shift of the stretching vibrations of adsorbed water and the solubility depend on the crystal structure of the drug substance. A reversible chemical reaction occurred between the adsorbed water and the perindopril salt.

  16. Water vaporization on Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Feldman, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A search is presently conducted for OH generated by the photodissociation of atmospheric water vapor in long-exposure IUE spectra of the region around Ceres. A statistically significant detection of OH is noted in an exposure off the northern limb of Ceres after perihelion. The amount of OH is consistent with a polar cap that might be replenished during winter by subsurface percolation, but which dissipates in summer.

  17. SOFIA Water Vapor Monitor Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R.; Roellig, T. L.; Yuen, L.; Shiroyama, B.; Meyer, A.; Devincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The SOFIA Water Vapor Monitor (WVM) is a heterodyne radiometer designed to determine the integrated amount of water vapor along the telescope line of sight and directly to the zenith. The basic technique that was chosen for the WVM uses radiometric measurements of the center and wings of the 183.3 GHz rotational line of water to measure the water vapor. The WVM reports its measured water vapor levels to the aircraft Mission Controls and Communication System (MCCS) while the SOFIA observatory is in normal operation at flight altitude. The water vapor measurements are also available to other scientific instruments aboard the observatory. The electrical, mechanical and software design of the WVM are discussed.

  18. A stratospheric water vapor feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Variations in stratospheric water vapor play a role in the evolution of our climate. We show here that variations in water vapor since 2004 can be traced to tropical tropopause layer (TTL) temperature perturbations from at least three processes: the quasi-biennial oscillation, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, and the temperature of the troposphere. The connection between stratospheric water vapor and the temperature of the troposphere implies the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the feedback in a chemistry-climate model to have a magnitude of +0.3 W/m2/K, which could be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. About two-thirds of the feedback comes from the extratropical stratosphere below ~16 km (the lowermost stratosphere), with the rest coming from the stratosphere above ~16 km (the overworld).

  19. Adsorption and Desorption of Nitrogen and Water Vapor by clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Deshan; Chen, Qiong; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and water vapor by clay has a significant impact on unsaturated soil physical and mechanical properties. In order to study the adsorption and desorption characteristics of nitrogen and water vapor by montmorillonite, kaolin and sliding zone soils, the Autosorb-iQ specific surface area and pore size analyzer instrument of United State was taken to carry out the analysis test. The adsorption and desorption of nitrogen at 77K and water vapor at 293K on clay sample were conducted. The theories of BET, FHH and hydration energy were taken to calculate the specific surface, surface fractal dimension and adsorption energy. The results show that the calculated specific surface of water vapor by clay is bigger than nitrogen adsorption test because clay can adsorb more water vapor molecule than nitrogen. Smaller and polar water vapor molecule can access the micropore and then adsorb on the mineral surface and mineral intralayer, which make the mineral surface cations hydrate and the mineral surface smoother. Bigger and nonpolar nitrogen molecule can not enter into the micropore as water vapor molecule and has weak interaction with clay surface.

  20. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  1. Zeolite Y adsorbents with high vapor uptake capacity and robust cycling stability for potential applications in advanced adsorption heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, XS; Narayanan, S; Michaelis, VK; Ong, TC; Keeler, EG; Kim, H; Mckay, IS; Griffin, RG; Wang, EN

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg2+ ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg, Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the lab-scale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N-2 sorption, Al-27/Si-29 MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2nd law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N-2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K.; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G.; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S.; Griffin, Robert G.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg2+ ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, 27Al/29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick’s 2nd law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. PMID:25395877

  3. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S; Griffin, Robert G; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg(2+) ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, (27)Al/(29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2(nd) law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. PMID:25395877

  4. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-01

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  5. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    A total of 18 different membranes were procured, characterized, and tested in a modified bench-scale vapor diffusion water reclamation unit. Four membranes were selected for further studies involving membrane fouling. Emphasis was placed on the problem of flux decline due to membrane fouling. This is discussed in greater details under "Summary and Discussion on Membrane Fouling Studies" presented in pages 47-51. The system was also investigated for low temperature application on wash-water where the permeated water is not recovered but vented into space vacuum.

  6. Water Vapor Feedbacks to Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    1999-01-01

    The response of water vapor to climate change is investigated through a series of model studies with varying latitudinal temperature gradients, mean temperatures, and ultimately, actual climate change configurations. Questions to be addressed include: what role does varying convection have in water vapor feedback; do Hadley Circulation differences result in differences in water vapor in the upper troposphere; and, does increased eddy energy result in greater eddy vertical transport of water vapor in varying climate regimes?

  7. Remote sensing of water vapor features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1991-01-01

    The three major objectives of the project are outlined: (1) to describe atmospheric water vapor features as functions of space and time; (2) to evaluate remotely sensed measurements of water vapor content; and (3) to study relations between fine-scale water vapor fields and convective activity. Data from several remote sensors were used. The studies used the GOES/VAS, HIS, and MAMS instruments have provided a progressively finer scale view of water vapor features.

  8. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:15797395

  9. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  10. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    An application of the water vapor diffusion technique is examined whereby the permeated water vapor is vented to space vacuum to alleviate on-board waste storage and provide supplemental cooling. The work reported herein deals primarily with the vapor diffusion-heat rejection (VD-HR) as it applies to the Space Shuttle. A stack configuration was selected, designed and fabricated. An asymmetric cellulose acetate membrane, used in reverse osmosis application was selected and a special spacer was designed to enhance mixing and promote mass transfer. A skid-mount unit was assembled from components used in the bench unit although no attempt was made to render it flight-suitable. The operating conditions of the VD-HR were examined and defined and a 60-day continuous test was carried out. The membranes performed very well throughout the test; no membrane rupture and no unusual flux decay was observed. In addition, a tentative design for a flight-suitable VD-HR unit was made.

  11. Water vapor, whence comest thou.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. W., Jr.; Hills, H. K.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    During a 14-hour period on Mar. 7, 1971, the Apollo 14 ALSEP suprathermal ion detector experiment (SIDE) observed an intense, prolonged series of bursts of 48.6-eV ions at the lunar surface. The SIDE mass analyzer showed the mass per unit charge of these ions to be characteristic of water vapor if singly ionized. The event was also observed by the SIDE total ion detectors (TIDs) at the Apollo 14 site and at Apollo 12 (located 183 km to the west). The TID data from SIDE 14 indicate that the energy spectrum was narrower than the 20-eV interval between energy channels. Ion spectra due to the LM exhaust gases are shown to be readily identified by the SIDE and are distinctly different in character from the spectra obtained on March 7. Detailed consideration of other possible sources of water, including the Apollo 14 CSM, leads to the conclusion that the water vapor did not come from a man-made source. Also, it is estimated that the event may have involved a quantity of water much greater than that which has been artificially introduced into the lunar environment. Consequently, it appears to be of lunar origin.

  12. Advanced Raman water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey; Ferrare, Richard A.; Evans, Keith A.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Staley, O. Glenn; Disilvestre, Raymond W.; Gorin, Inna; Kirks, Kenneth R.; Mamakos, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Water vapor and aerosols are important atmospheric constituents. Knowledge of the structure of water vapor is important in understanding convective development, atmospheric stability, the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface, and energy feedback mechanisms and how they relate to global warming calculations. The Raman Lidar group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed an advanced Raman Lidar for use in measuring water vapor and aerosols in the earth's atmosphere. Drawing on the experience gained through the development and use of our previous Nd:YAG based system, we have developed a completely new lidar system which uses a XeF excimer laser and a large scanning mirror. The additional power of the excimer and the considerably improved optical throughput of the system have resulted in approximately a factor of 25 improvement in system performance for nighttime measurements. Every component of the current system has new design concepts incorporated. The lidar system consists of two mobile trailers; the first (13m x 2.4m) houses the lidar instrument, the other (9.75m x 2.4m) is for system control, realtime data display, and analysis. The laser transmitter is a Lambda Physik LPX 240 iCC operating at 400 Hz with a XeF gas mixture (351 nm). The telescope is a .75m horizontally mounted Dall-Kirkham system which is bore sited with a .8m x 1.1m elliptical flat which has a full 180 degree scan capability - horizon to horizon within a plane perpendicular to the long axis of the trailer. The telescope and scan mirror assembly are mounted on a 3.65m x .9m optical table which deploys out the rear of the trailer through the use of a motor driven slide rail system. The Raman returns from water vapor (403 nm), nitrogen (383 nm) and oxygen (372 nm) are measured in addition to the direct Rayleigh/Mie backscatter (351). The signal from each of these is split at about a 5/95 ratio between two photomultiplier detectors. The 5 percent detector is used for

  13. Effect of Acids on Water Vapor Uptake by Pyrogenic Silica

    PubMed

    Bogdan; Kulmala

    1997-07-01

    Effect of gaseous HCl and HNO3 on the water vapor uptake by pyrogenic silica was studied at different relative humidities (RH) for pure water and different compositions of binary and ternary vapor mixtures. Experiments showed that the ability of silica to uptake water strongly depends on RH and on the type of acids and their concentration in the vapor mixtures. At low acid concentration in the binary mixtures the influence of acids is probably small. Water uptake by silica does not change monotonically with acid concentration: at first it decreases and then starts to grow. However, the presence of acids promotes water uptake, and the effect is very significant at low RH. HCl seems to be more effective acid to enhance water uptake than HNO3 . In the case of ternary mixtures the adsorbed weight of water is a bit larger than that adsorbed from the binary mixtures. Acids are accumulated by silica surface, and the accumulation is larger for nitric acid. PMID:9241208

  14. Profiling atmospheric water vapor by microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Wilheit, T. T.; Szejwach, G.; Gesell, L. H.; Nieman, R. A.; Niver, D. S.; Krupp, B. M.; Gagliano, J. A.; King, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended kalman-Bucy filter was implemented and applied for the water vapor retrieval. The results show great promise in atmospheric water vapor profiling by microwave radiometry heretofore not attainable at lower frequencies.

  15. Saturn's Stratospheric Water Vapor Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesman, Brigette E.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Romani, Paul N.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.

    2015-11-01

    Water is a sought after commodity in the solar system. It is used as an indication of life, planetary formation timescales, and signatures of past cometary impacts. In Saturn’s atmosphere there are two sources of water: an internal primordial reservoir that is confined to the troposphere, and an external source of unknown origin that delivers water to the stratosphere. Potential sources of stratospheric water include: Saturn’s main rings (via neutral infall and/or ions transported along magnetic field lines - “Ring Rain”), interplanetary dust particles, and the E-ring that is supplied with water from the plumes of Enceladus. Measuring the latitudinal and seasonal variation of H2O on Saturn will constrain the source of Saturn’s stratospheric water.Cassini’s Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) has detected emission lines of H2O on Saturn at wavelengths of 40 and 50 microns. CIRS also retrieves the temperature of the stratosphere using CH4 lines at 7.7 microns. Using our retrieved temperatures, we derive the mole fraction of H2O at the 0.5-5 mbar level for comparison with water-source models. The latitudinal variation of stratospheric water vapor will be presented as a first step in understanding the external source of water on Saturn. The observed local maximum near Saturn’s equator supports either a neutral infall from the rings or a source in the E-ring. We will look for secondary maxima at mid-latitudes to determine whether “Ring Rain” also contributes to the inventory of water in Saturn’s upper atmosphere.

  16. Saturn's Stratospheric Water Vapor Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesman, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Water is a sought after commodity in the solar system. It is used as an indication of life, planetary formation timescales, and signatures of past cometary impacts. In Saturn's atmosphere there are two sources of water: an internal primordial reservoir that is confined to the troposphere, and an external source of unknown origin that delivers water to the stratosphere. Potential sources of stratospheric water include: Saturn's main rings (via neutral infall and/or ions transported along magnetic field lines - "Ring Rain"), interplanetary dust particles, and the E-ring that is supplied with water from the plumes of Enceladus. Measuring the latitudinal and seasonal variation of H2O on Saturn will constrain the source of Saturn's stratospheric water. Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) has detected emission lines of H2O on Saturn at wavelengths of 40 and 50 microns. CIRS also retrieves the temperature of the stratosphere using CH4 lines at 7.7 microns. Using our retrieved temperatures, we derive the mole fraction of H2O at the 0.5-5 mbar level for comparison with water-source models. The latitudinal variation of stratospheric water vapor between 2004-2009 will be presented as a first step in understanding the external source of water on Saturn. The observed local maximum near Saturn's equator supports either a neutral infall from the rings or a source in the E-ring. We will look for secondary maxima at mid-latitudes to determine whether "Ring Rain" also contributes to the inventory of water in Saturn's upper atmosphere.

  17. High altitude aircraft water vapor measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1973-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft was developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on the NASA Convair 990 and on a USAF B-57 aircraft. Water vapor measurements from the Convair 990 were conducted up to 40,000 ft with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 ft.

  18. Copper ions removal from water using functionalized carbon nanotubes–mullite composite as adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Tofighy, Maryam Ahmadzadeh; Mohammadi, Toraj

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • CNTs–mullite composite was prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. • The prepared composite was modified with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan. • The modified CNTs–mullite composites were used as novel adsorbents. • Copper ion removal from water by the prepared adsorbents was performed. • Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was synthesized by direct growth of carbon nanotubes on mullite particles via chemical vapor deposition method using cyclohexanol and ferrocene as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. The carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was oxidized with concentrated nitric acid and functionalized with chitosan and then used as a novel adsorbent for copper ions removal from water. The results demonstrated that modification with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan improves copper ions adsorption capacity of the prepared composite, significantly. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. The carbon nanotubes growth on mullite particles to form the carbon nanotubes–mullite composite with further modification is an inherently safe approach for many promising environmental applications to avoid some concerns regarding environment, health and safety. It was found that the modified carbon nanotubes–mullite composite can be considered as an excellent adsorbent for copper ions removal from water.

  19. Eyeing the Sky's Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, and many like it, are one way NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is measuring trace amounts of water vapor in the atmosphere over far-northern Mars. Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) uses solar filters, or filters designed to image the sun, to make these images. The camera is aimed at the sky for long exposures.

    SSI took this image as a test on June 9, 2008, which was the Phoenix mission's 15th Martian day, or sol, since landing, at 5:20 p.m. local solar time. The camera was pointed about 38 degrees above the horizon. The white dots in the sky are detector dark current that will be removed during image processing and analysis.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space

  20. Tropospheric water vapor and climate sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1999-06-01

    Estimates are made of the effect of changes in tropospheric water vapor on the climate sensitivity to doubled carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) using a coarse resolution atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The sensitivity of the model to doubled CO{sub 2} is found as the difference between the equilibrium responses for control and doubled CO{sub 2} cases. Clouds are specified to isolate the water vapor feedback. Experiments in which the water vapor distribution is specified rather than internally calculated are used to find the contribution of water vapor in various layers and latitude belts to the sensitivity. The contribution of water vapor in layers of equal mass to the climate sensitivity varies by about a factor of 2 with height, with the largest contribution coming from layers between 450 and 750 mb, and the smallest from layers above 230 mb. The positive feedback on the global mean surface temperature response to doubled CO{sub 2} from water vapor above 750 mb is about 2.6 times as large as that from water vapor below 750 mb. The feedback on global mean surface temperature due to water vapor in the extratropical free troposphere is about 50% larger than the feedback due to the lower-latitude free troposphere water vapor. Several important sources of nonlinearity of the radiative heating rates were identified in the process of constructing the specified cloud and water vapor fields. These are (1) the interaction of clouds and solar radiation, which produces much more reflection of solar radiation for time mean clouds than for the instantaneous clouds; (2) the correlation of clouds and water vapor, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground for correlated clouds and water vapor than when these fields are independent; and (3) the interaction of water vapor with long wave radiation, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground of the average over instantaneous water vapor distributions than of

  1. X-ray-induced water vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Lee, J. S.; Je, J. H.; Fezzaa, K.

    2011-09-15

    We present quantitative evidence for x-ray-induced water vaporization: water is vaporized at a rate of 5.5 pL/s with the 1-A-wavelength x-ray irradiation of {approx}0.1 photons per A{sup 2}; moreover, water vapor is reversibly condensed during pauses in irradiation. This result fundamentally suggests that photoionization induces vaporization. This phenomenon is attributed to surface-tension reduction by ionization and would be universally important in radiological and electrohydrodynamic situations.

  2. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  3. Mars water vapor, near-surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous paper we concluded that the temperature sensors aboard the Viking landers (VL-1 and VL-2) were detecting the water vapor frost point. Analysis of one Mars year of data at both lander sites substantiates this conclusion. At VL-1 it is found that the water vapor mixing ratio is constant with height through the bulk of the atmosphere, most of the time. Exceptions are during the onset phases of the two major dust storms when temporary enhancement of near-surface vapor occurs (the same phenomenon is observed at VL-2), and some depletion of near-surface vapor during the decay phase of the first storm, possibly the second storm as well. The former suggests near-surface, northward transport of water vapor with the storms. The latter suggests adsorption of vapor on dust particles followed by surface deposition. At VL-2, severe near-surface depletion of water vapor occurs during northern autumn and winter. The residual vapor is in equilibrium with the surface condensate observed at the site during this period, indicating that the source region for the condensate must be aloft with downward transport by dust fall-out. Since the near-surface water vapor mixing ratio and concentration at VL-1 generally parallels the column abundance over VL-1 obtained by the orbiters, this suggests that VL-1 can be used to give a measure of column abundance for as long as the temperature sensors remain operational.

  4. Adsorbed water and CO on Pt electrode modified with Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futamata, Masayuki; Luo, Liqiang

    Highly sensitive ATR-SEIRA spectroscopy was exploited to elucidate water, CO and electrolyte anions adsorbed on the Ru modified Pt film electrode. CO on Ru domains was oxidized below ca. +0.3 V, followed by pronounced water adsorption. Since the oxidation potential of CO on Pt domain was significantly reduced compared to bare Pt, these water molecules on Ru obviously prompt CO oxidation on adjacent Pt surface as consistent with the bifunctional mechanism. Diffusion of adsorbate from Ru to Pt surfaces was indicated in dilute CH 3OH solution by spectral changes with potential.

  5. Water vapor retrieval over many surface types

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.C.; Johnson, J.

    1996-04-01

    In this paper we present a study of of the water vapor retrieval for many natural surface types which would be valuable for multi-spectral instruments using the existing Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) for the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature. An atmospheric code (6S) and 562 spectra were used to compute the top of the atmosphere radiance near the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature in steps of 2.5 nm as a function of precipitable water (PW). We derive a novel technique called ``Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption`` (APDA) and show that APDA performs better than the CIBR over many surface types.

  6. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work, we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyα photons, since the Lyα line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more extended distribution of warm water vapor, while dust growth and settling tends to reduce the amount of warm water vapor. Based on typical assumptions regarding the elemental oxygen abundance and the water chemistry, the column density of warm water vapor can be as high as 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. A small amount of hot water vapor with temperature higher than ∼300 K exists in a more extended region in the upper atmosphere of the disk. Cold water vapor with temperature lower than 100 K is distributed over the entire disk, produced by photodesorption of the water ice.

  7. Development of novel adsorbents for the control of vapor- phase mercury emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    Efficient sulfur-impregnated activated carbon-based (SIAC) sorbents for elemental mercury vapors were developed and evaluated in this study. The key parameters of the impregnation protocol included impregnation temperature and initial sulfur to carbon ratio (SCR). Gas constituents and temperature were the key process parameters studied for their impact on sorbent performance. Impregnation temperature is the major impregnation parameter that dominated the performance of SIACs. Performance deteriorated quickly as the impregnation temperature was lowered below 400°C. Higher impregnation temperatures facilitated the presence of more active short-chain S molecules, larger adsorbent surface area, greater fraction of meso-pores, and stronger sulfur-carbon bonding. SCR showed moderate impact on mercury uptake with a 50% decrease in sorbent capacity from highest SCR (4:1) to lowest SCR (1:2). Impact of gas constituents was investigated individually. CO2 (5 and 15%) behaved as inert gas and did not change the performance of SIAC. Also, trace amount of SO2 (300 ppm) and NO (500 ppm) did not alter its performance. Thermogravimetric Analysis showed that micro-structure of SIAC was unchanged after contacting trace pollutants. Low O2 concentration (3%) did not change the performance of SIAC, while high O2 concentration (6% and 9%) increased its capacity by 16% and 30%, respectively. It is postulated that SIAC catalyzed the formation of HgO in the presence of high O2 concentrations. High moisture concentration (10%) decreased SIAC's capacity by 25% while low moisture concentration (5%) showed no impact. It was assumed that water blocked the entrances to the active sites of carbon. H2 formation and hydrogen bonding could have also retarded mercury-sulfur reaction. SIAC's performance was negligible at 250 or 400°C due to the exothermic nature of Hg and S reaction, while its capacity at 140°C increased by 14% as smaller sorbent particle size (170 x 230) was used instead of 60 x 80

  8. CO2 DIAL measurements of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Margolis, Jack S.; Brothers, Alan M.; Tratt, David M.

    1987-01-01

    CO2 lidars have heretofore been used to measure water vapor concentrations primarily using the 10R(20) line at 10.247 microns, which has a strong overlap with a water vapor absorption line. This paper discusses the use of that line as well as other CO2 laser lines for which the absorption coefficients are weaker. The literature on measurement of water vapor absorption coefficients using CO2 lasers is reviewed, and the results from four laboratories are shown to be generally consistent with each other after they are normalized to the same partial pressure, temperature, and ethylene absorption coefficent for the 10P(14) CO2 laser line; however, the agreement with the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory's HITRAN and FASCOD 2 spectral data tapes is not good either for the water vapor absorption lines or for the water vapor continuum. Demonstration measurements of atmospheric water vapor have been conducted using the Mobile Atmospheric Pollutant Mapping System, a dual CO2 lidar system using heterodyne detection. Results are discussed for measurements using three sets of laser line pairs covering a wide range of water vapor partial pressures.

  9. Differential absorption radar techniques: water vapor retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, Luis; Lebsock, Matthew; Livesey, Nathaniel; Tanelli, Simone

    2016-06-01

    Two radar pulses sent at different frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor line can be used to determine total column water vapor and water vapor profiles (within clouds or precipitation) exploiting the differential absorption on and off the line. We assess these water vapor measurements by applying a radar instrument simulator to CloudSat pixels and then running end-to-end retrieval simulations. These end-to-end retrievals enable us to fully characterize not only the expected precision but also their potential biases, allowing us to select radar tones that maximize the water vapor signal minimizing potential errors due to spectral variations in the target extinction properties. A hypothetical CloudSat-like instrument with 500 m by ˜ 1 km vertical and horizontal resolution and a minimum detectable signal and radar precision of -30 and 0.16 dBZ, respectively, can estimate total column water vapor with an expected precision of around 0.03 cm, with potential biases smaller than 0.26 cm most of the time, even under rainy conditions. The expected precision for water vapor profiles was found to be around 89 % on average, with potential biases smaller than 77 % most of the time when the profile is being retrieved close to surface but smaller than 38 % above 3 km. By using either horizontal or vertical averaging, the precision will improve vastly, with the measurements still retaining a considerably high vertical and/or horizontal resolution.

  10. MMIC Receiver For Water-Vapor Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukamto, Lin M.; Cooley, Thomas W.; Janssen, Michael A.; Parks, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    MMIC receiver puts out signal, frequency of which proportioned to brightness temperature of sky at input frequency of 31 GHz. Miniaturization enhances thermal stability and stability of calibration of water-vapor radiometer. Potential for mass production at relatively low cost. Facilitating widespread use of MMIC water vapor radiometers in meteorology and aviation, deployed at several global sites to improve capability of general circulation models and at airports to monitor icing conditions by measuring supercooled liquid water in clouds.

  11. Water vapor radiometry research and development phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Chavez, M. C.; Yamane, N. L.; Barbier, K. M.; Chandlee, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the research and development phase for eight dual-channel water vapor radiometers constructed for the Crustal Dynamics Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, and for the NASA Deep Space Network. These instruments were developed to demonstrate that the variable path delay imposed on microwave radio transmissions by atmospheric water vapor can be calibrated, particularly as this phenomenon affects very long baseline interferometry measurement systems. Water vapor radiometry technology can also be used in systems that involve moist air meteorology and propagation studies.

  12. Gravity sensitivity of a resistojet water vaporizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. Earl

    1993-01-01

    A laboratory model of a water vaporizer for resistojet applications was designed, fabricated, and steady and transient characteristics were measured. Vaporizer operation was not impacted by rotation about a horizontal axis normal to its own. The vaporizer was operated under low and high accelerations aboard a jet aircraft for periods up to 25 s at flow rates ranging from 159(10)(exp -6) to 230(10)(exp -6) kg/s. Slight changes in inlet and outlet pressures and some heat exchanger temperatures were observed during the low-gravity tests. However, the results of these tests indicated probable compatibility of the vaporizer design tested with a low-gravity environment.

  13. Remote sensing of water vapor features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1993-01-01

    Water vapor plays a critical role in the atmosphere. It is an important medium of energy exchange between air, land, and water; it is a major greenhouse gas, providing a crucial radiative role in the global climate system; and it is intimately involved in many regional scale atmospheric processes. Our research has been aimed at improving satellite remote sensing of water vapor and better understanding its role in meteorological processes. Our early studies evaluated the current GOES VAS system for measuring water vapor and have used VAS-derived water vapor data to examine pre-thunderstorm environments. Much of that research was described at the 1991 Research Review. A second research component has considered three proposed sensors--the High resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), the Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). We have focused on MAMS and AMSU research during the past year and the accomplishments made in this effort are presented.

  14. Interaction of gases with lunar materials. [surface properties of lunar fines, especially on exposure to water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Gammage, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The surface properties of lunar fines were investigated. Results indicate that, for the most part, these properties are independent of the chemical composition and location of the samples on the lunar surface. The leaching of channels and pores by adsorbed water vapor is a distinguishing feature of their surface chemistry. The elements of air, if adsorbed in conjunction with water vapor or liquid water, severely impedes the leaching process. In the absence of air, liquid water is more effective than water vapor in attacking the grains. The characteristics of Apollo 17 orange fines were evaluated and compared with those of other samples. The interconnecting channels produced by water vapor adsorption were found to be wider than usual for other types of fines. Damage tracks caused by heavy cosmic ray nuclei and an unusually high halogen content might provide for stronger etching conditions upon exposure to water vapor.

  15. AVIRIS Spectrometer Maps Total Water Vapor Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.; Green, Robert O.; Carrere, Veronique; Margolis, Jack S.; Alley, Ronald E.; Vane, Gregg A.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Gary, Bruce L.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) processes maps of vertical-column abundances of water vapor in atmosphere with good precision and spatial resolution. Maps provide information for meteorology, climatology, and agriculture.

  16. Water vapor recovery from plant growth chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. J.; Newbold, D. D.; Colton, R. H.; Mccray, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is investigating the use of plant growth chambers (PGCs) for space missions and for bases on the moon and Mars. Key to successful development of PGCs is a system to recover and reuse the water vapor that is transpired from the leaves of the plants. A design is presented for a simple, reliable, membrane-based system that allows the recovery, purification, and reuse of the transpired water vapor through control of temperature and humidity levels in PGCs. The system is based on two membrane technologies: (1) dehumidification membrane modules to remove water vapor from the air, and (2) membrane contactors to return water vapor to the PGC (and, in doing so, to control the humidity and temperature within the PGC). The membrane-based system promises to provide an ideal, stable growth environment for a variety of plants, through a design that minimizes energy usage, volume, and mass, while maximizing simplicity and reliability.

  17. Anthropogenic water vapor emissions in Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwaki, Ryo; Kanda, Manabu; Senoo, Hiroshi; Hagishima, Aya; Kinouchi, Tsuyoshi

    2008-11-01

    Temporal and spatial variations in anthropogenic water vapor (AWV) emissions and anthropogenic heat (AH) in Tokyo were estimated using data from a geographic information system (GIS) and an energy-consumption database. The maximum value of AWV exceeded 500 W m-2 in summer in central Tokyo. Estimations of AWV were validated with field-measured data. The estimated and measured data agreed well, indicating that anthropogenic sources such as district cooling systems release large amounts of water vapor into the atmosphere.

  18. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2009-03-01

    Adsorbed water films strongly influence residual water saturations and hydraulic conductivities in porous media at low saturations. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media were investigated through combining Langmuir's film model with scaling analysis, without use of any adjustable parameters. Diffuse double layer influences are predicted to be important through the strong dependence of adsorbed water film thickness (f) on matric potential ({Psi}) and ion charge (z). Film thickness, film velocity, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are predicted to vary with z{sup -1}, z{sup -2}, and z{sup -3}, respectively. In monodisperse granular media, the characteristic grain size ({lambda}) controls film hydraulics through {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of (1) the perimeter length per unit cross sectional area over which films occur, (2) the critical matric potential ({Psi}{sub c}) below which films control flow, and (3) the magnitude of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity when {Psi} < {Psi}{sub c}. While it is recognized that finer textured sediments have higher unsaturated hydraulic conductivities than coarser sands at intermediate {Psi}, the {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of hydraulic conductivity predicted here extends this understanding to very low saturations where all pores are drained. Extremely low unsaturated hydraulic conductivities are predicted under adsorbed film-controlled conditions (generally < 0.1 mm y{sup -1}). On flat surfaces, the film hydraulic diffusivity is shown to be constant (invariant with respect to {Psi}).

  19. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kebabian, Paul

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma.

  20. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kebabian, P.

    1998-06-02

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma. 5 figs.

  1. Vacuum distillation/vapor filtration water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honegger, R. J.; Neveril, R. B.; Remus, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration (VD/VF) water recovery system are considered. As a functional model, the system converts urine and condensates waste water from six men to potable water on a steady-state basis. The system is designed for 180-day operating durations and for function on the ground, on zero-g aircraft, and in orbit. Preparatory tasks are summarized for conducting low gravity tests of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration system for recovering water from urine.

  2. DISTRIBUTION OF WATER VAPOR IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker; Snell, Ronald L.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Hollenbach, David J.; Kaufman, Michael J.; Li Di; Neufeld, David A. E-mail: vtolls@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu E-mail: mkaufman@email.sjsu.edu E-mail: neufeld@pha.jhu.edu

    2011-01-20

    We report the results of a large-area study of water vapor along the Orion Molecular Cloud ridge, the purpose of which was to determine the depth-dependent distribution of gas-phase water in dense molecular clouds. We find that the water vapor measured toward 77 spatial positions along the face-on Orion ridge, excluding positions surrounding the outflow associated with BN/KL and IRc2, display integrated intensities that correlate strongly with known cloud surface tracers such as CN, C{sub 2}H, {sup 13}CO J = 5-4, and HCN, and less well with the volume tracer N{sub 2}H{sup +}. Moreover, at total column densities corresponding to A{sub V}< 15 mag, the ratio of H{sub 2}O to C{sup 18}O integrated intensities shows a clear rise approaching the cloud surface. We show that this behavior cannot be accounted for by either optical depth or excitation effects, but suggests that gas-phase water abundances fall at large A{sub V}. These results are important as they affect measures of the true water-vapor abundance in molecular clouds by highlighting the limitations of comparing measured water-vapor column densities with such traditional cloud tracers as {sup 13}CO or C{sup 18}O. These results also support cloud models that incorporate freeze out of molecules as a critical component in determining the depth-dependent abundance of water vapor.

  3. Surface photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate: the role of adsorbed water in the formation of reduced nitrogen species on α-Fe2O3 particle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nanayakkara, Charith E; Jayaweera, Pradeep M; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Grassian, Vicki H

    2014-01-01

    The surface photochemistry of nitrate, formed from nitric acid adsorption, on hematite (α-Fe2O3) particle surfaces under different environmental conditions is investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following exposure of α-Fe2O3 particle surfaces to gas-phase nitric acid, a peak in the N1s region is seen at 407.4 eV; this binding energy is indicative of adsorbed nitrate. Upon broadband irradiation with light (λ > 300 nm), the nitrate peak decreases in intensity as a result of a decrease in adsorbed nitrate on the surface. Concomitant with this decrease in the nitrate coverage, there is the appearance of two lower binding energy peaks in the N1s region at 401.7 and 400.3 eV, due to reduced nitrogen species. The formation as well as the stability of these reduced nitrogen species, identified as NO(-) and N(-), are further investigated as a function of water vapor pressure. Additionally, irradiation of adsorbed nitrate on α-Fe2O3 generates three nitrogen gas-phase products including NO2, NO, and N2O. As shown here, different environmental conditions of water vapor pressure and the presence of molecular oxygen greatly influence the relative photoproduct distribution from nitrate surface photochemistry. The atmospheric implications of these results are discussed. PMID:24299394

  4. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in...

  9. Investigation of the adsorption of water vapor and carbon dioxide by KA zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Khanitonov, V.P.; Shtein, A.S.

    1984-05-01

    According to the present data, KA zeolite, which can adsorb only water vapor, helium, and hydrogen, has the greatest selectivity in drying. The feasibility of using this zeolite in devices for selective drying of gases used in gas-analysis systems was studied. The results of the experiments were approximated by the thermal equation of the theory of bulk filling of micropores. The limiting value of the adsorption depends on the temperature, and it can be calculated according to the density of the adsorbed phase and the adsorption volume. The critical diameters of the water and carbon dioxide molecules are close to the dimensions of the KA-zeolite pores, something that determines the activated nature of the adsorption of these substances. Experiments on coadsorption of water vapor and carbon dioxide by a fixed bed of KA-zeolite under dynamic conditions showed that the adsorption of these substances has a frontal nature. The time of the protective action of the layer of zeolite during adsorption af water vapor exceeded by more than an order the time of the protective action during adsorption of carbon dioxide. The results showed that this adsorbent can be used for selective drying of gas mixtures containing carbon dioxide in batch-operation devices. Beforehand, the adsorbent should be regenerated with respect to moisture, and then it should be saturated with carbon dioxide by blowing the adsorbent with a gas mixture of the working composition until the equilibrium state is reached.

  10. Detection of adsorbed water and hydroxyl on the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Data from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIAAS) on Cassini during its flyby of the AAoon in 1999 show a broad absorption at 3 micrometers due to adsorbed water and near 2.8 micrometers attributed to hydroxyl in the sunlit surface on the AAoon. The amounts of water indicated in the spectra depend on the type of mixing and the grain sizes in the rocks and soils but could be 10 to 1000 parts per million and locally higher. Water in the polar regions may be water that has migrated to the colder environments there. Trace hydroxyl is observed in the anorthositic highlands at lower latitudes.

  11. Adsorbent selection for endosulfan removal from water environment.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Y; Dikshit, A K

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to select a low cost adsorbing material for the removal of endosulfan [C,C'-(1,4,5,6,7,7-hexachloro-8,9,10- trinorborn-5-en-2,3-ylene)(dimethylsulphite)] from water. Various low cost adsorbents like wood charcoal, kimberlite tailings, silica, macro fungi sojar caju were tried with activated charcoal as reference material. The above materials were selected from various sources encompassing organic, inorganic, clayey, and biological sources. For the selection of suitable adsorbent for endosulfan uptake, maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax) was chosen as the parameter. Kinetic profiles of removal were generated for all the materials to assess the equilibrium time. Equilibrium studies were carried out for all materials to assess the adsorption equilibrium model that they followed. The model that gave the best correlation coefficient by linear regression analysis, was adopted for the calculation of Qmax of the corresponding adsorbent material. Using linearised forms of equilibrium models like Langmuir, BET, and Freundlich, maximum adsorptive capacities were determined. Activated charcoal showed the best adsorptive capacity with Qmax of 2.145 mg/g followed by wood charcoal 1.773 mg/g, sojar caju 1.575 mg/g, kimberlite tailings 0.8821 mg/g, and silica 0.3231 mg/g. Albeit activated charcoal gave better performance, it was not considered as a candidate material because of its high cost. Wood charcoal was the next best adsorbent with Qmax 1.773 mg/g. Therefore, wood charcoal was chosen as the best material for endosulfan removal. The study of physical and chemical characteristics of wood charcoal revealed that it is a potential adsorbent and can even be improved further. PMID:10048207

  12. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  13. Advanced Atmospheric Water Vapor DIAL Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; DeYoung, Russell J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor is very important for understanding the Earth's climate and water cycle. The remote sensing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is a powerful method to perform such measurement from aircraft and space. This thesis describes a new advanced detection system, which incorporates major improvements regarding sensitivity and size. These improvements include a low noise advanced avalanche photodiode detector, a custom analog circuit, a 14-bit digitizer, a microcontroller for on board averaging and finally a fast computer interface. This thesis describes the design and validation of this new water vapor DIAL detection system which was integrated onto a small Printed Circuit Board (PCB) with minimal weight and power consumption. Comparing its measurements to an existing DIAL system for aerosol and water vapor profiling validated the detection system.

  14. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit water vapor radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukamto, L. M.; Cooley, T. W.; Janssen, M. A.; Parks, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) is under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). WVR's are used to remotely sense water vapor and cloud liquid water in the atmosphere and are valuable for meteorological applications as well as for determination of signal path delays due to water vapor in the atmosphere. The high cost and large size of existing WVR instruments motivate the development of miniature MMIC WVR's, which have great potential for low cost mass production. The miniaturization of WVR components allows large scale deployment of WVR's for Earth environment and meteorological applications. Small WVR's can also result in improved thermal stability, resulting in improved calibration stability. Described here is the design and fabrication of a 31.4 GHz MMIC radiometer as one channel of a thermally stable WVR as a means of assessing MMIC technology feasibility.

  15. Detection of water vapor on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, H. P.; Fink, U.; Treffers, R.; Gautier, T. N., III

    1975-01-01

    High-altitude (12.4 km) spectroscopic observations of Jupiter at 5 microns from the NASA 91.5 cm airborne infrared telescope have revealed 14 absorptions assigned to the rotation-vibration spectrum of water vapor. Preliminary analysis indicates a mixing ratio about 1 millionth for the vapor phase of water. Estimates of temperature (greater than about 300 K) and pressure (less than 20 atm) suggest observation of water deep in Jupiter's hot spots responsible for its 5 micron flux. Model-atmosphere calculations based on radiative-transfer theory may change these initial estimates and provide a better physical picture of Jupiter's atmosphere below the visible cloud tops.

  16. EFFECTS OF COVAPORS ON ADSORPTION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF ORGANIC VAPORS ADSORBED ONTO ACTIVATED CARBON FROM FLOWING AIR

    SciTech Connect

    G. WOOD

    2000-12-01

    Published breakthrough time, adsorption rate, and capacity data for components of organic vapor mixtures adsorbed from flows through fixed activated carbon beds have been analyzed. Capacities (as stoichiometric centers of constant pattern breakthrough curves) yielded stoichiometric times {tau}, which are useful for determining elution orders of mixture components. We also calculated adsorption rate coefficients k{sub v} of the Wheeler (or, more general Reaction Kinetic) breakthrough curve equation, when not reported, from breakthrough times and {tau}. Ninety-five k{sub v} (in mixture)/ k{sub v} (single vapor) ratios at similar vapor concentrations were calculated and averaged for elution order categories. For 43 first-eluting vapors the average ratio (1.07) was statistically no different (0.21 standard deviation) than unity, so that we recommend using the single-vapor k{sub v} for such. Forty-seven second-eluting vapor ratios averaged 0.85 (0.24 standard deviation), also not significantly different from unity; however, other evidence and considerations lead us recommend using k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.85 k{sub v} (single vapor). Five third- and fourth-eluting vapors gave an average of 0.56 (0.16 standard deviation) for a recommended k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.56 k{sub v} (single vapor) for such.

  17. Relation between Water Vapor Adsorption Isotherms and Dynamic Dehumidification Performances of Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koji; Matsuguma, Shingo; Jin, Wei-Li; Okano, Hiroshi; Teraoka, Yasutake; Hirose, Tsutomu

    Desiccant rotors with different water vapor adsorption properties were fabricated by the synthesis of silica gels inside the honeycomb matrices. Dynamic dehumidification performances of the rotors were measured under different conditions and they were discussed in relation to water vapor adsorption isotherms. At the reactivation air temperatures of 80 and 140 oC, the best dynamic performance was observed with the rotor on which the adsorbed amount of water vapor at lower relative humidity was highest. When the reactivation air temperature was 50 oC, on the other hand, the rotor of which the isotherm exhibited monotonic and nearly linear increase up to higher relative humidity was the most suitable. The normalized changes of absolute humidity and adsorbed amount were defined, and these phenomena were analyzed. When the dependences of both parameters against the relative humidity were similar, the rotor showed the best dehumidification performance.

  18. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  19. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent packed bed. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the bed. Overall transfer coefficients of them as properties for the simulation were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was clarified that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer does not strongly depend on the air flow rate through the packed bed, the averaged equivalent mass transfer is governed by surface and pore diffusion in a particle of adsorbent at low flow rate. Moreover, the coefficient during the adsorption process is slightly larger than desorption. An equation of the overall mass transfer coefficient is derived. It shows five times as large as the value estimated by experiment. Therefore, the correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  20. Induced Potential in Porous Carbon Films through Water Vapor Absorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Yang, Peihua; Li, Song; Li, Jia; Ding, Tianpeng; Xue, Guobin; Chen, Qian; Feng, Guang; Zhou, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Sustainable electrical potential of tens of millivolts can be induced by water vapor adsorption on a piece of porous carbon film that has two sides with different functional group contents. Integrated experiments, and Monte Carlo and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the induced potential originates from the nonhomogeneous distribution of functional groups along the film, especially carboxy groups. Sufficient adsorbed water molecules in porous carbon facilitate the release of protons from the carboxy groups, resulting in a potential drop across the carbon film because of the concentration difference of the released free protons on the two sides. The potential utilization of such a phenomenon is also demonstrated by a self-powered humidity sensor. PMID:27159427

  1. Water Vapor in an Unexpected Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    The protoplanetary disk around DoAr 44 is fairly ordinary in most ways. But a recent study has found that this disk contains water vapor in its inner regions the first such discovery for a disk of its type.Drying Out DisksDoAr 44 is a transitional disk: a type of protoplanetary disk that has been at least partially cleared of small dust grains in the inner regions of the disk. This process is thought to happen as a result of dynamical interactions with a protoplanet embedded in the disk; the planet clears out a gap as it orbits.A schematic of the differences between a full protoplanetary disk, a pre-transitional disk, and a transitional disk. [Catherine Espaillat] Classical protoplanetary disks surrounding young, low-mass stars often contain water vapor, but transitional disks are typically dry no water vapor is detected from the disk inner regions. This is probably because water vapor is easily dissociated by far-UV radiation from the young, hot star. Once the dust is cleared out from the inner regions of the disk, the water vapor is no longer shielded from the UV radiation, so the disk dries out.Enter the exception: DoAr 44. The disk in this system doesnt have a fully cleared inner region, which labels it pre-transitional. Its composed of an inner ring out to 2 AU, a cleared gap between 2 and 36 AU, and then the outer disk. What makes DoAr 44 unusual, however, is that its the only disk with a large inner gap known to harbor detectable quantities of water vapor. The authors of this study ask a key question: where is this water vapor located?Unusual SystemLed by Colette Salyk (NOAO and Vassar College), the authors examined the system using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, a visiting instrument on the Gemini North telescope. They discovered that the water vapor emission originates from about 0.3 AU the inner disk region, where terrestrial-type planets may well be forming.Both dust-shielding and water self-shielding seem to have protected this water

  2. A FGGE water vapor wind data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Tod R.; Hayden, Christopher M.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time that water vapor structure visible in infrared imagery offers a potential for obtaining motion vectors when several images are considered in sequence (Fischer et al., 1981). A study evaluating water vapor winds obtained from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (Stewart et al., 1985) has confirmed the viability of the approach. More recently, 20 data sets have been produced from METEOSAT water vapor imagery for the FGGE period of 10-25 November 1979. Where possible, two data sets were prepared for each day at 0000 and 1200 GMT and compared with rawinsondes over Europe, Africa, and aircraft observations over the oceans. Procedures for obtaining winds were, in general, similar to the earlier study. Motions were detected both by a single pixel tracking and a cross correlation method by using three images individually separated by one hour. A height assignment was determined by matching the measured brightness temperature to the temperature structure represented by the FGGE-IIIB analyses. Results show that the METEOSAT water vapor winds provide uniform horizontal coverage of mid-level flow over the globe with good accuracy.

  3. Water adsorbate influence on the Cu(110) surface optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghbanpourasl, Amirreza; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Denk, Mariella; Cobet, Christoph; Hohage, Michael; Zeppenfeld, Peter; Hingerl, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Surface reflectance anisotropy may be utilized for characterizing surfaces, interfaces, and adsorption structures. Here, the reflectance anisotropy and surface dielectric functions of the thermodynamically most favored water adsorbate structures on the Cu(110) surface (i.e. hexagonal bilayers, pentagonal chains, and partially dissociated water structures) are calculated from density-functional theory and compared with recent experimental data. It is shown that the water overlayer structures modify in a geometry-specific way the optical anisotropy of the bare surface which can be exploited for in situ determination of the adsorption structures. For hexagonal bilayer overlayer geometries, strong features in the vacuum ultraviolet region are predicted. The theoretical analysis shows a noticeable influence of intraband transitions also for higher photon energies and rather slight influences of the van der Waals interaction on the spectral signatures. Water induced strain effects on the surface optical response are found to be negligible.

  4. Utility of adsorbents in the purification of drinking water: a review of characterization, efficiency and safety evaluation of various adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Shashi Prabha; Gopal, Krishna; Bersillon, J L

    2009-05-01

    Clean drinking water is one of the implicit requisites fora healthy human population. However the growing industrialization and extensive use of chemicals for various concerns, has increased the burden of unwanted pollutants in the drinking water of developing countries like India. The entry of potentially hazardous substances into the biota has been magnifying day by day. In the absence of a possible stoppage of these, otherwise, useful chemicals, the only way to maintain safer water bodies is to develop efficient purifying technologies. One such immensely beneficial procedure that has been in use is that of purification of water using 'adsorbents'. Indigenous minerals and natural plants products have potential for removing many pollutants viz. fluoride, arsenic, nitrate, heavy metals, pesticides as well as trihalomethanes. Adsorbents which are derived from carbon, alumina, zeolite, clay minerals, iron ores, industrial by products, and natural products viz. parts of the plants, herbs and algal biomass offer promising potential of removal. In the recent years attention has been paid to develop process involving screening/pretreatment/activation/impregnation using alkalies, acids, alum, lime, manganese dioxide, ferric chloride and other chemicals which are found to enhance their adsorbing efficiency. Chemical characterization of these adsorbents recapitulates the mechanism of the process. It is imperative to observe that capacities of the adsorbents may vary depending on the characteristics, chemical modifications and concentration of the individual adsorbent. Removal kinetics is found to be based on the experimental conditions viz. pH, concentration of the adsorbate, quantity of the adsorbent and temperature. It is suggested that isotherm model is suitable tool to assess the adsorption capacities in batch and column modes. Safety evaluation and risk assessment of the process/products may be useful to provide guidelines for its sustainable disposal. PMID:20120453

  5. Titanate-based adsorbents for radioactive ions entrapment from water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjiang; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2013-03-21

    This feature article reviews some titanate-based adsorbents for the removal of radioactive wastes (cations and anions) from water. At the beginning, we discuss the development of the conventional ion-exchangeable titanate powders for the entrapment of radioactive cations, such as crystalline silicotitanate (CST), monosodium titanate (MST), peroxotitanate (PT). Then, we specially emphasize the recent progress in the uptake of radioactive ions by one-dimensional (1D) sodium titanate nanofibers and nanotubes, which includes the synthesis and phase transformation of the 1D nanomaterials, adsorption ability (capacity, selectivity, kinetics, etc.) of radioactive cations and anions, and the structural evolution during the adsorption process. PMID:23412572

  6. Tunable lasers for water vapor measurements and other lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, R. W.; Mcilrath, T. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    A tunable dye laser suitable for differential absorption (DIAL) measurements of water vapor in the troposphere was constructed. A multi-pass absorption cell for calibration was also constructed for use in atmospheric DIAL measurements of water vapor.

  7. Use of Ni/NixB Nanoparticles as a Novel Adsorbent for the Preconcentration of Mercury Species prior to Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometric Determination.

    PubMed

    Yayayürük, Onur; Henden, Emür

    2016-01-01

    A selective matrix separation/enrichment method, utilizing a simple batch procedure with nickel/nickel boride (Ni/NixB) nanoparticles was proposed for the determination of inorganic mercury(II), Hg(2+) and methyl mercury(I), CH3Hg(+) in waters prior to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). The Ni/NixB nanoparticles, were synthesized by the chemical reduction of Ni(II) to Ni/NixB. The novel adsorbent was selective to Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) species between pH values of 4 - 10. Both of the mercury species were recovered from the adsorbent using 1.0 mol L(-1) hot HNO3 with high efficiency. It was observed that the adsorbent selectively removed Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) from the bulk solution in the presence of several competitor ions (As(3+), Sb(3+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Fe(3+)) with ≥96% adsorption. The limit of detection (3σ above blank) was found to be 1.8 ng L(-1) with a preconcentration factor of 20. The validation of the method was tested through spike recovery experiments with several water samples (tap and seawater) at μg L(-1) concentration levels, and all recovery values were found to vary between 95 and 105%. PMID:27506713

  8. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

    2012-12-05

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

  9. NONPHOTOCHEMICAL DECOMPOSITION OF FLUORENE VAPOR-ADSORBED ON COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluorene is representative of a group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that have been shown to exhibit oxidation in the absence of light when adsorbed on fly ash. The present study examines this process for fluorene in detail. Fluorene has been adsorbed on several different fl...

  10. Seasonal variability of mesospheric water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, P. R.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Wilson, W. J.; Ricketts, W. B.; Howard, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-based spectral line measurements of the 22.2 GHz atmospheric water vapor line in emission were made at the JPL in order to obtain data in a dry climate, and to confirm similar measurements made at the Haystack Observatory. The results obtained from March 1984 to July 1984 and from December 1984 to May 1985, were based on data recorded by a HP9816 microcomputer. The instrument spectrometer was a 64 channel, 62.5 kHz resolution filter bank. Data indicates the existence of a seasonal variation in the abundance of water vapor in the upper mesosphere, with mixing ratios higher in summer than in spring. This is consistent with recent theoretical and observational results. In the area of semiannual oscillation, Haystack data are more consistent than those of JPL, indicating an annual cycle with abundances at maximum in summer and minimum in winter.

  11. Adsorbed water and thin liquid films on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxe, C. S.; Hand, K. P.; Nealson, K. H.; Yung, Y. L.; Yen, A. S.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2012-07-01

    At present, bulk liquid water on the surface and near-subsurface of Mars does not exist due to the scarcity of condensed- and gas-phase water, pressure and temperature constraints. Given that the nuclei of soil and ice, that is, the soil solid and ice lattice, respectively, are coated with adsorbed and/or thin liquid films of water well below 273 K and the availability of water limits biological activity, we quantify lower and upper limits for the thickness of such adsorbed/water films on the surface of the Martian regolith and for subsurface ice. These limits were calculated based on experimental and theoretical data for pure water ice and water ice containing impurities, where water ice containing impurities exhibit thin liquid film enhancements, ranging from 3 to 90. Close to the cold limit of water stability (i.e. 273 K), thin liquid film thicknesses at the surface of the Martian regolith is 0.06 nm (pure water ice) and ranges from 0.2 to 5 nm (water ice with impurities). An adsorbed water layer of 0.06 nm implies a dessicated surface as the thickness of one monolayer of water is 0.3 nm but represents 0.001-0.02% of the Martian atmospheric water vapour inventory. Taking into account the specific surface area (SSA) of surface-soil (i.e. top 1 mm of regolith and 0.06 nm adsorbed water layer), shows Martian surface-soil may contain interfacial water that represents 6-66% of the upper- and lower-limit atmospheric water vapour inventory and almost four times and 33%, the lower- and upper-limit Martian atmospheric water vapour inventory. Similarly, taking the SSA of Martian soil, the top 1 mm or regolith at 5 nm thin liquid water thickness, yields 1.10×1013 and 6.50×1013 litres of waters, respectively, 55-325 times larger than Mars' atmospheric water vapour inventory. Film thicknesses of 0.2 and 5 nm represent 2.3×104-1.5×106 litres of water, which is 6.0×10-7-4.0×10-4%, respectively, of a 10 pr μm water vapour column, and 3.0×10-6-4.0×10-4% and 6.0×10

  12. Quality and Control of Water Vapor Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from the geostationary satellites such as GOES, Meteosat, and GMS provides synoptic views of dynamical events on a continual basis. Because the imagery represents a non-linear combination of mid- and upper-tropospheric thermodynamic parameters (three-dimensional variations in temperature and humidity), video loops of these image products provide enlightening views of regional flow fields, the movement of tropical and extratropical storm systems, the transfer of moisture between hemispheres and from the tropics to the mid- latitudes, and the dominance of high pressure systems over particular regions of the Earth. Despite the obvious larger scale features, the water vapor imagery contains significant image variability down to the single 8 km GOES pixel. These features can be quantitatively identified and tracked from one time to the next using various image processing techniques. Merrill et al. (1991), Hayden and Schmidt (1992), and Laurent (1993) have documented the operational procedures and capabilities of NOAA and ESOC to produce cloud and water vapor winds. These techniques employ standard correlation and template matching approaches to wind tracking and use qualitative and quantitative procedures to eliminate bad wind vectors from the wind data set. Techniques have also been developed to improve the quality of the operational winds though robust editing procedures (Hayden and Veldon 1991). These quality and control approaches have limitations, are often subjective, and constrain wind variability to be consistent with model derived wind fields. This paper describes research focused on the refinement of objective quality and control parameters for water vapor wind vector data sets. New quality and control measures are developed and employed to provide a more robust wind data set for climate analysis, data assimilation studies, as well as operational weather forecasting. The parameters are applicable to cloud-tracked winds as well with minor

  13. Improved cell for water-vapor electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aylward, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous-flow electrolytic cells decompose water vapor in steam and room air into hydrogen and oxygen. Sintered iridium oxide catalytic anode coating yields dissociation rates hundredfold greater than those obtained using platinum black. Cell consists of two mirror-image cells, with dual cathode sandwiched between two anodes. Gas traverses serpentine channels within cell and is dissociated at anode. Oxygen mingles with gas stream, while hydrogen migrates through porous matrix and is liberated as gas at cathode.

  14. Broad band airborne water vapor radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Peter M.

    An infrared radiometer with a pass band of 280 to 520 cm-1 (35.7 to 19.2 µm) is employed on the NASA Ames Research Center U-2 and C-141A aircraft in the measurement of water vapor burden in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Coincidentally with altitude changes the water vapor mass mixing ratio is also inferred by observing the change in optical depth over a known vertical distance. Data from the December 1980 U-2 Water Vapor Exchange Experiment over the Panama Canal Zone adds to the concept that overshooting cumulonimbus towers “moisten” the lower stratosphere. The average mass mixing ratio in close proximity to or above such towers ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 parts per million above 18 km while the average background mass mixing ratio is only 2.9 parts per million. Generally the lowest background mixing ratios, averaging 2.6 parts per million occurred in the 18 to 21 km layer. For the same levels background Panama mass mixing ratios averaged from 1.0 to 3.0 parts per million higher than in middle latitudes.

