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Sample records for adsorbent particle size

  1. Adsorption capacities of activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol vary with activated carbon particle size: Effects of adsorbent and adsorbate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Sakamoto, Asuka; Taniguchi, Takuma; Pan, Long; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-11-15

    The adsorption capacities of nine activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) were evaluated. For some carbons, adsorption capacity substantially increased when carbon particle diameter was decreased from a few tens of micrometers to a few micrometers, whereas for other carbons, the increase of adsorption capacity was small for MIB and moderate for geosmin. An increase of adsorption capacity was observed for other hydrophobic adsorbates besides geosmin and MIB, but not for hydrophilic adsorbates. The parameter values of a shell adsorption model describing the increase of adsorption capacity were negatively correlated with the oxygen content of the carbon among other characteristics. Low oxygen content indicated low hydrophilicity. The increase of adsorption capacity was related to the hydrophobic properties of both adsorbates and activated carbons. For adsorptive removal of hydrophobic micropollutants such as geosmin, it is therefore recommended that less-hydrophilic activated carbons, such as coconut-shell-based carbons, be microground to a particle diameter of a few micrometers to enhance their equilibrium adsorption capacity. In contrast, adsorption by hydrophilic carbons or adsorption of hydrophilic adsorbates occur in the inner pores, and therefore adsorption capacity is unchanged by particle size reduction. PMID:26302219

  2. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  3. How hottest geometries and adsorptive parameters influence the SER(R)S spectra of Methylene Blue molecules adsorbed on nanocolloidal gold particles of varied sizes?

    PubMed

    Roy, Sannak Dutta; Ghosh, Manash; Chowdhury, Joydeep

    2015-12-01

    The SER(R)S spectra of Methylene Blue (MB) molecule adsorbed on gold nanocolloidal particles (AuNCs) have been investigated. The adsorptive parameters of the molecule adsorbed on AuNCs have been evaluated with the aid of Fluorescence Spectroscopy study. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies have been further applied to understand the concentration of probe molecule actually adsorbed on AuNC surfaces. Gigantic enhancements ∼10(6)-10(16) orders of magnitude have been recorded for the enhanced Raman bands in the SER(R)S spectra. Three-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (3D-FDTD) simulations studies have been carried out to predict the distributions of electric fields around the possible nanoaggregated hot geometries considered to be responsible for the huge enhancements of SER(R)S bands of the MB molecule. PMID:26172467

  4. The influence of sediment particle size on the properties of adsorbed dissolved organic matter in the Yangtze Estuary and its interactions with As/Sb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Manman; Zhang, Di; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-04-15

    The characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from sediments with four particle sizes (<25, 63-25, 200-63 and >200μm) in the Yangtze Estuary were compared. The differences in their binding capacities for individual fluorescent components with As/Sb were studied using fluorescence-quenching titrations combined with excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra. The results indicated that the particle size influenced the quality and quantity of extracted DOM. With increasing particle size, the extracted DOM content, value of UV280 and acidic functional group content of the DOM decreased. Three protein-like components (C2, C3 and C4) and one humic-like component (C1) were identified using the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model. Wherein, protein-like material dominated in DOM on different particle-size fractions and possessed a stronger complex capacity with As/Sb. A significant positive correlation between the complexation capacity of extracted DOM from samples, as well as with the acidic functional group content, was observed. PMID:26965093

  5. Particle Size Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Howard G.; Sun, Shao-Tang

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review of research focusing on scattering, elution techniques, electrozone sensing, filtration, centrifugation, comparison of techniques, data analysis, and particle size standards. The review covers the period 1986-1988. (MVL)

  6. Effect of adsorbent particle size on the relative merits of a non-triangular and a triangular separation region in the optimal design of a three-zone simulated moving bed chromatography for binary separation with linear isotherms.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sungyong

    2016-06-24

    The design approaches for a three-zone simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatography with linear isotherms can be classified into two categories, depending on whether the SMB design is based on a classical region (i.e., triangular region of the triangle theory) in the first quadrant (m2, m3) plane or on a non-triangular separation region in the third quadrant (m2, m3) plane. The SMBs based on the classical and the non-triangular design approaches, which are named here as (m(+))_SMB and (m(-))_SMB respectively, are compared in this study using the Pareto solutions from the simultaneous optimization of throughput and desorbent usage under the constraints on product purities and pressure drop. The results showed that the (m(-))_SMB approach led to significantly lower desorbent usage than the (m(+))_SMB approach, which was due to the fact that the flow-rate-ratios from the (m(-))_SMB approach are extremely lower than those from the (m(+))_SMB approach. This factor also enables the (m(-))_SMB to have a significantly lower pressure drop, thereby making its throughput less restricted by a pressure-drop constraint. Due to such advantage of the (m(-))_SMB, it can make a further substantial improvement in throughput by modulating its adsorbent particle size properly. This issue was investigated using a model separation system containing succinic acid and acetic acid. It was confirmed that if the adsorbent particle size corresponding to the boundary between a mass-transfer limiting region and a pressure-drop limiting region is adopted, the (m(-))_SMB can lead to 82% higher throughput and 73% lower desorbent usage than the (m(+))_SMB. PMID:27208988

  7. Particle-Size Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W. ); Or, Dani; J.H. Dane and G.C. Topp

    2002-11-01

    Book Chapter describing methods of particle-size analysis for soils. Includes a variety of classification schemes. Standard methods for size distributions using pipet and hydrometer techniques are described. New laser-light scattering and related techniques are discussed. Complete with updated references.

  8. Size-dependent denaturing kinetics of bovine serum albumin adsorbed onto gold nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichroeb, J. H.; Forrest, J. A.; Jones, L. W.

    2008-08-01

    We have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) to monitor the kinetics of thermal denaturing of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed onto gold nanospheres of size 5nm-100nm. The effect of the protein on the LSPR was monitored by visible extinction spectroscopy. The wavelength of the peak extinction (resonance) is affected by the conformation of the adsorbed protein layer, and as such can be used as a very sensitive probe of thermal denaturing that is specific to the adsorbed (as opposed to free) protein. The time dependence of the denaturing is measured in the temperature range 60 °C - 70 °C , and the lifetimes are used to calculate an activation barrier for thermal denaturing. The results show that thermally activated denaturing of proteins adsorbed onto nanoparticles has a nanoparticle-size-dependent activation barrier, and this barrier increases for decreasing particle size. This may have important implications for other protein-nanoparticle interactions.

  9. Systemic antibody response to nano-size calcium phospate biocompatible adjuvant adsorbed HEV-71 killed vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Since 1980s, human enterovirus-71 virus (HEV-71) is one of the common infectious disease in Asian Pacific region since late 1970s without effective commercial antiviral or protective vaccine is unavailable yet. The work examines the role of vaccine adjuvant particle size and the route of administration on postvaccination antibody response towards HEV-71 vaccine adsorbed to calcium phosphate (CaP) adjuvant. Materials and Methods First, CaP nano-particles were compared to a commercial micro-size and vaccine alone. Secondly, intradermal reduced dosage was compared to the conventional intramuscular immunization. Killed HEV-71 vaccines adsorbed to CaP nano-size (73 nm) and commercial one of micro-size (1.7 µm) were administered through intradermal, intramuscular, rabbits received vaccine alone and unvaccinated animals. Results CaP nano-particles adsorbed HEV-71 vaccine displayed higher antibody than the micro-size or unadsorbed vaccine alone, through both parenteral immunization routes. Moreover, the intradermal route (0.5 µg/mL) of 0.1-mL volume per vaccine dose induced equal IgG antibody level to 1.0-mL intramuscular route (0.5 µg/mL). Conclusion The intradermal vaccine adsorbed CaP nano-adjuvant showed safer and significant antibody response after one-tenth reduced dose quantity (0.5 µg/mL) of only 0.1-mL volume as the most suitable protective, cost effective and affordable formulation not only for HEV-71; but also for developing further effective vaccines toward other human pathogens. PMID:25649429

  10. Ozonation of isoproturon adsorbed on silica particles under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflieger, Maryline; Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran

    2012-12-01

    The results on heterogeneous ozonation of a phenylurea pesticide, isoproturon, under atmospheric conditions are presented for the first time in the present study. The study was carried out using an experimental device previously adopted and validated for the heterogeneous reactivity of organics toward ozone (Pflieger et al., 2011). Isoproturon was adsorbed on silica particles via a liquid-to-solid equilibrium with a load far below a monolayer (0.02% by weight/surface coverage of 0.5%). The rate constants were estimated by measuring the consumption of the organic (dark, T = 26 °C, RH < 1%). The experimental data were fitted by both the modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood and the Eley-Rideal patterns, resulting in atmospheric lifetimes of heterogeneous ozonation of 4 and 6 days, respectively (for 40 ppb of O3). Parameters, such as the number and the quantity of pesticides adsorbed on the solid support, which can significantly influence the heterogeneous kinetics, were investigated as well. The results obtained suggest that the organic compound is adsorbed in multilayer aggregates on the aerosol even though submonolayer coverage is assumed. The presence of a second herbicide, trifluralin, together with isoproturon on the aerosol surface does not affect the kinetics of ozonation, indicating that both compounds are adsorbed on different surface sites of silica particles.

  11. Photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on aluminum oxide particle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2009-07-01

    Nitrogen oxides, including nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid, react with mineral dust particles in the atmosphere to yield adsorbed nitrate. Although nitrate ion is a well-known chromophore in natural waters, little is known about the surface photochemistry of nitrate adsorbed on mineral particles. In this study, nitrate adsorbed on aluminum oxide, a model system for mineral dust aerosol, is irradiated with broadband light (lambda > 300 nm) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in the presence of molecular oxygen. Upon irradiation, the nitrate ion readily undergoes photolysis to yield nitrogen-containing gas-phase products including NO(2), NO, and N(2)O, with NO being the major product. The relative ratio and product yields of these gas-phase products change with RH, with N(2)O production being highest at the higher relative humidities. Furthermore, an efficient dark reaction readily converts the major NO product into NO(2) during post-irradiation. Photochemical processes on mineral dust aerosol surfaces have the potential to impact the chemical balance of the atmosphere, yet little is known about these processes. In this study, the impact that adsorbed nitrate photochemistry may have on the renoxification of the atmosphere is discussed. PMID:19534452

  12. Confocal Raman microscopy of protein adsorbed in chromatographic particles.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuewu; Stone, Thomas; Bell, David; Gillespie, Christopher; Portoles, Marta

    2012-09-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy is a nondestructive analytical technique that combines the chemical information from vibrational spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of confocal microscopy. It was applied, for the first time, to measure conformation and distribution of protein adsorbed in wetted chromatographic particles. Monoclonal antibody was loaded into the Fractogel EMD SO(3) (M) cation exchanger at 2 mS/cm or 10 mS/cm. Amide I and III frequencies in the Raman spectrum of the adsorbed protein suggest that there are no detectable changes of the original β-sheet conformation in the chromatographic particles. Protein depth profile measurements indicate that, when the conductivity is increased from 2 mS/cm to 10 mS/cm, there is a change in mass transport mechanism for protein adsorption, from the shrinking-core model to the homogeneous-diffusion model. In this study, the use of confocal Raman microscopy to measure protein distribution in chromatographic particles fundamentally agrees with previous confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations, but confocal Raman spectroscopy enjoys additional advantages: use of unlabeled protein to eliminate fluorescent labeling, ability for characterization of protein secondary structure, and ability for spectral normalization to provide a nondestructive experimental approach to correct light attenuation effects caused by refractive index (RI) mismatching in semiopaque chromatographic particles. PMID:22803776

  13. Monodisperse Block Copolymer Particles with Controllable Size, Shape, and Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, Yongjoo; Kim, Bumjoon; PNEL Team

    Shape-anisotropic particles are important class of novel colloidal building block for their functionality is more strongly governed by their shape, size and nanostructure compared to conventional spherical particles. Recently, facile strategy for producing non-spherical polymeric particles by interfacial engineering received significant attention. However, achieving uniform size distribution of particles together with controlled shape and nanostructure has not been achieved. Here, we introduce versatile system for producing monodisperse BCP particles with controlled size, shape and morphology. Polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) self-assembled to either onion-like or striped ellipsoid particle, where final structure is governed by amount of adsorbed sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant at the particle/surrounding interface. Further control of molecular weight and particle size enabled fine-tuning of aspect ratio of ellipsoid particle. Underlying physics of free energy for morphology formation and entropic penalty associated with bending BCP chains strongly affects particle structure and specification.

  14. Effect of particle size and adsorbates on the L{sub 3}, L{sub 2} and L{sub 1} x-ray absorption near edge structure of supported Pt nanoparaticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Jelic, J.; Nitsche, L. C.; Meyer, R.; Miller, J.

    2011-04-01

    Pt nano-particles from about 1 to 10 nm have been prepared on silica, alkali-silica, alumina, silica-alumina, carbon and SBA-15 supports. EXAFS spectra of the reduced catalysts in He show a contraction of the Pt-Pt bond distance as particle size is decreased below 3 nm. The bond length decreased as much as 0.13 {angstrom} for 1 nm Pt particles. Adsorption of CO and H{sub 2} lead to a increase in Pt-Pt bond distance to that near Pt foil, e.g., 2.77 {angstrom}. In addition to changes in the Pt bond distance with size, as the particle size decreases below about 5 nm there is a shift in the XANES to higher energy at the L{sub 3} edge, a decrease in intensity near the edge and an increase in intensity beyond the edge. We suggest these features correspond to effects of coordination (the decrease at the edge) and lattice contraction (the increase beyond the edge). At the L{sub 2} edge, there are only small shifts to higher energy at the edge. However, beyond the edge, there are large increases in intensity with decreasing particle size. At the L{sub 1} edge there are no changes in position or shape of the XANES spectra. Adsorption of CO and H{sub 2} also lead to changes in the L{sub 3} and L{sub 2} edges, however, no changes are observed at the L1 edge. Density Functional Theory and XANES calculations show that the trends in the experimental XANES can be explained in terms of the states available near the edge. Both CO and H{sub 2} adsorption result in a depletion of states at the Fermi level but the creation of anti-bonding states above the Fermi level which give rise to intensity increases beyond the edge.

  15. Kinetic Assembly of Near-IR Active Gold Nanoclusters using Weakly Adsorbing Polymers to Control Size

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Jasmine M.; Murthy, Avinash K.; Ingram, Davis R.; Nguyen, Robin; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2013-01-01

    Clusters of metal nanoparticles with an overall size less than 100 nm and high metal loadings for strong optical functionality, are of interest in various fields including microelectronics, sensors, optoelectronics and biomedical imaging and therapeutics. Herein we assemble ~5 nm gold particles into clusters with controlled size, as small as 30 nm and up to 100 nm, which contain only small amounts of polymeric stabilizers. The assembly is kinetically controlled with weakly adsorbing polymers, PLA(2K)-b-PEG(10K)-b-PLA(2K) or PEG (MW = 3350), by manipulating electrostatic, van der Waals (VDW), steric, and depletion forces. The cluster size and optical properties are tuned as a function of particle volume fractions and polymer/gold ratios to modulate the interparticle interactions. The close spacing between the constituent gold nanoparticles and high gold loadings (80–85% w/w gold) produce a strong absorbance cross section of ~9×10−15 m2 in the NIR at 700 nm. This morphology results from VDW and depletion attractive interactions that exclude the weakly adsorbed polymeric stabilizer from the cluster interior. The generality of this kinetic assembly platform is demonstrated for gold nanoparticles with a range of surface charges from highly negative to neutral, with the two different polymers. PMID:20361735

  16. Fluctuations in the number of particles adsorbed under the influence of diffusion and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Siwek, Barbara; Szyk, Lilianna; Zembala, Maria

    1996-10-01

    Fluctuations in the number of colloid particles adsorbed irreversibly under diffusion and flow were determined. The experimental measurements were carried out in the impinging-jet cells using as model colloids the monodisperse polystyrene latex particles of micrometer size range adsorbing at mica sheets. The surface concentration of adsorbed particles was determined quantitatively using the direct microscope observation method coupled with an image analyzing system. Two series of experiments were performed (i) for diffusion controlled adsorption when the random sequential adsorption (RSA) mechanism was valid and (ii) for flow controlled adsorption. It was found that in the case of RSA the reduced variance of the distributions decreased markedly for increasing surface concentration θ in accordance with theoretical predictions based on the mean-field approximation. The experimental results were in a good agreement with the numerical simulations performed according to the RSA algorithm. It was also determined that the magnitude of fluctuations in our irreversible system was very similar to reversible systems described by the scaled-particle theory. A significantly different behavior was observed for flow affected adsorption when the reduced variance (at the same surface concentration) was much smaller than for the RSA model, therefore deviating considerably from an equilibrium system. The decrease in the variance indicated that the surface exclusion effects (described by the available surface function) were more important under flow due to the hydrodynamic scattering effect.

  17. Comparison of particle sizes determined with impactor, AFM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwaze, Patience; Annegarn, Harold J.; Huth, Joachim; Helas, Günter

    2007-11-01

    Particles size comparisons were made between conventional aerodynamic and mobility sizing techniques and physical geometric sizes measured by high resolution microscopes. Atmospheric particles were collected during the wet and dry seasons in the Amazonian ecosystems. Individual particles deposited on four stages of the MOUDI (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor) were characterised for particle volumes, projected surface diameters and morphologies with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). AFM and SEM size distributions were verified against distributions derived from response functions of individual MOUDI stages as specified by Winklmayr et al. [Winklmayr, W., Wang, H.-C., John, W., 1990. Adaptation of the Twomey algorithm to the inversion of cascade impactor data. Aerosol Science and Technology 13, 322-331.]. Particles indicated inherent discrepancies in sizing techniques. Particle volumes were systematically lower than expected by factors of up to 3.6. Differences were attributed to loss of mass, presumably water adsorbed on particles. Losses were high and could not be accounted for by measured humidity growth factors suggesting significant losses of other volatile compounds as well, particularly on particles that were collected during the wet season. Microscopy results showed that for hygroscopic particles, microscopy sizes depend on the relative humidity history of particles before and after sampling. Changes in relative humidity significantly altered particle morphologies. Depending on when changes occur, such losses will bias not only microscopy particle sizes but also impactor mass distributions and number concentrations derived from collected particles.

