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Sample records for adsorbent dosage initial

  1. Product development studies on surface-adsorbed nanoemulsion of olmesartan medoxomil as a capsular dosage form.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sumita; Pathak, Kamla; Bali, Vikas

    2012-12-01

    The present study aimed at development of capsular dosage form of surface-adsorbed nanoemulsion (NE) of olmesartan medoxomil (OLM) so as to overcome the limitations associated with handling of liquid NEs without affecting their pharmaceutical efficacy. Selection of oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant for construction of pseudoternary phase diagrams was made on the basis of solubility of drug in these excipients. Rationally selected NE formulations were evaluated for percentage transmittance, viscosity, refractive index, globule size, zeta potential, and polydispersity index (PDI). Formulation (F3) comprising of Capmul MCM® (10% v/v), Tween 80® (11.25% v/v), polyethylene glycol 400 (3.75% v/v), and double-distilled water (75% v/v) displayed highest percentage cumulative drug release (%CDR; 96.69 ± 1.841), least globule size (17.51 ± 5.87 nm), low PDI (0.203 ± 0.032), high zeta potential (-58.93 ± 0.98 mV), and hence was selected as the optimized formulation. F3 was adsorbed over colloidal silicon dioxide (2 ml/400 mg) to produce free-flowing solid surface-adsorbed NE that presented a ready-to-fill capsule composition. Conversion of NE to surface-adsorbed NE and its reconstitution to NE did not affect the in vitro release profile of OLM as the similarity factor with respect to NE was found to be 66% and 73% respectively. The %CDR after 12 h for optimized NE, surface-adsorbed NE, and reconstituted NE was found to be 96.69 ± 0.54, 96.07 ± 1.76, and 94.78 ± 1.57, respectively (p > 0.05). The present study established capsulated surface-adsorbed NE as a viable delivery system with the potential to overcome the handling limitations of NE.

  2. [Clinical usefulness of the new Japanese glomerular filtration rate equation for initial and individualized dosage adjustment concentrations of vancomycin].

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoki; Ueshima, Satoshi; Sato, Tomoaki; Kobiki, Eriko; Kawasaki, Yoichi; Matsunaga, Hisashi; Nakura, Hironori; Sendo, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    To clarify whether the new Japanese glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) equation was able to accurately determine the initial and individualized dosage adjustment concentrations of vancomycin (VCM), the predictive performance for VCM concentrations using the eGFR and Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equations was compared. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical records of 90 patients with MRSA infection whose trough and peak VCM concentrations had been determined. The predicted VCM initial and individualized dosage adjustment concentrations were performed with the 2-compartment linear model using pharmacokinetic parameter means and their individual values via Bayesian estimation, respectively. The prediction error (PE) and its absolute value (APE) between the observed and predicted VCM concentrations were calculated as indices of bias and accuracy in predictive performance, respectively. In the initial dosage adjustment of VCM, the PE value, calculated with the eGFR equation in trough and peak VCM concentrations of patients whose BMI were 18.5 kg/m(2) and higher, was significantly smaller than that calculated with the CG equation. In particular, both PE and APE values obtained from the eGFR calculated concentrations from nonelderly patients (younger than 65 years old) were significantly improved compared with those from the CG equation. In the individualized dosage adjustment of VCM, the eGFR equation gave a significantly smaller PE value in nonelderly patients' trough concentrations than the CG equation. These findings provide useful information for adjusting the VCM dosage to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy in patients with MRSA infection.

  3. Performance evaluation of low cost adsorbents in reduction of COD in sugar industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Parande, Anand K; Sivashanmugam, A; Beulah, H; Palaniswamy, N

    2009-09-15

    Studies on reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in effluent from sugar industry have been carried out by employing different absorbents optimizing various parameters, such as initial concentration of adsorbate, pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time. Experimental studies were carried out in batches using metakaolin, tamarind nut carbon and dates nut carbon as adsorbents by keeping initial adsorbent dosage at 1 g l(-1), agitation time over a range of 30-240 min, adsorbent dosage at 100-800 mg l(-1) by varying the pH range from 4 to 10. Characterization of there adsorbents were done using techniques such as Fourier transforms infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The experimental adsorption data fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The isotherms of the adsorbents indicate appreciable adsorption capacity. Higher COD removal was observed at neutral pH conditions. Studies reveal that maximum reduction efficiency of COD takes place using metakaolin as an absorbent at a dosage of 500 mg l(-1) in a contact time of 180 min at pH 7 and it could be used as an efficient absorbent for treating sugar industrial effluent.

  4. Dosage Effects of Diabetes Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans: The Starr County Border Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sharon A.; Blozis, Shelley A.; Kouzekanani, Kamiar; Garcia, Alexandra A.; Winchell, Maria; Hanis, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To compare 2 diabetes self-management interventions designed for Mexican Americans: “extended” (24 hours of education, 28 hours of support groups) and “compressed” (16 hours of education, 6 hours of support groups). Both interventions were culturally competent regarding language, diet, social emphasis, family participation, and incorporating cultural beliefs. Research Design and Methods We recruited 216 persons between 35 and 70 years of age, diagnosed with type 2 diabetes ≥1 year. Intervention groups of 8 participants and 8 support persons were randomly assigned to the “compressed” or “extended” conditions. The interventions differed in total number of contact hours over the yearlong intervention period, with the major difference being the number of support group sessions held. The same information provided in the educational sessions of the “extended” intervention was “compressed” into fewer sessions, thus providing more information during each group meeting. Results The interventions were not statistically different in reducing HbA1c; however, both were effective. A “dosage effect” of attendance was detected with the largest HbA1c reductions achieved by those who attended more of the “extended” intervention. For individuals who attended ≥50% of the intervention, baseline-to-12-month HbA1c change was −0.6%-age points for the “compressed” and −1.7%-age points for the “extended.” Conclusions Both culturally competent diabetes self-management education interventions were effective in promoting improved metabolic control and diabetes knowledge. A “dosage effect” was evident; attending more sessions resulted in greater improvements in metabolic control. PMID:15735182

  5. Microwave assisted thermal treatment of defective coffee beans press cake for the production of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S; Nunes, Anne A; Alves, Cibele C O

    2010-02-01

    Defective coffee press cake, a residue from coffee oil biodiesel production, was evaluated as an adsorbent for removal of basic dyes (methylene blue--MB) from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was prepared by microwave treatment, providing a significant reduction in processing time coupled to an increase in adsorption capacity in comparison to conventional carbonization in a muffle furnace. Batch adsorption tests were performed at 25 degrees C and the effects of particle size, contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial solution pH were investigated. Adsorption kinetics was better described by a second-order model. The experimental adsorption equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin adsorption models, with Langmuir providing the best fit. The results presented in this study show that microwave activation presents great potential as an alternative method in the production of adsorbents. PMID:19767204

  6. Investigation on removal of malachite green using EM based compost as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Bhagavathi Pushpa, T; Vijayaraghavan, J; Sardhar Basha, S J; Sekaran, V; Vijayaraghavan, K; Jegan, J

    2015-08-01

    The discarded materials from different sources can be utilized as effective materials in wastewater remediation. This proposed study was aimed mainly to investigate the possibility of Effective Microorganisms based compost (EMKC), which is derived from the kitchen solid waste, as a non-conventional low cost adsorbent for the removal of malachite green from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the optimum operating parameters like pH (2-9), initial dye concentration (50-1000mg/L), adsorbent particle size (0.6-2.36mm) and adsorbent dosage (2-12g/L). EMKC recorded maximum uptake of 136.6mg/g of MG at pH 8, initial dye concentration 1000mg/L, adsorbent particle size 1.18mm and adsorbent dosage 4g/L. Two and three parameter adsorption models were employed to describe experimental biosorption isotherm data. The results revealed that the Sips model resulted in better fit than other models. The pseudo-first and -second order models were applied to describe kinetic data, of which the pseudo-second order described experimental data better with high correlation coefficient. This investigation suggested that EMKC could be an effective and low cost material for the removal of malachite green dye from aqueous solution. PMID:25938698

  7. Investigation on removal of malachite green using EM based compost as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Bhagavathi Pushpa, T; Vijayaraghavan, J; Sardhar Basha, S J; Sekaran, V; Vijayaraghavan, K; Jegan, J

    2015-08-01

    The discarded materials from different sources can be utilized as effective materials in wastewater remediation. This proposed study was aimed mainly to investigate the possibility of Effective Microorganisms based compost (EMKC), which is derived from the kitchen solid waste, as a non-conventional low cost adsorbent for the removal of malachite green from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the optimum operating parameters like pH (2-9), initial dye concentration (50-1000mg/L), adsorbent particle size (0.6-2.36mm) and adsorbent dosage (2-12g/L). EMKC recorded maximum uptake of 136.6mg/g of MG at pH 8, initial dye concentration 1000mg/L, adsorbent particle size 1.18mm and adsorbent dosage 4g/L. Two and three parameter adsorption models were employed to describe experimental biosorption isotherm data. The results revealed that the Sips model resulted in better fit than other models. The pseudo-first and -second order models were applied to describe kinetic data, of which the pseudo-second order described experimental data better with high correlation coefficient. This investigation suggested that EMKC could be an effective and low cost material for the removal of malachite green dye from aqueous solution.

  8. Preparation and adsorption property of xylan/poly(acrylic acid) magnetic nanocomposite hydrogel adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Baichen; Jing, Zhanxin; Wang, Haihong

    2015-03-15

    Adsorbents based on natural polysaccharides have attracted increasing interest because of their low-cost and biodegradability, particularly, polysaccharide-based nanocomposite adsorbents. In this study the xylan/poly(acrylic acid) magnetic nanocomposite hydrogel adsorbent was prepared from wheat straw xylan and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and its adsorption property was studied on methylene blue removal. The prepared hydrogel adsorbent had a semi-interpenetrating network structure and exhibited a macro-porous structure with interconnected porous channels. Super-paramagnetic characteristic behavior was observed from magnetic analysis using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The optimum condition for methylene blue adsorption on the adsorbent was found at pH 8 with an adsorbent dosage of 3g/L and an initial concentration of 400mg/L, and the removal percentage reached above 90%. The adsorption isotherm of methylene blue on the prepared hydrogel adsorbent was fitted to the Langmuir model, and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model could describe the adsorption process. All obtained results indicated that the prepared hydrogel adsorbent is promising for water treatment applications. PMID:25542101

  9. Natural Iraqi palygorskite clay as low cost adsorbent for the treatment of dye containing industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nassir Taha, Dakhil; Sadi Samaka, Isra'a

    2012-01-01

    In this study, natural Iraqi low- cost locally available clay (palygorskite) was studied for its potential use as an adsorbent for removal Congo red from aqueous solutions. Batch type experiments were conducted to study the effect of contact time, initial pH of the dye solution, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, and particle size of adsorbent on adsorption capacity of Congo red. The adsorption occurred very fast initially and attains equilibrium within 60 min. When the effect of pH of solution dye on the yield adsorption has been carried in a range of 2-10, the adsorption obtained was nearly the same with very slightly effect of pH and it was reported that above 49.07 mg/g of Cong red by palygorskite clay occurred in the pH range 2 to 10. It was observed that the removal of Congo red increase with increasing initial dye concentration and adsorbent dose, but, adsorption capacity decrease with increasing adsorbent dose. The adsorption capacity increase with decreasing particle size of adsorbent. The equilibrium adsorption data were interpreted using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The obtained results revealed that the equilibrium data closely followed both models, but the Langmuir isotherm fitted the data better. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 99 mg/g at ambient temperature. Results indicate that Iraqi palygorskite clay could be employed as a low cost alternative to commercial activated carbon in wastewater treatment for the removal of colour and dyes. PMID:23196874

  10. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  11. Removal of methylene blue from wastewater using fly ash as an adsorbent by hydrocyclone.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, K; Sahu, J N; Meikap, B C; Biswas, M N

    2008-10-30

    The excessive release of color into the environment is a major concern worldwide. Adsorption process is among the most effective techniques for color removal from wastewater and fly ash has been widely used as an adsorbent. Therefore, this study was carried out to understand the adsorption behavior of methylene blue from aqueous systems onto fly ash using the continuous mode. Continuous mode sorption experiments were carried out to remove methylene blue from its aqueous solutions in hydrocyclone equipment. The experiments were performed at constant temperature and dimensions of hydrocyclone with variation of flows through the equipment, concentrations of methylene blue solutions and fly ash concentration, respectively. A maximum removal of 58.24% was observed at adsorbent dosage of 900 mg/l at pH 6.75 for an initial methylene blue concentration of 65 mg/l.

  12. Removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution using red loess as an adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shengtao; Zhao, Meiqing; Ma, Zichuan

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of heavy metals onto novel low-cost adsorbent, red loess, were investigated. Red loess was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectra. The results indicated that red loess mainly consisted of silicate, ferric and aluminum oxides. Solution pH, adsorbent dosage, initial metal concentration, contact time and temperature significantly influenced the efficiency of heavy metals removal. The adsorption reached equilibrium at 4 hr, and the experimental equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir monolayer adsorption model. The adsorption of Cu(II) and Zn(II) onto red loess was endothermic, while the adsorption of Pb(II) was exothermic. The maximum adsorption capacities of red loess for Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) were estimated to be 113.6, 34.2 and 17.5 mg/g, respectively at 25 degrees C and pH 6. The maximum removal efficiencies were 100% for Pb(II) at pH 7, 100% for Cu(II) at pH 8, and 80% for Zn(II) at pH 8. The used adsorbents were readily regenerated using dilute HCl solution, indicating that red loess has a high reusability. All the above results demonstrated that red loess could be used as a possible alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution.

  13. Controlled release liquid dosage formulation

    DOEpatents

    Benton, Ben F.; Gardner, David L.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid dual coated dosage formulation sustained release pharmaceutic having substantial shelf life prior to ingestion is disclosed. A dual coating is applied over controlled release cores to form dosage forms and the coatings comprise fats melting at less than approximately 101.degree. F. overcoated with cellulose acetate phthalate or zein. The dual coated dosage forms are dispersed in a sugar based acidic liquid carrier such as high fructose corn syrup and display a shelf life of up to approximately at least 45 days while still retaining their release profiles following ingestion. Cellulose acetate phthalate coated dosage form cores can in addition be dispersed in aqueous liquids of pH <5.

  14. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  15. Effective removal of Congo red dye from aqueous solution using modified xanthan gum/silica hybrid nanocomposite as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Soumitra; Sarkar, Amit Kumar; Panda, A B; Pal, Sagar

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to study the feasibility of XG-g-PAM/SiO2 nanocomposite towards its potential application as high performance adsorbent for removal of Congo red (CR) dye from aqueous solution. The surface area, average pore size and total pore volume of the developed nanocomposite has been determined. The efficiency of CR dye adsorption depends on various factors like pH, temperature of the solution, equilibrium time of adsorption, agitation speed, initial concentration of dye and adsorbent dosage. It has been observed that the nanocomposite is having excellent CR dye adsorption capacity (Q0=209.205 mg g(-1)), which is considerably high. The dye adsorption process is controlled by pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models. The adsorption equilibrium data correlates well with Langmuir isotherm. Desorption study indicates the efficient regeneration ability of the dye loaded nanocomposite.

  16. Effective removal of Congo red dye from aqueous solution using modified xanthan gum/silica hybrid nanocomposite as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Soumitra; Sarkar, Amit Kumar; Panda, A B; Pal, Sagar

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to study the feasibility of XG-g-PAM/SiO2 nanocomposite towards its potential application as high performance adsorbent for removal of Congo red (CR) dye from aqueous solution. The surface area, average pore size and total pore volume of the developed nanocomposite has been determined. The efficiency of CR dye adsorption depends on various factors like pH, temperature of the solution, equilibrium time of adsorption, agitation speed, initial concentration of dye and adsorbent dosage. It has been observed that the nanocomposite is having excellent CR dye adsorption capacity (Q0=209.205 mg g(-1)), which is considerably high. The dye adsorption process is controlled by pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models. The adsorption equilibrium data correlates well with Langmuir isotherm. Desorption study indicates the efficient regeneration ability of the dye loaded nanocomposite. PMID:23896441

  17. Using poly([1-vinyl-3-hexylimidazolium] [bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide]) to adsorb bio-ethanol from a Chamaecyparis obtuse leaves fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Baokun; Bi, Wentao; Row, Kyung Ho

    2013-06-01

    Poly([1-vinyl-3-hexylimidazolium] [bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide]) (poly([VHIM][Tf2N])) was assessed for its ability to adsorb bio-ethanol from Chamaecyparis obtuse leaves fermentation broths. Poly([VHIM][Tf2N]) was prepared by poly([VHIM][Br]) ion exchange with Li(Tf2N). Poly([VHIM][Br]) was obtained using a thermal-initiated polymerization method. The factors affecting the adsorption capacity of poly([VHIM][Tf2N]), such as the initial concentration of bio-ethanol in the fermentation broth, adsorption temperature and dosage of the adsorbent, as well as the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium of poly([VHIM][Tf2N]) were investigated. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms used to describe the adsorption of bio-ethanol on the adsorbent showed good correlation coefficients of 0.97, 0.96 and 0.98, respectively. A comparison of the separation factors for ethanol/water, ethanol/glucose and ethanol/xylose revealed poly([VHIM][Tf2N]) to have preferential selectivity for bio-ethanol. Compared to activated carbon, poly([VHIM][Tf2N]) exhibited higher adsorption capacity for bio-ethanol under the same adsorption conditions. The adsorbent could be used for 5 cycles with good efficiency, highlighting its reusability as an adsorbent.

  18. A novel agricultural waste adsorbent for the removal of lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M N Mohamad; Ngah, W S Wan; Norliyana, M S; Daud, W R Wan; Rafatullah, M; Sulaiman, O; Hashim, R

    2010-10-15

    The present study explores the ability of modified soda lignin (MSL) extracted from oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) in removing lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions. The effect of contact time, point zero charge (pH(pzc)) and pH of the solution, initial metal ion concentration and adsorbent dosage on the removal process were investigated. Furthermore, the MSL is characterized by SEM, XRF, FT-IR and surface area analysis. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models of adsorption. The kinetic data obtained at different initial concentrations were analyzed using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. The results provide strong evidence to support the hypothesis of adsorption mechanism.

  19. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  20. Magnetic Fe3O4@C nanoparticles as adsorbents for removal of amoxicillin from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kakavandi, Babak; Esrafili, Ali; Mohseni-Bandpi, Anoushiravan; Jonidi Jafari, Ahmad; Rezaei Kalantary, Roshanak

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, powder activated carbon (PAC) combined with Fe(3)O(4) magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were used for the preparation of magnetic composites (MNPs-PAC), which was used as an adsorbent for amoxicillin (AMX) removal. The properties of magnetic activated carbon were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Brunaeur, Emmett and Teller and vibrating sample magnetometer. The operational factors affecting adsorption such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial AMX concentration and temperature were studied in detail. The high surface area and saturation magnetization for the synthesized adsorbent were found to be 671.2 m(2)/g and 6.94 emu/g, respectively. The equilibrium time of the adsorption process was 90 min. Studies of adsorption equilibrium and kinetic models revealed that the adsorption of AMX onto MNPs-PAC followed Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The calculated values of the thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° demonstrated that the AMX adsorption was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. It could be concluded that MNPs-PAC have a great potential for antibiotic removal from aquatic media.

  1. Adsorption of Th4+, U6+, Cd2+, and Ni2+ from aqueous solution by a novel modified polyacrylonitrile composite nanofiber adsorbent prepared by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastbaz, Abolfazl.; Keshtkar, Ali Reza.

    2014-02-01

    In this study, SiO2 nanoparticles were modified by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and then applied to prepare a novel polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite nanofiber adsorbent by the electrospinning method. In addition, the adsorbent was characterized by SEM, BET, and FTIR analyses. Then the effects of pH, SiO2 and APTES content, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature were investigated. Moreover, adsorption experiments were carried out with initial concentrations in the range of 30-500 mg L-1 and the adsorbent affinity for metal ions was in order of Th4+ > U6+ > Cd2+ > Ni2+. Furthermore, it was observed that the optimum pH for adsorption was different for each metal. Some isotherm and kinetic models were applied to analyze the experimental data, among which the Langmuir and pseudo-second order models were better than the others. The regeneration study showed that the adsorbent could be used for industrial processes repeatedly without any significant reduction in its adsorption capacity. Based on the Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity of Th4+, U6+, Cd2+, and Ni2+ at 45 °C was 249.4, 193.1, 69.5 and 138.7 mg g-1, respectively. Besides, the calculated thermodynamic parameters showed an endothermic as well as chemical nature through the adsorption process.

  2. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  3. Using specialized adsorbents for remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, D.P.; Grant, A.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes two remediation case studies in which specialized adsorbents were used. In one case, the adsorbents were used to treat effluent from a soil vapor extraction system. In the other case, the adsorbents were used to treat air from a groundwater air stripper. The specialized adsorbents effectively removed volatile organic compounds from each air stream.

  4. Applications and limits of theoretical adsorption models for predicting the adsorption properties of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ju; Nguyen, Duc Canh; Na, Choon-Ki; Kim, Chung-il

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the applicability of adsorption models for predicting the properties of adsorbents. The kinetics of the adsorption of NO3- ions on a PP-g-AA-Am non-woven fabric have been investigated under equilibrium conditions in both batch and fixed bed column processes. The adsorption equilibrium experiments in the batch process were carried out under different adsorbate concentration and adsorbent dosage conditions and the results were analyzed using adsorption isotherm models, energy models, and kinetic models. The results of the analysis indicate that the adsorption occurring at a fixed adsorbate concentration with a varying adsorbent dosage occur more easily compared to those under a fixed adsorbent dosage with a varying adsorbate concentration. In the second part of the study, the experimental data obtained using fixed bed columns were fit to Bed Depth Service Time, Bohart-Adams, Clark, and Wolborska models, to predict the breakthrough curves and determine the column kinetic parameters. The adsorption properties of the NO3- ions on the PP-g-AA-Am non-woven fabric were differently described by different models for both the batch and fixed bed column process. Therefore, it appears reasonable to assume that the adsorption properties were dominated by multiple mechanisms, depending on the experimental conditions.

  5. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  6. Removal effects and mechanisms of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Wu, Cuirong; He, Yan; Zhang, Bingru; Li, Fengting

    2010-11-01

    The health of humans and other organisms is threatened by increasingly serious water contamination by algae in all the country's major lakes such as Taihu Lake. This experiment was conducted to investigate the removal effects and mechanism of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified adsorbent, with comparison of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) and poly ferric sulfate (PFS). Microcystic aeruginosa grown in the laboratory was used for this experiment. The results showed that the algae-removal efficiency of Chitosan-modified adsorbent presents a good performance. When the dosage of the adsorbent reached 20 ppm, the turbidity and the chlorophyll a of treated water dropped by 90% and 86%, respectively. Compared to conventional coagulation, the dosage was reduced. The adhesive bridge effect of Chitosan and adsorption of modified adsorbent provided an important complement to subsequent dehydrating treatment for algae.

  7. User-oriented batch reactor solutions to the homogeneous surface diffusion model for different activated carbon dosages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Crittenden, John; Hristovski, Kiril; Hand, David; Westerhoff, Paul

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a simplified approach and user-oriented solutions to the homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) equations for determining the surface diffusivity using a batch reactor system. Once the surface diffusivity is known, this model could also be used to estimate the performance of activated carbon (AC) applications as a function of contact time. In addition, fixed-bed performance can be predicted using the user-oriented solutions to the HSDM for fixed beds. The step-by-step procedure for determining surface diffusion coefficients of an activated carbon adsorber, which was initially developed by Hand, Crittenden and Thacker in 1983 for a carbon dose where C(equilibrium)/C(0)=0.5, is modified to allow calculations for different carbon dosages. This modification provides solutions to the HSDM equations for different activated carbon dosages. The solutions to the HSDM framework are provided as simplified algebraic equations suitable for quick and easy estimations of D(S). The excel spread sheet is provided in the supplemental information and a detailed example is discussed. PMID:19249812

  8. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  9. Carboxylated carbon nanotubes as an efficient and cost-effective adsorbent for sustainable removal of insecticide fenvalerate from contaminated solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeimi, Atena; Saeidi, Mahboubeh; Baroumand, Naser

    2016-10-01

    In this study, carboxylic multiwall carbon nanotubes (CMNTs) were used as an adsorbent for removing fenvalerate as a toxic insecticide from solution through batch experiments. The influence of four independent parameters of HCl, initial fenvalerate concentration, CMNTs dosage, and contact time on the fenvalerate adsorption process was investigated. Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed that the adsorption and maximum adsorption capacity (40.0 mg g-1) showed high adsorption potential of the proposed sorbent. The kinetic, isothermic, and thermodynamic of fenvalerate adsorptionon CMNTs were evaluated to better understand this environmental friendly adsorption strategy. A pseudo-first-order kinetic described very well the experimental data of the adsorption kinetics. The experimental data found to be properly fitted to Freundlich model, which indicates that the sorption takes place on a heterogeneous material. The thermodynamic results showed the negative value of the standard free energy (Δ G0 ) and standard enthalpy change (Δ H0 ) showing an exothermic and spontaneous system. Repeated availability of adsorbent investigated and SEM and HRTEM of reused adsorbent showed stability and non-aggregatable attributes of CMNTs.

  10. Simultaneous removal of PAHs and metal contaminants from water using magnetic nanoparticle adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuxiong; Fulton, Aaron N; Keller, Arturo A

    2016-11-15

    Many industrial wastewaters are contaminated with both heavy metal ions and organic compounds, posing a major threat to public health and the environment. In this study, magnetic nanoparticle adsorbents, namely Mag-PCMA-T, which contain a maghemite core and a silica mesoporous layer that permanently confines surfactant micelles within the mesopores, were synthesized to achieve simultaneous removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (1mg/L) and metal contaminants (1mg/L). The individual removal efficiency of Cd(2+) and acenaphthene using Mag-PCMA-T was evaluated under a range of initial ion concentrations and adsorbent dosages, as well as the competitive adsorption with Cd(2+) and acenaphthene simultaneously present. The isotherms and kinetics of Cd(2+) and acenaphthene sorption onto Mag-PCMA-T were determined. Mag-PCMA-T removed >85% of the acenaphthene in <30min, with relatively high sorption capacity (up to 1060mg/kg). Mag-PCMA-T also exhibited high sorption capacity for Cd(2+) (up to 2250mg/kg). The simultaneous sorption performance was stable across a wide pH range (4-9) as well as in the presence of competitive metal ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) or natural organic matters. The Mag-PCMA-T can be regenerated and reused, providing a sustainable, fast, convenient, and efficient approach for water treatment. PMID:27450251

  11. Removal of hazardous azopyrazole dye from an aqueous solution using rice straw as a waste adsorbent: Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bindary, Ashraf A.; El-Sonbati, Adel Z.; Al-Sarawy, Ahmad A.; Mohamed, Khaled S.; Farid, Mansour A.

    2015-02-01

    In this research, activated carbonmade from rice straw (ACRS) was synthesized simply by a low cost and nontoxic procedure and used for the adsorption of hazardous azopyrazole dye. The effect of different variables in the batch method as a function of solution pH, contact time, concentration of adsorbate, adsorbent dosage and temperature were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertaine. Surface modification of ACRS using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was obtained. More than 75% removal efficiency was obtained within 75 min at adsorbent dose of 0.5 g for initial dye concentration of 30-100 mg L-1 at pH 3. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by the isotherm models namely, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption and the isotherm constants were determined. The kinetic data obtained with different initial concentration and temperature were analyzed using a pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated and found to be +13.25 kJ mol-1 indicating that the adsorption is physisorption. The thermodynamics of the adsorption indicated spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. The results indicate that ACRS could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of acid dyes from aqueous solution.

  12. Use of sepiolite as an adsorbent for the removal of copper (II) from industrial waste leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamze Turan, N.; Ardali, Yüksel

    2013-04-01

    as talc, but it has discontinuities and inversion of the silica sheets, which give rise to structural tunnels and blocks. In the inner blocks, all corners of the silica tetrahedral are connected to adjacent blocks, but in the outer blocks, some of the corners are Si atoms bound to hydroxyls (Si-OH). This unique structure allows the penetration of organic and inorganic species into the structure and assigns sepiolite an industrial importance in adsorption. The objective of the present study is to investigate the feasibility of using sepiolite for the adsorptive removal of Cu (II) from the industrial waste leachate. The adsorption capacities and sorption efficiencies are determined. The pseudo first order, the pseudo-second order, Elovich and the intra particle diffusion kinetic models are used to describe the kinetic data to estimate the rate constants. The adsorption of Cu (II) from the aqueous leachate of industrial wastes onto sepiolite was performed using a batch equilibrium technique. At first stage, one-factor-at-a-time experiments were performed to see the individual effects of initial pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time. The adsorption of Cu (II) was favorably influenced by an increase in the adsorbent dosage. The maximum percent removal of Cu (II) were observed at pH>6, and significantly decreased at lower pH value. The optimum contact time is found as 10 min. for the removal of Cu (II). The increment in contact time from 10 min. to 120 min. did not show a significant effect on efficiency. The maximum Cu (II) adsorption efficiencies were obtained at 94.45%. The pseudo second order kinetic model agrees very well with the dynamical behavior for the adsorption of Cu (II) from aqueous leachate of industrial waste onto sepiolite. The results indicate that the use of sepiolite that is locally available and almost free of cost as an adsorbent could be a viable alternative to activated carbon for the removal of Cu (II) ions from aqueous solutions.

  13. Comparative safety of testosterone dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    Layton, J. Bradley; Meier, Christoph R.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Stürmer, Til; Jick, Susan S.; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2015-01-01

    Importance Increases in testosterone use and mixed reports of adverse events have raised concerns about the cardiovascular safety of testosterone. Testosterone is available in several delivery mechanisms with varying pharmacokinetics; injections cause spikes in testosterone levels, while transdermal patches and gels cause more subtle but sustained increases. The comparative cardiovascular safety of gels, injections and patches has not been studied. Objective To determine the comparative cardiovascular safety of testosterone injections, patches, and gels. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Administrative claims from a commercially-insured and Medicare population in the United States, and general practitioner records from the United Kingdom, years 2000 – 2012 Participants Adult (18+), male initiators of testosterone patches, gels, or injections following 180 days free of any testosterone use Exposure New initiation of a testosterone dosage form, followed for up to one year Main Outcomes and Measures In- or outpatient medical records, diagnoses, or claims for: cardio- and cerebrovascular events, including myocardial infarction (MI), unstable angina, stroke, composite acute event (MI, unstable angina, or stroke); venous thromboembolism (VTE); mortality, and all-cause hospitalization. Results We identified 431,687 testosterone initiators between the 3 datasets: 36% injection, 9% patch, 55% gel. Medicare had a majority of injection initiators (51%); the US commercially-insured population had majority gel initiators (56%); the United Kingdom had equal proportions of injections and gels (~41%). When compared to gels, injection initiators had higher hazards of CV events (MI, UA, and stroke) (HR=1.26, 95% CI: 1.18–1.35), hospitalization (HR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.13–1.18), and death (HR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.15–1.56), but not VTE (HR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.76–1.11). Patches did not confer increased hazards of CV events compared to gels (HR=1.10, 95% CI: 0.94–1

  14. Estimated Radiation Dosage on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This global map of Mars shows the estimated radiation dosages from cosmic rays reaching the surface, a serious health concern for any future human exploration of the planet.

    The estimates are based on cosmic-radiation measurements by the Mars radiation environment experiment, an instrument on NASA's Mars 2000 Odyssey spacecraft, plus information about Mars' surface elevations from the laser altimeter instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. The areas of Mars expected to have the lowest levels of cosmic radiation are where the elevation is lowest, because those areas have more atmosphere above them to block out some of the radiation. Earth's thick atmosphere shields us from most cosmic radiation, but Mars has a much thinner atmosphere than we have on Earth.

    The colors in the map refer to the estimated annual dose equivalent in rems, a unit of radiation dose. The range is generally from 10 rems(color-coded dark blue) to 20 rems (color coded dark red). Radiation exposure for astronauts on the International Space Station in Earth orbit is typically equivalent to an annualized rate of 20 to 40 rems.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor missions for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. The Mars radiation environment experiment was developed by NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for Odyssey, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Maths anxiety and medication dosage calculation errors: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Davis, Samantha

    2016-09-01

    A student's accuracy on drug calculation tests may be influenced by maths anxiety, which can impede one's ability to understand and complete mathematic problems. It is important for healthcare students to overcome this barrier when calculating drug dosages in order to avoid administering the incorrect dose to a patient when in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of maths anxiety on healthcare students' ability to accurately calculate drug dosages by performing a scoping review of the existing literature. This review utilised a six-stage methodology using the following databases; CINAHL, Embase, Medline, Scopus, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, Trip database (http://www.tripdatabase.com/) and Grey Literature report (http://www.greylit.org/). After an initial title/abstract review of relevant papers, and then full text review of the remaining papers, six articles were selected for inclusion in this study. Of the six articles included, there were three experimental studies, two quantitative studies and one mixed method study. All studies addressed nursing students and the presence of maths anxiety. No relevant studies from other disciplines were identified in the existing literature. Three studies took place in the U.S, the remainder in Canada, Australia and United Kingdom. Upon analysis of these studies, four factors including maths anxiety were identified as having an influence on a student's drug dosage calculation abilities. Ultimately, the results from this review suggest more research is required in nursing and other relevant healthcare disciplines regarding the effects of maths anxiety on drug dosage calculations. This additional knowledge will be important to further inform development of strategies to decrease the potentially serious effects of errors in drug dosage calculation to patient safety.

  16. Maths anxiety and medication dosage calculation errors: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Davis, Samantha

    2016-09-01

    A student's accuracy on drug calculation tests may be influenced by maths anxiety, which can impede one's ability to understand and complete mathematic problems. It is important for healthcare students to overcome this barrier when calculating drug dosages in order to avoid administering the incorrect dose to a patient when in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of maths anxiety on healthcare students' ability to accurately calculate drug dosages by performing a scoping review of the existing literature. This review utilised a six-stage methodology using the following databases; CINAHL, Embase, Medline, Scopus, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, Trip database (http://www.tripdatabase.com/) and Grey Literature report (http://www.greylit.org/). After an initial title/abstract review of relevant papers, and then full text review of the remaining papers, six articles were selected for inclusion in this study. Of the six articles included, there were three experimental studies, two quantitative studies and one mixed method study. All studies addressed nursing students and the presence of maths anxiety. No relevant studies from other disciplines were identified in the existing literature. Three studies took place in the U.S, the remainder in Canada, Australia and United Kingdom. Upon analysis of these studies, four factors including maths anxiety were identified as having an influence on a student's drug dosage calculation abilities. Ultimately, the results from this review suggest more research is required in nursing and other relevant healthcare disciplines regarding the effects of maths anxiety on drug dosage calculations. This additional knowledge will be important to further inform development of strategies to decrease the potentially serious effects of errors in drug dosage calculation to patient safety. PMID:27589091

  17. Schiff base - Chitosan grafted L-monoguluronic acid as a novel solid-phase adsorbent for removal of congo red.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Qiu, Li-Gan; Su, Hong-Zhen; Cao, Cheng-Liang; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    A novel modified chitosan adsorbent (GL-SBCS) was synthesized by covalently grafting a Schiff base-chitosan (SBCS) onto the surface of l-monoguluronic acid. Physico-chemical investigation on the adsorption of congo red, an anionic azo dye by GL-SBCS has been carried out. The effect of different weight contents of chitosan in GL-SBCS composite, adsorbent dosage, initial pH and contract time were studied in detail using batch adsorption. Results showed that GL-SBCS exhibited better than normal CS and l-monoguluronic acid. Further investigation demonstrated that the adsorption pattern fitted well with the Langmuir model (R(2)>0.99) but less-satisfied the Freundlich model. Both ionic interaction as well as physical forces is responsible for binding of congo red with GL-SBCS as determined by zeta potential measurement Both sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate significantly influenced the adsorption process. SBCS would be a good method and resource to increase absorption efficiency for the removal of anionic dyes in a wastewater treatment process.