  15. Removal of acutely hazardous pharmaceuticals from water using multi-template imprinted polymer adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Avinash; Chopra, Nikita; Krupadam, Reddithota J

    2014-05-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer adsorbent has been prepared to remove a group of recalcitrant and acutely hazardous (p-type) chemicals from water and wastewaters. The polymer adsorbent exhibited twofold higher adsorption capacity than the commercially used polystyrene divinylbenzene resin (XAD) and powdered activated carbon adsorbents. Higher adsorption capacity of the polymer adsorbent was explained on the basis of high specific surface area formed during molecular imprinting process. Freundlich isotherms drawn showed that the adsorption of p-type chemicals onto polymer adsorbent was kinetically faster than the other reference adsorbents. Matrix effect on adsorption of p-type chemicals was minimal, and also polymer adsorbent was amenable to regeneration by washing with water/methanol (3:1, v/v) solution. The polymer adsorbent was unaltered in its adsorption capacity up to 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption, which will be more desirable in cost reduction of treatment compared with single-time-use activated carbon. PMID:24499987

  16. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent rotor. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the rotor block. Overall transfer coefficients were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was examined that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer coefficient was not constant. It seems that both film fluid and diffusion resistance govern the coefficients in the block, and the influence of air flow on the time averaged coefficients is estimated by a considering the laminar forced convection from a flat plate. There is little difference of the coefficient between adsorption and desorption process. The correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  17. Kinetics of water vapor sorption on porous glass as a method of porometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreisberg, V. A.; Rakcheev, V. P.

    2014-09-01

    Equilibrium low temperature nitrogen adsorption and a new method based on the kinetics of water vapor sorption at room temperature are used for a comparative study of pore morphology of high-silica porous glass. The values of the total pore volume, the specific surfaces, the effective mesopore diameters, and the fraction of each mode in the total mesopore volume are established using both techniques. It is found that the rate of water vapor sorption at constant pressure grows in inverse ratio to the diameter of cylindrical menisci in pores. The time dependence of the volume of adsorbed water is linear, while the characteristic time of filling for each pore mode varies directly with the square of the effective pore mode diameter. The proposed new kinetic porometry technique based on analyzing water vapor adsorption kinetics at room temperature is quite simple as it requires no complicated vacuum equipment and allows the simultaneous examination of large numbers of porous material samples.

  18. The role of adsorbed water on the friction of a layer of submicron particles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sammis, Charles G.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Ze’ev

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously low values of friction observed in layers of submicron particles deformed in simple shear at high slip velocities are explained as the consequence of a one nanometer thick layer of water adsorbed on the particles. The observed transition from normal friction with an apparent coefficient near μ = 0.6 at low slip speeds to a coefficient near μ = 0.3 at higher slip speeds is attributed to competition between the time required to extrude the water layer from between neighboring particles in a force chain and the average lifetime of the chain. At low slip speeds the time required for extrusion is less than the average lifetime of a chain so the particles make contact and lock. As slip speed increases, the average lifetime of a chain decreases until it is less than the extrusion time and the particles in a force chain never come into direct contact. If the adsorbed water layer enables the otherwise rough particles to rotate, the coefficient of friction will drop to μ = 0.3, appropriate for rotating spheres. At the highest slip speeds particle temperatures rise above 100°C, the water layer vaporizes, the particles contact and lock, and the coefficient of friction rises to μ = 0.6. The observed onset of weakening at slip speeds near 0.001 m/s is consistent with the measured viscosity of a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water, with a minimum particle radius of approximately 20 nm, and with reasonable assumptions about the distribution of force chains guided by experimental observation. The reduction of friction and the range of velocities over which it occurs decrease with increasing normal stress, as predicted by the model. Moreover, the analysis predicts that this high-speed weakening mechanism should operate only for particles with radii smaller than approximately 1 μm. For larger particles the slip speed required for weakening is so large that frictional heating will evaporate the adsorbed water and weakening will not occur.

  19. Transient water vapor at Europa's south pole.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lorenz; Saur, Joachim; Retherford, Kurt D; Strobel, Darrell F; Feldman, Paul D; McGrath, Melissa A; Nimmo, Francis

    2014-01-10

    In November and December 2012, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaged Europa's ultraviolet emissions in the search for vapor plume activity. We report statistically significant coincident surpluses of hydrogen Lyman-α and oxygen OI 130.4-nanometer emissions above the southern hemisphere in December 2012. These emissions were persistently found in the same area over the 7 hours of the observation, suggesting atmospheric inhomogeneity; they are consistent with two 200-km-high plumes of water vapor with line-of-sight column densities of about 10(20) per square meter. Nondetection in November 2012 and in previous HST images from 1999 suggests varying plume activity that might depend on changing surface stresses based on Europa's orbital phases. The plume was present when Europa was near apocenter and was not detected close to its pericenter, in agreement with tidal modeling predictions. PMID:24336567

  20. Water Vapor Effects on Silica-Forming Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Silica-forming ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 are proposed for applications in combustion environments. These environments contain water vapor as a product of combustion. Oxidation of silica-formers is more rapid in water vapor than in oxygen. Parabolic oxidation rates increase with the water vapor partial pressure with a power law exponent value close to one. Molecular water vapor is therefore the mobile species in silica. Rapid oxidation rates and large amounts of gases generated during the oxidation reaction in high water vapor pressures may result in bubble formation in the silica and nonprotective scale formation. It is also shown that silica reacts with water vapor to form Si(OH)4(g). Silica volatility has been modeled using a laminar flow boundary layer controlled reaction equation. Silica volatility depends on the partial pressure of water vapor, the total pressure, and the gas velocity. Simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions have been modeled with paralinear kinetics.

  1. Adsorption of water vapor by homoionic montmorillonites: Heats of adsorption and desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dios Cancela, G.; Huertas, F.J.; Romero Taboada, E.; Sanchez-Rasero, F.; Hernandez Laguna, A.

    1997-01-15

    Adsorption isotherms for water vapor, basal spacing, and immersion heats and water desorption heats of Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} montmorillonite are measured at various relative humidities (r.h.). The amount of water adsorbed as a function of r.h. is found to increase gradually, whereas basal spacing increases and the adsorption heat decreases in steps. The water desorption heat also decreases in steps. The entropy of adsorbed water appears to be negative with respect to the entropy of liquid water. A theoretical model is proposed to describe the hydration process of Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} montmorillonites. The experimental adsorption heats are found to have a direct relationship with the sum of the hydration energy of the cations plus expansion energy.

  2. Effects of vertical distribution of water vapor and temperature on total column water vapor retrieval error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Jielun

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a test of the physically based total column water vapor retrieval algorithm of Wentz (1992) for sensitivity to realistic vertical distributions of temperature and water vapor. The ECMWF monthly averaged temperature and humidity fields are used to simulate the spatial pattern of systematic retrieval error of total column water vapor due to this sensitivity. The estimated systematic error is within 0.1 g/sq cm over about 70 percent of the global ocean area; systematic errors greater than 0.3 g/sq cm are expected to exist only over a few well-defined regions, about 3 percent of the global oceans, assuming that the global mean value is unbiased.

  3. Daytime Raman lidar measurements of water vapor during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Goldsmith, J.E.M.

    1998-04-01

    Because of the importance of water vapor, the ARM program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its CART (Cloud And Radiation Testbed) site. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. These IOPs provided an excellent opportunity to compare measurements from other systems with those made by the CART Raman lidar. This paper addresses primarily the daytime water vapor measurements made by the lidar system during the second of these IOPs.

  4. Poliovirus concentration from tap water with electropositive adsorbent filters.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, M D; Glass, J S

    1980-08-01

    Simple, reliable, and efficient concentration of poliovirus from tap water was obtained with two types of electropositive filter media, one of which is available in the form of a pleated cartridge filter (Virozorb 1MDS). Virus adsorption from tap water between pH 3.5 and 7.5 was more efficient with electropositive filters than with Filterite filters. Elution of adsorbed viruses was more efficient with beef extract in glycine, pH 9.5, than with glycine-NaOH, pH 11.0. In paired comparative studies, electropositive filters, with adsorption at pH 7.5 and no added polyvalent cation salts, gave less variable virus concentration efficiencies than did Filterite filters with adsorption at pH 3.5 plus added MgCl2. Recovery of poliovirus from 1,000-liter tap water volumes was approximately 30% efficient with both Virozorb 1MDS and Filterite pleated cartridge filters, but the former were much simpler to use. The virus adsorption behavior of these filters appears to be related to their surface charge properties, with more electropositive filters giving more efficient virus adsorption from tap water at higher pH levels. PMID:6258472

  5. Radiometric remote sensing of mesospheric and stratospheric water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croskey, Charles L.; Olivero, John J.; Martone, Joseph P.

    1991-01-01

    The remote sensing of stratospheric and mesospheric water vapor by microwave and millimeter radiometry is described. The received radiation is emitted by and interacts with all levels of the atmosphere. The pressure dependence of the linewidth for the absorption cross section of water vapor permits retrieval of vapor mixing ratios. The 183.31-GHz line of water vapor can also be used for remote sensing of the water vapor concentration in the upper atmosphere, but due to the much stronger absorption cross section for this line, ground-based observations are difficult. To date all measurements at 183 GHz have been made from platforms above the troposphere.

  6. Thermal effects in nano-sized adsorbate islands growth processes at vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, Vasyl O.; Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Dvornichenko, Alina V.

    2016-02-01

    We study a model of pattern formation in adsorptive systems with a local change in the surface temperature due to adsorption/desorption processes. It is found that thermal effects shrink the domain of main system parameters, when pattern formation is possible. It is shown that an increase in a surface reheat efficiency delays ordering processes. We have found that a distribution of adsorbate islands over sizes depends on relaxation and reheat processes. We have shown that the mean linear size of stationary adsorbate islands is of nano-meter range.

  7. Water vapor measurements by Raman lidar during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Whiteman, D.N.; Schwemmer, G.K.; Evans, K.D. |; Melfi, S.H.; Goldsmith, J.E.

    1998-04-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, as it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter of radiation, and it also plays an important role in energy transport and cloud formation. Accurate, high resolution measurements of this variable are critical in order to improve the understanding of these processes and thus their ability to model them. Because of the importance of water vapor, the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. The ARM CART site is the home of several different water vapor measurement systems. These systems include a Raman lidar, a microwave radiometer, a radiosonde launch site, and an instrumented tower. During these IOPs, additional instrumentation was brought to the site to augment the normal measurements in the attempt to characterize the CART instruments and to address the need to improve water vapor measurement capabilities. Some of the instruments brought to the CART site include a scanning Raman lidar system from NASA/GSFC, additional microwave radiometers from NOAA/ETL, a chilled mirror that was flown on a tethersonde and kite system, and dewpoint hygrometer instruments flow on the North Dakota Citation. This paper will focus on the Raman lidar intercomparisons from the second IOP.

  8. An approach to evaluate the absolute accuracy of WVR water vapor measurements inferred from multiple water vapor techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhizhao; Li, Min; Zhong, Weikun; Wong, Man Sing

    2013-12-01

    This paper uses three different types of water vapor observation instruments, radiosonde, AERONET sunphotometer and GPS, to infer the regression coefficients of one WVR (model: WVR-1100) in Hong Kong - a coastal city with high humidity. The regression using the three types of reference water vapor data is performed on a monthly basis for 6 months from January to June 2012. In order to evaluate the WVR regression accuracies, a water vapor-assisted (WV-assisted) GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method is proposed. The inferred water vapor data are directly injected into PPP computation to correct the water vapor wet tropospheric delay in GPS signals. In principle, water vapor of better accuracy will produce GPS PPP solutions of higher accuracy. Our analysis results show that the radiosonde, AERONET and GPS data all can be used to regress WVR and produce accurate WVR water vapor if the regressed instruments have good data quality. We find that the WVR water vapor inferred from GPS water vapor regression has the most reliable regression results. The vertical component of PPP solutions is very stable, with consistent biases (bias varying by 0.38 cm) and standard deviations (bias variation by 0.59 cm) over a 6-month period in 2012. When sufficient AEROENT water vapor data are available for WVR regression, the WVR water vapor accuracy will become compatible with that inferred from GPS water vapor regression. However AERONET water vapor measurements are seriously affected by weather condition and can be obtained only in sunny and clear conditions. Compared with the bias variation of 0.38 cm using GPS water vapor to regress WVR, the WVR water vapor data regressed by radiosonde result in a bias variation of 3.95 cm in the PPP vertical component during the 6-month period. All of the regressed WVR contain a bias, which possibly results from the fact that the WVR, GPS, AERONET and radiosonde stations are all horizontally and vertically separated. Overall, the WVR water vapor

  9. Solute rotational dynamics at the water liquid/vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2007-11-01

    The rotational dynamics of a number of diatomic molecules adsorbed at different locations at the interface between water and its own vapors are studied using classical molecular dynamics computer simulations. Both equilibrium orientational and energy correlations and nonequilibrium orientational and energy relaxation correlations are calculated. By varying the dipole moment of the molecule and its location, and by comparing the results with those in bulk water, the effects of dielectric and mechanical frictions on reorientation dynamics and on rotational energy relaxation can be studied. It is shown that for nonpolar and weekly polar solutes, the equilibrium orientational relaxation is much slower in the bulk than at the interface. As the solute becomes more polar, the rotation slows down and the surface and bulk dynamics become similar. The energy relaxation (both equilibrium and nonequilibrium) has the opposite trend with the solute dipole (larger dipoles relax faster), but here again the bulk and surface results converge as the solute dipole is increased. It is shown that these behaviors correlate with the peak value of the solvent-solute radial distribution function, which demonstrates the importance of the first hydration shell structure in determining the rotational dynamics and dependence of these dynamics on the solute dipole and location.

  10. Water vapor permeabilities through polymers: diffusivities from experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seethamraju, Sindhu; Chandrashekarapura Ramamurthy, Praveen; Madras, Giridhar

    2014-09-01

    This study experimentally determines water vapor permeabilities, which are subsequently correlated with the diffusivities obtained from simulations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used for determining the diffusion of water vapor in various polymeric systems such as polyethylene, polypropylene, poly (vinyl alcohol), poly (vinyl acetate), poly (vinyl butyral), poly (vinylidene chloride), poly (vinyl chloride) and poly (methyl methacrylate). Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) based methodology has been used to determine the water vapor transmission rates. These values were then used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for water vapor through these polymers. A comparative analysis is provided for diffusivities calculated from CRDS and MD based results by correlating the free volumes.

  11. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1973-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft has been developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on NASA and USAF aircraft. Water vapor measurements were conducted up to 40,000 feet with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 feet.

  12. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1974-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft was developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on the NASA Convair 990 and on a USAF B-57 aircraft. Water vapor measurements from the Convair 990 were conducted up to 40,000 ft with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 ft.

  13. The relationship between clear sky water vapor and SST anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas C.; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between clear sky water vapor anomalies and the SST anomalies (SSTAs) was investigated with the purpose of providing data for evaluating the clear sky greenhouse effect predicted in many global warming scenarios, by statistically analyzing anomaly data sets of SST and the water vapor anomaly data (obtained by subtracting the mean value of the six years of data for a given month from the observed values). Results show that clear sky water vapor anomalies increase in association with increases in SSTAs. The clear sky water vapor anomalies high in the troposphere were also found to increase with increasing SSTA.

  14. Advanced Water Vapor Lidar Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1998-01-01

    In the present water vapor lidar system, the detected signal is sent over long cables to a waveform digitizer in a CAMAC crate. This has the disadvantage of transmitting analog signals for a relatively long distance, which is subjected to pickup noise, leading to a decrease in the signal to noise ratio. Generally, errors in the measurement of water vapor with the DIAL method arise from both random and systematic sources. Systematic errors in DIAL measurements are caused by both atmospheric and instrumentation effects. The selection of the on-line alexandrite laser with a narrow linewidth, suitable intensity and high spectral purity, and its operation at the center of the water vapor lines, ensures minimum influence in the DIAL measurement that are caused by the laser spectral distribution and avoid system overloads. Random errors are caused by noise in the detected signal. Variability of the photon statistics in the lidar return signal, noise resulting from detector dark current, and noise in the background signal are the main sources of random error. This type of error can be minimized by maximizing the signal to noise ratio. The increase in the signal to noise ratio can be achieved by several ways. One way is to increase the laser pulse energy, by increasing its amplitude or the pulse repetition rate. Another way, is to use a detector system with higher quantum efficiency and lower noise, on the other hand, the selection of a narrow band optical filter that rejects most of the day background light and retains high optical efficiency is an important issue. Following acquisition of the lidar data, we minimize random errors in the DIAL measurement by averaging the data, but this will result in the reduction of the vertical and horizontal resolutions. Thus, a trade off is necessary to achieve a balance between the spatial resolution and the measurement precision. Therefore, the main goal of this research effort is to increase the signal to noise ratio by a factor of

  15. Holographic studies of the vapor explosion of vaporizing water-in-fuel emulsion droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Hess, C. F.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Holographic studies were performed which examined the fragmentation process during vapor explosion of a water-in-fuel (hexadecane/water) emulsion droplet. Holograms were taken at 700 to 1000 microseconds after the vapor explosion. Photographs of the reconstructed holograms reveal a wide range of fragment droplet sizes created during the explosion process. Fragment droplet diameters range from below 10 microns to over 100 microns. It is estimated that between ten thousand and a million fragment droplets can result from this extremely violent vapor explosion process. This enhanced atomization is thus expected to have a pronounced effect on vaporization processes which are present during combustion of emulsified fuels.

  16. Oil palm biomass-based adsorbents for the removal of water pollutants--a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanweer; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ghazali, Arniza; Sulaiman, Othman; Hashim, Rokiah

    2011-07-01

    This article presents a review on the role of oil palm biomass (trunks, fronds, leaves, empty fruit bunches, shells, etc.) as adsorbents in the removal of water pollutants such as acid and basic dyes, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, various gaseous pollutants, and so on. Numerous studies on adsorption properties of various low-cost adsorbents, such as agricultural wastes and its based activated carbons, have been reported in recent years. Studies have shown that oil palm-based adsorbent, among the low-cost adsorbents mentioned, is the most promising adsorbent for removing water pollutants. Further, these bioadsorbents can be chemically modified for better efficiency and can undergo multiple reuses to enhance their applicability at an industrial scale. It is evident from a literature survey of more than 100 recent papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants. The conclusion is been drawn from the reviewed literature, and suggestions for future research are proposed. PMID:21929380

  17. Effect of Increased Water Vapor Levels on TBC Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Garner, George Walter; Lowe, Tracie M; Haynes, James A; Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of increased water vapor levels on thermal barrier coating (TBC) lifetime, furnace cycle tests were performed at 1150 C in air with 10 vol.% water vapor (similar to natural gas combustion) and 90 vol.%. Either Pt diffusion or Pt-modified aluminide bond coatings were applied to specimens from the same batch of a commercial second-generation single-crystal superalloy and commercial vapor-deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats were applied. Three coatings of each type were furnace cycled to failure to compare the average lifetimes obtained in dry O{sub 2}, using the same superalloy batch and coating types. Average lifetimes with Pt diffusion coatings were unaffected by the addition of water vapor. In contrast, the average lifetime of Pt-modified aluminide coatings was reduced by more than 50% with 10% water vapor but only slightly reduced by 90% water vapor. Based on roughness measurements from similar specimens without a YSZ coating, the addition of 10% water vapor increased the rate of coating roughening more than 90% water vapor. Qualitatively, the amount of {beta}-phase depletion in the coatings exposed in 10% water vapor did not appear to be accelerated.

  18. Preliminary characterization of a water vaporizer for resistojet applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. Earl

    1992-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted to explore the characteristics of a water vaporizer intended for application to resistojet propulsion systems. The objectives of these tests were to (1) observe the effect of orientation with respect to gravity on vaporizer stability, (2) characterize vaporizer efficiency and outlet conditions over a range of flow rates, and (3) measure the thrust performance of a vaporizer/resistojet thruster assembly. A laboratory model of a forced-flow, once-through water vaporizer employing a porous heat exchange medium was built and characterized over a range of flow rates and power levels of interest for application to water resistojets. In a test during which the vaporizer was rotated about a horizontal axis normal to its own axis, the outlet temperature and mass flow rate through the vaporizer remained steady. Throttlability to 30 percent of the maximum flow rate tested was demonstrated. The measured thermal efficiency of the vaporizer was near 0.9 for all tests. The water vaporizer was integrated with an engineering model multipropellant resistojet. Performance of the vaporizer/thruster assembly was measured over a narrow range of operating conditions. The maximum specific impulse measured was 234 s at a mass flow rate and specific power level (vaporizer and thruster combined) of 154 x 10(exp-6)kg/s and 6.8 MJ/kg, respectively.

  19. Electron transport analysis in water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoru; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    2016-07-01

    A reliable set of electron collision cross sections for water vapor, including elastic, rotational, vibrational, and electronic excitation, electron attachment, and ionization cross sections, is estimated by the electron swarm method. In addition, anisotropic electron scattering for elastic and rotational excitation collisions is considered in the cross section set. Electron transport coefficients such as electron drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization coefficient are calculated from the cross section set by Monte Carlo simulation in a wide range of E/N values, where E and N are the applied electric field and the number density of H2O molecules, respectively. The calculated transport coefficients are in good agreement with those measured. The obtained results confirm that the anisotropic electron scattering is important for the calculation at low E/N values. Furthermore, the cross section set assuming the isotropic electron scattering is proposed for practical use.

  20. Water vapor sorption hysteresis of ceramic bricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koronthalyova, Olga

    2016-07-01

    A quantification of the hysteretic effects and their thorough analysis was carried out for three types of ceramic bricks. Water vapor adsorption/desorption isotherms were measured by the standard desiccator method. The desorption measurements were carried out from capillary moisture content as well as from equilibrium moisture content corresponding to the relative humidity of 98 %. For all three tested types of bricks the hysteretic effects were present but their significance differed depending on the particular type of brick. Significant differences were noticed also in desorption curves determined from capillary moisture content and from equilibrium moisture content corresponding to the relative humidity of 98 %. Based on the measured data a possible correlation between pore structure parameters and noticed hysteretic effects as well as relevance of the open pore model are discussed. The obtained adsorption/desorption curves were approximated by an analytical relation.

  1. The seasonal and global behavior of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere - Complete global results of the Viking atmospheric water detector experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Farmer, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    A key question regarding the evolution of Mars is related to the behavior of its volatiles. The present investigation is concerned with the global and seasonal abundances of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere as mapped by the Viking Mars Atmospheric Water Detector (MAWD) instrument for almost 1-1/2 Martian years from June 1976 to April 1979. Attention is given to the implications of the observed variations for determining the relative importance of those processes which may be controlling the vapor cycle on a seasonal basis. The processes considered include buffering of the atmosphere water by a surface or subsurface reservior of ground ice, physically adsorbed water, or chemically bound water. Other processes are related to the supply of water from the residual or seasonal north polar ice cap, the redistribution of the vapor resulting from atmospheric circulation, and control of the vapor holding capacity of the atmosphere by the local atmospheric temperatures.

  2. Seasonally-Active Water on Mars: Vapour, Ice, Adsorbate, and the Possibility of Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    southern caps. Similar climate-models of the water cycle also do not need much exchangeable adsorbed water in order to explain the observed vapour distributions. The possibility of liquid water is tantalizing, but difficult to definitively judge. On scales greater than a meter or so, Mars is most definitely well away from the water triple point--although the surface pressure can exceed 6.1 mbars, the partial pressure of water vapor (to which the triple point refers) is at best orders of magnitude lower. Several careful studies have shown, however, that locally transient (meta-stable) liquid is possible, if the net heating of ice deposits is high enough. This process is aided if the total surface pressure exceeds 6.1mbar (this prevents boiling, or the explosive loss of vapour into the atmosphere) or if the liquid is covered by a thin ice shell, and is only possible if surface temperatures exceed 273K (for pure water, or the appropriate eutectic for brines) and if ice is present. The former challenge is much easier to meet than the latter. The melt scenario requires that ice deposited in winter must be protected from sublimation as surface temperatures increase in spring, but then exposed to the peak of solar heating in summer. Available spacecraft observations of seasonal water will be discussed with the aid of GCM model simulations, and examined in the context of water distributions and phases.

  3. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  4. Water recovery by catalytic treatment of urine vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Quattrone, P. D.; Leban, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of water recovery on a man-rated scale by the catalytic processing of untreated urine vapor. For this purpose, two catalytic systems, one capable of processing an air stream containing low urine vapor concentrations and another to process streams with high urine vapor concentrations, were designed, constructed, and tested to establish the quality of the recovered water.

  5. Operating a radio-frequency plasma source on water vapor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sonca V T; Foster, John E; Gallimore, Alec D

    2009-08-01

    A magnetically enhanced radio-frequency (rf) plasma source operating on water vapor has an extensive list of potential applications. In this work, the use of a rf plasma source to dissociate water vapor for hydrogen production is investigated. This paper describes a rf plasma source operated on water vapor and characterizes its plasma properties using a Langmuir probe, a residual gas analyzer, and a spectrometer. The plasma source operated first on argon and then on water vapor at operating pressures just over 300 mtorr. Argon and water vapor plasma number densities differ significantly. In the electropositive argon plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i) approximately = n(e), where n(i) is the positive ion density. But in the electronegative water plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i+) = n(i-) + n(e). The positive ion density and electron density of the water vapor plasma are approximately one and two orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of argon plasma. These results suggest that attachment and dissociative attachment are present in electronegative water vapor plasma. The electron temperature for this water vapor plasma source is between 1.5 and 4 eV. Without an applied axial magnetic field, hydrogen production increases linearly with rf power. With an axial magnetic field, hydrogen production jumps to a maximum value at 500 W and then saturates with rf power. The presence of the applied axial magnetic field is therefore shown to enhance hydrogen production. PMID:19725651

  6. Water Vapor Uptake of Ultrathin Films of Biologically Derived Nanocrystals: Quantitative Assessment with Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Niinivaara, Elina; Faustini, Marco; Tammelin, Tekla; Kontturi, Eero

    2015-11-10

    Despite the relevance of water interactions, explicit analysis of vapor adsorption on biologically derived surfaces is often difficult. Here, a system was introduced to study the vapor uptake on a native polysaccharide surface; namely, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) ultrathin films were examined with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A significant mass uptake of water vapor by the CNC films was detected using the QCM-D upon increasing relative humidity. In addition, thickness changes proportional to changes in relative humidity were detected using SE. Quantitative analysis of the results attained indicated that in preference to being soaked by water at the point of hydration each individual CNC in the film became enveloped by a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water vapor, resulting in the detected thickness response. PMID:26461931

  7. Detection of Thermal Water Vapor Emission from W Hydrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Chen, Wesley; Melnick, Gary J.; DeGraauw, Thijs; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Harwitt, Martin

    1997-01-01

    We have detected four far-infrared emission lines of water vapor toward the evolved star W Hydrae, using the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). This is the first detection of thermal water vapor emission from a circumstellar outflow.

  8. Extratropical Influence of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor on Greenhouse Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, H.; Liu, W.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the impact of upper tropospheric water vapor on greenhouse warming in midlatitudes by analyzing the recent observations of the upper tropospheric water vapor from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), in conjuction with other space-based measurement and model simulation products.

  9. Warm Water Vapor around Sagittarius B2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernicharo, José; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Pardo, Juan R.; Asensio-Ramos, Andrés

    2006-05-01

    Several condensations heated externally by nearby hot stars are present in the Sgr B2 region for which H2O far-IR lines are expected to probe only an external low-density and high temperature section. Millimeter-wave lines can penetrate deeper into them (higher densities and lower Tk). We have conducted a study combining H2O lines in both spectral regions using the ISO (far-IR lines) and the IRAM 30 m telescope (183 GHz line). The far-IR H2O lines, seen in absorption, are optically thick. They form in the outermost gas in front of the far-IR continuum sources, probing a maximum visual extinction of ~5-10 mag. IR photons from the dust play a dominant role in their excitation. We conclude, based on observations of the CO J=7-6 line at 806.65 GHz, and the lack of emission from the far-IR CO lines, that the gas density has to be below ~104 cm-3. Using the gas kinetic temperature and density derived from OH, CO, and other molecular species, we derive a water column density of (9+/-3)×1016 cm-2 in the absorbing gas, implying an abundance of ~=(1-2)×10-5 in this region. The resulting relatively low H2O/OH abundance ratio, ~=2-4, is a signature of UV photon-dominated surface layers traced by far-IR observations. As a consequence, the temperature of the absorbing gas is high, Tk~=300-500 K, which allows very efficient neutral-neutral reactions producing H2O and OH. Finally, the 183.31 GHz data allow one to trace the inner, denser (n(H2)>=105-106 cm-3), and colder (Tk~40 K) gas. The emission is very strong toward the cores with an estimated water vapor abundance of a few × 10-7. There is also moderate extended emission around Sgr B2 main condensations, in agreement with the water vapor abundance derived from far-IR H2O lines. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with participation of ISAS and NASA.

  10. Detection of water vapor in Halley's comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Larson, H. P.; Williams, M.; Davis, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    Gaseous, neutral H2O was detected in the coma of comet Halley on 22.1 and 24.1 December 1985 Universal Time. Nine spectral lines of the nus band (2.65 micrometers) were found by means of a Fourier transform spectrometer on the NASA-Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The water production rate was about 6 x 10 to the 28th molecules per second on 22.1 December and 1.7 x 10 to the 29th molecules per second on 24.1 December UT. The numbers of spectral lines and their intensities are in accord with nonthermal-equilibrium cometary models. Rotational populations are derived from the observed spectral line intensities and excitation conditions are discussed. The ortho-para ratio was found to be 2.66 + or - 0.13, corresponding to a nuclear-spin temperature of 32 K (+5 K, -2 K), possibly indicating that the observed water vapor originated from a low-temperature ice.

  11. Quasielastic neutron scattering from adsorbed water molecules on pyrogenic silica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumanov, A. A.; Zarko, V. I.

    1994-04-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QNS) from hydrated samples of high dispersion (Aerosil) and of porous dioxide silicon was investigated. The broadening of the QNS peak analysis permits one to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient D of adsorbed water molecules. It was obtained that the D-value increases with silica hydration. The mean square displacement of the water molecules from equilibrium < x2> equals approximately 0.1 Å 2 and does not depend on the quantity of adsorbed water.

  12. Removal of pesticides from water and wastewater by different adsorbents: a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanweer; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ghazali, Arniza; Sulaiman, Othman; Hashim, Rokiah; Ahmad, Anees

    2010-10-01

    In this review article, the use of various low-cost adsorbents for the removal of pesticides from water and wastewater has been reviewed. Pesticides may appear as pollutants in water sources, having undesirable impacts to human health because of their toxicity, carcinogenicity, and mutagenicity or causing aesthetic problems such as taste and odors. These pesticides pollute the water stream and it can be removed very effectively using different low-cost adsorbents. It is evident from a literature survey of about 191 recently published papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for pesticides. PMID:21069614

  13. Water vapor weathering of Taurus-Littrow orange soil - A pore-structure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadenhead, D. A.; Mikhail, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A pore-volume analysis was performed on water vapor adsorption data previously obtained on a fresh sample of Taurus-Littrow orange soil, and the analysis was repeated on the same sample after its exposure to moist air for a period of approximately six months. The results indicate that exposure of an outgassed sample to high relative pressures of water vapor can result in the formation of substantial micropore structure, the precise amount being dependent on the sample pretreatment, particularly the outgassing temperature. Micropore formation is explained in terms of water penetration into surface defects. In contrast, long-term exposure to moist air at low relative pressures appears to reverse the process with the elimination of micropores and enlargement of mesopores possibly through surface diffusion of metastable adsorbent material. The results are considered with reference to the storage of lunar samples.

  14. DSMC simulation of Europa water vapor plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J. J.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.

    2016-10-01

    A computational investigation of the physics of water vapor plumes on Europa was performed with a focus on characteristics relevant to observation and spacecraft mission operations. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to model the plume expansion assuming a supersonic vent source. The structure of the plume was determined, including the number density, temperature, and velocity fields. The possibility of ice grain growth above the vent was considered and deemed probable for large (diameter > ∼20 m) vents at certain Mach numbers. Additionally, preexisting grains of three diameters (0.1, 1, 50 μm) were included and their trajectories examined. A preliminary study of photodissociation of H2O into OH and H was performed to demonstrate the behavior of daughter species. A set of vent parameters was evaluated including Mach number (Mach 2, 3, 5), reduced temperature as a proxy for flow energy loss to the region surrounding the vent, and mass flow rate. Plume behavior was relatively insensitive to these factors, with the notable exception of mass flow rate. With an assumed mass flow rate of ∼1000 kg/s, a canopy shock occurred and a maximum integrated line of sight column density of ∼1020 H2O molecules/m2 was calculated, comparing favorably with observation (Roth et al., 2014a).

  15. Factors Controlling Upper-Troposphere Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Yong; Newell, Reginald E.; Read, William G.

    2000-01-01

    The seasonal changes of the upper-tropospheric humidity are studied with the water vapor data from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and the winds and vertical velocity data obtained from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Using the same algorithm for vertical transport as that used for horizontal transport (by Zhu and Newell), the authors find that the moisture in the tropical upper troposphere may be increased mainly by intensified local convection in a small portion, less than 10%, of the whole area between 40 degrees S and 40 degrees N. The contribution of large-scale background circulations and divergence of horizontal transport is relatively small in these regions. These dynamic processes cannot be revealed by the traditional analyses of moisture fluxes. The negative response suggested by Lindzen, with enhanced convection in the Tropics being accompanied by subsidence drying in the subtropics, also exists, but the latter does not apparently dominate in the moisture budget.

  16. Water vapor diffusion in Mars subsurface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Troy L.; Aharonson, Oded; Schorghofer, Norbert; Farmer, Crofton B.; Hecht, Michael H.; Bridges, Nathan T.

    2007-05-01

    The diffusion coefficient of water vapor in unconsolidated porous media is measured for various soil simulants at Mars-like pressures and subzero temperatures. An experimental chamber which simultaneously reproduces a low-pressure, low-temperature, and low-humidity environment is used to monitor water flux from an ice source through a porous diffusion barrier. Experiments are performed on four types of simulants: 40-70 μm glass beads, sintered glass filter disks, 1-3 μm dust (both loose and packed), and JSC Mars-1. A theoretical framework is presented that applies to environments that are not necessarily isothermal or isobaric. For most of our samples, we find diffusion coefficients in the range of 2.8 to 5.4 cm2 s-1 at 600 Pascal and 260 K. This range becomes 1.9-4.7 cm2 s-1 when extrapolated to a Mars-like temperature of 200 K. Our preferred value for JSC Mars-1 at 600 Pa and 200 K is 3.7 +/- 0.5 cm2 s-1. The tortuosities of the glass beads is about 1.8. Packed dust displays a lower mean diffusion coefficient of 0.38 +/- 0.26 cm2 s-1, which can be attributed to transition to the Knudsen regime where molecular collisions with the pore walls dominate. Values for the diffusion coefficient and the variation of the diffusion coefficient with pressure are well matched by existing models. The survival of shallow subsurface ice on Mars and the providence of diffusion barriers are considered in light of these measurements.

  17. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Stratospheric Middleworld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry; Jensen, Eric; Sachse, Glenn; Podolske, James; Schoeberl, Mark; Browell, Edward; Ismail, Syed; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Water vapor in the winter arctic stratospheric middleworld is import-an: for two reasons: (1) the arctic middleworld is a source of air for the upper Troposphere because of the generally downward motion, and thus its water vapor content helps determine upper tropospheric water, a critical part of the earth's radiation budget; and (2) under appropriate conditions, relative humidities will be large, even to the point of stratospheric cirrus cloud formation, leading to the production of active chlorine species that could destroy ozone. On a number of occasions during SOLVE, clouds were observed in the stratospheric middleworld by the DC-8 aircraft. These tended to coincide with regions of low temperatures, though some cases suggest water vapor enhancements due to troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. The goal of this work is to understand the importance of processes in and at the edge of the arctic stratospheric middleworld in determining water vapor at these levels. Specifically, is water vapor at these levels determined largely by the descent of air from above, or are clouds both within and at the edge of the stratospheric middleworld potentially important? How important is troposphere-to-stratosphere transport of air in determining stratospheric middleworld water vapor content? To this end, we will first examine the minimum saturation mixing ratios along theta/EPV tubes during the SOLVE winter and compare these with DC-8 water vapor observations. This will be a rough indicator of how high relative humidities can get, and the likelihood of cirrus cloud formation in various parts of the stratospheric middleworld. We will then examine saturation mixing ratios along both diabatic and adiabatic trajectories, comparing these values with actual aircraft water vapor observations, both in situ and remote. Finally, we will attempt to actually predict water vapor using minimum saturation mixing ratios along trajectories, cloud injection (derived from satellite imagery) along

  18. Thermodynamic properties of adsorbed water on silica gel - Exergy losses in adiabatic sorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worek, W. M.; Zengh, W.; San, J.-Y.

    1991-09-01

    In order to perform exergy analyses to optimize the transient heat and mass transfer processes involving sorption by solid adsorbents, the thermodynamic properties of adsorbed water must be determined. In this paper, the integral enthalpy and entropy are determined directly from isotherm data of water adsorbed on silica gel particles and silica gel manufactured in the form of a felt with 25 percent cotton as a support and Teflon as a binder. These results are then used to evaluate the exergy losses, due to the sorption and the convective heat and mass transfer processes, that occur in each portion of an adiabatic desiccant dehumidificaton cycle.

  19. Climate and Ozone Response to Increased Stratospheric Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, Drew T.

    2001-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor abundance affects ozone, surface climate, and stratospheric temperatures. From 30-50 km altitude, temperatures show global decreases of 3-6 K over recent decades. These may be a proxy for water vapor increases, as the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model reproduces these trends only when stratospheric water vapor is allowed to increase. Observations suggest that stratospheric water vapor is indeed increasing, however, measurements are extremely limited in either spatial coverage or duration. The model results suggest that the observed changes may be part of a global, long-term trend. Furthermore, the required water vapor change is too large to be accounted for by increased production within the stratosphere, suggesting that ongoing climate change may be altering tropospheric input. The calculated stratospheric water vapor increase contributes an additional approximately equals 24% (approximately equals 0.2 W/m(exp 2)) to the global warming from well-mixed greenhouse gases over the past two decades. Observed ozone depletion is also better reproduced when destruction due to increased water vapor is included. If the trend continues, it could increase future global warming and impede stratospheric ozone recovery.

  20. Adsorption of N-hexane, methanol and water vapor and binary mixtures of N-hexane/water vapor on super activated carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Jesus Antonio

    Recent times have seen a large rise in the utilization of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) within a wide variety of industries due to their unique properties. Consequently, the fabrication, application and disposal of ENMs will inevitably lead to their release to the environment. Once ENMs are in the environment, they may undergo atmospheric transformations, such the sorption of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) or water vapor. These transformed ENMs may then affect the general public through inhalation -- or other pathways of exposure -- and those employed by the ever-growing nanotechnology sector are of particular vulnerability. As a result, it is important to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of a common carbon-based ENM under the presence of HAPs or water vapor which may adsorb onto them. This study investigated the unary and binary gas-phase adsorption of n-hexane, methanol and water vapor on super activated carbon nanoparticles (SACNPs) with a bench-scale adsorption system. Removal efficiencies, breakthrough tests, throughput ratios, adsorption capacities and kinetics modeling were completed to assess the adsorption behavior of the SACNPs.

  1. Regolith water vapor sources on Mars: A historical bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M.; Huguenin, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The regolith as a potential source and sink of atmospheric water is examined bibliographically. The controversy surrounding Solis Lacus, a region on Mars first identified by R. Huguenin as a possible regolith source of atmospheric water vapor, is reviewed. The publications listed describe the initial debate over the existence of a regolith source of atmospheric water vapor in Solis Lacus. The debate over Solis Lacus has motivated a rigorous examination of several important data sets, and helped define the limits of their interpretation.

  2. Electron deposition in water vapor, with atmospheric applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivero, J. J.; Stagat, R. W.; Green, A. E. S.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of the consequences of electron impact on water vapor in terms of the microscopic details of excitation, dissociation, ionization, and combinations of these processes. Basic electron-impact cross-section data are assembled in many forms and are incorporated into semianalytic functions suitable for analysis with digital computers. Energy deposition in water vapor is discussed, and the energy loss function is presented, along with the 'electron volts per ion pair' and the efficiencies of energy loss in various processes. Several applications of electron and water-vapor interactions in the atmospheric sciences are considered, in particular, H2O comets, aurora and airglow, and lightning.

  3. Water-Assisted Vapor Deposition of PEDOT Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Goktas, Hilal; Wang, Xiaoxue; Ugur, Asli; Gleason, Karen K

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis and characterization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) using water-assisted vapor phase polymerization (VPP) and oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) are reported. For the VPP PEDOT, the oxidant, FeCl3 , is sublimated onto the substrate from a heated crucible in the reactor chamber and subsequently exposed to 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) monomer and water vapor in the same reactor. The oCVD PEDOT was produced by introducing the oxidant, EDOT monomer, and water vapor simultaneously to the reactor. The enhancement of doping and crystallinity is observed in the water-assisted oCVD thin films. The high doping level observed at UV-vis-NIR spectra for the oCVD PEDOT, suggests that water acts as a solubilizing agent for oxidant and its byproducts. Although the VPP produced PEDOT thin films are fully amorphous, their conductivities are comparable with that of the oCVD produced ones. PMID:25882241

  4. Chemical reaction between water vapor and stressed glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soga, N.; Okamoto, T.; Hanada, T.; Kunugi, M.

    1979-01-01

    The crack velocity in soda-lime silicate glass was determined at room temperature at water-vapor pressures of 10 to 0.04 torr using the double torsion technique. A precracked glass specimen (70 x 16 x 1.6 mm) was placed in a vacuum chamber containing a four-point bending test apparatus. The plotted experimental results show that the crack propagation curve in water agrees fairly well with that of Wiederhorn (1967). Attention is given to the effect of water vapor pressure on crack velocity at K(I) = 550,000 N/m to the 3/2 power, with (Wiederhorn's data) or without N2 present. The plotted results reveal that the present crack velocity is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of Wiederhorn at high water-vapor conditions, but the difference decreases as the water-vapor concentration diminishes or the crack velocity slows down.

  5. Tribochemical polymerization of adsorbed n-pentanol on SiO2 during rubbing: when does it occur and is it responsible for effective vapor phase lubrication?

    PubMed

    Barnette, Anna L; Asay, David B; Ohlhausen, James A; Dugger, Michael T; Kim, Seong H

    2010-11-01

    The origin and role of tribochemical reaction products formed while sliding silicon oxide surfaces in the presence of adsorbed alcohol molecules in equilibrium with the vapor phase were studied. Wear and friction coefficient studies with varying contact loads and n-pentanol vapor environments were used to determine under what operating conditions the tribochemical reaction species was produced. Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and microinfrared spectroscopy found that hydrocarbon species with a molecular weight higher than the starting vapor molecules are produced when there is wear of the SiO(2) surface. When the n-pentanol vapor lubrication is effective and the silicon oxide surface does not wear, then the tribochemical polymerization products are negligible. These results imply that the tribochemical polymerization is associated with the substrate wear process occurring due to insufficient adsorbate supply or high mechanical load. The tribochemical reactions do not seem to be the primary lubrication mechanism for vapor phase lubrication of SiO(2) surfaces with alcohol, although they may lubricate the substrate momentarily upon failure of the alcohol vapor delivery to the sliding contact. PMID:20735117

  6. Low-cost adsorbents for heavy metals uptake from contaminated water: a review.

    PubMed

    Babel, Sandhya; Kurniawan, Tonni Agustiono

    2003-02-28

    In this article, the technical feasibility of various low-cost adsorbents for heavy metal removal from contaminated water has been reviewed. Instead of using commercial activated carbon, researchers have worked on inexpensive materials, such as chitosan, zeolites, and other adsorbents, which have high adsorption capacity and are locally available. The results of their removal performance are compared to that of activated carbon and are presented in this study. It is evident from our literature survey of about 100 papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for certain metal ions as compared to activated carbon. Adsorbents that stand out for high adsorption capacities are chitosan (815, 273, 250 mg/g of Hg(2+), Cr(6+), and Cd(2+), respectively), zeolites (175 and 137 mg/g of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+), respectively), waste slurry (1030, 560, 540 mg/g of Pb(2+), Hg(2+), and Cr(6+), respectively), and lignin (1865 mg/g of Pb(2+)). These adsorbents are suitable for inorganic effluent treatment containing the metal ions mentioned previously. It is important to note that the adsorption capacities of the adsorbents presented in this paper vary, depending on the characteristics of the individual adsorbent, the extent of chemical modifications, and the concentration of adsorbate. PMID:12573840

  7. The second-law analysis of a recirculation cycle desiccant cooling system: Cosorption of water vapor and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. M.; Worek, W. M.

    The second law, of thermodynamics is applied to a desiccant cooling system operating in the recirculation mode. In this study, the adsorbent is 13X molecular sieve, and the process air stream is assumed to contain only dry air, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. The second law efficiencies of a desiccant wheel are documented in terms of overall number of transfer units and the regeneration temperature. The results show that based on the first law and second law of thermodynamics, a solid desiccant adsorber using 13X molecular sieve can be optimally designed.

  8. Active Raman sounding of the earth's water vapor field.

    PubMed

    Tratt, David M; Whiteman, David N; Demoz, Belay B; Farley, Robert W; Wessel, John E

    2005-08-01

    The typically weak cross-sections characteristic of Raman processes has historically limited their use in atmospheric remote sensing to nighttime application. However, with advances in instrumentation and techniques, it is now possible to apply Raman lidar to the monitoring of atmospheric water vapor, aerosols and clouds throughout the diurnal cycle. Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric measurements of water vapor using Raman lidar are also possible but are limited to nighttime and require long integration times. However, boundary layer studies of water vapor variability can now be performed with high temporal and spatial resolution. This paper will review the current state-of-the-art of Raman lidar for high-resolution measurements of the atmospheric water vapor, aerosol and cloud fields. In particular, we describe the use of Raman lidar for mapping the vertical distribution and variability of atmospheric water vapor, aerosols and clouds throughout the evolution of dynamic meteorological events. The ability of Raman lidar to detect and characterize water in the region of the tropopause and the importance of high-altitude water vapor for climate-related studies and meteorological satellite performance are discussed. PMID:16029854

  9. Active Raman sounding of the earth's water vapor field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Whiteman, David N.; Demoz, Belay B.; Farley, Robert W.; Wessel, John E.

    2005-01-01

    The typically weak cross-sections characteristic of Raman processes has historically limited their use in atmospheric remote sensing to nighttime application. However, with advances in instrumentation and techniques, it is now possible to apply Raman lidar to the monitoring of atmospheric water vapor, aerosols and clouds throughout the diurnal cycle. Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric measurements of water vapor using Raman lidar are also possible but are limited to nighttime and require long integration times. However, boundary layer studies of water vapor variability can now be performed with high temporal and spatial resolution. This paper will review the current state-of-the-art of Raman lidar for high-resolution measurements of the atmospheric water vapor, aerosol and cloud fields. In particular, we describe the use of Raman lidar for mapping the vertical distribution and variability of atmospheric water vapor, aerosols and clouds throughout the evolution of dynamic meteorological events. The ability of Raman lidar to detect and characterize water in the region of the tropopause and the importance of high-altitude water vapor for climate-related studies and meteorological satellite performance are discussed.

  10. Condensation of water vapor in the gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshkov, V. G.; Makarieva, A. M.; Nefiodov, A. V.

    2012-10-15

    Physical peculiarities of water vapor condensation under conditions of hydrostatic equilibrium are considered. The power of stationary dynamic air fluxes and the vertical temperature distribution caused by condensation on large horizontal scales are estimated.

  11. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    2013-08-22

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  12. Performance Modeling of an Airborne Raman Water Vapor Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Schwemmer, G.; Berkoff, T.; Plotkin, H.; Ramos-Izquierdo, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2000-01-01

    A sophisticated Raman lidar numerical model had been developed. The model has been used to simulate the performance of two ground-based Raman water vapor lidar systems. After tuning the model using these ground-based measurements, the model is used to simulate the water vapor measurement capability of an airborne Raman lidar under both day-and night-time conditions for a wide range of water vapor conditions. The results indicate that, under many circumstances, the daytime measurements possess comparable resolution to an existing airborne differential absorption water vapor lidar while the nighttime measurement have higher resolution. In addition, a Raman lidar is capable of measurements not possible using a differential absorption system.

  13. Weather and climate analyses using improved global water vapor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonder Haar, Thomas H.; Bytheway, Janice L.; Forsythe, John M.

    2012-08-01

    The NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP) dataset is a global (land and ocean) water vapor dataset created by merging multiple sources of atmospheric water vapor to form a global data base of total and layered precipitable water vapor. Under the NASA Making Earth Science Data Records for Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, NVAP is being reprocessed and extended, increasing its 14-year coverage to include 22 years of data. The NVAP-MEaSUREs (NVAP-M) dataset is geared towards varied user needs, and biases in the original dataset caused by algorithm and input changes were removed. This is accomplished by relying on peer reviewed algorithms and producing the data in multiple “streams” to create products geared towards studies of both climate and weather. We briefly discuss the need for reprocessing and extension, steps taken to improve the product, and provide some early science results highlighting the improvements and potential scientific uses of NVAP-M.

  14. Venus: new microwave measurements show no atmospheric water vapor.

    PubMed

    Janssen, M A; Hills, R E; Thornton, D D; Welch, W J

    1973-03-01

    Two sets of passive radio observations of Venus-measurements of the spectrum of the disk temperature near the 1-centimeter wavelength, and interferometric measurements of the planetary limb darkening at the 1.35-centimeter water vapor resonance-show no evidence of water vapor in the lower atmosphere of Venus. The upper limit of 2 x 10(-3) for the mixing ratio of water vapor is substantially less than the amounts derived from the Venera space probes (0.5 x 10(-2) to 2.5 x 10(-2)). This amount of water vapor cannot produce dense clouds, and it is doubtful that it may contribute significantly to a greenhouse effect. PMID:17842164

  15. Retrieval of water vapor profiles from atmospheric radio-occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, M. de la Torre; Nilsson, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    We illustrate a novel method to extract water vapor with high vertical resolution, using the refractivity profiles without ancillary data. We also discuss the estimated accuracies and sources of error.

  16. Stratospheric water vapor in the NCAR CCM2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mote, Philip W.; Holton, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of the water vapor distribution in a 3D GCM with good vertical resolution, a state-of-the-art transport scheme, and a realistic water vapor source in the middle atmosphere. In addition to water vapor, the model transported methane and an idealized clock tracer, which provides transport times to and within the middle atmosphere. The water vapor and methane distributions are compared with Nimbus 7 SAMS and LIMS data and with in situ measurements. It is argued that the hygropause in the model is maintained not by 'freeze-drying' at the tops of tropical cumulonimbus, but by a balance between two sources and one sink. Since the southern winter dehydration is unrealistically intense, this balance most likely does not resemble the balance in the real atmosphere.

  17. Low-cost magnetic adsorbent for As(III) removal from water: adsorption kinetics and isotherms.

    PubMed

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles as adsorbent for arsenic (As) were coated on sand particles. The coated sand was used for the removal of highly toxic element 'As(III)' from drinking water. Here, batch experiments were performed with the variation of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and initial arsenic concentration. The adsorbent showed significant removal efficiency around 99.6 % for As(III). Analysis of adsorption kinetics revealed that the adsorbent follows pseudo-second-order kinetics model showing R (2) = 0.999, whereas for pseudo-first-order kinetics model, the value of R (2) was 0.978. In the case of adsorption equilibrium, the data is well fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model (R (2) > 0.99), indicating monolayer adsorption of As(III) on the surface of adsorbent. The existence of commonly present ions in water influences the removal efficiency of As(III) minutely in the following order PO4 (3-) > HCO3 (-) > Cl(-) > SO4 (2-). The obtained adsorbent can be used to overcome the problem of water filtration in rural areas. Moreover, as the nano-magnetite is coated on the sand, it avoids the problem of extraction of nanoparticles from treated water and can easily be removed by a simple filtration process. PMID:26711813

  18. Sorption and modeling of mass transfer of toxic chemical vapors in activated-carbon fiber-cloth adsorbers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Sagen, J.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorber coupled with an electrothermal regenerator and a cryogenic condenser was designed and developed to efficiently capture and recover toxic chemical vapors (TCVs) from simulated industrial gas streams. The system was characterized for adsorption by ACFC, electrothermal desorption, and cryogenic condensation to separate acetone and methyl ethyl ketone from gas streams. Adsorption dynamics are numerically modeled to predict system characteristics during scale-up and optimization of the process in the future. The model requires diffusivities of TCVs into an activated-carbon fiber (ACF) as an input. Effective diffusivities of TCVs into ACFs were modeled as a function of temperature, concentration, and pore size distribution. Effective diffusivities for acetone at 65 ??C and 30-60 ppmv were measured using a chromatography method. The energy factor for surface diffusion was determined from comparison between the experimental and modeled effective diffusivities. The modeled effective diffusivities were used in a dispersive computational model to predict mass transfer zones of TCVs in fixed beds of ACFC under realistic conditions for industrial applications.

  19. Stratospheric Water Vapor Increases Over the Past Half-Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenlof, K. H.; Oltmans, S. J.; Kley, D.; Russell, J. M., III; Chiou, E.-W.; Chu, W. P.; Johnson, D. G.; Kelly, K. K.; Michelsen, H. A.; Nedoluha, G. E.

    2001-01-01

    Ten data sets covering the period 1954-2000 are analyzed to show a 1% per year increase in stratospheric water vapor. The trend has persisted for at least 45 years, hence is unlikely the result of a single event but rather indicative of long-term climate change. A long-term change in the transport of water vapor into the stratosphere is the most probable cause.

  20. CRISM Observations of Water Vapor and Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, R. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra returned by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM, [1]) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) contain the clear spectral signature of several atmospheric gases including carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor (H2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). Here we describe the seasonal and spatial mapping of water vapor and carbon dioxide for one full Martian year using CRISM spectra.

  1. Adsorption and Desorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Mixtures on Synthetic Hydrophobic Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Several synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents produced through pyrolysis of polymeric materials are available commercially. Some appear to have advantages over activated carbon for certain adsorption applications. In particular, they can have tailored hydrophobicities that are significantly greater than that of activated carbon, while moderately high surfaces areas are retained. These sorbents are being investigated for possible use in removing trace contaminants and excess carbon dioxide from air in closed habitats, plant growth chambers, and other applications involving purification of humid gas streams. We have analyzed the characteristics of a few of these adsorbents through adsorption and desorption experiments and standard characterization techniques. This paper presents pure and multicomponent adsorption data collected for carbon dioxide and water on two synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents having different hydrophobicities and capillary condensation characteristics. The observations are interpreted through consideration of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the solids and interactions between adsorbed carbon dioxide, water, and the solvent gas.