  18. Oxygen release from nanobubbles adsorbed on hydrophobic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wanchen; Hu, Xiutao; Duan, Juan; Liu, Ting; Liu, Minghuan; Dong, Yaming

    2014-07-01

    On the hydrophobic particles, the carrying capacity of nano/microbubbles and the quantity of oxygen released in the hypoxic environment are still unknown while the bubbles blow out. This is very important to the biological and medical systems. Here, an experiment was designed and the change of the dissolved oxygen in a solution was monitored. The results indicated that the concentrations of dissolved oxygen in hypoxic environment changed dramatically, especially when the ultrasound vibration was applied. Furthermore, the amount of oxygen release also implied the quantity dependence of nano/microbubbles on the sizes and the hydrophobicity of the particles.

  19. Small-particle-size cement

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Almond, S.W.; Blerhaus, W.M. II )

    1991-05-01

    Successful remedial cementing has historically been difficult in wells with large-interval, multizone, gravel-packed completions. The reason is the inability of conventional oilfield cements to penetrate gravel packs adequately. Small-particle-size cement (SPSC) was developed to penetrate gravel packs and to provide the zonal isolation required. This paper details the laboratory work, job design, and field implementation of this new cement.

  20. Carbon dioxide (C{sup 16}O{sub 2} and C{sup 18}O{sub 2}) adsorption in zeolite Y materials: effect of cation, adsorbed water and particle size

    SciTech Connect

    Pragati Galhotra; Juan G. Navea; Sarah C. Larsen; Vicki H. Grassian

    2009-07-01

    In this study, CO{sub 2} adsorption in the presence and absence of co-adsorbed H{sub 2}O was investigated in zeolite Y. Several different zeolite Y materials were investigated including commercial NaY, commercial NaY ion-exchanged with Ba{sup 2+} and nanocrystalline NaY; herein referred to as NaY, BaY and nano-NaY. Following heating of these zeolites to 573 K and cooling to room temperature, CO{sub 2} was adsorbed as a function of pressure. FTIR spectra show that a majority of CO{sub 2} adsorbs in the pores of these three zeolites (NaY, BaY and nano-NaY) in a linear complex with the exchangeable cation, as indicated by the intense absorption band near 2350 cm{sup -1}, assigned to the 3 asymmetric stretch of adsorbed CO{sub 2}. Most interestingly is the formation of carbonate and bicarbonate on the external surface of nano-NaY zeolites as indicated by the presence of several broad absorption bands in the 1200-1800 cm{sup -1} region, suggesting unique sites for CO{sub 2} adsorption on the surface of the nanomaterial. For the other two zeolite materials investigated, bicarbonate formation is only evident in BaY zeolite in the presence of co-adsorbed water. Adsorption of {sup 18}O-labeled carbon dioxide and theoretical quantum chemical calculations confirm these assignments and conclusions. 28 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Atmospheric fate of oil matter adsorbed on sea salt particles under UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitilingom, M.; Avij, P.; Huang, H.; Valsaraj, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of liquid petroleum hydrocarbons at the sea water surface is an important source of marine pollution. An oil spill in sea-water will most likely occur due to an involuntary accident from tankers, offshore platforms, etc. However, a large amount of oil is also deliberately spilled in sea-water during the clean-out process of tank vessels (e.g. for the Mediterranean Sea, 490,000 tons/yr). Moreover, the pollution caused by an oil spill does not only affect the aquatic environment but also is of concern for the atmospheric environment. A portion of the oil matter present at the sea-water surface is transported into the atmosphere viaevaporation and adsorption at the surface of sea spray particles. Few studies are related to the presence of oil matter in airborne particles resulting from their adsorption on sea salt aerosols. We observed that the non-volatile oil matter was adsorbed at the surface of sea-salt crystals (av. size of 1.1 μm). Due to their small size, these particles can have a significant residence time in the atmosphere. The hydrocarbon matter adsorbed at the surface of these particles can also be transformed by catalyzers present in the atmosphere (i.e. UV, OH, O3, ...). In this work, we focused on the photo-oxidation rates of the C16 to C30alkanes present in these particles. We utilized a bubble column reactor, which produced an abundance of small sized bubbles. These bubbles generated droplets upon bursting at the air-salt water interface. These droplets were then further dried up and lifted to the top of the column where they were collected as particles. These particles were incubated in a controlled reactor in either dark conditions or under UV-visible light. The difference of alkane content analyzed by GC-MS between the particles exposed to UV or the particles not exposed to UV indicated that up to 20% in mass was lost after 20 min of light exposure. The degradation kinetics varied for each range of alkanes (C16-20, C21-25, C26

  2. PARTICLE SIZE DEFINITIONS FOR PARTICULATE DATA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a survey to identify all equations required to represent particle size data according to each of three particle diameter definitions: Stokes, classical aerodynamic, and aerodynamic impaction (or Lovelace diameter). Although the particle diameter defini...

  3. Recent trends in particle size analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances and developments in the particle-sizing technologies are briefly reviewed in accordance with three operating principles including particle size and shape descriptions. Significant trends of the particle size analysing equipment recently developed show that compact electronic circuitry and rapid data processing systems were mainly adopted in the instrument design. Some newly developed techniques characterizing the particulate system were also introduced.

  4. Effect of particle size on the reactivity of supported palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, S.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide adsorbed on sufficiently small palladium particles disproportionates to surface carbon and carbon dioxide. This does not occur on larger particles. The reaction between carbon monoxide and dioxygen is shown to be structure-insensitive provided the metal surface available for the reaction is estimated correctly. This varies with temperature for the small particles, as at low temperatures the deposited carbon eliminates sites for the reaction while the later become available at higher temperatures at which surface carbon reacts away with dioxygen. As a result of disproportionation of carbon monoxide on small particles, the selectivity of the reactions between carbon monoxide and dihydrogen shifts from methanol on large particles to methane on small ones. The methanation activity increases as the metal particle size decreases, indicating that methanation is a structure-sensitive reaction on palladium.

  5. Thermal effects in nano-sized adsorbate islands growth processes at vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, Vasyl O.; Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Dvornichenko, Alina V.

    2016-02-01

    We study a model of pattern formation in adsorptive systems with a local change in the surface temperature due to adsorption/desorption processes. It is found that thermal effects shrink the domain of main system parameters, when pattern formation is possible. It is shown that an increase in a surface reheat efficiency delays ordering processes. We have found that a distribution of adsorbate islands over sizes depends on relaxation and reheat processes. We have shown that the mean linear size of stationary adsorbate islands is of nano-meter range.

  6. Particle size distribution instrument. Topical report 13

    SciTech Connect

    Okhuysen, W.; Gassaway, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of an instrument to measure the concentration of particles in gas is described in this report. An in situ instrument was designed and constructed which sizes individual particles and counts the number of occurrences for several size classes. Although this instrument was designed to detect the size distribution of slag and seed particles generated at an experimental coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic power facility, it can be used as a nonintrusive diagnostic tool for other hostile industrial processes involving the formation and growth of particulates. Two of the techniques developed are extensions of the widely used crossed beam velocimeter, providing simultaneous measurement of the size distribution and velocity of articles.

  7. Dipolar capillary interactions between tilted ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gary B; Botto, Lorenzo

    2015-10-28

    Capillary interactions have emerged as a tool for the directed assembly of particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces, and play a role in controlling the mechanical properties of emulsions and foams. In this paper, following Davies et al. [Adv. Mater., 2014, 26, 6715] investigation into the assembly of ellipsoidal particles at interfaces interacting via dipolar capillary interactions, we numerically investigate the interaction between tilted ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface as their aspect ratio, tilt angle, bond angle, and separation vary. High-resolution Surface Evolver simulations of ellipsoidal particle pairs in contact reveal an energy barrier between a metastable tip-tip configuration and a stable side-side configuration. The side-side configuration is the global energy minimum for all parameters we investigated. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of clusters of up to 12 ellipsoidal particles show novel highly symmetric flower-like and ring-like arrangements. PMID:26323324

  8. PROCEDURE FOR DETERMINATION OF SEDIMENT PARTICLE SIZE (GRAIN SIZE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment quality and sediment remediation projects have become a high priority for USEPA. Sediment particle size determinations are used in environmental assessments for habitat characterization, chemical normalization, and partitioning potential of chemicals. The accepted met...

  9. Electrohydrodynamic manipulation of particles adsorbed on the surface of a drop.

    PubMed

    Amah, Edison; Shah, Kinnari; Fischer, Ian; Singh, Pushpendra

    2016-02-14

    In our previous studies we have shown that particles adsorbed on the surface of a drop can be concentrated at its poles or equator by applying a uniform electric field. This happens because even when the applied electric field is uniform the electric field on the surface of the drop is nonuniform, and so particles adsorbed on the surface are subjected to dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. In this paper, we study the behavior of adsorbed particles at low electric field frequencies when the drop and ambient liquids are weakly conducting dielectric liquids, and model it using a leaky dielectric model. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow which arises because of the accumulation of charge on the surface of the drop can be from pole-to-equator or equator-to-pole depending on the properties of the drop and ambient liquids. The flow however diminishes with increasing frequency and there is a critical frequency at which the drag force on a particle due to the EHD flow becomes equal to the DEP force, and above this critical frequency the DEP force dominates. When the fluid and particles properties are such that the EHD and DEP forces are in the opposite directions, particles can be collected at the poles or the equator, and also can be moved from the poles to the equator, or vice versa, by varying the frequency. Also, it is possible to separate the particles of a binary mixture when the critical frequencies of the two types of particles are different. PMID:26679523

  10. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. PMID:20851447

  11. Size dependent cytotoxicity of fly ash particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Tam, J.S.K.; Wong, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Fly ash samples were collected from the electrostatic precipitator of a coal-fired power plant in Hong Kong. The particles of the respirable range (smaller than 10 {mu}m) were divided into 4 groups according to their particle size (mass median aerodynamic diameters). The surface morphology and the metal contents (Fe, Mn, Al and Zn) of fly ash particles were examined by a scanning electron microscopy and an inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometer, respectively. The particles were very heterogeneous in size and shape as well as the concentration of metals. The cytotoxicity of these four groups of fly ash particles were evaluated using an in vitro rat alveolar macrophages culture assay. The viability of alveolar macrophages was lower when incubated with smaller size particles. This relationship was also reflected by the damage of the surface morphology of the cells and the release of cytoplasmic (lactate dehydrogenase) and lysosomal (acid phosphatase and {beta}-glucuronidase) marker enzymes into the culture media.

  12. The nitration of pyrene adsorbed on silica particles by nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Hasegawa, K; Kagaya, S

    2000-11-01

    Conversion of NO2, HNO2 gas, their mixture and a mixed gas of HNO2 and HNO3 on silica particles was investigated under simulated atmospheric conditions. Both HNO2 and HNO3 were detected as the products from conversion of NO2 on silica particles. However, unlike HNO3, which increased with conversion time, HNO2 underwent an increase-decrease time course due to the increased HNO3 further transformed HNO2 into NO+ on silica particles. Considering the catalytic effect of HNO3 and HNO2 on the nitration of pyrene adsorbed on silica particles by NO2, another electrophilic nitration path, analogous to the one that we previously reported, with NONO2+ and NON2O4+ as electrophiles was suggested. The two paths together gave an appropriate explanation for the catalytic effect of HNO2, HNO3 and their mixed gas on the nitration of the adsorbed pyrene by NO2. PMID:11057586

  13. Competition between Displacement and Dissociation of a Strong Acid Compared to a Weak Acid Adsorbed on Silica Particle Surfaces: The Role of Adsorbed Water.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Tang, Mingjin; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-16

    The adsorption of nitric (HNO3) and formic (HCOOH) acids on silica particle surfaces and the effect of adsorbed water have been investigated at 296 K using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Under dry conditions, both nitric and formic acids adsorb reversibly on silica. Additionally, the FTIR spectra show that both of these molecules remain in the protonated form. At elevated relative humidities (RH), adsorbed water competes both for surface adsorption sites with these acids as well as promotes their dissociation to hydronium ions and the corresponding anions. Compared to HNO3, the extent of dissociation is much smaller for HCOOH, very likely because it is a weaker acid. This study provides valuable insights into the interaction of HNO3 and HCOOH with silica surface on the molecular level and further reveals the complex roles of surface-adsorbed water in atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust particles-many of these containing silica. PMID:27220375

  14. APSAS; an Automated Particle Size Analysis System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; Eliason, A.H.; Fredericks, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Automated Particle Size Analysis System integrates a settling tube and an electroresistance multichannel particle-size analyzer (Coulter Counter) with a Pro-Comp/gg microcomputer and a Hewlett Packard 2100 MX(HP 2100 MX) minicomputer. This system and its associated software digitize the raw sediment grain-size data, combine the coarse- and fine-fraction data into complete grain-size distributions, perform method of moments and inclusive graphics statistics, verbally classify the sediment, generate histogram and cumulative frequency plots, and transfer the results into a data-retrieval system. This system saves time and labor and affords greater reliability, resolution, and reproducibility than conventional methods do.

  15. Magnetite Particle Size Distribution and Pellet Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyeon Jeong; Tang, Ming; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan

    2014-08-01

    Oxidation of magnetite pellets is commonly performed to prepare strong pellets for ironmaking. This article presents a contribution to quantitative understanding of fundamental pellet oxidation kinetics, based on measured oxidation kinetics of magnetite particles and pellets. The commonly observed "plateau" oxidation behavior is confirmed to be consistent with the effect of very large differences in magnetite particle sizes in the concentrate from which pellets are produced. The magnetite particles range in size from less than a micron to several tens of a microns; changing the size distribution by inert sintering of pellets decreases both the plateau level of oxidation and the specific surface area, in ways that are compatible with an assumed Rosin-Rammler magnetite particle size distribution.

  16. Size distributions of solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E.; Reames, D.; Kahler, S.; Cane, H.

    1991-01-01

    NASA particle detectors on the IMP-8 are employed to determine the size distributions of the peak fluxes of events related to solar-energetic particles including protons and electrons. The energetic proton events show a flatter size distribution which suggests that not all flares are proton flares. Both the electron and proton events are classified as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual', and the impulsive events tend to have a steeper power-law distribution.

  17. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  18. Solid particles adsorbed on capillary-bridge-shaped fluid polystyrene surfaces.

    PubMed

    McEnnis, Kathleen; Dinsmore, Anthony D; Russell, Thomas P

    2015-05-19

    Particles adsorbed on microscopic polystyrene (PS) capillary bridge surfaces were observed to investigate their motion under capillary forces arising from a nonuniform shape. Capillary bridges were created by placing thin PS films, heated above the glass transition temperature (Tg), between two electrodes with an air gap between the surface of the PS and the upper electrode. Silica particles, 100 nm in diameter, were placed on the surface of the PS capillary bridges, and the sample was heated above the Tg of PS to enable particle motion. Samples were cooled to below Tg, and the locations of the particles were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The particles did not preferentially locate around the center of the capillary bridge, as predicted by others, but instead segregated to the edges. These results indicate that the forces driving particles to the three-phase contact line (air/PS/electrode surface) are greater than those locating particles around the center. PMID:25938879

  19. Surface Chemistry at Size-Selected Nano-Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    A method has been developed to conduct surface chemistry and extract surface kinetic rates from size-selected aerosol nanoparticles. The measurements encompass broad ranges of particle size, phase, and composition. Results will be presented on the uptake of water by aerosolized soot nanoparticles of radius between 10 and 40 nm. Water uptake was monitored by tandem differential mobility analysis (T-DMA), which is capable of measuring changes in particle diameter as little as 0.2 nm. Soot particles were produced in an ethene diffusion flame and extracted into an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The particles were subjected to various thermal and oxidative treatments, and the effects of these treatments on the ability of soot to adsorb monolayer quantities of water was determined. The results are important because soot nucleates atmospheric cloud particles. More generally, the results represent one of the first kinetic and mechanistic studies of gas-phase nanoparticle reactivity. Co-author: Henry Ajo, University of Minnesota

  20. Complex Plasma with Two Distinct Particle Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bernard; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2008-10-01

    Dust particle clouds can be found in almost all plasma processing environments including both plasma etching devices and in plasma deposition processes. Dust particles suspended within such plasmas acquire an electric charge from collisions with free electrons in the plasma. If the ratio of inter-particle potential energy to the average kinetic energy is sufficient, the particles will form either a ``liquid'' structure with short range ordering or a crystalline structure with long range ordering. Otherwise, the dust particle system will remain in a gaseous state. The preponderance of prior experiments used monodisperse spheres to form complex plasma systems. In order to determine the effects of a size distribution, multiple monodisperse particle sizes need to be examined to determine the manner in which phase transitions and other thermodynamic properties depend upon the overall dust grain size distribution. In this experiment, two-dimensional plasma crystals were formed from mixtures of 11.9 μm and 6.50 μm monodisperse particles in Argon plasma. With the use of various optical techniques, the pair correlation function was determined at different pressures and powers and then compared to measurements obtained for experiments employing a single size distribution of monodisperse spheres. Additionally, vibrational data was examined to determine other dust and plasma parameters.

  1. The techniques of holographic particle sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Depending on the mechanism of particle production, the resultant particle size and velocity distribution may range over several orders of magnitude. In general, if particle size information is desired from a given type generator, one must resort to some form of experimental determination of the distribution. If the source of particle production is a dynamic one involving a reasonable volume, holography provides a tailor-made particle size and velocity distribution detector. This is evidenced by the fact that holography allows the entire volume to be recorded on one exposure without any interference with the volume of interest. Herein lies a very important characteristic of the holographic particle detection technique: It provides a holographic nondestructive testing technique in the fullest sense of the definition of nondestructive testing. This report provides a description of three different systems useful in this technique and includes the experimental results from one of the holographic systems which was used to detect particle size and velocity distribution from the Skylab waste tank.