  18. The entropies of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Charles T; Sellers, Jason R V

    2012-10-31

    Adsorbed molecules are involved in many reactions on solid surface that are of great technological importance. As such, there has been tremendous effort worldwide to learn how to predict reaction rates and equilibrium constants for reactions involving adsorbed molecules. Theoretical calculation of both the rate and equilibrium constants for such reactions requires knowing the entropy and enthalpy of the adsorbed molecule. While much effort has been devoted to measuring and calculating the enthalpies of well-defined adsorbates, few measurements of the entropies of adsorbates have been reported. We present here a new way to determine the standard entropies of adsorbed molecules (S(ad)(0)) on single crystal surfaces from temperature programmed desorption data, prove its accuracy by comparison to entropies measured by equilibrium methods, and apply it to published data to extract new entropies. Most importantly, when combined with reported entropies, we find that at high coverage, they linearly track the entropy of the gas-phase molecule at the same temperature (T), such that S(ad)(0)(T) = 0.70 S(gas)(0)(T) - 3.3R (R = the gas constant), with a standard deviation of only 2R over a range of 50R. These entropies, which are ~2/3 of the gas, are huge compared to most theoretical predictions. This result can be extended to reliably predict prefactors in the Arrhenius rate constant for surface reactions involving such species, as proven here for desorption. PMID:23033909

  19. The Effects of Alcohol Dosage and Dosage Expectancy on Aggressiveness and Assertiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreutzer, Jeffrey S.; Schneider, Henry G.

    The psychological (expectancy) and physiological (dosage) effects of alcohol on aggressive and assertive behavior were investigated. The expectancy manipulation was accomplished by informing subjects that the beer they were to receive was either half as strong or twice as strong as commercially available beer. The dosage manipulation involved…

  20. High capacity cryogel-type adsorbents for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naveen Kumar; Dsouza, Roy N; Grasselli, Mariano; Fernández-Lahore, Marcelo

    2014-08-15

    Cryogel bodies were modified to obtain epoxy groups by graft-copolymerization using both chemical and gamma irradiation initiation techniques. The free epoxy adsorbents were reacted further to introduce diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) functionalities. The resulting weak anion-exchange cryogel adsorbents showed dynamic binding capacities of ca. 27±3mg/mL, which was significantly higher than previously reported for this type of adsorbent material. Gamma irradiated grafting initiation showed a 4-fold higher capacity for proteins than chemical grafting initiation procedures. The phosphate capacity for these DEAE cryogels was 119mmol/L and also showed similar column efficiency as compared to commercial adsorbents. The large pores in the cryogel structure ensure convective transport of the molecules to active binding sites located on the polymer-grafted surface of cryogels. However, as cryogels have relatively large pores (10-100μm), the BET area available for surface activation is low, and consequently, the capacity of the cryogels is relatively low for biomolecules, especially when compared to commercial beaded adsorbents. Nevertheless, we have shown that gamma ray mediated surface grafting of cryogel matrices greatly enhance their functional and adsorptive properties.

  1. High capacity cryogel-type adsorbents for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naveen Kumar; Dsouza, Roy N; Grasselli, Mariano; Fernández-Lahore, Marcelo

    2014-08-15

    Cryogel bodies were modified to obtain epoxy groups by graft-copolymerization using both chemical and gamma irradiation initiation techniques. The free epoxy adsorbents were reacted further to introduce diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) functionalities. The resulting weak anion-exchange cryogel adsorbents showed dynamic binding capacities of ca. 27±3mg/mL, which was significantly higher than previously reported for this type of adsorbent material. Gamma irradiated grafting initiation showed a 4-fold higher capacity for proteins than chemical grafting initiation procedures. The phosphate capacity for these DEAE cryogels was 119mmol/L and also showed similar column efficiency as compared to commercial adsorbents. The large pores in the cryogel structure ensure convective transport of the molecules to active binding sites located on the polymer-grafted surface of cryogels. However, as cryogels have relatively large pores (10-100μm), the BET area available for surface activation is low, and consequently, the capacity of the cryogels is relatively low for biomolecules, especially when compared to commercial beaded adsorbents. Nevertheless, we have shown that gamma ray mediated surface grafting of cryogel matrices greatly enhance their functional and adsorptive properties. PMID:24980092

  2. Safety, compliance, and predictive parameters for dosage modification in adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Keun-Wook

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the compliance, safety, dosage modifications (dose reduction and/or schedule change [including permanent S-1 withdrawal]), and clinical parameters that predict S-1 dosage modification in gastric cancer patients receiving adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy. One hundred and forty-nine patients who underwent curative D2 surgery and received adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy were enrolled. S-1 was administered orally (40 mg/m(2) twice daily on days 1-28 every 6 weeks) for 1 year. For patients unable to tolerate S-1, the dosage was reduced or the schedule was changed to a 3-weekly schedule of 2 weeks on treatment followed by 1 week off treatment. The planned 1-year treatment was completed in 73.8% of patients; 69 patients required dosage modification because of toxicity. The most frequent cause of dosage modification was enterocolitis (37 patients; defined as ≥ grade 2 abdominal pain and/or ≥ grade 2 diarrhea). Most dosage modification occurred during the early cycles of treatment (within the first 3 months). Severe toxicities (≥ grade 3) included neutropenia (13.4%), abdominal pain (8.1%) and diarrhea (8.1%). In multivariate analyses, decreased relative dose intensity was related to poor disease-free survival independent of stage, and only low creatinine clearance predicted S-1 dosage modification. In conclusion, although adjuvant S-1 therapy has a high compliance rate, meticulous monitoring of adverse events is required in the early period of treatment. Decreased creatinine clearance was the only factor that predicted dosage modification. In patients with creatinine clearance <50 mL/min, dosage reduction should be considered from the initiation of S-1 treatment.

  3. Gene dosage imbalances: action, reaction, and models.

    PubMed

    Veitia, Reiner A; Potier, Marie Claude

    2015-06-01

    Single-gene deletions, duplications, and misregulation, as well as aneuploidy, can lead to stoichiometric imbalances within macromolecular complexes and cellular networks, causing their malfunction. Such alterations can be responsible for inherited or somatic genetic disorders including Mendelian diseases, aneuploid syndromes, and cancer. We review the effects of gene dosage alterations at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels, and the various responses of the cell to counteract their effects. Furthermore, we explore several biochemical models and ideas that can provide the rationale for treatments modulating the effects of gene dosage imbalances.

  4. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  5. Altered pharmacokinetics of soil-adsorbed benzene administered orally in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.; Bowers, J. )

    1990-08-01

    An experimental study of the effect of soil absorption on the pharmacokinetics of benzene in orally exposed rats was recently conducted. In this study, groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250-300 g were administered either benzene alone or soil-adsorbed benzene suspensions. The authors reported that absorption half-lives into blood plasma were not statistically different between treatment groups and that the elimination half-life of the clay treatment group was statistically different from the control treatment. The authors concluded that percentages of initial dose expired and metabolized were altered in the presence of both soils. The purpose of the present study was to investigate mechanisms by which the plasma concentration time course and excretion profile of benzene were altered by the presence of soils. The authors consider whether the changes in the pharmacokinetics of benzene between the treatment groups are due to differences in absorption and elimination rates as well as differences in dosages absorbed. Model based estimates of the half-lives of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract are derived.

  6. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W. -P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  7. Differences between Japan and the United States in dosages of drugs recently approved in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kae; Narukawa, Mamoru; Kanazu, Yoshiko; Takeuchi, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    The internationalization of clinical and regulatory guidelines and disease treatment and the globalization of the pharmaceutical industry have led drug development strategies in Japan to shift from bridging studies to multinational trials. However, the current standard for adequate dose-finding processes may sometimes complicate the timely participation of Japan in these multinational trials. The objective of this study is to investigate different factors that might influence dosage selection in Japan. Approved drug dosages in Japan and the United States during the period 2003-2008 were compared and assessed across different therapeutic areas and approval timings. Factors such as company type and daily dosage indication were demonstrated to have a statistically significant relationship with different dosages in Japan and the United States. Anticancer, antiviral, and enzyme drugs showed similar dosages in the 2 regions, whereas neurological drugs were observed to undergo more careful dosage-finding processes, resulting in the approval of generally lower doses in Japan. A broader analysis is needed for detailed assessment. The findings in this study serve as an initial review to identify important factors that should be considered before planning global drug development.

  8. Removal of malachite green dye from wastewater by different organic acid-modified natural adsorbent: kinetics, equilibriums, mechanisms, practical application, and disposal of dye-loaded adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou; Yuan, Xingzhong; Zeng, Guangming; Leng, Lijian; Peng, Xin; Liao, Kailingli; Peng, Lijuan; Xiao, Zhihua

    2014-10-01

    Natural adsorbent (Cinnamomum camphora sawdust) modified by organic acid (oxalic acid, citric acid, and tartaric acid) was investigated as a potential adsorbent for the removal of hazardous malachite green (MG) dye in aqueous media in a batch process. The extent of MG adsorption onto modified sawdust increased with increasing organic acid concentrations, pH, contact time, and temperature but decreased with increasing adsorbent dosage and ionic strength. Kinetic study indicated that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model could best describe the adsorption kinetics of MG. Equilibrium data were found to fit well with the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacity of the three kinds of organic acid-modified sawdust was 280.3, 222.8, and 157.5 mg/g, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that the sorption of MG was an endothermic process. The adsorption mechanism, the application of adsorbents in practical wastewater, the prediction of single-stage batch adsorption system, and the disposal of depleted adsorbents were also discussed.

  9. AQUATIC PHOTOLYSIS OF OXY-ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON GOETHITE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.

    1985-01-01

    Organic materials that will not absorb light at wavelengths longer than 295 nanometers (the solar wavelength cutoff) may nevertheless, undergo electron transfer reactions initiated by light. These reactions occur when the organic materials are adsorbed as ligand complexes to the surface of iron oxy-hydroxide (goethite). The adsorbed materials can be either inner or outer coordination sphere complexes. Goethite was chosen as the iron oxyhydroxide surface because it has the highest thermodynamic stability of any of the oxyhydroxides in water and it can be synthesized easily, with high purity.

  10. Nitric oxide releasing material adsorbs more fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Lantvit, Sarah M; Barrett, Brittany J; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-11-01

    One mechanism of the failure of blood-contacting devices is clotting. Nitric oxide (NO) releasing materials are seen as a viable solution to the mediation of surface clotting by preventing platelet activation; however, NO's involvement in preventing clot formation extends beyond controlling platelet function. In this study, we evaluate NO's effect on factor XII (fibrinogen) adsorption and activation, which causes the initiation of the intrinsic arm of the coagulation cascade. This is done by utilizing a model plasticized poly(vinyl) chloride (PVC), N-diazeniumdiolate system and looking at the adsorption of fibrinogen, an important clotting protein, to these surfaces. The materials have been prepared in such a way to eliminate changes in surface properties between the control (plasticized PVC) and composite (NO-releasing) materials. This allows us to isolate NO release and determine the effect on the adsorption of fibrinogen, to the material surface. Surprisingly, it was found that an NO releasing material with a surface flux of 17.4 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) showed a significant increase in the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed to the material surface compared to one with a flux of 13.0 ± 1.6 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) and the control (2334 ± 496, 226 ± 99, and 103 ±31% fibrinogen adsorbed of control, respectively). This study suggests that NO's role in controlling clotting is extended beyond platelet activation. PMID:23554300

  11. The origin and characterization of conformational heterogeneity in adsorbed polymer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Jack F.; Schneider, Hildegard M.; Frantz, Peter; Lipman, Robert; Granick, Steve

    1997-09-01

    The equilibration of polymer conformations tends to be sluggish in polymer layers adsorbed onto highly attractive substrates, so the structure of these layers must be understood in terms of the layer growth process rather than equilibrium theory. Initially adsorbed chains adopt a highly flattened configuration while the chains which arrive later must adapt their configurations to the increasingly limited space available for adsorption. Thus, the chains adsorbed in the late stage of deposition are more tenuously attached to the surface. This type of non-equilibrium growth process is studied for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) adsorbed on oxidized silicon where the segmental attraction is strong (0953-8984/9/37/005/img7/segment) and for polystyrene (PS) adsorbed on oxidized silicon from a carbon tetrachloride solution where the segmental attraction is relatively weak (0953-8984/9/37/005/img8/segment). Measurements were based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection (FTIR - ATR). In both cases, the chains arriving first adsorbed more tightly, became flattened (as measured by the dichroic ratio), and occupied a disproportionately large fraction of the surface. This non-uniform structure persisted indefinitely for the strongly adsorbed PMMA chains, while the PS chains exhibited a gradual evolution, presumably reflecting an equilibration of the adsorbed layer occurring after long times. On the theoretical side, the initial heterogeneity of these adsorbed polymer layers is modelled using a random sequential adsorption (RSA) model where the size of the adsorbing species is allowed to adapt to the surface space available at the time of adsorption. The inhomogeneity in the size of adsorbing species (hemispheres) in this model is similar to the distribution of chain contacts in our measurements on adsorbed polymer layers. Owing to extensive variance around the mean, conformations having the mean number of chain contacts are least probable, which

  12. Ultraviolet and electron radiation induced fragmentation of adsorbed ferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Welipitiya, D.; Green, A.; Woods, J.P.; Dowben, P.A.; Robertson, B.W.; Byun, D.; Zhang, J.

    1996-06-01

    From thermal desorption spectroscopy we find that ferrocene, Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, adsorbs and desorbs associatively on Ag(100). Photoemission results indicate that the initially adsorbed surface species closely resembles that of molecular ferrocene. The shift in photoemission binding energies relative to the gas phase is largely independent of the molecular orbital. We find that ultraviolet light does lead to partial fragmentation of the ferrocene and that the molecular fragments are much more strongly bound to the surface than the associatively adsorbed ferrocene. Since fragmentation occurs only in the presence of incident radiation, selective area deposition from this class of molecules is possible. Using a focused electron beam in a scanning transmission electron microscope, we show that selective area deposition of features with resolution of a few hundred angstroms is readily achieved. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Estimated Maximal Safe Dosages of Tumescent Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumescent lidocaine anesthesia consists of subcutaneous injection of relatively large volumes (up to 4 L or more) of dilute lidocaine (≤1 g/L) and epinephrine (≤1 mg/L). Although tumescent lidocaine anesthesia is used for an increasing variety of surgical procedures, the maximum safe dosage is unknown. Our primary aim in this study was to measure serum lidocaine concentrations after subcutaneous administration of tumescent lidocaine with and without liposuction. Our hypotheses were that even with large doses (i.e., >30 mg/kg), serum lidocaine concentrations would be below levels associated with mild toxicity and that the concentration-time profile would be lower after liposuction than without liposuction. METHODS: Volunteers participated in 1 to 2 infiltration studies without liposuction and then one study with tumescent liposuction totally by local anesthesia. Serum lidocaine concentrations were measured at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 24 hours after each tumescent lidocaine infiltration. Area under the curve (AUC∞) of the serum lidocaine concentration-time profiles and peak serum lidocaine concentrations (Cmax) were determined with and without liposuction. For any given milligram per kilogram dosage, the probability that Cmax >6 μg/mL, the threshold for mild lidocaine toxicity was estimated using tolerance interval analysis. RESULTS: In 41 tumescent infiltration procedures among 14 volunteer subjects, tumescent lidocaine dosages ranged from 19.2 to 52 mg/kg. Measured serum lidocaine concentrations were all <6 μg/mL over the 24-hour study period. AUC∞s with liposuction were significantly less than those without liposuction (P = 0.001). The estimated risk of lidocaine toxicity without liposuction at a dose of 28 mg/kg and with liposuction at a dose of 45 mg/kg was ≤1 per 2000. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary estimates for maximum safe dosages of tumescent lidocaine are 28 mg/kg without liposuction and 45 mg/kg with liposuction. As a

  14. Emergence of 3D Printed Dosage Forms: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Alhnan, Mohamed A; Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Sadia, Muzna; Wan, Ka-Wai; Ahmed, Waqar; Arafat, Basel

    2016-08-01

    The recent introduction of the first FDA approved 3D-printed drug has fuelled interest in 3D printing technology, which is set to revolutionize healthcare. Since its initial use, this rapid prototyping (RP) technology has evolved to such an extent that it is currently being used in a wide range of applications including in tissue engineering, dentistry, construction, automotive and aerospace. However, in the pharmaceutical industry this technology is still in its infancy and its potential yet to be fully explored. This paper presents various 3D printing technologies such as stereolithographic, powder based, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modelling and semi-solid extrusion 3D printing. It also provides a comprehensive review of previous attempts at using 3D printing technologies on the manufacturing dosage forms with a particular focus on oral tablets. Their advantages particularly with adaptability in the pharmaceutical field have been highlighted, which enables the preparation of dosage forms with complex designs and geometries, multiple actives and tailored release profiles. An insight into the technical challenges facing the different 3D printing technologies such as the formulation and processing parameters is provided. Light is also shed on the different regulatory challenges that need to be overcome for 3D printing to fulfil its real potential in the pharmaceutical industry.

  15. Emergence of 3D Printed Dosage Forms: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Alhnan, Mohamed A; Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Sadia, Muzna; Wan, Ka-Wai; Ahmed, Waqar; Arafat, Basel

    2016-08-01

    The recent introduction of the first FDA approved 3D-printed drug has fuelled interest in 3D printing technology, which is set to revolutionize healthcare. Since its initial use, this rapid prototyping (RP) technology has evolved to such an extent that it is currently being used in a wide range of applications including in tissue engineering, dentistry, construction, automotive and aerospace. However, in the pharmaceutical industry this technology is still in its infancy and its potential yet to be fully explored. This paper presents various 3D printing technologies such as stereolithographic, powder based, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modelling and semi-solid extrusion 3D printing. It also provides a comprehensive review of previous attempts at using 3D printing technologies on the manufacturing dosage forms with a particular focus on oral tablets. Their advantages particularly with adaptability in the pharmaceutical field have been highlighted, which enables the preparation of dosage forms with complex designs and geometries, multiple actives and tailored release profiles. An insight into the technical challenges facing the different 3D printing technologies such as the formulation and processing parameters is provided. Light is also shed on the different regulatory challenges that need to be overcome for 3D printing to fulfil its real potential in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:27194002

  16. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  17. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms....

  18. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage forms....

  19. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms....

  20. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage forms....

  1. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622 Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms....

  2. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  3. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622 Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms....

  4. 21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage forms....

  6. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage forms....

  7. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage forms....

  8. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage forms....

  9. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622 Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms....

  10. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  11. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms....

  12. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms....

  13. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms....

  14. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  15. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms....

  16. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms....

  17. 21 CFR 520.445 - Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.445... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.445 Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms....

  18. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms....

  19. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  20. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2160 Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  1. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms....

  2. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage forms....

  3. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms....

  4. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2160 Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage forms....

  6. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage forms....

  7. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622 Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms....

  8. 21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms....

  9. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage forms....

  10. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage forms....

  11. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  12. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms....

  13. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms....

  14. 21 CFR 520.2345 - Tetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.2345 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2345 Tetracycline oral dosage forms....

  15. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage forms....

  16. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2160 Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  17. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage forms....

  18. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  19. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms....

  20. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms....

  1. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms....

  2. 21 CFR 520.2345 - Tetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.2345 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2345 Tetracycline oral dosage forms....

  3. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms....

  4. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms....

  6. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms....

  7. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms....

  8. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms....

  9. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage forms....

  10. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage forms....

  11. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms....

  12. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms....

  13. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage forms....

  14. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms....

  15. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage forms....

  16. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms....

  17. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  18. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622 Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms....

  19. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  20. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms....

  1. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms....

  2. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms....

  3. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms....

  4. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  6. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2160 Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  7. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage forms....

  8. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms....

  9. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  10. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage forms....

  11. 21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms....

  12. 21 CFR 520.445 - Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.445... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.445 Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms....

  13. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms....

  14. 21 CFR 520.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms. 520.2220... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2220 Sulfadimethoxine oral dosage forms....

  15. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage forms....

  16. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms....

  17. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  18. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540 Dexamethasone oral dosage forms....

  19. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms....

  20. 21 CFR 520.1450 - Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms. 520.1450... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1450 Morantel tartrate oral dosage forms....

  1. 21 CFR 520.2160 - Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2160 Styrylpyridinium, diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  2. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage forms....

  3. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720 Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms....

  4. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905 Fenbendazole oral dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  6. 21 CFR 520.2261 - Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms. 520.2261... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2261 Sulfamethazine sodium oral dosage forms....

  7. 21 CFR 520.2123 - Spectinomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Spectinomycin oral dosage forms. 520.2123 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2123 Spectinomycin oral dosage forms....

  8. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage forms....

  9. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms....

  10. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms....

  11. 21 CFR 520.2260 - Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms. 520.2260 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2260 Sulfamethazine oral dosage forms....

  12. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  13. 21 CFR 520.2473 - Tioxidazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tioxidazole oral dosage forms. 520.2473 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473 Tioxidazole oral dosage forms....

  14. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300 Cambendazole oral dosage forms....

  15. 21 CFR 520.2325 - Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms. 520.2325... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2325 Sulfaquinoxaline oral dosage forms....

  16. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  17. 21 CFR 520.2380 - Thiabendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole oral dosage forms. 520.2380 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2380 Thiabendazole oral dosage forms....

  18. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.82 Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms....

  19. 21 CFR 520.2345 - Tetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.2345 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2345 Tetracycline oral dosage forms....

  20. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390 Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms....

  1. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620 Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms....

  2. Method And Apparatus For Regenerating Nox Adsorbers

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, J. Joshua; Endicott, Dennis L.; Faulkner, Stephen A.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-03-28

    Methods and apparatuses for regenerating a NOx adsorber coupled with an exhaust of an engine. An actuator drives a throttle valve to a first position when regeneration of the NOx adsorber is desired. The first position is a position that causes the regeneration of the NOx adsorber. An actuator drives the throttle valve to a second position while regeneration of the NOx adsorber is still desired. The second position being a position that is more open than the first position and operable to regenerate a NOx adsorber.

  3. Biodegradable metal adsorbent synthesized by graft polymerization onto nonwoven cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Ayako; Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    A fibrous adsorbent for Hg ions was synthesized by radiation-induced emulsion graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto a nonwoven cotton fabric and subsequent chemical modification. The optimal pre-irradiation dose for initiation of the graft polymerization of GMA, which minimized the effects of radiation damage on the mechanical strength of the nonwoven cotton fabric, was found to be 10 kGy. The GMA-grafted nonwoven cotton fabric was subsequently modified with ethylenediamine (EDA) or diethylenetriamine (DETA) to obtain a Hg adsorbent. The resulting amine-type adsorbents were evaluated for batch and continuous adsorption of Hg. In batch adsorption, the distribution coefficients of Hg reached 1.9×10 5 and 1.0×10 5 for EDA- and DETA-type adsorbents, respectively. A column packed with EDA-type adsorbent removed Hg from 1.8 ppm Hg solution at a space velocity of 100 h -1, which corresponds to 16,000 times the volume of the packed adsorbent. The adsorbed Hg on the EDA-type adsorbent could be completely eluted by 1 M HCl solution. A microbial oxidative degradation test revealed that the EDA-type adsorbent is biodegradable.

  4. Selective removal of copper and lead ions by diethylenetriamine-functionalized adsorbent: behaviors and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changkun; Bai, Renbi; San Ly, Quan

    2008-03-01

    The selective removal of copper and lead ions from aqueous solutions by diethylenetriamine (DETA)-functionalized polymeric adsorbent was investigated. The adsorbent was prepared by amination of the micro-beads synthesized from glycidyl methacrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate co-polymerization (denoted as P-DETA). In the single metal species system (only copper or lead ions present), P-DETA was found to adsorb copper ions or lead ions significantly (with a slightly higher adsorption uptake capacity for lead ions than copper ions). However, P-DETA displayed an excellent selectivity in the adsorption of copper ions over lead ions in the binary metal species system (with both copper and lead ions present). It was also found that initially (or previously) adsorbed lead ions on P-DETA were displaced, even completely, by subsequently adsorbed copper ions from the solution but the case was not vice versa. The greater electronegativity of copper ions than lead ions was identified as the major factor that caused P-DETA to selectively adsorb copper ions over lead ions during competitive adsorption in the binary metal species system. It was speculated that the displacement of already adsorbed lead ions on P-DETA by subsequently adsorbed copper ions was through an adjacent attachment and repulsion mechanism. P-DETA has been shown to have the potential to be used as an effective adsorbent for the removal as well as selective recovery of heavy metal ions in water or wastewater treatment.

  5. Lyophilization of unit dose pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Thapa, P; Baillie, A J; Stevens, H N E

    2003-05-01

    A lyophilization process for a pharmaceutical unit dosage form was developed which comprised a container closed with an impermeable membrane pierced with one or more holes through which the material in the container can be lyophilized. The hole or holes in the membrane have to be sufficiently large to allow water vapor to escape but small to ensure that the material is kept within the container. Lyophilization from sealed, perforated, unit-dose package has shown to be feasible. The technique offers a novel convenient means of lyophilizing nonsterile products in their primary pack and increases the potential for the development of lyophilized formulations for nonparenteral applications.

  6. Adrenal Insufficiency under Standard Dosage of Glucocorticoid Replacement after Unilateral Adrenalectomy for Cushing's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kentaro; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Kurihara, Isao; Hiratsuka, Ken; Sato, Seiji; Yokota, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Shibata, Hirotaka; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid replacement is needed for patients after adrenal surgery for Cushing's syndrome; however, the adequate dosage is not easily determined. The patient was a 62-year-old woman who has had hypertension for 5 years and presented with heart failure due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. She consulted with us because of general fatigue, facial edema, and muscle weakness and was diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome. A laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed, standard dosage of postoperative replacement was administered, and she was discharged with 30 mg/day of hydrocortisone (cortisol). However, she suffered from loss of appetite and was transferred to an emergency unit with the symptoms of adrenal insufficiency on postoperative day 15. After initial hydrocortisone replacement with 200 mg/day, the dosage was gradually decreased during hospitalization; however, reduction of hydrocortisone dosage lower than 60 mg/day was difficult because of nausea and fatigue. Her circadian cortisol profile after hydrocortisone administration showed delayed and lowered peaks, which suggested that hydrocortisone absorption in the intestine was impaired. Therefore, complicated heart failure may have led to the adrenal insufficiency in the patient. In such cases, we should consider postoperative administration of more than the standard dosage of hydrocortisone to avoid adrenal insufficiency after surgery for Cushing's syndrome. PMID:27375907

  7. Adrenal Insufficiency under Standard Dosage of Glucocorticoid Replacement after Unilateral Adrenalectomy for Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kentaro; Kurihara, Isao; Hiratsuka, Ken; Sato, Seiji; Yokota, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Shibata, Hirotaka; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid replacement is needed for patients after adrenal surgery for Cushing's syndrome; however, the adequate dosage is not easily determined. The patient was a 62-year-old woman who has had hypertension for 5 years and presented with heart failure due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. She consulted with us because of general fatigue, facial edema, and muscle weakness and was diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome. A laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed, standard dosage of postoperative replacement was administered, and she was discharged with 30 mg/day of hydrocortisone (cortisol). However, she suffered from loss of appetite and was transferred to an emergency unit with the symptoms of adrenal insufficiency on postoperative day 15. After initial hydrocortisone replacement with 200 mg/day, the dosage was gradually decreased during hospitalization; however, reduction of hydrocortisone dosage lower than 60 mg/day was difficult because of nausea and fatigue. Her circadian cortisol profile after hydrocortisone administration showed delayed and lowered peaks, which suggested that hydrocortisone absorption in the intestine was impaired. Therefore, complicated heart failure may have led to the adrenal insufficiency in the patient. In such cases, we should consider postoperative administration of more than the standard dosage of hydrocortisone to avoid adrenal insufficiency after surgery for Cushing's syndrome. PMID:27375907

  8. Adrenal Insufficiency under Standard Dosage of Glucocorticoid Replacement after Unilateral Adrenalectomy for Cushing's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kentaro; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Kurihara, Isao; Hiratsuka, Ken; Sato, Seiji; Yokota, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Shibata, Hirotaka; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid replacement is needed for patients after adrenal surgery for Cushing's syndrome; however, the adequate dosage is not easily determined. The patient was a 62-year-old woman who has had hypertension for 5 years and presented with heart failure due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. She consulted with us because of general fatigue, facial edema, and muscle weakness and was diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome. A laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed, standard dosage of postoperative replacement was administered, and she was discharged with 30 mg/day of hydrocortisone (cortisol). However, she suffered from loss of appetite and was transferred to an emergency unit with the symptoms of adrenal insufficiency on postoperative day 15. After initial hydrocortisone replacement with 200 mg/day, the dosage was gradually decreased during hospitalization; however, reduction of hydrocortisone dosage lower than 60 mg/day was difficult because of nausea and fatigue. Her circadian cortisol profile after hydrocortisone administration showed delayed and lowered peaks, which suggested that hydrocortisone absorption in the intestine was impaired. Therefore, complicated heart failure may have led to the adrenal insufficiency in the patient. In such cases, we should consider postoperative administration of more than the standard dosage of hydrocortisone to avoid adrenal insufficiency after surgery for Cushing's syndrome.

  9. A new adsorbent for boron removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Kluczka, Joanna; Korolewicz, Teofil; Zołotajkin, Maria; Simka, Wojciech; Raczek, Malwina

    2013-01-01

    A new adsorbent based on natural clinoptilolite and amorphous zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) was prepared for the uptake of boron from fresh water. The sorption behaviour of this adsorbent for boron was investigated using a batch system and found to obey Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. The ZrO2 loading level, pH, temperature, contact time, initial boron concentration and adsorbent dose, on the removal of boron were studied. It was found that the removal of boron increased while the adsorbent dose increased and the temperature decreased at an optimum pH (pH = 8) and a contact time of 30 min. At optimum conditions, the maximum boron percentage removal was 75%. According to the D-R model, the maximum capacity was estimated to be > 3 mg B/g of the adsorbent. The adsorption energy value (calculated as 9.13 kJ/mol) indicated that the adsorption of boron on clinoptilolite modified with ZrO2 was physical in nature. The parameters of the adsorption models and the pH investigations pointed to the possibility of a chemisorption process. The thermodynamic parameters (standard entropy deltaS degrees, enthalpy deltaH degrees , and free energy deltaG degrees changes) of boron adsorption were also calculated. The negative value of deltaS degrees indicated a decreased randomness at the solid-solution interface during the boron adsorption. Negative values of deltaH degrees showed the exothermic nature of the process. The negative values of deltaG degrees implied that the adsorption of boron on clinoptilolite modified with amorphous ZrO2 at 25 degrees C was spontaneous. It was considered that boron dissolved in water had been adsorbed both physically and chemically on clinoptilolite modified with 30% ZrO2.

  10. A new adsorbent for boron removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Kluczka, Joanna; Korolewicz, Teofil; Zołotajkin, Maria; Simka, Wojciech; Raczek, Malwina

    2013-01-01

    A new adsorbent based on natural clinoptilolite and amorphous zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) was prepared for the uptake of boron from fresh water. The sorption behaviour of this adsorbent for boron was investigated using a batch system and found to obey Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. The ZrO2 loading level, pH, temperature, contact time, initial boron concentration and adsorbent dose, on the removal of boron were studied. It was found that the removal of boron increased while the adsorbent dose increased and the temperature decreased at an optimum pH (pH = 8) and a contact time of 30 min. At optimum conditions, the maximum boron percentage removal was 75%. According to the D-R model, the maximum capacity was estimated to be > 3 mg B/g of the adsorbent. The adsorption energy value (calculated as 9.13 kJ/mol) indicated that the adsorption of boron on clinoptilolite modified with ZrO2 was physical in nature. The parameters of the adsorption models and the pH investigations pointed to the possibility of a chemisorption process. The thermodynamic parameters (standard entropy deltaS degrees, enthalpy deltaH degrees , and free energy deltaG degrees changes) of boron adsorption were also calculated. The negative value of deltaS degrees indicated a decreased randomness at the solid-solution interface during the boron adsorption. Negative values of deltaH degrees showed the exothermic nature of the process. The negative values of deltaG degrees implied that the adsorption of boron on clinoptilolite modified with amorphous ZrO2 at 25 degrees C was spontaneous. It was considered that boron dissolved in water had been adsorbed both physically and chemically on clinoptilolite modified with 30% ZrO2. PMID:24191469

  11. Bioavailability of valsartan oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Gangadhar; Bende, Girish; Mendonza, Anisha E; Solar-Yohay, Susan; Biswal, Shibadas; Neelakantham, Srikanth; Wagner, Robert; Flarakos, Jimmy; Zhang, Yiming; Jarugula, Venkateswar

    2014-03-01

    The oral bioavailability of valsartan from extemporaneous suspension and solution formulations were evaluated relative to tablet formulation in two separate open-label, randomized crossover studies in healthy adults. In both studies, the plasma concentrations of valsartan after oral administration were analyzed using validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods, and the corresponding pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis. The peak plasma concentration (Cmax ) and area under the concentration time-curves (AUC(0-∞) ) of valsartan from the extemporaneous suspension were higher by 1.93- and 1.56-fold, respectively, relative to the tablet formulation (P < .001). The Cmax and AUC(0-∞) of valsartan from the oral solution were higher by 2.21- and 1.74-fold, respectively, relative to the tablet formulation (P < .001). These results indicate that both rate and extent of absorption of valsartan are higher in the two liquid dosage forms (extemporaneous suspension and solution formulations) relative to the solid oral dosage form (tablet formulation). PMID:27128457

  12. Evaluation of new indomethacin dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Waller, E S

    1983-01-01

    Indomethacin, an indole derivative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been available since the early 1960s in gelatin capsules. In 1982, a sustained release product, Indocin SR, was marketed. Awaiting marketing approval is a unique controlled release form of indomethacin, Indos. The disposition of indomethacin includes enterohepatic cycling and extensive metabolism to inactive metabolites. Enterohepatic cycling makes interpretation of bioavailability estimates of indomethacin dosage forms difficult. The relationship of indomethacin plasma concentration to therapeutic effects and side effects is inconclusive. It appears in vivo prostaglandin inhibition occurs at very low plasma concentrations that are achievable with all available dosage forms. Indocin SR is a sustained release capsule of indomethacin designed to deliver 25 mg of drug immediately and 50 mg gradually. Absolute bioavailability of the product is 80%. The plasma concentration-time curves do not show good sustained release characteristics; after four hours plasma concentrations resemble those seen with a single dose of regular capsule. The cost compared with Indocin is competitive. Indos is a zero-order release form of indomethacin. It is a unique drug delivery system that shows good controlled release characteristics. Bioavailability is 85%. Both Indocin SR and Indos are apparently therapeutically equivalent to indomethacin capsules. In elderly patients, Indos has been shown to be associated with fewer side effects than Indocin. Both Indocin SR and Indos have the advantage of once or twice daily dosing.