  2. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  3. Logarithmic radiative effect of water vapor and spectral kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani Shahabadi, Maziar; Huang, Yi

    2014-05-01

    Radiative kernels have become a useful tool in climate analysis. A set of spectral kernels is calculated using a moderate resolution atmospheric transmission code MODTRAN and implemented in diagnosing spectrally decomposed global outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) changes. It is found that the effect of water vapor on the OLR is in proportion to the logarithm of its concentration. Spectral analysis discloses that this logarithmic dependency mainly results from water vapor absorption bands (0-560 cm-1 and 1250-1850 cm-1), while in the window region (800-1250 cm-1), the effect scales more linearly to its concentration. The logarithmic and linear effects in the respective spectral regions are validated by the calculations of a benchmark line-by-line radiative transfer model LBLRTM. The analysis based on LBLRTM-calculated second-order kernels shows that the nonlinear (logarithmic) effect results from the damping of the OLR sensitivity to layer-wise water vapor perturbation by both intra- and inter-layer effects. Given that different scaling approaches suit different spectral regions, it is advisable to apply the kernels in a hybrid manner in diagnosing the water vapor radiative effect. Applying logarithmic scaling in the water vapor absorption bands where absorption is strong and linear scaling in the window region where absorption is weak can generally constrain the error to within 10% of the overall OLR change for up to eightfold water vapor perturbations.

  4. Profiling of Atmospheric Water Vapor with MIR and LASE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Racette, P.; Triesly, M. E.; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Chang, L. A.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the first and the only simultaneous measurements of water vapor by MIR (Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer) and LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sounding Experiment) on board the same ER-2 aircraft. Water vapor is one of the most important constituents in the Earth's atmosphere, as its spatial and temporal variations affect a wide spectrum of meteorological phenomena ranging from the formation of clouds to the development of severe storms. Its concentration, as measured in terms of relative humidity, determines the extinction coefficient of atmospheric aerosol particles and therefore visibility. These considerations point to the need for effective and frequent measurements of the atmospheric water vapor. The MIR and LASE instruments provide measurements of water vapor profiles with two markedly different techniques. LASE can give water vapor profiles with excellent vertical resolution under clear condition, while MIR can retrieve water vapor profiles with a crude vertical resolution even under a moderate cloud cover. Additionally, millimeter-wave measurements are relatively simple and provide better spatial coverage.

  5. GROUND WATER SAMPLING OF VOCS IN THE WATER/CAPILLARY FRINGE AREA FOR VAPOR INTRUSION ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion has recently been considered a major pathway for increased indoor air contamination from certain volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). The recent Draft EPA Subsurface Vapor Intrusion Guidance Document states that ground water samples should be obtained from the u...

  6. Effect of the adsorbate kinetic diameter on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for modeling adsorption of organic vapors on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Niknaddaf, Saeid; Hashisho, Zaher

    2012-11-30

    This paper investigates the effect of the kinetic diameter (KD) of the reference adsorbate on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation for predicting the adsorption isotherms of organic vapors on microporous activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms for 13 organic compounds on microporous beaded activated carbon were experimentally measured, and predicted using the D-R model and affinity coefficients. The affinity coefficients calculated based on molar volumes, molecular polarizabilities, and molecular parachors were used to predict the isotherms based on four reference compounds (4.3≤KD≤6.8 Å). The results show that the affinity coefficients are independent of the calculation method if the reference and test adsorbates are from the same organic group. Choosing a reference adsorbate with a KD similar to that of the test adsorbate results in better prediction of the adsorption isotherm. The relative error between the predicted and the measured adsorption isotherms increases as the absolute difference in the kinetic diameters of the reference and test adsorbates increases. Finally, the proposed hypothesis was used to explain reports of inconsistent findings among published articles. The results from this study are important because they allow a more accurate prediction of adsorption capacities of adsorbents which allow for better design of adsorption systems. PMID:23044198

  7. Interpretation of MSL REMS data using 1D coupled heat and water vapor transport model of Mars subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloesener, Elodie; Karatekin, Özgür; Dehant, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) performed high-resolution measurements of temperature and relative humidity during more than one Martian year. In this work, a 1D subsurface model is used to study water vapor exchange between the atmosphere and the subsurface at Gale crater using REMS data. The thermal model used includes several layers of varying thickness with depth and properties that can be changed to correspond to those of Martian rocks at locations studied. It also includes the transport of water vapor through porous Martian regolith and the different phases considered are vapor, ice and adsorbed H2O. The total mass flux is given by the sum of diffusive and advective transport. The role of an adsorbing regolith on water transfer as well as the range of parameters with significant effect on water transport in Martian conditions are investigated. In addition, kinetics of the adsorption process is considered to examine its influence on the water vapor exchange between the subsurface and the atmosphere.

  8. Competition between Displacement and Dissociation of a Strong Acid Compared to a Weak Acid Adsorbed on Silica Particle Surfaces: The Role of Adsorbed Water.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Tang, Mingjin; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-16

    The adsorption of nitric (HNO3) and formic (HCOOH) acids on silica particle surfaces and the effect of adsorbed water have been investigated at 296 K using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Under dry conditions, both nitric and formic acids adsorb reversibly on silica. Additionally, the FTIR spectra show that both of these molecules remain in the protonated form. At elevated relative humidities (RH), adsorbed water competes both for surface adsorption sites with these acids as well as promotes their dissociation to hydronium ions and the corresponding anions. Compared to HNO3, the extent of dissociation is much smaller for HCOOH, very likely because it is a weaker acid. This study provides valuable insights into the interaction of HNO3 and HCOOH with silica surface on the molecular level and further reveals the complex roles of surface-adsorbed water in atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust particles-many of these containing silica. PMID:27220375

  9. Water Vapor-Mediated Volatilization of High-Temperature Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschter, Peter J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2013-07-01

    Volatilization in water vapor-containing atmospheres is an important and often unexpected mechanism of degradation of high-temperature materials during processing and in service. Thermodynamic properties data sets for key (oxy)hydroxide vapor product species that are responsible for material transport and damage are often uncertain or unavailable. Estimation, quantum chemistry calculation, and measurement methods for thermodynamic properties of these species are reviewed, and data judged to be reliable are tabulated and referenced. Applications of water vapor-mediated volatilization include component and coating recession in turbine engines, oxidation/volatilization of ferritic steels in steam boilers, chromium poisoning in solid-oxide fuel cells, vanadium transport in hot corrosion and degradation of hydrocracking catalysts, Na loss from Na β"-Al2O3 tubes, and environmental release of radioactive isotopes in a nuclear reactor accident or waste incineration. The significance of water vapor-mediated volatilization in these applications is described.

  10. A WATER VAPOR MONITOR USING DIFFERENTIAL INFRARED ABSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water vapor monitor has been developed with adequate sensitivity and versatility for a variety of applications. Two applications for which the instrument has been designed are the continuous monitoring of water in ambient air and the measuring of the mass of water desorbed from...

  11. Functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes using water-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ran Maofei; Sun Wenjing; Liu Yan; Chu Wei; Jiang Chengfa

    2013-01-15

    A simple and novel method, water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) during the synthesis process. The functionalized MWCNTs were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, XPS, TGA, NH{sub 3}-TPD, SEM and HR-TEM. It was found that new defects are introduced and the amount of acidic groups is increased on the MWCNT surface during the water-assisted CVD process. The amount of C-OH and C-O group on the MWCNT surface is found to be increased from 21.1% to 42% with water vapor assistance. Density functional theory (DFT) was employed to study the chemical behavior of water vapor molecule on the catalyst particle surface of Ni(1 1 1) cluster. Based on the experimental and DFT simulation results, a mechanism for functionalization of MWCNTs by water-assisted CVD is proposed. - Graphical abstract: Water is adsorbed and activated on Ni surface, then dissociated into OH and O species, followed by part of OH and O species desorbed from the surface. Finally, the desorbed OH and O species oxidize the unsaturated carbon atoms of carbon nanotubes, form defects and oxygen-containing groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MWCNTs were functionalized by water-assisted CVD method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Defects and weak-medium acidic sites were created on the MWCNT sidewalls. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen-containing groups in functionalized MWCNT were increased from 21.1% to 42%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanism for the influence of water vapor on MWCNTs was proposed.

  12. Upper-troposphere and lower-stratosphere water vapor retrievals from the 1400 and 1900 nm water vapor bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, K. S.; Thornberry, T.; Rollins, A.; Bui, T.

    2015-03-01

    Measuring water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere is difficult due to the low mixing ratios found there, typically only a few parts per million. Here we examine near-infrared spectra acquired with the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) during the first science phase of the NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX). From the 1400 and 1900 nm absorption bands we infer water vapor amounts in the tropical tropopause layer and adjacent regions between altitudes of 14 and 18 km. We compare these measurements to solar transmittance spectra produced with the MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission (MODTRAN) radiative transfer model, using in situ water vapor, temperature, and pressure profiles acquired concurrently with the SSFR spectra. Measured and modeled transmittance values agree within 0.002, with some larger differences in the 1900 nm band (up to 0.004). Integrated water vapor amounts along the absorption path lengths of 3 to 6 km varied from 1.26 × 10-4 to 4.59 × 10-4 g cm-2. A 0.002 difference in absorptance at 1367 nm results in a 3.35 × 10-5 g cm-2 change of integrated water vapor amounts; 0.004 absorptance change at 1870 nm results in 5.50 × 10-5 g cm-2 of water vapor. These are 27% (1367 nm) and 44% (1870 nm) differences at the lowest measured value of water vapor (1.26 × 10-4 g cm-2) and 7% (1367 nm) and 12% (1870 nm) differences at the highest measured value of water vapor (4.59 × 10-4 g cm-2). A potential method for extending this type of measurement from aircraft flight altitude to the top of the atmosphere is discussed.

  13. Upper-troposphere and lower-stratosphere water vapor retrievals from the 1400 and 1900 nm water vapor bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, K. S.; Thornberry, T.; Rollins, A.; Bui, T.

    2014-10-01

    Measuring water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere is difficult due to the low mixing ratios found there, typically only a few parts per million. Here we examine near infrared spectra acquired with the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer during the first science phase of the NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause EXperiment. From the 1400 and 1900 nm absorption bands, we infer water vapor amounts in the tropical tropopause layer and adjacent regions between 14 and 18 km altitude. We compare these measurements to solar transmittance spectra produced with the MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission (MODTRAN) radiative transfer model, using in situ water vapor, temperature, and pressure profiles acquired concurrently with the SSFR spectra. Measured and modeled transmittance values agree within 0.002, with some larger differences in the 1900 nm band (up to 0.004). Integrated water vapor amounts along the absorption path lengths of 3 to 6 km varied from 1.26 × 10-4 to 4.59 × 10-4 g cm-2. A 0.002 difference in absorptance at 1367 nm results in a 3.35 × 10-5 g cm-2 change of integrated water vapor amount, 0.004 absorptance change at 1870 nm results in 5.5 × 10-5 g cm-2 of water vapor. These are 27% (1367 nm) and 44% (1870 nm) differences at the lowest measured value of water vapor (1.26 × 10-4 g cm-2) and 7% (1367 nm) and 12% (1870 nm) differences at the highest measured value of water vapor (4.59 × 10-4 g cm-2). A potential method for extending this type of measurement from aircraft flight altitude to the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is discussed.

  14. Relaxation dynamics of surface-adsorbed water molecules in nanoporous silica probed by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Ru; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Relaxation dynamics of an exclusively adsorbed water molecule in mesoporous silica MCM-41-S was studied by using terahertz spectroscopy. With the temperature controlled from 0 to 50 °C, we observed strongly frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric relaxation responses, implying that, unlike ice, surface-adsorbed water molecules retained flourishing picosecond dynamics. Based on the Debye relaxation model, a relaxation time constant was found to increase from 1.77 to 4.83 ps when the water molecule was cooled from 50 to 0 °C. An activation energy of ˜15 kJ/mol, which was in close agreement with a hydrogen-bonding energy, was further extracted from the Arrhenius analysis. Combined with previous molecular dynamics simulations, our results indicate that the reorientation relaxation originated from the "flip-flop" rotation of a three hydrogen-bonded surface-adsorbed water molecule.

  15. Vapor compression distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization.

    PubMed

    Ashida, A; Mitani, K; Ebara, K; Kurokawa, H; Sawada, I; Kashiwagi, H; Tsuji, T; Hayashi, S; Otsubo, K; Nitta, K

    1987-01-01

    Water revitalization for a space station can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied; one is an absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor compression distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor compression distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water. PMID:11537274

  16. Vapor compression distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashida, A.; Mitani, K.; Ebara, K.; Kurokawa, H.; Sawada, I.; Kashiwagi, H.; Tsuji, T.; Hayashi, S.; Otsubo, K.; Nitta, K.

    1987-01-01

    Water revitalization for a space station can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied: one is absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor compression distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation, able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity, was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor compression distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water.

  17. Water vapor budget of the Indian monsoon depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Chen, Tsing-Chang

    2005-10-01

    Estimations by previous studies show that a minor amount of the Indian monsoon rainfall is contributed by Indian monsoon depressions (IMDs). In contrast, other studies found that approximately half of the summer monsoon rainfall in the northern Indian subcontinent is generated by IMDs. IMDs occur an average of six times during the summer season and provide a crucial water source to the agricultural activity over this region. The large disparity in the estimation of the IMD contribution to the Indian rainfall by previous studies requires a more accurate water vapor budget analysis of the IMD with quality data. For this reason, a composite analysis of the IMD is performed using the ERA-40 reanalysis and four precipitation data sets (the Global Precipitation Climatology Project, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, the GEOS precipitation index at the Goddard Space Flight Center and surface station observations) for the period of 1979 2002. Important findings of this study are: (i) about 45 55% of the total Indian rainfall is produced by the IMD; (ii) the rainfall maximum in the west south-west sector of IMDs is largely maintained by convergence of atmospheric water vapor flux. The convergence of water vapor flux is largely coupled with the lower-tropospheric divergent circulation. Thus, the IMD water vapor budget is modulated by the 30 60 and 10 20 d monsoon modes through changes of water vapor convergence/divergence. The magnitude of this modulation on the IMD water vapor budget is close to a quarter of the summer-mean water vapor budget over the Bay of Bengal and north-eastern India.

  18. High temperature oxidation of molybdenum in water vapor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A. T.; Sooby, E. S.; Kim, Y.-J.; Cheng, B.; Maloy, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    Molybdenum has recently gained attention as a candidate cladding material for use in light water reactors. Its excellent high temperature mechanical properties and stability under irradiation suggest that it could offer benefits to performance under a wide range of reactor conditions, but little is known about its oxidation behavior in water vapor containing atmospheres. The current study was undertaken to elucidate the oxidation behavior of molybdenum in water vapor environments to 1200 °C in order to provide an initial assessment of its feasibility as a light water reactor cladding. Initial observations indicate that at temperatures below 1000 °C, the kinetics of mass loss in water vapor would not be detrimental to cladding integrity during an off-normal event. Above 1000 °C, degradation is more rapid but remains slower than observed for optimized zirconium cladding alloys. The effect of hydrogen-water vapor and oxygen-water vapor mixtures on material loss was also explored at elevated temperatures. Parts-per-million levels of either hydrogen or oxygen will minimally impact performance, but hydrogen contents in excess of 1000 ppm were observed to limit volatilization at 1000 °C.

  19. The Apollo lunar surface water vapor event revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. W., Jr.; Hills, H. K.

    1991-01-01

    On March 7, 1971, the first sunrise following the Apollo 14 mission, the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) deployed at the Apollo 14 site reported an intense flux of ions whose mass per charge was consistent with water vapor. The amount of water is examined, and the various acceleration processes, responsible for accelerating ions into the SIDE, are discussed. It is concluded that during most of the event the observed water vapor ions were accelerated by the negative lunar surface electric potential and, secondly, that this event was probably the result of mission associated water vapor, either from the LM ascent and descent stage rockets or from residual water in the descent stage tanks.

  20. Removal of radioactive iodine from water using Ag2O grafted titanate nanolamina as efficient adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Bo, Arixin; Sarina, Sarina; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Yang, Dongjiang; Liu, Hongwei; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2013-02-15

    Emergency treatment of radioactive material leakage and safety disposal of nuclear waste is a constant concern all along with the development of radioactive materials applications. To provide a solution, titanate with large surface area (143 m(2)g(-1)) and a lamina morphology (the thickness of the lamina is in range of tens of nanometers) was prepared from inorganic titanium compounds by hydrothermal reactions at 433 K. Ag(2)O nanocrystals (5-30 nm) were deposited onto the titanate lamina. The surface of the titanate lamina has crystallographic similarity to that of Ag(2)O nanocrystals. Hence, the deposited Ag(2)O nanocrystals and titanate substrate join together at these surfaces, forming a well-matched phase coherent interface between them. Such coherence between the two phases reduces the overall energy by minimizing surface energy and anchors the Ag(2)O nanocrystals firmly on the external surface of the titanate structure. The composite thus obtained was applied as efficient adsorbent to remove radioactive iodine from water (one gram adsorbent can capture up to 3.4 mmol of I(-) anions). The composite adsorbent can be recovered easily for safe disposal. The structure changes of the titanate lamina and the composite adsorbent were monitored by various techniques. The isotherm and kinetics of iodine adsorption, competitive adsorption and column adsorption using the adsorbent were studied to assess its iodine removal abilities. The adsorbent exhibited a capacity as high as 3.4 mmol of iodine per gram of adsorbent in 1h. Therefore, Ag(2)O deposited titanate lamina is an effective adsorbent for removing radioactive iodine from water. PMID:23313892

  1. Removal and recycle of phosphate from treated water of sewage plants with zirconium ferrite adsorbent by high gradient magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, D.; Nishimura, K.; Miura, O.

    2009-03-01

    Zirconium ferrite particles are good adsorbent for phosphate ions. Magnetic separation characteristics for removal of phosphate from treated water of sewage plants with the adsorbent have been studied to prevent eutrophication of semi-enclosed bay, e.g. the bay of Tokyo. Based on the adsorption for the phosphate ions and ferromagnetic properties of the zirconium ferrite adsorbent, high gradient magnetic separation characteristics with using superconducting magnet was discussed. Very rapid magnetic filtration velocity, i.e. 1m/s, and regeneration properties of the adsorbent indicate that the zirconium ferrite is the excellent adsorbent for phosphorus removal and recycle from treated water of large scale sewage plants.

  2. Improved waste water vapor compression distillation technology. [for Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nuccio, P. P.; Reveley, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor compression distillation process is a method of recovering potable water from crewman urine in a manned spacecraft or space station. A description is presented of the research and development approach to the solution of the various problems encountered with previous vapor compression distillation units. The design solutions considered are incorporated in the preliminary design of a vapor compression distillation subsystem. The new design concepts are available for integration in the next generation of support systems and, particularly, the regenerative life support evaluation intended for project Spacelab.

  3. Numerical simulation of water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1995-01-01

    Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.

  4. Structure of water adsorbed on a mica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Ho; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-01-29

    Monte Carlo simulations of hydration water on the mica (001) surface under ambient conditions revealed water molecules bound closely to the ditrigonal cavities in the surface, with a lateral distribution of approximately one per cavity, and water molecules interposed between K{sup +} counter ions in a layer situated about 2.5 {angstrom} from a surface O along a direction normal to the (001) plane. The calculated water O density profile was in quantitative agreement with recent X-ray reflectivity measurements indicating strong lateral ordering of the hydration water but liquid-like disorder otherwise.

  5. Preliminary results on the immobilisation of radionuclides from waters with specific adsorbers based on phosphate salts.

    PubMed

    Valentini Ganzerli, Maria Teresa; Maggi, Luigino; Crespi Caramella, Vera; Berzero, Antonella

    2004-11-01

    The present paper is focused on the ability of aluminium phosphate (ALPC), magnesium ammonium phosphate (MGPC), magnesium hydrogen phosphate (MGHPC), and calcium hydrogenphosphate (CAHPC), adsorbed onto charcoal, to immobilise actinides by adsorption from natural waters. The objective of this process is to evaluate the environmental pollution due to the actinides. Europium, thorium, protactinium, neptunyl, and uranyl ions were chosen to simulate actinides in the +3, +4, +5 and +6 oxidation state. The adsorbers were tested using natural waters samples. The adsorption trends and capacities were analysed. ALPC and MGPC exhibited a similar behaviour and adsorbed demonstrating that the +5, +4 and +3 actinide ions can be easily immobilised from natural waters and may be successfully used at pH 7-8. MGHPC may be used at a higher pH, whereas CAHPC is effective in the whole pH range. In all cases, thorium, protactinium and europium were strongly PMID:15626242

  6. Sevoflurane Contamination: Water Accumulation in Sevoflurane Vaporizers Can Allow Bacterial Growth in the Vaporizer.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Arthur W

    2016-06-15

    Sevoflurane vaporizers (GE Tec 7) were difficult to fill with "slow flow" and a need to "burp." Evaluation of the bottle of sevoflurane (AbbVie Ultane) demonstrated a contaminant. Four of the facilities' 13 sevoflurane vaporizers had the contaminant. Unopened sevoflurane bottles did not have evidence of contamination. The contaminant was found to be water at pH 6.0 growing Staphylococcus epidermidis. Gas chromatography revealed the production of multiple metabolites of sevoflurane, including primarily urea and 1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (83% and 9.6% of volatiles) in addition to multiple other organic molecules. Sevoflurane contains water that can accumulate in vaporizers allowing bacterial growth. PMID:27301057

  7. Electron-Stimulated Oxidation of Thin Water Films Adsorbed on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Christopher D.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2007-11-08

    Electron-stimulated reactions in thin (< 3 monolayer, ML) water films adsorbed on TiO2(110) are investigated. For electron fluences less than ~1×1016 e-/cm2, irradiation with 100 eV electrons results in electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of atomic and molecular hydrogen, but no measurable O2. The ESD leaves adsorbed hydroxyls which oxidize the TiO2(110) surface and change the post-irradiation TPD spectra of the remaining water in characteristic ways. The species remaining on the TiO2(110) after irradiation of adsorbed water films are apparently similar to those produced without irradiation by co-dosing water and O2. Annealing above ~600 K reduces the oxidized surfaces, and water TPD spectra characteristic of ion sputtered and annealed TiO2(110) are recovered. The rate of electron-stimulated “oxidation” of the water films is proportional to the coverage of water in the first layer for coverages less than 1 ML. However, higher coverages suppress this reaction. When thin water films are irradiated, the rate of electron-stimulated oxidation is independent of the initial oxygen vacancy concentration, as is the final oxidized state achieved at high electron fluences. To explain the results, we propose that electron excitation of water molecules adsorbed on Ti4+ sites leads to desorption of hydrogen atoms and leaves an OH adsorbed at the site. If hydroxyls are present in the bridging oxygen rows, these react with the OH’s on the Ti4+ sites to reform water and heal the oxygen vacancy associated with the bridging OH. Once the bridge bonded hydroxyls have been eliminated, further irradiation increases the concentration of OH’s in the Ti4+ rows leading to the creation of species which block sites in the Ti4+ rows, perhaps H2O2 and/or HO2.

  8. Persistent disparities in stratospheric water vapor measurements drive large uncertainties in the radiative forcing by lower stratospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, D. F.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Portmann, R. W.; Voemel, H.; Schiller, C.; Smith, J. B.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Lower stratospheric water vapor is a powerful attenuator of outgoing long wave radiation, hence its strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. The radiative forcing by lower stratospheric water vapor is, however, quite uncertain because of significant disparities in lower stratospheric water vapor measurements by different instruments. Specifically, measurement discrepancies of 0.5 to 2 ppmv H2O (15 to 60%) between several well-established aircraft- and balloon-borne instruments have now persisted for almost two decades. The Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) in April 2011 provided not only a fresh opportunity to reexamine and reevaluate these persistent measurement discrepancies, but also to compare water vapor measurements by additional aircraft-based instrumentation. Here we compare the in situ measurements of lower stratospheric water vapor by five different instruments during MACPEX. Three of these instruments (Harvard water, FISH, and NOAA CIMS) were aboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft, while two (CFH and NOAA FPH) were launched on balloons. Substantial efforts were made to coordinate aircraft and balloon measurements in space and time, such that the aircraft would reach maximum altitude en route to the balloon rendezvous point, then both aircraft and balloon would descend together. Lower stratospheric water vapor measurements during MACPEX generally fall into two groups: CFH, NOAA FPH and FISH are in good agreement, while Harvard water and NOAA CIMS agree with each other but are significantly different than the other group. Differences between the two groups range from 0.5 to 1.0 ppmv (15 to 30%), with Harvard and NOAA CIMS mixing ratios consistently higher. Though these differences seem relatively large, they are smaller than some previously observed differences between the FPH/CFH and Harvard water. For example, Harvard stratospheric water vapor measurements during the 1993 CEPEX and 2006 CR-AVE campaigns were 1.5 and 2 ppmv

  9. Lidar simulation. [measurement of atmospheric water vapor via optical radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring atmospheric water vapor via orbital lidar is estimated. The calculation starts with laser radar equations representing backscatter with and without molecular line absorption; the magnitudes of off-line backscatter are demonstrated. Extensive prior data on water line strengths are summarized to indicate the available sensitivity to water vapor concentration. Several lidar situations are considered starting with uniform and perturbed atmospheres at 0, 3, 10 and 20 kM (stratosphere) altitudes. These simulations are indicative of results to be obtained in ground truth measurements (ground-based and airborne). An approximate treatment of polar observations is also given. Vertical atmospheric soundings from orbit and from ground stations are calculated. Errors are discussed as regards their propagation through the lidar equation to render the measured water vapor concentration imprecise; conclusions are given as to required laser energy and feasible altitude resolution.

  10. Removal of Sarin Aerosol and Vapor by Water Sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, John E.

    1998-09-01

    Falling water drops can collect particles and soluble or reactive vapor from the gas through which they fall. Rain is known to remove particles and vapors by the process of rainout. Water sprays can be used to remove radioactive aerosol from the atmosphere of a nuclear reactor containment building. There is a potential for water sprays to be used as a mitigation technique to remove chemical or bio- logical agents from the air. This paper is a quick-look at water spray removal. It is not definitive but rather provides a reasonable basic model for particle and gas removal and presents an example calcu- lation of sarin removal from a BART station. This work ~ a starting point and the results indicate that further modeling and exploration of additional mechanisms for particle and vapor removal may prove beneficial.

  11. Radiation Damage to Artemia Cysts:Effects of Water Vapor.

    PubMed

    Snipes, W C; Gordy, W

    1963-10-25

    Water vapor altered the form and greatly increased the rate of decay of the electron-spin resonance pattern of long-lived free radicals obtained upon gamma irradiation of Artemia salina cysts ( brine shrimp eggs). These results, combined with data on radiation survival, indicate that the water vapor protects the cysts from radiation damage, or heals the damage. They also indicate that water protects the cysts from the effect of oxygen by neutralizing the radiation-induced free radicals before they can interact with oxygen to produce irreversible damage. PMID:17748168

  12. Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Hines, A.L.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1995-02-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherms are reported for radon and water vapor on two commercial activated carbons: coconut shell Type PCB and hardwood Type BD. The isotherms of the water vapor were measured gravimetrically at 298 K. The isotherms of radon from dry nitrogen were obtained at 293, 298, and 308 K while the data for the mixture of radon and water vapor were measured at 298 K. The concentrations of radon in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously, once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products were established. The shape of the isotherms was of Type III for the radon and Type V for the water vapor, according to Brunauer`s classification. The adsorption mechanism was similar for both the radon and the water vapor, being physical adsorption on the macropore surface area in the low pressure region and micropore filling near saturation pressure. The uptake capacity of radon decreased both with increasing temperature and relative humidity. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the PCB- and the BD-activated carbons provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data for radon were correlated with a modified Freundlich equation.

  13. What regulates the annual cycle of stratospheric water vapor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jucker, Martin; Gerber, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is a potent greenhouse gas and active chemical tracer. Most of the stratosphere is well below saturation due to freeze drying at the tropical cold point -- the coldest region of the lower stratosphere where most air enters the middle atmosphere. The leading mode of variability of the tropical cold point is an annual cycle, despite the semi-annual cycle of radiative forcing in the tropics. This causes the stratospheric water vapor mixing ratio to follow a similar annual cycle, even remotely from the entry point, the so-called tape recorder. We develop an idealized GCM to investigate the origin of the annual cycle in the tropical cold point, with a particular focus on the interaction between dynamics and radiation. By varying the surface conditions of the model, we first show that planetary scale asymmetries in the midlatitude troposphere drive the annual cycle in the cold point. Both large scale topography and land sea contrast are important, influencing synoptic and planetary scale wave forcing. We then probe the impact of water vapor on the stratospheric circulation by comparing fully interactive integrations of the model to companion integrations where the coupling between the circulation and water vapor is disconnected. Our findings have implications in estimating the impacts of stratospheric water vapor feedbacks on decadal time scales and sensitivities to climate change.

  14. Proposed reference model for middle atmosphere water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, E. W.; Remsberg, E. E.; Rodgers, C. D.; Munro, R.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; McCormick, M. P.; Russell, J. M.

    Several new and significant satellite data sets on middle atmosphere water vapor have been produced recently. They include data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) and the Nimbus-7 Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) experiment. The SAGE II data provide an estimate of interannual variability of water vapor in the stratosphere. The SAMS data are appropriate for the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. We combine these two data sets with those from the Nimbus-7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment to update the COSPAR interim reference model for water vapor. Water vapor profiles from the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment, ground-based microwave, and in situ balloon and aircraft measurements have been used to check the quality of the satellite data sets. The updated reference model is given as a function of latitude and pressure altitude and now covers all four seasons. Tabulations are included for these seasonal water vapor mixing ratios (in ppmv) and their estimated errors (in percent).

  15. Empirical water vapor continuum models for infrared propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael E.

    1995-06-01

    The characterization of the water vapor continuum remains an important problem concerning infrared propagation in the atmosphere. Radiometric imaging within the atmosphere in the 8 to 12 micrometers and 3 - 5 micrometers regions, and eye safe lidar in the 2 micrometers and 1.6 micrometers window regions require accurate knowledge of the water vapor continuum. Although the physical nature of the continuum is a complex problem, the observed frequency, pressure and temperature dependence can be represented reasonably well by simple mathematical functions consistent with far wing theories. This approach is the basis for current models used in LOWTRAN/MODTRAN and for the models listed in the SPIE/ERIM EO/IR Systems Handbook (Volume 2 Chapter 1). However, these models are based solely on a limited, but high quality, data set collected by a spectrometer and White cell. Additional information on oxygen broadening and temperature dependence is available from numerous laser measurements of the water vapor continuum. A survey of relevant experimental data is made to determine the best available measurements of the water vapor continuum in various atmospheric window regions. Then the data are fit to an empirical model over the entire window region. A good fit is obtained for typical atmospheric conditions covering the 8 to 12 micrometers and 3 to 5 micrometers regions. No experimental data, covering atmospheric conditions, exist in the 2 micrometers and 1.6 micrometers regions. However, models can be proposed based on far wing extrapolations of the bordering vibrational water vapor bands.

  16. Enhanced removal of nitrate from water using surface modification of adsorbents--a review.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Kandasamy, Jaya

    2013-12-15

    Elevated concentration of nitrate results in eutrophication of natural water bodies affecting the aquatic environment and reduces the quality of drinking water. This in turn causes harm to people's health, especially that of infants and livestock. Adsorbents with the high capacity to selectively adsorb nitrate are required to effectively remove nitrate from water. Surface modifications of adsorbents have been reported to enhance their adsorption of nitrate. The major techniques of surface modification are: protonation, impregnation of metals and metal oxides, grafting of amine groups, organic compounds including surfactant coating of aluminosilicate minerals, and heat treatment. This paper reviews current information on these techniques, compares the enhanced nitrate adsorption capacities achieved by the modifications, and the mechanisms of adsorption, and presents advantages and drawbacks of the techniques. Most studies on this subject have been conducted in batch experiments. These studies need to include continuous mode column trials which have more relevance to real operating systems and pilot-plant trials. Reusability of adsorbents is important for economic reasons and practical treatment applications. However, only limited information is available on the regeneration of surface modified adsorbents. PMID:24211565

  17. Accurate predictions for the production of vaporized water

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, E.; Montel, F.

    1995-12-31

    The production of water vaporized in the gas phase is controlled by the local conditions around the wellbore. The pressure gradient applied to the formation creates a sharp increase of the molar water content in the hydrocarbon phase approaching the well; this leads to a drop in the pore water saturation around the wellbore. The extent of the dehydrated zone which is formed is the key controlling the bottom-hole content of vaporized water. The maximum water content in the hydrocarbon phase at a given pressure, temperature and salinity is corrected by capillarity or adsorption phenomena depending on the actual water saturation. Describing the mass transfer of the water between the hydrocarbon phases and the aqueous phase into the tubing gives a clear idea of vaporization effects on the formation of scales. Field example are presented for gas fields with temperatures ranging between 140{degrees}C and 180{degrees}C, where water vaporization effects are significant. Conditions for salt plugging in the tubing are predicted.

  18. Electrolysis cell functions as water vapor dehumidifier and oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Water vapor is absorbed in hygroscopic electrolyte, and oxygen generated by absorbed water electrolysis at anode is added simultaneously to air stream. Cell applications include on-board aircraft oxygen systems, portable oxygen generators, oxygen concentration requirements, and commercial air conditioning and dehumidifying systems.

  19. Numerical and Experimental Quantification of coupled water and water vapor fluxes in very dry soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Raneem; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions with deep groundwater and very dry soils, vapor movement in the vadose zone may be a major component in the total water flux. Therefore, the coupled movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat transport in the unsaturated zone should be explicitly considered to quantify subsurface water fluxes in such regions. Only few studies focused on the importance of vapor water diffusion in dry soils and in many water flow studies in soil it was neglected. We are interested in the importance of water vapor diffusion and condensation in very dry sand. A version of Hydrus-1D capable of solving the coupled water vapor and heat transport equations will be used to do the numerical modeling. The soil hydraulic properties will be experimentally determined. A soil column experiment was developed with negligible liquid flow in order to isolate vapor flux for testing. We have used different values of initial water contents trying to generate different scenarios to assess the role of the water vapor transport in arid and semi-arid soils and how it changes the soil water content using different soil hydraulic parametrization functions. In the session a preliminary experimental and modelling results of vapor and water fluxes will be presented.

  20. Analysis of the global ISCCP TOVS water vapor climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmeyer, Ian L.; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1994-01-01

    A climatological examination of the global water vapor field based on a multiyear period of successfull satellite-based observations is presented. Results from the multiyear global ISCCP TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) water vapor dataset as operationally produced by NESDIS and ISCCP are shown. The methods employed for the retrieval of precipitable water content (PWC) utilize infrared measurements collected by the TOVS instrument package flown aboard the NOAA series of operational polar-orbiting satellites. Strengths of this dataset include the nearly global daily coverage, availability for a multiyear period, operational internal quality checks, and its description of important features in the mean state of the atmosphere. Weaknesses of this PWC dataset include that the infrared sensors are unable to collect data in cloudy regions, the retrievals are strongly biased toward a land-based radiosonde first-guess dataset, and the description of high spatial and temporal variability is inadequate. Primary consequences of these factors are seen in the underestimation of ITCZ water vapor maxima, and underestimation of midlatitude water vapor mean and standard deviation values where transient atmospheric phenomena contribute significantly toward time means. A comparison of TOVS analyses to SSM/I data over ocean for the month of July 1988 shows fair agreement in the magnitude and distribution of the monthly mean values, but the TOVS fields exhibit much less temporal and spatial variability on a daily basis in comparison to the SSM/I analyses. The emphasis of this paper is on the presentation and documentation of an early satellite-based water vapor climatology, and description of factors that prevent a more accurate representation of the global water vapor field.

  1. Validation of Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's OMI Water Vapor Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.

    2015-12-01

    We perform a comprehensive validation of SAO's OMI water vapor product. The SAO OMI water vapor slant column is retrieved using the 430 - 480 nm wavelength range. In addition to water vapor, the retrieval considers O3, NO2, liquid water, O4, C2H2O2, the Ring effect, water ring, 3rd order polynomial, common mode and under-sampling. The slant column is converted to vertical column using AMF. AMF is calculated using GEOS-Chem water vapor profile shape, OMCLDO2 cloud information and OMLER surface albedo information. We validate our product using NCAR's GPS network data over the world and RSS's gridded microwave data over the ocean. We also compare our product with the total precipitable water derived from the AERONET ground-based sun photometer data, the GlobVapour gridded product, and other datasets. We investigate the influence of sub-grid scale variability and filtering criteria on the comparison. We study the influence of clouds, aerosols and a priori profiles on the retrieval. We also assess the long-term performance and stability of our product and seek ways to improve it.

  2. Interactions of adsorbed CO₂ on water ice at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Karssemeijer, L J; de Wijs, G A; Cuppen, H M

    2014-08-01

    We present a computational study into the adsorption properties of CO2 on amorphous and crystalline water surfaces under astrophysically relevant conditions. Water and carbon dioxide are two of the most dominant species in the icy mantles of interstellar dust grains and a thorough understanding of their solid phase interactions at low temperatures is crucial for understanding the structural evolution of the ices due to thermal segregation. In this paper, a new H2O-CO2 interaction potential is proposed and used to model the ballistic deposition of CO2 layers on water ice surfaces, and to study the individual binding sites at low coverages. Contrary to recent experimental results, we do not observe CO2 island formation on any type of water substrate. Additionally, density functional theory calculations are performed to assess the importance of induced electrostatic interactions. PMID:24955794

  3. Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption technique to retrieve columnar water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaepfer, D.; Itten, K.I.; Borel, C.C.; Keller, J.

    1998-09-01

    Differential absorption techniques are suitable to retrieve the total column water vapor contents from imaging spectroscopy data. A technique called Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption (APDA) is derived directly from simplified radiative transfer equations. It combines a partial atmospheric correction with a differential absorption technique. The atmospheric path radiance term is iteratively corrected during the retrieval of water vapor. This improves the results especially over low background albedos. The error of the method for various ground reflectance spectra is below 7% for most of the spectra. The channel combinations for two test cases are then defined, using a quantitative procedure, which is based on MODTRAN simulations and the image itself. An error analysis indicates that the influence of aerosols and channel calibration is minimal. The APDA technique is then applied to two AVIRIS images acquired in 1991 and 1995. The accuracy of the measured water vapor columns is within a range of {+-}5% compared to ground truth radiosonde data.

  4. Water vapor-nitrogen absorption at CO2 laser frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Nordstrom, R. J.; Damon, E. K.; Long, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a series of pressure-broadened water vapor absorption measurements at 27 CO2 laser frequencies between 935 and 1082 kaysers. Both multiple traversal cell and optoacoustic (spectrophone) techniques were utilized together with an electronically stabilized CW CO2 laser. Comparison of the results obtained by these two methods shows remarkable agreement, indicating a precision which has not been previously achieved in pressure-broadened studies of water vapor. The data of 10.59 microns substantiate the existence of the large (greater than 200) self-broadening coefficients determined in an earlier study by McCoy. In this work, the case of water vapor in N2 at a total pressure of 1 atm has been treated.

  5. Water vapor in the lower stratosphere measured from aircraft flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Guenther, B.; Dunn, P.

    1977-01-01

    Water vapor in the lower stratosphere was measured in situ by two aluminum oxide hygrometers mounted on the nose of an RB57 aircraft. Data were taken nearly continuously from January to May 1974 from an altitude of approximately 11-19 km as the aircraft flew between 70 deg N and 50 deg S over the land areas in the Western Hemisphere. Pseudomeridional cross sections of water vapor and temperature were derived from the flight data and show mixing ratios predominantly between 2 and 4 microg/g with an extreme range of 1-8 microg/g. Measurement precision was estimated by comparing the simultaneously measured values from the two flight hygrometer systems. Accuracy was estimated to be about + or - 40% at 19 km. A height-averaged latitudinal cross section of water vapor indicates symmetry of wet and dry zones. This cross section is compared with other aircraft measurements and relates to meridional circulation models.

  6. Water vapor in the lower stratosphere measured from aircraft flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Guenther, B.; Dunn, P.

    1976-01-01

    Water vapor in the lower stratosphere was measured in situ by two aluminum oxide hygrometers mounted on the nose of an RB57 aircraft. Data were taken nearly continuously from January to May 1974 from an altitude of approximately 11 km to 19 km as the aircraft flew between 70 deg N and 50 deg S over the land areas in the Western Hemisphere. Pseudomeridional cross sections of water vapor and temperature are derived from the flight data and show mixing ratios predominantly between 2 and 4 micron gm/gm with an extreme range of 1 to 8 micron gm/gm. Measurement precision is estimated by comparing the simultaneously measured values from the two flight hygrometer systems. Accuracy is estimated to be about + or - 40 percent at 19 km. A height-averaged latitudinal cross section of water vapor shows symmetry of wet and dry zones.

  7. An opacity-sampled treatment of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David R.; Augason, Gordon C.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1989-01-01

    Although the bands of H2O are strong in the spectra of cool stars and calculations have repeatedly demonstrated their significance as opacity sources, only approximate opacities are currently available, due both to the difficulty of accounting for the millions of lines involved and to the inadequacy of laboratory and theoretical data. To overcome these obstacles, a new treatment is presented, based upon a statistical representation of the water vapor spectrum derived from available laboratory data. This statistical spectrum of water vapor employs an exponential distribution of line strengths and random positions of lines whose overall properties are forced to reproduce the mean opacities observed in the laboratory. The resultant data set is then treated by the opacity-sampling method exactly as are all other lines, both molecular and atomic. Significant differences are found between the results of this improved treatment and the results obtained with previous treatments of water-vapor opacity.

  8. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  9. Dynamics of water molecules adsorbed by silica and resin SGK-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisichkin, Yu. V.; Sakharova, L. A.; Tumanov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper has presented neutron spectroscopy data on the dynamics of light water molecules adsorbed in the cation exchanger (ion-exchange resin) SGK-7 and on the surface of aerosils (highly dispersed pyrogenic silica) with different levels of hydration. The measurements have been performed on a DIN-2PI spectrometer (Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia). The characteristics of the diffusive and vibrational motions of adsorbed water molecules have been determined from the experimental neutron scattering spectra. The data obtained in the quasi-elastic neutron scattering region have been analyzed using a model accounting for the effects of restricted translational and rotational diffusion. The results have demonstrated a significant decrease in the diffusion mobility of adsorbed water molecules as compared to conventional (bulk) water. In particular, the self-diffusion coefficient decreases several times, and the diffusion rate is the lower, the smaller is the thickness of the hydration layer. The dependences of the intensity and half-width of the quasi-elastic scattering peak on the magnitude of the neutron momentum transfer q in the scattering process exhibit a nonmonotonic character. This indicates manifestation of the effects of restricted translational diffusion, rotational diffusion, and jump diffusion. The partial distributions of vibrational frequencies of hydrogen atoms of water molecules adsorbed by the cation exchanger and aerosils have been obtained from the inelastic neutron scattering data.

  10. Water vapor measurements in- and outside cirrus with the novel water vapor mass spectrometer AIMS-H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Stefan; Schlage, Romy; Voigt, Christiane; Jurkat, Tina; Krämer, Martina; Rolf, Christian; Zöger, Martin; Schäfler, Andreas; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Water vapor plays a crucial role for the earth's climate both directly via its radiative properties and indirectly due to its ability to form clouds. However, accurate measurements of especially low water vapor concentrations prevalent in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are difficult and exhibit large discrepancies between different instruments and methods. In order to address this issue and to provide a comprehensive water vapor data set necessary to gather a complete picture of cloud formation processes, four state-of-the-art hygrometers including the novel water vapor mass spectrometer AIMS-H2O were deployed on the DLR research aircraft HALO during the ML-Cirrus campaign in March/April 2014 over Europe. Here, we present first water vapor measurements of AIMS-H2O on HALO. The instrument performance is validated by intercomparison with the fluorescence hygrometer FISH and the laser hygrometer SHARC, both also mounted in the aircraft. This intercomparison shows good agreement between the instruments from low stratospheric mixing ratios up to higher H2O concentrations at upper tropospheric conditions. Gathering data from over 24 flight hours, no significant offsets between the instruments were found (mean of relative deviation

  11. Modeling upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric water vapor anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Dessler, A. E.; Wang, T.

    2013-08-01

    The domain-filling, forward trajectory calculation model developed by Schoeberl and Dessler (2011) is used to further investigate processes that produce upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric water vapor anomalies. We examine the pathways parcels take from the base of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) to the lower stratosphere. Most parcels found in the lower stratosphere arise from East Asia, the Tropical West Pacific (TWP) and Central/South America. The belt of TTL parcel origins is very wide compared to the final dehydration zones near the top of the TTL. This is due to the convergence of rising air due to the stronger diabatic heating near the tropopause relative to levels above and below. The observed water vapor anomalies - both wet and dry - correspond to regions where parcels have minimal displacement from their initialization. These minimum displacement regions include the winter TWP and the Asian and American monsoons. To better understand the stratospheric water vapor concentration we introduce the water vapor spectrum and investigate the source of the wettest and driest components of the spectrum. We find that the driest air parcels originate below the TWP, moving upward to dehydrate in the TWP cold upper troposphere. The wettest air parcels originate at the edges of the TWP as well as in the summer American and Asian monsoons. The wet air parcels are important since they skew the mean stratospheric water vapor distribution toward higher values. Both TWP cold temperatures that produce dry parcels as well as extra-TWP processes that control the wet parcels determine stratospheric water vapor.

  12. Modeling upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric water vapor anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Dessler, A. E.; Wang, T.

    2013-04-01

    The domain-filling, forward trajectory calculation model developed by Schoeberl and Dessler (2011) is used to further investigate processes that produce upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric water vapor anomalies. We examine the pathways parcels take from the base of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) to the lower stratosphere. Most parcels found in the lower stratosphere arise from East Asia, the Tropical West Pacific (TWP) and the Central/South America. The belt of TTL parcel origins is very wide compared to the final dehydration zones near the top of the TTL. This is due to the convergence of rising air as a result of the stronger diabatic heating near the tropopause relative to levels above and below. The observed water vapor anomalies - both wet and dry - correspond to regions where parcels have minimal displacement from their initialization. These minimum displacement regions include the winter TWP and the Asian and American monsoons. To better understand the stratospheric water vapor concentration we introduce the water vapor spectrum and investigate the source of the wettest and driest components of the spectrum. We find that the driest air parcels that originate below the TWP, moving upward to dehydrate in the TWP cold upper troposphere. The wettest air parcels originate at the edges of the TWP as well as the summer American and Asian monsoons. The wet air parcels are important since they skew the mean stratospheric water vapor distribution toward higher values. Both TWP cold temperatures that produce dry parcels as well as extra-TWP processes that control the wet parcels determine stratospheric water vapor.

  13. Investigation of water vapor motion winds from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, Christopher S.; Nieman, Steven J.; Wanzong, Steven

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from geostationary satellites has been available for over a decade. These data are used extensively by operational analysts and forecasters, mainly in a qualitative mode (Weldon and Holmes 1991). In addition to qualitative applications, motions deduced in animated water vapor imagery can be used to infer wind fields in cloudless regimes, thereby augmenting the information provided by cloud-drift wind vectors. Early attempts at quantifying the data by tracking features in water vapor imagery met with modest success (Stewart et al. 1985; Hayden and Stewart 1987). More recently, automated techniques have been developed and refined, and have resulted in upper-level wind observations comparable in quality to current operational cloud-tracked winds (Laurent 1993). In a recent study by Velden et al. (1993) it was demonstrated that wind sets derived from Meteosat-3 (M-3) water vapor imagery can provide important environmental wind information in data void areas surrounding tropical cyclones, and can positively impact objective track forecasts. M-3 was repositioned to 75W by the European Space Agency in 1992 in order to provide complete coverage of the Atlantic Ocean. Data from this satellite are being transmitted to the U.S. for operational use. Compared with the current GOES-7 (G-7) satellite (positioned near 112W), the M-3 water vapor channel contains a superior horizontal resolution (5 km vs. 16 km ). In this paper, we examine wind sets derived using automated procedures from both GOES-7 and Meteosat-3 full disk water vapor imagery in order to assess this data as a potentially important source of large-scale wind information. As part of a product demonstration wind sets were produced twice a day at CIMSS during a six-week period in March and April (1994). These data sets are assessed in terms of geographic coverage, statistical accuracy, and meteorological impact through preliminary results of numerical model forecast studies.

  14. Detection and Measurement of Charge in Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Positive charge is found in newly formed water vapor. Two detection and two measurement experiments are presented. The detection experiments are simple; their purpose is only to show the existence of charge in water vapor. The first of these experiments places one exposed end of an insulated wire in the vapor space of a flask, which holds boiling water. The other end of this wire is connected to the input high of an electrometer. The input low, in all of the presented experiments, is grounded. The second experiment detects charge by capacitive induction. It uses a beaker with gold leaves gilded on its outside surface. When water boils inside the beaker, the vapor charge is detected by the gold layer without contacting the water or vapor. The two measurement experiments have sensors made of conducting fabric. The fabric is used to cover the opening of a flask, which holds boiling water, to collect the charge in the escaping vapor. These two experiments differ by the number of fabric layers --- four in one and six in the other. The results obtained from these two experiments are essentially the same, within the margin of error, 0.734 & 0.733 nC per gram of vapor. Since the added two layers of the six-layer sensor do not collect more charge than the four-layer sensor, the four-layer sensor must have collected all available charge. The escaping vapor exits into a chamber, which has only a small area opening connecting to the atmosphere. This chamber prevents direct contact between the sensor and the ambient air, which is necessary because air is found to affect the readings from the sensor. Readings taken in the surrounding area in all four experiments show no accumulation of negative charge. These experiments identify a source for the atmospheric electricity in a laboratory environment other than that has been discussed in the literature. However, they also raise the question about the missing negative charge that would be predicted by charge balance or the

  15. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Naphthalene Vapor on Water Surface

    PubMed

    Smolík; Schwarz

    1997-01-15

    The evaporation of a water drop into a ternary gaseous mixture of air, steam, and naphthalene vapor was investigated. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical prediction based on a numerical solution of coupled boundary layer equations for heat and mass transfer from a drop moving in ternary gas. In the experiments the naphthalene vapor condensed on the water drop as a supercooled liquid even at temperatures far below the melting point of naphthalene. The condensation on drop surface is discussed in terms of classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation on smooth surfaces. PMID:9028892

  16. Stability of Materials in High Temperature Water Vapor: SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell material systems require long term stability in environments containing high-temperature water vapor. Many materials in fuel cell systems react with high-temperature water vapor to form volatile hydroxides which can degrade cell performance. In this paper, experimental methods to characterize these volatility reactions including the transpiration technique, thermogravimetric analysis, and high pressure mass spectrometry are reviewed. Experimentally determined data for chromia, silica, and alumina volatility are presented. In addition, data from the literature for the stability of other materials important in fuel cell systems are reviewed. Finally, methods for predicting material recession due to volatilization reactions are described.

  17. Ion removal from waste water using immobilized adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacson, A.E.; Jeffers, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes experiments investigating the removal of various anions from dilute aqueous streams using mixtures of ferric hydroxide and peat moss immobilized in porous polymer beads. Cyclic load-strip tests were conducted at aqueous-to-bead radios of 20, 10, and 5 for loading, stripping, and conditioning, respectively. Beads were stripped with a sodium hydroxide solution and regenerated with a dilute acid. Waste waters containing arsenic, chromium, molybdenum, selenium, tungsten, and vanadium were tested. The maximum waste loading on the beads was determined for each waste water; experimental isotherms are presented.

  18. Role(s) of adsorbed water in the surface chemistry of environmental interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-04-18

    The chemistry of environmental interfaces such as oxide and carbonate surfaces under ambient conditions of temperature and relative humidity is of great interest from many perspectives including heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry, heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, sensor technology, corrosion science, and cultural heritage science. As discussed here, adsorbed water plays important roles in the reaction chemistry of oxide and carbonate surfaces with indoor and outdoor pollutant molecules including nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, ozone and organic acids. Mechanisms of these reactions are just beginning to be unraveled and found to depend on the details of the reaction mechanism as well as the coverage of water on the surface. As discussed here, adsorbed water can: (i) alter reaction pathways and surface speciation relative to the dry surface; (ii) hydrolyze reactants, intermediates and products; (iii) enhance surface reactivity by providing a medium for ionic dissociation; (iv) inhibit surface reactivity by blocking sites; (v) solvate ions; (vi) enhance ion mobility on surfaces and (vii) alter the stability of surface adsorbed species. In this feature article, drawing on research that has been going on for over a decade on the reaction chemistry of oxide and carbonate surfaces under ambient conditions of temperature and relative humidity, a number of specific examples showing the multi-faceted roles of adsorbed water are presented. PMID:23417201

  19. Electrocatalytic reduction of dioxygen to water by iridium porphyrins adsorbed on edge plane graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Collman, J.P.; Chng, Leng Leng; Tyvoll, D.A.

    1995-03-15

    Electrocatalytic effects of adsorbed iridium porphyrin complexes for the reduction of oxygen to water was studied. The Ir(II) metal center is proposed as the active catalytic center and catalytic effects can be attributed to transformation to Ir(II) centers.

  20. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the

  1. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Padolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Mahoney, Michael J.; Richard, Erik

    2002-01-01

    This work describes transport and thermodynamic processes that control water vapor near the tropopause during the SAGE III-Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE), held during the Arctic 1999/2000 winter season. Aircraft-based water vapor, carbon monoxide, and ozone measurements were analyzed so as to establish how deeply tropospheric air mixes into the Arctic lowermost stratosphere and what the implications are for cloud formation and water vapor removal in this region of the atmosphere. There are three major findings. First, troposphere-to-stratosphere exchange extends into the Arctic stratosphere to about 13 km. Penetration is to similar levels throughout the winter, however, because ozone increases with altitude most rapidly in the early spring, tropospheric air mixes with the highest values of ozone in that season. The effect of this upward mixing is to elevate water vapor mixing ratios significantly above their prevailing stratospheric values of above 5ppmv. Second, the potential for cloud formation in the stratosphere is highest during early spring, with about 20% of the parcels which have ozone values of 300-350 ppbv experiencing ice saturation in a given 10 day period. Third, during early spring, temperatures at the troposphere are cold enough so that 5-10% of parcels experience relative humidities above 100%, even if the water content is as low as 5 ppmv. The implication is that during this period, dynamical processes near the Arctic tropopause can dehydrate air and keep the Arctic tropopause region very dry during early spring.