  2. Investigation of plasma particle interactions with variable particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    In dusty plasmas, the dust particles are subjected to many forces of different origins. Both the gas and plasma directly affect the dust particles through electric fields, neutral drag, ion drag and thermophoretic forces, while the particles themselves interact with one another through a screened coulomb potential, which can be influenced by flowing ions. Recently, micron sized particles have been used as probes to analyze the electric fields in the plasma directly. A proper analysis of the resulting data requires a full understanding of the manner in which these forces couple to the dust particles. In most cases each of the forces exhibit unique characteristics, many of which are partially dependent on the particle size. In this study, five different particle sizes are used to investigate the forces resident in the sheath above the lower electrode of a GEC RF reference cell. The particles are tracked using a high-speed camera, yielding two-dimensional force maps allowing the force on the particles to be described as a polynomial series. It will be shown that the data collected can be analyzed to reveal information about the origins of the various forces. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Sheathless Size-Based Acoustic Particle Separation

    PubMed Central

    Guldiken, Rasim; Jo, Myeong Chan; Gallant, Nathan D.; Demirci, Utkan; Zhe, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Particle separation is of great interest in many biological and biomedical applications. Flow-based methods have been used to sort particles and cells. However, the main challenge with flow based particle separation systems is the need for a sheath flow for successful operation. Existence of the sheath liquid dilutes the analyte, necessitates precise flow control between sample and sheath flow, requires a complicated design to create sheath flow and separation efficiency depends on the sheath liquid composition. In this paper, we present a microfluidic platform for sheathless particle separation using standing surface acoustic waves. In this platform, particles are first lined up at the center of the channel without introducing any external sheath flow. The particles are then entered into the second stage where particles are driven towards the off-center pressure nodes for size based separation. The larger particles are exposed to more lateral displacement in the channel due to the acoustic force differences. Consequently, different-size particles are separated into multiple collection outlets. The prominent feature of the present microfluidic platform is that the device does not require the use of the sheath flow for positioning and aligning of particles. Instead, the sheathless flow focusing and separation are integrated within a single microfluidic device and accomplished simultaneously. In this paper, we demonstrated two different particle size-resolution separations; (1) 3 μm and 10 μm and (2) 3 μm and 5 μm. Also, the effects of the input power, the flow rate, and particle concentration on the separation efficiency were investigated. These technologies have potential to impact broadly various areas including the essential microfluidic components for lab-on-a-chip system and integrated biological and biomedical applications. PMID:22368502

  4. The role of adsorbed water on the friction of a layer of submicron particles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sammis, Charles G.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Ze’ev

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously low values of friction observed in layers of submicron particles deformed in simple shear at high slip velocities are explained as the consequence of a one nanometer thick layer of water adsorbed on the particles. The observed transition from normal friction with an apparent coefficient near μ = 0.6 at low slip speeds to a coefficient near μ = 0.3 at higher slip speeds is attributed to competition between the time required to extrude the water layer from between neighboring particles in a force chain and the average lifetime of the chain. At low slip speeds the time required for extrusion is less than the average lifetime of a chain so the particles make contact and lock. As slip speed increases, the average lifetime of a chain decreases until it is less than the extrusion time and the particles in a force chain never come into direct contact. If the adsorbed water layer enables the otherwise rough particles to rotate, the coefficient of friction will drop to μ = 0.3, appropriate for rotating spheres. At the highest slip speeds particle temperatures rise above 100°C, the water layer vaporizes, the particles contact and lock, and the coefficient of friction rises to μ = 0.6. The observed onset of weakening at slip speeds near 0.001 m/s is consistent with the measured viscosity of a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water, with a minimum particle radius of approximately 20 nm, and with reasonable assumptions about the distribution of force chains guided by experimental observation. The reduction of friction and the range of velocities over which it occurs decrease with increasing normal stress, as predicted by the model. Moreover, the analysis predicts that this high-speed weakening mechanism should operate only for particles with radii smaller than approximately 1 μm. For larger particles the slip speed required for weakening is so large that frictional heating will evaporate the adsorbed water and weakening will not occur.

  5. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Sascha; Müller, Thomas; Weinhold, Kay; Zikova, Nadezda; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Marinoni, Angela; Bischof, Oliver F.; Kykal, Carsten; Ries, Ludwig; Meinhardt, Frank; Aalto, Pasi; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates, particle sizing, and the unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10 % to 20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 µm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 µm in aerodynamic diameter should only be used with caution. For particles larger than 3 µm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. Particularly this uncertainty of the particle number size distribution must be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3 µm

  6. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  8. TOF-SIMS measurements for toxic air pollutants adsorbed on the surface of airborne particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyasu, Bunbunoshin; Hoshi, Takahiro; Owari, Masanori; Nihei, Yoshimasa

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of particulate matter were collected: diesel and gasoline exhaust particles emitted directly from exhaust nozzle, and suspended particulate matter (SPM) near the traffic route. Soxhlet extraction was performed on each sample. By gas-chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis of these extracts, di-ethyl phthalate and di- n-butyl phthalate were detected from the extract of SPM and diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). Because these phthalates were sometimes suspected as contamination, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) measurements were also performed on the samples collected at the same environment. By comparing obtained spectra, it is clear that these environmental endocrine disrupters (EEDs) were adsorbed on DEP surface. Thus, we concluded that the combination of conventional method and TOF-SIMS measurement is one of the most powerful techniques for analyzing the toxic air pollutants adsorbed on SPM surface.

  9. The suitability of scanning angle reflectometry for colloidal particle sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zeeuw, E. A.; Sagis, L. M. C.; Koper, G. J. M.; Mann, E. K.; Haarmans, M. T.; Bedeaux, D.

    1996-07-01

    We investigated the suitability of reflectometry as a sizing method for polystyrene latex particles. This technique, where the particles are adsorbed at a quartz/water interface, involves the analysis of the reflection around the Brewster angle of light polarized in the plane of incidence. A computation of a full reflectivity curve containing about 20 datapoints, taking into account all electromagnetic interactions, is extremely complex and may take up to 100 h on an Indy R4600 computer (Silicon Graphics, Mountain View, CA). To use the complete electromagnetic theory for analysis of experiments therefore is impractical. We analyzed the experimental reflectivity curves using an approximate theory (free-sphere model), which neglects all electromagnetic interactions between different particles and their images in the substrate. To assess the errors introduced by neglecting these interactions, we have calculated reflectivity curves using the full electromagnetic theory for this system, and analyzed them with the free-sphere model. We found that the diameters determined with the free-sphere model deviate at most 2% from the actual values. The surface coverage determined with the free-sphere model is systematically smaller than the actual coverage. The difference can be as large as 15% at a coverage of 9%. We also show that size polydispersity of the sample plays a minor role in the analysis of the data. We illustrate the usefulness of the free-sphere model, by analyzing measurements in which polystyrene latex particles are swollen by an organic solvent that is miscible with water.

  10. Negative chromatography of hepatitis B virus-like particle: Comparative study of different adsorbent designs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Micky Fu Xiang; Chan, Eng Seng; Tan, Wen Siang; Tam, Kam Chiu; Tey, Beng Ti

    2016-05-01

    Purification of virus-like particles (VLPs) in bind-and-elute mode has reached a bottleneck. Negative chromatography has emerged as the alternative solution; however, benchmark of negative chromatography media and their respective optimized conditions are absent. Hence, this study was carried out to compare the performance of different negative chromatography media for the purification of hepatitis B VLPs (HB-VLPs) from clarified Escherichia coli feedstock. The modified anion exchange media, core-shell adsorbents (InertShell and InertLayer 1000) and polymer grafted adsorbents (SQ) were compared. The results of chromatography from packed bed column of core-shell adsorbents showed that there is a trade-off between the purity and recovery of HB-VLPs in the flowthrough fraction due to the shell thickness. Atomic force microscopic analysis revealed funnel-shaped pore channels in the shell layer which may contribute to the entrapment of HB-VLPs. A longer residence time at a lower feed flow rate (0.5ml/min) improved slightly the HB-VLPs purity in all modified adsorbents, but the recovery in InertShell reduced substantially. The preheat-treatment is not recommended for the negative chromatography as the thermal-induced co-aggregation of HCPs and HB-VLPs would flow along with HB-VLPs and thus reduced the HB-VLPs purity in the flowthrough. Further reduction in the feedstock concentration enhanced the purity of HB-VLPs especially in InertLayer 1000 but reduced substantially the recovery of HB-VLPs. In general, the polymer grafted adsorbent, SQ, performed better than the core-shell adsorbents in handling a higher feedstock concentration. PMID:27059397

  11. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Shariff, Karim

    2003-01-01

    In this note, we derive a transport equation for a spatially integrated distribution function of particles size that is suitable for sparse particle systems, such as in atmospheric clouds. This is done by integrating a Boltzmann equation for a (local) distribution function over an arbitrary but finite volume. A methodology for evolving the moments of the integrated distribution is presented. These moments can be either tracked for a finite number of discrete populations ('clusters') or treated as continuum variables.

  12. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution. PMID:23216158

  13. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A.; Cullen, Mark R.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m3 per mg/m3 (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities. PMID:26478760

  14. Particle size reduction of propellants by cryocycling

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, L.; Griffiths, S.; Lipkin, J.

    1995-05-01

    Repeated exposure of a propellant to liquid nitrogen causes thermal stress gradients within the material resulting in cracking and particle size reduction. This process is termed cryocycling. The authors conducted a feasibility study, combining experiments on both inert and live propellants with three modeling approaches. These models provided optimized cycle times, predicted ultimate particle size, and allowed crack behavior to be explored. Process safety evaluations conducted separately indicated that cryocycling does not increase the sensitivity of the propellants examined. The results of this study suggest that cryocycling is a promising technology for the demilitarization of tactical rocket motors.

  15. Cataclasis and processes of particle size reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, Tom G.

    1991-05-01

    The particle size distribution (P.S.D.) of fragmented geological materials is affected by the fragmentation process, initial size distribution, number of fracturing events, energy input, strain, and confining pressure. A summary of literature shows that the fractal dimension ( D) of the P.S.D. is increased by the number of fracturing events, energy input, strain, and confining pressure. Cenozoic cataclasis of granite, granodiorites, gneisses and arkose seen in cores from the Cajon Pass drillhole, southern California, produced P.S.D.s with values of D that varied from 1.88 to 3.08. Each rock type has a characteristic and more limited range of D. Areas of dilatant texture and mode I fracture-fillings have low average values (2.32 and 2.37) compared to an average value of 2.67 in shear fracture-fillings D has a good inverse correlation with average particle size. Data from fault rocks in the San Gabriel fault zone, southern California ( Anderson et al., 1983) have been reanalyzed to show that values of D are higher (2.10 5.52) and average particle size is lower than the Cajon Pass samples, but the ranges of values overlap, and the inverse correlation between D and average particle size is extended. Microstructural observations combined with these results suggest that three processes contributed to particle size reduction during cataclasis. The first process of feldspar alteration, which leads to low values of D, has not been previously recognized. The second process is probably constrained comminution ( Sammis et al., 1987), since the average D in shear fracture-fillings is close to the value of 2.58 predicted by this theory. A further stage of particle size reduction is demonstrated by an increase of D with cataclasis. This third process is selective fracture of larger particles, which may also operate during localization and the cataclastic flow-to-faulting transition as observed in experiments. A transition from constrained comminution to selective fracture of

  16. High-accuracy particle sizing by interferometric particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qieni, Lü; Wenhua, Jin; Tong, Lü; Xiang, Wang; Yimo, Zhang

    2014-02-01

    A method of high-accuracy estimation of fringes number/fringes frequency of interferogram based on erosion match and the Fourier transform technique is proposed. The edge images of the interference pattern of particles and the particle mask image are detected respectively by erosion operating firstly and then subtracted with the respective original image, and the center coordinate of particles can be extracted through the 2D correlation operation for the two edge images obtained. The interference pattern of each particle can then be achieved using the center coordinate, the shape and size of the particle image. The number of fringes/fringe spacing of the interferogram of the particle is extracted by Fourier transform and the modified Rife algorithm, and sub-pixel accuracy of the extracted frequency is acquired. Its performance is demonstrated by numerical simulation and experimental measurement. The measurement uncertainty is ±0.91 μm and the relative error 1.13% for the standard particle of diameter 45 μm. The research results show that the algorithm presented boasts high accuracy for particle sizing as well as location measurement.

  17. Underlying Asymmetry with Particle-Size Segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajjar, Parmesh; van der Vaart, Kasper; Epely-Chauvin, Gael; Andreini, Nicolas; Gray, Nico; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Granular media have a natural tendency to self-organise when sheared, with different sized constituents counter-intuitively separating from each other. Not only does the segregation produce a rich diversity of beautiful patterns, but it can also have serious implications in both industrial and geophysical environments. Despite the universal importance, the individual particle dynamics during segregation are still poorly understand, with such an analysis proving to be difficult with conventional techniques such as binning and sidewall observation. This talk will present results of recent experiments that studied particle scale segregation dynamics during oscillatory shear. Refractive index matched scanning allowed examination of the interior of the flow, where it was observed that large and small particles have an underlying asymmetry that is dependant on the local particle concentration. Small particles were seen to segregate faster through regions of many large particles, whilst large particles rise slower through regions of many small particles. The asymmetry is quantified on both bulk and particle length scales, and is shown to have good agreement with a continuum model that uses a cubic segregation flux.

  18. Acoustical concept for measuring particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, D.S.; Kaufman, M.

    1981-02-01

    A new concept is investigated for measuring particle size and distribution for air pollution control applications. This study illustrates that the proposed device--the Acoustic Particulate Monitor (APM)--can measure total mass loading, mean particle diameter, and width of particle size distributions on an in-situ basis. The concept for such an instrument is based upon experimental and theoretical observations that the presence of dust in air causes a reduction in the speed of sound as a function of the transmitted frequency. These percentage reductions in the speed of sound are small and the research results illustrate how the accompanying shift in the acoustical phase is a highly sensitive method for detecting such effects. The magnitudes of the phase shift are related to mass loading. The frequency associated with the maximum phase shift is defined as the acoustic frequency, fA. Experimentally determining fA provides a measure of the mean particle size of the distribution. The detailed shape of the phase shift as a function of frequency is a measure of the spread in the size distribution of the entrained particulate. Experiments were performed using several configurations. Results were verified using direct mass measurements and microphotographs.

  19. Constraining Particle Sizes of Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. M.; Colwell, J.; Esposito, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Saturn's beauty is often attributed to the magnificent rings that encircle the planet. Although admired for hundreds of years, we are now just beginning to understand the complexity of the rings as a result of new data from the Cassini orbiter. Studying occultations of the rings provides information about the distribution and sizes of the particles that define the rings. During one solar occultation, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board Cassini was slightly misaligned with the Sun, decreasing the amount of direct solar signal to ~1% of the normal value. As a result, UVIS detected a peak in photon counts above the non-occulted signal due to forward-scattered light diffracted by the small particles in the F Ring. There is a direct relationship between the size of the particles and the intensity of the light scattered. We utilize this relationship in a model that replicates the misalignment and calculates the amount of light that would be detected as a function of the particle sizes in the ring. We present new results from the model that constrain the size distribution of the dynamically active F Ring, contributing to the study of the origin and evolution of Saturn's ring system.