  13. Studies of phase transitions in the aripiprazole solid dosage form.

    PubMed

    Łaszcz, Marta; Witkowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the phase transitions in an active substance contained in a solid dosage form are very complicated but essential, especially if an active substance is classified as a BCS Class IV drug. The purpose of this work was the development of sensitive methods for the detection of the phase transitions in the aripiprazole tablets containing initially its form III. Aripiprazole exhibits polymorphism and pseudopolymorphism. Powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry methods were developed for the detection of the polymorphic transition between forms III and I as well as the phase transition of form III into aripiprazole monohydrate in tablets. The study involved the initial 10 mg and 30 mg tablets, as well as those stored in Al/Al blisters, a triplex blister pack and HDPE bottles (with and without desiccant) under accelerated and long term conditions. The polymorphic transition was not observed in the initial and stored tablets but it was visible on the DSC curve of the Abilify(®) 10 mg reference tablets. The formation of the monohydrate was observed in the diffractograms and Raman spectra in the tablets stored under accelerated conditions. The monohydrate phase was not detected in the tablets stored in the Al/Al blisters under long term conditions. The results showed that the Al/Al blisters can be recommended as the packaging of the aripiprazole tablets containing form III. PMID:26397209

  14. Studies of phase transitions in the aripiprazole solid dosage form.

    PubMed

    Łaszcz, Marta; Witkowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the phase transitions in an active substance contained in a solid dosage form are very complicated but essential, especially if an active substance is classified as a BCS Class IV drug. The purpose of this work was the development of sensitive methods for the detection of the phase transitions in the aripiprazole tablets containing initially its form III. Aripiprazole exhibits polymorphism and pseudopolymorphism. Powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry methods were developed for the detection of the polymorphic transition between forms III and I as well as the phase transition of form III into aripiprazole monohydrate in tablets. The study involved the initial 10 mg and 30 mg tablets, as well as those stored in Al/Al blisters, a triplex blister pack and HDPE bottles (with and without desiccant) under accelerated and long term conditions. The polymorphic transition was not observed in the initial and stored tablets but it was visible on the DSC curve of the Abilify(®) 10 mg reference tablets. The formation of the monohydrate was observed in the diffractograms and Raman spectra in the tablets stored under accelerated conditions. The monohydrate phase was not detected in the tablets stored in the Al/Al blisters under long term conditions. The results showed that the Al/Al blisters can be recommended as the packaging of the aripiprazole tablets containing form III.

  15. Solid-state conversion of fly ash to effective adsorbents for Cu removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Li, Lin; Zhu, Z H

    2007-01-10

    Solid-state conversion of fly ash to an amorphous aluminosilicate adsorbent (geopolymer) has been investigated under different conditions and the synthesised material has been tested for Cu2+ removal from aqueous solution. It has been found that higher reaction temperature and Na:FA ratio will make the adsorbents achieving higher removal efficiency. The adsorbent loading and Cu2+ initial concentration will also affect the removal efficiency while the adsorption capacity exhibits similarly at 30-40 degrees C. The adsorption capacity of the synthesised adsorbent shows much higher value than fly ash and natural zeolite. The capacity is 0.1, 3.5 and 92 mg/g, for fly ash, natural zeolite, and FA derived adsorbent, respectively. The kinetic studies indicate that the adsorption can be fitted by the second-order kinetic model. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms also can fit to the adsorption isotherm.

  16. Differential Effects of Sex-Lethal Mutations on Dosage Compensation Early in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, M.; Cline, T. W.

    1994-01-01

    In response to the primary sex determination signal, X chromosome dose, the Sex-lethal gene controls all aspects of somatic sex determination and differentiation, including X chromosome dosage compensation. Two complementary classes of mutations have been identified that differentially affect Sxl somatic functions: (1) those impairing the ``early'' function used to set developmental pathway choice in response to the sex determination signal and (2) those impairing ``late'' functions involved in maintaining the pathway choice independent of the initiating signal and/or in directing differentiation. This ``early vs. late'' distinction correlates with a switch in promoter utilization from Sxl(Pe) to Sxl(Pm) at the blastoderm stage and a corresponding switch from transcriptional to RNA splicing control. Here we characterize five partial-loss-of-function Sxl alleles to explore a distinction between ``early vs. late'' functioning of Sxl in dosage compensation. Assaying for dosage compensation during the blastoderm stage, we find that the earliest phase of the dosage compensation process is controlled by products of the early Sxl promoter, Sxl(Pe). Hence, in addition to triggering the sexual pathway decision of cells, products derived from Sxl(Pe) also control early dosage compensation, the first manifestation of sexually dimorphic differentiation. The effects of mutant Sxl alleles on early dosage compensation are consistent with their previous categorization as early vs. late defective with respect to their effects on pathway initiation. Results reported here suggest that the dosage compensation regulatory genes currently known to function downstream of Sxl, genes known as the ``male-specific lethals,'' do not control all aspects of dosage compensation either at the blastoderm stage or later in development. In the course of this study, we also discovered that the canonical early defective allele, Sxl(f9), which is impaired in its ability to establish the female

  17. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  18. Quasiparticle excitations of adsorbates on doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Dillon; Karrasch, Christoph; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jiong; Omrani, Arash A.; Brar, Victor; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wu, Qiong; Corsetti, Fabiano; Mostofi, Arash; Kawakami, Roland K.; Moore, Joel; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Mike

    Adsorbed atoms and molecules can modify the electronic structure of graphene, but in turn it is also possible to control the properties of adsorbates via the graphene substrate. In my talk, I will discuss the electronic structure of F4-TCNQ molecules on doped graphene and present a first-principles based theory of quasiparticle excitations that captures the interplay of doping-dependent image charge interactions between substrate and adsorbate and electron-electron interaction effects on the molecule. The resulting doping-dependent quasiparticle energies will be compared to experimental scanning tunnelling spectra. Finally, I will also discuss the effects of charged adsorbates on the electronic structure of doped graphene.

  19. X Chromosome and Autosome Dosage Responses in Drosophila melanogaster Heads

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen-Xia; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    X chromosome dosage compensation is required for male viability in Drosophila. Dosage compensation relative to autosomes is two-fold, but this is likely to be due to a combination of homeostatic gene-by-gene regulation and chromosome-wide regulation. We have baseline values for gene-by-gene dosage compensation on autosomes, but not for the X chromosome. Given the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes, these baseline values could differ. We used a series of deficiencies on the X and autosomes, along with mutations in the sex-determination gene transformer-2, to carefully measure the sex-independent X-chromosome response to gene dosage in adult heads by RNA sequencing. We observed modest and indistinguishable dosage compensation for both X chromosome and autosome genes, suggesting that the X chromosome is neither inherently more robust nor sensitive to dosage change. PMID:25850426

  20. X Chromosome and Autosome Dosage Responses in Drosophila melanogaster Heads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Xia; Oliver, Brian

    2015-04-07

    X chromosome dosage compensation is required for male viability in Drosophila. Dosage compensation relative to autosomes is two-fold, but this is likely to be due to a combination of homeostatic gene-by-gene regulation and chromosome-wide regulation. We have baseline values for gene-by-gene dosage compensation on autosomes, but not for the X chromosome. Given the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes, these baseline values could differ. We used a series of deficiencies on the X and autosomes, along with mutations in the sex-determination gene transformer-2, to carefully measure the sex-independent X-chromosome response to gene dosage in adult heads by RNA sequencing. We observed modest and indistinguishable dosage compensation for both X chromosome and autosome genes, suggesting that the X chromosome is neither inherently more robust nor sensitive to dosage change.

  1. [Influence of biological activated carbon dosage on landfill leachate treatment].

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan-Rui; Guo, Yan; Wu, Qing

    2014-08-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC) dosage on COD removal in landfill leachate treatment were compared. The COD removal efficiency of reactors with 0, 100 and 300 g activated carbon dosage per litre activated sludge was 12.9%, 19.6% and 27.7%, respectively. The results indicated that BAC improved the refractory organic matter removal efficiency and there was a positive correlation between COD removal efficiency and BAC dosage. The output of carbon dioxide after 8h of aeration in reactors was 109, 193 and 306 mg corresponding to the activated carbon dosages mentioned above, which indicated the amount of biodegradation and BAC dosage also had a positive correlation. The combination of adsorption and bioregeneration of BAC resulted in the positive correlation betweem organic matter removal efficiency and BAC dosage, and bioregeneration was the root cause for the microbial decomposition of refractory organics.

  2. Adsorption of inorganic and organic ions to polycarbophil as a means of sustained-release dosage formulation.

    PubMed

    See, N A; Russell, J; Connors, K A; Bass, P

    1987-06-01

    The adsorption and desorption of drugs and inorganic ions to and from polycarbophil (PC), a polymer, were investigated to determine if PC would be a suitable carrier for sustained-release dosage formulations. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments with a polycarbophil-atropine sulfate complex demonstrated the gradual-release properties of this system. Adsorbed Cr3+ ions, like atropine, are released slowly. In contrast, 51CrO4(2-) ions are predominantly bound in an irreversible manner. A third group of drugs minimally adsorbed to PC under the conditions studied. We conclude that PC under both in vitro and in vivo conditions is able to bind certain ions and drugs and then release them over a period of time in a predictable and repeatable manner.

  3. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; et al

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  4. An effective desiccant system to regulate the humidity inside the chambers of the solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Erling, Ida

    2007-11-01

    The most common way to protect moisture-sensitive pharmaceutical powders is to utilize protective packaging. However, the most convenient package materials are all permeable to water molecules to some extent and limited protection is normally achieved with this arrangement even though desiccants are employed. In the present study we introduce a novel system that can regulate the internal humidity of the containers used with solid dosage forms for a desired time at a requested level. Instead of the widely used solid adsorbents the system utilizes saturated salt solutions loaded in desiccant bags made of various polymer materials with appropriate permeation properties. By utilizing salt solutions the size of the desiccant bag can be further reduced. A wide variety of commonly used powder chambers and desiccant bags are tested, proving the effectiveness of the introduced system.

  5. Selective cesium removal from radioactive liquid waste by crown ether immobilized new class conjugate adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Awual, Md Rabiul; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Taguchi, Tomitsugu; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Suzuki, Shinichi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro

    2014-08-15

    Conjugate materials can provide chemical functionality, enabling an assembly of the ligand complexation ability to metal ions that are important for applications, such as separation and removal devices. In this study, we developed ligand immobilized conjugate adsorbent for selective cesium (Cs) removal from wastewater. The adsorbent was synthesized by direct immobilization of dibenzo-24-crown-8 ether onto inorganic mesoporous silica. The effective parameters such as solution pH, contact time, initial Cs concentration and ionic strength of Na and K ion concentrations were evaluated and optimized systematically. This adsorbent was exhibited the high surface area-to-volume ratios and uniformly shaped pores in case cavities, and its active sites kept open functionality to taking up Cs. The obtained results revealed that adsorbent had higher selectivity toward Cs even in the presence of a high concentration of Na and K and this is probably due to the Cs-π interaction of the benzene ring. The proposed adsorbent was successfully applied for radioactive Cs removal to be used as the potential candidate in Fukushima nuclear wastewater treatment. The adsorbed Cs was eluted with suitable eluent and simultaneously regenerated into the initial form for the next removal operation after rinsing with water. The adsorbent retained functionality despite several cycles during sorption-elution-regeneration operations.

  6. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  7. Extraction of palladium from acidic solutions with the use of carbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Kononova; N.G. Goryaeva; N.B. Dostovalova; S.V. Kachin; A.G. Kholmogorov

    2007-08-15

    We studied the sorption of palladium(II) on LKAU-4, LKAU-7, and BAU carbon adsorbents from model hydrochloric acid solutions and the solutions of spent palladium-containing catalysts. It was found that sorbents based on charcoal (BAU) and anthracite (LKAU-4) were characterized by high sorption capacities for palladium. The kinetics of the saturation of carbon adsorbents with palladium(II) ions was studied, and it was found that more than 60% of the initial amount of Pd(II) was recovered in a 1-h contact of an adsorbent with a model solution. This value for the solutions of spent catalysts was higher than 35%.

  8. Chitosan/Graphene Oxide Composite as an Effective Adsorbent for Reactive Red Dye Removal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Qu, Lijun; Tian, Mingwei; Zhu, Shifeng; Zhang, Xiansheng; Tang, Xiaoning; Sun, Kaikai

    2016-07-01

    Chitosan, modified with different dosages of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), was first prepared, and its adsorption capacity for reactive red (RR) dye in aqueous solutions was investigated, in this paper. The structure and morphology of the adsorbents were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM, EDX, BET, and TGA. The effect of varying parameters (pH, temperature, adsorbent loading, and contact time) was also investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity based on the Langmuir model was found to be 32.16 mg/g. In addition, experimental kinetic data were analyzed by the psuedo-first order and psuedo-second order equation models. The psuedo-second order model proved to be the best model for the adsorption system, which suggested that adsorption might be controlled by the chemical rate-limiting step through sharing of electrons or by covalent forces.

  9. Chitosan/Graphene Oxide Composite as an Effective Adsorbent for Reactive Red Dye Removal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Qu, Lijun; Tian, Mingwei; Zhu, Shifeng; Zhang, Xiansheng; Tang, Xiaoning; Sun, Kaikai

    2016-07-01

    Chitosan, modified with different dosages of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), was first prepared, and its adsorption capacity for reactive red (RR) dye in aqueous solutions was investigated, in this paper. The structure and morphology of the adsorbents were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM, EDX, BET, and TGA. The effect of varying parameters (pH, temperature, adsorbent loading, and contact time) was also investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity based on the Langmuir model was found to be 32.16 mg/g. In addition, experimental kinetic data were analyzed by the psuedo-first order and psuedo-second order equation models. The psuedo-second order model proved to be the best model for the adsorption system, which suggested that adsorption might be controlled by the chemical rate-limiting step through sharing of electrons or by covalent forces. PMID:27329054

  10. Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 205 NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials (Web, free access)   The NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials is a free, web-based catalog of adsorbent materials and measured adsorption properties of numerous materials obtained from article entries from the scientific literature. Search fields for the database include adsorbent material, adsorbate gas, experimental conditions (pressure, temperature), and bibliographic information (author, title, journal), and results from queries are provided as a list of articles matching the search parameters. The database also contains adsorption isotherms digitized from the cataloged articles, which can be compared visually online in the web application or exported for offline analysis.

  11. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    DOEpatents

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  12. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  13. Stability of dry coated solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Kablitz, Caroline Désirée; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2009-01-01

    The dry coating process was evaluated in terms of storage stability investigating drug release and agglomeration tendency of the different coated oral dosage forms; hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) was used with triethylcitrate (TEC) as plasticizer and acetylated monoglyceride (Myvacet) as wetting agent. Talc or colloidal silicon dioxide (Aerosil) was used as anti-tacking agents. In contrast to coating formulations consisting of HPMCAS and Myvacet all formulations containing TEC showed enteric resistance and no agglomeration tendency after preparation. After storage at 10% RH +/- 5% enteric resistance is increased slightly. This increase is more pronounced at 60% RH +/- 5%. The formulations without anti-tacking agents showed higher drug releases after 12 and 24 months due to the damage of the film's integrity during sample preparation caused by the high tackiness of the film. Tackiness is not affected by storing if samples are stored at low relative humidity. At high relative humidity tackiness increases upon storage especially for formulations without anti-tacking agents. The sieving results of the agglomeration measurements after storage can be confirmed by ring shear measurements performed immediately after preparation and approved to be a tool, which is able to predict the agglomeration during storage. PMID:19883250

  14. Stability of dry coated solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Kablitz, Caroline Désirée; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2009-01-01

    The dry coating process was evaluated in terms of storage stability investigating drug release and agglomeration tendency of the different coated oral dosage forms; hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) was used with triethylcitrate (TEC) as plasticizer and acetylated monoglyceride (Myvacet) as wetting agent. Talc or colloidal silicon dioxide (Aerosil) was used as anti-tacking agents. In contrast to coating formulations consisting of HPMCAS and Myvacet all formulations containing TEC showed enteric resistance and no agglomeration tendency after preparation. After storage at 10% RH +/- 5% enteric resistance is increased slightly. This increase is more pronounced at 60% RH +/- 5%. The formulations without anti-tacking agents showed higher drug releases after 12 and 24 months due to the damage of the film's integrity during sample preparation caused by the high tackiness of the film. Tackiness is not affected by storing if samples are stored at low relative humidity. At high relative humidity tackiness increases upon storage especially for formulations without anti-tacking agents. The sieving results of the agglomeration measurements after storage can be confirmed by ring shear measurements performed immediately after preparation and approved to be a tool, which is able to predict the agglomeration during storage.

  15. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V.; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M.; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of ‘extra adsorption domains’—that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically.

  16. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-26

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of 'extra adsorption domains'-that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically. PMID:26550825

  17. A nondestructive technique to determine the rate of oxygen permeation into solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Felton, L A; Timmins, G S

    2006-02-01

    The current study investigated the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy as a nondestructive method to quantify the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in tablets and hard shell capsules. Lithium phthalocyanine crystals (LiPC) were placed inside the dosage forms. The peak-to-peak linewidth of the first derivative of the LiPC EPR spectra was measured and, by calibration tables, the oxygen partial pressure, pO2, within the dosage form was determined. The intra-dosage form pO2 was followed as a function of time after changing the exterior gas stream composition. Results showed initial oxygen concentrations comparable to atmospheric levels in all tablets and capsules investigated. Oxygen rapidly permeated into unsealed gelatin and cellulosic hard shell capsules. Banding at the cap/body joint significantly reduced the oxygen permeation rate. Oxygen also rapidly permeated into tablet compacts, regardless of the compressional force used during tableting, while application of a polymeric film significantly decreased the rate of oxygen permeation. This EPR technique was shown to be a suitable nondestructive method to study oxygen permeation kinetics in solid dosage forms.

  18. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903 Section 520.903 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel...

  19. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903 Section 520.903 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel...

  20. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150 Section 520.2150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120 Section 520.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120 Section 520.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120 Section 520.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150 Section 520.2150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol...

  5. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 Section 520.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole...

  6. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903 Section 520.903 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel...

  7. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 Section 520.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150 Section 520.2150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol...

  9. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150 Section 520.2150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol...

  10. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154 Section 520.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin...

  11. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 Section 520.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole...

  12. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 Section 520.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin...

  13. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154 Section 520.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120 Section 520.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon...

  15. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 Section 520.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin...

  16. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154 Section 520.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin...

  17. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903 Section 520.903 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel...

  18. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903 Section 520.903 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel...

  19. 21 CFR 520.970 - Flunixin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flunixin oral dosage forms. 520.970 Section 520.970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.970 Flunixin...

  20. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 Section 520.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin...

  1. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 Section 520.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120 Section 520.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon...

  3. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154 Section 520.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin...

  4. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 Section 520.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin...

  5. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 Section 520.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin...

  6. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 Section 520.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole...

  7. 21 CFR 520.2150 - Stanozolol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stanozolol oral dosage forms. 520.2150 Section 520.2150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2150 Stanozolol...

  8. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 Section 520.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin...

  9. 21 CFR 520.38 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.38 Section 520.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.38 Albendazole...

  10. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154 Section 520.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin...

  11. 21 CFR 520.970 - Flunixin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flunixin oral dosage forms. 520.970 Section 520.970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.970 Flunixin...

  12. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 Section 520.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin...

  13. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 Section 520.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin...

  14. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 Section 520.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole...

  15. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin...

  16. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms....

  17. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin...

  19. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms....

  20. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms....

  1. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS INTRAMAMMARY DOSAGE FORMS § 526.1696...

  2. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms....

  3. Problem solved: dosage calculation in a nursing program.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Nancy V; De Carlo, James J

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety, including the safe administration of medications, is an essential component of nursing practice. However, helping students calculate medication dosages has continually challenged faculty members and students. The authors describe a comprehensive approach to teaching and evaluating dosage calculation. Common barriers to helping students master necessary math skills required for accuracy are addressed. PMID:21330900

  4. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720 Section 520.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 520.1720 - Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms. 520.1720 Section 520.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Phenylbutazone oral dosage forms....

  6. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905 Section 520.905 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Fenbendazole oral dosage forms....

  7. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  8. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  9. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  10. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  11. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  12. [Radiation dosage of various CT techniques in diagnostic lung imaging].

    PubMed

    Heinz-Peer, G; Weninger, F; Nowotny, R; Herold, C J

    1996-06-01

    Introduction of the computed tomography index CTDI and the multiple scan average dose (MSAD) has led to standardization of the dose description in CT examinations. Despite the use of these dose parameters, many different dosages are reported in the literature for different CT methods. In addition, there is still a wide range of radiation dosimetry results reported for conventional CT, helical CT, and HRCT used in chest examinations. The variations in dosage are mainly due to differences in factors affecting the dose, i.e. beam geometry, beam quality, scanner geometry ("generation"), and operating parameters. In addition, CT dosimetry instrumentation and methodology make a contribution to dosages. Recent studies calculating differences in factors affecting dosage and CT dosimetry and using similar operating parameters, show similar results in CT dosimetry for conventional and helical CT. On the other hand, dosages for HRCT were greatly reduced. This was mainly caused by narrow beam collimation and increasing section spacing.

  13. Application of longan shell as non-conventional low-cost adsorbent for the removal of cationic dye from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Zhu, Lin; Jiang, Haitao; Hu, Fang; Shen, Xiangqian

    2016-04-01

    With simple physical treatment, adsorption potential of longan shell for the methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution was studied as a low-cost material under the conditions of adsorbent dosage (1-6 g/L), initial solution pH (2-12), contact time (5-180 min), temperature (293, 313, 313 K) and initial dye concentration (100-500 mg/L). The SEM images and FTIR spectra of longan shell before and after dye adsorption were analyzed to understand the adsorption process of MB onto longan shell. The kinetic data and the equilibrium data were simulated by different kinetic and isotherm models, respectively. The results showed that the adsorption process was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the experimental equilibrium data were better fit to Langmuir equation than Freundlich equation with the maximum adsorption capacity of 141.04 mg/g. In addition, main activation parameters (Ea, ΔH#, ΔS# and ΔG#) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) of the absorption process were also determined.

  14. Heat transfer to the adsorbent in solar adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Papucik, Stefan; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with design and construction of solar adsorption cooling device and with heat transfer problem in adsorber. The most important part of adsorption cooling system is adsorber/desorber containing adsorbent. Zeolith (adsorbent) type was chosen for its high adsorption capacity, like a coolant was used water. In adsorber/desorber occur, at heating of adsorbent, to heat transfer from heat change medium to the adsorbent. The time required for heating of adsorber filling is very important, because on it depend flexibility of cooling system. Zeolith has a large thermal resistance, therefore it had to be adapted the design and construction of adsorber. As the best shows the tube type of adsorber with double coat construction. By this construction is ensured thin layer of adsorbent and heating is quick in all volume of adsorbent. The process of heat transfer was experimentally measured, but for comparison simulated in ANSYS, too.

  15. HLA dosage effect in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Verduijn, Willem; Haasnoot, Geert W; Drabbels, Jos J M; Lammers, Gert J; Claas, Frans H J

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. It is tightly associated with a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-allele: HLA-DQB1*06:02. Based on this, an autoimmune process has been hypothesized. A functional HLA-DQ molecule consists of a DQα and a DQβ chain. HLA-DQB1*06:02 (DQβ) has a strong preference for binding to HLA-DQA1*01:02 (DQα), and together they form the functional DQ0602 dimer. A dosage effect would be expected if the HLA-DQ0602 dimer itself is directly involved in the aetiology. An increased expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer is expected in individuals homozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02, but is also hypothesized in individuals heterozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02 and homozygous for HLA-DQA1*01:02. To study the impact of the expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer on narcolepsy susceptibility, 248 Dutch narcolepsy patients and 1272 Dutch control subjects, all of them positive for DQB1*06:02 (heterozygous and homozygous), were HLA-genotyped with attention not only to DQB1 but also to DQA1*01:02. DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02 homozygosity was significantly more often seen in patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.29) confirming previous observations. More importantly, a significantly higher prevalence of homozygosity for DQA1*01:02 was found in HLA-DQB1*06:02 heterozygous patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.37, p < 0.001). The latter finding clearly supports a direct role of the HLA-DQ molecule in the development of disease.

  16. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  17. States of water adsorbed on perindopril crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. A.; Khmelevskaya, V. S.; Bogdanov, N. Yu.; Gorchakov, K. A.

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between the structural state of adsorbed water, the crystal structure of the substances, and the solubility of the perindopril salt C19H32N2O5 · C4H11N in water was studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The high-frequency shift of the stretching vibrations of adsorbed water and the solubility depend on the crystal structure of the drug substance. A reversible chemical reaction occurred between the adsorbed water and the perindopril salt.

  18. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  19. An efficient removal of methyl orange dye from aqueous solution by adsorption onto chitosan/MgO composite: A novel reusable adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldorai, Yuvaraj; Shim, Jae-Jin

    2014-02-01

    We report a novel multi-functional magnesium oxide (MgO) immobilized chitosan (CS) composite was prepared by chemical precipitation method. The CS-MgO composite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and zeta potential. The composite was applied as a novel adsorbent for removal of methyl orange model dye and the effect of adsorbent dosage, pH and contact time were studied. The adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo second order reaction. The adsorbent efficiency was unaltered even after five cycles of reuse. In addition, the composite exhibited a superior antibacterial efficacy of 93% within 24 h against Escherichia coli as measured by colony forming units. Based on the data of present investigation the composite being a biocompatible, eco-friendly and low-cost adsorbent with antibacterial activity could find potential applications in variety of fields and in particular environmental applications.

  20. Carboxymethyl starch mucoadhesive microspheres as gastroretentive dosage form.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Marc; Gosselin, Patrick; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru

    2015-12-30

    Carboxymethyl starch microspheres (CMS-MS) were produced from carboxymethyl starch powder (CMS-P) with a degree of substitution (DS) from 0.1 to 1.5 in order to investigate the influence of DS on physicochemical, drug release and mucoadhesion properties as well as interactions with gastrointestinal tract (GIT) epithelial barrier models. Placebo and furosemide loaded CMS-MS were obtained by emulsion-crosslinking with sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). DS had an impact on increasing equilibrium water uptake and modulating drug release properties of the CMS-MS according to the surrounding pH. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of NCI-N87 gastric cell monolayers was not influenced in presence of CMS-MS, whereas that of Caco-2 intestinal cell monolayers decreased with increasing DS but recovered initial values at about 15h post-treatment. CMS-MS with increasing DS also enhanced furosemide permeability across both NCI-N87 and Caco-2 monolayers at pH gradients from 3.0 to 7.4. Mucoadhesion of CMS-MS on gastric mucosa (acidic condition) increased with the DS up to 55% for a DS of 1.0 but decreased on neutral intestinal mucosa to less than 10% with DS of 0.1. The drug release, permeability enhancement and mucoadhesive properties of the CMS-MS suggest CMS-MS with DS between 0.6 and 1.0 as suitable excipient for gastroretentive oral delivery dosage forms.

  1. The transit of dosage forms through the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Kah-Hay

    2010-08-16

    The human small intestine, with its enormous absorptive surface area, is invariably the principal site of drug absorption. Hence, the residence time of a dosage form in this part of the gut can have a great influence on the absorption of the contained drug. Various methods have been employed to monitor the gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but the use of gamma-scintigraphy has superceded all the other methods. However, careful consideration of the time interval for image acquisition and proper analysis of the scintigraphic data are important for obtaining reliable results. Most studies reported the mean small intestinal transit time of various dosage forms to be about 3-4h, being closely similar to that of food and water. The value does not appear to be influenced by their physical state nor the presence of food, but the timing of food intake following administration of the dosage forms can influence the small intestinal transit time. While the mean small intestinal transit time is quite consistent among dosage forms and studies, individual values can vary widely. There are differing opinions regarding the effect of density and size of dosage forms on their small intestinal transit properties. Some common excipients employed in pharmaceutical formulations can affect the small intestinal transit and drug absorption. There is currently a lack of studies regarding the effects of excipients, as well as the timing of food intake on the small intestinal transit of dosage forms and drug absorption.

  2. Aminophylline Dosage In Asthma Exacerbations in Children: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Adequate asthma treatment of childhood exacerbations with IV aminophylline depends on appropriate dosage. Recommendations to aim for a target therapeutic range may be inappropriate as serum concentrations correlate poorly with clinical improvement. This review aims to evaluate the evidence for the optimum dosage strategy of intravenous aminophylline in children suffering an exacerbation of asthma. Methods A systematic review comparing dosage regimens of intravenous aminophylline in children suffering an exacerbation of asthma. Primary outcomes were time until resolution of symptoms, mortality and need for mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes were date until discharge criteria are met, actual discharge and adverse effects. Data sources CENTRAL, CINAHL, MEDLINE and Web of Science. Search performed in March 2016 Eligibility criteria Studies using intravenous aminophylline in children with an acute exacerbation of asthma which reported the dosage and clinical outcomes. Findings 14 RCTs were included. There is a poor relationship between the dosage administered to children and symptom resolution, length of stay or need for mechanical ventilation. This study is limited due to its use of indirect evidence. Conclusion The currently recommended dosage regimens may not represent the optimum safety and efficacy of intravenous aminophylline. There is a need to develop the evidence base correlating dosage with patient centered clinical outcomes, to improve prescribing practices. PMID:27483163

  3. Photoexcitation of adsorbates on metal surfaces: One-step or three-step

    SciTech Connect

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-09-07

    In this essay we discuss the light-matter interactions at molecule-covered metal surfaces that initiate surface photochemistry. The hot-electron mechanism for surface photochemistry, whereby the absorption of light by a metal surface creates an electron-hole pair, and the hot electron scatters through an unoccupied resonance of adsorbate to initiate nuclear dynamics leading to photochemistry, has become widely accepted. Yet, ultrafast spectroscopic measurements of molecule-surface electronic structure and photoexcitation dynamics provide scant support for the hot electron mechanism. Instead, in most cases the adsorbate resonances are excited through photoinduced substrate-to-adsorbate charge transfer. Based on recent studies of the role of coherence in adsorbate photoexcitation, as measured by the optical phase and momentum resolved two-photon photoemission measurements, we examine critically the hot electron mechanism, and propose an alternative description based on direct charge transfer of electrons from the substrate to adsorbate. The advantage of this more quantum mechanically rigorous description is that it informs how material properties of the substrate and adsorbate, as well as their interaction, influence the frequency dependent probability of photoexcitation and ultimately how light can be used to probe and control surface femtochemistry.

  4. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  5. Extending the market exclusivity of therapeutic antibodies through dosage patents.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Dosage patents are one way to extend the market exclusivity of an approved drug beyond the lifetime of the patent that protects the drug as such. Dosage patents may help to compensate the applicant for the long period where the active pharmaceutical ingredient as such is already under patent prosecution, but not on the market yet, due to lengthy development and approval procedures. This situation erodes part of the time the drug is marketed under patent protection. Dosage patents filed at a later date can provide remedy for this problem. Examples of successful and unsuccesful attempts, and the reasons for the respective outcomes, are provided in this article. PMID:27115842

  6. Bayer Electrofilter Fines as Potential Se(VI) Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Julia; Fernández, Begoña

    2015-11-01

    Removal of Se(VI) from an aqueous solution under different conditions was investigated using Bayer electrofilter fines (BEFs), a waste from alumina production, as an adsorbent. Adsorption selenate was studied using batch adsorption experiments as a function of pH (2-12), contact time (0.08-30 h), adsorbent concentration (4-80 g/L), initial selenium concentration (5-203 mg/L), and ionic strength (0-0.1 M NaCl). The results showed that adsorption was significantly affected by pH Se(VI) having the highest affinity for BEFs at pH 3. Sorption Se(VI) reached equilibrium in 4 h. Increasing ionic strength decreased selenate sorption. The adsorption of Se(VI) onto BEFs was found to fit the Langmuir isotherm. Maximum selenium uptake values were calculated as 2.3613 mg/g and 1.5608 mg/g when using adsorbent concentrations of 20 g/L and 40 g/L, respectively.

  7. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  8. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  9. Mesoporous Silica: A Suitable Adsorbent for Amines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous silica with KIT-6 structure was investigated as a preconcentrating material in chromatographic systems for ammonia and trimethylamine. Its adsorption capacity was compared to that of existing commercial materials, showing its increased adsorption power. In addition, KIT-6 mesoporous silica efficiently adsorbs both gases, while none of the employed commercial adsorbents did. This means that KIT-6 Mesoporous silica may be a good choice for integrated chromatography/gas sensing micro-devices. PMID:20628459

  10. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  11. Infrared Analysis Of Enzymes Adsorbed Onto Model Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Gloria M.; Rauch, Deborah S.; Brode, Philip F.; Marcott, Curtis A.

    1989-12-01

    The adsorption of the enzymes, subtilisin BPN' and lysozyme, onto model surfaces was examined using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Using a cylindrical internal reflection (CIRcle) cell with a Germanium (Ge) internal reflection element (IRE), model hydrophilic surfaces were made by plasma cleaning the IRE and model hydrophobic surfaces were made by precoating the IRE with a thin film of polystyrene. Gas chromatography (GC)-IR data collection software was used to monitor adsorption kinetics during the first five minutes after injection of the enzyme into the CIRcle cell. It was found that for both lysozyme and BPN', most of the enzyme that was going to adsorb onto the model surface did so within ten seconds after injection. Nearly an order-of-magnitude more BPN' adsorbed on the hydrophobic Ge surface than the hydrophilic one, while lysozyme adsorbed somewhat more strongly to the hydrophilic Ge surface. Overnight, the lysozyme layer continued to increase in thickness, while BPN' maintained its initial coverage. The appearance of carboxylate bands in some of the adsorbed BPN' spectra suggests the occurrence of peptide bond hydrolysis. A Au/Pd coating on the CIRcle cell o-rings had a significant effect on the adsorption of BPN'. (This coating was applied in an attempt to eliminate interfering Teflon absorption bands.) An apparent electrochemical reaction occurred, involving BPN', Ge, Au/Pd, and the salt solution used to stabilize BPN'. The result of this reaction was enhanced adsorption of the enzyme around the coated o-rings, etching of the Ge IRE at the o-ring site, and some autolysis of the enzyme. No such reaction was observed with lysozyme.

  12. Adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lijuan; Yu, Weihua; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2014-03-01

    The emission of gasoline vapors is becoming a significant environmental problem especially for the population-dense area and also results in a significant economic loss. In this study, adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins at 308 K were investigated and compared with commercial activated carbon (NucharWV-A 1100). The results showed that the equilibrium and breakthrough adsorption capacities of virgin macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins were lower than virgin-activated carbon. Compared with origin adsorbents, however, the breakthrough adsorption capacities of the regenerated activated carbon for gasoline vapors decreased by 58.5 % and 61.3 % when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors were 700 and 1,400 mg/L, while those of macroporous and hypercrosslinked resins decreased by 17.4 % and 17.5 %, and 46.5 % and 45.5 %, respectively. Due to the specific bimodal property in the region of micropore (0.5-2.0 nm) and meso-macropore (30-70 nm), the regenerated hypercrosslinked polymeric resin exhibited the comparable breakthrough adsorption capacities with the regenerated activated carbon at the initial concentration of 700 mg/L, and even higher when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors was 1,400 mg/L. In addition, 90 % of relative humidity had ignorable effect on the adsorption of gasoline vapors on hypercrosslinked polymeric resin. Taken together, it is expected that hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent would be a promising adsorbent for the removal of gasoline vapors from gas streams.