  2. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Podolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Hipskino, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work describes transport and thermodynamic processes that control water vapor near the tropopause during the SAGE Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE), held during the Arctic 1999-2000 winter season. Aircraft based water vapor, carbon monoxide, and ozone measurements are analyzed so as to establish how deeply tropospheric air mixes into the arctic lower-most stratosphere, and what the implications are for cloud formation and water vapor removal in this region of the atmosphere. There are three major findings. First, troposphere-to- stratosphere exchange extends into the arctic stratosphere to about 13 km. Penetration is to similar levels throughout the winter, however, because ozone increases idly in the early spring, tropospheric air mixes with the highest values of ozone in that season. The effect of this upward mixing is to elevate water vapor mixing ratios significantly above their prevailing stratospheric values of about 5 ppmv. Second, the potential for cloud formation in the stratosphere is highest during early spring, with about 20\\% of the parcels which have ozone values of 300-350ppbv experiencing ice saturation in a given 10 day period. Third, during early Spring temperatures at the tropopause are cold enough so that 5-10\\% of parcels experience relative humidities above 100\\%, even if the water content is as low as 5 ppmv. The implication is that during, this period the arctic tropopause can play an important role in maintaining a very dry upper troposphere during early Spring.

  3. Kinetic Interpretation of Water Vapor Adsorption-Desorption Behavior of a Desiccant Rotor Showing S-shaped Adsorption Isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kumiko; Oshima, Kazunori; Takewaki, Takahiko; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor containing an iron aluminophosphate type zeolite FAM-Z01 (Functional Adsorbent Material Zeolite 01) was experimentally investigated for humidity swing. This rotor exhibited an S-shaped adsorption isotherm with its temperature dependence. Humidity swing, using a small piece of the rotor, could be usefully applied to interpret adsorption / desorption mechanisms by observing their rates. The most significant finding was that the adsorption / desorption rates in humidity swing could be described by the amount of adsorption, temperature and amplitude of the humidity swing, not by cycle time. Also, using the liner driving force (LDF) model, the overall mass transfer coefficient changed with the elapse of time or with the amount of adsorbed water. This implied that the LDF model, considering constant value of the overall mass transfer coefficient, was probably unable to explain the water adsorption / desorption behavior of FAM-Z01 desiccant rotor.

  4. Supersaturation in the spontaneous formation of nuclei in water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Adolf; Damkohler, Gerhard

    1953-01-01

    According to experience, a certain supersaturation is required for condensation of water vapor in the homogeneous phase; that is, for inception of the condensation, at a prescribed temperature, the water vapor partial pressure must lie above the saturation pressure. The condensation starts on so-called condensation nuclei. Solid or liquid suspended particles may serve as nuclei; these particles may either a priori be present in the gas phase (dust, soot), or may spontaneously be formed from the vapor molecules to be condensed themselves. Only the second case will be considered. Gas ions which facilitate the spontaneous formation of nuclei may be present or absent. The supersaturations necessary for spontaneous nucleus formation are in general considerable higher than those in the presence of suspended particles.

  5. A water vapor monitor using differential infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, D. E.; Goodsell, D. S.

    1981-09-01

    A water vapor monitor was developed with adequate sensitivity and versatility for a variety of applications. Two applications are the continuous monitoring of water in ambient air and the measuring of the mass of water desorbed from aerosol filters. The sample gas may be held static, or flow continuously through the 56 cc sample cell, temperature controlled at 45 C. Infrared energy from a tungsten-iodide bulb passes through a rotating filter wheel and the sample cell to a PbS detector. The infrared beam passes through the sample gas twice to produce a total optical path of 40 cm. The infrared beam passes alternately through two semicircular narrow bandpass filters. Absorption by the water vapor in the sample produces a 30-Hz modulation of the detector signal that is proportional to the water concentration. The maximum concentration that can be measured accurately is approximately 5%.

  6. Turning things downside up: Adsorbate induced water flipping on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Greg A. E-mail: bruce.kay@pnnl.gov; Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kay, Bruce D. E-mail: bruce.kay@pnnl.gov

    2014-11-14

    We have examined the adsorption of the weakly bound species N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and Kr on the (√(37)×√(37))R25.3{sup ∘} water monolayer on Pt(111) using a combination of molecular beam dosing, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. In contrast to multilayer crystalline ice, the adsorbate-free water monolayer is characterized by a lack of dangling OH bonds protruding into the vacuum (H-up). Instead, the non-hydrogen-bonded OH groups are oriented downward (H-down) to maximize their interaction with the underlying Pt(111) substrate. Adsorption of Kr and O{sub 2} have little effect on the structure and vibrational spectrum of the “√(37)” water monolayer while adsorption of both N{sub 2}, and CO are effective in “flipping” H-down water molecules into an H-up configuration. This “flipping” occurs readily upon adsorption at temperatures as low as 20 K and the water monolayer transforms back to the H-down, “√(37)” structure upon adsorbate desorption above 35 K, indicating small energy differences and barriers between the H-down and H-up configurations. The results suggest that converting water in the first layer from H-down to H-up is mediated by the electrostatic interactions between the water and the adsorbates.

  7. Turning things downside up: Adsorbate induced water flipping on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Gregory A.; Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-11-14

    We have examined the adsorption of the weakly bound species N2, O2, CO and Kr on the water monolayer on Pt(111) using a combination of molecular beam dosing, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In contrast to multilayer crystalline ice, the adsorbate-free water monolayer is characterized by a lack of dangling OH bonds protruding into the vacuum (H-up). Instead, the non-hydrogen-bonded OH groups are oriented downward (H-down) to maximize their interaction with the underlying Pt(111) substrate. Adsorption of Kr and O2 have little effect on the structure and vibrational spectrum of the “ ” water monolayer while adsorption of both N2, and CO are effective in “flipping” H-down water molecules into an H-up configuration. This “flipping” occurs readily upon adsorption at temperatures as low as 20 K and the water monolayer transforms back to the H-down, “ ” structure upon adsorbate desorption above 35 K, indicating small energy differences and barriers between the H-down and H-up configurations. The results suggest that converting water in the first layer from H-down to H-up is mediated by the electrostatic interactions between the water and the adsorbates.

  8. Formation of 1D adsorbed water structures on CaO(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xunhua; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Ghiringhelli, Luca M.; Levchenko, Sergey V.; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of water with oxide surfaces is of fundamental importance for basic and engineering sciences. Recently, a spontaneous formation of one-dimensional (1D) adsorbed water structures have been observed on CaO(001). Interestingly, at other alkaline earth metal oxides, in particular MgO(001) and SrO(001), such structures have not been found experimentally. We calculate the relative stability of adsorbed water structures on the three oxides using density-functional theory combined with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics. Low-energy structures at different coverages are obtained with a first-principles genetic algorithm. Finite-temperature vibrational spectra are calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics. We find a range of (T, p) conditions where 1D structures are thermodynamically stable on CaO(001). The orientation and vibrational spectra of the 1D structures are in agreement with the experiments. The formation of the 1D structures is found to be actuated by a symmetry breaking in the adsorbed water tetramer, as well as by a balance between water-water and water-substrate interactions, determined by the lattice constant of the oxide.

  9. Water-soluble adsorbent β-cyclodextrin-grafted polyethyleneimine for removing bilirubin from plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Wei, Houliang; Jia, Lingyun; Xu, Li; Zou, Chunyi; Xie, Jian

    2012-10-01

    A water-soluble adsorbent was developed for removing bilirubin from the plasma of hyperbilirubinemia patient. The adsorbent was synthesized by grafting β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) to branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) matrix. The resulting β-CD-PEI polymer had an average molecular weight of 163.7 kD, and it contained 56.3 β-CD functional groups. In β-CD-PEI-spiked dialysis, 35.8% of plasma bilirubin was removed, which was higher than that removed by the same concentration of bovine serum albumin. β-CD-PEI also removed aromatic amino acids and bile acids. The results indicated that β-CD-PEI could be an effective adsorbent for blood purification application aiming at the removal of toxins. PMID:22836125

  10. Hard coal as a potential low-cost adsorbent for removal of 4-chlorophenol from water.

    PubMed

    Kuśmierek, Krzysztof; Zarębska, Katarzyna; Świątkowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The potential use of raw hard coals as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) from aqueous solutions was examined. The effect of experimental parameters such as the pH and salt presence was evaluated. The kinetic studies showed the equilibrium time was found to be 2 h for all of the adsorbents and that the adsorption process followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The adsorption isotherms of the 4-CP on the hard coals were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, Sips and Redlich-Peterson equations. Based on the results obtained, hard coals appear to be a promising adsorbent for the removal of some hazardous water pollutants, like 4-CP and related compounds. PMID:27120657

  11. Optimization of the preparation process of biological sludge adsorbents for application in water treatment.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pacheco, C V; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Sánchez-Polo, M; López-Peñalver, J J

    2012-05-30

    The objective of this study was to optimize the preparation of treatment plant wastewater sludge adsorbents for application in water treatment. The optimal adsorption capacity was obtained with adsorbents prepared by pyrolysis at 700°C for 3h. We studied the effect of binder type on the adsorbents, finding that their textural properties were not substantially affected by the addition of phenolic resins but their surface area was reduced by the presence of clayey soil. Analysis of the composition of surface groups in these materials revealed: (i) a high concentration of basic surface groups in non-activated pyrolyzed sludge, (ii) an increase in the concentration of basic surface groups after chemical activation, (iii) no modification in the concentration of carboxyl or basic groups with the addition of binding agent before the activation, and (iv) total disappearance of carbonyl groups from sample surfaces with the addition of humic acid or clayey soil as binder. All these adsorbents had a low C content. The capacity of these sludge-derived materials to adsorb methylene blue, 2,4-dichlorophenol, tetracycline, and (Cd(II)) was studied. Their adsorption capacity was considerably increased by the chemical activation but reduced by the pre-activation addition of a binding agent (humic acid, phenolic resin, and clayey soil). PMID:22472426

  12. Removal of lead and zinc ions from water by low cost adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, P C; Patel, R K

    2009-08-30

    In this study, activated carbon, kaolin, bentonite, blast furnace slag and fly ash were used as adsorbent with a particle size between 100 mesh and 200 mesh to remove the lead and zinc ions from water. The concentration of the solutions prepared was in the range of 50-100 mg/L for lead and zinc for single and binary systems which are diluted as required for batch experiments. The effect of contact time, pH and adsorbent dosage on removal of lead and zinc by adsorption was investigated. The equilibrium time was found to be 30 min for activated carbon and 3h for kaolin, bentonite, blast furnace slag and fly ash. The most effective pH value for lead and zinc removal was 6 for activated carbon. pH value did not effect lead and zinc removal significantly for other adsorbents. Adsorbent doses were varied from 5 g/L to 20 g/L for both lead and zinc solutions. An increase in adsorbent doses increases the percent removal of lead and zinc. A series of isotherm studies was undertaken and the data evaluated for compliance was found to match with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. To investigate the adsorption mechanism, the kinetic models were tested, and it follows second order kinetics. Kinetic studies reveals that blast furnace slag was not effective for lead and zinc removal. The bentonite and fly ash were effective for lead and zinc removal. PMID:19299083

  13. Alteration of an annealed and irradiated lunar fines sample by adsorbed water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Agron, P. A.; Eichler, E.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Okelley, G. D.; Gammage, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Apollo 12 lunar fines sample 12070,403 was annealed at 1000 C and subsequently irradiated with a beam of 130 MeV Fe(9+) ions. Adsorptions of nitrogen and water were measured before and after the irradiation. Prior to the irradiation, the fines were nonporous and water had no effect on the physical characteristics of the lunar fines. In contrast, after the irradiation, the interaction with water caused an increase in the specific surface area and created a pore system. These results are definitive evidence that the interaction of water with damage tracks is the prime factor involved in the alteration of lunar fines by adsorbed water.

  14. Comparative study on adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) by different adsorbents in water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Volchek, Konstantin; Brown, Carl E; Robinson, Adam; Obal, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are emerging environmental pollutants. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are the two primary PFC contaminants that are widely found in water, particularly in groundwater. This study compared the adsorption behaviors of PFOS and PFOA on several commercially available adsorbents in water. The tested adsorbents include granular activated carbon (GAC: Filtrasorb 400), powdered activated carbon, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCN), double-walled carbon nanotube, anion-exchange resin (AER: IRA67), non-ion-exchange polymer, alumina, and silica. The study demonstrated that adsorption is an effective technique for the removal of PFOS/PFOA from aqueous solutions. The kinetic tests showed that the adsorption onto AER reaches equilibrium rapidly (2 h), while it takes approximately 4 and 24 h to reach equilibrium for MCN and GAC, respectively. In terms of adsorption capacity, AER and GAC were identified as the most effective adsorbents to remove PFOS/PFOA from water. Furthermore, MCN, AER, and GAC proved to have high PFOS/PFOA removal efficiencies (≥98%). AER (IRA67) and GAC (Filtrasorb 400) were thus identified as the most promising adsorbents for treating PFOS/PFOA-contaminated groundwater at mg L(-1) level based on their equilibrium times, adsorption capacities, removal efficiencies, and associated costs. PMID:25521134

  15. A SEARCH FOR WATER VAPORIZATION ON CERES

    SciTech Connect

    Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O.; Zucconi, J.-M.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Dumas, C.; Carry, B.; Marboeuf, U.

    2011-10-15

    There are hints that the dwarf planet (1) Ceres may contain a large amount of water ice. Some models and previous observations suggest that ice could be close enough to the surface to create a flux of water outward through the regolith. This work aims to confirm a previous detection of OH emission off the northern limb of Ceres with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Such emission would be evidence of water molecules escaping from the dwarf planet. We used the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph of the Very Large Telescope to obtain spectra off the northern and southern limbs of Ceres at several epochs. These spectra cover the 307-312 nm wavelength range corresponding to the OH (0,0) emission band, which is the brightest band of this radical, well known in the cometary spectra. These new observations, five times more sensitive than those from IUE, did not permit detection of OH around Ceres. We derive an upper limit for the water production of about {approx}7 x 10{sup 25} molecules s{sup -1} and estimate the minimum thickness of the dust surface layer above the water ice layer (if present) to be about 20 m.

  16. Characterization of Advanced Avalanche Photodiodes for Water Vapor Lidar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Halama, Gary E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2000-01-01

    Development of advanced differential absorption lidar (DIAL) receivers is very important to increase the accuracy of atmospheric water vapor measurements. A major component of such receivers is the optical detector. In the near-infrared wavelength range avalanche photodiodes (APD's) are the best choice for higher signal-to-noise ratio, where there are many water vapor absorption lines. In this study, characterization experiments were performed to evaluate a group of silicon-based APD's. The APD's have different structures representative of different manufacturers. The experiments include setups to calibrate these devices, as well as characterization of the effects of voltage bias and temperature on the responsivity, surface scans, noise measurements, and frequency response measurements. For each experiment, the setup, procedure, data analysis, and results are given and discussed. This research was done to choose a suitable APD detector for the development of an advanced atmospheric water vapor differential absorption lidar detection system operating either at 720, 820, or 940 nm. The results point out the benefits of using the super low ionization ratio (SLIK) structure APD for its lower noise-equivalent power, which was found to be on the order of 2 to 4 fW/Hz(sup (1/2)), with an appropriate optical system and electronics. The water vapor detection systems signal-to-noise ratio will increase by a factor of 10.

  17. No alarming ozone loss from stratospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-08-01

    At sufficiently low temperatures, water vapor in the lowermost stratosphere can cause ambient sulfate aerosol to grow, providing surfaces on which chlorine can activate to a form that destroys ozone. Ozone depletion in the stratosphere can allow harmful ultraviolet radiation to reach Earth's surface.

  18. Water-Vapor Raman Lidar System Reaches Higher Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    A Raman lidar system for measuring the vertical distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere is located at the Table Mountain Facility (TMF) in California. Raman lidar systems for obtaining vertical water-vapor profiles in the troposphere have been in use for some time. The TMF system incorporates a number of improvements over prior such systems that enable extension of the altitude range of measurements through the tropopause into the lower stratosphere. One major obstacle to extension of the altitude range is the fact that the mixing ratio of water vapor in the tropopause and the lower stratosphere is so low that Raman lidar measurements in this region are limited by noise. Therefore, the design of the TMF system incorporates several features intended to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. These features include (1) the use of 355-nm-wavelength laser pulses having an energy (0.9 J per pulse) that is high relative to the laser-pulse energy levels of prior such systems, (2) a telescope having a large aperture (91 cm in diameter) and a narrow field of view (angular width .0.6 mrad), and (3) narrow-bandpass (wavelength bandwidth 0.6 nm) filters for the water-vapor Raman spectral channels. In addition to the large-aperture telescope, three telescopes having apertures 7.5 cm in diameter are used to collect returns from low altitudes.

  19. Advances in Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K.; Demoz, B.; DiGirolamo, P.; Mielke, B.; Stein, B.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Tooman, T.; Turner, D.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent technology upgrades to the NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar have permitted significant improvements in the daytime and nighttime measurement of water vapor using Raman lidar. Numerical simulation has been used to study the temperature sensitivity of the narrow spectral band measurements presented here.

  20. Can we modify stratospheric water vapor by deliberate cloud seeding?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baojun; Yin, Yan

    2014-02-01

    Stratospheric water vapor has an important effect on Earth's climate. Considering the significance of overshooting deep convection in modulating the water vapor content (WVC) of the lower stratosphere (LS), we use a three-dimensional convective cloud model to simulate the effects of various silver iodide (AgI) seeding scenarios on tropical overshooting deep convection that occurred on 30 November 2005 in Darwin, Australia. The primary motivation for this study is to investigate whether the WVC in the LS can be artificially modified by deliberate cloud seeding. It is found that AgI seeding done at the early stages of clouds produces significant effects on cloud microphysical and dynamical properties, and that further affects the WVC in the LS, while seeding at the mature stages of clouds has only a slight impact. The response of stratospheric water vapor to changes in the amount of seeding agent is nonlinear. The seeding with a small (large) amount of AgI increases (decreases) the WVC in the LS, due to enhanced (reduced) production and vertical transport of cloud ice from the troposphere and subsequent sublimation in the stratosphere. The results show that stratospheric water vapor can be artificially altered by deliberate cloud seeding with proper amount of seeding agent. This study also shows an important role of graupel in regulating cloud microphysics and dynamics and in modifying the WVC in the LS.

  1. High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, David M.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.

    2014-05-01

    The terahertz frequency regime is often used as the `chemical fingerprint' region of the electromagnetic spectrum due to the large number of rotational and vibrational transitions of many molecules of interest. This region of the spectrum has particular utility for applications such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow frequency windows, accurate measurements across a wide spectrum are lacking. The water vapor continuum absorption is an excess absorption that is unaccounted for in resonant line spectrum simulations. Currently a semiempirical model is employed to account for this absorption, however more measurements are necessary to properly describe the continuum absorption in this region. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy measurements from previous work are enhanced with high-resolution broadband measurements in the atmospheric transmission window at 1.5THz. The transmission of broadband terahertz radiation through pure water vapor as well as air with varying relative humidity levels was recorded for multiple path lengths. The pure water vapor measurements provide accurate determination of the line broadening parameters and experimental measurements of the transition strengths of the lines in the frequency region. Also these measurements coupled with the atmospheric air measurements allow the water vapor continuum absorption to be independently identified at 1.5THz. Simulations from an atmospheric absorption model using parameters from the HITRAN database are compared with the current and previous experimental results.

  2. 5 THE RADIATIVE FORCING DUE TO CLOUDS AND WATER VAPOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter utilizes results from the spaceborne Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), launched in 1984 aboard the NOAA-9 (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency) satellite, to summarize our understanding of the radiative forcing due to water vapor and clouds. The effect of clouds on the rad...

  3. DETERMINING HOW VAPOR PHASE MTBE REACHES GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Region 2 and ORD have funded a RARE project for FY 2005/2006 to evaluate the prospects that MTBE (and other fuel components) in vapors that escape from an underground storage tank (UST) can find its way to ground water produced by monitoring wells at a gasoline filling statio...

  4. Advanced Detector and Waveform Digitizer for Water Vapor DIAL Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Luck, William S., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor has become a major requirement for understanding moist-air processes. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is a technique best suited for the measurement of atmospheric water vapor. NASA Langley Research Center is continually developing improved DIAL systems. One aspect of current development is focused on the enhancement of a DIAL receiver by applying state-of-the-art technology in building a new compact detection system that will be placed directly on the DIAL receiver telescope. The newly developed detection system has the capability of being digitally interfaced with a simple personal computer, using a discrete input/output interface. This has the potential of transmitting digital data over relatively long distances instead of analog signals, which greatly reduces measurement noise. In this paper, we discuss some results from the new compact water vapor DIAL detection system which includes a silicon based avalanche photodiode (APD) detector, a 14-bit, 10-MHz waveform digitizer, a microcontroller and other auxiliary electronics. All of which are contained on a small printed-circuit-board. This will significantly reduce the weight and volume over the current CAMAC system and eventually will be used in a water vapor DIAL system on an unpiloted atmospheric vehicle (UAV) aircraft, or alternatively on an orbiting spacecraft.

  5. Measurement of Water Vapor in the Lower Troposphere Using LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, Francis; Instiful, Peter; Thorpe, Arthur

    Water vapor is an important atmospheric variable which plays a key role in air quality, global warming, and climate change. It is known as a highly variable atmospheric constituent. Moreover, water vapor remains one of the most poorly characterized meteorological parameters. For example, water vapor measurements have proven to be difficult below 500 m in the lower troposphere. The overlap which exists between the incident laser beam and the receiver FOV is a factor affecting the lidar observation in the near field range. Because of its particular importance in tropospheric processes and the extraordinary ability of Raman Lidar through the SOLEX systemto sense accurately its high temporal and spatial structure in the atmosphere, we present here some particular details about the use of Raman Lidar SOLEX system to measure water vapor at lower atmosphere at several fixed ranges. A comparison is made between data obtained from the laser system and the ones obtained from calibrated temperature and relative humidity's sensors at the same location. Department of Natural and Physical Sciences.

  6. Water vapor differential absorption lidar development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Browell, E V; Wilkerson, T D; McIlrath, T J

    1979-10-15

    A ground-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system is described which has been developed for vertical range-resolved measurements of water vapor. The laser transmitter consists of a ruby-pumped dye laser, which is operated on a water vapor absorption line at 724.372 nm. Part of the ruby laser output is transmitted simultaneously with the dye laser output to determine atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics. The dye and ruby laser backscattered light is collected by a 0.5-m diam telescope, optically separated in the receiver package, and independently detected using photomultiplier tubes. Measurements of vertical water vapor concentration profiles using the DIAL system at night are discussed, and comparisons are made between the water vapor DIAL measurements and data obtained from locally launched rawinsondes. Agreement between these measurements was found to be within the uncertainty of the rawinsonde data to an altitude of 3 km. Theoretical simulations of this measurement were found to give reasonably accurate predictions of the random error of the DIAL measurements. Confidence in these calculations will permit the design of aircraft and Shuttle DIAL systems and experiments using simulation results as the basis for defining lidar system performance requirements. PMID:20216627

  7. Oxidation and Volatilization of Silica-Formers in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At high temperatures SiC and Si3N4 react with water vapor to form a silica scale. Silica scales also react with water vapor to form a volatile Si(OH)4 species. These simultaneous reactions, one forming silica and the other removing silica, are described by paralinear kinetics. A steady state, in which these reactions occur at the same rate, is eventually achieved, After steady state is achieved, the oxide found on the surface is a constant thickness and recession of the underlying material occurs at a linear rate. The steady state oxide thickness, the time to achieve steady state, and the steady state recession rate can all be described in terms of the rate constants for the oxidation and volatilization reactions. In addition, the oxide thickness, the time to achieve steady state, and the recession rate can also be determined from parameters that describe a water vapor-containing environment. Accordingly, maps have been developed to show these steady state conditions as a function of reaction rate constants, pressure, and gas velocity. These maps can be used to predict the behavior of silica formers in water-vapor containing environments such as combustion environments. Finally, these maps are used to explore the limits of the paralinear oxidation model for SiC and Si3N4

  8. Water vapor differential absorption lidar development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Mcllrath, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A ground-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system is described which has been developed for vertical range-resolved measurements of water vapor. The laser transmitter consists of a ruby-pumped dye laser, which is operated on a water vapor absorption line at 724.372 nm. Part of the ruby laser output is transmitted simultaneously with the dye laser output to determine atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics. The dye and ruby laser backscattered light is collected by a 0.5-m diam telescope, optically separated in the receiver package, and independently detected using photomultiplier tubes. Measurements of vertical water vapor concentration profiles using the DIAL system at night are discussed, and comparisons are made between the water vapor DIAL measurements and data obtained from locally launched rawinsondes. Agreement between these measurements was found to be within the uncertainty of the rawinsonde data to an altitude of 3 km. Theoretical simulations of this measurement were found to give reasonably accurate predictions of the random error of the DIAL measurements. Confidence in these calculations will permit the design of aircraft and Shuttle DIAL systems and experiments using simulation results as the basis for defining lidar system performance requirements

  9. Visualization of Atmospheric Water Vapor Data for SAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, Mou-Liang; Chu, W. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop visualization tools to study the water vapor dynamics using the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 11 (SAGE 11) water vapor data. During the past years, we completed the development of a visualization tool called EZSAGE, and various Gridded Water Vapor plots, tools deployed on the web to provide users with new insight into the water vapor dynamics. Results and experiences from this project, including papers, tutorials and reviews were published on the main Web page. Additional publishing effort has been initiated to package EZSAGE software for CD production and distribution. There have been some major personnel changes since Fall, 1998. Dr. Mou-Liang Kung, a Professor of Computer Science assumed the PI position vacated by Dr. Waldo Rodriguez who was on leave. However, former PI, Dr. Rodriguez continued to serve as a research adviser to this project to assure smooth transition and project completion. Typically in each semester, five student research assistants were hired and trained. Weekly group meetings were held to discuss problems, progress, new research direction, and activity planning. Other small group meetings were also held regularly for different objectives of this project. All student research assistants were required to submit reports for conference submission.

  10. Cassini/CIRS Observations of Water Vapor in Saturn's Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjoraker, G. L.; Achterberg, R. K.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Carlson, R. C.; Jennings, D. E.

    2008-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on the Cassini spacecraft has obtained numerous spectra of Saturn at varying spectral and spatial resolutions since Saturn Orbit Insertion in 2004. Emission lines due to water vapor in Saturn's stratosphere were first detected using whole-disk observations from the Infrared Space Observatory (Feuchtgruber et al 1997) and subsequently confirmed by the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (Rergin et al 2000). CIRS has detected water and the data permit the retrieval of the latitudinal variation of water on Saturn. Emission lines of H2O on Saturn are very weak in the CIRS data. Thus. large spectral averages as well as improvements in calibration are necessary to detect water vapor. Zonally averaged nadir spectra were produced every 10 degrees of latitude. Stratospheric temperatures in the 0.5 - 5.0 mbar range were obtained by inverting spectra of CH4 in the v4 band centered at 1304 cm(exp -1). The origin of water vapor is believed to be from the ablation of micrometeorites containing water ice, followed by photochemistry. This external source of oxygen originates either from the Saturn system (from the rings or perhaps from Enceladus) or from the interplanetary medium. Connerney (1986) proposed a mechanism to transport water from the inner edge of the B-ring along magnetic field lines to specific latitudes (50N and 44S) on Saturn. Prange et al (2006) interpreted a minimum in the abundance of acetylene from ultraviolet spectra near 41S on Saturn as possibly due to an enhanced influx of water. Existing CIRS far-IR spectra are at relatively low spatial resolution, but observations at closer range planned for the extended mission will be able to test the "ring rain" mechanism by searching for localized water vapor enhancement at midlatitudes.

  11. Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics of the Regional Hydrologic Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that local feedback of evaporation on precipitation, or recycling, is a significant source of water for precipitation. Quantitative results on the exact amount of recycling have been difficult to obtain in view of the inherent limitations of diagnostic recycling calculations. The current study describes a calculation of the amount of local and remote sources of water for precipitation, based on the implementation of passive constituent tracers of water vapor (termed water vapor tracers, WVT) in a general circulation model. In this case, the major limitation on the accuracy of the recycling estimates is the veracity of the numerically simulated hydrological cycle, though we note that this approach can also be implemented within the context of a data assimilation system. In this approach, each WVT is associated with an evaporative source region, and tracks the water until it precipitates from the atmosphere. By assuming that the regional water is well mixed with water from other sources, the physical processes that act on the WVT are determined in proportion to those that act on the model's prognostic water vapor. In this way, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation can be computed within the model simulation, and can be validated against the model's prognostic water vapor. Furthermore, estimates of precipitation recycling can be compared with bulk diagnostic approaches. As a demonstration of the method, the regional hydrologic cycles for North America and India are evaluated for six summers (June, July and August) of model simulation. More than 50% of the precipitation in the Midwestern United States came from continental regional tracers, and the local source was the largest of the regional tracers (14%). The Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic 2 regions contributed 18% of the water for Midwestern precipitation, but further analysis suggests that the greater region of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean may also contribute significantly. In

  12. The isotopic composition of water vapor as a tracer of water balance in the TTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolot, Maximilien; Moyer, Elisabeth; Legras, Bernard; Walker, Kaley; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The relatively small amount of water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) region is of disproportionate radiative importance, and projections of changes in TTL water are hampered by poor understanding of its sources and controls. We show here that the profile of the isotopic composition of water vapor can be used to quantify the contribution of various processes to the water budget of the region: convective sources of water, dehydration via in situ cirrus formation and sedimentation, and moistening from mixing with extratropical air. We combine these processes into a simple model for the isotopic ratio of TTL water vapor. By fitting the model parameters to reproduce an averaged tropical profile of water vapor isotopic ratio in the TTL, we can retrieve the convective contribution to TTL water vapor. Using isotopic measurements from the ACE-FTS solar-occultation instrument, we show that convective injection of water vapor must provide a significant contribution to TTL water vapor. That contribution in turn has large radiative effects, because it increases the production of in-situ cirrus over what would be inferred from large-scale uplift alone, by a factor 2-10 over the TTL (15-17.5 km).

  13. Development of a Household Water Defluoridation Process Using Aluminium Hydroxide Based Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, Eyobel; Zewge, Feleke; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the removal of fluoride from water using aluminium hydroxide based adsorbent has been investigated in continuous operation. The effect of fluoride influent concentration, feed flowrate, and adsorbent bed height onto the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system were examined. The fixed-bed adsorption system was found to perform better with lower influent fluoride concentration, lower flowrate, and higher bed depth. Thermodynamic evaluation using the bed depth service time model indicated that the fluoride adsorption capacity was 25.8 mg F-/g of adsorbent, which is high compared to commercially available activated alumina (1.8 to 1.9 mg/g). Kinetic studies showed that the rate of adsorption in continuous studies was in the range of 6.12×10(-3) to 39.3×10(-3) L/mg.h under different operating conditions. The household defluoridation unit (HDU) was tested at an up-flow mode and it was determined that the HDU packed with 0.9 kg of adsorbent with 28.3 cm of bed depth resulted in a specific safe water yield of 823.79 L. Regeneration of the exhaust media using 1% NaOH and 0.1 M HCl showed that the adsorbent could be reused. The estimated running cost of the unit was 2.0 U.S. dollar/m3 of treated water, with the potential to minimize further. Hence, it was concluded that the proposed method is simple and exhibits superior performance for the treatment of fluoride-contaminated water with the potential for household application. PMID:26459821

  14. a Study of Gnss Water Vapor Reconstruction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá, A. G.; Bento, F.; Crocker, P.; Fernandes, R. M.; Adams, D. K.; Miranda, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) observations are nowadays a well-established tool to measure the water vapor content in the atmosphere. This gas plays a major role in many processes concerning physics, thermodynamics and dynamics of the atmosphere. The knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of water vapor in the lower atmosphere (troposphere) is crucial for accurate quantitative prediction of precipitation and better understanding of many atmospheric processes like deep convective events. Major advantages of the use of GNSS observations are all-weather system, continuous unattended operation, high temporal resolution and an ever-increasing number of stations. The present work focuses on the study of the geometry and dynamics of moist convection, shallow and deep, through the use of 4D images of the atmosphere water vapor field, obtained from high-density GPS networks (i.e. tomographic inversion). For this, the SWART (SEGAL GNSS WAter Vapor ReconsTruction Image Software), a software package for GNSS water vapor reconstruction, has been developed. This package currently consists of four C++ programs. The C++ programs gather the necessary information to calculate the slant delays and to generate a file with the reconstructed image. The output consists in 2D slices of the 3D water vapor image in latitude, longitude or altitude. SWART is based on LOFTT_K (LOgiciel Français de Tomographie Troposphérique version Kalman) (Champollion 2005). We present the results of the comparison with LOFTT_K to validate SWART together with several tests covering diverse grid sizes and different number of receivers for the same water vapor image reconstruction. It is also analyzed the importance of the initial values for the image reconstruction. All these tests were realized with synthetic data, except for the grid area, which is from Marseilles, France. Finally, we present the current status of the analysis being carrying out for a dense network in Belem, Brazil

  15. The interaction of the theophylline metastable phase with water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, A. A.; Boldyrev, V. V.; Sidel'Nikov, A. A.; Chizhik, S. A.

    2008-07-01

    The conditions of hydration of the stable and metastable theophylline phases were determined. Two-phase metastable phase/monohydrate and stable phase/monohydrate equilibrium pressures were measured at 25, 30, and 35°C. The metastable phase began to react with water vapor at lower relative humidities than the stable phase. Processes that occurred with the metastable and stable theophylline phases over various water pressure ranges were considered. The metastable phase exhibited an unusual behavior at 25°C and relative humidity 47%. At constant water vapor pressure and temperature, theophylline was initially hydrated and then lost water and again became anhydrous. Two consecutive processes occurred in the system, the formation of theophylline monohydrate from the metastable phase and its decomposition to the stable phase. The ratio between the rates of these processes determined the content of the monohydrate at the given time moment.

  16. The Impact of Adsorbed Triethylene Glycol on Water Wettability of the {1014} Calcium Carbonate Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R.

    2015-12-01

    Water flooding is increasingly being used as a method of enhanced oil recovery and frequently involves calcium carbonate reservoirs. Very often, thermodynamic conditions in the upper few hundred meters allow for hydrate formation. One possible method of preventing hydrates is to inject hydrate inhibitors such as triethylene glycol (TEG) into the reservoir. Thus, it is of importance to know how such glycols affect water wettability, which is an important factor defining the oil behavior in such reservoirs. Wettability of a surface is defined by the contact angle of a liquid drop on the surface. The stronger the liquid is attracted to the surface, the smaller the wetting angle becomes, implying an increased degree of wetting. Therefore, it is possible to gain qualitative knowledge of the change in wetting properties with respect to external influences by studying corresponding changes in free energy of adsorption of the liquid. In our work [1], we used molecular dynamics (MD) and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) to study how adsorbed TEG on the {1014} calcium carbonate surface affected adsorbed water. We used the changes in density profiles of water to estimate changes in adsorption free energy of water. The adaptive biasing force (ABF) method was applied to TEG to calculate the adsorption free energy of TEG on the calcium carbonate surface. We found that water wetting of the calcium carbonate surface decreased in the presence of adsorbed TEG. [1] - Olsen, R.; Leirvik, K.; Kvamme, B.; Kuznetsova, T. Adsorption Properties of Triethylene Glycol on a Hydrated {1014} Calcite Surface and Its Effect on Adsorbed Water, Langmuir 2015, DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b02228

  17. Alexandrite laser transmitter development for airborne water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas H.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    In the DIAL technique, the water vapor concentration profile is determined by analyzing the lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned 'on' and 'off' a water vapor absorption line. Desired characteristics of the on-line transmitted laser beam include: pulse energy greater than or equal to 100 mJ, high-resolution tuning capability (uncertainty less than 0.25 pm), good spectral stability (jitter less than 0.5 pm about the mean), and high spectral purity (greater than 99 percent). The off-line laser is generally detuned less than 100 pm away from the water vapor line. Its spectral requirements are much less stringent. In our past research, we developed and demonstrated the airborne DIAL technique for water vapor measurements in the 720-nm spectral region using a system based on an alexandrite laser as the transmitter for the on-line wavelength and a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser for the off-line wavelength. This off-line laser has been replaced by a second alexandrite laser. Diode lasers are used to injection seed both lasers for frequency and linewidth control. This eliminates the need for the two intracavity etalons utilized in our previous alexandrite laser and thereby greatly reduces the risk of optical damage. Consequently, the transmitted pulse energy can be substantially increased, resulting in greater measurement range, higher data density, and increased measurement precision. In this paper, we describe the diode injection seed source, the two alexandrite lasers, and the device used to line lock the on-line seed source to the water vapor absorption feature.

  18. Diurnal variations in water vapor over Central and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Diurnal variations in atmospheric integrated water vapor (IWV) are studied employing IWV estimates, with a 30 minutes sampling rate, derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations during the period 2007-2013. The analysis was performed in 73 GNSS tracking sites (GPS + GLONASS) which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, with different diurnal variations of the integrated total humidity content. There are many processes that could induce diurnal variations in atmospheric water vapor (Dai et al, 1999 a,b), the most relevant causes are: surface evapotranspiration, atmospheric large-scale vertical motion, atmospheric low-level moisture convergence and precipitation and vertical mixing (which affects the vertical distribution of water vapor but does not affect the IWV). The numerical tools, Singular Value Decomposition and classical Multidimensional Scaling methods, are used to study these variations, considering the measurements made at each stations, as sample in the analysis. The aim of this investigation is to identify the IWV variability with respect to the local time associated to the different climate regions. In order to improve our analysis, all available weather information, such as radiosondes measurements (which are few), measurements of pressure and temperature and Numerical Weather Models reanalysis data, are used. Reference: Dai, A., K. E. Trenberth, and T. R. Karl, 1999 a: Effects of clouds, soil moisture, precipitation and water vapor on diurnal temperature range. J. Climate, 12, 2451-2473. Dai, A., F. Giorgi, and K. E. Trenberth, 1999 b: Observed and model simulated precipitation diurnal cycle over the contiguous United States.J. Geophys. Res., 104, 6377-6402. KEYWORDS: water vapor, diurnal cycle, GNSS

  19. Proton magnetic relaxation in aromatic polyamides during water vapor sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smotrina, T. V.; Chulkova, Yu. S.; Karasev, D. V.; Lebedeva, N. P.; Perepelkin, K. E.; Grebennikov, S. F.

    2009-07-01

    The state of the components in the aromatic polyamide-water system was studied by NMR and sorption. A comparative analysis of spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation in aromatic para-polyamide ( para-aramid) technical fibers Rusar, Kevlar, and Technora was performed depending on the sorption value. The NMR results correlated with the supramolecular structure of polymers and quasi-chemical equation parameters for water vapor sorption.

  20. Fixation of nitrogen in the presence of water vapor

    DOEpatents

    Harteck, Paul

    1984-01-01

    A process for the fixation of nitrogen is disclosed which comprises combining a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, metal oxide and water vapor, initially heating the combination to initiate a reaction which forms nitrate, but at a temperature and pressure range below the dissociation pressure of the nitrate. With or without the water component, the yield of fixed nitrogen is increased by the use of a Linde Molecular Sieve Catalyst.

  1. Cassini/CIRS Observations of Water Vapor in Saturn's Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjoraker, Gordon; Achterberg, R. K.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Jennings, D. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on the Cassini spacecraft has obtained numerous spectra of Saturn at varying spectral and spatial resolutions since Saturn Orbit Insertion in 2001. Emission lines due to water vapor in Saturn's stratosphere were first detected using whole-disk observations from the Infrared Space Observatory [1] and subsequently confirmed by the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite [2], CIRS has detected water and the data permit the retrieval of the latitudinal variation of water on Saturn. Emission lines of H2O on Saturn are very weak in the CIRS data. Thus, large spectral averages as well as improvements in calibration are necessary to detect water vapor. long integrations at the full 0.5/cm spectral resolution were performed at targeted latitudes on Saturn. High emission angles were chosen to enhance stratospheric emission. Over the course of the prime and extended mission a set of observations has been built up spaced roughly every 10 degrees of latitude. Stratospheric temperatures in the 0.5 - 5.0 mbar range were obtained by inverting spectra of CH4 in the v'4 band centered at 1501/cm. The origin of water vapor is believed to be from the ablation of micrometeorites containing eater ice, followed by photochemistry. This external source of oxygen originates either from the Saturn system (from the rings or perhaps from Enceladus) or from the interplanetary medium. Connerney [3] proposed a mechanism to transport water from the inner edge of the B-ring along magnetic field lines to specific latitudes (50N and 44S) on Saturn. Prange et al [4] interpreted a minimum in the abundance of acetylene from ultraviolet spectra gear 41S on Saturn as possibly due to an enhanced influx of water. We will be able to test the "ring rain" mechanism by searching, for localized water vapor enhancement at mid-latitudes. Our results may be used to constrain photochemical models of Saturn's stratosphere [5].

  2. Adsorption of prototypical amino acids on silica: Influence of the pre-adsorbed water multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remesal, Elena R.; Amaya, Javier; Graciani, Jesús; Márquez, Antonio M.; Sanz, Javier Fdez.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the interaction between acetic acid, some typical α-amino acids (α-AAs), and a fully hydroxylated (0001) surface of α-quartz by means of theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) under periodic boundary conditions. The influence of microsolvation, represented by a water multilayer, and dispersion forces is analyzed. All the considered molecules strongly adsorb on the hydroxylated surface and prefer to adsorb molecularly. The inclusion of dispersion forces increases the interaction energies by 15-30 kJ/mol, without significant changes in structure and mode of adsorption except for histidine where the interaction is improved through protonation of the α-amine group. When the water multilayer is included a decrease in the surface-adsorbate interaction energies is observed. Also, some α-AAs, glycine and alanine, change their adsorption mode and, now, the more stable structure is the zwitterion. Adsorption as zwitterions is always favored with respect to molecular interaction when dispersion forces are taken into account. Comparing the energies of adsorbed and solvated α-AA zwitterions, it turns out that inclusion of dispersion forces predicts that solvated zwitterions are the lower energy configurations.

  3. A comparison of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide adsorbed at mica/water and silica/water interfaces using neutron reflection.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Lucy R; Browning, Kathryn L; Truscott, Chris L; Clifton, Luke A; Webster, John; Clarke, Stuart M

    2016-09-15

    The layer structure of the dichain alkyl ammonium surfactant, didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), adsorbed from water on to silica and mica surfaces has been determined using neutron reflection. Although sometimes considered interchangeable surfaces for study, we present evidence of significant differences in the adsorbed layer structure below the critical micelle concentration. A complete DDAB bilayer was assembled at the water/mica interface at concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (CMC). In contrast it is not until the CMC was reached that the complete bilayer structure formed on the oxidised silicon crystal. Removal of the complete bilayer on both surfaces was attempted by both washing and ion exchange yet the adsorbed structure proved tenacious. PMID:27318715

  4. Magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube iron nanocomposites as adsorbents and antibacterial agents for water purification.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook; Garg, Vijayendra K

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges of the 21st century is to provide clean and affordable water through protecting source and purifying polluted waters. This review presents advances made in the synthesis of carbon- and iron-based nanomaterials, graphene-carbon nanotubes-iron oxides, which can remove pollutants and inactivate virus and bacteria efficiently in water. The three-dimensional graphene and graphene oxide based nanostructures exhibit large surface area and sorption sites that provide higher adsorption capacity to remove pollutants than two-dimensional graphene-based adsorbents and other conventional adsorbents. Examples are presented to demonstrate removal of metals (e.g., Cu, Pb, Cr(VI), and As) and organics (e.g., dyes and oil) by grapheme-based nanostructures. Inactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species (e.g., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) is also shown. A mechanism involving the interaction of adsorbents and pollutants is briefly discussed. Magnetic graphene-based nanomaterials can easily be separated from the treated water using an external magnet; however, there are challenges in implementing the graphene-based nanotechnology in treating real water. PMID:26498500

  5. Thermodynamic investigation of trichloroethylene adsorption in water-saturated microporous adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.; Hauck, B.; Jones, M.

    1999-08-01

    Adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) in adsorbents containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic micropores was investigated in order to determine the mechanisms responsible for TCE adsorption on mineral solids. A high-pressure liquid chromatography method was used to measure TCE adsorption isotherms on three microporous adsorbents. Silica gel and zeolite type NaX were used as hydrophilic model adsorbents, and hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)-treated silica gel was used as a model hydrophobic adsorbent. Batch uptake and desorption isotherms were also measured on the hydrophilic silica gel. Uptake of TCE by all three adsorbents was linear over the concentration range investigated. However, the silica gel desorption isotherm was highly nonlinear, as indicated by its Freundlich isotherm exponent of 0.58. Capillary phase separation into hydrophobic micropores was postulated as being responsible for the isotherm hysteresis. Supporting this hypothesis was the conformance of the TCE adsorption isotherm to Dubinin-Radushkevitch volume filling of micropores theory. The enthalpies for TCE adsorption on all three solids were determined by van't Hoff analysis of distribution coefficients measured over a temperature range from 5 to 90 C. The TCE adsorption enthalpies on the silica gel and HMDS silica gel were exothermic, but on the zeolite adsorption was endothermic. High exothermic adsorption enthalpies on the silica gel adsorbents indicated that TCE adsorption was occurring in hydrophobic micropores, and that adsorption on surfaces with large radii of curvature contributed only minimally to the total uptake. This indicates that the predominant mechanism for TCE adsorption on these mineral solids is not partitioning into the vicinal water layer.

  6. Water vapor and cloud water measurements over Darwin during the STEP 1987 tropical mission

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, K.K.; Proffitt, M.H. ); Chan, K.R.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J.R. ); Strahan, S.E. ); Wilson, J.C. ); Kley, D. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors report results of total water, and water vapor measurements made in the upper troposphere and stratosphere during the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange Project (STEP) Tropical mission over Darwin, Australia. Measurements were made from an ER-2 aircraft by lyman-[alpha] hygrometers. The average lower stratosphere water vapor was 2.4 parts per million by volume (ppmv), at a potential temperature of 375 K. This level is lower than the 3 to 4 ppmv water vapor level typical of the stratosphere.

  7. Preliminary endurance tests of water vaporizers for resistojet applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. Earl; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1993-01-01

    Three water vaporizers designed for resistojet applications were built and tested for periods up to 500 h and 250 thermal cycles. Two of the vaporizers were not sensitive to orientation with respect to gravity, an indication of likely compatibility with low-gravity environments. Some temperatures and pressures in the third were impacted by orientation, although operation was always stable. The pressure drop across the sand-filled version increased by 147 percent in 38 h and 19 thermal cycles. Bonding of the sand granules in the downstream end of the heat exchanger was the suspected cause of failure of this vaporizer. Pressure drops across the two sintered stainless steel-filled versions were more gradual. One, with a pore size of 60 microns, showed an 80 percent increase in 500 h and 250 thermal cycles and another, with a 10 microns poresize, showed a 29 percent increase in 350 h and 175 thermal cycles. Testing of the latter metal-filled vaporizer was ongoing as of this writing. Oxidation of the porous metal packing materials in these vaporizers, with subsequent deposition of oxide particles within the pores, was believed to have caused the observed increases in pressure drops.

  8. Preliminary endurance tests of water vaporizers for resistojet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morren, W. Earl; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1993-06-01

    Three water vaporizers designed for resistojet applications were built and tested for periods up to 500 h and 250 thermal cycles. Two of the vaporizers were not sensitive to orientation with respect to gravity, an indication of likely compatibility with low-gravity environments. Some temperatures and pressures in the third were impacted by orientation, although operation was always stable. The pressure drop across the sand-filled version increased by 147 percent in 38 h and 19 thermal cycles. Bonding of the sand granules in the downstream end of the heat exchanger was the suspected cause of failure of this vaporizer. Pressure drops across the two sintered stainless steel-filled versions were more gradual. One, with a pore size of 60 microns, showed an 80 percent increase in 500 h and 250 thermal cycles and another, with a 10 microns poresize, showed a 29 percent increase in 350 h and 175 thermal cycles. Testing of the latter metal-filled vaporizer was ongoing as of this writing. Oxidation of the porous metal packing materials in these vaporizers, with subsequent deposition of oxide particles within the pores, was believed to have caused the observed increases in pressure drops.

  9. Alumina Volatility in Water Vapor at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2003-01-01

    The volatility of alumina in high temperature water vapor was determined by a weight loss technique. Sapphire coupons were exposed at temperatures between 1250 and 1500 C, water partial pressures between 0.15 and 0.68 atm in oxygen, total pressure of 1 atm, and flowing gas velocities of 4.4 cm/s. The pressure dependence of sapphire volatility was consistent with AI(OH)3(g) formation. The enthalpy of reaction to form Al(OH)3(g) from sapphire and water vapor was determined to be 210 +/- 20 kJ/mol, comparing favorably to other studies. Microstructural examination of tested sapphire coupons revealed surface etching features consistent with a volatilization process.

  10. CRISM Limb Observations of Aerosols and Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, M.J.; Clancy, R.T.; Seelos, F.; Murchie, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Here we describe preliminary work on the retrieval of vertical profiles of aerosols and water vapor from the CRISM limb observations. The first full set of CRISM limb observations was taken in July 2009, with subsequent limb observations planned once every two months. Each set of limb observations contains about four dozen scans across the limb giving pole-to-pole coverage for two orbits at roughly 100 and 290 W longitude. Radiative transfer modeling taking account of aerosol scattering in the limb-viewing geometry is used to model the observations. The retrievals show the height to which dust and water vapor extend and the location and height of water ice clouds. Results from the First set of CRISM limb observations (July 2009, Ls=300) show dust aerosol well-mixed to about three scale heights above the surface with thin water ice clouds above the dust near the equator and at mid-northern latitudes. Water vapor is concentrated at high southern latitudes.

  11. Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics of the Regional Hydrologic Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that local feedback of surface evaporation on precipitation, or recycling, is a significant source of water for precipitation. Quantitative results on the exact amount of recycling have been difficult to obtain in view of the inherent limitations of diagnostic recycling calculations. The current study describes a calculation of the amount of local and remote geographic sources of surface evaporation for precipitation, based on the implementation of three-dimensional constituent tracers of regional water vapor sources (termed water vapor tracers, WVT) in a general circulation model. The major limitation on the accuracy of the recycling estimates is the veracity of the numerically simulated hydrological cycle, though we note that this approach can also be implemented within the context of a data assimilation system. In the WVT approach, each tracer is associated with an evaporative source region for a prognostic three-dimensional variable that represents a partial amount of the total atmospheric water vapor. The physical processes that act on a WVT are determined in proportion to those that act on the model's prognostic water vapor. In this way, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation can be predicted within the model simulation, and can be validated against the model's prognostic water vapor. As a demonstration of the method, the regional hydrologic cycles for North America and India are evaluated for six summers (June, July and August) of model simulation. More than 50% of the precipitation in the Midwestern United States came from continental regional sources, and the local source was the largest of the regional tracers (14%). The Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic regions contributed 18% of the water for Midwestern precipitation, but further analysis suggests that the greater region of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean may also contribute significantly. In most North American continental regions, the local source of precipitation is

  12. Tm:germanate Fiber Laser for Planetary Water Vapor Atmospheric Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; De Young, Russell

    2009-01-01

    The atmospheric profiling of water vapor is necessary for finding life on Mars and weather on Earth. The design and performance of a water vapor lidar based on a Tm:germanate fiber laser is presented.

  13. Seasonal Behavior of Tropical to Mid-Latitude Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor from UARS MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, B.; Read, W.; Waters, J.; Rosenlof, K.

    1998-01-01

    Upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) is a fundamental importance in understanding earth's atmosphere and climate. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas and it is in the upper troposphere that water vapor most strongly influences radiative forcing.

  14. Stable Calibration of Raman Lidar Water-Vapor Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Iain S.

    2008-01-01

    A method has been devised to ensure stable, long-term calibration of Raman lidar measurements that are used to determine the altitude-dependent mixing ratio of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Because the lidar measurements yield a quantity proportional to the mixing ratio, rather than the mixing ratio itself, calibration is necessary to obtain the factor of proportionality. The present method involves the use of calibration data from two sources: (1) absolute calibration data from in situ radiosonde measurements made during occasional campaigns and (2) partial calibration data obtained by use, on a regular schedule, of a lamp that emits in a known spectrum determined in laboratory calibration measurements. In this method, data from the first radiosonde campaign are used to calculate a campaign-averaged absolute lidar calibration factor (t(sub 1)) and the corresponding campaign-averaged ration (L(sub 1)) between lamp irradiances at the water-vapor and nitrogen wavelengths. Depending on the scenario considered, this ratio can be assumed to be either constant over a long time (L=L(sub 1)) or drifting slowly with time. The absolutely calibrated water-vapor mixing ratio (q) obtained from the ith routine off-campaign lidar measurement is given by q(sub 1)=P(sub 1)/t(sub 1)=LP(sub 1)/P(sup prime)(sub 1) where P(sub 1) is water-vapor/nitrogen measurement signal ration, t(sub 1) is the unknown and unneeded overall efficiency ratio of the lidar receiver during the ith routine off-campaign measurement run, and P(sup prime)(sub 1) is the water-vapor/nitrogen signal ratio obtained during the lamp run associated with the ith routine off-campaign measurement run. If L is assumed constant, then the lidar calibration is routinely obtained without the need for new radiosonde data. In this case, one uses L=L(sub 1) = P(sup prime)(sub 1)/t(sub 1), where P(sub 1)(sup prime) is the water-vapor/nitrogen signal ratio obtained during the lamp run associated

  15. Removal of arsenic from water using the adsorbent: New Zealand iron-sand.

    PubMed

    Panthi, Sudan Raj; Wareham, David Geraint

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption is a technology used to remove arsenic from water contaminated at levels above drinking water standards. In this study, New Zealand Iron-Sand (NZIS), a naturally-available adsorbent was investigated for its efficiency in removing both As (III) and As (V). Several batch tests were conducted with different concentrations of arsenic at different pH conditions. During the batch tests, the maximum adsorption of As (III) occurred at a pH of 7.5, while As (V) adsorption reached its maximum value at a pH of 3. Both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were found to fit with R(2) values greater than 0.92. From the Langmuir adsorption model, the maximum adsorption capacity of NZIS for As (III) and As (V) were estimated to be 1,250 and 500 μg/g, respectively. These values were substantial enough to consider NZIS a promising new adsorbent for arsenic removal. PMID:21991930

  16. The low-temperature loss tangent of adsorbed water in alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Mazin; Sarabi, Bahman; Khalil, M. S.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Gladchenko, Sergiy; Wellstood, F. C.; Lobb, C. J.; Osborn, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Superconducting quantum information circuits use various amorphous dielectrics for capacitors, and alumina is the ubiquitous barrier material for Josephson junctions within these devices. The exposure of the devices to air allows water molecules to penetrate the dielectric films along grain boundaries, and become adsorbed onto internal surfaces. In this study we plan to use ALD-grown alumina and titanium oxide to study the penetration of water through films. Using blocking layers to selectively prevent water penetration, we then plan to measure the difference in the low-temperature loss tangent between an alumina film which is exposed to air and one which is not.