  20. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  1. Role of particle size and composition in metal adsorption by solids deposited on urban road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Chandima; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2014-01-01

    Despite common knowledge that the metal content adsorbed by fine particles is relatively higher compared to coarser particles, the reasons for this phenomenon have gained little research attention. The research study discussed in the paper investigated the variations in metal content for different particle sizes of solids associated with pollutant build-up on urban road surfaces. Data analysis confirmed that parameters favourable for metal adsorption to solids such as specific surface area, organic carbon content, effective cation exchange capacity and clay forming minerals content decrease with the increase in particle size. Furthermore, the mineralogical composition of solids was found to be the governing factor influencing the specific surface area and effective cation exchange capacity. There is high quartz content in particles >150 μm compared to particles <150 μm. As particle size reduces below 150 μm, the clay forming minerals content increases, providing favourable physical and chemical properties that influence adsorption. PMID:24021928

  2. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  3. Formation Process of Eosin Y-Adsorbing ZnO Particles by Electroless Deposition and Their Photoelectric Conversion Properties.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Satoshi; Nishikiori, Hiromasa; Mizusaki, Hideaki; Wagata, Hajime; Teshima, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    The thin films consisting of crystalline ZnO particles were prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide electrodes by electroless deposition. The particles were deposited from an aqueous solution containing zinc nitrate, dimethyamine-borane, and eosin Y at 328 K. As the Pd particles were adsorbed on the substrate, not only the eosin Y monomer but also the dimer and debrominated species were rapidly adsorbed on the spherical ZnO particles, which were aggregated and formed secondary particles. On the other hand, in the absence of the Pd particles, the monomer was adsorbed on the flake-shaped ZnO particles, which vertically grew on the substrate surface and had a high crystallinity. The photoelectric conversion efficiency was higher for the ZnO electrodes containing a higher amount of the monomer during light irradiation. PMID:25978089

  4. Transport of biochar particles in saturated granular media: effects of pyrolysis temperature and particle size.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengjun; Zhang, Wei; Hao, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Dongmei

    2013-01-15

    Land application of biochar is increasingly being considered for potential agronomic and environmental benefits, e.g., enhancing carbon sequestration, nutrient retention, water holding capacity, and crop productivity; and reducing greenhouse gas emissions and bioavailability of environmental contaminants. However, little is known about the transport of biochar particles in the aqueous environment, which represents a critical knowledge gap because biochar particles can facilitate the transport of adsorbed contaminants. In this study, column experiments were conducted to investigate biochar particle transport and retention in water-saturated quartz sand. Specific factors considered included biochar feedstocks (wheat straw and pine needle), pyrolysis temperature (350 and 550 °C), and particle size (micrometer-particle (MP) and nanoparticle (NP)). Greater mobility was observed for the biochars of lower pyrolysis temperatures and smaller particle sizes. Extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) calculations that considered measured zeta potentials and Lewis acid-base interactions were used to better understand the influence of pyrolysis temperature on biochars particle transport. Most biochars exhibited attractive acid-base interactions that impeded their transport, whereas the biochar with the greatest mobility had repulsive acid-base interaction. Nonetheless, greater retention of the MPs than that of the NPs was in contrast with the XDLVO predictions. Straining and biochar surface charge heterogeneity were found to enhance the retention of biochar MPs, but played an insignificant role in the biochar NP retention. Experimental breakthrough curves and retention profiles were well-described using a two-site kinetic retention model that accounted for depth-dependent retention at one site. Modeled first-order retention coefficients on both sites 1 and 2 increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature and particle size. PMID:23249307

  5. Electrophoretic deposition of adsorbed arsenic on fine iron oxide particles in tap water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Syahira Mohd; Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu; Naim, M. Nazli; Rahman, Norazah Abd; Talib, Suhaimi Abdul

    2016-02-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique has been demonstrated to remove arsenic with natural adsorbent (fine iron oxide particles) in tap water samples. Characterizations of metal element particularly arsenic and fine iron oxide particles in tap water from two different locations, i.e. commercial and residential areas, were conducted. Results showed that the concentration of arsenic in tap water from residential area was higher than commercial area samples i.e. 0.022 ± 0.004 and 0.016 ± 0.008 ppm, respectively. The same finding was observed in zeta potential value where it was higher in the residential area than commercial area, i.e. -42.27 ± 0.12 and -34.83 ± 0.23 mV, respectively. During the removal of arsenic using the EPD technique, direct current (DC) voltage was varied from 5 to 25V at a constant electrode distance of 30 mm. Effect of zeta potential, voltage and electrode type were intensively investigated. High percentage removal of arsenic was obtained from carbon plate than carbon fibre electrode. The percentage removal of arsenic from all samples slightly decreased with increasing of the applied voltage. EDX analysis confirmed that arsenic has adsorbed onto deposited iron oxide particles on the anode electrode. Overall, EPD technique was found to be successful in removing arsenic onto fine iron oxide particles in tap water with 26% ± 1.05 of removal.

  6. Photographic techniques for characterizing streambed particle sizes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, M.S.; Moran, E.H.; Ourso, R.T.

    2003-01-01

    We developed photographic techniques to characterize coarse (>2-mm) and fine (???2-mm) streambed particle sizes in 12 streams in Anchorage, Alaska. Results were compared with current sampling techniques to assess which provided greater sampling efficiency and accuracy. The streams sampled were wade-able and contained gravel - cobble streambeds. Gradients ranged from about 5% at the upstream sites to about 0.25% at the downstream sites. Mean particle sizes and size-frequency distributions resulting from digitized photographs differed significantly from those resulting from Wolman pebble counts for five sites in the analysis. Wolman counts were biased toward selecting larger particles. Photographic analysis also yielded a greater number of measured particles (mean = 989) than did the Wolman counts (mean = 328). Stream embeddedness ratings assigned from field and photographic observations were significantly different at 5 of the 12 sites, although both types of ratings showed a positive relationship with digitized surface fines. Visual estimates of embeddedness and digitized surface fines may both be useful indicators of benthic conditions, but digitizing surface fines produces quantitative rather than qualitative data. Benefits of the photographic techniques include reduced field time, minimal streambed disturbance, convenience of postfield processing, easy sample archiving, and improved accuracy and replication potential.

  7. Frequency-scanning particle size spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, Alain L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A particle size spectrometer having a fixed field of view within the forward light scattering cone at an angle .theta..sub.s between approximately 100 and 200 minutes of arc (preferably at 150 minutes), a spectral range extending approximately from 0.2 to 4.0 inverse micrometers (.mu.m.sup.-1), and a spectral resolution between about 0.1 and 0.2 .mu.m.sup.-1 (preferably toward the lower end of this range of spectral resolution), is employed to determine the distribution of particle sizes, independently of the chemical composition of the particles, from measurements of incident light, I.sub.o, at each frequency, .sigma. (=1/.lambda.), and scattered light, I(.sigma.), according to the equation: ##EQU1## where l=2.pi.sin.theta., .theta. being the fixed viewing angle .theta..sub.s at which scattered light is measured, r is particle size, .sigma. is the reciprocal of wavelength, J.sub.1 is a Bessel function of first kind and order unity, Y.sub.1 is a Bessel function of second kind and order unity. The quantity, I.sub..sigma., is the ratio of scattered light to incident light at each frequency interval. The apparatus is a passive remote sensor that can be used in laboratories, field stations, flying aircrafts and airships, and on board an orbiting satellite.

  8. Langevin granulometry of the particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kákay, Attila; Gutowski, M. W.; Takacs, L.; Franco, V.; Varga, L. K.

    2004-06-01

    The problem of deriving the particle size distribution directly from superparamagnetic magnetization curves is studied by three mathematical methods: (1) least-squares deviation with regularization procedure, (2) simulated annealing and (3) genetic algorithm. Software has been developed for the latest versions of all these methods and its performance compared for various models of underlying particle size distributions (Dirac dgr-like, lognormal- and Gaussian-shaped). For single peak distributions all three methods give reasonable and similar results, but for bimodal distributions the genetic algorithm is the only acceptable one. The genetic algorithm is able to recover with the same precision both the lognormal and Gaussian single and double (mixed) model distributions. The sensitivity of the genetic algorithm—the most promising method—to uncertainty of measurements was also tested; correct peak position and its half width were recovered for Gaussian distributions, when the analysed data were contaminated with noise of up to 5% of MS.

  9. Colloid particle size-dependent dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Katzourakis, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that dispersion coefficients evaluated by fitting advection-dispersion transport models to nonreactive tracer breakthrough curves do not adequately describe colloid transport under the same flow field conditions. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size and interstitial velocity. A total of 49 colloid transport experiments were performed in columns packed with glass beads under chemically unfavorable colloid attachment conditions. Nine different colloid diameters, and various flow velocities were examined. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity is positively correlated with colloid particle size, and increases with increasing velocity.

  10. Complex Plasmas with Two Distinct Particle Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bernard; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2008-11-01

    Dust particle clouds are found in most plasma processing environments and many astrophysical environments. Dust particles suspended within such plasmas often acquire an electric charge from collisions with free electrons in the plasma. Depending upon the ratio of interparticle potential energy to average kinetic energy, charged dust particles can form a gaseous, liquid or crystalline structure with short to longer range ordering. The majority of past and current experiments employed monodisperse spheres to form their complex plasma system. As a result, the manner in which the basic thermodynamic properties of the system are dependent upon the overall dust grain size distribution is still not well understood. In this experiment, two-dimensional plasma crystals were formed from mixtures of 11.93 μm, 8.89 μm and 6.50 μm monodisperse particles in Argon plasma. The pair correlation function and vibrational data were determined for varying pressures and powers and then compared with measurements obtained for experiments employing a single size distribution of monodisperse spheres.

  11. Particle induced X-ray emission-computed tomography analysis of an adsorbent for extraction chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kitamura, Akane; Ohkubo, Takeru; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Takahatake, Yoko; Watanabe, Sou; Koma, Yoshikazu; Kada, Wataru

    2016-03-01

    Nd, which simulates minor actinides (MAs), was used for investigating residual minor actinides produced during the extraction chromatography separation of spent fuel from fast neutron reactors. A cross-sectional distribution of Nd in a minute globular adsorbent having diameter less than 50 μm was obtained using particle induced X-ray emission-computed tomography with a 3-MeV proton microbeam. The measurement area was 150 × 150 μm2 corresponding to 128 × 128 imaging pixels in projection images with 9° resolution, image reconstruction was carried out by a modified ML-EM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) method. As a result, the cross-sectional distribution of Nd in the adsorbent was successfully obtained, and it was first revealed that Nd existed both in the central region and on the outer surface even after an elution. This implies that the internal structure of the adsorbent must be modified for improving of the recovery of MAs.

  12. Method of producing non-agglomerating submicron size particles

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Roy S.; Eichman, Clarence C.; Welbon, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in "metallic inks".

  13. Method of producing submicron size particles and product produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, R.S.; Eichman, C.C.; Welbon, W.W.

    1988-05-11

    Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in ''metallic inks.'' 4 figs.

  14. Method for determining aerosol particle size device for determining aerosol particle size

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for determining the mass median diameter D of particles contained in a fluid is provided wherein the data of the mass of a pre-exposed and then a post-exposed filter is mathematically combined with data concerning the pressure differential across the same filter before and then after exposure to a particle-laden stream. A device for measuring particle size is also provided wherein the device utilizes the above-method for mathematically combining the easily quantifiable data.

  15. Chaotic mixing of finite-sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omurtag, Ahmet Can

    1997-10-01

    Dynamical systems concepts have been used to analyze the behavior of rigid spherical finite-sized particles in chaotic flows in the eccentric annular system. If the particles are sufficiently small they follow the fluid streamlines. Then the dynamical system is Hamiltonian as a result of the presence of a streamfunction for the two- dimensional incompressible flow. The Stokes number characterizes the significance of particle inertia. It is shown that the bifurcations of the dynamical system can be harnessed for separating particles with different physical properties. These results are numerically obtained for finite-sized particles in Stokes flows. Departure from Stokes flow toward higher Reynolds numbers results in longer transients in the fluid velocity field. It also changes the steady state pattern of the streamlines. Mixing under chaotic stirring procedures with up to Re=100 indicates a general tendency toward poorer mixing per cycle. Results obtained by the numerically generated fluid velocity field demonstrated good agreement with experimental results. The extent and shape of the chaotic regions are not, in general, radically modified as the Reynolds number increases. It was shown that the unstable manifolds of the underlying mapping based on Stokes flow provides a template for deformations in the flow even beyond the Stokes regime as well as with particle inertia and q/not=1. It was also shown that the stable and unstable manifolds can be located by calculating the finite-time Lyapunov exponents of a very large number of trajectories in the domain. Mixing in the eccentric annulus is applied to the problem of collecting fetal cells from maternal circulation of blood. Fetal cells were modeled as small spherical particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid filling the gap in a small eccentric annular mixing device. Two separate model collecting devices are used. The first model utilizes vertically placed and antibody coated fibers that adhere to fetal cells on

  16. Initial size distributions and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-10-01

    Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source size distributions were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single size, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed size change for particles of different sizes within the whole size spectrum. The source particle size distribution measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the size range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle sizes and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and phosphate removal and recovery of magnetic MnFe2O4 nano-particles as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shumei; Xu, Xiaoming; Xu, Changsong; Wang, Hongshuai; Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Guangmin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate removal is an important method for controlling eutrophication in bodies of water. Adsorption is an effective phosphate removal approach. In this research, the adsorbent, namely, MnFe2O4, was prepared through the improved co-precipitation method and investigated in terms of phosphate removal. MnFe2O4 was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Phosphate adsorption by MnFe2O4, desorption of adsorbed MnFe2O4 with the regeneration of desorbed MnFe2O4, and phosphate recovery were researched. Experimental results showed that adding the appropriate amount of polyethylene glycol to MnFe2O4 precursors during preparation inhibited the agglomeration of MnFe2O4 between particles because of the magnetic property of MnFe2O4 etc. High crystallinity and strong magnetism were achieved by MnFe2O4 at low temperatures. Average particle size was 5.1 nm. The hysteresis loops confirmed the ferrimagnetic behaviour of MnFe2O4 with a high saturation magnetization (i.e. 26.27 emu/g). The adsorption mechanism of phosphate was mainly physical. The prepared MnFe2O4 had a spinel structure. The proposed technique achieved a phosphate removal rate of 96.06%. A considerable amount of phosphate was desorbed from the adsorbed MnFe2O4 in 15 w/v% NaOH solution. The adsorption capacity of the desorbed MnFe2O4 could be restored to 96.73% in 10 w/v% NaNO3 solution through ion exchange. A sustainable phosphate source was recovered via hydroxyapatite crystallization in the desorption solution, which contained an abundant amount of phosphate as seed for suitable recovery condition. This finding suggested that MnFe2O4 could be a promising adsorbent for efficient phosphate removal. PMID:26292922

  18. Light Induced Degradation of Eight Commonly Used Pesticides Adsorbed on Atmospheric Particles: Kinetics and Product Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Durand, A.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.; Quivet, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pesticides are widely used all over the world whether in agricultural production or in non-agricultural settings. They may pose a potential human health effects and environmental risks due to their physico-chemical properties and their extensive use which is growing every year. Pesticides are found in the atmosphere removed from the target area by volatilization or wind erosion, and carried over long distances. These compounds are partitioned between the gaseous and particulate atmospheric phases. The increasingly used pesticides are semi-volatile compounds which are usually adsorbed on the surface of the atmospheric particles. These pesticides may undergo chemical and photo-chemical transformation. New compounds may then be formed that could be more hazardous than the primary pesticides. The atmospheric fate and lifetime of adsorbed pesticides on particles are controlled by the these (photo)chemical processes. However, there is a lack of kinetic data regarding the pesticides in the particle phase. This current work focuses on the photolytic degradation of commonly used pesticides in particulate phase. It aims at estimating the photolytic rates and thus the lifetimes of pesticides adsorbed on silica particles as a proxy of atmospheric particles. The following eight commonly used pesticides, cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin, tetraconazole, were chosen because of their physico-chemical properties. The photolysis rates of tetraconazole and permethrin were extremely slow ≤ 1.2 · 10-6 s-1. The photolysis rates for the other pesticides were determined in the range of: (5.9 ± 0.3) · 10-6 < k < (1.7 ± 0.1) · 10-4 s-1 from slowest to the fastest: pendimethalin < cyprodinil < deltamethrin < difenoconazole < oxadiazon < fipronil. Finally, the identification of the surface products upon light irradiation was performed, using GC-(QqQ)-MS/MS and LC-(Q-IMS-ToF)-MS/MS. The potentially formed gas-phase products during

  19. Novel adsorbent for DNA adsorption: Fe(3+)-attached sporopollenin particles embedded composite cryogels.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Şeyda; Odabaşı, Mehmet

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare supermacroporous cryogels embedded with Fe(3+)-attached sporopollenin particles (Fe(3++)-ASPs) having large surface area for high DNA adsorption capacity. Supermacroporous poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA)-based monolithic cryogel column embedded with Fe3+(+)-ASPs was prepared by radical cryo-copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with N,N´-methylene- bis-acrylamide (MBAAm) as cross-linker directly in a plastic syringe for DNA adsorption studies. Firstly, Fe3+(+) ions were attached to the sporopollenin particles (SPs), then the supermacroporous PHEMA cryogel with embedded Fe(3++)-ASPs was produced by free radical polymerization using N,N,N´, N´-Tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator/activator pair in an ice bath. Optimum conditions of adsorption experiments were performed at pH 6.0 (0.02 M Tris buffer containing 0.2 M NaCl), with flow rate of 0.5 mL/min, and at 5°C. The maximum amount of DNA adsorption from aqueous solution was very high (109 mg/g SPs) with initial concentration of 3 mg/mL. It was observed that DNA could be repeatedly adsorbed and desorbed with this composite cryogel without significant loss of adsorption capacity. As a result, higher amounts of DNA adsorbed these composite cryogels are expected to be good candidate for achieving higher removal of anti-DNA antibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients plasma. PMID:23305206

  20. Rod-like cyanophenyl probe molecules nanoconfined to oxide particles: Density of adsorbed surface species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunza, Stefan; Frunza, Ligia; Ganea, Constantin Paul; Zgura, Irina; Brás, Ana Rita; Schönhals, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Surface layers have already been observed by broadband dielectric spectroscopy for composite systems formed by adsorption of rod-like cyanophenyl derivates as probe molecules on the surface of oxide particles. In this work, features of the surface layer are reported; samples with different amounts of the probe molecules adsorbed onto oxide (nano) particles were prepared in order to study their interactions with the surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to analyze the amount of loaded probe molecules. The density of the surface species ns was introduced and its values were estimated from quantitative Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with TGA. This parameter allows discriminating the composites into several groups assuming a similar interaction of the probe molecules with the hosts of a given group. An influence factor H is further proposed as the ratio of the number of molecules in the surface layer showing a glassy dynamics and the number of molecules adsorbed tightly on the surface of the support: It was found for aerosil composites and used for calculating the maximum filling degree of partially filled silica MCM-41 composites showing only one dielectric process characteristic for glass-forming liquids and a bulk behavior for higher filling degrees.

  1. Effects of surface topography on the collective diffusion of interacting adsorbed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, M. E. R.; Pasinetti, P. M.; Bulnes, F.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    Collective diffusion of particles with repulsive nearest-neighbor interactions on bivariate surfaces is studied through Monte Carlo simulation, in the framework of the Kubo-Green theory. Shallow and deep adsorbing sites form l × l patches distributed at random or in chessboard-like ordered domains on a two-dimensional square lattice. The influence of the energetic correlation and the lateral interactions on the jump and collective diffusion coefficients are analyzed by simulating the coverage fluctuations in the grand canonical ensemble and the mean-square displacements of particles in the canonical ensemble. The combination of topography and lateral coupling is shown to produce interesting effects such as different filling regimes as well as strong effects on the coverage dependence of the transport coefficients.