  13. Recovery of iron oxides from acid mine drainage and their application as adsorbent or catalyst.

    PubMed

    Flores, Rubia Gomes; Andersen, Silvia Layara Floriani; Maia, Leonardo Kenji Komay; José, Humberto Jorge; Moreira, Regina de Fatima Peralta Muniz

    2012-11-30

    Iron oxide particles recovered from acid mine drainage represent a potential low-cost feedstock to replace reagent-grade chemicals in the production of goethite, ferrihydrite or magnetite with relatively high purity. Also, the properties of iron oxides recovered from acid mine drainage mean that they can be exploited as catalysts and/or adsorbents to remove azo dyes from aqueous solutions. The main aim of this study was to recover iron oxides with relatively high purity from acid mine drainage to act as a catalyst in the oxidation of dye through a Fenton-like mechanism or as an adsorbent to remove dyes from an aqueous solution. Iron oxides (goethite) were recovered from acid mine drainage through a sequential precipitation method. Thermal treatment at temperatures higher than 300 °C produces hematite through a decrease in the BET area and an increase in the point of zero charge. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, the solids adsorbed the textile dye Procion Red H-E7B according to the Langmuir model, and the maximum amount adsorbed decreased as the temperature of the thermal treatment increased. The decomposition kinetics of hydrogen peroxide is dependent on the H(2)O(2) concentration and iron oxides dosage, but the second-order rate constant normalized to the BET surface area is similar to that for different iron oxides tested in this and others studies. These results indicate that acid mine drainage could be used as a source material for the production of iron oxide catalysts/adsorbents, with comparable quality to those produced using analytical-grade reagents.

  14. Posttranscriptional control of X-chromosome dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Graindorge, Antoine; Militti, Cristina; Gebauer, Fátima

    2011-01-01

    RNA regulation plays a major role in the generation of diversity at the molecular and cellular levels, and furnishes the cell with flexibility potential to adapt to changing environments. Often, the regulation by/of RNA dictates when, where, and how the information encoded in the nucleus is revealed. One example is the regulation of X-chromosome dosage compensation. In Drosophila, differences in X-linked gene dosage between males and females are compensated by the transcriptional upregulation of the single male X chromosome. Mechanisms of alternative splicing and translational control, among others, enforce dosage compensation in males while inhibiting this process in females. In this review, we discuss the posttranscriptional RNA regulatory mechanisms that ensure appropriate dosage compensation in Drosophila, drawing parallels with the mammalian system when appropriate.

  15. Electrically heated particulate filter regeneration using hydrocarbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Gonze, Eugene V

    2011-02-01

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material selectively heats exhaust passing through the upstream end to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A hydrocarbon adsorbent coating applied to the PF releases hydrocarbons into the exhaust to increase a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

  16. 3,5-Dichlorophenol Removal From Wastewater Using Alternative Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobetičová, Hana; Lipovský, Marek; Wachter, Igor; Soldán, Maroš

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the efficiency of 3,5-dichlorophenol removal from wastewater by using alternative low cost adsorbents. Waste from the production and processing of metals (black nickel mud, red mud) and a biosorbent (Lemna minor) were used for this research. Initial concentration of the contaminant was 4 mmol L-1, the contact time of sorbent and waste water was 0 - 48 hrs and the temperature during experiment was 25 ± 0.2 °C. The results show that the highest removal efficiency of 3,5 - dichlorophenol (58.18 %) was reached by the red mud in 48 hours.

  17. Partial dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a sister group of beetles.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-02-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved independently in many different taxa, and so have mechanisms to compensate for expression differences on sex chromosomes in males and females. Different clades have evolved vastly different ways to achieve dosage compensation, including hypertranscription of the single X in male Drosophila, downregulation of both X's in XX Caenorhabditis, or inactivation of one X in female mammals. In the flour beetle Tribolium, the X appears hyperexpressed in both sexes, which might represent the first of two steps to evolve dosage compensation along the paths mammals may have taken (i.e., upregulation of X in both sexes, followed by inactivation of one X in females). Here we test for dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a sister taxon to beetles. We identify sex-linked chromosomes in Xenos vesparum based on genomic analysis of males and females, and show that its sex chromosome consists of two chromosomal arms in Tribolium: The X chromosome that is shared between Tribolium and Strepsiptera, and another chromosome that is autosomal in Tribolium and another distantly related Strepsiptera species, but sex-linked in X. vesparum. We use RNA-seq (RNA sequencing) to show that dosage compensation along the X of X. vesparum is partial and heterogeneous. In particular, genes that are X-linked in both beetles and Strepsiptera appear fully dosage compensated probably through downregulation in both sexes, whereas genes on the more recently added X segment have evolved only partial dosage compensation. In addition, reanalysis of published RNA-seq data suggests that Tribolium has evolved dosage compensation, without hypertranscribing the X in females. Our results demonstrate that patterns of dosage compensation are highly variable across sex-determination systems and even within species.

  18. Partial dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a sister group of beetles.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-02-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved independently in many different taxa, and so have mechanisms to compensate for expression differences on sex chromosomes in males and females. Different clades have evolved vastly different ways to achieve dosage compensation, including hypertranscription of the single X in male Drosophila, downregulation of both X's in XX Caenorhabditis, or inactivation of one X in female mammals. In the flour beetle Tribolium, the X appears hyperexpressed in both sexes, which might represent the first of two steps to evolve dosage compensation along the paths mammals may have taken (i.e., upregulation of X in both sexes, followed by inactivation of one X in females). Here we test for dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a sister taxon to beetles. We identify sex-linked chromosomes in Xenos vesparum based on genomic analysis of males and females, and show that its sex chromosome consists of two chromosomal arms in Tribolium: The X chromosome that is shared between Tribolium and Strepsiptera, and another chromosome that is autosomal in Tribolium and another distantly related Strepsiptera species, but sex-linked in X. vesparum. We use RNA-seq (RNA sequencing) to show that dosage compensation along the X of X. vesparum is partial and heterogeneous. In particular, genes that are X-linked in both beetles and Strepsiptera appear fully dosage compensated probably through downregulation in both sexes, whereas genes on the more recently added X segment have evolved only partial dosage compensation. In addition, reanalysis of published RNA-seq data suggests that Tribolium has evolved dosage compensation, without hypertranscribing the X in females. Our results demonstrate that patterns of dosage compensation are highly variable across sex-determination systems and even within species. PMID:25601100

  19. Partial Dosage Compensation in Strepsiptera, a Sister Group of Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved independently in many different taxa, and so have mechanisms to compensate for expression differences on sex chromosomes in males and females. Different clades have evolved vastly different ways to achieve dosage compensation, including hypertranscription of the single X in male Drosophila, downregulation of both X’s in XX Caenorhabditis, or inactivation of one X in female mammals. In the flour beetle Tribolium, the X appears hyperexpressed in both sexes, which might represent the first of two steps to evolve dosage compensation along the paths mammals may have taken (i.e., upregulation of X in both sexes, followed by inactivation of one X in females). Here we test for dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a sister taxon to beetles. We identify sex-linked chromosomes in Xenos vesparum based on genomic analysis of males and females, and show that its sex chromosome consists of two chromosomal arms in Tribolium: The X chromosome that is shared between Tribolium and Strepsiptera, and another chromosome that is autosomal in Tribolium and another distantly related Strepsiptera species, but sex-linked in X. vesparum. We use RNA-seq (RNA sequencing) to show that dosage compensation along the X of X. vesparum is partial and heterogeneous. In particular, genes that are X-linked in both beetles and Strepsiptera appear fully dosage compensated probably through downregulation in both sexes, whereas genes on the more recently added X segment have evolved only partial dosage compensation. In addition, reanalysis of published RNA-seq data suggests that Tribolium has evolved dosage compensation, without hypertranscribing the X in females. Our results demonstrate that patterns of dosage compensation are highly variable across sex-determination systems and even within species. PMID:25601100

  20. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications. PMID:27131811

  1. Bioavailability of intranasal promethazine dosage forms in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanathan, R.; Geary, R. S.; Bourne, D. W.; Putcha, L.

    1998-01-01

    Intramuscular promethazine (PMZ) is used aboard the US Space Shuttle to ameliorate symptoms of space motion sickness. Bioavailability after an oral dose of PMZ during space flight is thought to be impaired because of gastrointestinal disturbances associated with weightlessness and space motion sickness. In an attempt to find an alternative dosage form for use in space, we evaluated two intranasal (i.n.) dosage forms of PMZ in dogs for absorption and bioavailability relative to that of an equivalent intramuscular dose. Promethazine (5 mg kg-1) was administered as two intranasal dosage forms and as an intramuscular (i.m.) dose to three dogs in a randomised cross-over design. Serial blood samples were taken and analysed for PMZ concentrations and the absorption and bioavailability of PMZ were calculated for the three dosage forms. PMZ absorption from the carboxymethyl cellulose microsphere i.n. dosage form was more rapid and complete than from the myverol cubic gel formulation or from an i.m. injection. Bioavailability of the microsphere formulation was also greater than that of the gel formulation (AUC 3009 vs 1727 ng h ml-1). The bioavailability of the two i.n. dosage forms (relative to that of the i.m. injection) were 94% (microsphere) and 54% (gel). The i.n. microsphere formulation of PMZ offers great promise as an effective non-invasive alternative for treating space motion sickness due to its rapid absorption and bioavailability equivalent to the i.m. dose.

  2. Mammalian X chromosome inactivation evolved as a dosage-compensation mechanism for dosage-sensitive genes on the X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Pessia, Eugénie; Makino, Takashi; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; McLysaght, Aoife; Marais, Gabriel A. B.

    2012-01-01

    How and why female somatic X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) evolved in mammals remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that XCI is a dosage-compensation mechanism that evolved to equalize expression levels of X-linked genes in females (2X) and males (1X), with a prior twofold increase in expression of X-linked genes in both sexes (“Ohno's hypothesis”). Whereas the parity of X chromosome expression between the sexes has been clearly demonstrated, tests for the doubling of expression levels globally along the X chromosome have returned contradictory results. However, changes in gene dosage during sex-chromosome evolution are not expected to impact on all genes equally, and should have greater consequences for dosage-sensitive genes. We show that, for genes encoding components of large protein complexes (≥ 7 members)—a class of genes that is expected to be dosage-sensitive—expression of X-linked genes is similar to that of autosomal genes within the complex. These data support Ohno's hypothesis that XCI acts as a dosage-compensation mechanism, and allow us to refine Ohno's model of XCI evolution. We also explore the contribution of dosage-sensitive genes to X aneuploidy phenotypes in humans, such as Turner (X0) and Klinefelter (XXY) syndromes. X aneuploidy in humans is common and is known to have mild effects because most of the supernumerary X genes are inactivated and not affected by aneuploidy. Only genes escaping XCI experience dosage changes in X-aneuploidy patients. We combined data on dosage sensitivity and XCI to compute a list of candidate genes for X-aneuploidy syndromes. PMID:22392987

  3. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  4. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  5. Black molecular adsorber coatings for spaceflight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-09-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  6. Structure of polymer layers adsorbed from concentrated solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auvray, Loïc; Auroy, Philippe; Cruz, Margarida

    1992-06-01

    We study by neutron scattering the interfacial strucuture of poly(dimethylsiloxane) layers irreversibly adsorbed from concentrated solutions or melts. We first measure the thickness h of the layers swollen by a good solvent as a function of the chain polymerisation index N and of the polymer volume fraction in the initial solution Φ. The relation h ≈ N^{0.8}Φ^{0.3}, recently predicted from an analogy between irreversibly adsorbed layers and grafted polymer brushes, describes well our results. We can therefore deduce that there is at least one large loop of about N monomers per adsorbed chain. We also study the shape of the polymer concentration profile in the layers by measuring on two samples the polymer-solid partial structure factor, that is proportional to the Fourier transform of the profile. The model of pseudobrushes predicts a concentration decay varying with the distance of the wall z as z^{-2/5}. This power law profile accounts quantitatively for the angular variation of the polymer-solid cross structure factor but it is difficult to distinguish it without anbiguity from less singular profiles. It implies that the adsorption of PDMS onto silica is sufficiently strong and fast to quench completely the loop distribution in the initial layer. Nous étudions par diffusion de neutrons la structure interfaciale de couches de poly(diméthylsiloxane) irréversiblement adsorbées sur de la silice à partir de solutions semidiluées et de fondus. Nous mesurons d'abord l'épaisseur h des couches gonflées par un bon solvant en fonction du degré de polymérisation des chaînes N et de la fraction volumique dans la solution initiale Φ. La relation h≈ N^{0.8}Φ^{0.3} récemment prédite à partir de l'analogie entre couches irréversiblement adsorbées et brosses de polymères greffés décrit bien nos résultats. Nous en déduisons qu'il existe au moins une grande boucle d'environ N monomères par chaîne adsorbée. Nous étudions aussi la forme du profil de

  7. Guava (Psidium guajava) leaf powder: novel adsorbent for removal of methylene blue from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ponnusami, V; Vikram, S; Srivastava, S N

    2008-03-21

    Batch sorption experiments were carried out using a novel adsorbent, guava leaf powder (GLP), for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Potential of GLP for adsorption of MB from aqueous solution was found to be excellent. Effects of process parameters pH, adsorbent dosage, concentration, particle size and temperature were studied. Temperature-concentration interaction effect on dye uptake was studied and a quadratic model was proposed to predict dye uptake in terms of concentration, time and temperature. The model conforms closely to the experimental data. The model was used to find optimum temperature and concentration that result in maximum dye uptake. Langmuir model represent the experimental data well. Maximum dye uptake was found to be 295mg/g, indicating that GLP can be used as an excellent low-cost adsorbent. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models were tested. From experimental data it was found that adsorption of MB onto GLP follow pseudo second order kinetics. External diffusion and intraparticle diffusion play roles in adsorption process. Free energy of adsorption (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy change (DeltaH degrees ) and entropy change (DeltaS degrees ) were calculated to predict the nature of adsorption. Adsorption in packed bed was also evaluated.

  8. Method for modifying trigger level for adsorber regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.

    2010-05-25

    A method for modifying a NO.sub.x adsorber regeneration triggering variable. Engine operating conditions are monitored until the regeneration triggering variable is met. The adsorber is regenerated and the adsorbtion efficiency of the adsorber is subsequently determined. The regeneration triggering variable is modified to correspond with the decline in adsorber efficiency. The adsorber efficiency may be determined using an empirically predetermined set of values or by using a pair of oxygen sensors to determine the oxygen response delay across the sensors.

  9. Agro-industrial waste: a low cost adsorbent for effective removal of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid herbicide in batch and packed bed modes.

    PubMed

    Deokar, Sunil K; Mandavgane, Sachin A; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2016-08-01

    The present work describes the aqueous phase removal of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid herbicide by rice husk ash (RHA) using batch and packed bed adsorption techniques. The effects of dosage, initial concentration, time, pH, temperature, and particle size of adsorbent in batch compared with effects of influent concentration, flow rate, and bed height in packed bed were studied. The particle size effect reveals that the removal is dependent on chemical composition (silica and carbon content) together with BET surface area of RHA. The aptness of Langmuir isotherm to batch data indicates the favorable adsorption whereas that of Temkin isotherm informs the heterogeneous nature of RHA. The kinetics of adsorption follows the pseudo-second order and Elovich models while thermodynamics of process indicates the exothermic adsorption. Among the models applied in packed bed study, the deactivation kinetic, Yoon-Nelson and bed depth service time (BDST) models are suitable to explain the packed bed adsorption. The adsorption capacity of RHA in packed bed study is found greater than that in batch. The adsorption capacity of RHA determined by the BDST model is 3019 mg/L for 90 % saturation of bed. The adsorption capacity of RHA based on weight is ∼2.3 times and that based on surface area is ∼55.55 times greater than that of granular activated carbon.

  10. Agro-industrial waste: a low cost adsorbent for effective removal of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid herbicide in batch and packed bed modes.

    PubMed

    Deokar, Sunil K; Mandavgane, Sachin A; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2016-08-01

    The present work describes the aqueous phase removal of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid herbicide by rice husk ash (RHA) using batch and packed bed adsorption techniques. The effects of dosage, initial concentration, time, pH, temperature, and particle size of adsorbent in batch compared with effects of influent concentration, flow rate, and bed height in packed bed were studied. The particle size effect reveals that the removal is dependent on chemical composition (silica and carbon content) together with BET surface area of RHA. The aptness of Langmuir isotherm to batch data indicates the favorable adsorption whereas that of Temkin isotherm informs the heterogeneous nature of RHA. The kinetics of adsorption follows the pseudo-second order and Elovich models while thermodynamics of process indicates the exothermic adsorption. Among the models applied in packed bed study, the deactivation kinetic, Yoon-Nelson and bed depth service time (BDST) models are suitable to explain the packed bed adsorption. The adsorption capacity of RHA in packed bed study is found greater than that in batch. The adsorption capacity of RHA determined by the BDST model is 3019 mg/L for 90 % saturation of bed. The adsorption capacity of RHA based on weight is ∼2.3 times and that based on surface area is ∼55.55 times greater than that of granular activated carbon. PMID:27151241

  11. Synthesis of magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Fe-OMC) adsorbent and its evaluation for fuel desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzin Nejad, N.; Shams, E.; Amini, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon adsorbent was synthesized using soft templating method to adsorb sulfur from model oil (dibenzothiophene in n-hexane). Through this research, pluronic F-127, resorcinol-formaldehyde and hydrated iron nitrate were respectively used as soft template, carbon source and iron source. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and transmission electron microscopy. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement revealed the high surface area (810 m2 g-1), maxima pore size of 3.3 nm and large pore volume (1.01 cm3 g-1) of the synthesized sample. The adsorbent showed a maximum adsorption capacity of 111 mg dibenzothiophene g-1 of adsorbent. Sorption process was described by the pseudo-second-order rate equation and could be better fitted by the Freundlich model, showing the heterogeneous feature of the adsorption process. In addition, the adsorption capacity of regenerated adsorbent was 78.6% of the initial level, after five regeneration cycles.

  12. Low-cost magnetic adsorbent for As(III) removal from water: adsorption kinetics and isotherms.

    PubMed

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles as adsorbent for arsenic (As) were coated on sand particles. The coated sand was used for the removal of highly toxic element 'As(III)' from drinking water. Here, batch experiments were performed with the variation of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and initial arsenic concentration. The adsorbent showed significant removal efficiency around 99.6 % for As(III). Analysis of adsorption kinetics revealed that the adsorbent follows pseudo-second-order kinetics model showing R (2) = 0.999, whereas for pseudo-first-order kinetics model, the value of R (2) was 0.978. In the case of adsorption equilibrium, the data is well fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model (R (2) > 0.99), indicating monolayer adsorption of As(III) on the surface of adsorbent. The existence of commonly present ions in water influences the removal efficiency of As(III) minutely in the following order PO4 (3-) > HCO3 (-) > Cl(-) > SO4 (2-). The obtained adsorbent can be used to overcome the problem of water filtration in rural areas. Moreover, as the nano-magnetite is coated on the sand, it avoids the problem of extraction of nanoparticles from treated water and can easily be removed by a simple filtration process. PMID:26711813

  13. Low-cost magnetic adsorbent for As(III) removal from water: adsorption kinetics and isotherms.

    PubMed

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles as adsorbent for arsenic (As) were coated on sand particles. The coated sand was used for the removal of highly toxic element 'As(III)' from drinking water. Here, batch experiments were performed with the variation of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and initial arsenic concentration. The adsorbent showed significant removal efficiency around 99.6 % for As(III). Analysis of adsorption kinetics revealed that the adsorbent follows pseudo-second-order kinetics model showing R (2) = 0.999, whereas for pseudo-first-order kinetics model, the value of R (2) was 0.978. In the case of adsorption equilibrium, the data is well fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model (R (2) > 0.99), indicating monolayer adsorption of As(III) on the surface of adsorbent. The existence of commonly present ions in water influences the removal efficiency of As(III) minutely in the following order PO4 (3-) > HCO3 (-) > Cl(-) > SO4 (2-). The obtained adsorbent can be used to overcome the problem of water filtration in rural areas. Moreover, as the nano-magnetite is coated on the sand, it avoids the problem of extraction of nanoparticles from treated water and can easily be removed by a simple filtration process.

  14. Aminosilica materials as adsorbents for the selective removal of aldehydes and ketones from simulated bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Drese, Jeffrey H; Talley, Anne D; Jones, Christopher W

    2011-03-21

    The fast pyrolysis of biomass is a potential route to the production of liquid biorenewable fuel sources. However, degradation of the bio-oil mixtures due to reaction of oxygenates, such as aldehydes and ketones, reduces the stability of the liquids and can impact long-term storage and shipping. Herein, solid aminosilica adsorbents are described for the selective adsorptive removal of reactive aldehyde and ketone species. Three aminosilica adsorbents are prepared through the reaction of amine-containing silanes with pore-expanded mesoporous silica. A fourth aminosilica adsorbent is prepared through the ring-opening polymerization of aziridine from pore-expanded mesoporous silica. Adsorption experiments with a representative mixture of bio-oil model compounds are presented using each adsorbent at room temperature and 45 °C. The adsorbent comprising only primary amines adsorbs the largest amount of aldehydes and ketones. The overall reactivity of this adsorbent increases with increasing temperature. Additional aldehyde screening experiments show that the reactivity of aldehydes with aminosilicas varies depending on their chemical functionality. Initial attempts to regenerate an aminosilica adsorbent by acid hydrolysis show that they can be at least partially regenerated for further use. PMID:21246749

  15. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  16. Radon emanation from radium specific adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Alabdula'aly, Abdulrahman I; Maghrawy, Hamed B

    2010-01-01

    Pilot studies were undertaken to quantify the total activity of radon that is eluted following no-flow periods from several Ra-226 adsorbents loaded to near exhaustion. The adsorbents studied included two types of barium sulphate impregnated alumina (ABA-8000 and F-1) and Dowex MSC-1 resin treated by either barium hydroxide or barium chloride. In parallel, radium loaded plain activated aluminas and Dowex MSC-1 resin were similarly investigated. The results revealed that radon was quantitatively eluted during the first few bed volumes of column operation after no-flow periods. Although similar radon elution profiles were obtained, the position of the radon peak was found to vary and depended on the adsorbent type. Radon levels up to 24 and 14 kBq dm(-3) were measured after a rest period of 72h from radium exhausted Dowex MSC-1 treated with barium chloride and F-1 impregnated alumina with barium sulphate, respectively. The eluted radon values measured experimentally were compared to those calculated theoretically from accumulated radium quantities for the different media. For plain adsorbents, an agreement better than 10% was obtained. For treated resin-types a consistency within 30% but for impregnated alumina-types high discrepancy between respective values were obtained.

  17. Unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertel, E.

    1991-11-01

    Experimental work on unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems on metallic substrates is reviewed with emphasis on recent developments. The first part is devoted to molecular adsorbates. Weakly chemisorbed hydrocarbons are briefly discussed. An exhaustive inverse photoemission (IPE) study of the CO bond to the transition metals Ni, Pb, and Pt is presented. Adsorbed NO is taken as an example to demonstrate the persisting discrepancies in the interpretation of IPE spectra. Atomic adsorbates are discussed in the second part. The quantum well state model is applied to interpret the surface states in reconstructing and non-reconstructing adsorption systems of alkali metals and hydrogen. A recent controversy on the unoccupied electronic states of the Cu(110)/O p(2×1) surface is critically reviewed. The quantum well state model is then compared to tight binding and local-density-functional calculations of the unoccupied bands and the deficiencies of the various approaches are pointed out. Finally, the relation between the surface state model and more chemically oriented models of surface bonding is briefly discussed.

  18. Continuum elastic theory of adsorbate vibrational relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Steven P.; Pykhtin, M. V.; Mele, E. J.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the damping of low-frequency adsorbate vibrations via resonant coupling to the substrate phonons. The system is treated classically, with the substrate modeled as a semi-infinite elastic continuum and the adsorbate overlayer modeled as an array of point masses connected to the surface by harmonic springs. The theory provides a simple expression for the relaxation rate in terms of fundamental parameters of the system: γ=mω¯02/AcρcT, where m is the adsorbate mass, ω¯0 is the measured frequency, Ac is the overlayer unit-cell area, and ρ and cT are the substrate mass density and transverse speed of sound, respectively. This expression is strongly coverage dependent, and predicts relaxation rates in excellent quantitative agreement with available experiments. For a half-monolayer of carbon monoxide on the copper (100) surface, the predicted damping rate of in-plane frustrated translations is 0.50×1012s-1, as compared to the experimental value of (0.43±0.07)×1012s-1. Furthermore it is shown that, for all coverages presently accessible to experiment, adsorbate motions exhibit collective effects which cannot be treated as stemming from isolated oscillators.

  19. Influence of Polymers on the Crystal Growth Rate of Felodipine: Correlating Adsorbed Polymer Surface Coverage to Solution Crystal Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schram, Caitlin J; Taylor, Lynne S; Beaudoin, Stephen P

    2015-10-20

    The bioavailability of orally administered drugs that exhibit poor aqueous solubility can be enhanced with the use of supersaturating dosage forms. Stabilization of these forms by preventing or inhibiting crystallization in solution is an important area of study. Polymers can be used to stabilize supersaturated systems; however, the properties that impact their effectiveness as crystal growth rate inhibitors are not yet fully understood. In this study, the impact of various polymers on the crystal growth rate of felodipine and the conformation of these polymers adsorbed to crystalline felodipine was investigated in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of crystal growth inhibition. It was determined that polymer hydrophobicity impacted polymer adsorption as well as adsorbed polymer conformation. Polymer conformation impacts its surface coverage, which was shown to directly correlate to the polymer's effectiveness as a growth rate inhibitor. By modeling this correlation, it is possible to predict polymer effectiveness given the surface coverage of the polymer.

  20. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  1. Gaseous and adsorbed PAH in an iron foundry.

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, U; Elliehausen, H J; Woitowitz, H J

    1986-01-01

    The increased risk of lung cancer among foundry workers is assumed to be associated with the inhalation of gaseous and particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These compounds are produced during pyrolysis of carbon containing loading material in the moulding sand. The concentrations of 20 PAH, some of which are carcinogenic, have been determined in the dusty casting area of an iron foundry by means of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The total dust was fractionated by means of a precision cascade impactor. It was possible to differentiate the PAH load in microgram/mg dust in seven particle size fractions ranging from 0.36- greater than or equal to 24.95 microns. Initially, there was an increase of the adsorbed PAH mass concentration with increasing particle diameter up to a maximum of 1.1 microgram/mg in the dust of the 1.57 micron fraction. Thereafter there was a continuous decrease of PAH mass concentration with increasing particle size. When the differing weights of the seven fractions are taken into account, however, the total PAH load of the individual fractions increases steadily with increasing particle size. The inhalable fine dust, 31.4% of the total dust, contains 49.9% of the total adsorbed PAH. The gas phase contained on average three times more carcinogenic PAH with four and five rings than was adsorbed on the dust. Thus the percentage of the gaseous substances amounts to 77% of the total PAH load at the place of work in an iron foundry. PMID:3801335

  2. Interaction between adsorbed hydrogen and potassium on a carbon nanocone containing material as studied by photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Raaen, Steinar

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen adsorption on a potassium doped carbon nanocone containing material was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and work function measurement. The valence band spectra indicate that there is charge transfer from potassium to carbon. Upon deposition on carbon potassium is in its ionic state for lower doping and shows both ionic and metallic behavior at higher doping. Adsorption of hydrogen facilitates diffusion of potassium on the carbon material as seen by changes in the K{sub 2p} core level spectrum. Variations in the measured sample work function indicate that hydrogen initially adsorb on the K dopants and subsequently adsorb on the carbon cone containing material.

  3. Natural Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii by Adsorbed Chromosomal DNA: Role of Adsorbed DNA Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, N.; Zilles, J.; Nguyen, H.

    2008-12-01

    Recent increases in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms and the accompanying public health concerns result both from the widespread use of antibiotics and from the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among microorganisms. To understand the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and identify efficient measures to minimize these transfers, an interdisciplinary approach was used to identify physical and chemical factors that control the fate and biological availability of extracellular DNA. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to study extracellular DNA adsorption and the conformation of the adsorbed DNA on silica and natural organic matter (NOM) surfaces. Solution chemistry was varied systematically to investigate the role of adsorbed DNA conformation on transformation. Gene transfer was assessed under the same conditions using natural transformation of chromosomal DNA into the soil bacteria Azotobacter vinelandii. DNA adsorbed to both silica and NOM surfaces has a more compact and rigid conformation in the presence of Ca2+ compared to Na+. Extracellular DNA adsorbed on silica and NOM surfaces transformed A. vinelandii. The transformation efficiency of adsorbed DNA was up to 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of dissolved DNA. Preliminary results suggest that the presence of Ca2+ in groundwater (e.g. hardness) reduces the availability of adsorbed DNA for transformation.

  4. Efficiency of individual dosage of digoxin with calculated concentration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Yang, Peng; Li, Pengmei; Wang, Xiaoxing; Qin, Wangjun; Zhang, Xianglin

    2014-01-01

    Background Digoxin is a frequently prescribed drug, particularly in the elderly population, in which there is an increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation and cardiac failure. With its complex pharmacokinetic profile and narrow therapeutic index, use of digoxin requires regular monitoring of blood levels. Recent evidence suggests that a lower concentration range (0.4–1.0 ng/mL) is preferable in patients with congestive heart failure and a higher range (0.8–2.0 ng/mL) is needed in patients with atrial tachyarrhythmia. The Konishi equation is widely used to predict the serum digoxin concentration (SDC) in Japan. This study assessed the correlation between SDC predicted by the Konishi equation and that actually measured in Chinese patients and investigated the impact of renal function on SDC. Methods The study subjects comprised 72 patients with cardiac failure or/and atrial tachyarrhythmia seen at our hospital from January 2012 to December 2013. The patients were divided into five groups according to Kidney Diseases Outcome Quality Initiative guidelines. SDCs were measured using the Abbott Architect i1000 immunology analyzer. The correlations between measured SDCs and calculated SDCs and between clearance of digoxin and creatinine clearance rate were assessed retrospectively. Results The correlation between measured and predicted SDC calculated by the Konishi equation was significant (r=0.655, P<0.001) for the 72 patients overall; however, correlations within the different stages of renal function were nonsignificant, with a correlation found only in patients with stage 3 (30 mL per minute < creatinine clearance <60 mL per minute). With regard to the correlation between clearance of digoxin and creatinine clearance, our results show that although there was a significant correlation between clearance of digoxin and creatinine clearance in the group overall, correlations were not evident within the different stages of renal function. Conclusion The results of

  5. 76 FR 78149 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Estriol

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Estriol... (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of an original new animal drug... of Subjects in 21 CFR Part 520 Animal drugs. Therefore, under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  6. 75 FR 67031 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Domperidone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs... Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect the original approval of a new animal.... 801-808. List of Subjects in 21 CFR Part 520 Animal drugs. 0 Therefore, under the Federal Food,...

  7. 77 FR 15960 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Pergolide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Pergolide... (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of an original new animal drug... 21 CFR Part 520 Animal drugs. Therefore, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and...

  8. 77 FR 3927 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Deracoxib

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Deracoxib... (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of a supplemental new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Novartis Animal Health U.S., Inc. The supplemental NADA provides for...

  9. 76 FR 78815 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Cyclosporine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs... Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of a new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Novartis Animal Health US, Inc. The NADA provides for the veterinary prescription use...

  10. 76 FR 40808 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Amprolium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Amprolium... (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of an original abbreviated new animal.... 801-808. List of Subjects in 21 CFR Part 520 Animal drugs. Therefore, under the Federal Food,...

  11. 77 FR 15961 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Phenylpropanolamine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs... Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of an original new animal drug... congressional review requirements in 5 U.S.C. 801-808. List of Subjects in 21 CFR Part 520 Animal...

  12. 76 FR 18648 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Robenacoxib

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs... Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of an original new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Novartis Animal Health US, Inc. The NADA provides for the veterinary...

  13. 76 FR 38554 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Amprolium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Amprolium... (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of an original abbreviated new animal... requirements in 5 U.S.C. 801-808. List of Subjects in 21 CFR Part 520 Animal drugs. Therefore, under...

  14. Health Instruction Packages: Drug Dosage, Classification, and Mixing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracchi, Dorothy P.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in a set of seven learning modules to instruct nursing students in the fundamentals of drug classification, dosage, and mixing. The first module, by Dorothy Bracchi, teaches the student to identify six classifications of medication often administered to orthopedic patients: anti-neurospasmolytic…

  15. Recent progress and open questions in Drosophila dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Vensko, Steven P; Stone, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism is observed in many traits across diverse taxa, and often it is quite extreme. Within a species, individuals of opposing sex can appear strikingly different, reflecting differences at the molecular level that may be similarly striking. Among the most extreme cases of such molecular sexual dimorphism is the quantity of sex chromosomes that each sex possesses. Hemizygous sex chromosomes are common to many species, and various mechanisms have evolved to regulate transcriptional activity to ensure appropriate sex chromosome-to-autosome gene expression stoichiometry. Among the most thoroughly investigated of these mechanisms is Drosophila melanogaster's male-specific lethal (MSL) complex-mediated dosage compensation. In Drosophila, the male X chromosome transcription is upregulated approximately two-fold in somatic tissues to counterbalance the effects of sex chromosome hemizygosity on transcript abundance. Despite dramatic advances in our understanding of the Drosophila dosage compensation, many questions remain unanswered, and our understanding of its molecular underpinnings remains incomplete. In this review, we synthesize recent progress in the field as a means to highlight open questions, including how the MSL complex targets the X chromosome, how dosage compensation has shaped evolution of X-linked genes, and the degree to which MSL complex-mediated dosage compensation varies in activity across somatic tissues. PMID:26213294

  16. Calculating Dosages: A Programed Learner for Student Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary

    Intended for nursing students, this programed workbook contains learning exercises and study tests on using household, apothecary, and metric systems in calculating medication dosages. The material, organized in six learning units, was designed to help students meet six objectives: correctly interpret and use accepted symbols and abbreviations in…

  17. Dosage compensation and demasculinization of X chromosomes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bachtrog, Doris; Toda, Nicholas R T; Lockton, Steven

    2010-08-24

    The X chromosome of Drosophila shows a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, whereas mammalian X chromosomes are enriched for spermatogenesis genes expressed premeiosis and multicopy testis genes. Meiotic X-inactivation and sexual antagonism can only partly account for these patterns. Here, we show that dosage compensation (DC) in Drosophila may contribute substantially to the depletion of male genes on the X. To equalize expression between X-linked and autosomal genes in the two sexes, male Drosophila hypertranscribe their single X, whereas female mammals silence one of their two X chromosomes. We combine fine-scale mapping data of dosage compensated regions with genome-wide expression profiles and show that most male-biased genes on the D. melanogaster X are located outside dosage compensated regions. Additionally, X-linked genes that have newly acquired male-biased expression in D. melanogaster are less likely to be dosage compensated, and parental X-linked genes that gave rise to an autosomal male-biased retrocopy are more likely located within compensated regions. This suggests that DC contributes to the observed demasculinization of X chromosomes in Drosophila, both by limiting the emergence of male-biased expression patterns of existing X genes, and by contributing to gene trafficking of male genes off the X. PMID:20705467

  18. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of...