  17. A multifunctional azobenzene-based polymeric adsorbent for effective water remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Decheng; Chen, Feng; Geng, Qingrui; Lu, Hang; Willcock, Helen; Liu, Qiuming; Wang, Fangyingkai; Zou, Kaidian; Jin, Ming; Pu, Hongting; Du, Jianzhong

    2014-12-01

    The efficient removal of trace carcinogenic organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and ionic dyes, from water is an important technical challenge. We report a highly effective recyclable multifunctional azobenzene (AZ)-based silica-supported polymeric adsorbent which can simultaneously remove both PAHs and anionic dyes from water to below parts per billion (ppb) level based on multiple interactions such as the hydrophobic effect, π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions, thus providing a new strategy for designer water remediation materials.

  18. A multifunctional azobenzene-based polymeric adsorbent for effective water remediation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Decheng; Chen, Feng; Geng, Qingrui; Lu, Hang; Willcock, Helen; Liu, Qiuming; Wang, Fangyingkai; Zou, Kaidian; Jin, Ming; Pu, Hongting; Du, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The efficient removal of trace carcinogenic organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and ionic dyes, from water is an important technical challenge. We report a highly effective recyclable multifunctional azobenzene (AZ)-based silica-supported polymeric adsorbent which can simultaneously remove both PAHs and anionic dyes from water to below parts per billion (ppb) level based on multiple interactions such as the hydrophobic effect, π–π stacking and electrostatic interactions, thus providing a new strategy for designer water remediation materials. PMID:25465671

  19. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nadine; Schröder, Marc; Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene; Stengel, Martin; ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-01

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m2 for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m2 for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  20. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Nadine; Schroeder, Marc; Stengel, Martin; Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene; Collaboration: ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-10

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m{sup 2} for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m{sup 2} for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  1. Water Vapor Isotopic Fractionation and Strat/trop Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jucks, K. W.; Johnson, D. G.; Traub, W. A.; Chance, K. V.

    We will present atmospheric observations of the isotopic fractionation for water vapor as observed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory far-infrared spectrometer (FIRS-2). The stratospheric observations are corrected with a photochemical model to account for methane oxidation to determine the "entry level" isotopic fractionation of water in the stratosphere. These values are then compared to a simple Rayleigh frac- tionation model that includes estimations of convection, radiative heating, and mixing to infer relative contributions to stratosphere/troposphere exchange. The observations of water vapor fractionation are most consistent with a model that mixes air uplifted from roughly 11 km with significantly more air that has been dehydrated by convec- tion to an effective temperature that is much cooler than the tropopause temperature. The water vapor mixing ratio in the stratosphere results from a combination of radia- tive heating, recirculation of stratospheric air, and deep convection that supplies the air to the upper tropical troposphere. We believe that these types of observations could be a powerful tool for constraining circulation models.

  2. Revisiting Uvis Observations of the Enceladus Water Vapor Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) onboard Cassini spacecraft observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume and separate jets emitting from the southern pole of Enceladus [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume. These observations provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument. Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) are used to model the plume of Enceladus including an option to add multiple jet sources to the general background plume. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. Jet sources can differ in production rate and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along Tiger stripes [Porco et al. 2014]. We applied the spatial distribution of the sources observed by ISS in our models. The output of the models are the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densitioes derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets.

  3. Development of a preprototype vapor compression distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    The activities involved in the design, development, and test of a preprototype vapor compression distillation water recovery subsystem are described. This subsystem, part of a larger regenerative life support evaluation system, is designed to recover usable water from urine, urinal rinse water, and concentrated shower and laundry brine collected from three space vehicle crewmen for a period of 180 days without resupply. Details of preliminary design and testing as well as component developments are included. Trade studies, considerations leading to concept selections, problems encountered, and test data are also presented. The rework of existing hardware, subsystem development including computer programs, assembly verification, and comprehensive baseline test results are discussed.

  4. Nanotribological properties of water films adsorbing atop, and absorbing below, graphene layers supported by metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zijian; Curtis, C. K.; Stine, R.; Sheehan, P.; Krim, J.

    The tribological properties of graphite, a common lubricant with known sensitivity to the presence of water, have been studied extensively at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. Although far less attention has been devoted to the tribological properties of graphene, it has been established that the tribological response to the presence of water is dissimilar from that of graphite. We report here a quartz crystal microbalance study of the nanotribological properties of water films adsorbed/absorbed on graphene layers prepared by either chemical decomposition on nickel(111) substrates or transfer of freestanding graphene layers to aluminum substrates. Sliding friction levels of the water films were also measured for metal surfaces in the absence of a graphene layer. We observe very high friction levels for water adsorbed atop graphene on Ni(111) and very low levels for water on aluminum. For the case of graphene/aluminum, the data indicate that the water is absorbing between the graphene layer and the aluminum. Dissipation levels moreover indicate the presence of an interstitial water increases sliding friction between the graphene and the aluminum substrate Work supported by NSF and NRL.

  5. Temperature/pressure and water vapor sounding with microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Janssen, M. A.; Clancy, R. T.; Gulkis, S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Frerking, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two intense microwave spectra lines exist in the martian atmosphere that allow unique sounding capabilities: water vapor at 183 GHz and the (2-1) rotational line of CO at 230 GHz. Microwave spectra line sounding is a well-developed technique for the Earth's atmosphere for sounding from above from spacecraft and airplanes, and from below from fixed surface sites. Two simple instruments for temperature sounding on Mars (the CO line) and water vapor measurements are described. The surface sounder proposed for the MESUR sites is designed to study the boundary layer water vapor distribution and the temperature/pressure profiles with vertical resolution of 0.25 km up to 1 km with reduced resolution above approaching a scale height. The water channel will be sensitive to a few tenths of a micrometer of water and the temperature profile will be retrieved to an accuracy between 1 and 2 K. The latter is routinely done on the Earth using oxygen lines near 60 GHz. The measurements are done with a single-channel heterodyne receiver looking into a 10-cm mirror that is canned through a range of elevation angles plus a target load. The frequency of the receiver is sweep across the water and CO lines generating the two spectra at about 1-hr intervals throughout the mission. The mass and power for the proposed instrument are 2 kg and 5-8 W continuously. The measurements are completely immune to the atmospheric dust and ice particle loads. It was felt that these measurements are the ultimate ones to properly study the martian boundary layer from the surface to a few kilometers. Sounding from above requires an orbiting spacecraft with multichannel microwave spectrometers such as the instrument proposed for MO by a subset of the authors, a putative MESUR orbiter, and a proposed Discovery mission called MOES. Such an instrument can be built with less than 10 kg and use less than 15 W. The obvious advantage of this approach is that the entire atmosphere can be sounded for temperature and

  6. Monitoring the water vapor isotopic composition in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveinbjornsdottir, A. E.; Steen-Larsen, H.; Jonsson, T.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Water stable isotopes have during many decades been used as climate proxies and indicators for variations in the hydrological cycle. However we are to a great extent still using simple empirical relationships without any deeper theoretical understanding. In order to properly relate changes in the climate and hydrological cycle to changes in the observed stable water isotopic signal we must understand the underlying physical processes. Furthermore it is a challenge for General Climate Models to adequately represent the isotopes in the hydrological cycle because of lack of in-situ measurements of the atmospheric water-vapor composition in the source regions. During the fall of 2010 we installed an autonomous water vapor spectroscopy laser (from Los Gatos Research) in a lighthouse on the South Coast of Iceland (63.83 N 21.47W) with the plan to be operational for several years. The purpose of this installation was through monitoring of the water vapor isotopic composition to understand the physical processes governing the isotopic composition of the water vapor evaporated from the ocean as well as the processes of mixing between the free troposphere and marine boundary layer. Because of the remoteness of the monitoring site and simple topography we are able to isolate the 'fingerprint' on the isotopic signal in the water vapor from respectively the ocean and the interior highland leading to a near perfect case-study area. Using back-trajectories we find a strong influence of the origin of the air masses on the measured isotopic composition. The mixing of the marine-boundary layer is found to strongly influence the measured isotopic composition. The second order isotopic parameter, d-excess, is found to depend on both the isotopic composition as well as the relative humidity as prescribed by theories for evaporation from an ocean. The site likely represents a major source region for the moisture that later falls as snow on parts of the Greenland Ice Sheet. This leads to

  7. Hurricane Isabel, Amount of Atmospheric Water Vapor Observed By AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    These false-color images show the amount of atmospheric water vapor observed by AIRS two weeks prior to the passage of Hurricane Isabel, and then when it was a Category 5 storm. The region shown includes parts of South America and the West Indies. Puerto Rico is the large island below the upper left corner.

    Total water vapor represents the depth of a layer if all the water vapor in the atmosphere were to condense and fall to the surface. The color bar on the right sides of the plots give the thickness of this layer in millimeters (mm). The first image, from August 28, shows typical tropical water vapor amounts over the ocean: between roughly 25 and 50 mm, or 1 to 2 inches. The highest values of roughly 80 mm, seen as a red blob over South America, corresponds to intense thunderstorms. Thunderstorms pull in water vapor from surrounding regions and concentrate it, with much of it then falling as rain.

    Figure 1 shows total water during the passage of Hurricane Isabel on September 13. The storm is apparent: the ring of moderate values surrounding a very strong maximum of 100 mm. Total water of more than 80 mm is unusual, and these values correspond to the intense thunderstorms contained within Isabel. The thunderstorms--and the large values of total water--are fed by evaporation from the ocean in the hurricane's high winds. The water vapor near the center of the storm does not remain there long, since hurricane rain rates as high 50 mm (2 inches) per hour imply rapid cycling of the water we observe. Away from the storm the amount of total water vapor is rather low, associated with fair weather where air that ascended near the storm's eye returns to earth, having dropped its moisture as rain. Also seen in the second images are two small regions of about 70 mm of total water over south America. These are yet more thunderstorms, though likely much more benign than those in Isabel.

    The

  8. Binary adsorption equilibrium of carbon dioxide and water vapor on activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xiao, Penny; Webley, Paul

    2009-09-15

    Adsorption equilibria of a CO2/H2O binary mixture on activated alumina F-200 were measured at several temperatures and over a wide range of concentrations from 4% to around 90% of the saturated water vapor pressure. In comparison with the single-component data, the loading of CO2 was not reduced in the presence of H2O, whereas at low relative humidity the adsorption of H2O was depressed. The binary system was described by a competitive/cooperative adsorption model where the readily adsorbed water layers acted as secondary sites for further CO2 adsorption via hydrogen bonding or hydration reaction. The combination of kinetic models, namely, a Langmuir isotherm for characterizing pure CO2 adsorption and a BET isotherm for H2O, was extended to derive a binary adsorption equilibrium model for the CO2/H2O mixture. Models based on the ideal adsorbed solution theory of Myers and Prausnitz failed to characterize the data over the whole composition range, and a large deviation of binary CO2/H2O equilibrium from ideal solution behavior was observed. The extended Langmuir-BET (LBET) isotherm, analogous to the extended Langmuir equation, drastically underestimated the CO2 loading. By incorporating the interactions between CO2 and H2O molecules on the adsorbent surface and taking into account the effect of nonideality, the realistic interactive LBET (R-LBET) model was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental data. The derived binary isosteric heat of adsorption showed that the heat was reduced by competitive adsorption but promoted by cooperative adsorption. PMID:19678623

  9. Adsorption and removal kinetics of phosphonate from water using natural adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Anil; Velayudhan, K T; Ramachandran, V; Bhai, R Susheela; Unnikrishnan, G; Vasu, K

    2010-01-01

    The removal of phosphonate from water was studied using some natural adsorbents. Potassium phosphonate is a fungicide used for the control of Phytophthora capsici, which is prevalent in black pepper (Piper nigrum L.). Batch adsorption kinetic experiments were conducted on the adsorption of phosphonate onto the adsorbents. The concentration of phosphonate was measured on a high-performance liquid chromatograph fitted with a conductivity detector. The percentage removal of phosphonate by powdered laterite stone (PLS) from water was 40.4%, within a residence time of 15 minutes. The mechanisms of the rate of adsorption were analyzed and compared using the pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The experimental data was found to correlate well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating adsorption as a chemisorption process. A possible reaction in the phosphonate-PLS system also has been proposed. The PLS can be used as a low-cost natural adsorbent for phosphonate removal from water. PMID:20112539

  10. Modification of commercial NaY zeolite to give high water diffusivity and adsorb a large amount of water.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masahiro; Kimura, Michisato; Sugino, Mao; Horikawa, Toshihide; Nakagawa, Keizo; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    By using NaY zeolites as desiccant materials, commercial NaY zeolite was alkali treated with 1 M NaOH aqueous solution and then Mg(2+) ion-exchanged by 0.5 M Mg(NO3)2 aqueous solution. Alkali treatment (AT) of NaY zeolite removed silicon atoms selectivity from the framework of Y-type zeolite and enhanced water diffusivity of Y-type zeolite. On the other hand, Mg(2+) ion-exchange of NaY zeolite increased the amount of water adsorbed. Prepared Y-AT-Mg zeolite had both water adsorption velocity and a large difference of water adsorbed amount between adsorption at 30 °C and desorption at 100 °C. PMID:26072446

  11. Effects of water-vapor on friction and deformation of polymeric magnetic media in contact with a ceramic oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of humidity (water-vapor) in nitrogen on the friction and deformation behavior of magnetic tape in contact with a Ni-Zn ferrite spherical pin were studied. The coefficient of friction is markedly dependent on the ambient relative humidity. In elastic contacts the coefficient of friction increased linearly with increasing humidity; it decreased linearly when humidity was lowered. This effect is the result of changes in the chemistry and interaction of tape materials such as degradation of the lubricant. In plastic contacts there was no effect of humidity on friction below 40 percent relative humidity. There is no effect on friction associated with the breakthrough of the adsorbed water-vapor film at the interface of the tape and Ni-Zn ferrite. The coefficient of friction, however, increased rapidly with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent in plastic contacts.

  12. Water vapor analysis with use of sunphotometry and radiosoundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakszys, Paulina; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomek; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Strzalkowska, Agata; Markuszewski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    Information about vertically integrated content of water vapor in the atmosphere and type, composition and concentration of aerosols is relevant in many types of atmospheric studies. Such information is required to understand mechanisms of global climate and its further modeling (Smirnov et al., 2000). This work is devoted to the description of a basic technique of analysis and comparing the derivation of Columnar Water Vapor (CWV) from different instruments, such as a radiosonde and a sunphotometer. The measurements were carried out using Microtops II Ozone Monitor & Sunphotometer during the cruises onboard the R/V Oceania (13 cruises) and from one cruise onboard of the SY TASK in the southern Baltic Sea. Measurements were collected for the NASA program Maritime Aerosol Network. Data collected with the DiGICORA III Radiosonde (RS92) come from the webpage of the University of Wyoming, Department of Atmospheric Science. The first instrument, sunphotometer, allows us to collect data on days that are cloud-free. The Microtops II is capable of measuring the total ozone column, total precipitable water vapor and aerosol optical depth at 1020 nm (Morys et al. 2001; Ichoku et al., 2002). Each of these parameters is automatically derived. Data collected by Microtops have been processed with the pre- and post-field calibration and automatic cloud clearing. Precipitable water vapor in the column was derived from the 936nm channel. Detailed data description is available on the AERONET webpage. In radiousoundings the total precipitable water is the water that occurs in a vertical column of a unit cross-sectional area between any two specified levels, commonly expressed as from the earth's surface to the 'top' of the atmosphere. The Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPWV) is the height of liquid water that would result from the condensation of all water vapor in a column. The study of one cruise (29 March - 20 April) shows that 241 Microtops measurements were made, each of

  13. A nonisothermal emissivity and absorptivity formulation for water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanathan, V.; Downey, P.

    1986-01-01

    An emissivity approach is taken to modeling fluxes and cooling rates in the atmosphere. The nonisothermal water vapor long wave radiation emissivity and absorptivity model that is developed satisfies the requirements of defining a monochromatic transfer equation for predicting water vapor emissions. Predictions made with the model compare favorably with fluxes predicted by a radiation model for narrow-band emissions in 5 kayser intervals. The spectral resolution assumed in narrow-band models is shown to be an arbitrary parameter and, if a far wing continuum-type opacity is included in the emissivity scheme presented, results can be obtained which are as accurate as predictions made with state of the art line-by-line (LBL) calculations.

  14. Water vapor pressure should be addressed in Potomac study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Walter G.

    In Bruce Doe's article, “A Potomac Perspective on the Growing Global Greenhouse” (Eos, January 5,1999), a statement is made in the next to last paragraph that “other climatic parameters such as precipitation can correlate better than temperature among the five sites.” It would be expected that precipitation, and in particular the partial pressure of water vapor, should correlate with the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect. It was pointed out by W. G. Egan and coworkers in 1991 that there is an inverse relationship between carbon dioxide and water vapor partial pressure, seen both in laboratory experiments and at all worldwide Global Monitoring for Climate Change monitoring stations. Specific examples were presented for Cold Bay, Alaska and Palmer Station, Antarctica monthly and annually

  15. Water vapor continuum: Whether collision-induced absorption is involved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigasin, A. A.

    2014-11-01

    In a series of recent publications, the idea is pursued to shed a new light on the theory of the water vapor continuum absorption invoking the mechanism of collision-induced absorption. In the opinion of the present author, a portion of theoretical suggestions on this subject is biased and may thus lead to untenable conclusions about the nature of the continuum. The most typical drawback consists of improper consideration of statistics in the ensemble of interacting monomers that lead to embedding incorrect statistical weights to various types of molecular pairs which can form. The current note aims at clarifying the term “collision-induced absorption” in order to avoid incongruity in understanding the nature of the water vapor continuum.

  16. IR spectroscopy of water vapor confined in nanoporous silica aerogel.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Yu N; Petrova, T M; Solodov, A M; Solodov, A A

    2010-12-01

    The absorption spectrum of the water vapor, confined in the nanoporous silica aerogel, was measured within 5000-5600 cm(-1) with the IFS 125 HR Fourier spectrometer. It has been shown, that tight confinement of the molecules by the nanoporous size leads to the strong lines broadening and shift. For water vapor lines, the HWHM of confined molecules are on the average 23 times larger than those for free molecules. The shift values are in the range from -0.03 cm(-1) to 0.09 cm(-1). Some spectral lines have negative shift. The data on the half-widths and center shifts for some strongest H(2)O lines have been presented. PMID:21164954

  17. Atmospheric solar heating rate in the water vapor bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1986-01-01

    The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmospheres is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are computed for individual absorption bands and for the total near-infrared region. The parameterization is based upon monochromatic calculations and follows essentially the scaling approximation of Chou and Arking, but the effect of temperature variation with height is taken into account in order to enhance the accuracy. Furthermore, the spectral range is extended to cover the two weak bands centered at 0.72 and 0.82 micron. Comparisons with monochromatic calculations show that the atmospheric heating rate and the surface radiation can be accurately computed from the parameterization. Comparisons are also made with other parameterizations. It is found that the absorption of solar radiation can be computed reasonably well using the Goody band model and the Curtis-Godson approximation.

  18. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  19. Advancements in water vapor electrolysis technology. [for Space Station ECLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Heppner, Dennis B.; Sudar, Martin

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes a technology development program whose goal is to develop water vapor electrolysis (WVE) hardware that can be used selectively as localized topping capability in areas of high metabolic activity without oversizing the central air revitalization system on long-duration manned space missions. The WVE will be used primarily to generate O2 for the crew cabin but also to provide partial humidity control by removing water vapor from the cabin atmosphere. The electrochemically based WVE interfaces with cabin air which is controlled in the following ranges: dry bulb temperature of 292 to 300 K; dew point temperature of 278 to 289 K; relative humidity of 25 to 75 percent; and pressure of 101 + or - 1.4 kPa. Design requirements, construction details, and results for both single-cell and multicell module testing are presented, and the preliminary sizing of a multiperson subsystem is discussed.

  20. Water vapor, water-ice clouds, and dust in the North Polar Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, Leslie K.; Smith, Michael D.; Bass, Deborah S.; Hale, Amy S.

    2006-01-01

    The behavior of water vapor, water-ice and dust in the Martian atmosphere is important for understanding the overall Martian climate system, which is characterized by three main cycles: water, including water-ice, dust, and CO2. Understanding these cycles will lend insight into the behavior of the atmospheric dynamics, the atmosphere's ability to transport dust, water-ice, and vapor to different parts of the planet, and how that ability changes as a function of dust and water-ice loading.

  1. New Isotopic Water Analyzer for Hydrological Measurements of Both Liquid Water and Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owano, T.; Gupta, M.; Berman, E.; Baer, D.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope ratios of liquid water allow determination of water flowpaths, residence times in catchments, and groundwater migration. Previously, discrete water samples have been collected and transported to an IRMS lab for isotope characterization. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have thus been generally limited in scope and in temporal resolution. We report on the recent development of the first Isotopic Water Analyzer that simultaneously quantifies δ2H, δ17O and δ18O in liquid water or in water vapor from different natural water sources (e.g., rain, snow, streams and groundwater). In High-Throughput mode, the IWA can report measurements at the unprecedented rate of over 800 injections per day, which yields more than 140 total unknown and reference samples per day (still with 6 injections per measurement). This fast time response provides isotope hydrologists with the capability to study dynamic changes in δ values quickly (minutes) and over long time scales (weeks, months), thus enabling studies of mixing dynamics in snowmelt, canopy throughfall, stream mixing, and allows for individual precipitation events to be independently studied. In addition, the same IWA can also record fast measurements of isotopic water vapor (δ2H, δ17O, δ18O) in real time (2 Hz data rate or faster) over a range of mole fractions greater than 60000 ppm H2O in air. Changing between operational modes requires a software command, to enable the user to switch from measuring liquid water to measuring water vapor, or vice versa. The new IWA, which uses LGR's patented Off-axis ICOS technology, incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for stable measurements with essentially zero drift despite changes in ambient temperature (over the entire range from 0-45 degrees C). Measurements from recent field studies using the IWA will be presented.

  2. Surface potential of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of an extended molecular dynamics calculation of the surface potential (SP) of the water liquid-vapor interface is presented. The SP predicted by the TIP4P model is -(130 + or - 50) mV. This value is of reasonable magnitude but of opposite sign to the expectations based on laboratory experiments. The electrostatic potential shows a nonmonotonic variation with depth into the liquid.

  3. Water vapor variance measurements using a Raman lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, K.; Melfi, S. H.; Ferrare, R.; Whiteman, D.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the importance of atmospheric water vapor variance, we have analyzed data from the NASA/Goddard Raman lidar to obtain temporal scales of water vapor mixing ratio as a function of altitude over observation periods extending to 12 hours. The ground-based lidar measures water vapor mixing ration from near the earth's surface to an altitude of 9-10 km. Moisture profiles are acquired once every minute with 75 m vertical resolution. Data at each 75 meter altitude level can be displayed as a function of time from the beginning to the end of an observation period. These time sequences have been spectrally analyzed using a fast Fourier transform technique. An example of such a temporal spectrum obtained between 00:22 and 10:29 UT on December 6, 1991 is shown in the figure. The curve shown on the figure represents the spectral average of data from 11 height levels centered on an altitude of 1 km (1 plus or minus .375 km). The spectra shows a decrease in energy density with frequency which generally follows a -5/3 power law over the spectral interval 3x10 (exp -5) to 4x10 (exp -3) Hz. The flattening of the spectrum for frequencies greater than 6x10 (exp -3) Hz is most likely a measure of instrumental noise. Spectra like that shown in the figure are calculated for other altitudes and show changes in spectral features with height. Spectral analysis versus height have been performed for several observation periods which demonstrate changes in water vapor mixing ratio spectral character from one observation period to the next. The combination of these temporal spectra with independent measurements of winds aloft provide an opportunity to infer spatial scales of moisture variance.

  4. Extratropical influence of upper tropospheric water vapor on Greenhouse warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Hu, Hua

    1997-01-01

    Despite its small quantity, the importance of upper tropospheric water vapor is its ability to trap the longwave radiation emitted from the Earth's surface, namely the greenhouse effect. The greenhouse effect is defined quantitatively as the difference between the longwave flux emitted by the Earth's surface and the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) flux emitted from the top of the atmosphere (TOA) (Raval and Ramanathan 1989).

  5. Fiber-based lidar for atmospheric water-vapor measurements.

    PubMed

    Little, L M; Papen, G C

    2001-07-20

    The design and evaluation of a prototype fiber-based lidar system for autonomous measurement of atmospheric water vapor are presented. The system components are described, along with current limitations and options for improvement. Atmospheric measurements show good agreement with modeled signal returns from 400 to 1000 m but are limited below 400 m as a result of errors in signal processing caused by violation of the assumptions used in the derivation of the differential absorption lidar equation. PMID:18360367

  6. Nanogold-Decorated Silica Monoliths as Highly Efficient Solid-Phase Adsorbent for Ultratrace Mercury Analysis in Natural Waters.

    PubMed

    Huber, Jessica; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Sonke, Jeroen E; Ziller, Sebastian; Lindén, Mika; Leopold, Kerstin

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel analytical method for mercury (Hg) trace determination based on direct Hg preconcentration from aqueous solution onto a gold nanoparticle-decorated silica monolith (AuNP@SiO2). Detection of Hg is performed after thermal desorption by means of atomic fluorescence spectrometry. This new methodology benefits from reagent-free, time- and cost-saving procedure, due to most efficient solid-phase adsorbent and results in high sensitive quantification. The excellent analytical performance of the whole procedure is demonstrated by a limit of detection as low as 1.31 ng L(-1) for only one-min accumulation duration. A good reproducibility with standard deviations ≤5.4% is given. The feasibility of the approach in natural waters was confirmed by a recovery experiment in spiked seawater with a recovery rate of 101%. Moreover, the presented method was validated through reference analysis of a submarine groundwater discharge sample by cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry resulting in a very good agreement of the found values. Hence the novel method is a very promising new tool for low-level Hg monitoring in natural waters providing easy-handling on-site preconcentration, reagent-free stabilization as well as reagent-free, highly sensitive detection. PMID:26460188

  7. Combustion of a single magnesium particle in water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Ya; Xia, Zhi-Xun; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Huang, Xu; Hu, Jian-Xin

    2015-09-01

    The combustion of magnesium particles in water vapor is of interest for underwater propulsion and hydrogen production. In this work, the combustion process of a single magnesium particle in water vapor is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Combustion experiments are conducted in a combustor filled with motionless water vapor. Condensation of gas-phase magnesia on the particle surface is confirmed and gas-phase combustion flame characteristics are observed. With the help of an optical filter and a neutral optical attenuator, flame structures are captured and determined. Flame temperature profiles are measured by an infrared thermometer. Combustion residue is a porous oxide shell of disordered magnesia crystal, which may impose a certain influence on the diffusivity of gas phases. A simplified one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, quasi-steady combustion model is then developed. In this model, the condensation of gas-phase magnesia on the particle surface and its influence on the combustion process are included, and the Stefan problem on the particle surface is also taken into consideration. With the combustion model, the parameters of flame temperature, flame diameter, and the burning time of the particle are solved analytically under the experimental conditions. A reasonable agreement between the experimental and modeling results is demonstrated, and several features to improve the model are identified. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51406231).

  8. Mars atmospheric water vapor abundance: 1996-1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Hunten, D. M.; Doose, L. R.; Hill, R. E.

    2003-05-01

    Measurements of martian atmospheric water vapor made throughout Ls = 18.0°-146.4° (October 3, 1996-July 12, 1997) show changes in Mars humidity on hourly, daily, and seasonal time scales. Because our observing program during the 1996-1997 Mars apparition did not include concomitant measurement of nearby CO 2 bands, high northern latitude data were corrected for dust and aerosol extinction assuming an optical depth of 0.8, consistent with ground-based and HST imaging of northern dust storms. All other measurements with airmass greater than 3.5 were corrected using a total optical depth of 0.5. Three dominant results from this data set are as follows: (1) pre- and post-opposition measurements made with the slit crossing many hours of local time on Mars' Earth-facing disk show a distinct diurnal pattern with highest abundances around and slightly after noon with low abundances in the late afternoon, (2) measurements of water vapor over the Mars Pathfinder landing site (Carl Sagan Memorial Station) on July 12, 1997, found 21 ppt μm in the spatial sector centered near 19° latitude, 36° longitude while abundances around the site varied from as low as 6 to as high as 28 ppt μm, and (3) water vapor abundance is patchy on hourly and daily time scales but follows the usual seasonal trends.

  9. Interactions between carbon and water vapor fluxes in Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2009-04-01

    Tropical ecosystems are particularly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and have a significant impact on the global climate due to biophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks. It is still unclear how precipitation variability and soil moisture will develop under future climatic conditions, with large implications on ecosystems in the tropics. Thus, an improved understanding of the interactions between carbon and water vapor fluxes in the tropics is needed. However, continuous measurements of these fluxes in tropical regions are sparse in general and only few localities exist in Central America. Our two eddy flux towers were established in Sardinilla, Central Panama (9.3° N, 79.6° W, 70 m a.s.l.) to measure carbon and water vapor fluxes continuously over an afforestation with native tree species and an adjacent, traditionally grazed pasture. Our objective is to understand the variability of carbon and water vapor fluxes, their environmental drivers and their interaction in these two ecosystems. First results from nearly two years of continuous operation will be presented and discussed, focusing particularly on seasonal transition periods and the effects of a prolonged dry season caused by a strong ENSO event (La Niña) in 2008.

  10. Solar radiation and water vapor pressure to forecast chickenpox epidemics.

    PubMed

    Hervás, D; Hervás-Masip, J; Nicolau, A; Reina, J; Hervás, J A

    2015-03-01

    The clear seasonality of varicella infections in temperate regions suggests the influence of meteorologic conditions. However, there are very few data on this association. The aim of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of varicella infections on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic conditions and schooling. Data on the number of cases of varicella were obtained from the Network of Epidemiologic Surveillance, which is composed of primary care physicians who notify varicella cases on a compulsory basis. From 1995 to 2012, varicella cases were correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, water vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and solar radiation using regression and time-series models. The influence of schooling was also analyzed. A total of 68,379 cases of varicella were notified during the study period. Cases occurred all year round, with a peak incidence in June. Varicella cases increased with the decrease in water vapor pressure and/or the increase of solar radiation, 3 and 4 weeks prior to reporting, respectively. An inverse association was also observed between varicella cases and school holidays. Using these variables, the best fitting autoregressive moving average with exogenous variables (ARMAX) model could predict 95 % of varicella cases. In conclusion, varicella in our region had a clear seasonality, which was mainly determined by solar radiation and water vapor pressure. PMID:25265908

  11. LASE measurements of aerosols and water vapor during TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Melfi, Harvey; Whiteman, David N.; Schwenner, Geary; Evans, Keith D.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Hignett, Philip; Holben, Brent N.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.

  12. Column atmospheric water vapor and vegetation liquid water retrievals from airborne imaging spectrometer data

    SciTech Connect

    Bo-Cai Gao; Goetz, A.F.H. )

    1990-03-20

    High spatial resolution column atmospheric water vapor amounts were derived from spectral data collected by the airborne visible-infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS). The quantitative derivation is made by curve fitting observed spectra with calculated spectra in the 1.14-{mu}m and 0.94-{mu}m water vapor band absorption regions using an atmospheric model, a narrow-band spectral model, and a nonlinear least squares fitting technique. The derivation makes use of the facts that (1) the reflectances of many ground targets vary approximately linearly with wavelength in the 0.94- and 1.14-{mu}m water vapor band absorption regions, (2) the scattered radiation near 1 {mu}m is small compared with the directly reflected radiation when the atmospheric aerosol concentrations are low, and (3) the scattered radiation in the lower part of the atmosphere is subjected to the water vapor absorption. Based on the analyses of an AVIRIS data set that was acquired within an hour of radiosonde launch, it appears that the accuracy approaches the precision. The derived column water vapor amounts are independent of the absolute surface reflectances. It now appears feasible to derive high spatial resolution column water vapor amounts over land areas from satellite altitude with the proposed high resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS). Curve fitting of spectra near 1 {mu}m from areas covered with vegetation, using an atmospheric model and a simplified vegetation reflectance model, indicates that both the amount of atmospheric water vapor and the moisture content of vegetation can be retrieved simultaneously because the band centers of liquid water in vegetation and the atmospheric water vapor are offset by approximately 0.05 {mu}m.

  13. In search of water vapor on Jupiter: Laboratory measurements of the microwave properties of water vapor under simulated jovian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpowicz, Bryan M.; Steffes, Paul G.

    2011-03-01

    Detection and measurement of atmospheric water vapor in the deep jovian atmosphere using microwave radiometry has been discussed extensively by Janssen et al. (Janssen, M.A., Hofstadter, M.D., Gulkis, S., Ingersoll, A.P., Allison, M., Bolton, S.J., Levin, S.M., Kamp, L.W. [2005]. Icarus 173 (2), 447-453.) and de Pater et al. (de Pater, I., Deboer, D., Marley, M., Freedman, R., Young, R. [2005]. Icarus 173 (2), 425-447). The NASA Juno mission will include a six-channel microwave radiometer system (MWR) operating in the 1.3-50 cm wavelength range in order to retrieve water vapor abundances from the microwave signature of Jupiter (see, e.g., Matousek, S. [2005]. The Juno new frontiers mission. Tech. Rep. IAC-05-A3.2.A.04, California Institute of Technology). In order to accurately interpret data from such observations, nearly 2000 laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity of H2O vapor in a H2/He atmosphere have been conducted in the 5-21 cm wavelength range (1.4-6 GHz) at pressures from 30 mbars to 101 bars and at temperatures from 330 to 525 K. The mole fraction of H2O (at maximum pressure) ranged from 0.19% to 3.6% with some additional measurements of pure H2O. These results have enabled development of the first model for the opacity of gaseous H2O in a H2/He atmosphere under jovian conditions developed from actual laboratory data. The new model is based on a terrestrial model of Rosenkranz et al. (Rosenkranz, P.W. [1998]. Radio Science 33, 919-928), with substantial modifications to reflect the effects of jovian conditions. The new model for water vapor opacity dramatically outperforms previous models and will provide reliable results for temperatures from 300 to 525 K, at pressures up to 100 bars and at frequencies up to 6 GHz. These results will significantly reduce the uncertainties in the retrieval of jovian atmospheric water vapor abundances from the microwave radiometric measurements from the upcoming NASA Juno mission, as well as provide a clearer

  14. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  15. Liquid-vapor oscillations of water in hydrophobic nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckstein, Oliver; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2003-06-01

    Water plays a key role in biological membrane transport. In ion channels and water-conducting pores (aquaporins), one-dimensional confinement in conjunction with strong surface effects changes the physical behavior of water. In molecular dynamics simulations of water in short (0.8 nm) hydrophobic pores the water density in the pore fluctuates on a nanosecond time scale. In long simulations (460 ns in total) at pore radii ranging from 0.35 to 1.0 nm we quantify the kinetics of oscillations between a liquid-filled and a vapor-filled pore. This behavior can be explained as capillary evaporation alternating with capillary condensation, driven by pressure fluctuations in the water outside the pore. The free-energy difference between the two states depends linearly on the radius. The free-energy landscape shows how a metastable liquid state gradually develops with increasing radius. For radii > 0.55 nm it becomes the globally stable state and the vapor state vanishes. One-dimensional confinement affects the dynamic behavior of the water molecules and increases the self diffusion by a factor of 2-3 compared with bulk water. Permeabilities for the narrow pores are of the same order of magnitude as for biological water pores. Water flow is not continuous but occurs in bursts. Our results suggest that simulations aimed at collective phenomena such as hydrophobic effects may require simulation times >50 ns. For water in confined geometries, it is not possible to extrapolate from bulk or short time behavior to longer time scales.

  16. Arsenic removal from water/wastewater using adsorbents--A critical review.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Pittman, Charles U

    2007-04-01

    Arsenic's history in science, medicine and technology has been overshadowed by its notoriety as a poison in homicides. Arsenic is viewed as being synonymous with toxicity. Dangerous arsenic concentrations in natural waters is now a worldwide problem and often referred to as a 20th-21st century calamity. High arsenic concentrations have been reported recently from the USA, China, Chile, Bangladesh, Taiwan, Mexico, Argentina, Poland, Canada, Hungary, Japan and India. Among 21 countries in different parts of the world affected by groundwater arsenic contamination, the largest population at risk is in Bangladesh followed by West Bengal in India. Existing overviews of arsenic removal include technologies that have traditionally been used (oxidation, precipitation/coagulation/membrane separation) with far less attention paid to adsorption. No previous review is available where readers can get an overview of the sorption capacities of both available and developed sorbents used for arsenic remediation together with the traditional remediation methods. We have incorporated most of the valuable available literature on arsenic remediation by adsorption ( approximately 600 references). Existing purification methods for drinking water; wastewater; industrial effluents, and technological solutions for arsenic have been listed. Arsenic sorption by commercially available carbons and other low-cost adsorbents are surveyed and critically reviewed and their sorption efficiencies are compared. Arsenic adsorption behavior in presence of other impurities has been discussed. Some commercially available adsorbents are also surveyed. An extensive table summarizes the sorption capacities of various adsorbents. Some low-cost adsorbents are superior including treated slags, carbons developed from agricultural waste (char carbons and coconut husk carbons), biosorbents (immobilized biomass, orange juice residue), goethite and some commercial adsorbents, which include resins, gels, silica

  17. Water vapor stable isotope observations from tropical Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Stephen; Deutscher, Nicholas; Griffith, David; McCabe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    The response of the tropical hydrological cycle to anthropogenically induced changes in radiative forcing is one of the largest discrepancies between climate models. Paleoclimate archives of the stable isotopic composition of precipitation in the tropics indicate a relationship with precipitation amount that could be exploited to study past hydroclimate and improve our knowledge of how this region responds to changes in climate forcing. Recently modelling studies of convective parameterizations fitted with water isotopes and remote sensing of water vapor isotopes in the tropics have illustrated uncertainty in the assumed relationship with rainfall amount. Therefore there is a need to collect water isotope data in the tropics that can be used to evaluate these models and help identify the relationships between the isotopic composition of meteoric waters and rainfall intensity. However, data in this region is almost non-existent. Here we present in-situ water vapor isotopic measurements and the HDO retrievals from the co-located Total Column Carbon Observing Network (TCCON) site at Darwin in Tropical Australia. The Darwin site is interestingly placed within the tropical western pacific region and is impacted upon by a clear monsoonal climate, and key climate cycles including ENSO and Madden Julian Oscillations. The analysis of the data illustrated relationships between water vapor isotopes and humidity which demonstrated the role of precipitation processes in the wet season and air mass mixing during the dry season. Further the wet season observations show complex relationships between humidity and isotopes. A simple Rayleigh distillation model was not obeyed, instead the importance of rainfall re-evaporation in generating the highly depleted signatures was demonstrated. These data potentially provide a useful tool for evaluating model parameterizations in monsoonal regions as they demonstrate relationships with precipitation processes that cannot be observed with

  18. Water Vapor Adsorption - Desorption Behavior of a Small Piece of Desiccant Rotor in Temperature Swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washio, Yasuko; Kodama, Akio

    This study aims to clarify the adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor onto / from a desiccant rotor in temperature swing. A magnetic suspension balance followed time variations of the weight of a small piece of desiccant rotor at various desorption temperature, adsorption / desorption time and their duration time ratio. Adsorption-desorption swing in steady state settled down at certain amplitude of the amount adsorbed keeping the balance of the adsorption and desorption rates averaged over each period. At low regeneration temperature around 40-50 oC, adsorption and desorption rates were affected considerably by the change of driving force of adsorption q*-q rather than the temperature dependence of the mass transfer coefficient. At constant adsorption and desorption air conditions, the adsorption /desorption rates could be summarized by the amount of adsorption and temperature, independently of the length of cycle time. Also, region of the amount of adsorption at which adsorption - desorption swing occurred was predicted considering the adsorption / desorption rates - amount adsorbed relationship and the adsorption / desorption duration ratio.

  19. Kinetics of water vapor diffusion in activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmasheva, D. M.; Kapralov, P. O.; Travkin, V. D.; Artemov, V. G.; Tikhonov, V. I.; Volkov, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    We describe an experimental method for studying rapid processes of water vapor sorption by fine-dispersed and porous materials. The concentration of gas-phase water molecules is detected during adsorption by a laser-diode spectrometer. The kinetic pressure curves are recorded in a time window of 10-1 to 103 s and are analyzed using analogy of the diffusion flow with the electric current in a branched RC circuit. The proposed model establishes the relation between the kinetics curves being measured and the structural parameters of the medium.

  20. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-01

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  1. Venus: implications from microwave spectroscopy of the atmospheric content of water vapor.

    PubMed

    Pollack, J B; Wood, A T

    1968-09-13

    From comparison of theoretical and observed microwave brightness temperatures of Venus at 1.35 centimeters, the center of a water-vapor line, we obtain an upper limit of 0.8 percent for the water-vapor mixing ratio in the lower atmosphere. This limit is consistent with the amount of water vapor detected by Venera 4, the existence of aqueous ice clouds, and a greenhouse effect caused by water vapor and carbon dioxide. The computed spectra suggest that a sensitive procedure for detection of water vapor is examination of the wavelength region between I and 1.4 centimeters. PMID:17812281

  2. Water Vapor Profiling From CoSSIR Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Chang, L. A.; Monosmith, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Previous millimeter-wave radiometry for water vapor profiling, by either airborne or satellite sensors, has been limited to frequencies less than or equal to 183 GHz. The retrievals are generally limited to an altitude range of 0-10 km. The additional measurements at the frequencies of 380.2 plus or minus 0.8, 380.2 plus or minus 1.8, 380.2 plus or minus 3.3, and 380.2 plus or minus 6.2 GHz provided by the new airborne Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR) can extend this profiling capability up to an altitude of about 15 km. Furthermore, the retrievals can be performed over both land and water surfaces in the tropics without much difficulty. These properties are demonstrated by recent CoSSIR measurements on board the NASA WB-57 aircraft during CR-AVE in January 2006. Retrievals of water vapor mixing ratio were performed at eight altitude levels of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 km from CoSSIR data sets acquired at observational angles of 0 and 53.4 degrees, and the results were compared with other available measurements from the same aircraft and near-concurrent satellites. A comparison of the variations of mixing ratios retrieved from CoSSIR and those derived from the Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) in the aircraft vicinity, along the path of the transit flight on January 14, 2006, appears to show some connection, although the measurements were referring to different altitudes. A very good agreement was found between the collocated values of total precipitable water derived from the CoSSIR-retrieved water vapor profiles and those estimated from TMI (TRMM Microwave Imager)

  3. Water vapor diffusion into a nanostructured iron oxyhydroxide.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaowei; Boily, Jean-François

    2013-06-17

    Water diffusion through 0.4 nm × 0.4 nm wide tunnels of synthesized akaganéite (β-FeOOH) nanoparticles was studied by a coupled experimental-molecular modeling approach. A sorption isotherm model obtained from quartz crystal microbalance measurements suggests that the akaganéite bulk can accommodate a maximum of 22.4 mg of water/g (44% bulk site occupancy) when exposed to atmospheres of up to 16 Torr water vapor. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy also showed that water molecules interact with (hydr)oxo groups on both the akaganéite bulk and surface. Diffusion reactions through the akaganéite bulk were confirmed through important changes in the hydrogen-bonding environment of bulk hydroxyl groups. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that water molecules are localized in cavities that are bound by eight hydroxyl groups, forming short-lived (<0.5 ps) hydrogen bonds with one another. Diffusion coefficients of water are three orders of magnitude lower than they are in liquid water (D = 0.0-11.1 × 10(-12) m(2)·s(-1)), whereas large integral rotational correlation times are 4 to 15 times higher (τr = 8.4-31.8 ps). Moreover, both of these properties are strongly loading-dependent. The simulations of the interface between the water vapor phase and the (010) surface plane of the akaganéite, where tunnel openings are exposed, revealed sluggish rates of incorporation between interfacial water species and their tunnel counterparts. The presence of defects in the synthesized particles are suspected to contribute to different diffusion rates in the laboratory when compared to those observed in pristine crystalline materials, as studied by molecular modeling. PMID:23701490

  4. Water vapor and cloud water measurements over Darwin during the STEP 1987 tropical mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, K. K.; Proffitt, M. H.; Chan, K. R.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Strahan, E.; Wilson, J. C.; Kley, D.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of stratospheric and upper tropospheric cloud water plus water vapor (total water) and water vapor were made with two Lyman alpha hygrometers as part of the STEP tropical experiment. The in situ measurements were made in the Darwin, Australia, area in January and February of 1987 on an ER-2 aircraft. Average stratospheric water vapor at a potential temperature of 375 K (the average value of Theta at the tropopause) was 2.4 parts per million by volume (ppmv). This water mixing ratio is below the 3.0 to 4.0 ppmv necessary to be consistent with the observed upper stratospheric dryness. Saturation with respect to ice and the potential for dehydration was observed up to Theta = 402 K.

  5. Variations of stratospheric water vapor over the past three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Vernier, J.-P.

    2014-11-01

    We examine variations in water vapor in air entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) over the past three decades in satellite data and in a trajectory model. Most of the variance can be explained by three processes that affect the TTL: the quasi-biennial oscillation, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, and the temperature of the tropical troposphere. When these factors act in phase, significant variations in water entering the stratosphere are possible. We also find that volcanic eruptions, which inject aerosol into the TTL, affect the amount of water entering the stratosphere. While there is clear decadal variability in the data and models, we find little evidence for a long-term trend in water entering the stratosphere through the TTL over the past 3 decades.

  6. Fiber-Optic Gratings for Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vann, Leila B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band filters in the form of phase-shifted Fabry-Perot Bragg gratings incorporated into optical fibers are being developed for differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) instruments used to measure concentrations of atmospheric water vapor. The basic idea is to measure the relative amounts of pulsed laser light scattered from the atmosphere at two nearly equal wavelengths, one of which coincides with an absorption spectral peak of water molecules and the other corresponding to no water vapor absorption. As part of the DIAL measurement process, the scattered light is made to pass through a filter on the way to a photodetector. Omitting other details of DIAL for the sake of brevity, what is required of the filter is to provide a stop band that: Surrounds the water-vapor spectral absorption peaks at a wavelength of 946 nm, Has a spectral width of at least a couple of nanometers, Contains a pass band preferably no wider than necessary to accommodate the 946.0003-nm-wavelength water vapor absorption peak [which has 8.47 pm full width at half maximum (FWHM)], and Contains another pass band at the slightly shorter wavelength of 945.9 nm, where there is scattering of light from aerosol particles but no absorption by water molecules. Whereas filters used heretofore in DIAL have had bandwidths of =300 pm, recent progress in the art of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters has made it feasible to reduce bandwidths to less than or equal to 20 pm and thereby to reduce background noise. Another benefit of substituting fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters for those now in use would be significant reductions in the weights of DIAL instruments. Yet another advantage of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters is that their transmission spectra can be shifted to longer wavelengths by heating or stretching: hence, it is envisioned that future DIAL instruments would contain devices for fine adjustment of transmission wavelengths through stretching or heating of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters

  7. Inferring water vapor amounts with solar spectral irradiance: Measurements, modeling, and comparisons with in situ water vapor profiles in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere from ATTREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, D. W.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Bui, T. V.

    2013-12-01

    The Airborne Tropical TRopopause Experiment (ATTREX) flew six science missions on the NASA Global Hawk aircraft from NASA Dryden, California to the Pacific tropics to sample the upper troposphere, lower stratosphere (UTLS) during February and March of 2013. After transit to the tropics, the aircraft performed a series of vertical profiles from the cruising altitude of about 18 km down to 14 km sampling the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). A science focus of ATTREX is to examine water vapor and its transport through the TTL. The extremely cold temperatures found in the TTL act to limit the transport of water vapor from the troposphere to stratosphere, making this region critical to the water vapor budget of the stratosphere. Here we investigate the use of the strong water bands centered at 1400 and 1900 nm in the telluric solar spectrum to infer the small water vapor amounts through the TTL. Measurements of spectral irradiance from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) at the top and bottom of the aircraft profiles are used to produce transmission spectra. These are compared with atmospheric radiative transfer calculations of transmission through the layer. The measured water vapor profile from the NOAA water vapor instrument, as well as temperature and pressure, were used in the modeling, providing a rare opportunity to compare water vapor amount inferred from solar transmittance to in situ measurements. Prospects for the use of these bands for determining the total column water vapor amount from the UTLS to the top of the atmosphere from aircraft are also discussed.

  8. WATER VAPOR IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK OF DG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Podio, L.; Dougados, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.; Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Nisini, B.; Sandell, G.; Williams, J. P.; Testi, L.; Woitke, P.

    2013-03-20

    Water is key in the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the formation of comets and icy/water planets. While high-excitation water lines originating in the hot inner disk have been detected in several T Tauri stars (TTSs), water vapor from the outer disk, where most water ice reservoirs are stored, was only reported in the nearby TTS TW Hya. We present spectrally resolved Herschel/HIFI observations of the young TTS DG Tau in the ortho- and para-water ground-state transitions at 557 and 1113 GHz. The lines show a narrow double-peaked profile, consistent with an origin in the outer disk, and are {approx}19-26 times brighter than in TW Hya. In contrast, CO and [C II] lines are dominated by emission from the envelope/outflow, which makes H{sub 2}O lines a unique tracer of the disk of DG Tau. Disk modeling with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo indicates that the strong UV field, due to the young age and strong accretion of DG Tau, irradiates a disk upper layer at 10-90 AU from the star, heating it up to temperatures of 600 K and producing the observed bright water lines. The models suggest a disk mass of 0.015-0.1 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the estimated minimum mass of the solar nebula before planet formation, and a water reservoir of {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} Earth oceans in vapor and {approx}100 times larger in the form of ice. Hence, this detection supports the scenario of ocean delivery on terrestrial planets by the impact of icy bodies forming in the outer disk.

  9. Cassini/CIRS Observations of Water Vapor in Titan's Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Achterberg, R. K.; Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Carlson, R. C.; Jennings, D. E.

    2008-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on the Cassini spacecraft has obtained spectra of Titan during most of the 44 flybys of the Cassini prime mission. Water vapor on Titan was first detected using whole-disk observations from the Infrared Space Observatory (Coustenis et al 1998, Astron. Astrophys. 336, L85-L89). CIRS data permlt the retrieval of the latitudinal variation of water on Titan and some limited information on its vertical profile. Emission lines of H2O on Titan are very weak in the CIRS data. Thus, large spectral averages as well as improvements in calibration are necessary to detect water vapor. Water abundances were retrieved in nadir spectra at 55 South, the Equator, and at 19 North. Limb spectra of the Equator were also modeled to constrain the vertical distribution of water. Stratospheric temperatures in the 0.5 - 4.0 mbar range were obtained by inverting spectra of CH4 in the v4 band centered at 1304/cm. The temperature in the lower stratosphere (4 - 20 mbar) was derived from fitting pure rotation lines of CH4 between 80 and 160/cm. The origin of H2O and CO2 is believed to be from the ablation of micrometeorites containing water ice, followed by photochemistry. This external source of water originates either within the Saturn system or from the interplanetary medium. Recently, Horst et al (J. Geophys. Res. 2008, in press) developed a photochemical model of Titan in which there are two external sources of oxygen. Oxygen ions (probably from Enceladus) precipitate into Titan's atmosphere to form CO at very high altitudes (1100 km). Water ice ablation at lower altitudes (700 km) forms H2O and subsequent chemistry produces CO2. CIRS measurements of CO, CO2, and now of H2O will provide valuable constraints to these photochemical models and - improve our understanding of oxygen chemistry on Titan.

  10. Vapor Transport Modeling of Continental Water Isotope Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritch, A. J.; Caves, J. K.; Ibarra, D. E.; Winnick, M. J.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotopes have been widely used to reconstruct past climatic conditions and topographic histories of mountain belts. However, many studies do not account for the influences of evapotranspiration and vapor recycling on downstream meteoric water isotopic compositions. Here we present a case study of the modern Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range to illustrate the value of using process-based models across larger spatial scales to reconstruct the conditions driving local- to regional-scale water isotopic compositions. We use a one-dimensional reactive vapor transport model, driven by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) high-resolution North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset, to simulate the isotopic composition of modern meteoric waters (δ18O and δD) along storm tracks across the Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range. Storm track pathways are generated using NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory's Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model. In addition, we couple the vapor transport model with a soil moisture model to simulate depth profiles of the oxygen isotopic composition of authigenic carbonate along our storm tracks. We show that, given reasonable estimates of the modern partitioning between evaporation and transpiration, our model output is in agreement with modern isotopic data both from compilations of published meteoric water samples and from newly collected soil carbonate samples along a transect across the northern Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range (~38-42° N). These results demonstrate that our modeling approach can be used to analyze the relative contributions of climate and topography to observed isotopic gradients. Future studies can apply this modeling framework to isotopes preserved in the geologic record to provide a quantitative means of understanding the paleoclimatic influences on spatial isotopic distributions.

  11. Electrophoretic deposition of adsorbed arsenic on fine iron oxide particles in tap water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Syahira Mohd; Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu; Naim, M. Nazli; Rahman, Norazah Abd; Talib, Suhaimi Abdul

    2016-02-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique has been demonstrated to remove arsenic with natural adsorbent (fine iron oxide particles) in tap water samples. Characterizations of metal element particularly arsenic and fine iron oxide particles in tap water from two different locations, i.e. commercial and residential areas, were conducted. Results showed that the concentration of arsenic in tap water from residential area was higher than commercial area samples i.e. 0.022 ± 0.004 and 0.016 ± 0.008 ppm, respectively. The same finding was observed in zeta potential value where it was higher in the residential area than commercial area, i.e. -42.27 ± 0.12 and -34.83 ± 0.23 mV, respectively. During the removal of arsenic using the EPD technique, direct current (DC) voltage was varied from 5 to 25V at a constant electrode distance of 30 mm. Effect of zeta potential, voltage and electrode type were intensively investigated. High percentage removal of arsenic was obtained from carbon plate than carbon fibre electrode. The percentage removal of arsenic from all samples slightly decreased with increasing of the applied voltage. EDX analysis confirmed that arsenic has adsorbed onto deposited iron oxide particles on the anode electrode. Overall, EPD technique was found to be successful in removing arsenic onto fine iron oxide particles in tap water with 26% ± 1.05 of removal.

  12. Quantifying Boundary Layer Water Vapor with Near-Infrared and Microwave Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan Valle, L. F.; Lebsock, M. D.; Fishbein, E.; Kalmus, P.; Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the synergy of collocated microwave radiometry and near-infrared imagery to estimate the planetary boundary layer water vapor. Microwave radiometry provides the total column water vapor, while the near-infrared imagery provides the water vapor above the cloud layers. The difference between the two gives the vapor between the surface and the cloud top, which may be interpreted as the boundary layer water vapor. In combining the two data sets, we apply several flags as well as proximity tests to remove pixels with high clouds and / or intrapixel heterogeneity. Comparisons against radiosondes (MAGIC, VOCALS-REX, etc) and ECMWF reanalysis data demonstrate the robustness of these boundary layer water vapor estimates. It is shown that the measured AMSR-MODIS boundary layer water vapor can be analyzed using sea surface temperature and cloud top pressure information by employing simple equations based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship.