  2. Zeolite (Na) modified by nano-Fe particles adsorbing phosphate in rainwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lili; Zuo, Jiane; Xie, Bangmi; Li, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2012-01-01

    Zeolite (Na) modified by self-synthesized nano-Fe particles was used as infiltration media to adsorb phosphate in rainwater runoff. The adsorption capacities increased up to 75 times that of natural zeolite at a saturated equilibrium phosphate concentration of 0.42 mg/L. The correlation of capacity and material-specific surface area indicated that specific surface area was not the key factor contributing to the capacity improvement. SEM and XRD analysis showed that chemical reaction between Fe and P to form new products like cacoxenite is the main reason for the increased capacity, and that the method of adding metal ions or particles to improve the adsorption capacity for phosphate is feasible. PMID:23534225

  3. Spatial Variability of CCN Sized Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, A.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    The computational limitations restrict the grid size used in GCM models, and for many cloud types they are too large when compared to the scale of the cloud formation processes. Several parameterizations for e.g. convective cloud formation exist, but information on spatial subgrid variation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCNs) sized aerosol concentration is not known. We quantify this variation as a function of the spatial scale by using datasets from airborne aerosol measurement campaigns around the world including EUCAARI LONGREX, ATAR, INCA, INDOEX, CLAIRE, PEGASOS and several regional airborne campaigns in Finland. The typical shapes of the distributions are analyzed. When possible, we use information obtained by CCN counters. In some other cases, we use particle size distribution measured by for example SMPS to get approximated CCN concentration. Other instruments used include optical particle counters or condensational particle counters. When using the GCM models, the CCN concentration used for each the grid-box is often considered to be either flat, or as an arithmetic mean of the concentration inside the grid-box. However, the aircraft data shows that the concentration values are often lognormal distributed. This, combined with the subgrid variations in the land use and atmospheric properties, might cause that the aerosol-cloud interactions calculated by using mean values to vary significantly from the true effects both temporary and spatially. This, in turn, can cause non-linear bias into the GCMs. We calculate the CCN aerosol concentration distribution as a function of different spatial scales. The measurements allow us to study the variation of these distributions within from hundreds of meters up to hundreds of kilometers. This is used to quantify the potential error when mean values are used in GCMs.

  4. Comparative measurements using different particle size instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the measurement and comparison of particle size and velocity measurements in sprays. The general nature of sprays and the development of standard, consistent research sprays are described. The instruments considered in this paper are: pulsed laser photography, holography, television, and cinematography; laser anemometry and interferometry using visibility, peak amplitude, and intensity ratioing; and laser diffraction. Calibration is by graticule, reticle, powders with known size distributions in liquid cells, monosize sprays, and, eventually, standard sprays. Statistical analyses including spatial and temporal long-time averaging as well as high-frequency response time histories with conditional sampling are examined. Previous attempts at comparing instruments, the making of simultaneous or consecutive measurements with similar types and different types of imaging, interferometric, and diffraction instruments are reviewed. A program of calibration and experiments for comparing and assessing different instruments is presented.

  5. Kinetic study of heterogeneous ozonolysis of alachlor, trifluralin and terbuthylazine adsorbed on silica particles under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflieger, Maryline; Monod, Anne; Wortham, Henri

    To better understand the atmospheric behaviour of pesticides, heterogeneous ozonolysis of three herbicides (alachlor, terbuthylazine and trifluralin) adsorbed on silica particles were performed in a flow reactor. The experimental setup used in this study and previously validated ( Pflieger et al., 2009) has been specially developed to investigate extremely slow reactivity. The pesticides were adsorbed on particles using a gas/solid adsorption equilibrium, in order to simulate atmospheric conditions. After exposure to ozone concentrations ranging from 5 to 41 ppm during 90 min to 6 h, the kinetics were calculated by comparing the initial and the remaining amounts of pesticides adsorbed on silica particles. This work offers the first results of heterogeneous ozonolysis of alachlor and trifluralin adsorbed on mineral particles. Although alachlor and terbuthylazine were expected to react with ozone, no degradation was observed which leads to a lifetime higher than 8 months towards ozonolysis (for 40 ppb of O 3). A significant degradation of trifluralin adsorbed on silica particles by heterogeneous ozonolysis was observed. The experimental data could be fit by both the Langmuir-Rideal and the Langmuir-Hinshelwood models resulting in atmospheric lifetimes (towards heterogeneous ozonolysis) of 40 and 32 days respectively (for 40 ppb of O 3). These results are discussed and compared to other studies.

  6. Surface photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate: the role of adsorbed water in the formation of reduced nitrogen species on α-Fe2O3 particle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nanayakkara, Charith E; Jayaweera, Pradeep M; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Grassian, Vicki H

    2014-01-01

    The surface photochemistry of nitrate, formed from nitric acid adsorption, on hematite (α-Fe2O3) particle surfaces under different environmental conditions is investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following exposure of α-Fe2O3 particle surfaces to gas-phase nitric acid, a peak in the N1s region is seen at 407.4 eV; this binding energy is indicative of adsorbed nitrate. Upon broadband irradiation with light (λ > 300 nm), the nitrate peak decreases in intensity as a result of a decrease in adsorbed nitrate on the surface. Concomitant with this decrease in the nitrate coverage, there is the appearance of two lower binding energy peaks in the N1s region at 401.7 and 400.3 eV, due to reduced nitrogen species. The formation as well as the stability of these reduced nitrogen species, identified as NO(-) and N(-), are further investigated as a function of water vapor pressure. Additionally, irradiation of adsorbed nitrate on α-Fe2O3 generates three nitrogen gas-phase products including NO2, NO, and N2O. As shown here, different environmental conditions of water vapor pressure and the presence of molecular oxygen greatly influence the relative photoproduct distribution from nitrate surface photochemistry. The atmospheric implications of these results are discussed. PMID:24299394

  7. Characterization of Nanometer-Sized Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eugine

    1990-01-01

    New methods for characterizing nanometer sized particles produced by the multiple expansion cluster source (MECS) were developed. The cluster beam from the MECS was analyzed directly with a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) using excimer laser photoionization. The mass spectrometer was designed and built with perpendicular molecular beam and time of flight axis to combine high resolution and high mass range to study metal clusters. The TOFMS can resolve individual clusters containing upto 100 atoms per cluster and detect heavy clusters of upto 5 nm. diameter. The mass spectra of high masses were obtained by reducing the velocity of clusters in the molecular beam before ionization. The slower initial velocities permitted easier deflection of heavy particles. The TOFMS was used to analyze the growth of Sn clusters in the MECS. Sn cluster growth was found to depend solely on the concentration of Sn atoms and the residence time in the reactor. The MECS produced a normal distribution of cluster diameters. This is in good agreement with growth prediction based on pure birth growth kinetics. The standards deviation of this normal distribution is between 0.3 and 0.5 nm when the mean particle diameter is less than 2.5 nm. A secondary growth region beyond 2.5 nm diameter cluster was observed with He gas in the MECS reactor. The clusters in this growth region show bimodal peak size distribution with the heavier peak located at twice the mass of the first peak when the clusters in the beam are first slowed down with deceleration gas. The deceleration gas slows down the clusters in the beam based on their cross section area to mass ratio. This effect is due to growth from cluster to cluster collisions forming a loosely bound aggregate. These small aggregates do not change structure since the cross sectional area to mass ratio is unchanged as observed by the bimodal peak distribution. Au clusters ranging from 1 to 10 nm diameter deposited on flat Au substrates and on

  8. Fabrication and evaluation of low-cost agarose-zinc nanoporous composite matrix: influence of adsorbent density and size distribution on the performance of expanded beds.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Fateme; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2012-09-28

    Expanded bed adsorption (EBA), a promising and practical separation technique for adsorption of nanobioproduct/bioproduct, has been widely studied in the past two decades. The development of adsorbent with the special design for expanded bed process is a challenging course. To reduce the costs of adsorbent preparation, fine zinc powder was used as the inexpensive densifier. A series of matrices named Ag-Zn were prepared by water-in-oil emulsification method. The structure and morphology of the prepared matrix were studied by the optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The physical properties as a function of zinc powder ratio to agarose slurry were measured. The prepared matrices had regular spherical shape, and followed logarithmic normal size distribution with the range of 75-330 μm, mean diameter of 140.54-191.11 μm, wet density of 1.33-2.01 g/ml, water content of 0.45-0.75, porosity of 0.86-0.97 and pore size of about 40-90 nm. The bed expansion factor at the range of 2-3 was examined. The obtained results indicated that the expansion factor was decreased with increasing of matrix density. In addition, it was found that matrices with large particle size were suitable for high operation flow rate. The hydrodynamic properties were determined in expanded bed by the residence time distribution method (RTD). The effects of flow velocity, expansion factor and density of matrix on the hydrodynamic properties were also investigated. Moreover, the influence of particle size distribution on the performance of expanded bed has been studied. Therefore, three different particle size fractions (65-140, 215-280 and 65-280 μm) were assessed. The results indicated that dispersion in liquid-solid expanded beds increased with increasing flow rate and expansion factor; and matrix with a wide particle size distribution leaded to a reduced axial dispersion compared to matrices with a narrow size distribution. The axial dispersion coefficient also enhanced

  9. Method for determining aerosol particle size, device for determining aerosol particle size

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.

    1998-10-06

    A method for determining the mass median diameter D of particles contained in a fluid is provided wherein the data of the mass of a pre-exposed and then a post-exposed filter is mathematically combined with data concerning the pressure differential across the same filter before and then after exposure to a particle-laden stream. A device for measuring particle size is also provided wherein the device utilizes the above-method for mathematically combining the easily quantifiable data. 2 figs.

  10. Protein adsorption onto nanoparticles induces conformational changes: Particle size dependency, kinetics, and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Satzer, Peter; Svec, Frantisek; Sekot, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials in bioapplications demands a detailed understanding of protein–nanoparticle interactions. Proteins can undergo conformational changes while adsorbing onto nanoparticles, but studies on the impact of particle size on conformational changes are scarce. We have shown that conformational changes happening upon adsorption of myoglobin and BSA are dependent on the size of the nanoparticle they are adsorbing to. Out of eight initially investigated model proteins, two (BSA and myoglobin) showed conformational changes, and in both cases this conformational change was dependent on the size of the nanoparticle. Nanoparticle sizes ranged from 30 to 1000 nm and, in contrast to previous studies, we attempted to use a continuous progression of sizes in the range found in live viruses, which is an interesting size of nanoparticles for the potential use as drug delivery vehicles. Conformational changes were only visible for particles of 200 nm and bigger. Using an optimized circular dichroism protocol allowed us to follow this conformational change with regard to the nanoparticle size and, thanks to the excellent temporal resolution also in time. We uncovered significant differences between the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin and BSA. In this study, we also evaluated the plausibility of commonly used explanations for the phenomenon of nanoparticle size‐dependent conformational change. Currently proposed mechanisms are mostly based on studies done with relatively small particles, and fall short in explaining the behavior seen in our studies.

  11. A novel adsorbent for protein chromatography: supermacroporous monolithic cryogel embedded with Cu2+-attached sporopollenin particles.

    PubMed

    Erzengin, Mahmut; Ünlü, Nuri; Odabaşı, Mehmet

    2011-01-21

    The aim of this study is to prepare supermacroporous cryogels embedded with Cu(2+)-attached sporopollenin particles (Cu(2+)-ASP) having large surface area for high protein adsorption capacity. Supermacroporous poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA)-based monolithic cryogel column embedded with Cu(2+)-ASP was prepared by radical cryo-copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBAAm) as cross-linker directly in a plastic syringe for affinity purification of human serum albumin (HSA). Firstly, Cu(2+) ions were attached to sporopollenin particles (SP), then the supermacroporous PHEMA cryogel with embedded Cu(2+)-ASP was produced by free radical polymerization using N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator/activator pair in an ice bath. Embedded particles (10 mg) in PHEMA-based cryogel column were used in the adsorption/desorption of HSA from aqueous solutions. Optimum conditions of adsorption experiments were performed at pH 8.0 phosphate buffer, with flow rate of 0.5 mL/min, and at 5°C. The maximum amount of HSA adsorption from aqueous solution was very high (677.4 mg/g SP) with initial concentration 6 mg/mL. It was observed that HSA could be repeatedly adsorbed and desorbed to the embedded Cu(2+)-ASP in PHEMA cryogel without significant loss of adsorption capacity. PMID:21176840

  12. Identification and quantification of ozonation products of anthracene and phenanthrene adsorbed on silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraudin, Emilie; Budzinski, Hélène; Villenave, Eric

    Primary products of the reactions of gas-phase ozone with anthracene and phenanthrene adsorbed on silica model particles have been investigated. Silica was selected as proxy for mineral atmospheric particles. The particles, coated with anthracene or phenanthrene and placed on a filter, were exposed in a reaction cell to a gaseous ozone flow. Ozone concentration was constant ((6.0±0.6)×10 13 molecule cm -3) during the experiments. Anthracene, phenanthrene and their ozonation products were then extracted by focused microwave-assisted extraction or fluid pressurized extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Anthraquinone and anthrone on the one hand, and 1,1'-biphenyl-2,2'-dicarboxaldehyde on the other hand were identified as the products of anthracene and phenanthrene, respectively and quantified versus time of ozone exposure. This kinetical approach allowed to show that anthraquinone, anthrone and 1,1'-biphenyl-2,2'-dicarboxaldehyde are the primary products of the studied reactions, and to determine their formation yields (respectively, 0.42±0.04, 0.056±0.005 and 1.0±0.4).

  13. The determination and optimization of (rutile) pigment particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A light scattering particle size test which can be used with materials having a broad particle size distribution is described. This test is useful for pigments. The relation between the particle size distribution of a rutile pigment and its optical performance in a gray tint test at low pigment concentration is calculated and compared with experimental data.

  14. Influence of system size on the properties of a fluid adsorbed in a nanopore: Physical manifestations and methodological consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Puibasset, Joël; Kierlik, Edouard Tarjus, Gilles

    2014-07-28

    Hysteresis and discontinuities in the isotherms of a fluid adsorbed in a nanopore in general hamper the determination of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, even in computer simulations. A way around this has been to consider both a reservoir of small size and a pore of small extent in order to restrict the fluctuations of density and approach a classical van der Waals loop. We assess this suggestion by thoroughly studying through Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory the influence of system size on the equilibrium configurations of the adsorbed fluid and on the resulting isotherms. We stress the importance of pore-symmetry-breaking states that even for modest pore sizes lead to discontinuous isotherms and we discuss the physical relevance of these states and the methodological consequences for computing thermodynamic quantities.

  15. Disposition of disodium cromoglycate administered in three particle sizes.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, S H; Taylor, A J; Evans, S; Godfrey, S; Zeidifard, E

    1975-01-01

    1 Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) was administered in three particle sizes to five human subjects. 2 Urinary excretion of DSCG, as a proportion of the dose, was highest following small particles; the lower values recorded following intermediate-sized and large particles were similar. 3 DSCG deposited in the mouth was highest following large particles; the lower values recorded following intermediate-sized and small particles were similar. 4 The data were examined in relation to the recent observation that the protective effect of small particles of DSCG is dramatically superior to that of large particles. PMID:825134

  16. Polymer composite adsorbents using particles of molecularly imprinted polymers or aluminium oxide nanoparticles for treatment of arsenic contaminated waters.

    PubMed

    Önnby, L; Pakade, V; Mattiasson, B; Kirsebom, H

    2012-09-01

    Removal of As(V) by adsorption from water solutions was studied using three different synthetic adsorbents. The adsorbents, (a) aluminium nanoparticles (Alu-NPs, <50 nm) incorporated in amine rich cryogels (Alu-cryo), (b) molecular imprinted polymers (<38 μm) in polyacrylamide cryogels (MIP-cryo) and (c) thiol functionalised cryogels (SH-cryo) were evaluated regarding material characteristics and arsenic removal in batch test and continuous mode. Results revealed that a composite design with particles incorporated in cryogels was a successful means for applying small particles (nano- and micro- scale) in water solutions with maintained adsorption capacity and kinetics. Low capacity was obtained from SH-cryo and this adsorbent was hence excluded from the study. The adsorption capacities for the composites were 20.3 ± 0.8 mg/g adsorbent (Alu-cryo) and 7.9 ± 0.7 mg/g adsorbent (MIP-cryo) respectively. From SEM images it was seen that particles were homogeneously distributed in Alu-cryo and heterogeneously distributed in MIP-cryo. The particle incorporation increased the mechanical stability and the polymer backbones of pure polyacrylamide (MIP-cryo) were of better stability than the amine containing polymer backbone (Alu-cryo). Both composites worked well in the studied pH range of pH 2-8. Adsorption tested in real wastewater spiked with arsenic showed that co-ions (nitrate, sulphate and phosphate) affected arsenic removal for Alu-cryo more than for MIP-cryo. Both composites still adsorbed well in the presence of counter-ions (copper and zinc) present at low concentrations (μg/l). The unchanged and selective adsorption in realistic water observed for MIP-cryo was concluded to be due to a successful imprinting, here controlled using a non-imprinted polymer (NIP). A development of MIP-cryo is needed, considering its low adsorption capacity. PMID:22687522

  17. Modeling and Analysis of the Electrokinetic Mass Transport and Adsorption Mechanisms of a Charged Adsorbate in Capillary Electrochromatography Systems Employing Charged Nonporous Adsorbent Particles.

    PubMed

    Grimes, B. A.; Liapis, A. I.