  19. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of...

  20. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of...

  1. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of...

  2. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1448 - Monensin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monensin oral dosage forms. 520.1448 Section 520.1448 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... starting line). The loss on drying is not more than 10 percent when dried in vacuum at 60 °C for 2 hours....

  4. 21 CFR 520.1448 - Monensin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monensin oral dosage forms. 520.1448 Section 520.1448 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... starting line). The loss on drying is not more than 10 percent when dried in vacuum at 60 °C for 2 hours....

  5. Promotion of CO oxidation on PdO(101) by adsorbed H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juhee; Pan, Li; Mehar, Vikram; Zhang, Feng; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the influence of adsorbed H2O on the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) using temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that water inhibits CO adsorption on PdO(101) by site blocking, but also provides a more facile pathway for CO oxidation compared with the bare oxide surface. In the presence of adsorbed H2O, the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) produces a CO2 TPRS peak that is centered at a temperature ~ 50 K lower than the main CO2 TPRS peak arising from CO oxidation on clean PdO(101) (~ 330 vs. 380 K). RAIRS shows that CO continues to adsorb on atop-Pd sites of PdO(101) when H2O is co-adsorbed, and provides no evidence of other reactive intermediates. DFT calculations predict that the CO oxidation mechanism follows the same steps for CO adsorbed on PdO(101) with and without co-adsorbed H2O, wherein an atop-CO species recombines with an oxygen atom from the oxide surface lattice. According to DFT, hydrogen bonding interactions with adsorbed H2O species stabilize the carboxyl-like transition structure and intermediate that result from the initial recombination of CO and O on the PdO(101) surface. This stabilization lowers the energy barrier for CO oxidation on PdO(101) by ~ 10 kJ/mol, in good agreement with our experimental estimate.

  6. Fibrous adsorbent for removal of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Jun; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Yamada, Toshiro; Takagi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Bundles of a strongly hydrophobic fibrous material (p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole; PBO; Zylon) were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of aqueous aromatic compounds, because the PBO fibers are too rigid to be woven and did not entrap suspended solids. The removal performance for nine kinds of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was evaluated. PAHs and DEHP at initial concentrations of 50 microg L(-1) were removed at 72.5-99.9% and ca. 95%, respectively, although the removal efficiencies were affected by the phase ratio (fiber weight/solution volume). The logarithm of the partition coefficient (log K) for planar PAHs was linearly correlated with the logarithm of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P), but nonplanar PAHs, such as cis-stilbene, p-terphenyl, and o-terphenyl, showed significantly lower adsorption performance. The adsorbed PAHs were not desorbed effectively with CH3CN, CH2Cl2, and toluene. On the other hand, DEHP was effectively desorbed with methanol.

  7. Fibrous adsorbent for removal of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Jun; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Yamada, Toshiro; Takagi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Bundles of a strongly hydrophobic fibrous material (p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole; PBO; Zylon) were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of aqueous aromatic compounds, because the PBO fibers are too rigid to be woven and did not entrap suspended solids. The removal performance for nine kinds of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was evaluated. PAHs and DEHP at initial concentrations of 50 microg L(-1) were removed at 72.5-99.9% and ca. 95%, respectively, although the removal efficiencies were affected by the phase ratio (fiber weight/solution volume). The logarithm of the partition coefficient (log K) for planar PAHs was linearly correlated with the logarithm of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P), but nonplanar PAHs, such as cis-stilbene, p-terphenyl, and o-terphenyl, showed significantly lower adsorption performance. The adsorbed PAHs were not desorbed effectively with CH3CN, CH2Cl2, and toluene. On the other hand, DEHP was effectively desorbed with methanol. PMID:17585293

  8. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  9. Quantitative analysis of Cu and Co adsorbed on fish bones via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezk, R. A.; Galmed, A. H.; Abdelkreem, M.; Ghany, N. A. Abdel; Harith, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of heavy metals adsorbed by fish bones. Fish bones were used as a natural and low cost heavy metal sorbent (mainly Cu and Co) from synthetic wastewater. The removal efficiency of the adsorbent was studied as a function of initial metal concentration and pH value. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated for improving the sensitivity of LIBS technique through parametric dependence studies. Furthermore, calibration curves were constructed based on X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis technique, whereas, the limits of detection (LOD) for Cu and Co were calculated. The results were validated by comparing LIBS data with those obtained by XRF spectrometry. The results of the two techniques are strongly correlated which verified the feasibility of using LIBS to detect traces of heavy metals adsorbed from wastewater by fish bones. This study reflects the potential of using LIBS in environmental applications.

  10. Utilization of granular activated carbon adsorber for nitrates removal from groundwater of the Cluj region.

    PubMed

    Moşneag, Silvia C; Popescu, Violeta; Dinescu, Adrian; Borodi, George

    2013-01-01

    The level of nitrates from groundwater from Cluj County and other areas from Romania have increased values, exceeding or getting close to the allowed limit values, putting in danger human and animal heath. In this study we used granular activated carbon adsorbent (GAC) for nitrate (NO(-)3) removal for the production of drinking water from groundwater of the Cluj county. The influences of the contact time, nitrate initial concentration, and adsorbent concentration have been studied. We determined the equilibrium adsorption capacity of GAC, used for NO(-)3 removal and we applied the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used for process characterization. We also determined: pH, conductivity, Total Dissolved Solids and Total Hardness. The GAC adsorbents have excellent capacities of removing nitrate from groundwater from Cluj County areas.

  11. Amine-pillared Nanosheet Adsorbents for CO2 Capture Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui

    3D microporous layers with 8 MB openings in the plane of the layers, as well as perpendicular to the layers, which are larger than CO2 molecules. Based on the structure differences between nanosheets precursor material MCM-22(P) and nanoporous layered silicate material AMH-3, the latter might be more suitable for CO 2 capturer application as an APN candidate material. However, none of the assumptions above have been approved experimentally. In this study, the influence of the amine loading on adsorption capacity and kinetics of adsorption for the mixed porosity material pillared MCM-22 (P) (also called MCM-36) is studied systematically, in order to determine a potential route to achieve a final material with both high amine loading and high adsorption capacity. We first synthesized MCM-22(P), followed by swelling and pillaring to create MCM-36. Polymeric amines such as polyethylenimine (PEI) are used as an organic component of the supported amine adsorbents, with varying polymer loadings within the adsorbents used. The kinetics and diffusion properties of carbon dioxide capture on a MCM-36 pillared material impregnated with amine containing Polyethylenimine polymers has been investigated. It was determined that the introduction of amine polymer cannot be used to improve the capture capacity of the support over that of the bare material, due to the fact that with the addition of a high loading of amine polymer the large pore diffusion channels become impossible for carbon dioxide molecules to diffuse through. This sets an upper limit to the capture capacity of polymer impregnated MCM-36 for carbon dioxide which does not surpass that for the initial bare material, and greatly reduces the utility of using this sort of amine-solid adsorbent for carbon capture plans in the future.

  12. Modeling Effective Dosages in Hormetic Dose-Response Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belz, Regina G.; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Two hormetic modifications of a monotonically decreasing log-logistic dose-response function are most often used to model stimulatory effects of low dosages of a toxicant in plant biology. As just one of these empirical models is yet properly parameterized to allow inference about quantities of interest, this study contributes the parameterized functions for the second hormetic model and compares the estimates of effective dosages between both models based on 23 hormetic data sets. Based on this, the impact on effective dosage estimations was evaluated, especially in case of a substantially inferior fit by one of the two models. Methodology/Principal Findings The data sets evaluated described the hormetic responses of four different test plant species exposed to 15 different chemical stressors in two different experimental dose-response test designs. Out of the 23 data sets, one could not be described by any of the two models, 14 could be better described by one of the two models, and eight could be equally described by both models. In cases of misspecification by any of the two models, the differences between effective dosages estimates (0–1768%) greatly exceeded the differences observed when both models provided a satisfactory fit (0–26%). This suggests that the conclusions drawn depending on the model used may diverge considerably when using an improper hormetic model especially regarding effective dosages quantifying hormesis. Conclusions/Significance The study showed that hormetic dose responses can take on many shapes and that this diversity can not be captured by a single model without risking considerable misinterpretation. However, the two empirical models considered in this paper together provide a powerful means to model, prove, and now also to quantify a wide range of hormetic responses by reparameterization. Despite this, they should not be applied uncritically, but after statistical and graphical assessment of their adequacy. PMID

  13. Computer simulations of adsorbed liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Greg D.; Cleaver, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    The structures adopted by adsorbed thin films of Gay-Berne particles in the presence of a coexisting vapour phase are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The films are adsorbed at a flat substrate which favours planar anchoring, whereas the nematic-vapour interface favours normal alignment. On cooling, a system with a high molecule-substrate interaction strength exhibits substrate-induced planar orientational ordering and considerable stratification is observed in the density profiles. In contrast, a system with weak molecule-substrate coupling adopts a director orientation orthogonal to the substrate plane, owing to the increased influence of the nematic-vapour interface. There are significant differences between the structures adopted at the two interfaces, in contrast with the predictions of density functional treatments of such systems.

  14. Magnesium silicates adsorbents of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielczyk, Filip; Krysztafkiewicz, Andrzej; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2007-08-01

    Studies were presented on production of highly dispersed magnesium silicate at a pilote scale. The process of silicate adsorbent production involved precipitation reaction using water glass (sodium metasilicate) solution and appropriate magnesium salt, preceded by an appropriate optimization stage. Samples of best physicochemical parameters were in addition modified (in order to introduce to silica surface of several functional groups) using the dry technique and various amounts of 3-isocyanatepropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-thiocyanatepropyltrimethoxysilane, N-phenyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane. The so prepared samples were subjected to a comprehensive physicochemical analysis. At the terminal stage of studies attempts were made to adsorb phenol from its aqueous solutions on the surface of unmodified and modified magnesium silicates. Particle size distributions were determined using the ZetaSizer Nano ZS apparatus. In order to define adsorptive properties of studied magnesium silicates isotherms of nitrogen adsorption/desorption on their surfaces were established. Efficiency of phenol adsorption was tested employing analysis of post-adsorption solution.

  15. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  16. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.

  17. A novel starch-based adsorbent for removing toxic Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Xiao, Congming; Chen, Bingxia

    2011-08-30

    A novel effective starch-based adsorbent was prepared through two common reactions, which included the esterification of starch with excess maleic anhydride in the presence of pyridine and the cross-linking reaction of the obtained macromonomer with acrylic acid by using potassium persulphate as initiator. The percentage of carboxylic groups of the macromonomer ranged from 14% to 33.4%. The cross-linking degree of the adsorbent was tailored with the amount of acrylic acid which varied from 10wt% to 80wt%. Both Fourier transform infrared spectra and thermogravimetric analysis results verified the structure of the adsorbent. The maximum gel fraction and swelling ratio of the adsorbent were about 72% and 6.25, respectively, and they were able to be adjusted with the amount of monomers. The weight loss percentage of the adsorbent could reach 96.9% after immersing in the buffer solution that contained α-amylase for 14h. It was found that the adsorption capacities of the adsorbent for lead and mercury ions could be 123.2 and 131.2mg/g, respectively. In addition, the adsorbent was able to remove ca. 51-90% Pb(II) and Hg(II) ions that existed in the decoctions of four medicinal herbals. PMID:21724326

  18. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Adsorbent Packed Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideo; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Suguru

    The effective thermal conductivity of adsorbent packed beds of granular zeolite 13X and granular silica gel A in the presence of stagnant steam or air was measured under different conditions of the adsorbent bed temperature, particle size and filler-gas pressure. The measured effective thermal conductivity showed to become smaller with decreasing particle size or decreasing pressure, but it was nearly independent of the bed temperature. When steam was the filler-gas, the rise in the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent particles due to steam adsorption led to the increase in the effective thermal conductivity of the bed, and this effect was not negligible at high steam pressure for the bed of large particle size. It was found that both the predictions of the effective thermal conductivity by the Hayashi et al.'s model and the Bauer-Schlünder model generally agreed well with the measurements, by considering the particle thermal conductivity rise due to steam adsorption. The thermal conductivity of a consolidated bed of granular zeolite 13X was also measured, and it was found to be much larger than that of the packed bed especially at lower pressure. The above prediction models underestimated the effective thermal conductivity of the consolidated bed.

  19. Orbital tomography for highly symmetric adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtmüller, B.; Willenbockel, M.; Reinisch, E. M.; Ules, T.; Bocquet, F. C.; Soubatch, S.; Puschnig, P.; Koller, G.; Ramsey, M. G.; Tautz, F. S.; Kumpf, C.

    2012-10-01

    Orbital tomography is a new and very powerful tool to analyze the angular distribution of a photoemission spectroscopy experiment. It was successfully used for organic adsorbate systems to identify (and consequently deconvolute) the contributions of specific molecular orbitals to the photoemission data. The technique was so far limited to surfaces with low symmetry like fcc(110) oriented surfaces, owing to the small number of rotational domains that occur on such surfaces. In this letter we overcome this limitation and present an orbital tomography study of a 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetra-carboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer film adsorbed on Ag(111). Although this system exhibits twelve differently oriented molecules, the angular resolved photoemission data still allow a meaningful analysis of the different local density of states and reveal different electronic structures for symmetrically inequivalent molecules. We also discuss the precision of the orbital tomography technique in terms of counting statistics and linear regression fitting algorithm. Our results demonstrate that orbital tomography is not limited to low-symmetry surfaces, a finding which makes a broad field of complex adsorbate systems accessible to this powerful technique.

  20. Recycling of spent adsorbents for oxyanions and heavy metal ions in the production of ceramics.

    PubMed

    Verbinnen, Bram; Block, Chantal; Van Caneghem, Jo; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Spent adsorbents for oxyanion forming elements and heavy metals are classified as hazardous materials and they are typically treated by stabilization/solidification before landfilling. The use of lime or cement for stabilization/solidification entails a high environmental impact and landfilling costs are high. This paper shows that mixing spent adsorbents in the raw material for the production of ceramic materials is a valuable alternative to stabilize oxyanion forming elements and heavy metals. The produced ceramics can be used as construction material, avoiding the high economic and environmental impact of stabilization/solidification followed by landfilling. To study the stabilization of oxyanion forming elements and heavy metals during the production process, two series of experiments were performed. In the first series of experiments, the main pollutant, Mo was adsorbed onto iron-based adsorbents, which were then mixed with industrial sludge (3 w/w%) and heated at 1100°C for 30 min. Mo was chosen, as this element is easily adsorbed onto iron-based adsorbents and it is the element that is the most difficult to stabilize (i.e. the highest temperatures need to be reached before the concentrations in the leachate are reduced). Leaching concentration from the 97/3 sludge/adsorbent mixture before heating ranged between 85 and 154 mg/kg; after the heating process they were reduced to 0.42-1.48 mg/kg. Mo was actually stabilized, as the total Mo concentration after addition was not affected by the heat treatment. In the second series of experiments, the sludge was spiked with other heavy metals and oxyanion forming elements (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb) in concentrations 5 times higher than the initial concentrations; after heat treatment the leachate concentrations were below the regulatory limit values. The incorporation of spent adsorbents in ceramic materials is a valuable and sustainable alternative to the existing treatment methods, saving raw materials in the

  1. Regenerable granular carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid adsorbents for diclofenac sodium and carbamazepine removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haoran; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Qian; Nie, Yao; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2013-08-01

    A novel granular carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/alumina (Al2O3) hybrid adsorbent with good sorption and regeneration properties was successfully prepared by mixing CNTs with surfactant Brij 35 and pseudo boehmite, followed by calcining to remove surfactant and form porous granules. Alumina binder increased the mechanical strength, hydrophilicity and porosity of the granular adsorbent, while the dispersed CNTs in the granular adsorbent were responsible for the sorption of diclofenac sodium (DS) and carbamazepine (CBZ). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the CNTs and Al2O3 were mixed well and the porous structure was formed in the granular adsorbent. The high surface area and appropriate pore size of granular CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were favorable for sorption. The sorption of DS decreased with increasing solution pH, while pH had little effect on CBZ sorption. The maximum sorption capacities of CBZ and DS on the CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were 157.4 and 106.5 μmol/g according to the Langmuir fitting. Moreover, the spent CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent can be thermally regenerated at 400 °C in air due to the thermal stability of CNTs. The removal of CBZ and DS changed a little in the initial reuse cycles and then kept relatively constant until tenth cycles. The adsorbed CBZ and DS were decomposed in the regeneration process. This regenerable adsorbent may find potential application in water or wastewater treatment for the removal of some micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals.

  2. Regenerable granular carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid adsorbents for diclofenac sodium and carbamazepine removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haoran; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Qian; Nie, Yao; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2013-08-01

    A novel granular carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/alumina (Al2O3) hybrid adsorbent with good sorption and regeneration properties was successfully prepared by mixing CNTs with surfactant Brij 35 and pseudo boehmite, followed by calcining to remove surfactant and form porous granules. Alumina binder increased the mechanical strength, hydrophilicity and porosity of the granular adsorbent, while the dispersed CNTs in the granular adsorbent were responsible for the sorption of diclofenac sodium (DS) and carbamazepine (CBZ). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the CNTs and Al2O3 were mixed well and the porous structure was formed in the granular adsorbent. The high surface area and appropriate pore size of granular CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were favorable for sorption. The sorption of DS decreased with increasing solution pH, while pH had little effect on CBZ sorption. The maximum sorption capacities of CBZ and DS on the CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were 157.4 and 106.5 μmol/g according to the Langmuir fitting. Moreover, the spent CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent can be thermally regenerated at 400 °C in air due to the thermal stability of CNTs. The removal of CBZ and DS changed a little in the initial reuse cycles and then kept relatively constant until tenth cycles. The adsorbed CBZ and DS were decomposed in the regeneration process. This regenerable adsorbent may find potential application in water or wastewater treatment for the removal of some micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals. PMID:23579087

  3. RFID Tag Helix Antenna Sensors for Wireless Drug Dosage Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyu; Zhao, Peisen; Chen, Pai-Yen; Ren, Yong; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Hu, Ye; Akinwande, Deji

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized helix antennas are integrated with drug reservoirs to function as RFID wireless tag sensors for real-time drug dosage monitoring. The general design procedure of this type of biomedical antenna sensors is proposed based on electromagnetic theory and finite element simulation. A cost effective fabrication process is utilized to encapsulate the antenna sensor within a biocompatible package layer using PDMS material, and at the same time form a drug storage or drug delivery unit inside the sensor. The in vitro experiment on two prototypes of antenna sensor-drug reservoir assembly have shown the ability to monitor the drug dosage by tracking antenna resonant frequency shift from 2.4-2.5-GHz ISM band with realized sensitivity of 1.27 [Formula: see text] for transdermal drug delivery monitoring and 2.76-[Formula: see text] sensitivity for implanted drug delivery monitoring. PMID:27170865

  4. Dosage compensation, the origin and the afterlife of sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jan; Meller, Victoria H

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 100 years Drosophila has been developed into an outstanding model system for the study of evolutionary processes. A fascinating aspect of evolution is the differentiation of sex chromosomes. Organisms with highly differentiated sex chromosomes, such as the mammalian X and Y, must compensate for the imbalance in gene dosage that this creates. The need to adjust the expression of sex-linked genes is a potent force driving the rise of regulatory mechanisms that act on an entire chromosome. This review will contrast the process of dosage compensation in Drosophila with the divergent strategies adopted by other model organisms. While the machinery of sex chromosome compensation is different in each instance, all share the ability to direct chromatin modifications to an entire chromosome. This review will also explore the idea that chromosome-targeting systems are sometimes adapted for other purposes. This appears the likely source of a chromosome-wide targeting system displayed by the Drosophila fourth chromosome.

  5. 1p36 tumor suppression--a matter of dosage?

    PubMed

    Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Schwab, Manfred; Westermann, Frank

    2012-12-01

    A broad range of human malignancies is associated with nonrandom 1p36 deletions, suggesting the existence of tumor suppressors encoded in this region. Evidence for tumor-specific inactivation of 1p36 genes in the classic "two-hit" manner is scarce; however, many tumor suppressors do not require complete inactivation but contribute to tumorigenesis by partial impairment. We discuss recent data derived from both human tumors and functional cancer models indicating that the 1p36 genes CHD5, CAMTA1, KIF1B, CASZ1, and miR-34a contribute to cancer development when reduced in dosage by genomic copy number loss or other mechanisms. We explore potential interactions among these candidates and propose a model where heterozygous 1p36 deletion impairs oncosuppressive pathways via simultaneous downregulation of several dosage-dependent tumor suppressor genes.

  6. Regulatory perspectives on acceptability testing of dosage forms in children.

    PubMed

    Kozarewicz, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Current knowledge about the age-appropriateness of different dosage forms is still fragmented or limited. Applicants are asked to demonstrate that the target age group(s) can manage the dosage form or propose an alternative strategy. However, questions remain about how far the applicant must go and what percentage of patients must find the strategy 'acceptable'. The aim of this overview is to provide an update on current thinking and understanding of the problem, and discuss issues relating to the acceptability testing. This overview should be considered as means to start a wider discussion which hopefully will result in a harmonised, globally acceptable approach for confirmation of the acceptability in the future.

  7. Dosage compensation of the sex chromosomes and autosomes.

    PubMed

    Disteche, Christine M

    2016-08-01

    Males are XY and females are XX in most mammalian species. Other species such as birds have a different sex chromosome make-up: ZZ in males and ZW in females. In both types of organisms one of the sex chromosomes, Y or W, has degenerated due to lack of recombination with its respective homolog X or Z. Since autosomes are present in two copies in diploid organisms the heterogametic sex has become a natural "aneuploid" with haploinsufficiency for X- or Z-linked genes. Specific mechanisms have evolved to restore a balance between critical gene products throughout the genome and between males and females. Some of these mechanisms were co-opted from and/or added to compensatory processes that alleviate autosomal aneuploidy. Surprisingly, several modes of dosage compensation have evolved. In this review we will consider the evidence for dosage compensation and the molecular mechanisms implicated.

  8. Sex-linked dosage-sensitive modifiers as imprinting genes.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, C

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed that differential genome imprinting is the result of dosage-sensitive modifier genes located on the sex chromosomes. Parallels between variegating position-effects in Drosophila, the phenotype elicited by transgenes in the mouse and data from several pediatric tumors indicate that the net result of the activity of such modifier genes is often cellular mosaicism in the expression of affected alleles. The mechanism by which inactivation of affected alleles is achieved is proposed to be through the formation of heterochromatic domains. Because the relevant sex-linked modifying loci are dosage sensitive in their activity, differential imprinting will occur even within homogeneous genetic backgrounds. The presence of allelic variants at these loci in non-inbred populations will give rise to variation in the observed expressivity and mode of inheritance of affected traits.

  9. Multiple RNA-protein interactions in Drosophila dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Amrein, Hubert

    2000-01-01

    From worms to humans, recognizing and modifying a specific chromosome is essential for dosage compensation, the mechanism by which equal X-linked gene expression in males and females is achieved. Recent molecular genetic and biochemical studies have provided new insights into how regulatory factors in Drosophila are recruited and assembled on the X chromosome, leading to the essential hypertranscription of its genes. PMID:11178270

  10. Dosage Compensation in the African Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Graham; Krzywinska, Elzbieta; Kim, Jan; Revuelta, Loic; Ferretti, Luca; Krzywinski, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation is the fundamental process by which gene expression from the male monosomic X chromosome and from the diploid set of autosomes is equalized. Various molecular mechanisms have evolved in different organisms to achieve this task. In Drosophila, genes on the male X chromosome are upregulated to the levels of expression from the two X chromosomes in females. To test whether a similar mechanism is operating in immature stages of Anopheles mosquitoes, we analyzed global gene expression in the Anopheles gambiae fourth instar larvae and pupae using high-coverage RNA-seq data. In pupae of both sexes, the median expression ratios of X-linked to autosomal genes (X:A) were close to 1.0, and within the ranges of expression ratios between the autosomal pairs, consistent with complete compensation. Gene-by-gene comparisons of expression in males and females revealed mild female bias, likely attributable to a deficit of male-biased X-linked genes. In larvae, male to female ratios of the X chromosome expression levels were more female biased than in pupae, suggesting that compensation may not be complete. No compensation mechanism appears to operate in male germline of early pupae. Confirmation of the existence of dosage compensation in A. gambiae lays the foundation for research into the components of dosage compensation machinery in this important vector species. PMID:26782933

  11. Gastric emptying of multi-particulate dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Newton, J Michael

    2010-08-16

    The evidence in the literature for the concept that multi-particulate dosage forms below a specific size empty from the stomach as if they were liquids and hence have the potential to provide the best solution to the formulation of controlled release oral dosage forms, has been considered. There is some evidence that particles less than 1.0mm provide a more rapid response than larger size particles but there is also evidence that this is not always the case and that rapid and reproducible gastric emptying of small particles does not always occur when they are administered. There is strong evidence that food can delay the gastric emptying of multi-particulate systems. Some of the misconception for gastric emptying performance of multi-particulate system is shown to be related to the limitation of the study design and limitation of the way the data is processed. Nevertheless, there is clear evidence that multi-particulate systems can provide effective oral controlled release dosage forms. There is still some way to go with experimental techniques which would allow a definitive answer to the issue of how the variability of the gastric emptying of multi-particulate systems of less than 2.0mm arises.

  12. Oral dosage form performance tests: new dissolution approaches.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Walter W; Foster, Thomas; Sheinin, Eric; Cecil, Todd; Brown, William; Marques, Margareth; Williams, Roger L

    2005-02-01

    The performance test is one of a series of tests that compose the specification in a United States Pharmacopeia (USP) dosage form monograph. For an orally administered, nonsolution dosage form, it is usually satisfied by either a dissolution or disintegration procedure. Dissolution acceptance criteria are usually set in private negotiations between an applicant and a regulatory agency. With information about this private agreement and other information provided in a sponsor's Request for Revision to USP, the USP's Council of Experts elaborates a public dosage form monograph. Based on the relationship between the regulatory decisions and the Request for Revision, the USP dissolution procedure links to a regulatory judgment about bioavailability and bioequivalence and, ultimately, to a judgment about safety and efficacy. The current dissolution procedure and acceptance criteria are perceived as having worked well over the years and are generally accepted. This article discusses new approaches that merit consideration. These approaches focus on a) explicit use of hypothesis testing, b) use of parametric tolerance intervals, c) improved ways to set dissolution acceptance criteria, and d) a more flexible protocol to assess conformity. Application of the proposed approaches may better assess, manage, and communicate both manufacturer and consumer risk for dissolution testing.

  13. Status of dosage compensation of X chromosome in bovine genome.

    PubMed

    Ka, Sojeong; Ahn, Hyeonju; Seo, Minseok; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Jin Nam; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Dosage compensation system with X chromosome upregulation and inactivation have evolved to overcome the genetic imbalance between sex chromosomes in both male and female of mammals. Although recent development of chromosome-wide technologies has allowed us to test X upregulation, discrete data processing and analysis methods draw disparate conclusions. A series of expression studies revealed status of dosage compensation in some species belonging to monotremes, marsupials, rodents and primates. However, X upregulation in the Artiodactyla order including cattle have not been studied yet. In this study, we surveyed the genome-wide transcriptional upregulation in X chromosome in cattle RNA-seq data using different gene filtration methods. Overall examination of RNA-seq data revealed that X chromosome in the pituitary gland expressed more genes than in other peripheral tissues, which was consistent with the previous results observed in human and mouse. When analyzed with globally expressed genes, a median X:A expression ratio was 0.94. The ratio of 1-to-1 ortholog genes between chicken and mammals, however, showed considerable reduction to 0.68. These results indicate that status of dosage compensation for cattle is not deviated from those found in rodents and primate, and this is consistent with the evolutionary history of cattle. PMID:27376899

  14. Spectrophotometric Assay of Mebendazole in Dosage Forms Using Sodium Hypochlorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swamy, N.; Prashanth, K. N.; Basavaiah, K.

    2014-07-01

    A simple, selective and sensitive spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of mebendazole (MBD) in bulk drug and dosage forms. The method is based on the reaction of MBD with hypochlorite in the presence of sodium bicarbonate to form the chloro derivative of MBD, followed by the destruction of the excess hypochlorite by nitrite ion. The color was formed by the oxidation of iodide with the chloro derivative of MBD to iodine in the presence of starch and forming the blue colored product, which was measured at 570 nm. The optimum conditions that affect the reaction were ascertained and, under these conditions, a linear relationship was obtained in the concentration range of 1.25-25.0·g/ml MBD. The calculated molar absorptivity and Sandell sensitivity values are 9.56·103 l·mol-1·cm-1 and 0.031 μg/cm2, respectively. The limits of detection and quantification are 0.11 and 0.33 μg/ml, respectively. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of MBD in bulk drug and dosage forms, and no interference was observed from excipients present in the dosage forms. The reliability of the proposed method was further checked by parallel determination by the reference method and also by recovery studies.

  15. Status of dosage compensation of X chromosome in bovine genome.

    PubMed

    Ka, Sojeong; Ahn, Hyeonju; Seo, Minseok; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Jin Nam; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Dosage compensation system with X chromosome upregulation and inactivation have evolved to overcome the genetic imbalance between sex chromosomes in both male and female of mammals. Although recent development of chromosome-wide technologies has allowed us to test X upregulation, discrete data processing and analysis methods draw disparate conclusions. A series of expression studies revealed status of dosage compensation in some species belonging to monotremes, marsupials, rodents and primates. However, X upregulation in the Artiodactyla order including cattle have not been studied yet. In this study, we surveyed the genome-wide transcriptional upregulation in X chromosome in cattle RNA-seq data using different gene filtration methods. Overall examination of RNA-seq data revealed that X chromosome in the pituitary gland expressed more genes than in other peripheral tissues, which was consistent with the previous results observed in human and mouse. When analyzed with globally expressed genes, a median X:A expression ratio was 0.94. The ratio of 1-to-1 ortholog genes between chicken and mammals, however, showed considerable reduction to 0.68. These results indicate that status of dosage compensation for cattle is not deviated from those found in rodents and primate, and this is consistent with the evolutionary history of cattle.

  16. Recovery of Technetium Adsorbed on Charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Mark D.; Metz, Lori A.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2006-05-01

    Two methods capable of near complete recovery of technetium adsorbed on charcoal are presented. The first involves liquid extraction of the technetium from the charcoal by hot 4M nitric acid. An average recovery of 98% (n=3) is obtained after three rounds of extraction. The second method involves dry ashing with air in a quartz combustion tube at 400-450 C. This method yields an average recovery of 96% (n=5). Other thermal methods were attempted, but resulted in reduced recovery and incomplete material balance

  17. Conformational properties of an adsorbed charged polymer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Ho; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2005-06-01

    The behavior of a strongly charged polymer adsorbed on an oppositely charged surface of a low-dielectric constant is formulated by the functional integral method. By separating the translational, conformational, and fluctuational degrees of freedom, the scaling behaviors for both the height of the polymer and the thickness of the diffusion layer are determined. Unlike the results predicted by scaling theory, we identified the continuous crossover from the weak compression to the compression regime. All the analytical results are found to be consistent with Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, an alternative (operational) definition of a charged polymer adsorption is proposed. PMID:16089715

  18. The X factor: X chromosome dosage compensation in the evolutionarily divergent monotremes and marsupials.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Pask, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Marsupials and monotremes represent evolutionarily divergent lineages from the majority of extant mammals which are eutherian, or placental, mammals. Monotremes possess multiple X and Y chromosomes that appear to have arisen independently of eutherian and marsupial sex chromosomes. Dosage compensation of X-linked genes occurs in monotremes on a gene-by-gene basis, rather than through chromosome-wide silencing, as is the case in eutherians and marsupials. Specifically, studies in the platypus have shown that for any given X-linked gene, a specific proportion of nuclei within a cell population will silence one locus, with the percentage of cells undergoing inactivation at that locus being highly gene-specific. Hence, it is perhaps not surprising that the expression level of X-linked genes in female platypus is almost double that in males. This is in contrast to the situation in marsupials where one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated in females by the long non-coding RNA RSX, a functional analogue of the eutherian XIST. However, marsupial X chromosome inactivation differs from that seen in eutherians in that it is exclusively the paternal X chromosome that is silenced. In addition, marsupials appear to have globally upregulated X-linked gene expression in both sexes, thus balancing their expression levels with those of the autosomes, a process initially proposed by Ohno in 1967 as being a fundamental component of the X chromosome dosage compensation mechanism but which may not have evolved in eutherians.

  19. Antioxidant activity evaluation of new dosage forms as vehicles for dehydrated vegetables.

    PubMed

    Romero-de Soto, María Dolores; García-Salas, Patricia; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Campos, Francisco; Clares-Naveros, Beatriz

    2013-06-01

    A dehydrated vegetables mixture loaded in four pharmaceutical dosage forms as powder, effervescent granulate, sugar granulate and gumdrops were investigated for their antioxidant capacity using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) radical scavenging capacity assay, oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay and ferric reducing antioxidant potential assay. Total phenolic content of dehydrated vegetables powder mixture was also measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, so as to evaluate its contribution to their total antioxidant function. The effect of different temperatures on stability of these systems after 90 days storage was also evaluated. These formulations presented strong antioxidant properties and high phenolic content (279 mg gallic acid equivalent/g of sample) and thus could be potential rich sources of natural antioxidants. Antioxidant properties differed significantly among selected formulations (p < 0.05). Generally, the losses were lower in samples stored under refrigeration. To interpret the antioxidant properties a kinetic approach was performed. Degradation kinetics for the phenolic content and antioxidant capacity followed a zero-order function. Effervescent granulate was the formulation which underwent faster degradation. Contrary, sugar granulate and gumdrops were much more slowly. Time required to halve the initial amount of phenolic compounds was 589 ± 45 days for samples stored at 4 º C, and 312 ± 16 days for samples stored at room temperature. These developed dosage forms are new and innovative approach for vegetable intakes in population with special requirements providing an improvement in the administration of vegetables and fruits.