  13. A slowing down of proton motion from HPTS to water adsorbed on the MCM-41 surface.

    PubMed

    Alarcos, Noemí; Cohen, Boiko; Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2016-01-28

    We report on the steady-state and femtosecond-nanosecond (fs-ns) behaviour of 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (pyranine, HPTS) and its interaction with mesoporous silica based materials (MCM-41) in both solid-state and dichloromethane (DCM) suspensions in the absence and presence of water. In the absence of water, HPTS forms aggregates which are characterized by a broad emission spectrum and multiexponential behavior (τsolid-state/DCM = 120 ps, 600 ps, 2.2 ns). Upon interaction with MCM41, the aggregate population is found to be lower, leading to the formation of adsorbed monomers. In the presence of water (1%), HPTS with and without MCM41 materials in DCM suspensions undergoes an excited-state intermolecular proton-transfer (ESPT) reaction in the protonated form (ROH*) producing a deprotonated species (RO(-)*). The long-time emission decays of the ROH* in different systems in the presence of water are multiexponential, and are analysed using the diffusion-assisted geminate recombination model. The obtained proton-transfer and recombination rate constants for HPTS and HPTS/MCM41 complexes in DCM suspensions in the presence of water are kPT = 13 ns(-1), krec = 7.5 Å ns(-1), and kPT = 5.4 ns(-1), krec = 2.2 Å ns(-1), respectively, The slowing down of both processes in the latter case is explained in terms of specific interactions of the dye and of the water molecules with the silica surface. The ultrafast dynamics (fs-regime) of the HPTS/MCM41 complexes in DCM suspensions, without and with water, shows two components which are assigned to intramolecular vibrational-energy relaxation (IVR) (∼120 fs vs. ∼0.8 ps), and vibrational relaxation/cooling (VC), and charge transfer (CT) processes (∼2 ps without water and ∼5 ps with water) of the adsorbed ROH*. Our results provide new knowledge on the interactions and the proton-transfer reaction dynamics of HPTS adsorbed on mesoporous materials. PMID:26705542

  14. Trapping of water vapor from an atmosphere by condensed silicate matter formed by high-temperature pulse vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerasimov, M. V.; Dikov, Yu. P.; Yakovlev, O. I.; Wlotzka, F.

    1993-01-01

    The origin of planetary atmospheres is thought to be the result of bombardment of a growing planet by massive planetesimals. According to some models, the accumulation of released water vapor and/or carbon dioxide can result in the formation of a dense and hot primordial atmosphere. Among source and sink processes of atmospheric water vapor the formation of hydroxides was considered mainly as rehydration of dehydrated minerals (foresterite and enstatite). From our point of view, the formation of hydroxides is not limited to rehydration. Condensation of small silicate particles in a spreading vapor cloud and their interaction with a wet atmosphere can also result in the origin of hydrated phases which have no genetic connections with initial water bearing minerals. We present results of two experiments of a simulated interaction of condensed silicate matter which originated during vaporization of dry clinopyroxene in a wet helium atmosphere.

  15. Comparison of Adsorbed Mercury Screening Method With Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry for Determination of Mercury in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterling, Donald F.; Hovanitz, Edward S.; Street, Kenneth W.

    2000-01-01

    A field screening method for the determination of elemental mercury in environmental soil samples involves the thermal desorption of the mercury from the sample onto gold and then the thermal desorption from the gold to a gold-film mercury vapor analyzer. This field screening method contains a large number of conditions that could be optimized for the various types of soils encountered. In this study, the conditions were optimized for the determination of mercury in silty clay materials, and the results were comparable to the cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometric method of determination. This paper discusses the benefits and disadvantages of employing the field screening method and provides the sequence of conditions that must be optimized to employ this method of determination on other soil types.

  16. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  17. ACA phase calibration scheme with the ALMA water vapor radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaki, Yoshiharu; Matsushita, Satoki; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Nikolic, Bojan

    2012-09-01

    In Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) commissioning and science verification we have conducted a series of experiments of a novel phase calibration scheme for Atacama Compact Array (ACA). In this scheme water vapor radiometers (WVRs) devoted to measurements of tropospheric water vapor content are attached to ACA’s four total-power array (TP Array) antennas surrounding the 7 m dish interferometer array (7 m Array). The excess path length (EPL) due to the water vapor variations aloft is fitted to a simple two-dimensional slope using WVR measurements. Interferometric phase fluctuations for each baseline of the 7 m Array are obtained from differences of EPL inferred from the two-dimensional slope and subtracted from the interferometric phases. In the experiments we used nine ALMA 12-m antennas. Eight of them were closely located in a 70-m square region, forming a compact array like ACA. We supposed the most four outsiders to be the TP Array while the inner 4 antennas were supposed to be the 7 m Array, so that this phase correction scheme (planar-fit) was tested and compared with the WVR phase correction. We estimated residual root-mean-square (RMS) phases for 17- to 41-m baselines after the planar-fit phase correction, and found that this scheme reduces the RMS phase to a 70 - 90 % level. The planar-fit phase correction was proved to be promising for ACA, and how high or low PWV this scheme effectively works in ACA is an important item to be clarified.

  18. Oxidation of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, Raymond C.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) including HfB2 + 20v/0 SiC (HS), ZrB2 + 20v/0 SiC (ZS), and ZrB2 + 30v/0 C + 14v/0 SiC (ZCS) have been investigated for use as potential aeropropulsion engine materials. These materials were oxidized in water vapor (90 percent) using a cyclic vertical furnace at 1 atm. The total exposure time was 10 h at temperatures of 1200, 1300, and 1400 C. CVD SiC was also evaluated as a baseline for comparison. Weight change, X-ray diffraction analyses, surface and cross-sectional SEM and EDS were performed. These results are compared with tests ran in a stagnant air furnace at temperatures of 1327 C for 100 min, and with high pressure burner rig (HPBR) results at 1100 and 1300 C at 6 atm for 50 h. Low velocity water vapor does not make a significant contribution to the oxidation rates of UHTCs when compared to stagnant air. The parabolic rate constants at 1300 C, range from 0.29 to 16.0 mg(sup 2)cm(sup 4)/h for HS and ZCS, respectively, with ZS results between these two values. Comparison of results for UHTCs tested in the furnace in 90 percent water vapor with HPBR results was difficult due to significant sample loss caused by spallation in the increased velocity of the HPBR. Total recession measurements are also reported for the two test environments.

  19. Titanium Dioxide Volatility in High Temperature Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QynhGiao N.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) containing materials are of high interest to the aerospace industry due to its high temperature capability, strength, and light weight. As with most metals an exterior oxide layer naturally exists in environments that contain oxygen (i.e. air). At high temperatures, water vapor plays a key role in the volatility of materials including oxide surfaces. This study will evaluate cold pressed titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder pellets at a temperature range of 1400 C - 1200 C in water containing environments to determine the volatile hydroxyl species using the transpiration method. The water content ranged from 0-76 mole% and the oxygen content range was 0-100 mole % during the 20-250 hour exposure times. Preliminary results indicate that oxygen is not a key contributor at these temperatures and the following reaction is the primary volatile equation for all three temperatures: TiO2 (s) + H2O (g) = TiO(OH)2 (g).

  20. Adsorption of water vapor on modified methacrylate polymeric sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Platonova, N.P.; Tataurova, O.G.; Vartapetyan, R.Sh.

    1995-12-31

    Adsorption of water vapor on methacrylate copolymers and terpolymers was studied. An increase in the content of the cross-linking agent gives rise to increase in the limiting adsorption of water vapor at the saturation pressure (a{sub s}) and to decrease in the concentration of primary adsorption centers. Modification of the initial copolymer containing 60% of 2,3-epoxypropyl methacrylate (EPMA) monomer and 40% of cross-linking agent, ethylene dimethacrylate, with diethylenetriamine (DETA) results in an increase in the a{sub s} value, while modification with C{sub 12} and C{sub 18} alkyl, benzyl, and phenyl groups gives rise to decrease in the a{sub s} values for the copolymeric sorbents. The concentration of primary adsorption centers (a{sub m}) increases considerably on modification of the copolymer with DETA and C{sub 12} groups and decreases markedly on modification with benzyl and phenyl groups. For terpolymers, containing EPMA and styrene, an increase in the styrene/EPMA ratio reduces the a{sub s}, and a{sub m} values. The copolymer modified with DETA groups possesses the most hydrophilic properties, while the copolymer modified with benzyl group exhibits the most hydrophobic properties. The mechanism of adsorption of water molecules on the polymers is discussed.

  1. Oxidation of Carbon Fibers in Water Vapor Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2003-01-01

    T-300 carbon fibers (BP Amoco Chemicals, Greenville, SC) are a common reinforcement for silicon carbide composite materials, and carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites (C/SiC) are proposed for use in space propulsion applications. It has been shown that the time to failure for C/SiC in stressed oxidation tests is directly correlated with the fiber oxidation rate (ref. 1). To date, most of the testing of these fibers and composites has been conducted in oxygen or air environments; however, many components for space propulsion, such as turbopumps, combustors, and thrusters, are expected to operate in hydrogen and water vapor (H2/H2O) environments with very low oxygen contents. The oxidation rate of carbon fibers in conditions representative of space propulsion environments is, therefore, critical for predicting component lifetimes for real applications. This report describes experimental results that demonstrate that, under some conditions, lower oxidation rates of carbon fibers are observed in water vapor and H2/H2O environments than are found in oxygen or air. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the weight loss of the fibers was studied as a function of water pressure, temperature, and gas velocity. The rate of carbon fiber oxidation was determined, and the reaction mechanism was identified.

  2. Remote sensing evidence for regolith water vapor sources on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huguenin, R. L.; Clifford, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    McCord et al. (1977) have presented earth-based photometric imaging data of an event associated with the 1973 dust storm on Mars. The initial dust cloud in Solis Lacus and two regions to the north and south appeared anomalously bright at blue wavelengths. Water frosts, hazes, and/or clouds were identified, and it was suggested that the water responsible for these findings may have originated from Solis Lacus. More recently, a more intensive review of the observational record of Mars was undertaken. Earth-based telescope observations and data from the Mariner and Viking missions have revealed that Solis Lacus has been a center of repeated activity. Persistent activity in the vicinity of Noachis-Hellespontus and in the border regions of Syrtis Major was also discovered. A review of the observations is provided and possible interpretations are discussed. The obtained results appear to support the original proposal that Solis Lacus may be a source of water vapor. Noachis-Hellespontus seems to be a similar vapor source

  3. Fluoride removal in water by a hybrid adsorbent lanthanum-carbon.

    PubMed

    Vences-Alvarez, Esmeralda; Velazquez-Jimenez, Litza Halla; Chazaro-Ruiz, Luis Felipe; Diaz-Flores, Paola E; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2015-10-01

    Various health problems associated with drinking water containing high fluoride levels, have motivated researchers to develop more efficient adsorbents to remove fluoride from water for beneficial concentrations to human health. The objective of this research was to anchor lanthanum oxyhydroxides on a commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) to remove fluoride from water considering the effect of the solution pH, and the presence of co-existing anions and organic matter. The activated carbon was modified with lanthanum oxyhydroxides by impregnation. SEM and XRD were performed in order to determine the crystal structure and morphology of the La(III) particles anchored on the GAC surface. FT-IR and pK(a)'s distribution were determined in order to elucidate both the possible mechanism of the lanthanum anchorage on the activated carbon surface and the fluoride adsorption mechanism on the modified material. The results showed that lanthanum ions prefer binding to carboxyl and phenolic groups on the activated carbon surface. Potentiometric titrations revealed that the modified carbon (GAC-La) possesses positive charge at a pH lower than 9. The adsorption capacity of the modified GAC increased five times in contrast to an unmodified GAC adsorption capacity at an initial F(-) concentration of 20 mg L(-1). Moreover, the presence of co-existing anions had no effect on the fluoride adsorption capacity at concentrations below 30 mg L(-1), that indicated high F(-) affinity by the modified adsorbent material (GAG-La). PMID:26070190

  4. Water vapor measurement system in global atmospheric sampling program, appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Dudzinski, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The water vapor measurement system used in the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is described. The system used a modified version of a commercially available dew/frostpoint hygrometer with a thermoelectrically cooled mirror sensor. The modifications extended the range of the hygrometer to enable air sample measurements with frostpoint temperatures down to -80 C at altitudes of 6 to 13 km. Other modifications were made to permit automatic, unattended operation in an aircraft environment. This report described the hygrometer, its integration with the GASP system, its calibration, and operational aspects including measurement errors. The estimated uncertainty of the dew/frostpoint measurements was + or - 1.7 Celsius.

  5. An alexandrite regenerative amplifier for water vapor and temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thro, P.-Y.; Boesenberg, J.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is a powerful method for determining meteorological parameters, but it requires high quality of the laser source: high energy, very narrow bandwidth, high wavelength stability, and spectral purity. Although many efforts have been made to improve the lasers in view of these aspects, a satisfactory solution has not been demonstrated up to now. We describe a regenerative amplifier, using a Ti:sapphire laser as master oscillator and an alexandrite laser as slave amplifier, which is expected to meet the requirements for water vapor concentration and temperature measurements.

  6. Paralinear Oxidation of CVD SiC in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Hann, Raiford E., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of CVD SiC were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in a 50% H2O/50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s for temperatures between 1200 and 1400 C. Paralinear weight change kinetics were observed as the water vapor oxidized the SiC and simultaneously volatilized the silica scale. The long-term degradation rate of SiC is determined by the volatility of the silica scale. Rapid SiC surface recession rates were estimated from these data for actual aircraft engine combustor conditions.

  7. Carbon dioxide and water vapor high temperature electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Verostko, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    The design, fabrication, breadboard testing, and the data base obtained for solid oxide electrolysis systems that have applications for planetary manned missions and habitats are reviewed. The breadboard tested contains sixteen tubular cells in a closely packed bundle for the electrolysis of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The discussion covers energy requirements, volume, weight, and operational characteristics related to the measurement of the reactant and product gas compositions, temperature distribution along the electrolyzer tubular cells and through the bundle, and thermal energy losses. The reliability of individual cell performance in the bundle configuration is assessed.

  8. Water Vapor Winds and Their Application to Climate Change Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lerner, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The retrieval of satellite-derived winds and moisture from geostationary water vapor imagery has matured to the point where it may be applied to better understanding longer term climate changes that were previously not possible using conventional measurements or model analysis in data-sparse regions. In this paper, upper-tropospheric circulation features and moisture transport covering ENSO periods are presented and discussed. Precursors and other detectable interannual climate change signals are analyzed and compared to model diagnosed features. Estimates of winds and humidity over data-rich regions are used to show the robustness of the data and its value over regions that have previously eluded measurement.

  9. Raman-shifted dye laser for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Singh, U. N.; Cotnoir, L. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Higdon, N. S.; Browell, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    For improved DIAL measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, narrowband (about 0.03/cm) laser radiation at 720- and 940-nm wavelengths was generated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), using the narrow linewidth (about 0.02/cm) output of a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. For a hydrogen pressure of 350 psi, the first Stokes conversion efficiencies to 940 nm were 20 percent and 35 percent, when using a conventional and waveguide Raman cell, respectively. The linewidth of the first Stokes line at high cell pressures, and the inferred collisional broadening coefficients, agree well with those previously measured in spontaneous Raman scattering.

  10. Interactions of Water Vapor with Oxides at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Opila, Elizabeth; Copland, Evan; Myers, Dwight

    2003-01-01

    Many volatile metal hydroxides form by reaction of the corresponding metal oxide with water vapor. These reactions are important in a number of high temperature corrosion processes. Experimental methods for studying the thermodynamics of metal hydroxides include: gas leak Knudsen cell mass spectrometry, free jet sampling mass spectrometry, transpiration and hydrogen-oxygen flame studies. The available experimental information is reviewed and the most stable metal hydroxide species are correlated with position in the periodic table. Current studies in our laboratory on the Si-O-H system are discussed.

  11. Airborne water vapor DIAL research: System development and field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Chyba, Thomas H.; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurement of water vapor (H2O) and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. The airborne H2O DIAL system was flight tested aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Electra aircraft in three separate field deployments between 1989 and 1991. Atmospheric measurements were made under a variety of atmospheric conditions during the flight tests, and several modifications were implemented during this development period to improve system operation. A brief description of the system and major modifications will be presented, and the most significant atmospheric observations will be described.

  12. Forsterite Carbonation in Wet-scCO2: Dependence on Adsorbed Water Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, J.; Benezeth, P.; Qafoku, O.; Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Bonneville, A.; McGrail, P.; Felmy, A.; Rosso, K.

    2013-12-01

    Capturing and storing CO2 in basaltic formations is one of the most promising options for mitigating atmospheric CO2 emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. These geologic reservoirs have high reactive potential for CO2-mineral trapping due to an abundance of divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4). Recent studies have shown that carbonation of these silicates under wet scCO2 conditions, e. g. encountered near a CO2 injection well, proceeds along a different pathway and is more effective than in CO2-saturated aqueous fluids. The presence of an adsorbed water film on the forsterite surface seems to be key to reactivity towards carbonation. In this study, we employed in situ high pressure IR spectroscopy to investigate the dependence of adsorbed water film thickness on forsterite carbonation chemistry. Post reaction ex situ SEM, TEM, TGA, XRD, and NMR measurements will also be discussed. Several IR titrations were performed of forsterite with water at 50 °C and 90 bar scCO2. Aliquots of water were titrated at 4-hour reaction-time increments. Once a desired total water concentration was reached, data were collected for about another 30 hours. One titration involved 10 additions, which corresponds to 6.8 monolayers of adsorbed water. Clearly, a carbonate was precipitating, and its spectral signature matched magnesite. Another titration involved 8 aliquots, or up to 4.4 monolayers of water. The integrated absorbance under the CO stretching bands of carbonate as a function of time after reaching 4.4 monolayers showed an increase and then a plateau. We are currently unsure of the identity of the carbonate that precipitated, but it could be an amorphous anhydrous phase or magnesite crystals with dimensions of only several nanometers. A third titration only involved 3 additions, or up to 1.6 monolayers of water. The integrated absorbance under the CO stretching bands of carbonate as a function of time after reaching 1.6 monolayers

  13. New Isotopic Water Analyzer for Hydrological Measurements of both Liquid Water and Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owano, T. G.; Gupta, M.; Dong, F.; Baer, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope ratios of liquid water (δ2H and δ18O) allow determination of water flowpaths, residence times in catchments, and groundwater migration. In the past, discrete water samples have been collected and transported to an IRMS lab for isotope characterization. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have thus been generally limited in scope and in temporal resolution. We report on the recent development of a new field-portable Isotopic Water Analyzer (IWA-35EP) that accurately quantifies δ2H and δ18O of different natural water sources (e.g., rain, snow, streams and groundwater) at the unprecedented rate of 1080 injections per day, which yields 180 total unknown and reference samples per day (150 unknown samples per day), or 1 measurement of an unknown sample in less than 10 minutes (with 6 injections per measurement). This fast time response provides isotope hydrologists with the capability to study dynamic changes in δ values quickly (minutes) and over long time scales (weeks, months), thus enabling studies of mixing dynamics in snowmelt, canopy throughfall, stream mixing, and allows for individual precipitation events to be independently studied. In addition, the same IWA can also record fast measurements of isotopic water vapor (δ18O and δ2H) in real time (2 Hz data rate or faster) over a range of mole fractions greater than 60000 ppm H2O in air. Changing between operational modes requires a software command, to enable the user to switch from measuring liquid water to measuring water vapor, or vice versa. The new IWA, which uses LGR's patented Off-axis ICOS technology, incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for stable measurements with essentially zero drift. Measurements from recent field studies using the IWA will be presented.

  14. Effects of the polarizability and packing density of transparent oxide films on water vapor permeation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Won Hoe; Jeong, Soon Moon; Choi, Sang Hun; Kim, Woo Jin; Baik, Hong Koo; Lee, Sung Man; Lee, Se Jong

    2005-06-01

    The tin oxide and silicon oxide films have been deposited on polycarbonate substrates as gas barrier films, using a thermal evaporation and ion beam assisted deposition process. The oxide films deposited by ion beam assisted deposition show a much lower water vapor transmission rate than those by thermal evaporation. The tin oxide films show a similar water vapor transmission rate to the silicon oxide films in thermal evaporation but a lower water vapor transmission rate in IBAD. These results are related to the fact that the permeation of water vapor with a large dipole moment is affected by the chemistry of oxides and the packing density of the oxide films. The permeation mechanism of water vapor through the oxide films is discussed in terms of the chemical interaction with water vapor and the microstructure of the oxide films. The chemical interaction of water vapor with oxide films has been investigated by the refractive index from ellipsometry and the OH group peak from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the microstructure of the composite oxide films was characterized using atomic force microscopy and a transmission electron microscope. The activation energy for water vapor permeation through the oxide films has also been measured in relation to the permeation mechanism of water vapor. The diffusivity of water vapor for the tin oxide films has been calculated from the time lag plot, and its implications are discussed. PMID:16852387

  15. Final Report for ARM Project Measuring 4-D Water Vapor Fields with GPS

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, John

    2006-02-06

    Water vapor is a primary element in the Earth’s climate system. Atmospheric water vapor is central to cloud processes, radiation transfer, and the hydrological cycle. Using funding from Department of Energy (DOE) grant DE-FG03-02ER63327, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) developed new observational techniques to measure atmospheric water vapor and applied these techniques to measure four dimensional water vapor fields throughout the United States Southern Great Plains region. This report summarizes the development of a new observation from ground based Global Positioning System (GPS) stations called Slant Water Vapor (SW) and it’s utilization in retrieving four dimensional water vapor fields. The SW observation represents the integrated amount of water vapor between a GPS station and a transmitting satellite. SW observations provide improved temporal and spatial sampling of the atmosphere when compared to column-integrated quantities such as preciptitable water vapor (PW). Under funding from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, GPS networks in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region were deployed to retrieve SW to improve the characterization of water vapor throughout the region. These observations were used to estimate four dimensional water vapor fields using tomographic approaches and through assimilation into the MM5 numerical weather model.

  16. Mechanical properties of hexadecane-water interfaces with adsorbed hydrophobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhewen

    Certain strains of hydrophobic bacteria are known to play critical roles in petroleum-related applications. The aim of this study was to investigate how hydrophobic bacteria in their stationary phase could adsorb onto the hexadecane-water interface and alter its mechanical properties. The two strains of bacteria used in forming the interfacial films were Acinetobacter venetianus RAG-1 (a Gram-negative bacterium) and Rhodococcus erythropolis 20S-E1-c (Gram-positive). Experiments at two different length scales (millimetre and micrometre) were conducted and the results were compared. In addition, a simple flow experiment was designed in a constricted channel and the results were related to the intrinsic mechanical properties of bacteria-adsorbed films. On the millimetre scale, using the pendant drop technique, the film interfacial tension was monitored as the surface area was made to undergo changes. Under static conditions, both types of bacteria showed no significant effect on the interfacial tension. When subjected to transient excitations, the two bacterial films exhibited qualitatively similar, yet quantitative distinct rheological properties (including film elasticities and relaxation times). Under continuous reduction of surface area, the RAG-1 system showed a "paper-like" interface, while the interface of the 20S-E1-c system was "soap film-like." These macroscopic observations could be explained by the surface ultrastructures of the two cell strains. On the micrometre scale, using the micropipette technique, colloidal stability of the bacteria-coated oil droplets was examined through direct-contact experiments. Both types of bacteria were seen to function as effective stabilizers. In addition, the adsorbed bacteria also interacted with one another at the interface, giving rise to higher order 2-D rheological properties. A technique of directly probing the mechanical properties of the emulsion drop surfaces revealed that (a) the films behaved as purely elastic

  17. The measurement of water vapor permeability of glove materials using dilute tritiated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, D. H.

    As fusion technology progresses, there will be an increasing need to handle tritium and tritiated compounds. Protective clothing, especially drybox gloves, must be an effective barrier to minimize worker exposure. The water vapor permeability of glove materials and finished glove constructions is a crucial property of drybox gloves and is not sufficiently well characterized. We have built an apparatus that measures water vapor permeability of elastomers using dilute tritiated water. The technique is more sensitive than other methods currently available and allows us to make measurements on materials and under conditions previously inaccessible. In particular, we present results on laminated drybox gloves for which data is not currently available.

  18. Ceria modified activated carbon: an efficient arsenic removal adsorbent for drinking water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawana, Radha; Somasundar, Yogesh; Iyer, Venkatesh Shankar; Baruwati, Babita

    2016-03-01

    Ceria (CeO2) coated powdered activated carbon was synthesized by a single step chemical process and demonstrated to be a highly efficient adsorbent for the removal of both As(III) and As(V) from water without any pre-oxidation process. The formation of CeO2 on the surface of powdered activated carbon was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The percentage of Ce in the adsorbent was confirmed to be 3.5 % by ICP-OES. The maximum removal capacity for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 10.3 and 12.2 mg/g, respectively. These values are comparable to most of the commercially available adsorbents. 80 % of the removal process was completed within 15 min of contact time in a batch process. More than 95 % removal of both As(III) and As(V) was achieved within an hour. The efficiency of removal was not affected by change in pH (5-9), salinity, hardness, organic (1-4 ppm of humic acid) and inorganic anions (sulphate, nitrate, chloride, bicarbonate and fluoride) excluding phosphate. Presence of 100 ppm phosphate reduced the removal significantly from 90 to 18 %. The equilibrium adsorption pattern of both As(III) and As(V) fitted well with the Freundlich model with R 2 values 0.99 and 0.97, respectively. The material shows reusability greater than three times in a batch process (arsenic concentration reduced below 10 ppb from 330 ppb) and a life of at least 100 L in a column study with 80 g material when tested under natural hard water (TDS 1000 ppm, pH 7.8, hardness 600 ppm as CaCO3) spiked with 330 ppb of arsenic.

  19. Adsorption and solvation of ethanol at the water liquid-vapor interface: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1997-01-01

    The free energy profiles of methanol and ethanol at the water liquid-vapor interface at 310K were calculated using molecular dynamics computer simulations. Both alcohols exhibit a pronounced free energy minimum at the interface and, therefore, have positive adsorption at this interface. The surface excess was computed from the Gibbs adsorption isotherm and was found to be in good agreement with experimental results. Neither compound exhibits a free energy barrier between the bulk and the surface adsorbed state. Scattering calculations of ethanol molecules from a gas phase thermal distribution indicate that the mass accommodation coefficient is 0.98, and the molecules become thermalized within 10 ps of striking the interface. It was determined that the formation of the solvation structure around the ethanol molecule at the interface is not the rate-determining step in its uptake into water droplets. The motion of an ethanol molecule in a water lamella was followed for 30 ns. The time evolution of the probability distribution of finding an ethanol molecule that was initially located at the interface is very well described by the diffusion equation on the free energy surface.

  20. The Reaction Kinetics of LiD with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Balooch, M; Dinh, L N; Calef, D F

    2003-04-01

    The interaction of LiD with water vapor in the partial pressure range of 10{sup -7} Torr to 20 Torr has been investigated. The reaction probability of water with pure LiD cleaved in an ultra high vacuum environment was obtained using the modulated molecular beam technique. This probability was 0.11 and independent of LiD surface temperature suggesting a negligible activation energy for the reaction in agreement with quantum chemical calculations. The value gradually reduced, however, to .007 as the surface concentration of oxygen containing product (LiOH), which was monitored in-situ by Auger electron spectroscopy on the reaction zone, approached full coverage. As the hydroxide film grew beyond a monolayer, the phase lag of hydrogen product increased from zero to 20 degrees and the reaction probability reduced further until it approached our detection limit ({approx} 10{sup -4}). This phase lag was attributed to a diffusion limited process in this regime. In separate experiments, the film growth has been studied in nitrogen atmosphere with 100% relative humidity using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and in air with 50% relative humidity utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For exposures to environment with high water concentrations and for micrometer thick films, the reaction probability reduced to 4 x 10{sup -7} and was independent of exposure time, The lattice diffusion through the film was no longer controlling the transport of water to the LiD/LiOH interface. Microcracks generated in the film to release stress provided easier pathways to the interface. A modified microscope, capable of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoindentation, was employed to investigate the surface morphology of LiOH.H{sub 2}O grown on LiOH at high water vapor partial pressures and the kinetics of this growth.

  1. Water Vapor Products from Differential-InSAR with Auxiliary Calibration Data: Accuracy and Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F. J.; Webley, P.

    2014-12-01

    Although water vapor disturbance has been long term recognized as the major error source in differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (d-InSAR) techniques for the ground deformation monitoring and topography reconstruction, it provides opportunities to extract the atmospheric water-vapor information from satellite SAR imageries that can be further used to support studies on earth energy budget, climate, the hydrological cycle, and meteorological forecasting, etc. The water vapor contribution in interferometric phases is normally referred as the atmospheric delay dominated by water vapor rather than condensed water (e.g. cloud). D-InSAR can produce maps of the column water vapor amounts (equivalent to integrated water vapor (IWV) or Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) in other literatures) that are important parameters quantitatively describe the total amount of water vapor overlying a point on the earth surface. Similar products have been operationally produced in multi-spectrum remote sensing, e.g. Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with a spatial resolution in 500 m to 1km; Whereas, the PWV products derived by d-InSAR have remarkably high spatial resolution that can capture fine scale of water vapor variations in space as small as tens of meters or even less. In recent years, some efforts have been made to derive the water vapor products from interferogram and analyze the corresponding products quality, such as studies comparing integrated water vapor derived from interferometric phases to other measurements (e.g. MERIS, MODIS, GNSS), studies on deriving absolute water vapor products from d-InSAR, and studies on integrating d-InSAR water vapor products in meteorological numerical forecast. In this study, considering these limitation factors and based on previous studies, we discuss the accuracy and statistics of the water vapor products from satellite SAR, including (1) Accuracy of the differential water vapor products; (2) Sources of

  2. Hollow Co@C prepared from a Co-ZIF@microporous organic network: magnetic adsorbents for aromatic pollutants in water.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seokjo; Yoo, Jin; Park, Nojin; Lee, Sang Moon; Park, Je-Geun; Park, Ji Hoon; Son, Seung Uk

    2015-12-28

    This work shows the new engineering strategy of magnetic adsorbents by the combination of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) and microporous organic network (MON) chemistry. ZIF-67 nanoparticles containing Co(2+) ions were coated with MON. The thermolysis of ZIF-67@MON under argon resulted in hollow carbon materials bearing cobalt nanoparticles which showed promising performance as magnetic adsorbents for aromatic pollutants in water. PMID:26490193

  3. Micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar: transmitter design and performance.

    PubMed

    Nehrir, Amin R; Repasky, Kevin S; Carlsten, John L

    2012-10-22

    An all diode-laser-based micropulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laser transmitter for tropospheric water vapor and aerosol profiling is presented. The micropulse DIAL (MPD) transmitter utilizes two continuous wave (cw) external cavity diode lasers (ECDL) to seed an actively pulsed, overdriven tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA). The MPD laser produces up to 7 watts of peak power over a 1 µs pulse duration (7 µJ) and a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. Spectral switching between the online and offline seed lasers is achieved on a 1Hz basis using a fiber optic switch to allow for more accurate sampling of the atmospheric volume between the online and offline laser shots. The high laser spectral purity of greater than 0.9996 coupled with the broad tunability of the laser transmitter will allow for accurate measurements of tropospheric water vapor in a wide range of geographic locations under varying atmospheric conditions. This paper describes the design and performance characteristics of a third generation MPD laser transmitter with enhanced laser performance over the previous generation DIAL system. PMID:23187280

  4. Condensation of water vapor in rarefaction waves. I - Homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed theoretical investigation has been made of the condensation of water vapor/carrier gas mixtures in the nonstationary rarefaction wave generated in a shock tube. It is assumed that condensation takes place by homogeneous nucleation. The equations of motion together with the nucleation rate and the droplet growth equations were solved numerically by the method of characteristics and Lax's method of implicit artificial viscosity. It is found that, for the case considered, the condensation wave formed by the collapse of the metastable nonequilibrium state is followed by a shock wave generated by the intersection of characteristics of the same family. The expansion is practically isentropic up to the onset of condensation. The condensation front accelerates in the x,t plane. The results of the computations for a chosen case of water vapor/nitrogen mixture are presented by plotting variations of pressure, nucleation rate, number density of critical clusters, and condensate mass-fraction along three particle paths. Some consideration is given to homogeneous condensation experiments conducted in a shock tube. Although a direct comparison of the present theoretical work and these experiments is not possible, several worthwhile interpretative features have resulted nevertheless.

  5. Hybrid materials: Magnetite-Polyethylenimine-Montmorillonite, as magnetic adsorbents for Cr(VI) water treatment.

    PubMed

    Larraza, Iñigo; López-Gónzalez, Mar; Corrales, Teresa; Marcelo, Gema

    2012-11-01

    Hybrid materials formed by the combination of a sodium rich Montmorillonite (MMT), with magnetite nanoparticles (40 nm, Fe(3)O(4) NPs) coated with Polyethylenimine polymer (PEI 800 g/mol or PEI 25000 g/mol) were prepared. The intercalation of the magnetite nanoparticles coated with PEI among MMT platelets was achieved by cationic exchange. The resulting materials presented a high degree of exfoliation of the MMT sheets and a good dispersion of Fe(3)O(4) NPs on both the surface and among the layers of MMT. The presence of amine groups in the PEI structure not only aids the exfoliation of the MMT layers, but also gives to the hybrid material the necessary functionality to interact with heavy metals. These hybrid materials were used as magnetic sorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium from water. The effect that pH, Cr(VI) concentration, and adsorbent material composition have on the Cr(VI) removal efficiency was studied. A complete characterization of the materials was performed. The hybrid materials showed a slight dependence of the removal efficiency with the pH in a wide range (1-9). A maximum amount of adsorption capacity of 8.8 mg/g was determined by the Langmuir isotherm. Results show that these hybrid materials can be considered as potential magnetic adsorbent for the Cr(VI) removal from water in a wide range of pH. PMID:22841705

  6. Water and ion transport in ultra-adsorbing porous magnesium carbonate studied by dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochard, Isabelle; Frykstrand, Sara; Ahlström, Olle; Forsgren, Johan; Strømme, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Porous materials are used in application areas ranging from drug and vaccine delivery, medical implants, molecular sieves and cosmetics to catalysis and humidity control. In the present work, we employed an alternative approach to gain in-depth understanding about water interaction properties in such materials by the use of dielectric spectroscopy and thereby show that it is possible to obtain information that is not accessible from the more commonly employed water interaction analysis techniques. Specifically, the complex dielectric response of Upsalite, a novel, super-hydroscopic, high-surface area, porous magnesium carbonate material was measured in isothermal frequency scans between 10-3 and 106 Hz at controlled relative humidity (RH). We found the dielectric constant of the dry material to be 1.82. The ratio of bound to free water present in Upsalite after adsorption at room temperature was found to be high irrespective of the surrounding humidity with values ranging from ˜67% to ˜90%. We further found that OH- ions are the charge carriers responsible for the electrode polarization observed in the dielectric response and that the amount of these ions that are free to move in the material corresponds to a concentration of the order of 1-10 μmol l-1 independent of RH. Finally, the OH- diffusion coefficient displayed a drastic decrease with decreasing RH, typical of transport in unsaturated conditions. The presented results provide detailed insight about water interactions in the novel water adsorbing material under study and it is foreseen that the employed analysis methods can be used to evaluate other types of moisture adsorbing materials as well as the movement of functional species in the pores of inorganic drug delivery materials and materials tailored for adsorption of harmful charged species.

  7. Microstructure and water vapor transport properties of temperature sensitive polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuemei

    Temperature sensitive polyurethane (TS-PU) is one novel type of smart polymers. The water vapor permeability (WVP) of its membrane could undergo a significant increase as temperature increases within a predetermined temperature range. Such smart property enables this material to have a broad range of potential applications to textile industry, medicine, environmental fields and so on. However, based on the literature review, contradicting results were found on some TS-PUs. The aims of this project are to synthesize TS-PU with Tm in the broader temperature range including ambient temperature range, and then investigate systematically the relationships between microstructure and water vapor transport properties of TS-PU. For this purpose, in this project, a series of polyurethanes (PU) were synthesized using five different crystalline polyols with approximately similar molecule weight and three different hydrophilic contents, and dense membranes were prepared accordingly. The microstructure and properties of these PUs were investigated using DSC, WAXD, DMA, FTIR, GPC, POM, TEM, SEM and PALS. Their equilibrium water sorption and water vapor permeability were measured accordingly. Results show that crystal melting of these resulting PUs take place in the temperature range from -10--60°C as desired. Storage modulus (E') drops down quickly in the temperature range of crystal melting, suggesting a great transition in the predetermined temperature range. The decreased HSC as well as regular chemical structure of polyols results in the larger spherulites and higher melting end temperature, and the higher crystallinity induces the more obvious incompatibility of soft segment and hard segment in the PUs. These PUs are proved to have good enough tensile properties for textile application. The mean free volume size and fractional free volume increase more significantly in the temperature range of crystal melting than in other temperature intervals. Finally, as expected, the

  8. Continuous on-line water vapor isotope measurements in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsberg, Janek; Romanini, Daniele; Holmen, Kim; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Meijer, Harro; Kerstel, Erik

    2010-05-01

    In the context of a globally warming climate it is crucial to study the climate variability in the past and to understand the underlying mechanisms (1). Precipitation deposited on the polar ice caps provides a means to retrieve information on temperature changes (through the paleo-temperature dependence of the isotopic composition of the ice) and atmospheric composition (of gas stored in bubbles in the ice) on time scales from one to almost one million years, with sub-annual resolution in the most recent centuries. However, it is now widely recognized that the calibration of the paleo-thermometer is highly problematic. For this reason attempts to model the global water cycle, including the isotope signals, are ongoing with the aim of providing a more physical basis of the isotope - temperature relation. Currently, there is a large divergence in the results obtained by different modeling strategies. The missing link in these model studies is their forcing by experimental data on the pre-deposition isotopic composition of the vapor phase compartment of the hydrological cycle. We propose to measure the isotopic composition of moisture carried towards and deposited on Antarctica, in order to constrain the numerical models. In this context we are developing a modified, more sensitive and precise, version of a laser water vapor isotope spectrometer, originally designed for stratospheric studies (2, 3). This instrument, which will first be operated at the Norwegian station of Troll in Queen Maud Land, will enable the continuous, online measurement of all three stable isotope ratios of atmospheric water vapor. So far, such data is non-existent. Our data should improve the validity of the models and improve the understanding of the physical mechanisms at the basis of the isotope thermometer. This in turn will lead to an increased confidence in the predictions of (general circulation) models concerning climate variability. (1) International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 4

  9. Preprototype vapor compression distillation subsystem. [recovering potable water from wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, G. S.; Wynveen, R. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    A three-person capacity preprototype vapor compression distillation subsystem for recovering potable water from wastewater aboard spacecraft was designed, assembled, and tested. The major components of the subsystem are: (1) a distillation unit which includes a compressor, centrifuge, central shaft, and outer shell; (2) a purge pump; (3) a liquids pump; (4) a post-treat cartridge; (5) a recycle/filter tank; (6) an evaporator high liquid level sensor; and (7) the product water conductivity monitor. A computer based control monitor instrumentation carries out operating mode change sequences, monitors and displays subsystem parameters, maintains intramode controls, and stores and displays fault detection information. The mechanical hardware occupies 0.467 m3, requires 171 W of electrical power, and has a dry weight of 143 kg. The subsystem recovers potable water at a rate of 1.59 kg/hr, which is equivalent to a duty cycle of approximately 30% for a crew of three. The product water has no foul taste or odor. Continued development of the subsystem is recommended for reclaiming water for human consumption as well as for flash evaporator heat rejection, urinal flushing, washing, and other on-board water requirements.

  10. Back-trajectory Analyses of Water Vapor in Northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Y.; Asanuma, J.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of precipitation sources is indispensable for prediction of extreme events as droughts and flood [Dirmeyer and Brubaker, 1999]. In this paper, the transport pathways of water vapor that precipitates in northern Mongolia were identified using back-trajectory analyses in order to find out factors causing such events in arid/semi-arid area. First, a back-trajectory model of atmospheric water vapor was developed. An air parcel is placed on an isentropic plane over the target site at each time of precipitation. Then, back trajectories was calculated with a kinematic method following the implicit technique [Merrill et al., 1986; Merrill, 1989]. Each of the air parcels was tagged with the precipitation time and the altitude, and then tracked back in time for 5 days on the isentropic surface. Japanese 25-year Reanalysis/JMA Climate Data Assimilation System (JRA-25/JCDAS) of Japan Meteorological Agency [Onogi et al., 2007] was used for 3D field of meteorological variables for the calculation. As a validation, the model was compared with two others, namely, Meteorological Data Explorer of the Center for Global Environmental Reserch (METEX/CGER) [Zeng et al., 2003], and the trajectory model of the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) [Tomikawa and Sato, 2005]. The comparison found that model results are fairly robust within 5 days from the computational start, i.e., the end of the trajectory, regardless of different datasets and different schemes employed in these models. Then, the back-trajectory model was applied to the observed precipitation at the target site, a surface station in northern Mongolia called Kherlenbayan-Ulaan(KBU), where highly accurate and temporarily dense precipitation measurements are available. Back trajectory lines were calculated for each of the observed precipitation during the warm season of the years 2003 to 2009, on the isentropic surfaces of 300K, 310K and 320K where the highest value of water vapor is observed. The results show

  11. Absorption of Water Vapor into Aqueous Solutions of Lithium Bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahara, Tsutomu; Hayashida, Atsushi; Yabase, Hajime; Hihara, Eiji; Saito, Takamoto

    Heat and mass transfer processes are experimentally investigated for the case of water absorption into aqueous solutions of lithium bromide flowing over a flat plate. Variables considered are inlet solution flow rate,concentration of an additive,and inclination angle of the plate. The use of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol as an additive results in about a four to five fold improvement in absorption rate. The occurrence of surface distrbances dose not has a direct connection with the solubility limit of the additive. The cause of the surface disturbances in the presence of additives is investigated through experiments for pool absorption By regulating the flow of water vapor,the form of the Marangoni convection can be controlled. A qualitative discussion of addictives in the role of inducing surface disturbances is presented.

  12. Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-11-06

    Water injection has been recognized as a powerful techniquefor enhancing energy recovery from vapor-dominated geothermal systemssuch as The Geysers. In addition to increasing reservoir pressures,production well flow rates, and long-term sustainability of steamproduction, injection has also been shown to reduce concentrations ofnon-condensible gases (NCGs) in produced steam. The latter effectimproves energy conversion efficiency and reduces corrosion problems inwellbores and surface lines.This report reviews thermodynamic andhydrogeologic conditions and mechanisms that play an important role inreservoir response to water injection. An existing general-purposereservoir simulator has been enhanced to allow modeling of injectioneffects in heterogeneous fractured reservoirs in three dimensions,including effects of non-condensible gases of different solubility.Illustrative applications demonstrate fluid flow and heat transfermechanisms that are considered crucial for developing approaches to insitu abatement of NCGs.

  13. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements in supersaturated water vapor.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jirí

    2008-11-01

    The rate of homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapors of water was studied experimentally using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Helium was used as a carrier gas. Our study covers a range of nucleation rates from 3x10(-1) to 3x10(2) cm(-3) s(-1) at four isotherms: 290, 300, 310, and 320 K. The molecular content of critical clusters was estimated from the slopes of experimental data. The measured isothermal dependencies of nucleation rate of water on saturation ratio were compared with the prediction of the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation, the empirical prediction of Wolk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 10 (2002)], the scaled model of Hale [Phys. Rev. A 33, 4156 (1986)], and the former nucleation onset data. PMID:19045352

  14. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1989-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T(sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  15. Novel Anionic Clay Adsorbents for Boiler-Blow-Down Waters Reclaim and Reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore Tsotsis

    2010-01-08

    Arsenic (As) and Selenium (Se) are found in water in the form of oxyanions. Relatively high concentrations of As and Se have been reported both in power plant discharges, as well as, in fresh water supplies. The International Agency for Research on Cancer currently classifies As as a group 1 chemical, that is considered to be carcinogenic to humans. In Phase I of this project we studied the adsorption of As and Se by uncalcined and calcined layered double hydroxide (LDH). The focus of the present work is a systematic study of the adsorption of As and Se by conditioned LDH adsorbents. Conditioning the adsorbent significantly reduced the Mg and Al dissolution observed with uncalcined and calcined LDH. The adsorption rates and isotherms have been investigated in batch experiments using particles of four different particle size ranges. As(V) adsorption is shown to follow a Sips-type adsorption isotherm. The As(V) adsorption rate on conditioned LDH increases with decreasing adsorbent particle size; the adsorption capacity, on the other hand, is independent of the particle size. A homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) and a bi-disperse pore model (BPM) - the latter viewing the LDH particles as assemblages of microparticles and taking into account bulk diffusion in the intraparticle pore space, and surface diffusion within the microparticles themselves - were used to fit the experimental kinetic data. The HSDM estimated diffusivity values dependent on the particle size, whereas the BPM predicted an intracrystalline diffusivity, which is fairly invariant with particle size. The removal of As(V) on conditioned LDH adsorbents was also investigated in flow columns, where the impact of important solution and operational parameters such as influent As concentration, pH, sorbent particle size and flow rate were studied. An early breakthrough and saturation was observed at higher flow rates and at higher influent concentrations, whereas a decrease in the sorbent particle

  16. Removal of atrazine from water by low cost adsorbents derived from agricultural and industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajendra Kumar; Kumar, Anoop; Joseph, P E

    2008-05-01

    In the present study six adsorbents viz. wood charcoal, fly ash, coconut charcoal, saw dust, coconut fiber and baggasse charcoal were studied for their capacity to remove atrazine from water. The removal efficiency of different adsorbents varied from 76.5% to 97.7% at 0.05 ppm concentration and 78.5% to 95.5% at 0.1 ppm concentration of atrazine solution, which was less than removal efficiency of activated charcoal reported as 98% for atrazine (Adams and Watson, J Environ Eng ASCE 39:327-330, 1996). Wood charcoal was a cheap (Rs 15 kg(-1)) and easily available material in house holds. Since wood charcoal was granular in nature, it could be used for the removal of atrazine from water to the extent of 95.5%-97.7%. Fly ash is a waste product of thermal plant containing 40%-50% silica, 20%-35% alumina, 12%-30% carbon and unburnt minerals having a high pH of 9-10. It is very cheap and abundant material and has comparatively good adsorption capacity. It was found that fly ash effectively removed about 84.1%-88.5% atrazine from water at 0.05 and 0.1 ppm levels. Coconut shell is also waste product. Therefore, both are inexpensive. The removal efficiency of atrazine from water was 92.4%-95.2% by coconut shell charcoal and 85.9%-86.3% by coconut fiber. Sawdust is generally used as domestic fuel and found everywhere. It is also very cheap (Re. 1 kg(-1)). Baggasse charcoal is a waste product of sugar mill and abundant material. Its cost is due to transport expense, which depends upon distance from the sugar mill. The removal efficiency of sawdust and baggasse charcoal was found 78.5-80.5 and 76.5-84.6, respectively. The efficacy of chemically treated adsorbents for the removal of atrazine from water is in the order: wood charcoal > coconut shell charcoal > fly ash > coconut fiber charcoal > baggasse charcoal > sawdust. PMID:18357400

  17. Oxygen Isotope Fractionation Effects in Soil Water via Cations Adsorbed to High-CEC Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerter, E.; Finstad, K.; Schaefer, J.; Goldsmith, G. R.; Dawson, T. E.; Amundson, R.

    2012-12-01

    In isotope-based approaches to hydrology, soil and sediment are implicitly considered to be an inert matrix in which water resides or moves. Yet, this assumption is inconsistent with the fact that soils contain a wide range of solutes, and highly variable concentrations of chemically reactive clay particles, all of which may react with bulk water and create pools of energetically differing water with varying isotope compositions. The empirical basis of this hypothesis is the work of Sofer and Gat (1972, EPSL, 15(3)), who showed that the formation of hydration spheres around cations in aqueous solutions fractionate oxygen isotopes of water in ways that appear to be dependent on the cation's ionic potential and concentration. Because soil solutions commonly have high solid to fluid ratios, the potential for solids to create substantial pools of low free energy water, with corresponding isotope fractionation of the free and low energy waters, may be a common process. The potential for this to create measurable isotopic effects would be most evident in soils with high Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). In order to test this hypothesis, montmorillonite (CEC ≈ 100 meq/100g), kaolinite (CEC≈10) and quartz (CEC≈0) mineral powders were saturated with 3M MgCl2 and KCl solutions (separately), rinsed with methanol and dried to saturate all available CEC sites with either Mg or K cations. Triplicate sets of monominerallic-deionized water mixtures were created at 5, 25, 50, 75 and 95% gravimetric water content. Each set of samples was then subjected to one of three water extraction techniques designed to access specific "pools" of soil water: (1) direct equilibration with CO2 to sample the soil's "free water", i.e. water not adsorbed to cations via hydration spheres; (2) centrifugation to simulate permanent wilting point conditions, thereby yielding most micro-pore, macro-pore, and free water; and (3) cryogenic vacuum distillation to recover all the soil water (free, pore and

  18. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Stratospheric Middleworld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Podolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: Water vapor in the winter arctic stratospheric middleworld (that part of the stratosphere with potential temperatures lower than the tropical tropopause) is important for two reasons: (1) the arctic middleworld is a source of air for the upper troposphere because of the generally downward motion, and thus its water vapor content helps determine upper tropospheric water, a critical part of the earth's radiation budget; and (2) under appropriate conditions, relative humidities will be large even to the point of stratospheric cirrus cloud formation, leading to the production of active chlorine species that could destroy ozone. On a number of occasions during SOLVE, clouds were observed in the stratospheric middleworld by the DC-8 aircraft. The relationship between ozone and CO from aircraft measurements taken during the early, middle and late part of the winter of 1999-2000 show that recent mixing with tropospheric air extends up to ozone values of about 350-450 ppbv. Above that level, the relationship suggests stratospheric air with minimal tropospheric influence. The transition is quite abrupt, particularly in early spring. Trajectory analyses are consistent with these relationships, with a significant drop-off in the percentage of trajectories with tropospheric PV values in their 10-day history as in-situ ozone increases above 400 ppbv. The water distribution is affected by these mixing characteristics, and by cloud formation. Significant cloud formation along trajectories occurs up to ozone values of about 400 ppbv during the early spring, with small, but nonzero probabilities extending to 550 ppbv. Cloud formation in the stratospheric middleworld is minimal during early and midwinter. Also important is the fact that, during early spring 30% of the trajectories near the tropopause (ozone values less than 200 ppbv) have minimum saturation mixing ratios less than 5 ppmv. Such parcels can mix out into the troposphere and could lead to very dry conditions in

  19. Characterization of Upper Troposphere Water Vapor Measurements during AFWEX using LASE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Kooi, S.; Brasseur, L. H.; Brackett, V. G.; Clayton, M.; Barrick, J.; Linne, H.; Lammert, A.

    2002-01-01

    Water vapor profiles from NASA's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system acquired during the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) are used to characterize upper troposphere water vapor (UTWV) measured by ground-based Raman lidars, radiosondes, and in situ aircraft sensors. Initial comparisons showed the average Vaisala radiosonde measurements to be 5-15% drier than the average LASE, Raman lidar, and DC-8 in situ diode laser hygrometer measurements. We show that corrections to the Raman lidar and Vaisala measurements significantly reduce these differences. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from the LASE water vapor profiles agrees within 3% on average with PWV derived from the ARM ground-based microwave radiometer (MWR). The agreement among the LASE, Raman lidar, and MWR measurements demonstrates how the LASE measurements can be used to characterize both profile and column water vapor measurements and that ARM Raman lidar, when calibrated using the MWR PWV, can provide accurate UTWV measurements.

  20. Raman lidar profiling of atmospheric water vapor: Simultaneous measurements with two collocated systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Bisson, Scott E.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Evans, Keith D.; Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    Raman lidar is a leading candidate for providing the detailed space- and time-resolved measurements of water vapor needed by a variety of atmospheric studies. Simultaneous measurements of atmospheric water vapor are described using two collocated Raman lidar systems. These lidar systems, developed at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and Sandia National Laboratories, acquired approximately 12 hours of simultaneous water vapor data during three nights in November 1992 while the systems were collocated at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Although these lidar systems differ substantially in their design, measured water vapor profiles agreeed within 0.15 g/kg between altitudes of 1 and 5 km. Comparisons with coincident radiosondes showed all instruments agreed within 0.2 g/kg in this same altitude range. Both lidars also clearly showed the advection of water vapor in the middle troposphere and the pronounced increase in water vapor in the nocturnal boundary layer that occurred during one night.

  1. Alumina Volatility in Water Vapor at Elevated Temperatures: Application to Combustion Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2003-01-01

    The volatility of alumina in high temperature water vapor was determined by measuring weight loss of sapphire coupons at temperatures between 1250 and 1500 C, water vapor partial pressures between 0.15 and 0.68 atm in oxygen, at one atmosphere total pressure, and a gas velocity of 4.4 centimeters per second. The variation of the volatility with water vapor partial pressure was consistent with Al(OH)3(g) formation. The enthalpy of reaction to form Al(OH)3(g) from alumina and water vapor was found to be 210 plus or minus 20 kJ/mol. Surface rearrangement of ground sapphire surfaces increased with water vapor partial pressure, temperature and volatility rate. Recession rates of alumina due to volatility were determined as a function of water vapor partial pressure and temperature to evaluate limits for use of alumina in long term applications in combustion environments.

  2. Biotransformation of pink water TNT on the surface of a low-cost adsorbent pine bark.

    PubMed

    Chusova, O; Nõlvak, H; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Truu, M; Oopkaup, K; Nehrenheim, E

    2015-09-01

    This two-week anaerobic batch study evaluated 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) removal efficiency from industrial pink water by (1) adsorption on low-cost adsorbent pine bark, and (2) adsorption coupled with TNT biotransformation by specialised microbial communities. Samples of the supernatant and acetonitrile extracts of pine bark were analysed by HPLC, while the composition of the bacterial community of the experimental batches, inocula and pine bark were profiled by high-throughput sequencing the V6 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Integrated adsorption and biotransformation proved to be the most efficient method for TNT removal from pink water. The type of applied inoculum had a profound effect on TNT removal efficiencies and microbial community structures, which were dominated by phylotypes belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. The analysis of acetonitrile extracts of pine bark supported the hypothesis that the microbial community indigenous to pine bark has the ability to degrade TNT. PMID:26142875

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of water clusters co-adsorbed with hydrogen molecules on a sodium chloride film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen gas containing a trace of water vapor was dosed on a vacuum-evaporated sodium chloride film at 13 K, and water clusters formed on the substrate were investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Absorption bands due to (H2O)n clusters with n = 3-6 and an induced absorption band due to hydrogen were clearly observed. With increasing gas dosage, the intensities of the cluster bands increased linearly while the intensity of the hydrogen band was constant. This suggests that the water clusters were formed in two-dimensional matrices of hydrogen. We found that the water clusters did exist on the surface upon heating even after the hydrogen molecules had desorbed. A further rise of the substrate temperature up to 27 K yielded the formation of larger clusters, (H2O)n with n > 6 . We also discuss the origins of the two bands of the trimer in terms of pseudorotation and a metastable isomer.