    2001-02-01

    Mass-transfer systems based on electrokinetic phenomena (i.e., capillary electrochromatography (CEC)) have shown practical potential for becoming powerful separation methods for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. A dynamic mathematical model, consisting of the momentum balance and the Poisson equations, as well as the unsteady-state continuity expressions for the cation and anion of the background electrolyte and of a positively charged analyte (adsorbate), is constructed and solved to determine quantitatively the electroosmotic velocity, the electrostatic potential, the concentration profiles of the charged species in the double layer and in the electroneutral core region of the fluid in the interstitial channels for bulk flow in the packed chromatographic column, and the axial current density profiles as the adsorbate adsorbs onto the negatively charged fixed sites on the surface of the nonporous particles packed in the chromatographic column. The frontal analysis mode of operation is simulated in this work. The results obtained from model simulations provide significant physical insight into and understanding of the development and propagation of the dynamic profile of the concentration of the adsorbate (analyte) and indicate that sharp, highly resolved adsorption fronts and large amounts of adsorbate in the adsorbed phase for a given column length can be obtained under the following conditions: (i) The ratio, gamma(2, 0), of the electroosmotic velocity of the mobile liquid phase at the column entrance after the adsorption front has passed the column entrance to the electrophoretic velocity of the anion is very close to -1. The structure of the equations of the model and model simulations indicate that a stable adsorption front cannot develop when gamma(2, 0) is less than -1 unless the value of the mobility of the cation is less than the value of the mobility of the analyte, which may be a rare occurrence in practical CEC systems. (ii) The ratio of

  18. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P.; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Igathinathane, C.; Miu, P.I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-06-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R2 > 0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced strongly fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 25.4 mm screens and fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  19. Monitoring the particle size in CFB using fuzzy neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.; Chen, H.; Tian, Z.; He, W.

    1999-07-01

    The particle size and particle size distributions (PSDs) affect the performance of a circulating fluidized (CFB) boiler. For improving the efficiency of analysis of particle size to monitor the particle size and particle size distribution, a fuzzy neural network (FNN) model is presented. Because the pressure fluctuant frequency and particle size have some non-linear relationship, the FNN models the relationship between the pressure fluctuant frequencies along CFB boiler height and particle size sampled from CFB boiler by neural network training. A hybrid fuzzy neural network parameter training method is presented to identify the model parameters, which combine the gradient back propagation (BP) algorithm and least square estimation (LSE) algorithm to estimate unknown non-linear parameter and linear parameter respectively. When the FNN training procedure converges, the parameters, which reflect the non-linear relationship between frequency and particle, are determined for a given operational condition of CFB boiler. In operating CFB boilers, the coal particle size at high temperature changes with combustion and its values are unknown, however, pressure fluctuation frequency can be obtained easily. In this case, FNN can predict the particle size and PSDs along the CFB boiler height according to the pressure fluctuation frequency. To validate the FNN model effect of analyzing the particle size, data from experiment are used with fluidized gas velocity equal to 41.82 cm/s. The predictive error of FNN model is 3.839%. It is proved that the model not only identifies the non-linear relationship between particle size and pressure fluctuation frequency with high precision but also can adaptively learn the data information without expert knowledge by adjusting its own parameters. It operates quickly and can satisfy the real-time request of monitoring the particle size and its distribution in CFB boilers.

  20. Preference of food particle size among several urban ant species.

    PubMed

    Hooper-Bùi, Linda M; Appel, Arthur G; Rust, Michael K

    2002-12-01

    Appropriate particle size may be a critical characteristic for effective granular ant baits. We examined the particle size preference of six species of pest ants to an anchovy-based bait. We also examined head capsule widths of Argentine ants, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (mean = 0.54 mm), California harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex californicus (Buckley) (mean = 1.63 mm), red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren (mean = 0.9 mm), and southern fire ants, Solenopsis xyloni McCook (mean = 0.76 mm) and compared them with the first and second most preferred particle size. There were differences between particle size of which the most mass was removed and of which there were more particles removed by ants. California Argentine ants, southern fire ants, and Alabama Argentine ants removed more 840 to 1,000-microm particle mass of the anchovy diet but had more visits to dishes containing 420 to 590 microm particles. California harvester ants and Allegheny mound ants, Formica spp., removed more >2,000 microm particle mass but visited dishes containing 1,000 to 2,000 microm particles more often. Red imported fire ants also removed more >2,000 microm particle mass but visited dishes with 590 to 840-microm particles most often. Pharaoh ants, Monomorium pharaonis (L.), removed and visited 420 to 590-microm particles more than any other size. A linear regression model determined that particle size preferred by each ant species relates to forager head width. The majority of particles of commercial ant bait, including Amdro, Ascend, Award, Bushwhacker, Max Force with fipronil, and old and new formulations of Max Force with hydramethylnon, were 1,000 to 2,000 microm, but the majority of Niban particles were <420 microm. Altering the size of particles of toxic ant baits to fit the particle size preference of each pest ant species may increase the efficacy of ant baits. PMID:12539835

  1. Positive frequency shifts observed upon adsorbing micron-sized solid objects to a quartz crystal microbalance from the liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Pomorska, Agata; Shchukin, Dmitry; Hammond, Richard; Cooper, Matthew A; Grundmeier, Guido; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2010-03-15

    By specifically binding derivatized colloidal particles and physisorbing nonderivatized particles to the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), we have observed positive shifts of frequency, Deltaf, in contrast to the negative frequency shifts typically found in adsorption experiments. Evidently, the Sauerbrey relation does not apply to this situation. A comparison of frequencies shifts and bandwidths on different overtones reveals a coupled resonance: at low overtones, Deltaf is negative, whereas it is positive at high overtones, with maximal resonance bandwidth observed at the crossover point. As predicted by the Dybwad model, the spheres bound to the surface form resonating systems on their own. A composite resonator is formed, consisting of a large crystal with resonance frequency omega and the adsorbed spheres with resonance frequency omega(S). In the case in which the resonance frequency of the small spheres (firmly attached to crystal), omega(S), is higher than the resonance frequency of the crystal, omega, Deltaf of the composite system is negative (leading to the Sauerbrey limit). In the opposite limit (that is, in the case of large adsorbed particles bound to the sensor surface via a sufficiently weak bridge) Deltaf is positive. Such a behavior is known from sphere-plate contacts in the dry state. Finite element calculation demonstrates that this phenomena is also plausible in liquid phase media, with Deltaf critically dependent on the strength of the sphere-plate contact. Operated in this mode, the QCM most likely probes the contact strength, rather than the mass of the particle. PMID:20166672

  2. Process for preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; Micale, F. J.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Kornfeld, D. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Monodisperse latexes having a particle size in the range of 2 to 40 microns are prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization in microgravity. A reaction mixture containing smaller monodisperse latex seed particles, predetermined amounts of monomer, emulsifier, initiator, inhibitor and water is placed in a microgravity environment, and polymerization is initiated by heating. The reaction is allowed to continue until the seed particles grow to a predetermined size, and the resulting enlarged particles are then recovered. A plurality of particle-growing steps can be used to reach larger sizes within the stated range, with enlarge particles from the previous steps being used as seed particles for the succeeding steps. Microgravity enables preparation of particles in the stated size range by avoiding gravity related problems of creaming and settling, and flocculation induced by mechanical shear that have precluded their preparation in a normal gravity environment.

  3. Evaluation of process for sludge particle size reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Precechtel, D.R.; Packer, M.J., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-18

    This document evaluates the available technology for K Basin sludge particle size. The results can be used to demonstrate the sensitivity or lack thereof, of K Basin sludge to available reduction processes and TWRS proposed particle acceptance criteria.

  4. The biological response to nanometre-sized polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiqin; Richards, Laura; Bladen, Catherine L; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John; Tipper, Joanne L

    2015-09-01

    Recently, nanometre-sized UHMWPE particles generated from hip and knee replacements have been identified in vitro and in vivo. UHMWPE particles in the 0.1-1.0μm size range have been shown to be more biologically active than larger particles, provoking an inflammatory response implicated in late aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. The biological activity of nanometre-sized particles has not previously been studied. The biological response to clinically-relevant UHMWPE wear particles including nanometre-sized and micrometre-sized, along with polystyrene particles (FluoSpheres 20nm, 60nm, 200nm and 1.0μm), and nanometre-sized model polyethylene particles (Ceridust 3615®), was determined in terms of osteolytic cytokine release from primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs). Nanometre-sized UHMWPE wear particles, nanometre-sized Ceridust 3615® and 20nm FluoSpheres had no significant effect on TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 release from PBMNCs at a concentration of 100μm(3) particles per cell after 12 and 24h. The micrometre-size UHMWPE wear particles (0.1-1.0μm) and 60nm, 200nm and 1.0μm FluoSpheres caused significantly elevated osteolytic cytokine release from PBMNCs. These results indicated that particles below circa 50nm fail to activate PBMNCs and that particle size, composition and morphology played a crucial role in cytokine release by particle stimulated macrophages. PMID:26004221

  5. Seed particle response and size characterization in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudoff, Roger C.; Bachalo, William D.

    1991-01-01

    The response of seed particles ranging between 0.7 and 8.7 micron is determined using a phase Doppler particle analyzer which simultaneously measures particle size and velocity. The stagnant seed particles are entrained into a high speed free jet at velocities ranging from 40 to 300 m/s. The size-mean axial velocity correlation and size-rms velocity correlations are used to determine the particle response to the sudden acceleration. It was determined that at the lower speeds, seed particles up to approximately 5 microns are adequate, but as velocities approach 300 m/s only particles on the order of one micron are suitable. The ability to determine size and velocity simultaneously is essential if seeding with polydispersions is used since it allows the rejection of data which will not accurately represent the flow field.

  6. Online sizing of pneumatically conveyed particles by acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yonghui; Qian, Xiangchen; Huang, Xiaobin; Gao, Lingjun; Yan, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Accurate determination of particle size distribution is critical to achieving optimal combustion efficiency and minimum pollutant emissions in both biomass and biomass/coal fired power plants. This paper presents an instrumentation system for online continuous measurement of particle size distribution based on acoustic emission (AE) method. Impulsive AE signals arising from impacts of particles with a metallic waveguide protruding into the flow carry information about the particle size. With detailed information about the generation, propagation and detection of impact AE signals, the particle size can be quantitatively characterized. Experimental results obtained with glass beads demonstrate the capability of the system to discriminate particles of different sizes from the recorded AE signals. The system has several appealing features such as online measurement, high sensitivity, simple structure, minimum invasiveness and low cost, which make it well suited for industrial applications.

  7. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles. PMID:21087645

  8. Particle size dependent chemistry from laser ablation of brass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyi; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Sam S; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E

    2005-10-15

    The proportion of zinc and copper in particles formed by laser ablation of brass was found to vary with the particle diameter. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis showed that smaller particles were zinc enhanced while larger particles were composed mostly of copper. A model based on condensation of vapor onto large droplets ejected from a melted liquid layer is proposed to describe the change in particle composition versus size. PMID:16223257

  9. Pitfalls and novel applications of particle sizing by dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Karl; Schmidt, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    After briefly introducing the theoretical equations for DLS based particle size analysis, the need for angular dependent DLS investigations is emphasized to obtain correct particle sizes. Practical examples are given that demonstrate the possible magnitudes of errors in particle size if DLS is measured at one large scattering angle, only, as done by essentially all, most frequently utilized commercial "single angle" particle sizers. The second part is focused on a novel DLS application to sensitively trace (nano)particle interactions with concentrated blood serum or plasma that leads to the formation of large aggregates in a size regime of ≫100 nm. Most likely, such aggregates originate from protein induced bridging of nanoparticles, since it is well known that serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of essentially all nanoparticles utilized in medical applications. Thus, the protein corona around nanoparticles does not only change their biological identity but to a large extend also their size, thus possibly affecting biodistribution and in vivo circulation time. PMID:27179435

  10. Mass transfer rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between micron-size particles and their environment--theoretical estimates.

    PubMed Central

    Gerde, P; Scholander, P

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of how rapidly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorb onto initially clean micron-size particles in the ambient air and how fast these substances are likely to be desorbed from the particles after deposition on the surface lining layer of the lung. Results show that, on the one hand, the very low gas-phase concentrations of PAHs in the ambient air should result in a comparatively slow transfer of such compounds to micron-size particles, a process that may last from minutes to hours. On the other hand, the comparatively high solubilities of PAHs in the lining layer of the lung should promote an almost instantaneous release of PAHs onto nonporous particles, and a release within a matter of minutes of most PAHs reversibly adsorbed onto the interior surfaces of porous particles. Two important conclusions can be drawn from this. First, the PAHs in tobacco smoke do not have time enough to interact in the gas phase with other airborne particles before these agents are inhaled into the smoker's lungs. Therefore, adsorption in the gas phase of PAHs onto asbestos fibers can hardly be a characteristic parameter in the mechanism behind the synergistic effect between tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure for the induction of bronchial cancer. Second, the release rate of reversibly adsorbed PAHs from their carrier particles in the lung seems to be so fast that this cannot be a parameter of importance in directly influencing the residence times of such substances in the lung. PMID:2707206

  11. Mass transfer rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between micron-size particles and their environment--theoretical estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Gerde, P.; Scholander, P.

    1989-02-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of how rapidly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorb onto initially clean micron-size particles in the ambient air and how fast these substances are likely to be desorbed from the particles after deposition on the surface lining layer of the lung. Results show that, on the one hand, the very low gas-phase concentrations of PAHs in the ambient air should result in a comparatively slow transfer of such compounds to micron-size particles, a process that may last from minutes to hours. On the other hand, the comparatively high solubilities of PAHs in the lining layer of the lung should promote an almost instantaneous release of PAHs onto nonporous particles, and a release within a matter of minutes of most PAHs reversibly adsorbed onto the interior surfaces of porous particles. Two important conclusions can be drawn from this. First, the PAHs in tobacco smoke do not have time enough to interact in the gas phase with other airborne particles before these agents are inhaled into the smoker's lungs. Therefore, adsorption in the gas phase of PAHs onto asbestos fibers can hardly be a characteristic parameter in the mechanism behind the synergistic effect between tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure for the induction of bronchial cancer. Second, the release rate of reversibly adsorbed PAHs from their carrier particles in the lung seems to be so fast that this cannot be a parameter of importance in directly influencing the residence times of such substances in the lung.

  12. Particle size distributions of polyaniline-silica colloidal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Armes, S.P. ); Fairhurst, D. ); Emmett, S.N. ); Idzorek, G.; Pigott, T. )

    1992-09-01

    We have characterized a new polyaniline-silica composite colloid by various particle sizing techniques. Our transmission electron microscopy studies have confirmed for the first time an unusual raspberry morphology, with the small silica particles held together by the polyaniline [open quotes]binder[close quotes]. These particles have average diameters in the size range 150-500 nm. Charge-velocity analysis experiments indicated a number-average particle diameter of 300 [plus minus] 80 nm, but only poor statistics were obtained (172 particles counted). Photon correlation spectroscopy studies suggested an intensity-average particle diameter of 380 nm. Disk centrifuge photosedimentometry (DCP) turned out to be our preferred sizing technique for the polyaniline-silica colloids, since it was both quick and reliable and, more importantly, produced the true particle size distribution (PSD) curve with excellent statistics. The DCP data indicated a weight-average and number-average particle diameter of 330 [plus minus] 70 nm and 280 [plus minus] 70 nm, respectively, and moreover confirmed the PSD to be both broad and unimodal. Finally, these colloidal composites were sized using the Malvern Aerosizer. Using this instrument in conjunction with a nebulizer attachment (which allowed particle sizing of the [open quotes]wet[close quotes] dispersion) rather than in the conventional [open quotes]dry powder[close quotes] mode, we obtained particle size data which were in reasonable agreement with the DCP results. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Effects of particle size and chain length on flotation of quaternary ammonium salts onto kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhua, Xu; Yuehua, Hu; Faqin, Dong; Hao, Jiang; Houqin, Wu; Zhen, Wang; Ruohua, Liu

    2015-06-01

    Effects of particle size and chain length on flotation of quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) onto kaolinite have been investigated by flotation tests. Dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) were used as collectors for kaolinite in different particle size fractions (0.075 ~ 0.01 mm, 0.045 ~ 0.075 mm, 0 ~ 0.045 mm). The anomalous flotation behavior of kaolinite have been further explained based on crystal structure considerations by adsorption tests and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results show that the flotation recovery of kaolinite in all different particle size fractions decreases with an increase in pH. As the concentration of collectors increases, the flotation recovery increases. The longer the carbon chain of QAS is, the higher the recoveries of coarse kaolinite (0.075 ~ 0.01 mm and 0.045 ~ 0.075 mm) are. But the flotation recovery of the finest kaolinite (0 ~ 0.045 mm) decreases with chain lengths of QAS collectors increasing, which is consistent with the flotation results of unscreened kaolinite (0 ~ 0.075 mm). It is explained by the froth stability related to the residual concentration of QAS collector in mineral pulp. In lower residual concentration, the froth stability becomes worse. Within the range of flotation collector concentration, it's easy of CTAC to be completely adsorbed by kaolinite in the particle size fraction (0-0.045 mm), which led to lower flotation recovery. Moreover, it is interesting that the coarser particle size of kaolinite is, the higher flotation recovery is. The anomalous flotation behavior of kaolinite is rationalized based on crystal structure considerations. The results of MD simulations show that the (001) kaolinite surface has the strongest interaction with DTAC, compared with the (00 1) face, (010) and (110) edges. On the other hand, when particle size of kaolinite is altered, the number of basal planes and edge planes is changed. It is observed that the finer kaolinite

  14. Size Effects on the Magnetic Properties of Nanoscale Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianping

    Finite size effects on the magnetic properties of nanoscale particles have been studied in this work. The first system studied was MnFe_2O _4 prepared by coprecipitation followed by digestion. The particles were single crystals with an average diameter controllable from 5 nm to 25 nm. These particles have a higher inversion degree of metal ion distribution between the tetrahedral sites and octahedral sites of the spinel structure than those synthesized with ceramic methods. This higher inversion leads to a higher Curie temperature. We found that the structure of the particles can be varied by heat treatment. The Curie temperature of the particles decreased after heat treatment in inert gas, however, it increased after heat treatment in air. The size effects show in two aspects on the MnFe_2O _4 particles. First, the Curie temperature decreased as particles size was reduced, which was explained by finite size scaling. Second, the saturation magnetization decreased as particle size decreased because of the existence of a nonmagnetic layer on the surface of MnFe_2 O_4 particles. The second system studied was Co particles synthesized with an inverse micelle technique. The particles were small (1-5 nm) and had a narrow size distribution. The Co particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and showed a set of consistent magnetic data in magnetic moment per particle, coercivity, and blocking temperature. We found the anisotropy constant and saturation magnetization of Co particles had a strong size dependence. The anisotropy constant was above the bulk value of Co and increased as particle size decreased. The saturation magnetization increased as the particle became smaller. The magnetic properties of Co particles also strongly suggested a core/shell structure in each particle. But no physical inhomogeneity was observed. We have also studied ligand effects on the magnetic properties of Co particles. The magnetization of the Co particles was quenched by 36%, 27

  15. The heterogeneous ozonation of pesticides adsorbed on mineral particles: Validation of the experimental setup with trifluralin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflieger, Maryline; Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran; Nieto, Laura; Wortham, Henri

    2011-12-01

    In this study, an experimental device adapted for the investigation of organic compounds with both low and high reactivity towards gaseous ozone is presented. The heterogeneous reactions were performed in a round-bottom flask connected to a rotary evaporator specially adapted to this purpose. The extract of the remaining compound on silica particles was filtered and analysed using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography with a UV detector. The kinetic was determined by following the consumption of the organic (dark, T = 26 °C, RH < 1%). The herbicide trifluralin was chosen as a test compound since its heterogeneous ozonation has already been studied in a previous work ( Pflieger et al., 2009b). The obtained kinetic data was fitted by both the modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood ( kmax' = 4.6 (±7.4) × 10 -4 s -1 and KO3 = 2.4 (±4.2) × 10 -16 cm 3) and Eley-Rideal ( kO3/ER = 1.05 (±0.06) × 10 -19 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1) patterns, even though this latter seems to be the most consistent model. These results confirmed that the heterogeneous reactivity of trifluralin with O 3 is very slow in the atmosphere and lead to the formation of adsorbed degradation products. Moreover, our kinetic constants are in reasonable agreement (factor 3) to the one obtained in the previous study using flow tubes. Finally, our simple alternative device offers the possibility of increasing the number of heterogeneous process investigations, which constitutes an absolute necessity for issues of the environmental fate of pesticides.