  20. The X factor: X chromosome dosage compensation in the evolutionarily divergent monotremes and marsupials.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Pask, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Marsupials and monotremes represent evolutionarily divergent lineages from the majority of extant mammals which are eutherian, or placental, mammals. Monotremes possess multiple X and Y chromosomes that appear to have arisen independently of eutherian and marsupial sex chromosomes. Dosage compensation of X-linked genes occurs in monotremes on a gene-by-gene basis, rather than through chromosome-wide silencing, as is the case in eutherians and marsupials. Specifically, studies in the platypus have shown that for any given X-linked gene, a specific proportion of nuclei within a cell population will silence one locus, with the percentage of cells undergoing inactivation at that locus being highly gene-specific. Hence, it is perhaps not surprising that the expression level of X-linked genes in female platypus is almost double that in males. This is in contrast to the situation in marsupials where one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated in females by the long non-coding RNA RSX, a functional analogue of the eutherian XIST. However, marsupial X chromosome inactivation differs from that seen in eutherians in that it is exclusively the paternal X chromosome that is silenced. In addition, marsupials appear to have globally upregulated X-linked gene expression in both sexes, thus balancing their expression levels with those of the autosomes, a process initially proposed by Ohno in 1967 as being a fundamental component of the X chromosome dosage compensation mechanism but which may not have evolved in eutherians. PMID:26806635

  1. A progressive review of Sandhana kalpana (Biomedical fermentation): An advanced innovative dosage form of Ayurveda

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Anand; Singh, Neetu; Dalvi, Madhuri; Wele, Asmita

    2011-01-01

    Sandhana kalpana (biomedical fermented formulations) are one of the best dosage forms of Ayurveda in practice since thousands of years. In order to prepare these medicaments, certain sets of conditions are prearranged, which lead to fermentation. Thus, products bequeath with self-generated ethyl alcohol, which potentiate these preparations (Asava–Arishta), pharmaceutically and therapeutically. Commonly, medicinal and commercial components of these formulations are prompting many researchers to contribute in manufacturing, quality control, safety, and efficacy of these formulations. To cope up with this, literature related to Asava–Arishta has been surveyed from the Vedic period to recent publications of Government of India, ie, Ayurvedic Formulary of India, and presented briefly here. In this review paper, we have discussed pioneering facts such as nature and amount of carbohydrate, type of containers, optimum temperature, variety and relevance of initiator of fermentation, manufacturing, regulatory rules, and business aspects of Asava-Arishta. After going through this basic information, any academician or researcher may show a way to further strengthen this dosage form. PMID:22529661

  2. Full-scale sludge liquor treatment for ammonium reduction with low carbon dosage.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, D J I; Nyberg, U; Jansen, J la Cour

    2011-01-01

    The separate treatment of sludge liquor, produced by dewatering anaerobic digested sludge at wastewater treatment plants, gives rise to extreme environments for nitrogen removal. A full-scale sequencing batch reactor was operated with the aim of introducing and studying denitritation as a supplement to nitritation in order to reduce operating costs. Since the main plant only has problems with ammonium reduction capacity, the initial strategy was to have sufficient ammonium reduction with optimal alkalinity production by denitrifiers, i.e. low carbon dosage and minimum alkalinity and residual oxidized ammonium in the effluent. This strategy led to an unbalanced and sensitive process because the denitrifiers were often inhibited. High dissolved oxygen (DO) readings and no decrease in oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) during anoxic phases with simultaneous ethanol dosage indicated inhibition of denitrifiers, probably by the intermediate product NO, which may have interfered with the DO sensor. Nitric oxide production was believed to be favoured in the beginning of the anoxic phase as a result of low pH and high nitrite concentration. A stable nitritation-denitritation process could be achieved when the aerobic hydraulic retention time (HRT) was decreased to the same length as the anoxic HRT, which resulted in increased unused alkalinity. PMID:21879560

  3. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2158 - Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2158 Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 520.2158 - Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2158 Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms....

  6. 21 CFR 520.1326 - Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1326 Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  7. 21 CFR 520.1326 - Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1326 Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  8. 21 CFR 520.2158 - Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2158 Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms....

  9. 21 CFR 520.2158 - Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2158 Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms....

  10. 21 CFR 520.1263 - Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1263 Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms....

  11. 21 CFR 520.2158 - Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2158 Streptomycin/dihydrostreptomycin oral dosage forms....

  12. 21 CFR 520.1263 - Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1263 Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms....

  13. 21 CFR 520.1326 - Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1326 Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  14. 21 CFR 520.1263 - Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1263 Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms....

  15. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms....

  16. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms....

  17. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms....

  18. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms....

  19. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form...

  20. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form...

  1. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form...

  2. The Development of Teaching Efficacy for Drug-Dosage Calculation Instruction: A Nursing Faculty Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Gail A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how nursing efficacy for drug-dosage calculation instruction is determined. Medication administration is a critical function of nurses in healthcare settings. An essential component of safe medication administration is accurate drug-dosage calculation, but instruction in drug-dosage calculation methods…

  3. Mimetite Formation from Goethite-Adsorbed Ions.

    PubMed

    Kleszczewska-Zębala, Anna; Manecki, Maciej; Bajda, Tomasz; Rakovan, John; Borkiewicz, Olaf J

    2016-06-01

    Bioavailability of arsenic in contaminated soils and wastes can be reduced to insignificant levels by precipitation of mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl. The objective of this study is to elucidate mechanisms of the reaction between solution containing lead ions and arsenates adsorbed on synthetic goethite (AsO4-goethite), or arsenate ions in the solution and goethite saturated with adsorbed Pb (Pb-goethite). These reactions, in the presence of Cl, result in rapid crystallization of mimetite. Formation of mimetite is faster than desorption of AsO4 but slower than desorption of Pb from the goethite surface. Slow desorption of arsenates from AsO4-goethite results in heterogeneous precipitation and formation of mimetite incrustation on goethite crystals. Desorption of lead from Pb-goethite is at least as fast as diffusion and advection of AsO4 and Cl in suspension allowing for homogeneous crystallization of mimetite in intergranular solution. Therefore, the mechanism of nucleation is primarily driven by the kinetics of constituent supply to the saturation front, rather than by the thermodynamics of nucleation. The products of the reactions are well documented using microscopy methods such as scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  4. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers.

    PubMed

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-21

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role. PMID:27353115

  5. Optimizing heterosurface adsorbent synthesis for liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovskii, S. Yu.; Serdan, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural and geometric parameters of a silica matrix (SM) for the synthesis of heterosurface adsorbents (HAs) are optimized. Modification is performed by shielding the external surfaces of alkyl-modified silica (AS) using human serum albumin and its subsequent crosslinking. The structural and geometric characteristics of the SM, AS, and HA are measured via low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. It is found that the structural characteristics of AS pores with diameters D < 6 nm do not change during HA synthesis, while the volume of pores with diameters of 6 nm < D < 9 nm shrinks slightly due to the adsorption of albumin in the pore orifices. It is established that the volume of pores with diameters D > 9 nm reduces significantly due to adsorption of albumin. It is concluded that silica gel with a maximum pore size distribution close to 5 nm and a minimal proportion of pores with D > 9 nm is optimal for HA synthesis; this allows us to achieve the greatest similarity between the chromatographic retention parameters for HA and AS. The suitability of the synthesized adsorbents for analyzing drugs in biological fluids through direct sample injection is confirmed by chromatography. It was found that the percentage of the protein fraction detected at the outlet of the chromatographic column is 98%.

  6. Equilibrium molecular theory of two-dimensional adsorbate drops on surfaces of heterogeneous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2016-08-01

    A molecular statistical theory for calculating the linear tension of small multicomponent droplets in two-dimensional adsorption systems is developed. The theory describes discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a scale comparable to molecular size) and continuous distributions of molecules (at short distances inside cells) in their translational and vibrational motions. Pair intermolecular interaction potentials (the Mie type potential) in several coordination spheres are considered. For simplicity, it is assumed that distinctions in the sizes of mixture components are slight and comparable to the sizes of adsorbent adsorption centers. Expressions for the pressure tensor components inside small droplets on the heterogeneous surface of an adsorbent are obtained, allowing calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of a vapor-fluid interface, including linear tension. Problems in refining the molecular theory are discussed: describing the properties of small droplets using a coordination model of their structure, considering the effect an adsorbate has on the state of a near-surface adsorbent region, and the surface heterogeneity factor in the conditions for the formation of droplets.

  7. Removal of uranium from aqueous solution by a low cost and high-efficient adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun-Hai; Wang, You-Qun; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Cao, Xiao-Hong; Nie, Wen-Bin; Li, Qin; Hua, Rong

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a low-cost and high-efficient carbonaceous adsorbent (HTC-COOH) with carboxylic groups was developed for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution compared with the pristine hydrothermal carbon (HTC). The structure and chemical properties of resultant adsorbents were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform-infrared spectra (FT-IR) and acid-base titration. The key factors (solution pH, contact time, initial U(VI) concentrations and temperature) affected the adsorption of U(VI) on adsorbents were investigated using batch experiments. The adsorption of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH was pH-dependent, and increased with temperature and initial ion concentration. The adsorption equilibrium of U(VI) on adsorbents was well defined by the Langmuir isothermal equation, and the monolayer adsorption capacity of HTC-COOH was found to be 205.8 mg/g. The kinetics of adsorption was very in accordance with the pseudo-second-order rate model. The adsorption processes of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH were endothermic and spontaneous in nature according to the thermodynamics of adsorption. Furthermore, HTC-COOH could selectively adsorption of U(VI) in aqueous solution containing co-existing ions (Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+). From the results of the experiments, it is found that the HTC-COOH is a potential adsorbent for effective removal of U(VI) from polluted water.

  8. Extraction of uranium from seawater using magnetic adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, H.; Fujita, K.; Nakajima, F.; Ozawa, Y.; Murata, T.

    1981-01-01

    A new process for the extraction of uranium from seawater was developed. In the process, uranium adsorption is effected using powdered magnetic adsorbents; the adsorbents are then separated from seawater using magnetic separation technology. This process is superior to a column method using a granulated hydrous titanium oxide adsorber bed in the following ways: (1) a higher rate of adsorption is realized because smaller particles are used in the uranium adsorption; and (2) blocking, which is inevitable in an adsorber bed, is eliminated. The composite hydrous titanium-iron oxide as a magnetic adsorbent having high uranium adsorption capacity and magnetization can be prepared by adding urea to a mixed solution of titanium sulfate and ferrous sulfate. Adsorption and desoprtion of uranium and the removal of the adsorbent using a small-scale uranium extraction plant (about 15 m/sup 3//d) is reported, and the feasibility of uranium extraction from seawater by this process is demonstrated. 10 figures.

  9. In Situ Investigation the Photolysis of the PAHs Adsorbed on Mangrove Leaf Surfaces by Synchronous Solid Surface Fluorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Wu, Tun-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    An established synchronous solid surface fluorimetry (S-SSF) was utilized for in situ study the photolysis processes of anthracene (An) and pyrene (Py) adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of Kandelia obovata seedlings (Ko) and Aegiceras corniculata (L.) Blanco seedlings (Ac). Experimental results demonstrated that the photolysis of An and Py adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of two mangrove species under the laboratory conditions, followed first-order kinetics with their photolysis rates in the order of Ac>Ko. In addition, with the same amount of substances, the photolysis rate of An adsorbed on the same mangrove leaf surfaces was much faster than the adsorbed Py. In order to investigate further, the photolysis processes of An and Py in water were also studied for comparison. And the photolysis of An and Py in water also followed first-order kinetics. Moreover, for the same initial amount, the photolysis rate of the PAH in water was faster than that adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of two mangrove species. Therefore, photochemical behaviors of PAHs were dependent not only on their molecular structures but also the physical-chemical properties of the substrates on which they are adsorbed. PMID:24404158

  10. Neutron and Proton Dosages in the Upper Atmosphere from Solar Flare Radiation.

    PubMed

    Flamm, E J; Lingenfelter, R E

    1964-06-26

    The radiation dosage from secondary neutrons as well as from primary and secondary protons in the earth's atmosphere during solar particle events is calculated as a function of the solar proton flux, atmospheric depth, and geomagnetic-cutoff rigidity. The dosage in rems from secondary neutrons exceeds the dosage from protons below 30 g/cm(2) of residual atmosphere. Neutron dosages in rads are less than the dosage from primary protons at all depths above 100 g/cm(2). The maximum neutron dose to travelers in supersonic aircraft during solar particle events of the magnitude observed during the last solar cycle would be of the order of I rem.

  11. Gene Expression Dosage Regulation in an Allopolyploid Fish

    PubMed Central

    Matos, I; Machado, M. P.; Schartl, M.; Coelho, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    How allopolyploids are able not only to cope but profit from their condition is a question that remains elusive, but is of great importance within the context of successful allopolyploid evolution. One outstanding example of successful allopolyploidy is the endemic Iberian cyprinid Squalius alburnoides. Previously, based on the evaluation of a few genes, it was reported that the transcription levels between diploid and triploid S. alburnoides were similar. If this phenomenon occurs on a full genomic scale, a wide functional ‘‘diploidization’’ could be related to the success of these polyploids. We generated RNA-seq data from whole juvenile fish and from adult livers, to perform the first comparative quantitative transcriptomic analysis between diploid and triploid individuals of a vertebrate allopolyploid. Together with an assay to estimate relative expression per cell, it was possible to infer the relative sizes of transcriptomes. This showed that diploid and triploid S. alburnoides hybrids have similar liver transcriptome sizes. This in turn made it valid to directly compare the S. alburnoides RNA-seq transcript data sets and obtain a profile of dosage responses across the S. alburnoides transcriptome. We found that 64% of transcripts in juveniles’ samples and 44% in liver samples differed less than twofold between diploid and triploid hybrids (similar expression). Yet, respectively 29% and 15% of transcripts presented accurate dosage compensation (PAA/PA expression ratio of 1 instead of 1.5). Therefore, an exact functional diploidization of the triploid genome does not occur, but a significant down regulation of gene expression in triploids was observed. However, for those genes with similar expression levels between diploids and triploids, expression is not globally strictly proportional to gene dosage nor is it set to a perfect diploid level. This quantitative expression flexibility may be a strong contributor to overcome the genomic shock, and be an

  12. Fluoride removal from aqueous solution by Al(III)-Zr(IV) binary oxide adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiuya; Lin, Xiaoyan; Wu, Pengwei; Zhou, Qiusheng; Luo, Xuegang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a novel binary oxide adsorbent of Al2O3-ZrO2 was prepared via coprecipitation followed by calcination method, and the calcination temperatures were investigated. The adsorbent was characterized by XRD, EDX and XPS. The batch adsorption experiments were carried out at different parameters, such as solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial fluoride concentration and adsorption temperature, to evaluate the fluoride removal performance. The results showed that the adsorption isotherm was better described by the linear Langmuir model, and a maximum adsorption capacity was 114.54 mg/g. The adsorption kinetics was well fitted by the linear pseudo-second-order, and the correlation coefficient value (R2) was 0.997. The thermodynamic parameters of ΔH0, ΔS0 and ΔG0 were calculated, which showed that the fluoride adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. And the possible adsorption mechanism of the adsorbent for fluoride could involve the ligand-exchange and ion-exchange based on the results in the study.

  13. Carbonised jackfruit peel as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Inbaraj, B Stephen; Sulochana, N

    2004-08-01

    The fruit of the jack (Artocarpus heterophyllus) is one of the popular fruits in India, where the total area under this fruit is about 13,460 ha. A significant amount of peel (approximately 2,714-11,800 kg per tree per year) is discarded as agricultural waste, as apart from its use as a table fruit, it is popular in many culinary preparations. Treatment of jackfruit peel with sulphuric acid produced a carbonaceous product which was used to study its efficiency as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(II) from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed as a function of process parameters; agitation time, initial metal concentration, adsorbent concentration and pH. Kinetic analyses made with Lagergren pseudo-first-order, Ritchie second-order and modified Ritchie second-order models showed better fits with modified Ritchie second-order model. The Langmuir-Freundlich (Sips equation) model best defined the experimental equilibrium data among the three isotherm models (Freundlich, Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich) tested. Taking a particular metal concentration, the optimum dose and pH required for the maximum metal removal was established. A complete recovery of the adsorbed metal ions from the spent adsorbent was achieved by using 0.01 M HCl.

  14. Municipal sludge-industrial sludge composite desulfurization adsorbents: synergy enhancing the catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Bandosz, Teresa J; Block, Karin

    2006-05-15

    Mixtures of sewage sludge, waste oil sludge, and metal oil sludge were prepared and carbonized at 950 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. Dynamic adsorption of H2S was measured on the materials obtained, and the breakthrough capacity was calculated. The initial and exhausted adsorbents after the breakthrough tests were characterized using sorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis, and XRF, XRD, and surface pH measurements. Mixing sludges leads to very high capacity adsorbents on which hydrogen sulfide is oxidized to elemental sulfur. Although the micropore volume of the adsorbents obtained is not high, their high volume of mesopores contributes significantly to reactive adsorption and provides space to store the oxidation products. The H2S breakthrough capacity on the new materials reaches 10 wt %. These adsorbents work until all active pores are filled and the catalytic centers are exhausted. The reason for such high capacity is in the formation of catalytically active mineral like phases during pyrolysis in the presence of nitrogen and carbon. This highly dispersed phase provides basicity and catalytic centers for hydrogen sulfide dissociation and its oxidation to sulfur.

  15. Temperature sex reversal implies sex gene dosage in a reptile.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Alexander E; Georges, Arthur; Sarre, Stephen D; Guarino, Fiorenzo; Ezaz, Tariq; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2007-04-20

    Sex in reptiles is determined by genes on sex chromosomes or by incubation temperature. Previously these two modes were thought to be distinct, yet we show that high incubation temperatures reverse genotypic males (ZZ) to phenotypic females in a lizard with ZZ and ZW sex chromosomes. Thus, the W chromosome is not necessary for female differentiation. Sex determination is probably via a dosage-sensitive male-determining gene on the Z chromosome that is inactivated by extreme temperatures. Our data invite a novel hypothesis for the evolution of temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) and suggest that sex chromosomes may exist in many TSD reptiles.

  16. Isomerization reactions on single adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Karina

    2009-02-17

    Molecular switches occur throughout nature. In one prominent example, light induces the isomerization of retinal from the compact 11-cis form to the elongated all-trans form, a conversion that triggers the transformation of light into a neural impulse in the eye. Applying these natural principles to synthetic systems offers a promising way to construct smaller and faster nanoelectronic devices. In such systems, electronic switches are essential components for storage and logical operations. The development of molecular switches on the single-molecule level would represent a major step toward incorporating molecules as building units into nanoelectronic circuits. Molecular switches must be both reversible and bistable. To meet these requirements, a molecule must have at least two different thermally stable forms and a way to repeatedly interconvert between those forms based on changes in light, heat, pressure, magnetic or electric fields, pH, mechanical forces, or electric currents. The conversion should be connected to a measurable change in electronic, optical, magnetic, or mechanical properties. Because isomers can differ significantly in physical and chemical properties, isomerization could serve as a molecular switching mechanism. Integration of molecular switches into larger circuits will probably require arranging them on surfaces, which will require a better understanding of isomerization reactions in these environments. In this Account, we describe our scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the isomerization of individual molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Investigating chlorobenzene and azobenzene derivatives on the fcc(111) faces of Ag, Cu, and Au, we explored the influence of substituents and the substrate on the excitation mechanism of the isomerization reaction induced by inelastically tunneling electrons. We achieved an irreversible configurational (cis-trans) isomerization of individual 4-dimethyl-amino-azobenzene-4-sulfonic acid molecules on Au

  17. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, Gunnar I.; Dietz, Russell N.

    1994-01-01

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

  18. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1994-04-05

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

  19. Air stripper VOC treatment using specialized adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Craven, C.N.; Blystone, P.G.; Grant, A.

    1994-12-31

    Abatement of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions is required by federal, state and local regulatory agencies. Sources of VOC emissions include air stripping processes at groundwater remediation and industrial wastewater operations. The Purus A2000 system is an innovative emission control system that utilizes specialized adsorbent resins, on-site regeneration and solvent recovery for abatement of VOCs. This paper describes two applications in which air stripper off-gas is treated by the Purus A2000 Adsorption System. The first is a groundwater remediation pump-and-treat operation in which the air stripper off-gas contains chlorinated solvents. At the second site, benzene and styrene emissions from an industrial wastewater air stripper operation were successfully treated. At both sites the recovered solvent was recycled. Capital and operating costs will be compared to other treatment methods.

  20. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  1. Linear transport models for adsorbing solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.; Jury, W. A.

    1993-04-01

    A unified linear theory for the transport of adsorbing solutes through soils is presented and applied to analyze movement of napropamide through undisturbed soil columns. The transport characteristics of the soil are expressed in terms of the travel time distribution of the mobile phase which is then used to incorporate local interaction processes. This approach permits the analysis of all linear transport processes, not only the small subset for which a differential description is known. From a practical point of view, it allows the direct use of measured concentrations or fluxes of conservative solutes to characterize the mobile phase without first subjecting them to any model. For complicated flow regimes, this may vastly improve the identification of models and estimation of their parameters for the local adsorption processes.

  2. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A. Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-01

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role.The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth

  3. Development of a new adsorbent from agro-industrial waste and its potential use in endocrine disruptor compound removal.

    PubMed

    Rovani, Suzimara; Censi, Monique T; Pedrotti, Sidnei L; Lima, Eder C; Cataluña, Renato; Fernandes, Andreia N

    2014-04-30

    A new activated carbon (AC) material was prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of coffee grounds, eucalyptus sawdust, calcium hydroxide and soybean oil at 800°C. This material was used as adsorbent for the removal of the endocrine disruptor compounds 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) from aqueous solutions. The carbon material was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), N2 adsorption/desorption curves and point of zero charge (pHPZC). Variables including the initial pH of the adsorbate solutions, adsorbent masses and contact time were optimized. The optimum range of initial pH for removal of endocrine disruptor compounds (EDC) was 2.0-11.0. The kinetics of adsorption were investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. The Sips isotherm model gave the best fits of the equilibrium data (298K). The maximum amounts of E2 and EE2 removed at 298K were 7.584 (E2) and 7.883mgg(-1) (EE2) using the AC as adsorbent. The carbon adsorbent was employed in SPE (solid phase extraction) of E2 and EE2 from aqueous solutions. PMID:24647264

  4. Development of a stable oral liquid dosage form of spironolactone.

    PubMed

    Pramar, Y; Das Gupta, V; Bethea, C

    1992-08-01

    A clear, stable, oral liquid dosage form of spironolactone has been developed. Solubility profiles of spironolactone were obtained in several co-solvent blends. Using this data, a co-solvent blend containing polyethylene glycol 400 (30% v/v), propylene glycol (10% v/v), glycerin (10% v/v) and ethyl alcohol (10% v/v) was used to solubilize spironolactone at a concentration of 2 mg/ml. The final formulation contained sweetening agents (sucrose, saccharin sodium), flavours (cherry, sweet), a desensitizing agent (menthol), a dye (FD&C Red #40) and a preservative (benzoic acid) to incorporate the desired organoleptic and preservative properties. A phosphate buffer was used to maintain a pH value of 4.5 (pH of maximum stability as reported earlier) to minimize hydrolysis. The final dosage form was stable for at least 93 days at 40 degrees C (loss of potency less than 4%). According to FDA guidelines, a tentative expiration date of 2 years at 25 degrees C is justifiable.

  5. An increase in MECP2 dosage impairs neural tube formation.

    PubMed

    Petazzi, Paolo; Akizu, Naiara; García, Alejandra; Estarás, Conchi; Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Rodríguez-Paredes, Manuel; Martínez-Balbás, Marian A; Huertas, Dori; Esteller, Manel

    2014-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are fundamental for shaping the activity of the central nervous system (CNS). Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) acts as a bridge between methylated DNA and transcriptional effectors responsible for differentiation programs in neurons. The importance of MECP2 dosage in CNS is evident in Rett Syndrome and MECP2 duplication syndrome, which are neurodevelopmental diseases caused by loss-of-function mutations or duplication of the MECP2 gene, respectively. Although many studies have been performed on Rett syndrome models, little is known about the effects of an increase in MECP2 dosage. Herein, we demonstrate that MECP2 overexpression affects neural tube formation, leading to a decrease in neuroblast proliferation in the neural tube ventricular zone. Furthermore, an increase in MECP2 dose provokes premature differentiation of neural precursors accompanied by greater cell death, resulting in a loss of neuronal populations. Overall, our data indicate that correct MECP2 expression levels are required for proper nervous system development.

  6. Impact of excipient interactions on solid dosage form stability.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Desai, Divyakant; Badawy, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Drug-excipient interactions in solid dosage forms can affect drug product stability in physical aspects such as organoleptic changes and dissolution slowdown, or chemically by causing drug degradation. Recent research has allowed the distinction in chemical instability resulting from direct drug-excipient interactions and from drug interactions with excipient impurities. A review of chemical instability in solid dosage forms highlights common mechanistic themes applicable to multiple degradation pathways. These common themes include the role of water and microenvironmental pH. In addition, special aspects of solid-state reactions with excipients and/or excipient impurities add to the complexity in understanding and modeling reaction pathways. This paper discusses mechanistic basis of known drug-excipient interactions with case studies and provides an overview of common underlying themes. Recent developments in the understanding of degradation pathways further impact methodologies used in the pharmaceutical industry for prospective stability assessment. This paper discusses these emerging aspects in terms of limitations of drug-excipient compatibility studies, emerging paradigms in accelerated stability testing, and application of mathematical modeling for prediction of drug product stability.

  7. RFID Tag Helix Antenna Sensors for Wireless Drug Dosage Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyu; Zhao, Peisen; Chen, Pai-Yen; Ren, Yong; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Hu, Ye; Akinwande, Deji

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized helix antennas are integrated with drug reservoirs to function as RFID wireless tag sensors for real-time drug dosage monitoring. The general design procedure of this type of biomedical antenna sensors is proposed based on electromagnetic theory and finite element simulation. A cost effective fabrication process is utilized to encapsulate the antenna sensor within a biocompatible package layer using PDMS material, and at the same time form a drug storage or drug delivery unit inside the sensor. The in vitro experiment on two prototypes of antenna sensor-drug reservoir assembly have shown the ability to monitor the drug dosage by tracking antenna resonant frequency shift from 2.4–2.5-GHz ISM band with realized sensitivity of 1.27 \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\mu~{\\rm l}/{\\rm MHz}$\\end{document} for transdermal drug delivery monitoring and 2.76-\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\mu~{\\rm l}/{\\rm MHz}$\\end{document} sensitivity for implanted drug delivery monitoring. PMID:27170865

  8. Maintenance and Loss of Duplicated Genes by Dosage Subfunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Gout, Jean-Francois; Lynch, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) have contributed to gene-repertoire enrichment in many eukaryotic lineages. However, most duplicated genes are eventually lost and it is still unclear why some duplicated genes are evolutionary successful whereas others quickly turn to pseudogenes. Here, we show that dosage constraints are major factors opposing post-WGD gene loss in several Paramecium species that share a common ancestral WGD. We propose a model where a majority of WGD-derived duplicates preserve their ancestral function and are retained to produce enough of the proteins performing this same ancestral function. Under this model, the expression level of individual duplicated genes can evolve neutrally as long as they maintain a roughly constant summed expression, and this allows random genetic drift toward uneven contributions of the two copies to total expression. Our analysis suggests that once a high level of imbalance is reached, which can require substantial lengths of time, the copy with the lowest expression level contributes a small enough fraction of the total expression that selection no longer opposes its loss. Extension of our analysis to yeast species sharing a common ancestral WGD yields similar results, suggesting that duplicated-gene retention for dosage constraints followed by divergence in expression level and eventual deterministic gene loss might be a universal feature of post-WGD evolution. PMID:25908670

  9. Gene Dosage Imbalance Contributes to Chromosomal Instability-Induced Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Ruiz, Marta; Murillo-Maldonado, Juan M; Benhra, Najate; Barrio, Lara; Pérez, Lidia; Quiroga, Gonzalo; Nebreda, Angel R; Milán, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is thought to be a source of mutability in cancer. However, CIN often results in aneuploidy, which compromises cell fitness. Here, we used the dosage compensation mechanism (DCM) of Drosophila to demonstrate that chromosome-wide gene dosage imbalance contributes to the deleterious effects of CIN-induced aneuploidy and its pro-tumorigenic action. We present evidence that resetting of the DCM counterbalances the damaging effects caused by CIN-induced changes in X chromosome number. Importantly, interfering with the DCM suffices to mimic the cellular effects of aneuploidy in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, JNK-dependent cell death, and tumorigenesis upon apoptosis inhibition. We unveil a role of ROS in JNK activation and a variety of cellular and tissue-wide mechanisms that buffer the deleterious effects of CIN, including DNA-damage repair, activation of the p38 pathway, and cytokine induction to promote compensatory proliferation. Our data reveal the existence of robust compensatory mechanisms that counteract CIN-induced cell death and tumorigenesis. PMID:26859353

  10. Aceclofenac topical dosage forms: in vitro and in vivo characterization.

    PubMed

    Dua, Kamal; Pabreja, Kavita; Ramana, Malipeddi Venkata

    2010-12-01

    Aceclofenac is a new generation non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug showing effective anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. It is available in the form of tablets of 100 mg. Importance of aceclofenac as a NSAID has inspired development of topical dosage forms. This mode of administration may help avoid typical side effects associated with oral administration of NSAIDs, which have led to its withdrawal. Furthermore, aceclofenac topical dosage forms can be used as a supplement to oral therapy for better treatment of conditions such as arthritis. Ointments, creams, and gels containing 1% (m/m) aceclofenac have been prepared. They were tested for physical appearance, pH, spreadability, extrudability, drug content uniformity, in vitro diffusion and in vitro permeation. Gels prepared using Carbopol 940 (AF2, AF3) and macrogol bases (AF7) were selected after the analysis of the results. They were evaluated for acute skin irritancy, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects using the carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema method. AF2 was shown to be significantly (p < 0.05) more effective in inhibiting hyperalgesia associated with inflammation, compared to AF3 and AF7. Hence, AF2 may be suggested as an alternative to oral preparations.

  11. Evaluation of the dosage of ivermectin in falcons.

    PubMed

    Lierz, M

    2001-05-12

    Twelve groups of falcons, each containing three female gyrfalcon-peregrine falcon hybrids (Falco rusticolus x Falco peregrinus) were injected intramuscularly with a single dose of ivermectin ranging from 0.2 mg/kg to 11 mg/kg bodyweight, and a control group was injected with water. Doses of ivermectin between 0.2 and 5 mg/kg failed to produce clinical signs of illness in the birds. Four birds which received either 6, 7 or 8 mg/kg showed slight clinical signs, and all the birds receiving 9 to 11 mg/kg showed more or less severe clinical signs of anorexia, apathy and sedation. Slight changes in the mean plasma activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase (AP) were detected in the group dosed with 5 mg/kg, and higher dosages caused marked changes in these enzymes as well as in the mean plasma activity of lactate dehydrogenase. The mean activity of AP decreased, and the activities of the other enzymes increased. A dosage of 2 to 3 mg/kg ivermectin is recommended as a safe and effective antiparasitic drug for falcons and it has been used successfully to treat infestations of Serratospiculum species.

  12. Nanoclay-Based Solid-Amine Adsorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Elliot A.

    The objective of this research was to develop an efficient, low cost, recyclable solid sorbent for carbon dioxide adsorption from large point sources, such as coal-fired power plants. The current commercial way to adsorb CO 2 is to use a liquid amine or ammonia process. These processes are used in industry in the "sweetening" of natural gas, but liquid based technologies are not economically viable in the adsorption of CO2 from power plants due to the extremely large volume of CO2 and the inherent high regeneration costs of cycling the sorbent. Therefore, one of the main objectives of this research was to develop a novel sorbent that can be cycled and uses very little energy for regeneration. The sorbent developed here is composed of a nanoclay (montmorillonite), commonly used in the production of polymer nanocomposites, grafted with commercially available amines. (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS) was chemically grafted to the edge hydroxyl groups of the clay. While another amine, polyethylenimine (PEI), was attached to the surface of the clay by electrostatic interactions. To confirm the attachment of amines to the clay, the samples were characterized using FTIR and the corresponding peaks for amines were observed. The amount of amine loaded onto the support was determined by TGA techniques. The treated clay was initially analyzed for CO2 adsorption in a pure CO 2 stream. The adsorption temperatures that had the highest adsorption capacity were determined to be between 75°C and 100°C for all of the samples tested at atmospheric pressure. The maximum CO2 adsorption capacity observed was with nanoclay treated with both APTMS and PEI at 85°C. In a more realistic flue gas of 10% CO2 and 90% N2, the adsorbents had essentially the same overall CO2 adsorption capacity indicating that the presence of nitrogen did not hinder the adsorption of CO2. Adsorption studies in pure CO2 at room temperature under pressure from 40-300 PSI were also conducted. The average

  13. Magnesium oxide-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic: a novel cadmium(II) adsorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Md; Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Maneesh, Namburath; Munekage, Yukihiro; Motomura, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    The contamination of cadmium (Cd) in the aquatic environment is one of the serious environmental and human health's risks. The present study attempted to develop the potential magnesium oxide (MgO)-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic (MITDC)-based novel adsorbent media for adsorbing higher rate of cadmium [Cd(II)] from water phase. A potential MITDC adsorbent media was developed using volcanic raw tuff soil and its Cd(II) adsorption capacity from water phase was evaluated comparing with the raw tuff soil. A series of studies were carried out in an agitated batch method at 20 ± 2 °C to characterize the adsorption capacity of MITDC under different conditions of factors, such as contact time (0-360 min), initial pH (3-11) of solution, dose of MITDC (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 g/L), and initial concentration of Cd(II) (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg/L), influencing the adsorption mechanism. MITDC exhibited the equilibrium state of maximum Cd(II) adsorption at the contact time 120 min and pH 4.7 (removed 98.2 % Cd) when initial Cd(II) concentration was 10 mg/L in the present study. The dose of 7.5 g MITDC/L showed maximum removal of Cd(II) from water. Experimental data were described by the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherms and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model (R 2 = 0.996). The Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MITDC was 31.25 mg/g. The high Cd(II) adsorption capacity indicated that novel MITDC could be used as a potential ceramic adsorbent media to remove high rate of Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  14. Electron-Stimulated Oxidation of Thin Water Films Adsorbed on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Christopher D.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2007-11-08

    Electron-stimulated reactions in thin (< 3 monolayer, ML) water films adsorbed on TiO2(110) are investigated. For electron fluences less than ~1×1016 e-/cm2, irradiation with 100 eV electrons results in electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of atomic and molecular hydrogen, but no measurable O2. The ESD leaves adsorbed hydroxyls which oxidize the TiO2(110) surface and change the post-irradiation TPD spectra of the remaining water in characteristic ways. The species remaining on the TiO2(110) after irradiation of adsorbed water films are apparently similar to those produced without irradiation by co-dosing water and O2. Annealing above ~600 K reduces the oxidized surfaces, and water TPD spectra characteristic of ion sputtered and annealed TiO2(110) are recovered. The rate of electron-stimulated “oxidation” of the water films is proportional to the coverage of water in the first layer for coverages less than 1 ML. However, higher coverages suppress this reaction. When thin water films are irradiated, the rate of electron-stimulated oxidation is independent of the initial oxygen vacancy concentration, as is the final oxidized state achieved at high electron fluences. To explain the results, we propose that electron excitation of water molecules adsorbed on Ti4+ sites leads to desorption of hydrogen atoms and leaves an OH adsorbed at the site. If hydroxyls are present in the bridging oxygen rows, these react with the OH’s on the Ti4+ sites to reform water and heal the oxygen vacancy associated with the bridging OH. Once the bridge bonded hydroxyls have been eliminated, further irradiation increases the concentration of OH’s in the Ti4+ rows leading to the creation of species which block sites in the Ti4+ rows, perhaps H2O2 and/or HO2.