  4. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multi-spectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/ml, which compared to the 4 W/m' magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/m' estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude tuning

  5. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multispectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/sq m, which compared to the 4 W/sq m magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/sq m estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude

  6. A method for preparing ferric activated carbon composites adsorbents to remove arsenic from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao Li; Lin, Y C; Chen, X; Gao, Nai Yun

    2007-09-30

    Iron oxide/activated carbon (FeO/AC) composite adsorbent material, which was used to modify the coal-based activated carbon (AC) 12 x 40, was prepared by the special ferric oxide microcrystal in this study. This composite can be used as the adsorbent to remove arsenic from drinking water, and Langmuir isotherm adsorption equation well describes the experimental adsorption isotherms. Then, the arsenic desorption can subsequently be separated from the medium by using a 1% aqueous NaOH solution. The apparent characters and physical chemistry performances of FeO/AC composite were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch and column adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate and compare the arsenic removal capability of the prepared FeO/AC composite material and virgin activated carbon. It can be concluded that: (1) the main phase present in this composite are magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)), hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) and goethite (alpha-FeO(OH)); (2) the presence of iron oxides did not significantly affect the surface area or the pore structure of the activated carbon; (3) the comparisons between the adsorption isotherms of arsenic from aqueous solution onto the composite and virgin activated carbon showed that the FeO/AC composite behave an excellent capacity of adsorption arsenic than the virgin activated carbon; (4) column adsorption experiments with FeO/AC composite adsorbent showed that the arsenic could be removed to below 0.01 mg/L within 1250 mL empty bed volume when influent concentration was 0.5mg/L. PMID:17434260

  7. Cold Water Vapor in the Barnard 5 Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Persson, C. M.; Buckle, J. V.; Cordiner, M. A.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-06-01

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold (~10 K) water vapor has been detected—L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work—likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H2O (J = 110-101) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  8. COLD WATER VAPOR IN THE BARNARD 5 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Wirström, E. S.; Persson, C. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. A.; Buckle, J. V.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-06-20

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold (∼10 K) water vapor has been detected—L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work—likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H{sub 2}O (J = 1{sub 10}-1{sub 01}) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  9. Cold Water Vapor in the Barnard 5 Molecular Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Persson, C. M.; Buckle, J. V.; Cordiner, M. A.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold ((is) approximately 10 K) water vapor has been detected-L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work-likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H2O (J = 110-101) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  10. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rye, B.J.

    1996-04-01

    The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance and the correction of other site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. In this study, we develop system performance models and examine the potential of infrared differential absoroption lidar (DIAL) to determine the concentration of water vapor.

  11. Compact Water Vapor Exchanger for Regenerative Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Anderson, Molly; Hodgson, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Thermal and environmental control systems for future exploration spacecraft must meet challenging requirements for efficient operation and conservation of resources. Regenerative CO2 removal systems are attractive for these missions because they do not use consumable CO2 absorbers. However, these systems also absorb and vent water to space along with carbon dioxide. This paper describes an innovative device designed to minimize water lost from regenerative CO2 control systems. Design studies and proof-of-concept testing have shown the feasibility of a compact, efficient membrane water vapor exchanger (WVX) that will conserve water while meeting challenging requirements for operation on future spacecraft. Compared to conventional WVX designs, the innovative membrane WVX described here has the potential for high water recovery efficiency, compact size, and very low pressure losses. The key innovation is a method for maintaining highly uniform flow channels in a WVX core built from water-permeable membranes. The proof-of-concept WVX incorporates all the key design features of a prototypical unit, except that it is relatively small scale (1/23 relative to a unit sized for a crew of six) and some components were fabricated using non-prototypical methods. The proof-of-concept WVX achieved over 90% water recovery efficiency in a compact core in good agreement with analysis models. Furthermore the overall pressure drop is very small (less than 0.5 in. H2O, total for both flow streams) and meets requirements for service in environmental control and life support systems on future spacecraft. These results show that the WVX provides very uniform flow through flow channels for both the humid and dry streams. Measurements also show that CO2 diffusion through the water-permeable membranes will have negligible effect on the CO2 partial pressure in the spacecraft atmosphere.

  12. Dependence of Tritium Release from Stainless Steel on Temperature and Water Vapor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shmayda, W. T.; Sharpe, M.; Boyce, A. M.; Shea, R.; Petroski, B.; Schroeder, W. U.

    2015-09-15

    The impact of water vapor and temperature on the release of tritium from stainless steel was studied. Degreased stainless steel samples loaded with tritium at room temperature following a 24-h degassing in vacuum at room temperature were subjected to increasing temperatures or humidity. In general, increasing either the sample temperature or the humidity causes an increased quantity of tritium to be removed. Increasing the temperature to 300°C in a dry gas stream results in a significant release of tritium and is therefore an effective means for reducing the tritium inventory in steel. For humid purges at 30°C, a sixfold increasemore » in humidity results in a tenfold increase in the peak outgassing rate. Increasing the humidity from 4 parts per million (ppm) to 1000 ppm when the sample temperature is 100°C causes a significant increase in the tritium outgassing rate. Finally, a simple calculation shows that only 15% of the activity present in the sample was removed in these experiments, suggesting that the surface layer of adsorbed water participates in regulating tritium desorption from the surface.« less

  13. Dependence of Tritium Release from Stainless Steel on Temperature and Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shmayda, W. T.; Sharpe, M.; Boyce, A. M.; Shea, R.; Petroski, B.; Schroeder, W. U.

    2015-09-15

    The impact of water vapor and temperature on the release of tritium from stainless steel was studied. Degreased stainless steel samples loaded with tritium at room temperature following a 24-h degassing in vacuum at room temperature were subjected to increasing temperatures or humidity. In general, increasing either the sample temperature or the humidity causes an increased quantity of tritium to be removed. Increasing the temperature to 300°C in a dry gas stream results in a significant release of tritium and is therefore an effective means for reducing the tritium inventory in steel. For humid purges at 30°C, a sixfold increase in humidity results in a tenfold increase in the peak outgassing rate. Increasing the humidity from 4 parts per million (ppm) to 1000 ppm when the sample temperature is 100°C causes a significant increase in the tritium outgassing rate. Finally, a simple calculation shows that only 15% of the activity present in the sample was removed in these experiments, suggesting that the surface layer of adsorbed water participates in regulating tritium desorption from the surface.

  14. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-06

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  27 x 23 km Limb ... Access: OPeNDAP Parameters:  H2O Water Volume Mixing Radio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  15. Water Vapor Diffusion through Soil as Affected by Temperature and Aggregate Size

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water vapor diffusion through the soil is an important part in the total water flux in the unsaturated zone of arid or semiarid regions and has several significant agricultural and engineering applications because soil moisture contents near the surface are relatively low. Water vapor diffusing thro...

  16. The annual cycle of stratospheric water vapor in a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mote, Philip W.

    1995-01-01

    The application of general circulation models (GCM's) to stratospheric chemistry and transport both permits and requires a thorough investigation of stratospheric water vapor. The National Center for Atmospheric Research has redesigned its GCM, the Community Climate Model (CCM2), to enable studies of the chemistry and transport of tracers including water vapor; the importance of water vapor to the climate and chemistry of the stratosphere requires that it be better understood in the atmosphere and well represented in the model. In this study, methane is carried as a tracer and converted to water; this simple chemistry provides an adequate representation of the upper stratospheric water vapor source. The cold temperature bias in the winter polar stratosphere, which the CCM2 shares with other GCM's, produces excessive dehydration in the southern hemisphere, but this dry bias can be ameliorated by setting a minimum vapor pressure. The CCM2's water vapor distribution and seasonality compare favorably with observations in many respects, though seasonal variations including the upper stratospheric semiannual oscillation are generally too small. Southern polar dehydration affects midlatitude water vapor mixing ratios by a few tenths of a part per million, mostly after the demise of the vortex. The annual cycle of water vapor in the tropical and northern midlatitude lower stratosphere is dominated by drying at the tropical tropopause. Water vapor has a longer adjustment time than methane and had not reached equilibrium at the end of the 9 years simulated here.

  17. Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements at the DOE SGP CART Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was deployed to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in northern Oklahoma September - December, 2000 for two DOE sponsored field campaigns: 1) the Water Vapor Intensive Operations Experiment 2000 and 2) the Atmospheric Radiations Measurement First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment Experiment (AFWEX). WvIOP2000 focussed on water vapor measurements in the lower troposphere while AFWEX focussed on upper tropospheric water vapor. For the first time ever, four water vapor lidars were operated simultaneously: one airborne and three ground-based systems. Intercomparisons of these measurements and others will be presented at the meeting.

  18. Water vapor sources associated with the early summer precipitation over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, K. C.; Tong, Hang-Wai; Chan, Johnny C. L.

    2008-04-01

    This study investigates the water vapor sources for the early summer precipitation over China in association with the Asian summer monsoon, based on the sensitivity experiments performed by a regional climate model for the year 1998. It is found that the northern South China Sea (NSCS) is an important region for the early summer precipitation over China, particularly the south China region. The evaporative water vapor flux or sea surface temperature over the NSCS could significantly affect the southwesterly water vapor transport towards the NSCS. This in turn may significantly change the water vapor transport from the NSCS to China and so changes the precipitation there. The results of the experiments also show that the precipitation over China does not particularly depend on the water vapor transports from some distant sources by the large-scale flows. Most of the required water vapor could be obtained from the ocean within the monsoon region. The results suggest that the water vapor transport over China is basically a combination of the southeasterly water vapor transport associated with the north Western Pacific subtropical high and the southwesterly water vapor transport associated with the Indian summer monsoon. Without the latter, the early summer precipitation over China could be reduced by up to half of the original amount.

  19. Prediction of water vapor transport rates across polyvinylchloride packaging systems using a novel radiotracer method

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.W.; Mulski, M.J.; Kuu, W.Y. )

    1990-09-01

    A radiotracer method is used to study the transport properties of water vapor in polyvinylchloride (PVC), a plastic commonly used in the packaging of parenteral solutions. Water vapor transport across a PVC film appears to be Fickian in nature. Using the steady-state solution of Fick's second law and the permeability coefficient of water vapor across the PVC film obtained using the described method, the predicted water vapor transport rate (WVTR) for a parenteral solution packaged in PVC is in reasonable agreement with actual WVTR as determined by weight loss under precisely controlled conditions.

  20. Inclusion of high resolution MODIS maps on a 3D tropospheric water vapor GPS tomography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Pedro; Catalao, Joao; Nico, Giovanni; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Observing the water vapor distribution on the troposphere remains a challenge for the weather forecast. Radiosondes provide precise water vapor profiles of the troposphere, but lack geographical and temporal coverage, while satellite meteorological maps have good spatial resolution but even poorer temporal resolution. GPS has proved its capacity to measure the integrated water vapor in all weather conditions with high temporal sampling frequency. However these measurements lack a vertical water vapor discretization. Reconstruction of the slant path GPS observation to the satellite allows oblique water vapor measurements. Implementation of a 3D grid of voxels along the troposphere over an area where GPS stations are available enables the observation ray tracing. A relation between the water vapor density and the distanced traveled inside the voxels is established, defining GPS tomography. An inverse problem formulation is needed to obtain a water vapor solution. The combination of precipitable water vapor (PWV) maps obtained from MODIS satellite data with the GPS tomography is performed in this work. The MODIS PWV maps can have 1 or 5 km pixel resolution, being obtained 2 times per day in the same location at most. The inclusion of MODIS PWV maps provides an enhanced horizontal resolution for the tomographic solution and benefits the stability of the inversion problem. A 3D tomographic grid was adjusted over a regional area covering Lisbon, Portugal, where a GNSS network of 9 receivers is available. Radiosonde measurements in the area are used to evaluate the 3D water vapor tomography maps.

  1. Remote sensing of water vapor in the near IR from EOS/MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gao, Bo-Cai

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the selection of spectral channels in the near-infrared IR which are to be employed for the derivation of total column water vapor using the MODIS instrument on the NASA's Earth Observing System. Data obtained show that the three near-IR water vapor channels on the MODIS instrument enable remote sensing of the total column water vapor with an absolute accuracy of +/- 13 percent. An absolute accuracy of +/-7 percent can be obtained if additional MODIS channels are used to decrease the effect of uncertainty in the spectral reflectance of the surface, subpixel clouds, haze, and temperature profile on the derived water vapor.

  2. The diel cycle of water vapor in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2014-08-01

    We present a study of the dynamics of small-scale (~100 km) atmospheric circulation in west Greenland which is dominated by interactions of marine and continental air masses. Water vapor concentration and isotopic ratios measured continuously over a 25 day period in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland were used to monitor the convergence of easterly katabatic winds and westerly sea breezes that form a front between the dry, isotopically depleted, glacial air mass and the moist, isotopically enriched, marine air mass. During the latter 16 days of the measurement period, an interval with no large-scale synoptic interference, the inland penetration of the sea breeze controlled the largest day-to-day humidity and vapor isotopic variations. Kangerlussuaq experienced sea breezes in the afternoon on 9 days, consistent with the long-term average of such occurrences on 56% of days in July and August. The inland position of the sea breeze front is controlled by the katabatic wind strength, which is stronger during times of reduced cloud coverage and/or higher-pressure gradient between the coast and the Greenland ice sheet. The position and movement of the front will likely respond to changes in the general atmospheric circulation and regional radiation balance resulting from global warming, which will, in turn, impact the local hydrological cycle and ecosystem processes.

  3. Activated carbons and low cost adsorbents for remediation of tri- and hexavalent chromium from water.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Pittman, Charles U

    2006-09-21

    Hexavalent chromium is a well-known highly toxic metal, considered a priority pollutant. Industrial sources of Cr(VI) include leather tanning, cooling tower blowdown, plating, electroplating, anodizing baths, rinse waters, etc. The most common method applied for chromate control is reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent form in acid (pH approximately 2.0) and subsequent hydroxide precipitation of Cr(III) by increasing the pH to approximately 9.0-10.0 using lime. Existing overviews of chromium removal only cover selected technologies that have traditionally been used in chromium removal. Far less attention has been paid to adsorption. Herein, we provide the first review article that provides readers an overview of the sorption capacities of commercial developed carbons and other low cost sorbents for chromium remediation. After an overview of chromium contamination is provided, more than 300 papers on chromium remediation using adsorption are discussed to provide recent information about the most widely used adsorbents applied for chromium remediation. Efforts to establish the adsorption mechanisms of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on various adsorbents are reviewed. Chromium's impact environmental quality, sources of chromium pollution and toxicological/health effects is also briefly introduced. Interpretations of the surface interactions are offered. Particular attention is paid to comparing the sorption efficiency and capacities of commercially available activated carbons to other low cost alternatives, including an extensive table. PMID:16904258

  4. Development of a nanosphere adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaisheng; Wu, Shibiao; He, Junyong; Chen, Liang; Cai, Xingguo; Chen, Kai; Li, Yulian; Sun, Bai; Lin, Dongyue; Liu, Guqing; Kong, Lingtao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2016-08-01

    A new uniform-sized CeCO3OH nanosphere adsorbent was developed, and tested to establish its efficiency, using kinetic and thermodynamic studies, for fluoride removal. The results demonstrated that the CeCO3OH nanospheres exhibited much high adsorption capacities for fluoride anions due to electrostatic interactions and exchange of the carbonate and hydroxyl groups on the adsorbent surface with fluoride anions. Adsorption kinetics was fitted well by the pseudo-second-order model as compared to a pseudo-first-order rate expression, and adsorption isotherm data were well described by Langmuir model with max adsorption capacity of 45mg/g at pH 7.0. Thermodynamic examination demonstrated that fluoride adsorption on the CeCO3OH nanospheres was reasonably endothermic and spontaneous. Moreover, the CeCO3OH nanospheres have less influence on adsorption of F(-) by pH and co-exiting ions, such as SO4(2-), Cl(-), HCO3(-), CO3(2-), NO3(-) and PO4(3-), and the adsorption efficiency is very high at the low initial fluoride concentrations in the basis of the equilibrium adsorption capacities. This study indicated that the CeCO3OH nanospheres could be developed into a very viable technology for highly effective removal of fluoride from drinking water. PMID:27138842

  5. Magnetic zeolites: a new adsorbent for removal of metallic contaminants from water.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luiz C A; Petkowicz, Diego I; Smaniotto, Alessandra; Pergher, Sibele B C

    2004-10-01

    In this work the adsorption features of Na Y zeolite with the magnetic properties of iron oxides have been combined in a composite to produce a magnetic adsorbent. These magnetic composites can be used as an adsorbent for metallic contaminants in water and subsequently removed from the medium by a simple magnetic process. The zeolites:iron oxide magnetic composites, were prepared by using Na Y with weight ratio of 3:1 and were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetization measurements, chemical analyses, N(2) adsorption isotherms and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms showed that the surface area decreased from 505 m(2)g(-1) for the pure Na Y to 353 m(2)g(-1) for the Na Y:Fe oxide 3:1 composite. The adsorption isotherms of metal ions Cr(3+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) from aqueous solution onto the composites also showed that the presence of iron oxide does not affect the adsorption capacity. PMID:15350421

  6. Density-functional theory study of interactions between water and carbon monoxide adsorbed on platinum under electrochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Juan A.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki

    2009-08-01

    In the study of CO poisoning of the platinum-based hydrogen anode in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell, a key issue that has eluded our understanding is the interactions of CO adsorbed on Pt surfaces and solvent H 2O. Our density-functional theory calculations reveal a new interpretation of the adsorbed state of CO and its interaction with water under electrochemical conditions, which rationalizes the observed quantitative relationship between infrared intensities for adsorbed bridging CO (bridge) and water exhibiting a high-frequency O-H stretch (ca. 3650 cm -1). The theoretical modeling indicates that the observed feature is due to a water molecule firmly hydrogen-bonded to CO (bridge).

  7. Solar Mesosphere Explorer observations of stratospheric and mesospheric water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Thomas, Gary E.; Rusch, David W.; Barth, Charles A.; Lawrence, George M.; Olivero, John J.; Clancy, R. Todd; Sanders, Ryan W.; Knapp, Barry G.

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that while the SME (Solar Mesosphere Explorer) data is consistent with the earlier LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) results, its interpretation is complicated by aerosol contamination, particularly at altitudes below 35 km. This contamination arose from several volcanic eruptions, including that of El Chichon. Analyses are reported of a subset of data from the SME satellite, concentrating primarily on the period January through March 1982 so as to avoid contamination from the El Chichon volcanic aerosol. The SME observations of water vapor between 20 and 60 km were inverted for the first three months of 1982 as well as for selected additional periods. Reasonable results are obtained at locations where no contamination by aerosol is suspected.

  8. Oxidation of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QuynGiao N.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) including HfB2 + 20% SiC (HS), and ZrB2 + 20% SiC (ZC), and ZrB2 + 30% C + 14% SiC (ZCS) have been investigated for use as potential aeropropolsion engine materials. These materials were oxidized in water vapor (90%) using a cyclic vertical furnace at 1 atm. The total exposure time was 10 hours at temperature of 1200, 1300, and 1400 C. CVD SiC was also evaluate as a baseline for comparison. Weight change, X-ray diffraction analysis, surface and cross-sectional SEM and EDS were performed. These results are compared with tests conducted in a stagnant air furnace at temperatures of 1327 C for 100 minutes, and with high pressure burner rig (HPBR) results at 1100 and 1300 C at 6 atm for 50 h. Total recession measurements are also reported for the two tests environments.

  9. A solution to water vapor in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, Blair B.; Bruce, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    As cryogenic wind tunnels are utilized, problems associated with the low temperature environment are being discovered and solved. Recently, water vapor contamination was discovered in the National Transonic Facility, and the source was shown to be the internal insulation which is a closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam. After an extensive study of the absorptivity characteristics of the NTF thermal insulation, the most practical solution to the problem was shown to be the maintaining of a dry environment in the circuit at all times. Utilizing a high aspect ratio transport model, it was shown that the moisture contamination effects on the supercritical wing pressure distributions were within the accuracy of setting test conditions and as such were considered negligible for this model.

  10. Computation of infrared cooling rates in the water vapor bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, M. D.; Arking, A.

    1978-01-01

    A fast but accurate method for calculating the infrared radiative terms due to water vapor has been developed. It makes use of the far wing approximation to scale transmission along an inhomogeneous path to an equivalent homogeneous path. Rather than using standard conditions for scaling, the reference temperatures and pressures are chosen in this study to correspond to the regions where cooling is most significant. This greatly increased the accuracy of the new method. Compared to line by line calculations, the new method has errors up to 4% of the maximum cooling rate, while a commonly used method based upon the Goody band model (Rodgers and Walshaw, 1966) introduces errors up to 11%. The effect of temperature dependence of transmittance has also been evaluated; the cooling rate errors range up to 11% when the temperature dependence is ignored. In addition to being more accurate, the new method is much faster than those based upon the Goody band model.

  11. Global lower mesospheric water vapor revealed by LIMS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordley, L. L.; Russell, J. M., III; Remsberg, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratospheric water vapor channel data analysis has been extended from the 1. mb level (about 48 km) to the .3 mb level (about 60 km) through a radiance averaging procedure and better understanding of systematic errors. The data show H2O mixing ratio peaks near the .5 mb level varying from 4 to 7 ppmv with latitude and season. Above this level the mixing ratio drops off quickly with altitude, but, due to experimental uncertainties, at an uncertain rate. The stratospheric results are virtually the same as determined from the archived LIMS results with a tropical hygropause and enhanced H2O concentration in the lower levels at high winter latitudes.

  12. Imaging spectrometer measurement of water vapor in the 400 to 2500 nm spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.; Conel, James E.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    The Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) measures the total upwelling spectral radiance from 400 to 2500 nm sampled at 10 nm intervals. The instrument acquires spectral data at an altitude of 20 km above sea level, as images of 11 by up to 100 km at 17x17 meter spatial sampling. We have developed a nonlinear spectral fitting algorithm coupled with a radiative transfer code to derive the total path water vapor from the spectrum, measured for each spatial element in an AVIRIS image. The algorithm compensates for variation in the surface spectral reflectance and atmospheric aerosols. It uses water vapor absorption bands centered at 940 nm, 1040 nm, and 1380 nm. We analyze data sets with water vapor abundances ranging from 1 to 40 perceptible millimeters. In one data set, the total path water vapor varies from 7 to 21 mm over a distance of less than 10 km. We have analyzed a time series of five images acquired at 12 minute intervals; these show spatially heterogeneous changes of advocated water vapor of 25 percent over 1 hour. The algorithm determines water vapor for images with a range of ground covers, including bare rock and soil, sparse to dense vegetation, snow and ice, open water, and clouds. The precision of the water vapor determination approaches one percent. However, the precision is sensitive to the absolute abundance and the absorption strength of the atmospheric water vapor band analyzed. We have evaluated the accuracy of the algorithm by comparing several surface-based determinations of water vapor at the time of the AVIRIS data acquisition. The agreement between the AVIRIS measured water vapor and the in situ surface radiometer and surface interferometer measured water vapor is 5 to 10 percent.

  13. Sampling Impacts on the NVAP-M Global Water Vapor Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonder Haar, T. H.; Forsythe, J. M.; Cronk, H. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a fundamental ingredient both for regulating climate as a greenhouse gas and as a necessary precursor for high impact weather events such as heavy precipitation. Water vapor concentration varies geographically because of its close linkage with surface temperature and as a component of synoptic and mesoscale weather systems. Satellite observations provide the only means to quantify the global occurrence and variability of water vapor. In common with other long-term climate data records such as clouds and precipitation, intercalibrating and blending diverse measurements of water vapor to create a consistent record through time is a challenge. The NASA Making Earth Science Data Records for Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program supported the development of the NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP-M) dataset. The dataset was released to the science community in 2013 via the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center. The dataset is a global (land and ocean) water vapor dataset created by merging multiple satellite infrared and microwave sources of atmospheric water vapor along with surface data to form global gridded fields of total and layered precipitable water vapor. NVAP-M spans 22 years (1988-2009) of data. The challenges in creating this multisensor, multidecadal satellite-driven climate data record are illustrative of challenges for all satellite climate data records. While advances in sensor intercalibration and retrieval algorithms have improved the quality of the global water vapor climate data record, uncertainties arise due to sampling biases of the input sensors. These biases are particularly evident on a regional scale, in cloudy regions or over desert surfaces. The changing mixture of sensors with varying sensitivity to clear/cloudy, land/ocean and even day/night conditions can lead to different results on trends and variability of water vapor. We explore this variability via the NVAP-M data set. Connections and collaborations

  14. A Simple Experiment for Determining Vapor Pressure and Enthalpy of Vaporization of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Gerald S.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory procedures, calculations, and sample results are described for a freshman chemistry experiment in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation is introduced as a means of describing the variation of vapor pressure with temperature and for determining enthalpy of vaporization. (Author/SK)

  15. Projected Regime Shift in Arctic Cloud and Water Vapor Feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yonghua; Miller, James R.; Francis, Jennifer; Russel, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic climate is changing faster than any other large-scale region on Earth. A variety of positive feedback mechanisms are responsible for the amplification, most of which are linked with changes in snow and ice cover, surface temperature (T(sub s)), atmospheric water vapor (WV), and cloud properties. As greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere, air temperature and water vapor content also increase, leading to a warmer surface and ice loss, which further enhance evaporation and WV. Many details of these interrelated feedbacks are poorly understood, yet are essential for understanding the pace and regional variations in future Arctic change. We use a global climate model (Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Atmosphere-Ocean Model) to examine several components of these feedbacks, how they vary by season, and how they are projected to change through the 21st century. One positive feedback begins with an increase in T(sub s) that produces an increase in WV, which in turn increases the downward longwave flux (DLF) and T(sub s), leading to further evaporation. Another associates the expected increases in cloud cover and optical thickness with increasing DLF and T(sub s). We examine the sensitivities between DLF and other climate variables in these feedbacks and find that they are strongest in the non-summer seasons, leading to the largest amplification in Ts during these months. Later in the 21st century, however, DLF becomes less sensitive to changes in WV and cloud optical thickness, as they cause the atmosphere to emit longwave radiation more nearly as a black body. This regime shift in sensitivity implies that the amplified pace of Arctic change relative to the northern hemisphere could relax in the future.

  16. Analysis of satellite-derived ozone and water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Research under this grant has involved analyses of satellite-derived measurements of water vapor and total ozone. Upper tropospheric water vapor data from the Nimbus 7 temperature-humidity infrared radiometer (THIR) 6.7 micron channel were analyzed by Fourier transformation to provide wavenumber spectra for a case of an upper level system over Europe. The power law spectrum for horizontal scales from 60 to several hundred km suggests that when convective cloud energy sources are not present, the enstrophy-cascading process (with variance proportional to the minus three power of wavenumber) may hold to much smaller scales than previously thought. Several investigations of the middle atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) were also conducted. Slow atmospheric oscillations with periods of 1-2 months were investigated in total ozone measurements and in ionospheric data. Using one-point correlation maps and total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) data, strong statistical evidence was found for the planetary-scale oscillations at these periods. A dipole-like pattern in the tropical equatorial Indian ocean-western Pacific region was documented, along with wavetrain-like patterns emanating into the extratropics. While attempting to follow the oscillations upward above stratosphere, oscillations were studied in ionospheric data (D-region radio wave absorption, in the upper mesosphere, around 80-90 km altitude). Cross-spectral analyses with solar flux data revealed that much of the observed 1-2 month variance in the ionospheric D-region was well correlated to solar variations. Further research has involved investigations of the photochemical lifetime of greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide. Using Nimbus 7 satellite data, a new analysis technique was employed to determine the lifetime of these gases in situ in the upper stratosphere. The lifetimes are found to be in good agreement with theoretical estimates.

  17. Development and Validation of Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics for the Atmospheric Hydrologic Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding of the local and remote sources of water vapor can be a valuable diagnostic in understanding the regional atmospheric hydrologic cycle. In the present study, we have implemented passive tracers as prognostic variables to follow water vapor evaporated in predetermined regions until the water tracer precipitates. The formulation of the sources and sinks of tracer water is generally proportional to the prognostic water vapor variable. Because all water has been accounted for in tracers, the water vapor variable provides the validation of the tracer water and the formulation of the sources and sinks. The tracers have been implemented in a GEOS General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation consisting of several summer periods to determine the source regions of precipitation for the United States and India. The recycling of water and interannual variability of the sources of water will be examined. Potential uses in GCM sensitivity studies, predictability studies and data assimilation will be discussed.

  18. Possible near-IR channels for remote sensing precipitable water vapor from geostationary satellite platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, B.-C.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Westwater, Ed R.; Conel, J. E.; Green, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing of troposheric water vapor profiles from current geostationary weather satellites is made using a few broadband infrared (IR) channels in the 6-13 micron region. Uncertainties greater than 20% exist in derived water vapor values just above the surface from the IR emission measurements. In this paper, we propose three near-IR channels, one within the 0.94-micron water vapor band absorption region, and the other two in nearby atmospheric windows, for remote sensing of precipitable water vapor over land areas, excluding lakes and rivers, during daytime from future geostationary satellite platforms. The physical principles are as follows. The reflectance of most surface targets varies approximately linearly with wavelength near 1 micron. The solar radiation on the sun-surface-sensor ray path is attenuated by atmospheric water vapor. The ratio of the radiance from the absorption channel with the radiances from the two window channels removes the surface reflectance effects and yields approximately the mean atmospheric water vapor transmittance of the absorption channel. The integrated water vapor amount from ground to space can be obtained with a precision of better than 5% from the mean transmittance. Because surface reflectances vary slowly with time, temporal variation of precipitable water vapor can be determined reliably. High spatial resolution, precipitable water vapor images are derived from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visable-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, which measures solar radiation reflected by the surface in the 0.4-2.5 micron region in 10-nm channels and has a ground instantaneous field of view of 20 m from its platform on an ER-2 aircraft at 20 km. The proposed near-IR reflectance technique would complement the IR emission techniques for remote sensing of water vapor profiles from geostationary satellite platforms, especially in the boundary layer where most of the water vapor is located.

  19. Water, Vapor, and Salt Dynamics in a Hot Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrami, Davood; Danko, George; Walton, John

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a new model study examining the high temperature nuclear waste disposal concept at Yucca Mountain using MULTIFLUX, an integrated in-drift- and mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic model. The results show that a large amount of vapor flow into the drift is expected during the period of above-boiling temperatures. This phenomenon makes the emplacement drift a water/moisture attractor during the above-boiling temperature operation. The evaporation of the percolation water into the drift gives rise to salt accumulation in the rock wall, especially in the crown of the drift for about 1500 years in the example. The deposited salts over the drift footprint, almost entirely present in the fractures, may enter the drift either by rock fall or by water drippage. During the high temperature operation mode, the barometric pressure variation creates fluctuating relative humidity in the emplacement drift with a time period of approximately 10 days. Potentially wet and dry conditions and condensation on salt-laden drift wall sections may adversely affect the storage environment. Salt accumulations during the above-boiling temperature operation must be sufficiently addressed to fully understand the waste package environment during the thermal period. Until the questions are resolved, a below-boiling repository design is favored where the Alloy-22 will be less susceptible to localized corrosion. (authors)

  20. Enhanced Positive Water Vapor Feedback Associated with Tropical Deep Convection: New Evidence from Aura MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Hui; Read, William G.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Waters, Joe W.; Wu, Dong L.; Fetzer, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent simultaneous observations of upper tropospheric (UT) water vapor and cloud ice from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite provide new evidence for tropical convective influence on UT water vapor and its associated greenhouse effect. The observations show that UT water vapor increases as cloud ice water content increases. They also show that, when sea surface temperature (SST) exceeds approx.300 K, UT cloud ice associated with tropical deep convection increases sharply with increasing SST. The moistening of the upper troposphere by deep convection leads to an enhanced positive water vapor feedback, about 3 times that implied solely by thermodynamics. Over tropical oceans when SST greater than approx.300 K, the 'convective UT water vapor feedback' inferred from the MLS observations contributes approximately 65% of the sensitivity of the clear-sky greenhouse parameter to SST.

  1. Transparent and robust siloxane-based hybrid lamella film as a water vapor barrier coating.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Hara, Takaaki; Abe, Risa; Takahashi, Masahide

    2014-11-12

    Water vapor barriers are important in various application fields, such as food packaging and sealants in electronic devices. Polymer/clay composites are well-studied water vapor barrier materials, but their transparency and mechanical strength degrade with increasing clay loading. Herein, we demonstrate films with good water vapor barrier properties, high transparency, and mechanical/thermal stability. Water vapor barrier films were prepared by the solution crystallization of siloxane hybrid lamellae. The films consist of highly crystallized organic/inorganic hybrid lamellae, which provide high transparency, hardness, and thermal stability and inhibit the permeation of water vapor. The water permeability of a 6 μm thick hybrid film is comparable to that of a 200 μm thick silicon rubber film. PMID:25296395

  2. The role of water vapor in climate. A strategic research plan for the proposed GEWEX water vapor project (GVaP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, D. OC. (Editor); Melfi, S. Harvey (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The proposed GEWEX Water Vapor Project (GVaP) addresses fundamental deficiencies in the present understanding of moist atmospheric processes and the role of water vapor in the global hydrologic cycle and climate. Inadequate knowledge of the distribution of atmospheric water vapor and its transport is a major impediment to progress in achieving a fuller understanding of various hydrologic processes and a capability for reliable assessment of potential climatic change on global and regional scales. GVap will promote significant improvements in knowledge of atmospheric water vapor and moist processes as well as in present capabilities to model these processes on global and regional scales. GVaP complements a number of ongoing and planned programs focused on various aspects of the hydrologic cycle. The goal of GVaP is to improve understanding of the role of water vapor in meteorological, hydrological, and climatological processes through improved knowledge of water vapor and its variability on all scales. A detailed description of the GVaP is presented.

  3. Water vapor-weighted mean temperature and its impact on the determination of precipitable water vapor and its linear trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Kefei; Wu, Suqin; Fan, Shijie; Cheng, Yingyan

    2016-01-01

    Water vapor-weighted mean temperature, Tm, is a vital parameter for retrieving precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the zenith wet delay (ZWD) of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signal propagation. In this study, the Tm at 368 GNSS stations for 2000-2012 were calculated using three methods: (1) temperature and humidity profiles from ERA-Interim, (2) the Bevis Tm-Ts relationship, and (3) the Global Pressure and Temperature 2 wet model. Tm derived from the first method was used as a reference to assess the errors of the other two methods. Comparisons show that the relative errors of the Tm derived from these two methods are in the range of 1-3% across more than 95% of all the stations. The PWVs were calculated using the aforementioned three types of Tm and the GNSS-derived ZWD at 107 stations. Again, the PWVs calculated using Tm from the first method were used as the reference of the other two PWVs. The root-mean-square errors of these two PWVs are both in the range of 0.1-0.7 mm. The second method is recommended in real-time applications, since its performance is slightly better than the third method. In addition, the linear trends of the PWV time series from the first method were also used as the reference to evaluate the trends from the other two methods. Results show that 13% and 23% of the PWV trends from the respective second and third methods have a relative error of larger than 10%. For climate change studies, the first method, if available, is always recommended.

  4. Influence of liquid water and water vapor on antimisting kerosene (AMK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Sarolouki, M.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to evaluate the compatibility of liquid water and water vapor with antimisting kerosenes (AMK) containing polymer additive FM-9 developed by Imperial Chemical Industries. This effort consists of the determination of water solubility in AMK, influence of water on restoration (degradation) of AMK, and effect of water on standard AMK quality control methods. The principal conclusions of this investigation are: (1) the uptake of water in AMK critically depends upon the degree of agitation and can be as high as 1300 ppm at 20 C, (2) more than 250 to 300 ppm of water in AMK causes an insoluble second phase to form. The amount of this second phase depends on fuel temperature, agitation, degree of restoration (degradation) and the water content of the fuel, (3) laboratory scale experiments indicate precipitate formation when water vapor comes in contact with cold fuel surfaces at a much lower level of water (125 to 150 ppm), (4) precipitate formation is very pronounced in these experiments where humid air is percolated through a cold fuel (-20 C), (5) laboratory tests further indicate that water droplet settling time is markedly reduced in AMK as compared to jet A, (6) limited low temperature testing down to -30 C under laboratory conditions indicates the formation of stable, transparent gels.

  5. Removal efficiency of water purifier and adsorbent for iodine, cesium, strontium, barium and zirconium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sato, Itaru; Kudo, Hiroaki; Tsuda, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    The severe incident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station has caused radioactive contamination of environment including drinking water. Radioactive iodine, cesium, strontium, barium and zirconium are hazardous fission products because of the high yield and/or relatively long half-life. In the present study, 4 pot-type water purifiers and several adsorbents were examined for the removal effects on these elements from drinking water. Iodide, iodate, cesium and barium were removed by all water purifiers with efficiencies about 85%, 40%, 75-90% and higher than 85%, respectively. These efficiencies lasted for 200 l, which is near the recommended limits for use of filter cartridges, without decay. Strontium was removed with initial efficiencies from 70% to 100%, but the efficiencies were slightly decreased by use. Zirconium was removed by two models, but hardly removed by the other models. Synthetic zeolite A4 efficiently removed cesium, strontium and barium, but had no effect on iodine and zirconium. Natural zeolite, mordenite, removed cesium with an efficiency as high as zeolite A4, but the removal efficiencies for strontium and barium were far less than those of zeolite A4. Activated carbon had little removal effects on these elements. In case of radioactive contamination of tap water, water purifiers may be available for convenient decontamination of drinking water in the home. PMID:22129747

  6. Sulfonated graphene nanosheets as a superb adsorbent for various environmental pollutants in water.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Chen, Baoliang

    2015-06-16

    Graphene nanosheets, as a novel nanoadsorbent, can be further modified to optimize the adsorption capability for various pollutants. To overcome the structural limits of graphene (aggregation) and graphene oxide (hydrophilic surface) in water, sulfonated graphene (GS) was prepared by diazotization reaction using sulfanilic acid. It was demonstrated that GS not only recovered a relatively complete sp(2)-hybridized plane with high affinity for aromatic pollutants but also had sulfonic acid groups and partial original oxygen-containing groups that powerfully attracted positively charged pollutants. The saturated adsorption capacities of GS were 400 mg/g for phenanthrene, 906 mg/g for methylene blue and 58 mg/g for Cd(2+), which were much higher than the corresponding values for reduced graphene oxide and graphene oxide. GS as a graphene-based adsorbent exhibits fast adsorption kinetic rate and superior adsorption capacity toward various pollutants, which mainly thanks to the multiple adsorption sites in GS including the conjugate π region sites and the functional group sites. Moreover, the sulfonic acid groups endow GS with the good dispersibility and single or few nanosheets which guarantee the adsorption processes. It is great potential to expose the adsorption sites of graphene nanosheets for pollutants in water by regulating their microstructures, surface properties and water dispersion. PMID:26008607

  7. Thermodynamic and dynamic characteristics of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose adsorbed films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Oscar E; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M; Pilosof, Ana M R

    2006-01-01

    Surface pressure isotherms and structural and surface dilatational properties of three hydroxypropylmethycelluloses (HPMCs, called E4M, E50LV, and F4M) adsorbed films at the air-water interface were determined. In this work we present evidence that HPMC molecules are able to diffuse and saturate the air-water interface at very low concentrations in the bulk phase. As bulk concentration increased, structural changes at a molecular level occurred at the interface. These changes corresponded to transition from an expanded structure (structure I) to a condensed one (structure II). When the surface concentration of HPMC was high enough, the collapse of the monolayer was observed. The three HPMCs formed very elastic films at the air-water interface, even at low surface pressures. E4M showed features that make it unique. For instance it showed the highest surface activity, mainly at low bulk concentrations (<10(-4) wt %). The differences observed in surface activity may be attributed to differences in the hydroxypropyl molar substitution and molecular weight of HPMC. All three HPMCs formed films of similar viscoelasticity and elastic dilatational modulus, which can be accounted for by their similar degree of methyl substitution. PMID:16398540

  8. Anisotropic orientational motion of molecular adsorbates at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zimdars, D.; Dadap, J.I.; Eisenthal, K.B.; Heinz, T.F.

    1999-04-29

    The ultrafast orientational motions of coumarin 314 (C314) adsorbed at the air/water interface were investigated by time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TRSHG). The theory and method of using TRSHG to detect both out-of-plane and in-plane orientational motions are discussed. The interfacial solute motions were found to be anisotropic, with differing out-of-plane and in-plane reorientation time constants. This report presents the first direct observation of in-plane orientational motion of a molecule (C314) at the air/water interface using TRSHG. The in-plane reorientation time constant is 600 {+-} 40 ps. The out-of-plane reorientation time constant is 350 {+-} 20 ps. The out-of-plane orientational motion of C314 is similar to the previous results on rhodamine 6G at the air/water interface which indicated increased interfacial friction compared with bulk aqueous solution. The surface reorientation times are 2--3 times slower than the bulk isotropic orientational diffusion time.

  9. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Nadir (TL2H2ON)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Nadir (TL2H2ON) News:  TES News ... Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ...

  10. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Nadir (TL2H2ONS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Nadir (TL2H2ONS) News:  TES News ... Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  5.3 8.5 km nadir ...

  11. A Two-Line Absorption Instrument for Scramjet Temperature and Water Vapor Concentration Measurement in HYPULSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, C. Y.

    1998-01-01

    A three beam water vapor sensor system has been modified to provide for near simultaneous temperature measurement. The system employs a tunable diode laser to scan spectral line of water vapor. The application to measurements in a scramjet combustor environment of a shock tunnel facility is discussed. This report presents and discusses die initial calibration of the measurement system.

  12. Alexandrite laser characterization and airborne lidar developments for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, P.; Higdon, N. S.; Grossmann, B. E.; Browell, E. V.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of an Alexandrite laser used for making water vapor DIAL measurements have been evaluated. The optical servo-system used to lock the laser wavelength on a water vapor absorption line is described. A brief description of the DIAL system is given and the data obtained with this lidar during flight tests in March 1990 are also presented.

  13. High Temperature Corrosion of Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are proposed for applications in high temperature combustion environments containing water vapor. Both SiC and Si3N4 react with water vapor to form a silica (SiO2) scale. It is therefore important to understand the durability of SiC, Si3N4 and SiO2 in water vapor. Thermogravimetric analyses, furnace exposures and burner rig results were obtained for these materials in water vapor at temperatures between 1100 and 1450 C and water vapor partial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 3.1 atm. First, the oxidation of SiC and Si3N4 in water vapor is considered. The parabolic kinetic rate law, rate dependence on water vapor partial pressure, and oxidation mechanism are discussed. Second, the volatilization of silica to form Si(OH)4(g) is examined. Mass spectrometric results, the linear kinetic rate law and a volatilization model based on diffusion through a gas boundary layer are discussed. Finally, the combined oxidation and volatilization reactions, which occur when SiC or Si3N4 are exposed in a water vapor-containing environment, are presented. Both experimental evidence and a model for the paralinear kinetic rate law are shown for these simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions.

  14. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    This dissertation summarizes results of an experimental exploration of heat transfer during vaporization of a water droplet deposited on a nanostructured surface at a temperature approaching and exceeding the Leidenfrost point for the surface and at lower surface temperatures 10-40 degrees C above the saturated temperature of the water droplet at approximately 101 kPa. The results of these experiments were compared to those performed on bare smooth copper and aluminum surfaces in this and other studies. The nanostructured surfaces were composed of a vast array of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals grown by hydrothermal synthesis on a smooth copper substrate having an average surface roughness of approximately 0.06 micrometer. Various nanostructured surface array geometries were produced on the copper substrate by performing the hydrothermal synthesis for 4, 10 and 24 hours. The individual nanostructures were randomly-oriented and, depending on hydrothermal synthesis time, had a mean diameter of about 500-700 nm, a mean length of 1.7-3.3 micrometers,and porosities of approximately 0.04-0.58. Surface wetting was characterized by macroscopic measurements of contact angle based on the droplet profile and calculations based on measurements of liquid film spread area. Scanning electron microscope imaging was used to document the nanoscale features of the surface before and after the experiments. The nanostructured surfaces grown by hydrothermal synthesis for 4 and 24 hours exhibited contact angles of approximately 10, whereas the surfaces grown for 10 hours were superhydrophilic, exhibiting contact angles typically less than 3 degrees. In single droplet deposition experiments at 101 kPa, a high-speed video camera was used to document the droplet-surface interaction. Distilled and degassed water droplets ranging in size from 2.5-4.0 mm were deposited onto the surface from heights ranging from approximately 0.2-8.1 cm, such that Weber numbers spanned a range of approximately 0

  15. Evaluation of the Water Vapor Transport over the Yellow River Basin in CMIP5 Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiawei; Feng, Jinming

    2014-05-01

    Temperature, precipitation and water vapor transport in China, particularly in the Yellow River Basin simulated by the 16 models participating in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) were evaluated for the period 1979-2005. Results suggest that most CMIP5 models are able to capture the climatological distribution patterns and inter-annual variations of surface air temperature, but with cold bias. Most models reproduce the spatial distribution pattern of warming trends identical with observations. Models tend to overestimate precipitation with relative biases ranging from 4.59 % to 61.46 %. Compared with observations, most models simulate more precipitation over the east of Tibetan Plateau and less in southeastern coastal regions. The spatial distribution of precipitation trends displayed in the observations cannot be well simulated by most models. The underestimation of temperature and the overestimation of precipitation simulated by some models over the east of Tibetan Plateau may be related to the anomalously strong western Pacific subtropical high and sufficient water vapor transport from Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean. In terms of the Yellow River Basin, modeled water vapor mainly flows in from eastern boundary and out from the western boundary. Water vapor also flows in through the southern boundary, but with smaller intensity. Owing to the overestimation of water vapor convergence, some models tend to exaggerate the climatological precipitation. Additionally, we found that the summer water vapor budget and precipitation keep pace with each other, which is well reflected by the FIO-ESM model. Models can also reproduce this relation in the lower reaches, with the total water vapor budget correlated strongly with water vapor transport from eastern, western and southern boundaries, indicating that water vapor budget and even the precipitation are strongly influenced by the water vapor transport from Indian Ocean and western

  16. Water Vapor Self-Continuum by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the 1.6 Micron Transparency Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, Alain; Kassi, Samir; Mondelain, Didier

    2014-06-01

    Since its discovery one century ago, a deep and unresolved controversy remains on the nature of the water vapor continuum. Several interpretations are proposed: accumulated effect of the distant wings of many individual spectral lines, metastable or true bound water dimers, collision-induced absorption. The atmospheric science community has largely sidestepped this controversy, and has adopted a pragmatic approach: most radiative transfer codes used in climate modelling, numerical weather prediction and remote sensing use the MT_CKD model which is a semi-empirical formulation of the continuum The MT_CKD cross-sections were tuned to available observations in the mid-infrared but in the absence of experimental constraints, the extrapolated near infrared (NIR) values are much more hazardous. Due to the weakness of the broadband absorption signal to be measured, very few measurements of the water vapor continuum are available in the NIR windows especially for temperature conditions relevant for our atmosphere. This is in particular the case for the 1.6 μm window where the very few available measurements show a large disagreement. Here we present the first measurements of the water vapor self-continuum cross-sections in the 1.6 μm window by cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). The pressure dependence of the absorption continuum was investigated during pressure cycles up to 12 Torr for selected wavenumber values. The continuum level is observed to deviate from the expected quadratic dependence with pressure. This deviation is interpreted as due to a significant contribution of water adsorbed on the super mirrors to the cavity loss rate. The pressure dependence is well reproduced by a second order polynomial. We interpret the linear and quadratic terms as the adsorbed water and vapour water contribution, respectively. The derived self-continuum cross sections, measured between 5875 and 6450 wn, shows a minimum value around 6300 wn. These cross sections will be compared

  17. Water Vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Properties on the Tibetan Plateau Using Multi-Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Dai, Guangyao; Wang, Dongxiang; Zhai, Xiaochun; Song, Xiaoquan

    2016-06-01

    The 3rd Tibetan Plateau atmospheric expedition experiment campaign were operated in the Tibetan Plateau during July and August 2014 by utilizing the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WVCAL), Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar and ceilometer VAISALA CL31. The observation was carried out in Nagqu area (31.5°N, 92.05°E), which is 4508 meters above the mean sea level. Water vapor mixing ratio, cloud height, vertical wind speed and vertical water vapor flux was measured by these lidars. The inversion methods of data products of lidars are described in details in this paper. Furthermore, the clouds heights measured by lidar and ceilometer were compared to verify the performance of the lidar. Finally, the case studies of water vapor mixing ratio, water vapor flux and cloud height and statistics were provided.

  18. Application of an automatic cloud tracking technique to Meteosat water vapor and infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endlich, R. M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    The automatic cloud tracking system was applied to METEOSAT 6.7 micrometers water vapor measurements to learn whether the system can track the motions of water vapor patterns. Data for the midlatitudes, subtropics, and tropics were selected from a sequence of METEOSAT pictures for 25 April 1978. Trackable features in the water vapor patterns were identified using a clustering technique and the features were tracked by two different methods. In flat (low contrast) water vapor fields, the automatic motion computations were not reliable, but in areas where the water vapor fields contained small scale structure (such as in the vicinity of active weather phenomena) the computations were successful. Cloud motions were computed using METEOSAT infrared observations (including tropical convective systems and midlatitude jet stream cirrus).

  19. First lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols from a high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed

    1995-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in many atmospheric processes related to radiation, climate change, atmospheric dynamics, meteorology, the global hydrologic cycle, and atmospheric chemistry, and yet our knowledge of the global distribution of water vapor is very limited. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique has the potential of providing needed high resolution water vapor measurements from aircraft and from space, and the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is a key step in the development of this capability. The LASE instrument is the first fully engineered, autonomous DIAL system, and it is designed to operate from a high-altitude aircraft (ER-2) and to make water vapor and aerosol profile measurements across the troposphere. The LASE system was flown from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in a series of engineering flights during September 1994. This paper discusses the characteristics of the LASE system and presents the first LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles.

  20. A New Raman Water Vapor Lidar Calibration Technique and Measurements in the Vicinity of Hurricane Bonnie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Keith D.; Demoz, Belay B.; Cadirola, Martin P.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, David N.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Starr, David OC.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Feltz, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    The NAcA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar has made measurements of water vapor and aerosols for almost ten years. Calibration of the water vapor data has typically been performed by comparison with another water vapor sensor such as radiosondes. We present a new method for water vapor calibration that only requires low clouds, and surface pressure and temperature measurements. A sensitivity study was performed and the cloud base algorithm agrees with the radiosonde calibration to within 10- 15%. Knowledge of the true atmospheric lapse rate is required to obtain more accurate cloud base temperatures. Analysis of water vapor and aerosol measurements made in the vicinity of Hurricane Bonnie are discussed.

  1. An interim reference model for the variability of the middle atmosphere water vapor distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Russell, J. M., III; Wu, C.-Y.

    1990-01-01

    A reference model for the middle atmosphere water vapor distribution for some latitudes and seasons was developed using two data sets. One is the seven months of Nimbus LIMS data obtained during November 1978 to May 1979 over the range 64 deg S - 84 deg N latitude and from about 100-mb to 1-mb altitude, and the other is represented by water vapor profiles from 0.2 mb to 0.01 mb in the mid-mesosphere, measured on ground at several fixed mid-latitude sites in the Northern Hemisphere, using microwave-emission techniques. This model provides an interim water vapor profile for the entire vertical range of the middle atmosphere, with accuracies of better than 25 percent. The daily variability of stratospheric water vapor profiles about the monthly mean is demonstrated, and information is provided on the longitudinal variability of LIMS water vapor profiles about the daily, weekly, and monthly zonal means.

  2. Observations of vaporizing water-in-fuel emulsion droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Baer, M.R.; Denison, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    These observations in a Leidenfrost-type experiment allowed one to distinguish between different mechanisms in the emulsion combustion process. Three events were observed: disruptions, heterogeneously nucleated vapor explosions, and homogeneously nucleated vapor explosions. The last event greatly enhances combustion. The cenospheres, carbospheres or oil-coke particles formed will be reduced or eliminated by the vapor explosions, and any small solid fragments are likely to be consumed in the enhanced combustion processes. (DLC)

  3. Measurements of water vapor adsorption on the Geysers rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Horita, Juske; Simonson, John M.; Mesmer, Robert E.

    1996-01-24

    The ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers was measured at 150 °C and at 200 °C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 ≤ p/p0 ≤ 0.98, where p0 is the saturated water vapor pressure. The rocks were crushed and sieved into three fractions of different grain sizes (with different specific surface areas). Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, BET surface area analyses were performed by Porous Materials Inc. on the same rock samples using nitrogen or krypton adsorption measurements at 77 K. Specific surface areas and pore volumes were determined. These parameters are important in estimating water retention capability of a porous material. The same laboratory also determined the densities of the samples by helium pycnometry. Their results were then compared with our own density values obtained by measuring the effect of buoyancy in compressed argon. One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously (Shang et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995) between 90 and 130°C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang et al. (1994a, 1994b, 1995), some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms (with closing points at p/p0 ≈ 0.6) were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated

  4. Adsorption Properties of Triethylene Glycol on a Hydrated {101̅4} Calcite Surface and Its Effect on Adsorbed Water.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Richard; Leirvik, Kim N; Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana

    2015-08-11

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and Born-Oppenheimer MD (BOMD) simulations were employed to investigate adsorption of aqueous triethylene glycol (TEG) on a hydrated {101̅4} calcite surface at 298 K. We analyzed the orientation of TEG adsorbed on calcite, as well as the impact of TEG on the water density and adsorption free energy. The adsorption energies of TEG, free energy profiles for TEG, details of hydrogen bonding between water and adsorbed TEG, and dihedral angle distribution of adsorbed TEG were estimated. We found that while the first layer of water was mostly unaffected by the presence of adsorbed TEG, the density of the second water layer was decreased by 71% at 75% surface coverage of TEG. TEG primarily attached to the calcite surface via two adjacent adsorption sites. Hydrogen bonds between water and adsorbed TEG in the second layer almost exclusively involved the hydroxyl oxygen of TEG. The adsorption energy of TEG on calcite in a vacuum environment calculated by classical MD amounted to 217 kJ/mol, which agreed very well with estimates found by using BOMD. Adsorption on hydrated calcite yielded a drastically lower value of 33 kJ/mol, with the corresponding adsorption free energy of 55.3 kJ/mol, giving an entropy increase of 22.3 kJ/mol due to adsorption. We found that the presence of TEG resulted in a decreased magnitude of the adsorption free energy of water, thus decreasing the calcite wettability. This effect can have a profound effect on oil and gas reservoir properties and must be carefully considered when evaluating the risk of hydrate nucleation. PMID:26161580

  5. Tuning of surface wettability of RGO-based aerogels for various adsorbates in water using different amino acids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; Wang, Yongke; Li, Zhaohui

    2014-09-14

    RGO-based aerogels with varied and controllable surface wettability were fabricated using different amino acids. Hydrophobic cys-RGO aerogels prepared by L-cysteine exhibited an outstanding adsorption toward oils and organic solvents, while hydrophilic lys-RGO aerogels obtained from L-lysine can be used as adsorbents for heavy metal ions in water. PMID:25057754

  6. Polymer composite adsorbents using particles of molecularly imprinted polymers or aluminium oxide nanoparticles for treatment of arsenic contaminated waters.