  16. [Intraoperative chemotherapy against peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer with intraperitoneal activated carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, A; Takahashi, T; Sawai, K; Yamaguchi, T; Iwamoto, A; Yoneyama, C

    1989-02-01

    For prevention and therapy of peritoneal dissemination, a new dosage from (MMC-CH) comprising carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C was given to 44 patients (the MMC-CH group) undergoing gastrectomy for gastric cancer, of which advancing stage was classified into the category of H0, and S2 or S3, and P0, P1, P2 or P3 according to the General Rules for the Gastric Cancer Study. MMC-CH, principally at 50 mg person in terms of mitomycin C was administered intraperitoneally before the surgical wound was closed. Historical control group was composed of 53 patients not given MMC-CH, who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer in the same advancing stage as those of the 44 patients. There was statistically no significant difference of age, sex, depth of infiltration, macroscopically and microscopically defined progression of lymph-nodal metastases, between the MMC-CH group and the historical control group. The survival rate of the overall patients, and each group of the patients with the lesion defined as P0, P1, P2, or P3 was compared with Kaplan-Meier's method between the MMC-CH group and the historical control group. In the MMC-CH group, the survival rates of the overall patients and the patients with P0, P1, or P2 lesion were statistically significantly higher than those in the historical control group. However, the rate of the P3 patients in the MMC-CH group was statistically significantly lower than in the historical control group. PMID:2493221

  17. Graphene-enhanced visible-light photocatalysis of large-sized CdS particles for wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid composites of graphene decorated by large-sized CdS particles (G/M-CdS) were prepared by a one-pot solvothermal route in which the reduction of graphite oxide into graphene was accompanied by the generation of microsized CdS particles. The structure and composition of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CdS particles with the average sizes of approximately 640 nm were formed on graphene sheets. The as-prepared composite was used as adsorbent to remove dye from wastewater using the organic dye Rhodamine B as the adsorbate. The G/M-CdS composite reveals a high photodegradation rate under visible light irradiation. Our results demonstrate that the G/M-CdS is very promising for removing organic dyes from wastewater. PMID:24666436

  18. Graphene-enhanced visible-light photocatalysis of large-sized CdS particles for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei; Chen, Jie; Wu, Yao; Duan, Lianfeng; Yang, Yue; Ge, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid composites of graphene decorated by large-sized CdS particles (G/M-CdS) were prepared by a one-pot solvothermal route in which the reduction of graphite oxide into graphene was accompanied by the generation of microsized CdS particles. The structure and composition of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CdS particles with the average sizes of approximately 640 nm were formed on graphene sheets. The as-prepared composite was used as adsorbent to remove dye from wastewater using the organic dye Rhodamine B as the adsorbate. The G/M-CdS composite reveals a high photodegradation rate under visible light irradiation. Our results demonstrate that the G/M-CdS is very promising for removing organic dyes from wastewater. PMID:24666436

  19. Graphene-enhanced visible-light photocatalysis of large-sized CdS particles for wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Wei; Chen, Jie; Wu, Yao; Duan, Lianfeng; Yang, Yue; Ge, Xin

    2014-03-01

    The hybrid composites of graphene decorated by large-sized CdS particles (G/M-CdS) were prepared by a one-pot solvothermal route in which the reduction of graphite oxide into graphene was accompanied by the generation of microsized CdS particles. The structure and composition of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CdS particles with the average sizes of approximately 640 nm were formed on graphene sheets. The as-prepared composite was used as adsorbent to remove dye from wastewater using the organic dye Rhodamine B as the adsorbate. The G/M-CdS composite reveals a high photodegradation rate under visible light irradiation. Our results demonstrate that the G/M-CdS is very promising for removing organic dyes from wastewater.

  20. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  1. A model for the prediction of droplet size in Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged particles.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Trivikram; Mani, Ethayaraja; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2014-08-12

    Colloidal particles irreversibly adsorb at fluid-fluid interfaces stabilizing what are commonly called "Pickering" emulsions and foams. A simple geometrical model, the limited coalescence model, was earlier proposed to estimate droplet sizes in emulsions. This model assumes that all of the particles are effective in stabilization. The model predicts that the average emulsion drop size scales inversely with the total number of particles, confirmed qualitatively with experimental data on Pickering emulsions. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in synthesizing emulsions with oppositely charged particles (OCPs). In our experimental study, we observed that the drop size varies nonmonotonically with the number ratio of oppositely charged colloids, even when a fixed total number concentration of colloids is used, showing a minimum. We develop a mathematical model to predict this dependence of drop size on number ratio in such a mixed particle system. The proposed model is based on the hypothesis that oppositely charged colloids form stable clusters due to the strong electrostatic attraction between them and that these clusters are the effective stabilizing agents. The proposed model is a two-parameter model, parameters being the ratio of effective charge of OCPs (denoted as k) and the size of the aggregate containing X particles formed due to aggregation of OCPs. Because the size of aggregates formed during emulsification is not directly measurable, we use suitable values of parameters k and X to best match the experimental observations. The model predictions are in qualitative agreement with experimentally observed nonmonotonic variation of droplet sizes. Using experiments and theory, we present a physical insight into the formation of OCP stabilized Pickering emulsions. Our model upgrades the existing Wiley's limited coalescence model as applied to emulsions containing a binary mixture of oppositely charged particles. PMID:25054284

  2. Hydrodynamic model for particle size segregation in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Leonardo; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2003-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theoretical model for “Brazil nut” size segregation in granular materials. We give analytical solutions for the rise velocity of a large intruder particle immersed in a medium of monodisperse fluidized small particles. We propose a new mechanism for this particle size-segregation due to buoyant forces caused by density variations which come from differences in the local “granular temperature”. The mobility of the particles is modified by the energy dissipation due to inelastic collisions and this leads to a different behavior from what one would expect for an elastic system. Using our model we can explain the size ratio dependence of the upward velocity.

  3. Synthesis of poly(aminopropyl/methyl)silsesquioxane particles as effective Cu(II) and Pb(II) adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Yin, Qiangfeng; Xin, Zhong; Li, Yang; Han, Ting

    2011-11-30

    Poly(aminopropyl/methyl)silsesquioxane (PAMSQ) particles have been synthesized by a one-step hydrolytic co-condensation process using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) as precursors in the presence of base catalyst in aqueous medium. The amino functionalities of the particles could be controlled by adjusting the organosilanes feed ratio. The compositions of the amino-functionalized polysilsesquioxanes were confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy, solid-state (29)Si NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The strong adsorbability of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions onto PAMSQ particles was systematically examined. The effect of adsorption time, initial metal ions concentration and pH of solutions was studied to optimize the metal ions adsorbability of PAMSQ particles. The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption process well fits the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Adsorption phenomena appeared to follow Langmuir isotherm. The PAMSQ particles demonstrate the highest Cu(II) and Pb(II) adsorption capacity of 2.29 mmol/g and 1.31 mmol/g at an initial metal ions concentration of 20mM, respectively. The PAMSQ particles demonstrate a promising application in the removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:21945683

  4. Stability and size of particle pairs in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A. V.; Kompaneets, R.; Morfill, G.

    2014-11-15

    Particle pairing in a complex plasma was experimentally studied with the emphasis on pair spatial extent and stability. Micron-size particles were suspended in the (pre)sheath area above the lower electrode in a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge in argon. They formed vertical pairs due to the ion wakes created by the flow of ions past particles. We discuss the confinement mechanism for the lower particle, resulting from a combination of the wake field and the field of non-uniform sheath. A model of particle pairs is proposed, which provides good description for the dependence of pair size and stability on experimental parameters.

  5. Acoustic measurements of clay-size particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of sediment concentration is important in the study of streams and rivers. The work presented explores using high frequency (20 MHz) acoustic signal attenuation to measure the concentration of fine sediment particles (0.2-5.0 microns) in a fluvial environment. A small laboratory tank with...

  6. Influence of particle size on diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Z J; Zou, X W; Zhang, W B; Jin, Z Z

    1999-11-01

    The influence of particle size on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) has been investigated by computer simulations. For DLA clusters consisting of two kinds of particles with different sizes, when large particles are in the minority, the patterns of clusters appear asymmetrical and nonuniform, and their fractal dimensions D(f) increase compared with one-component DLA. With increasing size of large particles, D(f) increases. This increase can be attributed to two reasons: one is that large particles become new growth centers; the other is the big masses of large particles. As the concentration ratio x(n) of large particles increases, D(f) will reach a maximum value D(f(m)) and then decrease. When x(n) exceeds a certain value, the morphology and D(f) of the two-component DLA clusters are similar to those of one-component DLA clusters. PMID:11970534

  7. A hybrid mathematical model for controlling particle size, particle size distribution, and color properties of toner particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataeefard, Maryam; Shadman, Alireza; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadi, Yousef

    2016-08-01

    A mathematical modeling approach was proposed combining the capabilities of response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF) and implemented successfully in production of printing toner particles. Toner powders were systematically synthesized through suspension copolymerization process. Applying RSM, a series of experiments were designed and toner particles were prepared and the effects of monomer ratio, colorant and surfactant content on the particle size (PS), particle size distribution (PSD), thermal and colorimetric properties (∆ E) of the resulting toner were monitored and discussed. The second-order models corresponding to each target characteristic, i.e., PS, PSD, and ∆ E of different types of toner powders, were obtained by individual optimization to express variation of each property in terms of polymerization parameters. Applying statistical calculations, the best reduced models were identified to be fed in the second step of optimization. Since toners with appropriate PS, PSD, and CP were needed, we applied multi-objective optimization based on DF approach. The results show that exact tuning of toner properties is closely possible with the aid of hybrid mathematical model developed in this work. Noticeably, desirabilities are very close to 100 %.

  8. Laser Doppler spectrometer method of particle sizing. [for air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, F. N.

    1976-01-01

    A spectrometer for the detection of airborne particulate pollution in the submicron size range is described. In this device, airborne particles are accelerated through a supersonic nozzle, with different sizes achieving different velocities in the gas flow. Information about the velocities of the accelerated particles is obtained with a laser-heterodyne optical system through the Doppler shift of light scattered from the particles. Detection is accomplished by means of a photomultiplier. Nozzle design and signal processing techniques are also discussed.

  9. The role of particle-size soil fractions in the adsorption of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandzhieva, Saglara; Minkina, Tatiana; Pinsky, David; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Kalinitchenko, Valeriy; Sushkova, Svetlana; Chaplygin, Viktor; Dikaev, Zaurbek; Startsev, Viktor; Bakoev, Serojdin

    2014-05-01

    Ion-exchange adsorption phenomena are important in the immobilization of heavy metals (HMs) by soils. Numerous works are devoted to the study of this problem. However, the interaction features of different particle-size soil fractions and their role in the immobilization of HMs studied insufficiently. Therefore, the assessment of the effect of the particle-size distribution on the adsorption properties of soils is a vital task. The parameters of Cu2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption by chernozems of the south of Russia and their particle-size fractions were studied. In the particle-size fractions separated from the soils, the concentrations of Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2 decreased with the decreasing particle size. The parameters of the adsorption values of k (the constant of the affinity)and Cmax.(the maximum adsorption of the HMs) characterizing the adsorption of HMs by the southern chernozem and its particle-size fractions formed the following sequence: silt > clay > entire soil. The adsorption capacity of chernozems for Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+ depending on the particle-size distribution decreased in the following sequence: clay loamy ordinary chernozem clay loamy southern chernozem> loamy southern chernozem> loamy sandy southern chernozem. According to the parameters of the adsorption by the different particle-size fractions, the heavy metal cations form a sequence analogous to that obtained for the entire soils: Cu2+ ≥ Pb2+ > Zn2+. The parameters of the heavy metal adsorption by similar particle-size fractions separated from different soils decreased in the following order: clay loamy chernozem> loamy chernozem> loamy sandy chernozem. The analysis of the changes in the parameters of the Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+ adsorption by the studied soils and their particle-size fractions showed that the extensive adsorption characteristic - the maximum adsorption (Cmax.) - is a less sensitive parameter characterizing the adsorption capacity of the soils than the intensive characteristic of

  10. Suppression of alveolar macrophage membrane receptor-mediated phagocytosis by model and actual particle-adsorbate complexes. Initial contact with the alveolar macrophage membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, G J; Risby, T H; Sehnert, S S; Hmieleski, R R; Farrington, J E

    1990-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages were treated with carbon blacks and adsorbates in order to evaluate the biologic effect of adsorbate, adsorbent and adsorbate-adsorbent complexes. Their capacity to phagocytize a subsequent challenge via the Fc-membrane receptor was quantified. Phagocytosis was suppressed in a dose-related manner with increasing concentrations of both carbon blacks and adsorbates. Carbon black N339 covered with 0.5 monolayers of the adsorbates suppressed phagocytosis more than N339 without the adsorbates. Increasing the adsorbate acrolein coverage from 0.5 to greater than 2.0 monolayers suppressed phagocytosis in a dose-related manner. Finally, samples of diesel particulate matter collected from an engine operated on a pure hydrocarbon fuel with various oxidizers, air (PSU #1) and an oxidizer free of nitrogen (N-free) were tested. Treatment of the macrophages with PSU #1 had a negligible effect on phagocytosis whereas the N-free sample suppressed phagocytosis in a dose-related manner. The data show that alveolar macrophage Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis is affected by: carbon black and adsorbate identity and concentration, coverage of the carbon black with adsorbates, and the oxidizer used in the generation of particles emitted by a diesel engine. Images FIGURE 6. PMID:2401270

  11. Particle Size: A sediment tracing challenge or opportunity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Evrard, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Tracing sediment back to their sources with biogeochemical fingerprints involves multiple assumptions. One of the most fundamental assumptions is the conservative behavior of tracer properties during sediment generation, transportation, and deposition processes. Essentially, the biogeochemical fingerprints used to trace sediment must remain constant, or conservative, during these erosion processes, or they must vary in a predictable way. At the core of this assumption of conservative behavior are potential particle size impacts. Owing to the significance of particle size for sediment tracing research, we believe it is important to present an overview of past and present techniques used to address particle size, along with possibilities for future research. The two primary approaches utilized to address particle size impacts are fractionation (e.g., <10μm and <63μm fractions) and corrections (e.g. specific surface area), with both approaches often used simultaneously. The effectiveness of fractionation and corrections to address particle size has received increasing attention, testing fundamental assumptions central to the applicability of sediment tracing and fingerprinting. Alternative approaches to addressing particle size have also been presented. For example, researchers applying the tributary tracing approach or sampling sediment generated directly on hillslopes may potentially address particle size impacts in their sampling design. Although these approaches have been presented in the literature, their effectiveness has yet to be determined. For the future, we boldly suggest that there are likely situations where particle size may be potentially used as a fingerprint in and of itself. Indeed, potential particle size impacts are directly related to the biogeochemical fingerprints used to trace sediments and we believe that there is a fantastic opportunity to obtain further sediment source information through comprehensively investigating and unravelling

  12. Machine vision based particle size and size distribution determination of airborne dust particles of wood and bark pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Igathinathane, C; Pordesimo, L.O.