  15. Batch technique to evaluate the efficiency of different natural adsorbents for defluoridation from groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Saraswat, Chitresh; Mishra, Binaya Kumar; Avtar, Ram; Patel, Hiral; Patel, Asha; Sharma, Tejal; Patel, Roshni

    2016-09-01

    Fluoride pollution (with concentration >1.0 mg/L) in groundwater has become a global threat in the recent past due to the lesser availability of potable groundwater resource. In between several defluoridation techniques discovered so far, the adsorption process proved to be most economic and efficient. This study is an effort to evaluate defluoridation efficiency of powdered rice husk, fine chopped rice husk and sawdust by the batch adsorption process. Optimum defluoridation capacity is achieved by optimizing various parameters, viz. dose of adsorbent, pH, contact time and initial concentration. It was found that all three materials can be employed for the defluoridation technique, but powdered rice husk is the best adsorbent in the midst of all three. Powdered rice husk showed fluoride removal efficiency ranging between 85 and 90 % in the contact period of 7 h only in conditions of all optimized parameter. Following this parameter optimization, adsorption efficiency was also evaluated at natural pH of groundwater to minimize the cost of defluoridation. No significant difference was found between fluoride adsorption at optimized pH (pH = 4) and natural one (pH = 7), which concludes that powdered rice husk can be efficiently used for the defluoridation technique at field scale. The adsorption isotherm using this adsorbent perfectly followed Langmuir isotherms. The value of calculated separation factor also suggests the favourable adsorption of fluoride onto this adsorbent under the conditions used for the experiments. The field application for defluoridation of groundwater using this adsorbent (based on pH of natural groundwater there and seasonal variation of temperature) showed the high success rate.

  16. Anomalous fast dynamics of adsorbate overlayers near an incommensurate structural transition.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2013-09-20

    We investigate the dynamics of a compressively strained adsorbed layer on a periodic substrate via a simple two-dimensional model that admits striped and hexagonal incommensurate phases. We show that the mass transport is superfast near the striped-hexagonal phase boundary and in the hexagonal phase. For an initial step profile separating a bare substrate region (or "hole") from the rest of a striped incommensurate phase, the superfast domain wall dynamics leads to a bifurcation of the initial step profile into two interfaces or profiles propagating in opposite directions with a hexagonal phase in between. This yields a theoretical understanding of the recent experiments for the Pb/Si(111) system.

  17. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-14

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet. PMID:26374054

  18. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-14

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  19. Food-processes wastewaters treatment using food solid-waste materials as adsorbents or absorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapti, Ilaira; Georgopoulos, Stavros; Antonopoulou, Maria; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Papadaki, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The wastewaters generated by olive-mills during the production of olive oil, wastewaters from a dairy and a cow-farm unit and wastewaters from a small food factory have been treated by means of selected materials, either by-products of the same units, or other solid waste, as absorbents or adsorbents in order to identify the capacity of those materials to remove organic load and toxicity from the aforementioned wastewaters. The potential of both the materials used as absorbents as well as the treated wastewaters to be further used either as fertilizers or for agricultural irrigation purposes are examined. Dry olive leaves, sheep wool, rice husks, etc. were used either in a fixed-bed or in a stirred batch arrangemen,t employing different initial concentrations of the aforementioned wastewaters. The efficiency of removal was assessed using scpectrophotometric methods and allium test phytotoxicity measurements. In this presentation the response of each material employed is shown as a function of absorbent/adsorbent quantity and kind, treatment time and wastewater kind and initial organic load. Preliminary results on the potential uses of the adsorbents/absorbents and the treated wastewaters are also shown. Keywords: Olive-mill wastewaters, dairy farm wastewaters, olive leaves, zeolite, sheep wool

  20. Use of waste materials--Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, as potential adsorbents for the removal of Amaranth from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Alok; Kurup Krishnan, Lisha; Gupta, Vinod K

    2005-01-31

    Bottom Ash, a power plan t waste material and De-Oiled Soya, an agriculture waste product were successfully utilized in removing trisodium 2-hydroxy-1-(4-sulphonato-1-naphthylazo)naphthalene-3,6-disulphonate--a water-soluble hazardous azo dye (Amaranth). The paper incorporates thermodynamic and kinetic studies for the adsorption of the dye on these two waste materials as adsorbents. Characterization of each adsorbent was carried out by I.R. and D.T.A. curves. Batch adsorption studies were made by measuring effects of pH, adsorbate concentration, sieve size, adsorbent dosage, contact time, temperature etc. Specific rate constants for the processes were calculated by kinetic measurements and a first order adsorption kinetics was observed in each case. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were applied to calculate thermodynamic parameters. The adsorption on Bottom Ash takes place via film diffusion process at lower concentrations and via particle diffusion process at higher concentrations, while in the case of De-Oiled Soya process only particle diffusion takes place in the entire concentration range.

  1. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  2. Mammalian Y chromosomes retain widely expressed dosage-sensitive regulators.

    PubMed

    Bellott, Daniel W; Hughes, Jennifer F; Skaletsky, Helen; Brown, Laura G; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Cho, Ting-Jan; Koutseva, Natalia; Zaghlul, Sara; Graves, Tina; Rock, Susie; Kremitzki, Colin; Fulton, Robert S; Dugan, Shannon; Ding, Yan; Morton, Donna; Khan, Ziad; Lewis, Lora; Buhay, Christian; Wang, Qiaoyan; Watt, Jennifer; Holder, Michael; Lee, Sandy; Nazareth, Lynne; Alföldi, Jessica; Rozen, Steve; Muzny, Donna M; Warren, Wesley C; Gibbs, Richard A; Wilson, Richard K; Page, David C

    2014-04-24

    The human X and Y chromosomes evolved from an ordinary pair of autosomes, but millions of years ago genetic decay ravaged the Y chromosome, and only three per cent of its ancestral genes survived. We reconstructed the evolution of the Y chromosome across eight mammals to identify biases in gene content and the selective pressures that preserved the surviving ancestral genes. Our findings indicate that survival was nonrandom, and in two cases, convergent across placental and marsupial mammals. We conclude that the gene content of the Y chromosome became specialized through selection to maintain the ancestral dosage of homologous X-Y gene pairs that function as broadly expressed regulators of transcription, translation and protein stability. We propose that beyond its roles in testis determination and spermatogenesis, the Y chromosome is essential for male viability, and has unappreciated roles in Turner's syndrome and in phenotypic differences between the sexes in health and disease.

  3. [Customizing dosage drugs what contribution in therapeutic drug monitoring?].

    PubMed

    Abdessadek, Mohammed; Magoul, Rabia; Amarti, Afaf; El Ouezzani, Seloua; Khabbal, Youssef

    2014-01-01

    Drug response is often variable from an individual to another: the same dose of drug administered to different patients could cause variable pharmacological effects in nature and intensity. Those effects are often the result of variability in drugs pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) which alter their bioavailability. In fact, two factors should be taken into account: the disease(s) from which the patient suffers, and the associated drugs, because many drug interactions may alter their pharmacokinetics causing consequently quite enough of different therapeutic effects. The choice of the assay of the drug subject in monitoring is crucial, it allows quantifying the in vivo dose of the drug and the quality of compliance thereof, the pharmacokinetic characteristics allows the clinician to adjust the dosage by different approaches so that plasma concentrations are included in the therapeutic range. Therapeutic monitoring aims to increase clinical efficacy and to minimize toxicity.

  4. Oral Solid Dosage Form Disintegration Testing - The Forgotten Test.

    PubMed

    Al-Gousous, Jozef; Langguth, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Since its inception in the 1930s, disintegration testing has become an important quality control (QC) test in pharmaceutical industry, and disintegration test procedures for various dosage forms have been described by the different pharmacopoeias, with harmonization among them still not quite complete. However, because of the fact that complete disintegration does not necessarily imply complete dissolution, much more research has been focused on dissolution rather than on disintegration testing. Nevertheless, owing to its simplicity, disintegration testing seems to be an attractive replacement to dissolution testing as recognized by the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines, in some cases. Therefore, with proper research being carried out to overcome the associated challenges, the full potential of disintegration testing could be tapped saving considerable efforts allocated to QC testing and quality assurance.

  5. Mammalian Y chromosomes retain widely expressed dosage-sensitive regulators

    PubMed Central

    Bellott, Daniel W.; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Skaletsky, Helen; Brown, Laura G.; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Cho, Ting-Jan; Koutseva, Natalia; Zaghlul, Sara; Graves, Tina; Rock, Susie; Kremitzki, Colin; Fulton, Robert S.; Dugan, Shannon; Ding, Yan; Morton, Donna; Khan, Ziad; Lewis, Lora; Buhay, Christian; Wang, Qiaoyan; Watt, Jennifer; Holder, Michael; Lee, Sandy; Nazareth, Lynne; Alföldi, Jessica; Rozen, Steve; Muzny, Donna M.; Warren, Wesley C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Page, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The human X and Y chromosomes evolved from an ordinary pair of autosomes, but millions of years ago genetic decay ravaged the Y chromosome, and only three percent of its ancestral genes survived. We reconstructed the evolution of the Y chromosome across eight mammals to identify biases in gene content and the selective pressures that preserved the surviving ancestral genes. Our findings indicate that survival was non-random, and in two cases, convergent across placental and marsupial mammals. We conclude that the Y chromosome's gene content became specialized through selection to maintain the ancestral dosage of homologous X-Y gene pairs that function as broadly expressed regulators of transcription, translation and protein stability. We propose that beyond its roles in testis determination and spermatogenesis, the Y chromosome is essential for male viability, and plays unappreciated roles in Turner syndrome and in phenotypic differences between the sexes in health and disease. PMID:24759411

  6. Noise reduction facilitated by dosage compensation in gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weilin; Song, Ruijie; Acar, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Genetic noise together with genome duplication and volume changes during cell cycle are significant contributors to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. How can cells buffer the effects of these unavoidable epigenetic and genetic variations on phenotypes that are sensitive to such variations? Here we show that a simple network motif that is essential for network-dosage compensation can reduce the effects of extrinsic noise on the network output. Using natural and synthetic gene networks with and without the network motif, we measure gene network activity in single yeast cells and find that the activity of the compensated network is significantly lower in noise compared with the non-compensated network. A mathematical analysis provides intuitive insights into these results and a novel stochastic model tracking cell-volume and cell-cycle predicts the experimental results. Our work implies that noise is a selectable trait tunable by evolution. PMID:27694830

  7. Pullulan Production by Aureobasidium pullulans ATCC 201253 Cells Adsorbed onto Cellulose Anion and Cation Exchangers

    PubMed Central

    West, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The anion exchanger phosphocellulose and the cation exchanger triethylaminoethyl cellulose were used to immobilize cells of the fungus Aureobasidium pullulans ATCC 201253 and the adsorbed cells were subsequently investigated for their ability to produce the polysaccharide pullulan using batch fermentation. The cells adsorbed on the triethylaminoethyl cellulose at pH 7.5 produced higher pullulan levels than those cells immobilized on phosphocellulose at pH 4.0 for 2 cycles of 168 h at 30 °C. Relative to the initial cycle of 168 h, pullulan production by the cells immobilized on the triethylaminoethyl cellulose decreased slightly after 168 h of the second production cycle while pullulan production by the phosphocellulose-immobilized cells remained about the same after 168 h of the second production cycle. PMID:23762749

  8. Sweet potato starch residue as starting material to prepare polyacrylonitrile adsorbent via SI-SET-LRP.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhihai; Wang, Dongju; Chen, Hou; Sun, Jinming; Xu, Yuanyuan

    2014-02-26

    Sweet potato starch residue (SPSR) was used as starting material to prepare an eco-friendly adsorbent. SPSR was modified by bromoacetyl bromide to obtain a macroinitiator for surface-initiated single electron transfer-living radical polymerization (SI-SET-LRP) of acrylonitrile (AN) catalyzed by La(0)/hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of ascorbic acid (VC). The amidoxime (AO) adsorbent was prepared by the reaction of the graft copolymer bromoactylated sweet potato starch (BSPS)/polyacrylonitrile (BSPS-g-PAN) with hydroxylamine. The maximum adsorption capacity for Hg(II) was 4.03 mmol·g(-1). This simple method provided a novel approach to recycle and reuse agricultural residues for controlling heavy metal pollution. PMID:24512626

  9. Active suppression of diabetes after oral administration of insulin is determined by antigen dosage.

    PubMed

    Bergerot, I; Fabien, N; Mayer, A; Thivolet, C

    1996-02-13

    We have previously demonstrated that feeding six-week-old female mice with 20 units of human insulin every 2 - 3 days for 15 or 30 days induced an active mechanism of suppression through the generation of regulatory T cells that reduced the number of successful diabetic transfers in irradiated NOD recipients. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of antigen dosage and the critical period of cell injection to obtain protection. The effects of the dose of insulin feeding were therefore compared during cotransfer experiments of 5 x 10(6) T cells from diabetic mice and 5 x 10(6) T cells from the spleen of mice receiving 10 units, 20 units, or 40 units of insulin or saline every 2 - 3 days for 15 days. Only T lymphocytes from mice fed with 20 units conferred active cellular protection during adoptive transfer with a significant delay in diabetes onset (p = 0.002). No significant difference was noticed during histological analysis of pancreatic glands, indicating tha insulitis was not prevented. However, mice receiving T lymphocytes from the 20 units of insulin-fed animals had a milder form of inflammation, with a significantly lower percentage of severely infiltrated islets. Injecting regulatory T cells 7 days and 14 days after iv injection of diabetogenic T cells did not modify the incidence curves of diabetes in the recipients, suggesting that cellular interactions and delay in cell trafficking were determinants. These results may have important clinical implications in humans. In conclusion, this study indicates the importance but also the limits of antigen therapy in type I diabetes. Antigen dosage is a critical element for active suppression. Such analysis is important to perform in humans before the initiation of a large-scale prevention trial in prediabetic individuals. PMID:8610991

  10. NASA Applications of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a new, innovative technology that was developed to reduce the risk of molecular contamination on spaceflight applications. Outgassing from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, and potting compounds, pose a significant threat to the spacecraft and the lifetime of missions. As a coating made of highly porous inorganic materials, MAC offers impressive adsorptive capabilities that help capture and trap contaminants. Past research efforts have demonstrated the coating's promising adhesion performance, optical properties, acoustic durability, and thermal stability. These results advocate its use near or on surfaces that are targeted by outgassed materials, such as internal optics, electronics, detectors, baffles, sensitive instruments, thermal control coatings, and vacuum chamber test environments. The MAC technology has significantly progressed in development over the recent years. This presentation summarizes the many NASA spaceflight applications of MAC and how the coatings technology has been integrated as a mitigation tool for outgassed contaminants. For example, this sprayable paint technology has been beneficial for use in various vacuum chambers for contamination control and hardware bake-outs. The coating has also been used in small instrument cavities within spaceflight instrument for NASA missions.

  11. Bowl inversion of surface-adsorbed sumanene.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Rached; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Bussi, Giovanni; Aït-Mansour, Kamel; Groening, Oliver; Amaya, Toru; Hirao, Toshikazu; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    Bowl-shaped π-conjugated compounds offer the possibility to study curvature-dependent host-guest interactions and chemical reactivity in ideal model systems. For surface-adsorbed π bowls, however, only conformations with the bowl opening pointing away from the surface have been observed so far. Here we show for sumanene on Ag(111) that both bowl-up and bowl-down conformations can be stabilized. Analysis of the molecular layer as a function of coverage reveals an unprecedented structural phase transition involving a bowl inversion of one-third of the molecules. On the basis of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and complementary atomistic simulations, we develop a model that describes the observed phase transition in terms of a subtle interplay between inversion-dependent adsorption energies and intermolecular interactions. In addition, we explore the coexisting bowl-up and -down conformations with respect to host-guest binding of methane. STM reveals a clear energetic preference for methane binding to the concave face of sumanene. PMID:25181621

  12. Morphological characterization of furfuraldehyde resins adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Monteiro, S.N.; D`Almeida, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Sugar cane is one of the most traditional plantation cultivated crops in large areas in Brazil. The State University of the North of Rio de Janeiro, UENF, is currently engaged in a program aimed to exploit the potentialities of sugar cane industry as a self sustained non-polluting enterprise. One of the projects being carried out at the UENF is the transformation of sugar cane bagasse in precursor materials for the industry of furan derivatives such as the furfuraldehyde resins obtained by acid catalysis. The possibility of employing acid catalyzed furfuraldehyde resins as selective adsorbents has arisen during a comprehensive study of physical-chemical adsorption properties of these materials. The morphology of these resins depend on the synthesis method. Scanning Electron Microscopic studies of these materials which were synthesized, in bulk (FH-M) and solution (FH-D), showed differences in surface density and particle size. Using mercury porosimeter techniques and BET adsorption methods, it was found different pore size distributions and a decrement in surface area when solvent was employed in the synthesis process. By thermogravimetric analysis it was found similar weight losses (6%) of water adsorption and a small differences in thermal stabilities.

  13. Evaluation of a two-point method for prediction of lithium maintenance dosage.

    PubMed

    Karki, S D; Carson, S W; Holden, J M; Nanavati, D

    1987-10-01

    A lithium test dose method, based on the two-point method of Perry et al. (1982), was evaluated in 20 patients for the prediction of maintenance dosage of slow-release lithium carbonate tablets. These predictions were compared with the predictions obtained from the dosing chart of Cooper et al. (1973). The two-point method accurately predicted the maintenance dosage within clinically acceptable limits, but dosages predicted from the dosing chart would have yielded much higher serum lithium concentrations. PMID:3121719

  14. The impact of space travel on dosage form design and use.

    PubMed

    Aronsohn, A; Brazeau, G; Hughes, J

    1999-07-01

    The author speculates on potential factors that may influence the utilization of dosage forms in space. A key assumption is that most of the arguments will be based on current understanding of how dosage forms work on earth. Factors discussed include dosage form stability; and administration of drugs, particularly inhalation and aerosols. A sample experiment used a tissue culture model of drug transfer for passively absorbed drugs to address how alterations in hydrostatic pressure would change paracellular transport.

  15. Surfactant-modified montmorillonite as a nanosized adsorbent for removal of an insecticide: kinetic and isotherm studies.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Aydin; Khataee, Alireza; Karaca, Semra; Shirzad-Siboni, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant-modified montmorillonites (MMT) were prepared using trimethyloctylammonium bromide (TMOAB) and employed as a nanosized adsorbent to remove diazinon from aqueous solutions. The prepared adsorbent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The dependence of removal efficiency on initial diazinon concentration, amount of adsorbent, pH of the solution and ionic strength was investigated. The affinity sequence for ion adsorption on TMOAB/MMT was in the order: without anion> sodium carbonate> sodium bicarbonate> sodium sulphate> sodium chloride. The adsorption kinetic and isotherm were best fit by a pseudo-second-order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm models, respectively. PMID:26006742

  16. Development of carbon dioxide adsorbent from rice husk char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abang, S.; Janaun, J.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Ikhwan, F. S.

    2016-06-01

    This study was mainly concerned about the development of carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbent from rice husk (RH). Several chemical treatments were used to produce activated rice husk char (RHAC) from RH. Initially the RH was refluxed with 3M of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, activation followed by using 0.5M of zinc chloride (ZnCl2) solution and finally acidic treatment by using 0.1M of hydrochloric acid (HCl). Then, the RHAC was functionalized by using 3-chloropropylamine hydrochloride (3-CPA) and noted as RHN. RHN samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Based on the SEM, the RHN sample had a large pore diameter compared to RH sample after being treated. Based on MIP data, the average pore diameter between RH and RHAC samples were increased significantly from 0.928 microns to 1.017 microns. The RHN sample also had higher total porosity (%) compared to RHAC and RH (58.45%, 47.82% and 45.57% respectively). The total specific surface area of the sample was much increasing from RHO to RHAC (29.17 m2/g and 62.94 m2/g respectively) and slightly being decreasing from RHAC to RHN (58.88 m2/g). FTIR result showed the present of weak band at 1587 cm-1 which demonstrating of the amine group present on the sample. The CO2 capture result showed that the decreasing of operating temperature can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. On the contrary decreasing of CO2 gas flow rate can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. The highest total amount of CO2 adsorbed was 25338.57 mg of CO2/g of RHN sample by using 100 mL/min of gas flow rate at 30oC. Based on adsorption isotherm analysis, the Freundlich isotherm was the best isotherm to describe the CO2 adsorption on the sample.

  17. Compensation of Dosage-Sensitive Genes on the Chicken Z Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Fabian; Harrison, Peter W.; Dessimoz, Christophe; Mank, Judith E.

    2016-01-01

    In many diploid species, sex determination is linked to a pair of sex chromosomes that evolved from a pair of autosomes. In these organisms, the degeneration of the sex-limited Y or W chromosome causes a reduction in gene dose in the heterogametic sex for X- or Z-linked genes. Variations in gene dose are detrimental for large chromosomal regions when they span dosage-sensitive genes, and many organisms were thought to evolve complete mechanisms of dosage compensation to mitigate this. However, the recent realization that a wide variety of organisms lack complete mechanisms of sex chromosome dosage compensation has presented a perplexing question: How do organisms with incomplete dosage compensation avoid deleterious effects of gene dose differences between the sexes? Here we use expression data from the chicken (Gallus gallus) to show that ohnologs, duplicated genes known to be dosage-sensitive, are preferentially dosage-compensated on the chicken Z chromosome. Our results indicate that even in the absence of a complete and chromosome wide dosage compensation mechanism, dosage-sensitive genes are effectively dosage compensated on the Z chromosome. PMID:27044516

  18. 10 CFR 35.63 - Determination of dosages of unsealed byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) For a unit dosage, this determination must be made by— (1) Direct measurement of radioactivity; or (2... measurement of radioactivity; (2) Combination of measurement of radioactivity and mathematical...

  19. 10 CFR 35.63 - Determination of dosages of unsealed byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) For a unit dosage, this determination must be made by— (1) Direct measurement of radioactivity; or (2... measurement of radioactivity; (2) Combination of measurement of radioactivity and mathematical...

  20. 10 CFR 35.63 - Determination of dosages of unsealed byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) For a unit dosage, this determination must be made by— (1) Direct measurement of radioactivity; or (2... measurement of radioactivity; (2) Combination of measurement of radioactivity and mathematical...

  1. 10 CFR 35.63 - Determination of dosages of unsealed byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) For a unit dosage, this determination must be made by— (1) Direct measurement of radioactivity; or (2... measurement of radioactivity; (2) Combination of measurement of radioactivity and mathematical...

  2. 10 CFR 35.63 - Determination of dosages of unsealed byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) For a unit dosage, this determination must be made by— (1) Direct measurement of radioactivity; or (2... measurement of radioactivity; (2) Combination of measurement of radioactivity and mathematical...

  3. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  4. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  5. From adsorption to condensation: the role of adsorbed molecular clusters.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubian, Sima; Zandavi, Seyed Hadi; Ward, C A

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of heptane vapour on a smooth silicon substrate with a lower temperature than the vapour is examined analytically and experimentally. An expression for the amount adsorbed under steady state conditions is derived from the molecular cluster model of the adsorbate that is similar to the one used to derive the equilibrium Zeta adsorption isotherm. The amount adsorbed in each of a series of steady experiments is measured using a UV-vis interferometer, and gives strong support to the amount predicted to be adsorbed. The cluster distribution is used to predict the subcooling temperature required for the adsorbed vapour to make a disorder-order phase transition to become an adsorbed liquid, and the subcooling temperature is found to be 2.7 ± 0.4 K. The continuum approach for predicting the thickness of the adsorbed liquid film originally developed by Nusselt is compared with that measured and is found to over-predict the thickness by three-orders of magnitude. PMID:27426944

  6. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  7. Novel adhesion properties of irreversibly adsorbed polymer chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhizhao; Sen, Mani; Cheung, Justin; Barkley, Deborah; Jiang, Naisheng; Zeng, Wenduo; Endoh, Maya K.; Koga, Tadanori

    The stability of thin polymer films on solids is of vital interest in traditional technologies and in new emerging nanotechnologies. We recently found that nanoscale structures of polymer chains adsorbed onto a silicon (Si) substrate (``adsorbed nanolayers'') play a crucial role in the thermal stability of the film. To understand the adhesion mechanism at the adsorbed polymer-free polymer interface, we mimicked the interface by preparing bilayers where a 200 nm-thick polymer film and an adsorbed nanolayer, both prepared on Si, were pressed together at high temperature. The bilayers were then subjected to an adhesion test by measuring the critical normal force required to separate the two films. Polystyrene was used as a model. The results are intriguing as they show an absence of adhesion between the ``flattened'' adsorbed chains, which lie flat on the solid, and the chemically identical free chains. On the other hand, the ``loosely adsorbed'' polymer chains, which are formed as a result of limited adsorption space on the solid surface, do display a degree of adhesion with the bulk polymer. We postulate that the loosely adsorbed chains act as ``connectors'' which promote adhesion effectively across the solid-polymer interface. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  8. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  9. Rapid enrichment of rare-earth metals by carboxymethyl cellulose-based open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent from HIPEs template.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongfeng; Wang, Wenbo; Zheng, Yian; Wang, Feng; Wang, Aiqin

    2016-04-20

    A series of monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbents based on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) were prepared through high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) and used to enrich the rare-earth metals La(3+) and Ce(3+). The changes of pore structure, and the effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration on the adsorption performance were systematically studied. The results show that the as-prepared monolithic hydrogel adsorbents possess good open-cellular framework structure and have fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity for La(3+) and Ce(3+). The involved adsorption system can reach equilibrium within 30min and the maximal adsorption capacity is determined to be 384.62mg/g for La(3+) and 333.33mg/g for Ce(3+). Moreover, these porous hydrogel adsorbents show an excellent adsorptive reusability for La(3+) and Ce(3+) through five adsorption-desorption cycles. Such a pore hierarchy structure makes this monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent be an effective adsorbent for effective enrichment of La(3+) and Ce(3+) from aqueous solution. PMID:26876827

  10. Rapid enrichment of rare-earth metals by carboxymethyl cellulose-based open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent from HIPEs template.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongfeng; Wang, Wenbo; Zheng, Yian; Wang, Feng; Wang, Aiqin

    2016-04-20

    A series of monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbents based on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) were prepared through high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) and used to enrich the rare-earth metals La(3+) and Ce(3+). The changes of pore structure, and the effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration on the adsorption performance were systematically studied. The results show that the as-prepared monolithic hydrogel adsorbents possess good open-cellular framework structure and have fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity for La(3+) and Ce(3+). The involved adsorption system can reach equilibrium within 30min and the maximal adsorption capacity is determined to be 384.62mg/g for La(3+) and 333.33mg/g for Ce(3+). Moreover, these porous hydrogel adsorbents show an excellent adsorptive reusability for La(3+) and Ce(3+) through five adsorption-desorption cycles. Such a pore hierarchy structure makes this monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent be an effective adsorbent for effective enrichment of La(3+) and Ce(3+) from aqueous solution.

  11. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  12. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of pyrazole adsorbed on silver colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Neto, Natale; Sbrana, Giuseppe

    1999-05-01

    SERS spectra of pyrazole adsorbed on silver hydrosol at different pH values and on silver colloidal substrate deposited on filters were obtained and interpreted on the basis of the existence of three forms in equilibrium, cationic, neutral and anionic. SERS data indicate that the neutral molecule is preferentially adsorbed in acidic environment, pyrazolide anion is instead favoured over all the other pH values. Addition of chloride anions induces the formation of reaction products when pyrazole is adsorbed on silver hydrosols, while this effect is missing on dry silver substrate.

  13. Mysterious Lattice Rotations in Adsorbed Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Renee D.

    1997-03-01

    Lattice rotations due to a mismatch in structure have been observed in film growth for many years, probably beginning in the 1930's with the Nishiyama-Wasserman and Kurdjumov-Sachs orientations observed when fcc(111) films grow on bcc(110) surfaces, or vice versa. Early analysis of this problem was carried out with the aid of Moiré patterns and the observation that the preferred lattice orientations are those which maximize the Moiré fringe spacing. Later energy calculations indicated that the structures which were predicted by the the Moiré technique actually do correspond to energy minima. Epitaxial rotation in adsorbed monolayers is a conceptually simpler problem since in principle it involves only two planes of atoms, and it was first observed in 1977 for Ar on a graphite surface(C. G. Shaw, M. D. Chinn, S. C. Fain, Jr. Phys. Rev. Lett. 41 (1978) 955.). This observation came only a few months after a new theory, based on the expected elastic behavior of an overlayer, was developed by A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague(A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague, Phys. Rev. Lett. 38 (1977) 1286.), and the agreement with the experimental results was remarkable. It was later shown that a few symmetry principles similar to those used for the film growth studies sometimes can also predict the observed structures. However, the situation for incommensurate layers physisorbed on metal surfaces currently looks bleak. None of the existing theories or models appears to describe the experimental results. New data for physisorbed gases on metal surfaces will be presented, along with some half-baked (and probably wrong) ideas for what might be happening. This work was supported by NSF.

  14. A modified cryostat for photo-electrical characterization of porous materials in controlled atmosphere at very low gas dosage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, Alessandro; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Lamberti, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    We developed an integrated system for photo-electrical characterization of materials for sensing applications in strictly controlled environment conditions. The peculiar aspect of this setup is the capability of a fine-tuned gas dosage and a fast dynamic chamber pressure control, coupled with current and voltage sensing within a modified cryostat. To illustrate the capabilities of our system we have characterised both p+-type mesoporous silicon (meso-PS) membranes and nano-crystalline mesoporous titanium dioxide (nc-TiO2) films. In particular, as a main topic is presented a well-resolved characterization of mesoporous silicon electrical conductivity changes induced by presence of ethanol. At low pore filling level adsorbate-shunted conduction is avoided, while dielectric screening effects on frozen doping centres are observable. Beside we presented observation of mesoporous titanium dioxide photo-conductivity as a function of different gas pressure reporting opposite effects of relatively low- and high-pressure regimes. High reproducibility provided by the system is discussed as a final remark.

  15. To choose the proper antibiotic regimen between the old and new antimicrobial agents and to determine the optimum dosage with Bi-Digital O-Ring Test.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Wu, Ping-Shi; Panik, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) can be used for various purposes for medical and dental diagnosis as well as for treatment purposes by determining the type of medication and the dosage for a patient. In case of infection, BDORT is a fast and non-invasive way to decide what kind of antibiotic and the dosage to be given to patient. If a patient already has been on a certain antibiotic for days, the clinician could use BDORT with diode (with arrow signs of the diode pointing to the patient) to test the same drug. Otherwise without diode, if BDORT result is negative, it could either mean the negative result might be due to resonance phenomenon or it may be because the antibiotic is ineffective. Either way, if O-Ring would be open during testing, the clinician should gradually increase or decrease the dosage of antibiotic to find out if BDORT result begins to become positive. In great majority of cases involving less effective old generation antibiotics, it is usually due to resistant microbia that require increasing dosage of antibiotic to make it become more effective. If increasing dosage would make O-Ring close, then the increased dosage would be effective to the patient. If the result is negative, the clinician should consider switching to another antibiotic regimen that may be tested positive with BDORT. Old generation antibiotics have not necessarily lost usefulness or lack efficacy on those new emerging resistant bacteria. Clinicians may just need to increase the dosage of those older generation antibiotics to make them more effective. In fact, with so many antibiotic-resisting strains of bacteria, clinician often face dilemma whether to switch to newer generation of antibiotics or just to increase the dosage of the older generation of antibiotics that a patient has been taking. When testing antibiotic of penicillin-related medication including amoxicillin, the thymus tablet (bovine source) should also be used for the testing after initially testing without it

  16. To choose the proper antibiotic regimen between the old and new antimicrobial agents and to determine the optimum dosage with Bi-Digital O-Ring Test.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Wu, Ping-Shi; Panik, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) can be used for various purposes for medical and dental diagnosis as well as for treatment purposes by determining the type of medication and the dosage for a patient. In case of infection, BDORT is a fast and non-invasive way to decide what kind of antibiotic and the dosage to be given to patient. If a patient already has been on a certain antibiotic for days, the clinician could use BDORT with diode (with arrow signs of the diode pointing to the patient) to test the same drug. Otherwise without diode, if BDORT result is negative, it could either mean the negative result might be due to resonance phenomenon or it may be because the antibiotic is ineffective. Either way, if O-Ring would be open during testing, the clinician should gradually increase or decrease the dosage of antibiotic to find out if BDORT result begins to become positive. In great majority of cases involving less effective old generation antibiotics, it is usually due to resistant microbia that require increasing dosage of antibiotic to make it become more effective. If increasing dosage would make O-Ring close, then the increased dosage would be effective to the patient. If the result is negative, the clinician should consider switching to another antibiotic regimen that may be tested positive with BDORT. Old generation antibiotics have not necessarily lost usefulness or lack efficacy on those new emerging resistant bacteria. Clinicians may just need to increase the dosage of those older generation antibiotics to make them more effective. In fact, with so many antibiotic-resisting strains of bacteria, clinician often face dilemma whether to switch to newer generation of antibiotics or just to increase the dosage of the older generation of antibiotics that a patient has been taking. When testing antibiotic of penicillin-related medication including amoxicillin, the thymus tablet (bovine source) should also be used for the testing after initially testing without it

  17. Dosage optimization in positron emission tomography: state-of-the-art methods and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Fokou, Eleni; Tsoumpas, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used nowadays for tumor staging and therapy response in the clinic. However, average PET radiation exposure has increased due to higher PET utilization. This study aims to review state-of-the-art PET tracer dosage optimization methods after accounting for the effects of human body attenuation and scan protocol parameters on the counting rate. In particular, the relationship between the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and the dosage (NECR-dosage curve) for a range of clinical PET systems and body attenuation sizes will be systematically studied to prospectively estimate the minimum dosage required for sufficiently high NECR. The optimization criterion can be determined either as a function of the peak of the NECR-dosage curve or as a fixed NECR score when NECR uniformity across a patient population is important. In addition, the systematic NECR assessments within a controllable environment of realistic simulations and phantom experiments can lead to a NECR-dosage response model, capable of predicting the optimal dosage for every individual PET scan. Unlike conventional guidelines suggesting considerably large dosage levels for obese patients, NECR-based optimization recommends: i) moderate dosage to achieve 90% of peak NECR for obese patients, ii) considerable dosage reduction for slimmer patients such that uniform NECR is attained across the patient population, and iii) prolongation of scans for PET/MR protocols, where longer PET acquisitions are affordable due to lengthy MR sequences, with motion compensation becoming important then. Finally, the need for continuous adaptation of dosage optimization to emerging technologies will be discussed. PMID:26550543

  18. Relative Bioavailability of Scopolamine Dosage Forms and Interaction with Dextroamphetamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Du, Brian; Vaksman, Zalman; Locke, James P.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Reduced Gravity Office (RGO) uses scopolamine (SCOP) and in combination with dextoamphetamine (DEX) to manage motion sickness symptoms during parabolic flights. The medications are dispensed as custom dosage forms as gelatin capsules. Anecdotal evidence of efficacy suggests that these formulations are unreliable and less efficacious for the treatment of motion sickness. We estimated bioavailability of four different oral formulations used by NASA for the treatment of motion sickness. Twelve healthy, non-smoking subjects between 21and 48 years of age received four treatments on separate days in a randomized fashion; the treatments were 0.8 mg SCOP alone as tablet, 0.8 mg SCOP alone in gel cap, 0.8 mg SCOP and 10 mg DEX as tablets, and 0.8 mg SCOP and 10 mg DEX in gel cap. After each treatment, blood, saliva, and urine samples were collected at scheduled time intervals for 24 h after dosing. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and compared using ANOVA. After administration of SCOP tablets alone, maximum concentration (C(sub max)) and time for maximum concentration (t(sub max)) were 0.26 plus or minus 0.04 ng/mL and 0.71 plus or minus 0.02 h, respectively; volume of distribution, and clearance were 47.6 plus or minus 4.72 L/kg and 23.0 plus or minus 4.58 L/h/kg, respectively. SCOP t(sub max) after administration as gelcaps was significantly longer than that with tablets (1.04 h, p less than 0.05), but no significant differences in other pharmacokinetic parameters of SCOP were observed between the two dosage forms. When coadministered with DEX, the area underneath the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of SCOP was significantly reduced to 0.61 plus or minus 0.09 and 0.64 plus or minus 0.11 ng (raised dot) h/mL after administration as a tablet or gelcap formulation, respectively; SCOP C(sub max) was lower after coadministration with DEX, this difference, however, was not statistically significant. Delayed absorption with gelcaps

  19. Radiation grafted adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Nasef, Mohamed; Ting, T. M.; Abbasi, Ali; Layeghi-moghaddam, Alireza; Sara Alinezhad, S.; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation induced grafting (RIG) is acquired to prepare a number of adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications using a single route involving RIG of glycidymethacrylate (GMA) onto polyethylene-polypropylene (PE-PP) non-woven fabric. The grafted fabric was subjected to one of three functionalization reactions to impart desired ionic characters. This included treatment with (1) N-dimethyl-D-glucamine, (2) triethylamine and (3) triethylamine and alkalisation with KOH. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to study the changes in chemical and physical structures of the obtained fibrous adsorbents. The potential applications of the three adsorbents for removal of boron from solutions, capturing CO2 from CO2/N2 mixtures and catalysing transesterification of triacetin/methanol to methyl acetate (biodiesel) were explored. The obtained fibrous adsorbents provide potential alternatives to granular resins for the investigated applications and require further development.