    PubMed

    Önnby, L; Pakade, V; Mattiasson, B; Kirsebom, H

    2012-09-01

    Removal of As(V) by adsorption from water solutions was studied using three different synthetic adsorbents. The adsorbents, (a) aluminium nanoparticles (Alu-NPs, <50 nm) incorporated in amine rich cryogels (Alu-cryo), (b) molecular imprinted polymers (<38 μm) in polyacrylamide cryogels (MIP-cryo) and (c) thiol functionalised cryogels (SH-cryo) were evaluated regarding material characteristics and arsenic removal in batch test and continuous mode. Results revealed that a composite design with particles incorporated in cryogels was a successful means for applying small particles (nano- and micro- scale) in water solutions with maintained adsorption capacity and kinetics. Low capacity was obtained from SH-cryo and this adsorbent was hence excluded from the study. The adsorption capacities for the composites were 20.3 ± 0.8 mg/g adsorbent (Alu-cryo) and 7.9 ± 0.7 mg/g adsorbent (MIP-cryo) respectively. From SEM images it was seen that particles were homogeneously distributed in Alu-cryo and heterogeneously distributed in MIP-cryo. The particle incorporation increased the mechanical stability and the polymer backbones of pure polyacrylamide (MIP-cryo) were of better stability than the amine containing polymer backbone (Alu-cryo). Both composites worked well in the studied pH range of pH 2-8. Adsorption tested in real wastewater spiked with arsenic showed that co-ions (nitrate, sulphate and phosphate) affected arsenic removal for Alu-cryo more than for MIP-cryo. Both composites still adsorbed well in the presence of counter-ions (copper and zinc) present at low concentrations (μg/l). The unchanged and selective adsorption in realistic water observed for MIP-cryo was concluded to be due to a successful imprinting, here controlled using a non-imprinted polymer (NIP). A development of MIP-cryo is needed, considering its low adsorption capacity. PMID:22687522

  7. The Annual Cycle of Water Vapor on Mars as Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spectra taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have been used to monitor the latitude, longitude, and seasonal dependence of water vapor for over one full Martian year (March 1999-March 2001). A maximum in water vapor abundance is observed at high latitudes during mid-summer in both hemispheres, reaching a maximum value of approximately 100 pr-micrometer in the north and approximately 50 pr-micrometer in the south. Low water vapor abundance (<5 pr-micrometer) is observed at middle and high latitudes in the fall and winter of both hemispheres. There are large differences in the hemispheric (north versus south) and seasonal (perihelion versus aphelion) behavior of water vapor. The latitudinal and seasonal dependence of the decay of the northern summer water vapor maximum implies cross-equatorial transport of water to the southern hemisphere, while there is little or no corresponding transport during the decay of the southern hemisphere summer maximum. The latitude-longitude dependence of annually-averaged water vapor (corrected for topography) has a significant positive correlation with albedo and significant negative correlations with thermal inertia and surface pressure. Comparison of TES results with those retrieved from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detectors (MAWD) experiments shows some similar features, but also many significant differences. The southern hemisphere maximum observed by TES was not observed by MAWD and the large latitudinal gradient in annually-averaged water vapor observed by MAWD does not appear in the TES results.

  8. [Monitoring and Analysis of Stable Isotopes of the Near Surface Water Vapor in Changsha].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu-long; Zhang, Xin-ping; Yao, Tian-ci; Huang, Huang

    2016-02-15

    Based on the monitored atmospheric water vapor stable isotopes and observed meteorological elements at Changsha during the period from November 12, 2014 to April 13, 2015, the variations of water vapor stable isotopes and the relationships between isotope ratios and temperature, absolute humidity, precipitation amount were analyzed in this paper. The results indicated that: (1) Seasonal variations of delta18O and 82H in atmospheric water vapor at Changsha were remarkable, with high values in winter. delta18O and delta2H in atmospheric water vapor were positively correlated with absolute humidity in winter. There were some fluctuations of the delta18O and delta2H in atmospheric water vapor, especially when the precipitation events occurred. Precipitation events had a significant effect on the variations of delta18O and delta2H in atmospheric water vapor, and low values were often accompanied with precipitation events; (2) Diurnal Variations of delta18O and delta2H in atmospheric water vapor had a close correlation with the atmospheric water vapor content, whereas the absolute humidity was mainly controlled by the strength of the local evapotranspiration and atmospheric turbulence. The "precipitation amount effect" was observed during the process of a single precipitation event; (3) Values of delta18O and delta2H in atmospheric water vapor were always lower than those of precipitation in Changsha, but he variation trends were completely consistent, the average difference values were 8.6% per hundred and 66.82% per hundred, respectively; (4) The meteoric vapor line (MVL) in cold months was delta2H =7.18 delta18O + 10.58, the slope and intercept of MVL were always lower than those of MWL, and the slope and intercept of MVL in spring were significantly higher than those of winter. PMID:27363133

  9. An Assessment of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor in the MERRA-2 Reanalysis: Comparisons with MLS and In Situ Water Vapor Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkirk, H. B.; Molod, A.; Pawson, S.; Douglass, A. R.; Voemel, H.; Hurst, D. F.; Jiang, J. H.; Read, W. G.; Schwartz, M. J.; Manyin, M.

    2015-12-01

    The recently released MERRA-2 reanalysis represents a significant evolution of the GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model and data assimilation system since the original MERRA project, and it is expected that MERRA-2 will be widely used in climate change studies as has its predecessor. A number of studies have demonstrated critical sensitivities of the climate system to the water vapor content of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) and it is therefore important to assess how well the MERRA-2 reanalysis represents the mean structure and variability of water vapor in this part of the atmosphere. Recent comparisons with MLS water vapor indicate that the ECMWF and original MERRA reanalyses overestimate water vapor throughout the global upper troposphere by 50-80%. These overestimates are particularly acute at 147 hPa and 215 hPa and occur in all seasons. In this presentation, we analyze differences between the MLS v.4.2 water vapor data and the new MERRA-2 reanalysis to assess improvements in the treatment of water vapor in the GEOS-5 system since MERRA. We also include in our analysis a comparison of MERRA-2 profiles with water vapor and relative humidity profiles from frostpoint hygrometers at five sites with long-term records and a sixth with an intensive campaign of one month. Three of the long-term sites, Boulder, Colorado, Lindenburg, Germany and Lauder, New Zealand, lie in middle latitudes, and two sites, San José, Costa Rica and Hilo, Hawaii, are in the tropics and subtropics, respectively. The campaign-only database is from the NASA SEAC4RS mission at Ellington Field, Houston, TX in 2013.

  10. Millimeter-wave Radiometer for High Sensitivity Water Vapor Profiling in Arid Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Pazmany, Andrew

    2006-11-09

    Abstract - ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for long-term, unattended measurements of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Precipitable water vapor and liquid water path are estimated from zenith brightness temperatures measured from four double-sideband receiver channels, centered at 183.31 1, 3 and 7, and 14 GHz. A prototype ground-based version of the instrument was deployed at the DOE ARM program?s North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow AK in April 2005, where it collected data continuously for one year. A compact, airborne version of this instrument, packaged to operate from a standard 2-D PMS probe canister, has been tested on the ground and is scheduled for test flights in the summer of 2006. This paper presents design details, laboratory test results and examples of retrieved precipitable water vapor and liquid water path from measured brightness temperature data.

  11. Soluble hydrocarbons uptake by porous carbonaceous adsorbents at different water ionic strength and temperature: something to consider in oil spills.

    PubMed

    Flores-Chaparro, Carlos E; Ruiz, Luis Felipe Chazaro; Alfaro-De la Torre, Ma Catalina; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, petrochemical operations involve risks to the environment and one of the biggest is oil spills. Low molecular aromatics like benzene, toluene, and naphthalene dissolve in water, and because of their toxicological characteristics, these produce severe consequences to the environment. The oil spill cleanup strategies are mainly designed to deal with the heavy fractions accumulated on the water surface. Unfortunately, very limited information is available regarding the treatment of dissolved fractions.A commercial (Filtrasorb 400) and modified activated carbons were evaluated to remove benzene, toluene, and naphthalene from water, which are the most soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, at different ionic strengths (I) and temperatures (0-0.76 M and 4-25 °C, respectively). This allowed simulating the conditions of fresh and saline waters when assessing the performance of these adsorbents. It was found that the hydrocarbons adsorption affinity increased 12 % at a I of 0.5 M, due to the less negative charge of the adsorbent, while at a high I (≃0.76 M) in a synthetic seawater, the adsorption capacity decreased 21 % that was attributed to the adsorbent's pores occlusion by water clusters. Approximately, 40 h were needed to reach equilibrium; however, the maximum adsorption rate occurred within the first hour in all the cases. Moreover, the hydrocarbons adsorption and desorption capacities increased when the temperature augmented from 4 to 25 °C. On the other hand, thermally and chemically modified materials showed that the interactions between adsorbent-contaminant increased with the basification degree of the adsorbent surface. PMID:26903130

  12. Single frequency and wavelength stabilized near infrared laser source for water vapor DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Walters, Brooke; Shuman, Tim; Losee, Andrew; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-02-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a single frequency, wavelength stabilized near infrared laser transmitter for NASA airborne water vapor DIAL application. The application required a single-frequency laser transmitter operating at 935 nm near infrared (NIR) region of the water vapor absorption spectrum, capable of being wavelength seeded and locked to a reference laser source and being tuned at least 100 pm across the water absorption spectrum for DIAL on/off measurements. Fibertek is building a laser transmitter system based on the demonstrated results. The laser system will be deployed in a high altitude aircraft (ER-2 or UAV) to autonomously perform remote, long duration and high altitude water vapor measurements.

  13. Tropical stratospheric water vapor measured by the microwave limb sounder (MLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, E.S.; Harwood, R.S.; Mote, P.W.

    1995-03-15

    The lower stratospheric variability of equatorial water vapor, measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), follows an annual cycle modulated by the quasi-biennial oscillation. At levels higher in the stratosphere, water vapor measurements exhibit a semiannual oscillatory signal with the largest amplitudes at 2.2 and 1hPa. Zonal-mean cross sections of MLS water vapour are consistent with previous satellite measurements from the LIMS and SAGE II instruments in that they show water vapor increasing upwards and pole-wards from a well defined minimum in the tropics. The minimum values vary in height between the retreived 46 and 22hPa pressure levels.

  14. Electrode kinetics of a water vapor electrolysis cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, G.

    1974-01-01

    The anodic electrochemical behavior of the water vapor electrolysis cell was investigated. A theoretical review of various aspects of cell overvoltage is presented with special emphasis on concentration overvoltage and activation overvoltage. Other sources of overvoltage are described. The experimental apparatus controlled and measured anode potential and cell current. Potentials between 1.10 and 2.60 V (vs NHE) and currents between 0.1 and 3000 mA were investigated. Different behavior was observed between the standard cell and the free electrolyte cell. The free electrolyte cell followed typical Tafel behavior (i.e. activation overvoltage) with Tafel slopes of about 0.15, and the exchange current densities of 10 to the minus 9th power A/sq cm, both in good agreement with literature values. The standard cell exhibitied this same Tafel behavior at lower current densities but deviated toward lower than expected current densities at higher potentials. This behavior and other results were examined to determine their origin.

  15. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  16. Valorization of solid waste products from olive oil industry as potential adsorbents for water pollution control--a review.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Amit; Kaczala, Fabio; Hogland, William; Marques, Marcia; Paraskeva, Christakis A; Papadakis, Vagelis G; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-01-01

    The global olive oil production for 2010 is estimated to be 2,881,500 metric tons. The European Union countries produce 78.5% of the total olive oil, which stands for an average production of 2,136,000 tons. The worldwide consumption of olive oil increased of 78% between 1990 and 2010. The increase in olive oil production implies a proportional increase in olive mill wastes. As a consequence of such increasing trend, olive mills are facing severe environmental problems due to lack of feasible and/or cost-effective solutions to olive-mill waste management. Therefore, immediate attention is required to find a proper way of management to deal with olive mill waste materials in order to minimize environmental pollution and associated health risks. One of the interesting uses of solid wastes generated from olive mills is to convert them as inexpensive adsorbents for water pollution control. In this review paper, an extensive list of adsorbents (prepared by utilizing different types of olive mill solid waste materials) from vast literature has been compiled, and their adsorption capacities for various aquatic pollutants removal are presented. Different physicochemical methods that have been used to convert olive mill solid wastes into efficient adsorbents have also been discussed. Characterization of olive-based adsorbents and adsorption mechanisms of various aquatic pollutants on these developed olive-based adsorbents have also been discussed in detail. Conclusions have been drawn from the literature reviewed, and suggestions for future research are proposed. PMID:24068561

  17. Measuring sub-nm adsorbed water layer thickness and desorption rate using a fused-silica whispering-gallery microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganta, D.; Dale, E. B.; Rosenberger, A. T.

    2014-05-01

    We report an optical method for measuring the thickness of the water layer adsorbed onto the surface of a high-Q fused-silica microresonator. Light from a tunable diode laser operating near 1550 nm is coupled into the microresonator to excite whispering-gallery modes (WGMs). By observing thermal distortion or even bistability of the WGM resonances caused by absorption in the water layer, the contribution of that absorption to the total loss is determined. Thereby, the thickness of the water layer is found to be ˜0.1 nm (approximately one monolayer). This method is further extended to measure the desorption rate of the adsorbed water, which is roughly exponential with a decay time of ˜40 h when the fused-silica microresonator is held in a vacuum chamber at low pressure.

  18. A comprehensive study of methyl and ethylmercury determination in natural water by adsorbent preconcentration an GC/AFS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Jaffe, R.; Jones, R.

    1996-10-01

    This paper presents a sample preparation method for the determination of MeHg and ethylmercury (EtHg) in water samples by adsorbent preconcentration and capillary gas chromatography/atomic fluorescence detection (GC/AFS). MeHg and EtHg were preconcentrated from water on to a screening column packed with sulfhydryl cotton fiber (SCF) adsorbent. The MeHg and EtHg were elated by a mixture of acidic potassium bromide and copper sulfate solution, and then extracted using dichloromethane. Breakthrough volume of the SCF column used was tested using high organic matter-containing water from the Florida Everglades and seawater from Florida Bay. Good recoveries were achieved for both MeHg (85%) and EtHg (70%), and no breakthrough was found up to 2 L of sample. The detection limit was 0.01 ng/L in a 2 L water sample for both MeHg and EtHg.

  19. Nanoporous composites prepared by a combination of SBA-15 with Mg–Al mixed oxides. Water vapor sorption properties

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Verdejo, Amaury; Pfeiffer, Heriberto; Ruiz-Reyes, Mayra; Santamaría, Juana-Deisy; Fetter, Geolar

    2014-01-01

    Summary This work presents two easy ways for preparing nanostructured mesoporous composites by interconnecting and combining SBA-15 with mixed oxides derived from a calcined Mg–Al hydrotalcite. Two different Mg–Al hydrotalcite addition procedures were implemented, either after or during the SBA-15 synthesis (in situ method). The first procedure, i.e., the post-synthesis method, produces a composite material with Mg–Al mixed oxides homogeneously dispersed on the SBA-15 nanoporous surface. The resulting composites present textural properties similar to the SBA-15. On the other hand, with the second procedure (in situ method), Mg and Al mixed oxides occur on the porous composite, which displays a cauliflower morphology. This is an important microporosity contribution and micro and mesoporous surfaces coexist in almost the same proportion. Furthermore, the nanostructured mesoporous composites present an extraordinary water vapor sorption capacity. Such composites might be utilized as as acid-base catalysts, adsorbents, sensors or storage nanomaterials. PMID:25161858

  20. Catalytic combustion of styrene over copper based catalyst: inhibitory effect of water vapor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongyan; Xu, Mingyao; Li, Zhong; Huang, Sisi; He, Chun

    2009-07-01

    The effects of water vapor on the activity of the copper based catalysts with different supports such as CuO/gamma-Al2O3, CuO/SiO2 and CuO/TiO2 for styrene combustion were investigated. The catalytic activity of the catalysts was tested in the absence of and presence of water vapor and the catalysts were characterized. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments and diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) measurements were conducted in order to estimate and explain the water effects. Results showed that the existence of water vapor had a significant negative effect on the catalytic activity of these copper based catalysts due to the competition adsorption of water molecule. DRIFTS studies showed that the catalyst CuO/gamma-Al2O3 had the strongest adsorption of water, while the catalyst CuO/TiO2 had the weakest adsorption of water. H2O-TPD studies also indicated that the order of desorption activation energies of water vapor on the catalysts or the strength of interactions of water molecules with the surfaces of the catalysts was CuO/gamma-Al2O3>CuO/SiO2>CuO/TiO2. As a consequence of that, the CuO/TiO2 exhibited the better durability to water vapor, while CuO/gamma-Al2O3 had the poorest durability to water vapor among these three catalysts. PMID:19427660

  1. Thermal Water Vapor Emission from Shocked Regions in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwitt, Martin; Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.; Kaufman, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory, we have observed thermal water vapor emission from a roughly circular field of view approximately 75" in diameter centered on the Orion BN-KL region. The Fabry-Perot line strengths, line widths, and spectral line shifts observed in eight transitions between 71 and 125 micron show good agreement with models of thermal emission arising from a molecular cloud subjected to a magnetohydrodynamic C-type shock. Both the breadth and the relative strengths of the observed lines argue for emission from a shock rather than from warm quiescent gas in the Orion core. Although one of the eight transitions appears anomalously strong and may be subject to the effects of radiative pumping, the other seven indicate an H2O/H2 abundance ratio on the order of 5 x 10(exp -4) and a corresponding gas-phase oxygen-to-hydrogen abundance ratio on the order of 4 x 10(exp -4). Given current estimates of the interstellar, gas-phase, oxygen and carbon abundances in the solar vicinity, this value is consistent with theoretical shock models that predict the conversion into water of all the gas-phase oxygen that is not bound as CO. The overall cooling provided by rotational transitions of H2O in this region appears to be comparable to the cooling through rotational lines of CO but is an order of magnitude lower than cooling through H2 emission. However, the model that best fits our observations shows cooling by H2O and CO dominant in that portion of the postshock region where temperatures are below approximately 800 K and neither vibrational nor rotational radiative cooling by H2 is appreciable.

  2. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  3. Diurnal variation of atmospheric water vapor at Gale crater: Analysis from ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, German; McConnochie, Timothy; Renno, Nilton; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Fischer, Erik; Vicente-Retortillo, Alvaro; Borlina, Caue; Kemppinen, Osku; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; de la Torre-Juárez, Manuel; Zorzano, Mari-Paz; Martin-Torres, Javier; Bridges, Nathan; Maurice, Sylvestre; Gasnault, Olivier; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Wiens, Roger

    2016-04-01

    We analyze measurements obtained by Curiosity's Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) and ChemCam (CCAM) instruments to shed light on the hydrological cycle at Gale crater. In particular, we use nighttime REMS measurements taken when the atmospheric volume mixing ratio (VMR) and its uncertainty are the lowest (between 05:00 and 06:00 LTST) [1], and daytime CCAM passive sky measurements taken when the VMR is expected to be the highest (between 10:00 and 14:00 LTST) [2]. VMR is calculated from simultaneous REMS measurements of pressure (P), temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) at 1.6 m (VMR is defined as RH×es(T)/P , where es is the saturation water vapor pressure over ice). The REMS relative humidity sensor has recently been recalibrated (June 2015), providing RH values slightly lower than those in the previous calibration (Dec 2014). The full diurnal cycle of VMR cannot be analyzed using only REMS data because the uncertainty in daytime VMR derived from REMS measurements is extremely high. Daytime VMR is inferred by fitting the output of a multiple-scattering discrete-ordinates radiative transfer model to CCAM passive sky observations [3]. CCAM makes these observations predominately in the vicinity of 11:00 - 12:00 LTST, but occasionally in the early morning near 08:00 LTST. We find that throughout the Martian year, the daytime VMR is higher than at night, with a maximum day-to-night ratio of about 6 during winter. Various processes might explain the differences between nighttime REMS and daytime CCAM VMR values. Potential explanations include: (i) surface nighttime frost formation followed by daytime sublimation [1], (ii) surface nighttime adsorption of water vapor by the regolith followed by daytime desorption and (iii) large scale circulations changing vertical H2O profiles at different times of the year. Potential formation of surface frost can only occur in late fall and winter [1], coinciding with the time when the diurnal amplitude of the near

  4. Enhanced water vapor separation by temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Wonjae; Yun, Jongju; Khan, Fakhre Alam; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-08-01

    Here we present a new strategy of selectively rejecting water vapor while allowing fast transport of dry gases using temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWNTs). The mechanism is based on the water vapor condensation at the entry region of nanotubes followed by removing aggregated water droplets at the tip of the superhydrophobic aligned-MWNTs. The first condensation step could be dramatically enhanced by decreasing the nanotube temperature. The permeate-side relative humidity was as low as ~17% and the helium-water vapor separation factor was as high as 4.62 when a helium-water vapor mixture with a relative humidity of 100% was supplied to the aligned-MWNTs. The flow through the interstitial space of the aligned-MWNTs allowed the permeability of single dry gases an order of magnitude higher than the Knudsen prediction regardless of membrane temperature. The water vapor separation performance of hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene membranes could also be significantly enhanced at low temperatures. This work combines the membrane-based separation technology with temperature control to enhance water vapor separation performance.Here we present a new strategy of selectively rejecting water vapor while allowing fast transport of dry gases using temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWNTs). The mechanism is based on the water vapor condensation at the entry region of nanotubes followed by removing aggregated water droplets at the tip of the superhydrophobic aligned-MWNTs. The first condensation step could be dramatically enhanced by decreasing the nanotube temperature. The permeate-side relative humidity was as low as ~17% and the helium-water vapor separation factor was as high as 4.62 when a helium-water vapor mixture with a relative humidity of 100% was supplied to the aligned-MWNTs. The flow through the interstitial space of the aligned-MWNTs allowed the permeability of single dry gases an order of

  5. A novel membrane device for the removal of water vapor and water droplets from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Mccray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kliss, Mark

    1992-01-01

    One of the key challenges facing NASA engineers is the development of systems for separating liquids and gases in microgravity environments. In this paper, a novel membrane-based phase separator is described. This device, known as a water recovery heat exchanger (WRHEX), overcomes the inherent deficiencies of current phase-separation technology. Specifically, the WRHEX cools and removes water vapor or water droplets from feed-air streams without the use of a vacuum or centrifugal force. As is shown in this paper, only a low-power air blower and a small stream of recirculated cool water is required for WRHEX operation. This paper presents the results of tests using this novel membrane device over a wide range of operating conditions. The data show that the WRHEX produces a dry air stream containing no entrained or liquid water - even when the feed air contains water droplets or mist. An analysis of the operation of the WRHEX is presented.

  6. Seasonal Trends in Stratospheric Water Vapor as Derived from SAGE II Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roell, Marilee M.; Fu, Rong

    2008-01-01

    Published analysis of HALOE and Boulder balloon measurements of water vapor have shown conflicting trends in stratospheric water vapor for the periods of 1981 through 2005. Analysis of the SAGE II monthly mean water vapor data filtered for large aerosol events for time periods from 1985-1991, 1995-1999, and 2000-2005 have shown a globally decreasing water vapor trend at 17.5km. Seasonal analysis for these three time periods show a decreasing trend in water vapor at 17.5km for the winter and spring seasons. The summer and autumn seasonal analysis show a decreasing trend from 1985-2005, however, there is a increasing trend in water vapor at 17.5km for these seasons during 1995-2005. Latitude vs height seasonal analysis show a decreasing trend in the lower stratosphere between 20S - 20N for the autumn season, while at the latitudes of 30-50S and 30-50N there is an increasing trend in water vapor at heights up to 15km for that season. Comparison with regions of monsoon activity (Asian and North American) show that the Asian monsoon region had some effect on the lower stratospheric moistening in 1995-1999, however, for the time period of 2000-2005, there was no change in the global trend analysis due to either monsoon region. This may be due to the limitations of the SAGE II data from 2000-2005.

  7. Water vapor transport in the lower stratosphere during summer linked to Asian monsoon and horizontal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeger, Felix; Mueller, Rolf; Riese, Martin; Konopka, Paul

    We compare global water vapor observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and simulations with the Lagrangian chemistry transport model CLaMS (Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere) to investigate the pathways of water vapor into the lower stratosphere during northern hemisphere (NH) summer. We find good agreement between the simulation and observations, with an effect of the satellite averaging kernel especially at high latitudes. The Asian and American monsoons emerge as regions of particularly high water vapor mixing ratios in the lower stratosphere during boreal summer. In NH mid latitudes and high latitudes, a clear anticorrelation between water vapor and ozone daily tendencies reveals a large region influenced by frequent horizontal transport from low latitudes, extending up to about 450K during summer and fall. Analysis of the zonal mean tracer continuity equation shows that close to the subtropics, this horizontal transport is mainly caused by the residual circulation. In contrast, at higher latitudes, poleward of about 50N, eddy mixing dominates the horizontal water vapor transport. Model simulations with transport barriers confirm that almost the entire annual cycle of water vapor in NH mid latitudes above about 360K, with maximum mixing ratios during summer and fall, is caused by horizontal transport from low latitudes. In the model, highest water vapor mixing ratios in this region are clearly linked to upward transport within the Asian monsoon in the subtropics and subsequent poleward horizontal transport.

  8. Simulation of the effect of water-vapor increase on temperature in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yun; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhou, Renjun; Yi, Mingjian; Deng, Shumei

    2011-07-01

    To analyze the mechanism by which water vapor increase leads to cooling in the stratosphere, the effects of water-vapor increases on temperature in the stratosphere were simulated using the two-dimensional, interactive chemical dynamical radiative model (SOCRATES) of NCAR. The results indicate that increases in stratospheric water vapor lead to stratospheric cooling, with the extent of cooling increasing with height, and that cooling in the middle stratosphere is stronger in Arctic regions. Analysis of the radiation process showed that infrared radiative cooling by water vapor is a pivotal factor in middle-lower stratospheric cooling. However, in the upper stratosphere (above 45 km), infrared radiation is not a factor in cooling; there, cooling is caused by the decreased solar radiative heating rate resulting from ozone decrease due to increased stratospheric water vapor. Dynamical cooling is important in the middle-upper stratosphere, and dynamical feedback to temperature change is more distinct in the Northern Hemisphere middle-high latitudes than in other regions and significantly affects temperature and ozone in winter over Arctic regions. Increasing stratospheric water vapor will strengthen ozone depletion through the chemical process. However, ozone will increase in the middle stratosphere. The change in ozone due to increasing water vapor has an important effect on the stratospheric temperature change.

  9. Space-Time Variations in Water Vapor as Observed by the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elson, Lee S.; Read, William G.; Waters, Joe W.; Mote, Philip W.; Kinnersley, Jonathan S.; Harwood, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor in the upper troposphere has a significant impact on the climate system. Difficulties in making accurate global measurements have led to uncertainty in understanding water vapor's coupling to the hydrologic cycle in the lower troposphere and its role in radiative energy balance. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite is able to retrieve water vapor concentration in the upper troposphere with good sensitivity and nearly global coverage. An analysis of these preliminary retrievals based on 3 years of observations shows the water vapor distribution to be similar to that measured by other techniques and to model results. The primary MLS water vapor measurements were made in the stratosphere, where this species acts as a conserved tracer under certain conditions. As is the case for the upper troposphere, most of the stratospheric discussion focuses on the time evolution of the zonal mean and zonally varying water vapor. Stratospheric results span a 19-month period and tropospheric results a 36-month period, both beginning in October of 1991. Comparisons with stratospheric model calculations show general agreement, with some differences in the amplitude and phase of long-term variations. At certain times and places, the evolution of water vapor distributions in the lower stratosphere suggests the presence of meridional transport.

  10. Cellulose based cationic adsorbent fabricated via radiation grafting process for treatment of dyes waste water.

    PubMed

    Goel, Narender Kumar; Kumar, Virendra; Misra, Nilanjal; Varshney, Lalit

    2015-11-01

    A cationized adsorbent was prepared from cellulosic cotton fabric waste via a single step-green-radiation grafting process using gamma radiation source, wherein poly[2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (PMAETC) was covalently attached to cotton cellulose substrate. Radiation grafted (PMAETC-g-cellulose) adsorbent was investigated for removal of acid dyes from aqueous solutions using two model dyes: Acid Blue 25 (AB25) and Acid Blue 74 (AB74). The equilibrium adsorption data was analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, whereas kinetic data was analyzed by pseudo first order, pseudo second order, intra particle diffusion and Boyd's models. The PMAETC-g-cellulose adsorbent with 25% grafting yield exhibited equilibrium adsorption capacities of ∼ 540.0mg/g and ∼ 340.0mg/g for AB25 and AB74, respectively. Linear and nonlinear fitting of adsorption data suggested that the equilibrium adsorption process followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, whereas, the kinetic adsorption process followed pseudo-second order model. The multi-linearities observed in the intra-particle kinetic plots suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling process in the adsorption of acid dyes on the adsorbent, which was further supported by Boyd's model. The adsorbent could be regenerated by eluting the adsorbed dye from the adsorbent and could be repeatedly used. PMID:26256369

  11. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OLS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OLS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  27 x 23 km Limb ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  H2O Water Volume Mixing Radio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  12. Coordination structure of adsorbed Zn(II) at Water-TiO2 interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    He, G.; Pan, G.; Zhang, M.; Waychunas, G.A.

    2011-01-15

    The local structure of aqueous metal ions on solid surfaces is central to understanding many chemical and biological processes in soil and aquatic environments. Here, the local coordination structure of hydrated Zn(II) at water-TiO{sub 2} interfaces was identified by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A nonintegral coordination number of average {approx}4.5 O atoms around a central Zn atom was obtained by EXAFS analysis. DFT calculations indicated that this coordination structure was consistent with the mixture of 4-coordinated bidentate binuclear (BB) and 5-coordinated bidentate mononuclear (BM) metastable equilibrium adsorption (MEA) states. The BB complex has 4-coordinated Zn, while the monodentate mononuclear (MM) complex has 6-coordinated Zn, and a 5-coordinated adsorbed Zn was found in the BM adsorption mode. DFT calculated energies showed that the lower-coordinated BB and BM modes were thermodynamically more favorable than the higher-coordinated MM MEA state. The experimentally observed XANES fingerprinting provided additional direct spectral evidence of 4- and 5-coordinated Zn-O modes. The overall spectral and computational evidence indicated that Zn(II) can occur in 4-, 5-, and 6-oxygen coordinated sites in different MEA states due to steric hindrance effects, and the coexistence of different MEA states formed the multiple coordination environments.

  13. An Assessment of Stratospheric Water Vapor Using a General Circulation Model. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mote, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor not only participates in the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in cloud formation, it also participates in stratospheric chemistry and, due to the strong dependence of saturation on temperature, serves as a tracer for exposure of air to cold temperatures. The application of general circulation models (GCM`s) to stratospheric chemistry and transport both enables and requires a thorough investigation of stratospheric water vapor. The National Center for Atmospheric Research has redesigned its GCM, the CCM2, to enable studies of stratospheric chemistry and tracer transport, including that of water vapor. Simple methane chemistry provides an adequate representation of the upper stratospheric water vapor source in the CCM2. The CCM2`s water vapor distribution and seasonality compare favorably with observations in many respects, and the CCM2 fills gaps in the obsevations, yielding some new insights. For example, southern polar dehydration can affect midlatitude water mixing ratios by a few tenths of a ppmv. The annual cycle of water vapor in the tropical and subtropical lower stratosphere is dominated by drying at the tropical tropopause. Water vapor has a very long adjustment time, a factor 2-4 longer than for methane, a common long-lived tracer. In the lower stratosphere, however, two model deficiencies have a profound impact on simulated water vapor. The first is a cold temperature bias in the winter polar stratosphere, a deficiency common to GCM`s. The cold bias produces excessive dehydration in the southern hemisphere. This deficiency can be eliminated fairly simply by setting a minimum vapor pressure. The second deficiency, however, is not so easily remedied. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the tropics has a different character from the observed; for example, too little mass flux occurs under low mixing ratio conditions, so that the stratosphere is somewhat too moist.

  14. Temporal changes in endmember abundances, liquid water and water vapor over vegetation at Jasper Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Green, Robert O.; Sabol, Donald E.; Adams, John B.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging spectrometry offers a new way of deriving ecological information about vegetation communities from remote sensing. Applications include derivation of canopy chemistry, measurement of column atmospheric water vapor and liquid water, improved detectability of materials, more accurate estimation of green vegetation cover and discrimination of spectrally distinct green leaf, non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV: litter, wood, bark, etc.) and shade spectra associated with different vegetation communities. Much of our emphasis has been on interpreting Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometry (AVIRIS) data spectral mixtures. Two approaches have been used, simple models, where the data are treated as a mixture of 3 to 4 laboratory/field measured spectra, known as reference endmembers (EM's), applied uniformly to the whole image, to more complex models where both the number of EM's and the types of EM's vary on a per-pixel basis. Where simple models are applied, materials, such as NPV, which are spectrally similar to soils, can be discriminated on the basis of residual spectra. One key aspect is that the data are calibrated to reflectance and modeled as mixtures of reference EM's, permitting temporal comparison of EM fractions, independent of scene location or data type. In previous studies the calibration was performed using a modified-empirical line calibration, assuming a uniform atmosphere across the scene. In this study, a Modtran-based calibration approach was used to map liquid water and atmospheric water vapor and retrieve surface reflectance from three AVIRIS scenes acquired in 1992 over the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. The data were acquired on June 2nd, September 4th and October 6th. Reflectance images were analyzed as spectral mixtures of reference EM's using a simple 4 EM model. Atmospheric water vapor derived from Modtran was compared to elevation, and community type. Liquid water was compare to the abundance of NPV, Shade and Green Vegetation

  15. A new criterion to evaluate water vapor interference in protein secondary structural analysis by FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ye; Ma, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Second derivative and Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD) are two commonly used techniques to resolve the overlapped component peaks from the often featureless amide I band in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) curve-fitting approach for protein secondary structural analysis. Yet, the reliability of these two techniques is greatly affected by the omnipresent water vapor in the atmosphere. Several criteria are currently in use as quality controls to ensure the protein absorption spectrum is negligibly affected by water vapor interference. In this study, through a second derivative study of liquid water, we first argue that the previously established criteria cannot guarantee a reliable evaluation of water vapor interference due to a phenomenon that we refer to as sample's absorbance-dependent water vapor interference. Then, through a comparative study of protein and liquid water, we show that a protein absorption spectrum can still be significantly affected by water vapor interference even though it satisfies the established criteria. At last, we propose to use the comparison between the second derivative spectra of protein and liquid water as a new criterion to better evaluate water vapor interference for more reliable second derivative and FSD treatments on the protein amide I band. PMID:24901531

  16. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chempath, Shaji; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  17. Roles of Oxygen and Water Vapor in the Oxidation of Halogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shiyu; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianette, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-12-18

    The initial stage of the oxidation of Cl and Br terminated Ge(111) surfaces is studied using photoelectron spectroscopy. The authors perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different factors in oxidation, and find that water vapor and oxygen play different roles. Water vapor effectively replaces the halogen termination layers with the hydroxyl group, but does not oxidize the surfaces further. In contrast, little oxidation is observed for Cl and Br terminated surfaces with dry oxygen alone. However, with the help of water vapor, oxygen oxidizes the surface by breaking the Ge-Ge back bonds instead of changing the termination layer.

  18. Latitudinal survey of middle atmospheric water vapor revealed by shipboard microwave spectroscopy. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important greenhouse gases and is an important tracer of atmospheric motions in the middle atmosphere. It also plays an important role in the chemistry of the middle atmosphere and through its photodissociation by solar radiation, it is the major source of hydrogen escaping to space. Ground-based microwave measurements conducted in the 1980s have provided a fair understanding of the seasonal variation of mesospheric water vapor in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes, but the global distribution of water vapor in the middle atmosphere is only beginning to be revealed by space-based measurements.

  19. A simple method to incorporate water vapor absorption in the 15 microns remote temperature sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallu, G.; Prabhakara, C.; Conhath, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    The water vapor absorption in the 15 micron CO2 band, which can affect the remotely sensed temperatures near the surface, are estimated with the help of an empirical method. This method is based on the differential absorption properties of the water vapor in the 11-13 micron window region and does not require a detailed knowledge of the water vapor profile. With this approach Nimbus 4 IRIS radiance measurements are inverted to obtain temperature profiles. These calculated profiles agree with radiosonde data within about 2 C.

  20. Upper tropospheric water vapor: A field campaign of two Raman lidars, Airborne hygrometers, and Radiosondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, S. Harvey; Turner, Dave; Evans, Keith; Whiteman, Dave; Schwemmer, Geary; Ferrare, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Water vapor in the atmosphere plays an important role in radiative transfer and the process of radiative balance so critical for understanding global change. It is the principal ingredient in cloud formation, one of the most difficult atmospheric processes to model, and the most variable component of the Earth-atmosphere albedo. And as a free molecule, it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter, thus, the most important greenhouse gas. The radiative impact of water vapor is important at all levels of the atmosphere. Even though moisture decreases by several orders-of-magnitude from the Earth's surface to the tropopause, recent research has shown that, from a radiative standpoint, a small percentage change in water vapor at any level is nearly equivalent. Therefore accurate and precise measurements of this important atmospheric constituent are needed at all levels to evaluate the full radiative impact. The need for improved measurements in the upper troposphere is particularly important because of the generally hostile (very dry and cold) conditions encountered. Because of the importance of water vapor to the understanding of radiative transfer, the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program initiated a series of measurement campaigns at the Cloud And Radiation Testbed (CART) site in Oklahoma, especially focused on atmospheric water vapor. Three water vapor intensive observation period (water vapor IOP) campaigns were planned. Two of the water vapor IOP campaigns have been completed: the first IOP was held during the fall of 1996 with a focus on boundary layer water vapor measurements, and the second was conducted during the fall of 1997 with a focus on both boundary layer moisture e and moisture in the upper troposphere. This paper presents a review of the intercomparisons of water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere aquired during the second water vapor IOP. Data to be presented include water vapor measurements ements

  1. Relative spectral absorption of solar radiation by water vapor and cloud droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, R.; Ridgway, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A moderate (20/cm) spectral resolution model which accounts for both the highly variable spectral transmission of solar radiation through water vapor within and above cloud, as well as the more slowly varying features of absorption and anisotropic multiple scattering by the cloud droplets, is presented. Results from this model as applied to the case of a typical 1 km thick stratus cloud in a standard atmosphere, with cloud top altitude of 2 km and overhead sun, are discussed, showing the relative importance of water vapor above the cloud, water vapor within the cloud, and cloud droplets on the spectral absorption of solar radiation.

  2. Development of Field-deployable Diode-laser-based Water Vapor Dial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Le Hoai, Phong; Abo, Makoto; Sakai, Tetsu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for lower-tropospheric water vapor observation in Tokyo, Japan. A photoacoustic cell is used for spectroscopy experiment around absorption peaks of 829.022 nm and 829.054 nm. The water vapor density extracted from the observational data agrees with the referenced radiosonde data. Furthermore, we applied modulated pulse technique for DIAL transmitter. It enables DIAL to measure water vapor profile for both low and high altitude regions.

  3. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  4. Water vapor diffusion effects on gas dynamics in a sonoluminescing bubble.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Apfel, Robert E; Khong, Anthony; Hu, Xiwei; Wang, Long

    2003-07-01

    Calculations based on a consideration of gas diffusion of gas dynamics in a sonoluminescing bubble filled with a noble gas and water vapor are carried out. Xenon-, argon-, and helium-filled bubbles are studied. In the absence of shock waves, bubble temperatures are found to be decreased, a decrease attributable to the large heat capacity of water vapor. Peak bubble temperature reductions are seen in bubbles containing Xe or Ar but not in those containing He. Further extrapolations provide evidence for the occurrence of shock waves in bubbles with Xe and water vapor. No shock waves are observed in bubbles with Ar or He. PMID:12935248

  5. Contributions of stratospheric water vapor to decadal changes in the rate of global warming.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Rosenlof, Karen H; Portmann, Robert W; Daniel, John S; Davis, Sean M; Sanford, Todd J; Plattner, Gian-Kasper

    2010-03-01

    Stratospheric water vapor concentrations decreased by about 10% after the year 2000. Here we show that this acted to slow the rate of increase in global surface temperature over 2000-2009 by about 25% compared to that which would have occurred due only to carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. More limited data suggest that stratospheric water vapor probably increased between 1980 and 2000, which would have enhanced the decadal rate of surface warming during the 1990s by about 30% as compared to estimates neglecting this change. These findings show that stratospheric water vapor is an important driver of decadal global surface climate change. PMID:20110466

  6. Inter-Annual Variability of Atmospheric Water Vapor as seen from the TOVS Pathfinder Path a Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Amita; Susskind, Joel

    1999-01-01

    The atmospheric water vapor is a major greenhouse gas and plays a critical role in determining energy and water cycle in the climate system. A new, global, long-term (1985-98) water vapor data set derived from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) Path A system will be introduced in the presentation. An assessment of the accuracy of the TOVS Path A water vapor data will he presented. The focus of this oral presentation will be on the inter-annual variability of the water vapor distribution in the atmosphere. Also, water vapor distribution observed during 1997/98 ENSO event will be shown.

  7. Isotopic Controls of Rainwater and Water Vapor on Mangrove Leaf Water and Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, N.; Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H or δ2H) of sedimentary mangrove lipid biomarkers can be used as a proxy of past salinity and water isotopes. This approach is based on the observation that apparent 2H/1H fractionation between surface water and mangrove lipids increases with surface water salinity in six species of mangroves with different salt management strategies growing at sites spanning a range of relative humidities throughout Australia and Micronesia. In order to more robustly apply mangrove lipid δ2H as a paleoclimate proxy, we investigated the cause of the correlation between apparent 2H fractionation and salinity. We present results from two related experiments that assessed controls on isotopes of mangrove leaf water, the direct source of hydrogen in lipids: (1) Measurements of natural δ2H in precipitation, surface water, and mangrove tissue water from a series of lakes with varying salinity and water isotope composition in Palau, and (2) measurements of mangrove tissue water and treatment water from a controlled simulation in which mangroves were treated with artificial rain of varying isotopic composition. Rainwater 2H/1H fluctuations of 30‰ over a one-month period explain up to 65% of the variance in leaf water δ2H for Bruguiera gymnorhiza mangroves from Palau despite lake water isotope differences among sites of up to 35‰. This indicates that in humid tropical settings, leaf water isotopes are more closely related to those of precipitation and water vapor than to those of lake surface water, explaining the observed change in apparent fractionation in B. gymnorhiza lipids with salinity. The relationship between leaf water and rainwater isotopes may be due to either equilibration of leaf water with water vapor in the nearly saturated air or direct foliar uptake of rain and/or dew. Foliar uptake is an important water source for many plants, but has not been documented in mangroves. We tested the capacity for mangroves to perform this function by

  8. Case Studies of Water Vapor and Surface Liquid Water from AVIRIS Data Measured Over Denver, CO and Death Valley, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, B.-C.; Kierein-Young, K. S.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Westwater, E. R.; Stankov, B. B.; Birkenheuer, D.

    1991-01-01

    High spatial resolution column atmospheric water vapor amounts and equivalent liquid water thicknesses of surface targets are retrieved from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). The retrievals are made using a nonlinear least squares curve fitting technique. Two case studies from AVIRIS data acquired over Denver-Platteville area, Colorado and over Death Valley, California are presented. The column water vapor values derived from AVIRIS data over the Denver-Platteville area are compared with those obtained from radiosondes, ground level upward-looking microwave radiometers, and geostationary satellite measurements. The column water vapor image shows spatial variation patterns related to the passage of a weather front system. The column water vapor amounts derived from AVIRIS data over Death Valley decrease with increasing surface elevation. The derived liquid water image clearly shows surface drainage patterns.

  9. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M.; Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C.

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  10. The verification of millennial-scale monsoon water vapor transport channel in northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Chengqi; Wang, Yue

    2016-05-01

    Long-term changes of the Asian summer monsoon water vapor transport play a pivotal role in the variability of monsoon precipitation. Paleo-climate simulations have shown that there is an important monsoon vapor transport channel in western China. Previous studies mostly focused on the correlation between monsoon precipitation and intensity. Little research has been done on the verification of the water vapor channel. Compared with speleothem and lacustrine systems, the hydrological cycle of land surface sediments is more directly related to the monsoon water vapor. In this study, we used carbonate δ18O and organic matter δ13C of the surface eolian sediments from the piedmont of the northern Qilian Mountains to verify the monsoon water vapor on the Holocene millennial-scale. Two surface sedimentary sections were selected to study paleo-monsoon water vapor transport. Proxy data, including carbonate δ18O and organic matter δ13C of surface eolian sediments, as well as total organic matter and carbonate content were obtained from the two eolian sections. We also synthesized transient simulations of the CCSM3 and the Kiel climate models. The PMIP 3.0 project and TRACE isotopic simulations were also compared with the reconstructed monsoon water vapor transport. Our findings indicate that the strength of the Holocene Asian summer monsoon is consistent with the water vapor transport in western China that has significant impacts to long-term monsoon precipitation in northern China. This study verifies a significant millennial-scale correlation between the monsoon strength and monsoon water vapor transport intensity along the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

  11. On the vertical distribution of water vapor in the Martian tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    Although measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric water vapor on Mars have been made, measurements of its vertical distribution have not. How water is distributed in the vertical is fundamental to atmosphere-surface exchange processes, and especially to transport within the atmosphere. Several lines of evidence suggest that in the lowest several scale heights of the atmosphere, water vapor is nearly uniformly distributed. However, most of these arguments are suggestive rather than conclusive since they only demonstrate that the altitude to saturation is very high if the observed amount of water vapor is distributed uniformly. A simple argument is presented, independent of the saturation constraint, which suggests that in tropical regions, water vapor on Mars should be very nearly uniformly mixed on an annual and zonally averaged basis.

  12. Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.; Goldsmith, JE M.

    1999-08-01

    Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's first water vapor intensive observation period (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This instrument, which makes high-resolution measurements of water vapor both spatially and temporally, is capable of making these measurements with no operator interaction (other than initial startup) for days at a time. Water vapor measurements collected during the 1996 and 1997 WVIOPs are discussed here, illustrating both the nighttime and daytime capabilities of this system. System characteristics, calibration issues, and techniques are presented. Finally, detailed intercomparisons of the lidar's data with those from a microwave radiometer, radiosondes, an instrumented tower, a chilled mirror flown on both a tethersonde and a kite, and measurements from aircraft are shown and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and stability of this system for both nighttime and daytime measurements.

  13. Non-targeted evaluation of selectivity of water-compatible class selective adsorbents for the analysis of steroids in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kopperi, Matias; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2016-05-12

    Selective adsorbents for solid-phase extraction are needed to meet the low concentration requirements of new environmental quality standard directives, especially for the analysis of estrogens in wastewater. In this work, bulk polymerization procedures were first optimized for the synthesis of non-imprinted polymers (NIP) with low non-specific adsorption of nonpolar compounds in aqueous environments. Water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) were then synthetized by increasing the selectivity of the polymer towards steroids with a testosterone template (average imprinting factor > 10). In addition, the affinity of synthetized entrapped β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers (ECD) towards steroids was clarified. The polymers were applied to the extraction of spiked wastewater effluent samples and their performance compared to commercially available adsorbents. The selectivity of the studied adsorbents was evaluated utilizing liquid chromatography ‒ mass spectrometry as well as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography ‒ time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Affinity between adsorbents and steroids as well as matrix removal potential were measured with targeted methodologies, and two novel non-targeted methodologies were proposed to quantitatively measure adsorbent selectivity by utilizing chemometrics. Semi-quantitative selectivity was measured from the ratio of peak areas between steroidal and other compounds. Semi-qualitative selectivity was calculated from the ratio between the number of tentatively identified steroidal and other compounds. The synthetized polymers provided good matrix removal potential (ion suppression 15-30%) and semi-qualitative selectivity (∼4 units) compared to the commercial adsorbents (ion suppression 45-80%, selectivity < 3 units). Simple non-targeted approaches provided a novel method of quantifying the selectivity of extraction. PMID:27114222

  14. Application of ultradisperse magnetic adsorbents for removal of small concentrations of pollutants from large volumes of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.; Kuznetsov, Anatoli; Kuznetsov, Oleg

    2016-07-01

    Pollution of natural bodies of water (rivers, lakes, ground water, etc) is unfortunately very common, both from natural sources like volcanic activity; and, even more importantly, from human activity, including disposal of industrial and municipal waste, mining, etc. Many toxic substances are harmful for humans and other organisms even in very low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 µg/L of cadmium is harmful, for Hg it is 0.5 µg/L, for phenol - 1 µg/L), and can remain in water for decades or longer. Cleaning large volumes of water even from low concentrations of pollutants is a challenging technological task and is very expensive. We propose to use suspension of ultradisperse magnetic adsorbents, for example, nanostructured ferro-carbon particles, produced by plasmachemical technique, for removing small concentrations of pollutants from large volumes of water. The suspension is introduced into the water. Due to their small sizes and densities similar to water (we measured the density of FC-4 ferro-carbon to be about 1 g/cm3; presumably due to porosity) the particles do not sediment for a long time (hours, days or longer), move due to Brownian motion and adsorb a variety of substances from the water. The particle surface can be modified to provide selectivity of the adsorption. Sorption capacities of ferro-carbon adsorbents is in dozens of percent. Therefore, to collect 1 kg of a pollutant, 2 to 20 kg of the adsorbents is required. Then the particles with the adsorbed contaminant can be collected (e.g., downstream of the river) using a variety of magnetic traps. The traps can consist of ferromagnetic wires and permanent magnets, a variety of simple and inexpensive designs are available. As a model system, the kinetics of adsorption of a highly diluted (0.002 mg/ml) aqueous solution of a low molecular weight compound (toluidine blue) by a small concentration of a ferro-carbon powder (FC-4) was studied by spectrophotometry. Before each measurement, the particles

  15. DIURNAL CYCLE OF PRECIPITABLE WATER VAPOR OVER SPAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Galisteo, J. P.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Torres, B.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Bennouna, Yasmine; de Frutos, A. M.

    2011-05-20

    Despite the importance of the diurnal cycle of precipitable water vapor (PWV), its knowledge is very limited due to the lack of data with sufficient temporal resolution. Currently, from GPS receivers, PWV can be obtained with high temporal resolution in all weather conditions for all hours of the day. In this study we have calculated the diurnal cycle of PWV for ten GPS stations over Spain. The minimum value is reached approximately at the same time at all the stations, ~0400-0500 UTC, whereas the maximum is reached in the second half of the day, but with a larger dispersion of its occurrence between stations. The amplitude of the cycle ranges between 0.72 mm and 1.78 mm. The highest values are recorded at the stations on the Mediterranean coast, with a doubling of the values of the stations on the Atlantic coast or inland. The amplitude of the PWV cycle, relative to the annual mean value, ranges between 8.8 % on the Mediterranean coast and 3.6 % on the Atlantic coast. Two distinctly different seasonal diurnal cycles have been identified, one in winter and other in summer, with spring and autumn being only transition states. The winter cycle is quite similar at all locations, whereas in summer, local effects are felt strongly, making the diurnal cycle quite different between stations. The amplitude of the summer cycle is 1.69 mm, it is almost double the winter one (0.93 mm). Analogous to the annual cycles, the seasonal cycles of the different stations are more similar during the night and early morning hours than during the afternoon. The observed features of the PWV diurnal cycle are explained in a qualitative way on the basis of the air temperature, the transport of moisture by local winds, and the turbulent vertical mixing.

  16. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  17. Water Vapor in nearby Infrared Galaxies as Probed by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chentao; Gao, Yu; Omont, A.; Liu, Daizhong; Isaak, K. G.; Downes, D.; van der Werf, P. P.; Lu, Nanyao

    2013-07-01

    We report the first systematic study of the submillimeter water vapor rotational emission lines in infrared (IR) galaxies based on the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) data of Herschel SPIRE. Among the 176 galaxies with publicly available FTS data, 45 have at least one H2O emission line detected. The H2O line luminosities range from ~1 × 105 L ⊙ to ~5 × 107 L ⊙ while the total IR luminosities (L IR) have a similar spread (~1-300 × 1010 L ⊙). In addition, emission lines of H2O+ and H_2^{18}O are also detected. H2O is found, for most galaxies, to be the strongest molecular emitter after CO in FTS spectra. The luminosity of the five most important H2O lines is near-linearly correlated with L IR, regardless of whether or not strong active galactic nucleus signature is present. However, the luminosity of H2O(211-202) and H2O(220-211) appears to increase slightly faster than linear with L IR. Although the slope turns out to be slightly steeper when z ~ 2-4 ULIRGs are included, the correlation is still closely linear. We find that L_{H_2O}/L IR decreases with increasing f 25/f 60, but see no dependence on f 60/f 100, possibly indicating that very warm dust contributes little to the excitation of the submillimeter H2O lines. The average spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of the entire sample is consistent with individual SLEDs and the IR pumping plus collisional excitation model, showing that the strongest lines are H2O(202-111) and H2O(321-312). Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  18. Interannual variation of water isotopologues at Vostok indicates a contribution from stratospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Renato; Landais, Amaelle; Risi, Camille; Baroni, Melanie; Ekaykin, Alexey; Jouzel, Jean; Petit, Jean Robert; Prie, Frederic; Minster, Benedicte; Falourd, Sonia

    2013-10-01

    Combined measurements of water isotopologues of a snow pit at Vostok over the past 60 y reveal a unique signature that cannot be explained only by climatic features as usually done. Comparisons of the data using a general circulation model and a simpler isotopic distillation model reveal a stratospheric signature in the 17O-excess record at Vostok. Our data and theoretical considerations indicate that mass-independent fractionation imprints the isotopic signature of stratospheric water vapor, which may allow for a distinction between stratospheric and tropospheric influences at remote East Antarctic sites.

  19. Interannual variation of water isotopologues at Vostok indicates a contribution from stratospheric water vapor

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Renato; Landais, Amaelle; Risi, Camille; Baroni, Melanie; Ekaykin, Alexey; Jouzel, Jean; Petit, Jean Robert; Prie, Frederic; Minster, Benedicte; Falourd, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Combined measurements of water isotopologues of a snow pit at Vostok over the past 60 y reveal a unique signature that cannot be explained only by climatic features as usually done. Comparisons of the data using a general circulation model and a simpler isotopic distillation model reveal a stratospheric signature in the 17O-excess record at Vostok. Our data and theoretical considerations indicate that mass-independent fractionation imprints the isotopic signature of stratospheric water vapor, which may allow for a distinction between stratospheric and tropospheric influences at remote East Antarctic sites. PMID:23798406

  20. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.