  20. Trace contaminant studies of HSC adsorbent. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yieh, D. T. N.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of fifteen trace contaminants on HSC (polyethylenimine coated acrylic ester) adsorbent were experimentally investigated with the following two objectives: to test the removal potential and the adsorption reversibility of the selected trace contaminants, and to test the effect a preadsorbed trace contaminant has on the CO2 adsorption capacity. The experimental method for acquiring the adsorption equilibrium data used is based on the volumetric (or displacement) concept of vacuum adsorption. From the experimental results, it was found that the HSC adsorbent has good adsorption potential for contaminants of alcohol compounds, esters, and benzene compounds; whereas, adsorption of ketone compounds, oxidizing and reducing agents are detrimental to the adsorbent. In addition, all liquid contaminants reduce the CO2 capacity of HSC adsorbent.

  1. Adsorption of β-galactosidase on silica and aluminosilicate adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Dobryakova, I. V.; Pilipenko, O. S.

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that adsorption of β-galactosidase of Aspergillus oryzae fungi on mesoporous and biporous silica and aluminosilicate adsorbents and the rate of the process grow along with the diameter of the pores of the adsorbent. It is found that the shape of the adsorption isotherms changes as well, depending on the texture of the adsorbent: the Michaelis constant rises from 0.3 mM for the enzyme in solution to 0.4-0.5 mM for the enzyme on a surface in the hydrolysis of o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside. It is concluded that β-galactosidase displays its maximum activity on the surface of biporous adsorbents.

  2. Mycotoxin detoxication of animal feed by different adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Huwig, A; Freimund, S; Käppeli, O; Dutler, H

    2001-06-20

    The contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins represents a worldwide problem for farmers. These toxins originate from molds whose growth on living and stored plants is almost unavoidable particularly under moist conditions. Mycotoxin-containing feed can cause serious diseases in farm animals resulting in suffering and even death and thus can cause substantial economic losses. The most applied method for protecting animals against mycotoxicosis is the utilization of adsorbents mixed with the feed which are supposed to bind the mycotoxins efficiently in the gastro-intestinal tract. Aluminosilicates are the preferred adsorbents, followed by activated charcoal and special polymers. The efficiency of mycotoxin binders, however, differs considerably depending mainly on the chemical structure of both the adsorbent and the toxin. This review describes the most important types of adsorbents and the respective mechanisms of adsorption. Data of the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of detoxication are given.

  3. New insights into perfluorinated adsorbents for analytical and bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Nicola; Guzzinati, Roberta; Catani, Martina; Massi, Alessandro; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorinated (F-) adsorbents are generally prepared by bonding perfluoro-functionalized silanes to silica gels. They have been employed for a long time essentially as media for solid-phase extraction of F-molecules or F-tagged molecules in organic chemistry and heterogeneous catalysis. More recently, this approach has been extended to proteomics and metabolomics. Owing to their unique physicochemical properties, namely fluorophilicity and proteinophilicity, and a better understanding of some fundamental aspects of their behavior, new applications of F-adsorbents in the field of environmental science and bio-affinity studies can be envisaged. In this article, we revisit the most important features of F-adsorbents by focusing, in particular, on some basic information that has been recently obtained through (nonlinear) chromatographic studies. Finally, we try to envisage new applications and possibilities that F-adsorbents will allow in the near future. PMID:25358910

  4. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  5. Oil palm biomass as an adsorbent for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Many industries discharge untreated wastewater into the environment. Heavy metals from many industrial processes end up as hazardous pollutants of wastewaters.Heavy metal pollution has increased in recent decades and there is a growing concern for the public health risk they may pose. To remove heavy metal ions from polluted waste streams, adsorption processes are among the most common and effective treatment methods. The adsorbents that are used to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media have both advantages and disadvantages. Cost and effectiveness are two of the most prominent criteria for choosing adsorbents. Because cost is so important, great effort has been extended to study and find effective lower cost adsorbents.One class of adsorbents that is gaining considerable attention is agricultural wastes. Among many alternatives, palm oil biomasses have shown promise as effective adsorbents for removing heavy metals from wastewater. The palm oil industry has rapidly expanded in recent years, and a large amount of palm oil biomass is available. This biomass is a low-cost agricultural waste that exhibits, either in its raw form or after being processed, the potential for eliminating heavy metal ions from wastewater. In this article, we provide background information on oil palm biomass and describe studies that indicate its potential as an alternative adsorbent for removing heavy metal ions from wastewater. From having reviewed the cogent literature on this topic we are encouraged that low-cost oil-palm-related adsorbents have already demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants.Because cost is so important to those who choose to clean waste streams by using adsorbents, the use of cheap sources of unconventional adsorbents is increasingly being investigated. An adsorbent is considered to be inexpensive when it is readily available, is environmentally friendly, is cost-effective and be effectively used in economical processes. The

  6. Oil palm biomass as an adsorbent for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Many industries discharge untreated wastewater into the environment. Heavy metals from many industrial processes end up as hazardous pollutants of wastewaters.Heavy metal pollution has increased in recent decades and there is a growing concern for the public health risk they may pose. To remove heavy metal ions from polluted waste streams, adsorption processes are among the most common and effective treatment methods. The adsorbents that are used to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media have both advantages and disadvantages. Cost and effectiveness are two of the most prominent criteria for choosing adsorbents. Because cost is so important, great effort has been extended to study and find effective lower cost adsorbents.One class of adsorbents that is gaining considerable attention is agricultural wastes. Among many alternatives, palm oil biomasses have shown promise as effective adsorbents for removing heavy metals from wastewater. The palm oil industry has rapidly expanded in recent years, and a large amount of palm oil biomass is available. This biomass is a low-cost agricultural waste that exhibits, either in its raw form or after being processed, the potential for eliminating heavy metal ions from wastewater. In this article, we provide background information on oil palm biomass and describe studies that indicate its potential as an alternative adsorbent for removing heavy metal ions from wastewater. From having reviewed the cogent literature on this topic we are encouraged that low-cost oil-palm-related adsorbents have already demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants.Because cost is so important to those who choose to clean waste streams by using adsorbents, the use of cheap sources of unconventional adsorbents is increasingly being investigated. An adsorbent is considered to be inexpensive when it is readily available, is environmentally friendly, is cost-effective and be effectively used in economical processes. The

  7. Evolution of dosage compensation in Diptera: the gene maleless implements dosage compensation in Drosophila (Brachycera suborder) but its homolog in Sciara (Nematocera suborder) appears to play no role in dosage compensation.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, M F; Esteban, M R; Doñoro, C; Goday, C; Sánchez, L

    2000-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster and in Sciara ocellaris dosage compensation occurs by hypertranscription of the single male X chromosome. This article reports the cloning and characterization in S. ocellaris of the gene homologous to maleless (mle) of D. melanogaster, which implements dosage compensation. The Sciara mle gene produces a single transcript, encoding a helicase, which is present in both male and female larvae and adults and in testes and ovaries. Both Sciara and Drosophila MLE proteins are highly conserved. The affinity-purified antibody to D. melanogaster MLE recognizes the S. ocellaris MLE protein. In contrast to Drosophila polytene chromosomes, where MLE is preferentially associated with the male X chromosome, in Sciara MLE is found associated with all chromosomes. Anti-MLE staining of Drosophila postblastoderm male embryos revealed a single nuclear dot, whereas Sciara male and female embryos present multiple intranuclear staining spots. This expression pattern in Sciara is also observed before blastoderm stage, when dosage compensation is not yet set up. The affinity-purified antibodies against D. melanogaster MSL1, MSL3, and MOF proteins involved in dosage compensation also revealed no differences in the staining pattern between the X chromosome and the autosomes in both Sciara males and females. These results lead us to propose that different proteins in Drosophila and Sciara would implement dosage compensation. PMID:11102379

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering enhancement of thymine adsorbed on graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of carbon nanostructures, namely, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, graphene nanoplatelets, graphene oxide, and multiwall carbon nanotubes as well CARS spectra of thymine (Thy) molecules adsorbed on graphene oxide were studied. The spectra of the samples were compared with spontaneous Raman scattering (RS) spectra. The CARS spectra of Thy adsorbed on graphene oxide are characterized by shifts of the main bands in comparison with RS. The CARS spectra of the initial nanocarbons are definitely different: for all investigated materials, there is a redistribution of D- and G-mode intensities, significant shift of their frequencies (more than 20 cm-1), and appearance of new modes about 1,400 and 1,500 cm-1. The D band in CARS spectra is less changed than the G band; there is an absence of 2D-mode at 2,600 cm-1 for graphene and appearance of intensive modes of the second order between 2,400 and 3,000 cm-1. Multiphonon processes in graphene under many photon excitations seem to be responsible for the features of the CARS spectra. We found an enhancement of the CARS signal from thymine adsorbed on graphene oxide with maximum enhancement factor about 105. The probable mechanism of CARS enhancement is discussed. PMID:24948887

  9. A simple approach to fabricate granular adsorbent for adsorption of rare elements.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongfeng; Zheng, Yian; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-01-01

    A kind of granular hybrid hydrogel was prepared under an ambient temperature in air atmosphere using Fenton reagent as the redox initiator, and its three-dimensional structured polymeric network can be formed by the grafting reaction of acrylic acid (AA) onto hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) with attapulgite (APT) as the inorganic component. The resulting granular hybrid hydrogel was marked as HPC-g-PAA/APT and used as the adsorbent to remove the rare earth elements, La(III) and Ce(III). The effects of pH and APT content on the adsorption capacity, as well as the adsorption isotherms and kinetics, were systematically investigated. Finally, the reusability of HPC-g-PAA/APT for La(III) and Ce(III) were evaluated. The results indicate that the adsorption process is pH-independent at pH ≥ 4.0 and can be described using the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium isotherm matches well with the Langmuir model. The adsorbed La(III) and Ce(III) can be desorbed by 0.5 mol/L HCl, with the desorption percentage of 80% for La(III) and Ce(III). After five adsorption-desorption cycles, the adsorption capacity shows a slight decrease (about 15%), implying that the granular hybrid hydrogel can be used as an effective adsorbent for the removal and recovery of La(III) and Ce(III) from aqueous solution.

  10. Fano Profiles in STM Spectroscopy of Single and Corraled Kondo Adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzuk, J. W.; Plihal, M.

    2001-03-01

    Resonance tunneling STM studies of transition metal atoms adsorbed on noble metal surfaces have produced spatially-dependent differential conductance versus voltage spectra, frequently observed to be asymmetric Fano lineshapes. The basic ideas behind the Fano profile of isolated atoms have been adapted to a theory of STM spectroscopy of atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The state of the tunneling electron within an STM tip biased with respect to the surface is regarded as the initially excited state. The atom on the surface plays the role of Fano’s discrete state embedded in the continuum. The normalized differential conductivity associated with the resonance, the STM equivalent of a spectral lineshape, is described by an expression that is related to, but more complicated than the Fano formula. It also contains more information, particularly that which is relevant to electron surface transport and scattering from artificially-synthesized surface nanostructures such as quantum corrals. Theoretical temperature and tip-position-dependent tunneling characteristics for Kondo systems such as single and “corraled” Co or Ce adsorbed on Au(111) will be presented and discussed.

  11. A regenerable oxide-based H2S adsorbent with nanofibrous morphology.

    PubMed

    Behl, Mayank; Yeom, Junghoon; Lineberry, Quentin; Jain, Prashant K; Shannon, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen sulphide is found in raw fuels such as natural gas and coal/biomass-derived syngas. It is poisonous to catalysts and corrosive to metals and therefore needs to be removed. This is often achieved using metal oxides as reactive adsorbents, but metal oxides perform poorly when subjected to repeated cycles of sulphidation and re-oxidation as a result of complex structural and chemical changes. Here, we show that Zn-Ti-O-based adsorbents with nanofibrous morphology can sustain their initial reactivity and sulphur removal capacity over multiple regeneration cycles. These nanostructured sorbents offer rapid reaction rates that overcome the gas-transport limitations of conventional pellet-based sorbents and allow all of the material to be used efficiently. Regeneration can be carried out at the same temperature as the sulphidation step because of the higher reactivity, which prevents sorbent deterioration and reduces energy use. The efficient regeneration of the adsorbent is also aided by structural features such as the growth of hierarchical nanostructures and preferential stabilization of a wurtzite phase in the sulphidation product.

  12. Development of adsorbent for the simultaneous removal of organic and inorganic contaminants from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Choi, J W; Chung, S G; Hong, S W; Kim, D J; Lee, S H

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a modified adsorbent, alginate complex beads, was prepared and applied to the removal of mixed contaminants from wastewater. The alginate complex beads were generated by the immobilization of powdered activated carbon and synthetic zeolites onto alginate gel beads, which were then dried at 110 °C for 20 h until the diameter had been reduced to 1 mm. This dry technique increased the hardness of the adsorbent to assure its durability and application. The adsorption onto the alginate complex beads of organic and inorganic compounds, as target contaminants, was investigated by performing both equilibrium and kinetic batch experiments. From the adsorption isotherms, according to the Langmuir equation, the alginate complex bead was capable of effectively removing benzene, toluene, zinc and cadmium. From kinetic batch experiments, the removal efficiencies of benzene, toluene, zinc and cadmium were found to be 66.5, 92.4, 74.1 and 76.7%, respectively, for initial solution concentrations of 100 mg L(-1). The results indicated that the adsorbent developed in this study has the potential to be a promising material for the removal of mixed pollutants from industrial wastewater or contaminated groundwater. PMID:22020474

  13. Removal of aqueous nickel (II) using laterite as a low-cost adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Somnath; Kumar, Sunil; Misra, A K; Acharya, P C

    2006-10-01

    The present paper describes the laboratory study of laterite as a low-cost adsorbent for removal of aqueous nickel (II). At pH 7 and a temperature of 30 degrees C, a sorbent dose of 15 mg/L resulted in approximately 90% removal of nickel (II) from its initial concentration of 10 mg/L. A maximum removal of 98% of the adsorbate was observed with an adsorbent particle size of 210 micro with the above conditions. Batch kinetics results were described by fitting in a Langmuir isotherm. Helffrich's half-time equation (Helffrich, 1962) has been applied to evaluate the adsorption process. It appears that film diffusion would be the rate-limiting step. The effect of pH on the sorption process was carried out to a value of 8.0. The removal rate of nickel was found to be the function of pH of the reaction mixture. The rate of nickel uptake by laterite with the decrease in pH value has been explained on the basis of aqueous-complex formation and the subsequent acid-base dissociation at the solid-solution interface. PMID:17120446

  14. Preventive obesity agent montmorillonite adsorbs dietary lipids and enhances lipid excretion from the digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengfei; Dai, Shu; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jin; Wang, Fang; Zhai, Yonggong

    2016-01-01

    Western diets are typically high in fat and are associated with long-term complications such as obesity and hepatic steatosis. Because of the enjoyable taste of high-fat diets (HFDs), we are interested in determining how to decrease lipid absorption and enhance lipid excretion from the digestive tract after the consumption of eating fatty foods. Montmorillonite was initially characterized as a gastrointestinal mucosal barrier protective agent for the treatment of diarrhoea. Dietary lipid adsorbent- montmorillonite (DLA-M) was isolated and purified from Xinjiang montmorillonite clay via the water extraction method. Here, we show that DLA-M has an unexpected role in preventing obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis in HFD-fed rats. Interestingly, combined application of polarized light microscopy and lipid staining analyses, showed that DLA-M crystals have dietary lipid-adsorbing ability in vitro and in vivo, which enhances lipid excretion via bowel movements. In summary, our results indicate that DLA-M prevent HFD-induced obesity. This novel dietary lipid-adsorbing agent can help prevent obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:26891902

  15. Efficient and selective adsorption of multi-metal ions using sulfonated cellulose as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cuihua; Zhang, Fulong; Pang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Guihua

    2016-10-20

    Contamination of heavy metal in wastewater has caused great concerns on human life and health. Developing an efficient material to eliminate the heavy metal ions has been a popular topic in recent years. In this work, sulfonated cellulose (SC) was explored as efficient adsorbent for metal ions in solution. Thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) first analyzed the characterizations of SC. Subsequently, effects of solution pH, adsorbent loading, temperature and initial metal ion concentration on adsorption performance were investigated. The results showed that sulfonated modification of cellulose could decrease the crystallinity and thermostability of cellulose. Due to its excellent performance of adsorption to metal ions, SC could reach adsorption equilibrium status within as short as 2min. In multi-component solution, SC can orderly removes Fe(3+), Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) with excellent selectivity and high efficiency. In addition, SC is a kind of green and renewable adsorbent because it can be easily regenerated by treatment with acid or chelating liquors. The mechanism study shows that the sulfonic group play a major role in the adsorption process. PMID:27474562

  16. A regenerable oxide-based H2S adsorbent with nanofibrous morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, Mayank; Yeom, Junghoon; Lineberry, Quentin; Jain, Prashant K.; Shannon, Mark A.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen sulphide is found in raw fuels such as natural gas and coal/biomass-derived syngas. It is poisonous to catalysts and corrosive to metals and therefore needs to be removed. This is often achieved using metal oxides as reactive adsorbents, but metal oxides perform poorly when subjected to repeated cycles of sulphidation and re-oxidation as a result of complex structural and chemical changes. Here, we show that Zn-Ti-O-based adsorbents with nanofibrous morphology can sustain their initial reactivity and sulphur removal capacity over multiple regeneration cycles. These nanostructured sorbents offer rapid reaction rates that overcome the gas-transport limitations of conventional pellet-based sorbents and allow all of the material to be used efficiently. Regeneration can be carried out at the same temperature as the sulphidation step because of the higher reactivity, which prevents sorbent deterioration and reduces energy use. The efficient regeneration of the adsorbent is also aided by structural features such as the growth of hierarchical nanostructures and preferential stabilization of a wurtzite phase in the sulphidation product.

  17. Removal of aqueous nickel (II) using laterite as a low-cost adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Somnath; Kumar, Sunil; Misra, A K; Acharya, P C

    2006-10-01

    The present paper describes the laboratory study of laterite as a low-cost adsorbent for removal of aqueous nickel (II). At pH 7 and a temperature of 30 degrees C, a sorbent dose of 15 mg/L resulted in approximately 90% removal of nickel (II) from its initial concentration of 10 mg/L. A maximum removal of 98% of the adsorbate was observed with an adsorbent particle size of 210 micro with the above conditions. Batch kinetics results were described by fitting in a Langmuir isotherm. Helffrich's half-time equation (Helffrich, 1962) has been applied to evaluate the adsorption process. It appears that film diffusion would be the rate-limiting step. The effect of pH on the sorption process was carried out to a value of 8.0. The removal rate of nickel was found to be the function of pH of the reaction mixture. The rate of nickel uptake by laterite with the decrease in pH value has been explained on the basis of aqueous-complex formation and the subsequent acid-base dissociation at the solid-solution interface.

  18. Treatment of malachite green-containing wastewater using poultry feathers as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Beak, Mi H; Ijagbemi, Christianah O; Kim, Dong S

    2009-04-01

    The feasibility of using feathers, a waste from poultry as an absorbent for malachite green in dye wastewater was studied. The batch adsorption tests were shown to be influenced by the concentration of the dye, reaction temperature, solution pH, and pre-treatment with ethanol. In order to establish the equilibrium state of the process, a kinetic study was conducted for an optimal practice of adsorption treatment process. The adsorption reached equilibrium within 120 min in the range of dye concentration studied. It was found that the adsorption rate increases especially at low concentrations of dye and the adsorption data fitted well to the first-order reaction kinetics over all dye concentration range. Absolute amount of adsorbed malachite green at equilibrium condition decreased as concentration decreases. Adsorption of malachite green on poultry feathers fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model. As temperature increases, the adsorbed amount of malachite green at equilibrium also increased, indicating an endothermic adsorption reaction. In addition, the color removal of malachite green rapidly increased with increase in dye's water pH. The pre-treatment of adsorbent with ethanol produced initial slow rate of malachite green removal but after about 100 min of reaction time, same removal rate was observed compare with the untreated feathers.

  19. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  20. Effects of maternal psychotropic drug dosage on birth outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Michielsen, Laura A; van der Heijden, Frank MMA; Janssen, Paddy KC; Kuijpers, Harold JH

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this retrospective study was to explore the relationship between psychotropic medication dosage and birth outcomes. Methods A total of 136 women were enrolled, who had an active mental disorder, were taking medication to prevent a relapse, or had a history of postpartum depression or psychosis. Medication use was evaluated for the three trimesters and during labor. Based on the defined daily dose, medication use was classified into three groups. Primary outcome variables included the infant gestational age at birth, birth weight, and Apgar scores at one and 5 minutes. Results Our study showed a significantly higher incidence of Apgar score ≤7 at 5 minutes in women taking psychotropic drugs as compared with the group taking no medication, respectively (16.3% versus 0.0%, P=0.01). There was no significant difference between the two groups in Apgar score at one minute or in gestational age and birth weight. The results showed no significant differences in gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores for a low–intermediate or high dose of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and for a low or intermediate dose of an antipsychotic. Conclusion This study does not indicate a relationship between doses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and antipsychotics and adverse neonatal outcomes. PMID:24376355

  1. Atropine maintenance dosage in patients with severe organophosphate pesticide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Worek, Franz; Radtke, Maria; Eyer, Peter; Eyer, Florian; Felgenhauer, Norbert; Zilker, Thomas

    2011-09-25

    Although the importance of atropine in therapy of organophosphate (OP) poisoning is generally recognized, its dosing is a matter of debate. A retrospective analysis of atropine dosing was undertaken in 34 patients who had been enrolled in a clinical study assessing obidoxime effectiveness in OP-poisoning. All patients were severely intoxicated (suicidal attempts) and required artificial ventilation. Atropine was administered routinely by intensive care physicians for life-threatening muscarinic symptoms, with the recommendation to favor low dosage. The pharmacological active enantiomere S-hyoscyamine was determined by a radioreceptor assay. When RBC-AChE activity ranged between 10% and 30%, S-hyoscyamine plasma concentrations of approx. 5 nmol L⁻¹ were sufficient. This concentration could be maintained with about 0.005 mg h⁻¹ kg⁻¹ atropine. Only when RBC-AChE was completely inhibited, therapy of cholinergic crisis required atropine doses up to 0.06 mg h⁻¹ kg⁻¹. Elimination half-life of S-hyoscyamine was 1.5 h, showing occasionally a second slow elimination phase with t(½)=12 h. Malignant arrhythmias were observed in some 10% of our cases, which occurred late and often in the absence of relevant glandular cholinergic signs, when the S-hyoscyamine concentration was below 2.5 nmol L⁻¹. Arrhythmias mostly resolved on reinstitution of atropine.

  2. PTEN dosage is essential for neurofibroma development and malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, Caroline; Nakashima, Jonathan; Dry, Sarah M; Nghiemphu, P Leia; Smith, Kate Barzan; Ao, Yan; Dang, Julie; Lawson, Gregory; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mischel, Paul S; Phelps, Michael; Parada, Luis F; Liu, Xin; Sofroniew, Michael V; Eilber, Fritz C; Wu, Hong

    2009-11-17

    Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) carry approximately a 10% lifetime risk of developing a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). Although the molecular mechanisms underlying NF1 to MPNST malignant transformation remain unclear, alterations of both the RAS/RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways have been implicated. In a series of genetically engineered murine models, we perturbed RAS/RAF/MAPK or/and PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway, individually or simultaneously, via conditional activation of K-ras oncogene or deletion of Nf1 or Pten tumor suppressor genes. Only K-Ras activation in combination with a single Pten allele deletion led to 100% penetrable development of NF lesions and subsequent progression to MPNST. Importantly, loss or decrease in PTEN expression was found in all murine MPNSTs and a majority of human NF1-associated MPNST lesions, suggesting that PTEN dosage and its controlled signaling pathways are critical for transformation of NFs to MPNST. Using noninvasive in vivo PET-CT imaging, we demonstrated that FDG can be used to identify the malignant transformation in both murine and human MPNSTs. Our data suggest that combined inhibition of RAS/RAF/MAPK and PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathways may be beneficial for patients with MPNST. PMID:19846776

  3. [Oral dosage forms for children: acceptability and palatability].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Children generally reject taking medicine which does not have a favorable shape, taste, flavor, etc. However, if a child who needs to take a medicine, rejects taking it, he might never recover from his condition. When a child is unable to take medicine orally, it is intravenously administered, and he and his caregivers then may experience stress. Syrups and suspensions are considered as favorable types of dosage forms in which to orally administer medicine to infants and children. However, they may have disadvantages such as solubility, a bad taste, portability problems or required refrigerator storage. World Health Organization (WHO) currently favors that infants and children be treated with oral solid medicines. New oral solid tablets, such as a mini-tablet, instead of liquid medicines are proposed for this group, however, there are a few reports that mini-tablets are suitable for infants and children. Palatability is one of the main elements of patient acceptability of an oral pediatric medicine. Palatability is defined as the overall appreciation of an oral medicinal product in relation to its smell, taste, aftertaste and feeling in the mouth. Design of the formulation of an oral pediatric medicine should be considered together with its palatability. PMID:25747220

  4. No current evidence for widespread dosage compensation in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Eduardo M; Springer, Michael; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of laboratory strains of budding yeast had shown that when gene copy number is altered experimentally, RNA levels generally scale accordingly. This is true when the copy number of individual genes or entire chromosomes is altered. In a recent study, Hose et al. (2015) reported that this tight correlation between gene copy number and RNA levels is not observed in recently isolated wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants. To understand the origins of this proposed difference in gene expression regulation between natural variants and laboratory strains of S. cerevisiae, we evaluated the karyotype and gene expression studies performed by Hose et al. on wild S. cerevisiae strains. In contrast to the results of Hose et al., our reexamination of their data revealed a tight correlation between gene copy number and gene expression. We conclude that widespread dosage compensation occurs neither in laboratory strains nor in natural variants of S. cerevisiae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10996.001 PMID:26949255

  5. PTEN dosage is essential for neurofibroma development and malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, Caroline; Nakashima, Jonathan; Dry, Sarah M; Nghiemphu, P Leia; Smith, Kate Barzan; Ao, Yan; Dang, Julie; Lawson, Gregory; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mischel, Paul S; Phelps, Michael; Parada, Luis F; Liu, Xin; Sofroniew, Michael V; Eilber, Fritz C; Wu, Hong

    2009-11-17

    Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) carry approximately a 10% lifetime risk of developing a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). Although the molecular mechanisms underlying NF1 to MPNST malignant transformation remain unclear, alterations of both the RAS/RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways have been implicated. In a series of genetically engineered murine models, we perturbed RAS/RAF/MAPK or/and PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway, individually or simultaneously, via conditional activation of K-ras oncogene or deletion of Nf1 or Pten tumor suppressor genes. Only K-Ras activation in combination with a single Pten allele deletion led to 100% penetrable development of NF lesions and subsequent progression to MPNST. Importantly, loss or decrease in PTEN expression was found in all murine MPNSTs and a majority of human NF1-associated MPNST lesions, suggesting that PTEN dosage and its controlled signaling pathways are critical for transformation of NFs to MPNST. Using noninvasive in vivo PET-CT imaging, we demonstrated that FDG can be used to identify the malignant transformation in both murine and human MPNSTs. Our data suggest that combined inhibition of RAS/RAF/MAPK and PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathways may be beneficial for patients with MPNST.

  6. Processing challenges with solid dosage formulations containing vitamin E TPGS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Sinko, Patrick D; Bindra, Dilbir S; Hamey, Rhye; Gour, Shruti; Vema-Varapu, Chandra

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate processing challenges associated with the incorporation of Vitamin E TPGS (d-α tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate) into solid pharmaceutical dosage forms. For this work, a wet granulation process (high-shear and fluid bed) was used and Vitamin E TPGS was added as part of the binder solution during granulation. It was shown that Vitamin E TPGS can be incorporated into a prototype formulation at 10% w/w concentration without any significant processing challenges. However, the resulting granulations could only be compressed successfully at low tablet press speeds (dwell time ~100 ms). When compressed at low dwell times (<20 ms) representative of commercial tablet manufacturing, a significant loss in compactability was observed. In addition, several other tablet defects were observed. It was shown that intragranular incorporation of Aeroperl(®) 300, a granulated form of colloidal silicon dioxide, was able to overcome these compaction problems. The formulation consisting of Aeroperl(®) 300 showed significantly lower granule particle size, higher granule porosity and higher compactability as compared to the formulation without Aeroperl(®) 300.

  7. An interface model for dosage adjustment connects hematotoxicity to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Meille, C; Iliadis, A; Barbolosi, D; Frances, N; Freyer, G

    2008-12-01

    When modeling is required to describe pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics simultaneously, it is difficult to link time-concentration profiles and drug effects. When patients are under chemotherapy, despite the huge amount of blood monitoring numerations, there is a lack of exposure variables to describe hematotoxicity linked with the circulating drug blood levels. We developed an interface model that transforms circulating pharmacokinetic concentrations to adequate exposures, destined to be inputs of the pharmacodynamic process. The model is materialized by a nonlinear differential equation involving three parameters. The relevance of the interface model for dosage adjustment is illustrated by numerous simulations. In particular, the interface model is incorporated into a complex system including pharmacokinetics and neutropenia induced by docetaxel and by cisplatin. Emphasis is placed on the sensitivity of neutropenia with respect to the variations of the drug amount. This complex system including pharmacokinetic, interface, and pharmacodynamic hematotoxicity models is an interesting tool for analysis of hematotoxicity induced by anticancer agents. The model could be a new basis for further improvements aimed at incorporating new experimental features. PMID:19107581

  8. 21 CFR 524.1881 - Prednisolone acetate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prednisolone acetate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1881 Section 524.1881 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1881 Prednisolone acetate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms....

  9. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  10. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  11. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  12. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  13. Dosage and Distribution in Morphosyntax Intervention: Current Evidence and Future Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor-Williams, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the effectiveness of dose forms and the efficacy of dosage and distribution in morphosyntax intervention for children. Dose forms include the commonly used techniques, procedures, and intervention contexts that constitute teaching episodes; dosage includes the quantitative measures of dose, dose frequency, total intervention…

  14. 21 CFR 200.7 - Supplying pharmacists with indications and dosage information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplying pharmacists with indications and dosage information. 200.7 Section 200.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... indications and dosage information. There are presently no regulations under the Federal Food, Drug,...

  15. 21 CFR 524.1484 - Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1484 Section 524.1484 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484 Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms....

  16. 75 FR 54492 - Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gentamicin and Betamethasone Ophthalmic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 524 Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New... AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS 0 1. The authority citation for 21 CFR part 524 continues to... conjunctival sac three or four times a day. (2) Indications for use. For treatment of external...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine injectable dosage forms....

  18. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  19. A System for Dosage-Based Functional Genomics in Poplar[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Altering gene dosage through variation in gene copy number is a powerful approach to addressing questions regarding gene regulation, quantitative trait loci, and heterosis, but one that is not easily applied to sexually transmitted species. Elite poplar (Populus spp) varieties are created through interspecific hybridization, followed by clonal propagation. Altered gene dosage relationships are believed to contribute to hybrid performance. Clonal propagation allows for replication and maintenance of meiotically unstable ploidy or structural variants and provides an alternative approach to investigating gene dosage effects not possible in sexually propagated species. Here, we built a genome-wide structural variation system for dosage-based functional genomics and breeding of poplar. We pollinated Populus deltoides with gamma-irradiated Populus nigra pollen to produce >500 F1 seedlings containing dosage lesions in the form of deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments (indel mutations). Using high-precision dosage analysis, we detected indel mutations in ∼55% of the progeny. These indels varied in length, position, and number per individual, cumulatively tiling >99% of the genome, with an average of 10 indels per gene. Combined with future phenotype and transcriptome data, this population will provide an excellent resource for creating and characterizing dosage-based variation in poplar, including the contribution of dosage to quantitative traits and heterosis. PMID:26320226

  20. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun

    2013-08-28

    This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as sorbents for gaseous iodine. Work was conducted in fiscal year 2012 to demonstrate the feasibility of converting Sn2S3 chalcogel without iodine into a glass. This current document summarizes the work conducted in fiscal year 2013 to assess the consolidation potential of non-oxide aerogels with adsorbed iodine. The Sn2S3 and Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels were selected for study. The first step in the process for these experiments was to load them with iodine (I2). The I2 uptake was ~68 mass% for Sn2S3 and ~50 mass% for Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of both sets of sorbents showed that metal-iodide complexes were formed during adsorption, i.e., SnI4 for Sn2S3 and SbI3 for Sb13.5Sn5S20. Additionally, metal-sulfide-iodide complexes were formed, i.e., SnSI for Sn2S3 and SbSI for Sb13.5Sn5S20. No XRD evidence for unreacted iodine was found in any of these samples. Once the chalcogels had reached maximum adsorption, the consolidation potential was assessed. Here, the sorbents were heated for consolidation in vacuum-sealed quartz vessels. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogel was heated both (1) in a glassy carbon crucible within a fused quartz tube and (2) in a single-containment fused quartz tube. The Sn2S3 chalcogel was only heated in a single-containment fused quartz tube. In both cases with the single-containment fused quartz experiments, the material consolidated nicely. However, in both cases, there were small fractions of metal iodides not incorporated into the final product as well as fused quartz particles within the melt due to the sample attacking the quartz wall during the heat treatment. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 did not appear to attack the glassy carbon crucible so, for future experiments, it would be ideal to apply a coating, such as pyrolytic graphite, to the inner walls of the fused quartz vessel to prevent