    2009-08-01

    Dust management strategies in industrial environment, especially of airborne dust, require quantification and measurement of size and size distribution of the particles. Advanced specialized instruments that measure airborne particle size and size distribution apply indirect methods that involve light scattering, acoustic spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. In this research, we propose a simple and direct method of airborne dust particle dimensional measurement and size distribution analysis using machine vision. The method involves development of a user-coded ImageJ plugin that measures particle length and width and analyzes size distribution of particles based on particle length from high-resolution scan images. Test materials were airborne dust from soft pine wood sawdust pellets and ground pine tree bark pellets. Subsamples prepared by dividing the actual dust using 230 mesh (63 m) sieve were analyzed as well. A flatbed document scanner acquired the digital images of the dust particles. Proper sampling, layout of dust particles in singulated arrangement, good contrast smooth background, high resolution images, and accurate algorithm are essential for reliable analysis. A halo effect around grey-scale images ensured correct threshold limits. The measurement algorithm used Feret s diameter for particle length and pixel-march technique for particle width. Particle size distribution was analyzed in a sieveless manner after grouping particles according to their distinct lengths, and several significant dimensions and parameters of particle size distribution were evaluated. Results of the measurement and analysis were presented in textual and graphical formats. The developed plugin was evaluated to have a dimension measurement accuracy in excess of 98.9% and a computer speed of analysis of <8 s/image. Arithmetic mean length of actual wood and bark pellets airborne dust particles were 0.1138 0.0123 and 0.1181 0.0149 mm, respectively. The airborne dust particles of

  13. Planar particle/droplet size measurement technique using digital particle image velocimetry image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P. (Inventor); Mielke, Amy F. (Inventor); Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for determining a mass flux of an entrained phase in a planar two-phase flow records images of particles in the two-phase flow. Respective sizes of the particles (the entrained phase) are determined as a function of a separation between spots identified on the particle images. Respective velocities of the particles are determined. The mass flux of the entrained phase is determined as a function of the size and velocity of the particles.

  14. The Size of Gelatin Sponge Particles: Differences with Preparation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumori, Tetsuya Kasahara, Toshiyuki

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To assess whether the size distribution of gelatin sponge particles differed according to the method used to make them and the type of original sheet. Methods. Gelatin sponge particles of approximately 1-1.5 x 1-1.5 x 2 mm were made from either Spongel or Gelfoam sheets by cutting with a scalpel and scissors. Particles were also made of either Spongel or Gelfoam sheets by pumping with two syringes and a three-way stopcock. The size distribution of the particles in saline was compared among the groups. Results. (1) Cutting versus pumping: When Spongel was used, cutting produced lower rates of smaller particles {<=}500 {mu}m and larger particles >2000 {mu}m compared with pumping back and forth 30 times (1.1% vs 37.6%, p < 0.0001; 2.2% vs 14.4%, p = 0.008). When Gelfoam was used, cutting produced lower rates of smaller and larger particles compared with pumping (8.5% vs 20.4%, p = 0.1809; 0% vs 48.1%, p < 0.0001). (2) Spongel versus Gelfoam: There was no significant difference in the size distribution of the particles between Spongel and Gelfoam (p = 0.2002) when cutting was used. Conclusion. The size distribution of gelatin sponge particles differed according to the method used to make them. More uniform particle sizes can be achieved by cutting than by pumping.

  15. Effects of particle size distribution in thick film conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of particle size distribution in thick film conductors are discussed. The distribution of particle sizes does have an effect on fired film density but the effect is not always positive. A proper distribution of sizes is necessary, and while the theoretical models can serve as guides to selecting this proper distribution, improved densities can be achieved by empirical variations from the predictions of the models.

  16. Determination of surface-adsorbed excipients of various types on drug particles prepared by antisolvent precipitation using HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anne; Elema, Michiel Ringkjøbing; Hansen, Tue; Müllertz, Anette; Hovgaard, Lars

    2007-08-15

    A common challenge in the development of new drug substances is poor dissolution characteristics related to low aqueous solubility. One approach to overcome this problem is antisolvent precipitation in the presence of polymers or surfactants, which may enhance the dissolution rate through reduced particle size and increased wettability. In this study, a simple method based on size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) was developed for the determination of polymers and surfactants adsorbed to drug particles prepared by antisolvent precipitation of the poorly water-soluble model drug Lu 28-179. Detection of many polymeric excipients and surfactants is problematic due to the lack of UV-absorbing chromophores, but ELSD proved successful for the direct determination of the investigated compounds. A mixed mode column was used to effectively separate each of the excipient structures from the drug. The mobile phase comprised acetonitrile-ammonium formate (20mM; pH 6.5) (50:50, v/v) at a flow-rate of 0.6 ml/min. Qualification studies showed that the method was adequately sensitive and precise with limits of detection between 0.72 and 4.32 microg/ml. Linearity of the calibration curves was achieved by log-log modelling. The method was applied for determination of nine polymeric excipients and surfactants adsorbed to particles of the model drug. The extent of excipient adsorption varied between 0.07 and 1.39% (w/w) of the total particle weight. PMID:17531425

  17. Particle size and particle-particle interactions on tensile properties and reinforcement of corn flour particles in natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renewable corn flour has a significant reinforcement effect in natural rubber. The corn flour was hydrolyzed and microfluidized to reduce its particle size. Greater than 90% of the hydrolyzed corn flour had an average size of ~300 nm, a reduction of 33 times compared to unhydrolyzed corn flour. Comp...

  18. The vertical distribution of Martian aerosol particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    Using approximately 410 limb-viewing observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), we retrieve the vertical distribution of Martian dust and water ice aerosol particle sizes. We find that dust particles have an effective radius of 1.0 µm over much of the atmospheric column below 40 km throughout the Martian year. This includes the detached tropical dust layers detected in previous studies. Little to no variation with height is seen in dust particle size. Water ice clouds within the aphelion cloud belt exhibit a strong sorting of particle size with height, however, and the effective radii range from >3 µm below 20 km to near 1.0 µm at 40 km altitude. Conversely, water ice clouds in the seasonal polar hoods show a near-uniform particle size with an effective radius of approximately 1.5 µm throughout the atmospheric column.

  19. Particle size and shape distributions of hammer milled pine

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, Tyler Lott; Matthews, Austin Colter; Williams, Christopher Luke; Ryan, John Chadron Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Particle size and shape distributions impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen sizes in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Both materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the distributions of the particle sizes and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle size and shape distributions. This milestone was met on schedule.

  20. Particle size measurement in intravenous fluids.

    PubMed

    Haines-Nutt, R F; Munton, T J

    1984-08-01

    The level of particulate contamination in a range of large volume injections has been measured using electrical resistance (Coulter) and light blockage (HIAC) techniques. Particle counts showed large variations between the two techniques and although a correlation could be shown for ionic solutions no such correlation could be found for sugar containing solutions. Shape factors alone cannot explain these discrepancies but other differences fundamental to the physics of the two measuring techniques play an important part. We conclude that results obtained using one technique cannot be correlated, theoretically or actually, with those obtained from the other technique. PMID:6148396

  1. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  2. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwa-Min; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Bonghwan

    2016-09-01

    Using an ultrasound-assisted sol-gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  3. [Intraoperative chemotherapy with intraperitoneal activated carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C against peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, A; Takahashi, T; Sasabe, T; Itoh, M; Kondoh, S; Seiki, K; Yoneyama, C; Shimotsuma, M; Hagiwara, A; Yamaguchi, T

    1989-08-01

    A new form of dosage (MMC-CH) was composed of activated carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C. Intraperitoneal administration of MMC-CH was tested clinically for prophylactic and therapeutic effects on peritoneal carcinomatosis of gastric cancer. The criteria of MMC-CH's administration were equal or less than 70 years old, more than 40 kg in body weight, no disfunction of liver and kidney, no particular findings in electrocardiography, S2 or S3 in the grade of serosal invasion, P0, P1, P2 or P3 in the grade of peritoneal dissemination, according to the General Rules for the Gastric Cancer Study in Surgery and Pathology by the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer. MMC-CH was given to 44 patients undergoing gastrectomy for gastric cancer in our department from 1985 to 1988. The 44 patients were composed of 12 patients with P0 findings (P0 patients), 8 patients with P1 findings (P1 patients), 12 patients with P2 findings (P2 patients), and 12 patients with P3 findings (P3 patients). MMC-CH at 50 mg/person in terms of mitomycin C was administered intraperitoneally before the operation wound was closed. Fifty-seven patients in our department from 1983 to 1987 for whom the same criteria were applicable and did not receive MMC-CH therapy, served as the control group. The 57 patients were composed of 23 P0 patients, 21 P1 patients, 10 P2 patients, and 3 P3 patients. There was statistically with chi 2 test no significant difference of age, sex, depth of infiltration macroscopically and microscopically defined progression of lymph-nodal metastases between the MMC-CH group and the control group. Survival rate was calculated with Kaplan-Meier's method in the overall patients in each of the MMC-CH group or the control group. The overall survival rate in the MMC-CH group was statistically significantly (p less than 0.01-0.05) higher from day 460 to day 552 and from day 736 to day 800 than that in the control group. Next, the patients were classified into two subgroups

  4. Saturn's rings - Particle size distributions for thin layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Marouf, E. A.; Tyler, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    A model incorporating limited interaction between the incident energy and particles in the ring is considered which appears to be consistent with the multiple scattering process in Saturn's rings. The model allows for the small physical thickness of the rings and can be used to relate Voyager 1 observations of 3.6- and 13-cm wavelength microwave scatter from the rings to the ring particle size distribution function for particles with radii ranging from 0.001 to 20 m. This limited-scatter model yields solutions for particle size distribution functions for eight regions in the rings, which exhibit approximately inverse-cubic power-law behavior.

  5. Backscattering measurements of micron-sized spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Brendan M; Heinson, Yuli W; Maughan, Justin B; Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Sorensen, Christopher M

    2016-04-20

    An apparatus was designed and assembled to measure scattered light in the range of 180°±6° where enhanced backscattering, the cause of a glory, occurs. The apparatus was calibrated and tested using Fraunhofer circular aperture diffraction, angle of incidence correction, and a diffuse reflector. Theory indicates that backscattering is strongly dependent on particle size, refractive index, and shape. Experimental measurements from polystyrene latex spheres of two sizes and water droplets showed good agreement with Mie theory, but also indicated the extreme sensitivity of the backscattering to particle parameters. The results presented should have use in the fields of particle scattering, particle metrology, and LIDAR. PMID:27140090

  6. Cytotoxicity evaluation of ceramic particles of different sizes and shapes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akiko; Honma, Rieko; Sumita, Masae; Hanawa, Takao

    2004-02-01

    When artificial hip or knee joints are implanted in the human body, they release metallic, ceramic, and polymeric debris into the surrounding tissues. The toxicity of the released particles is of two types: chemical, caused by the released soluble ions and monomers, and mechanical, a result of mechanical stimulation produced by the insoluble particles. In this study, the cytotoxicity of particles of TiO2, Al2O3, ZrO2, Si3N4, and SiC for murine fibroblasts and macrophages were examined to evaluate just their mechanical toxicity because these particles are not expected to release soluble metal ions. Different sizes and shapes of TiO2 particles were used to evaluate the effect of size and shape on particle cytotoxicity. The results suggest that the cytotoxicity of ceramic particles does not depend on their chemical species. Cytotoxicity levels were lower than those of corresponding metal ions, indicating that the mechanical toxicity of particles is lower than the chemical toxicity of released soluble ions and monomers. The differences in size did not affect the mechanical toxicity of these particles. The dendritic particles had a higher cytotoxicity level for macrophages than did spindle and spheric particles. PMID:14704966

  7. Wastewater treatment by batch adsorption method onto micro-particles of dried Withania frutescens plant as a new adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Chiban, Mohamed; Soudani, Amina; Sinan, Fouad; Persin, Michel

    2012-03-01

    A new adsorbent for removing metallic elements, nitrate and phosphate ions from municipal and industrial wastewaters has been investigated. This new adsorbent consists of micro-particles of dried Withania frutescens plant (<500 μm). Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the removal of metallic elements and anions from raw wastewaters by W. frutescens particles. The results show that the micro-particles of W. frutescens plant presented a good adsorption of metallic elements, nitrate and phosphate ions from both real wastewaters. This adsorption increased with increasing of contact time. The percentage of metallic elements removal from industrial wastewater by W. frutescens plant was 98 ≈ 99% for Pb(II), 92 ≈ 93% for Cd(II), 91 ≈ 92% for Cu(II) and 92 ≈ 93% for Zn(II). The maximum adsorption capacity was dependent on the type of ions. The results also indicate that the values of chemical oxygen demand (COD) decrease after the contact with W. frutescens particles. Based on the results it can be concluded that the dried W. frutescens plant appears to be an economical and environmentally friendly material for wastewater treatment. PMID:21803480

  8. Cytotoxicity of Metal and Ceramic Particles in Different Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Morita, Masafumi; Mishina, Hiroshi

    The wear debris caused by joint prosthesis is well known to induce an inflammation in the peripheral tissue. The authors carried out two kinds of experiments, to clarify the phagocytable size of wear particles and the cytotoxicity of macrophage related to the size and materials. The test materials were Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2 fine particles and Ti-6Al-4V, Co-28Cr-6Mo wear particles. The results showed that the phagocytable particle size was less than 11.9±11.2µm. It appears that the cytotoxicity did not depend on the particle size, even if the particles were phagocytable size. In the relationship between material type and inflammation, damage levels were found to be different between SiO2 and TiO2 particles, even if neither material released metal ions. The cells were damaged more severely by SiO2 particles than by Co-28Cr-6Mo for which the eluted ion could not be ignored (damage levels; SiO2>Co-28Cr-6Mo>Ti-6Al-4V>Al2O3≧TiO2). For these reasons, it was confirmed that there was a factor in addition to the toxicity of the eluted metal ion (i. e., the implant material's corrosion resistance ability), which influenced the inflammation.

  9. Evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor. [Volumetric size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    The Malvern 2200/3300 Particle Sizer is a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. The instrument is designed to analyze particle sizes in the range of 1 to 1800 microns diameter through a selection of lenses for the receiving optics. It is not a single-particle counter but rather an ensemble averager over the distribution of particles present in the measuring volume. Through appropriate measurement techniques, the instrument can measure the volumetric size distribution of: solids in gas or liquid suspension; liquid droplets in gas or other immiscible liquids; and, gas bubbles in liquid. (Malvern Handbook, Version 1.5). This report details a limited laboratory evaluation of the Malvern system to determine its operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) wer also tested. The characteristic size parameter from the Malvern system for each of these samples was compared with the results of a Coulter particle counter (Model TA II) analysis to determine the size measurement accuracy. Most of the particulate samples were suspended in a liquid media (water or isoton, plus a dispersant) for the size characterization. Specifically, the investigations contained in this report fall into four categories: (a) Sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration studies, (b) studies testing the applicability to aerosols, (c) tests of the manufacturer supplied software, and (d) size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. 5 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Particle sizing experiments with the laser Doppler velocimeter: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Giel, T.V. Jr.; Son, J.Y.

    1988-06-01

    Measurement techniques for in-situ simultaneous measurements of particle size distributions and particle velocities using the dual beam laser Doppler velocimeter (LV) were analytically and experimentally investigated. This investigation examined the different signal characteristics of the LV for determination of particle size and particle velocity, simultaneously. The different size related signal components were evaluated not only singularly but also as simultaneous measurements to determine which characteristic, or combination of characteristics, provided the best measure of particle size. The evaluation concentrated on the 0.5 to 5 ..mu..m particle size range, in which the LV light scattering characteristics are complex often non-monotonic functions of the particle size as well as functions of index of refraction, the laser light wavelength, laser intensity and polarization, and the location and response characteristics of the detector. Different components of the LV signal were considered, but analysis concentrated on Doppler phase, visibility and scatter-intensity because they show the greatest promise. These signals characteristics were initially defined analytically for numerous optical configurations over the 0.5 to 5 ..mu..m diameter range with 0.1 ..mu..m segmentation, for refractive index values from 1.0 to 3.0 with absorptive (imaginary) components varied form 0 to 1.0. Collector orientation and effective f/No., as well as fringe spacing, beam polarization and wavelength, were varied in this analytical evaluation. 18 refs., 42 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Particle size distributions in the Eastern Mediterranean troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Birmili, W.; Stock, M.; Wehner, B.; Massling, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2008-11-01

    Atmospheric particle size distributions were measured on Crete island, Greece in the Eastern Mediterranean during an intensive field campaign between 28 August and 20 October, 2005. Our instrumentation combined a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and measured number size distributions in the size range 0.018 μm 10 μm. Four time periods with distinct aerosol characteristics were discriminated, two corresponding to marine and polluted air masses, respectively. In marine air, the sub-μm size distributions showed two particle modes centered at 67 nm and 195 nm having total number concentrations between 900 and 2000 cm-3. In polluted air masses, the size distributions were mainly unimodal with a mode typically centered at 140 nm, with number concentrations varying between 1800 and 2900 cm-3. Super-μm particles showed number concentrations in the range from 0.01 to 2.5 cm-3 without any clear relation to air mass origin. A small number of short-lived particle nucleation events were recorded, where the calculated particle formation rates ranged between 1.1 1.7 cm-3 s-1. However, no particle nucleation and growth events comparable to those typical for the continental boundary layer were observed. Particles concentrations (Diameter <50 nm) were low compared to continental boundary layer conditions with an average concentration of 300 cm-3. The production of sulfuric acid and its subsequently condensation on preexisting particles was examined with the use of a simplistic box model. These calculations suggested that the day-time evolution of the Aitken particle population was governed mainly by coagulation and that particle formation was absent during most days.

  12. Particle size distributions in the Eastern Mediterranean troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Birmili, W.; Stock, M.; Wehner, B.; Massling, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2008-04-01

    Atmospheric particle size distributions were measured on Crete island, Greece in the Eastern Mediterranean during an intensive field campaign between 28 August and 20 October 2005. Our instrumentation combined a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and measured number size distributions in the size range 0.018 μm-10 μm. Four time periods with distinct aerosol characteristics were discriminated, two corresponding to marine and polluted air masses, respectively. In marine air, the sub-μm size distributions showed two particle modes centered at 67 nm and 195 nm having total number concentrations between 900 and 2000 cm-3. In polluted air masses, the size distributions were mainly unimodal with a mode typically centered at 140 nm, with number concentrations varying between 1800 and 2900 cm-3. Super-μm particles showed number concentrations in the range from 0.01 to 2.5 cm-3 without any clear relation to air mass origin. A small number of short-lived particle nucleation events were recorded, where the calculated particle formation rates ranged between 1.1-1.7 cm-3 s-1. However, no particle nucleation and growth events comparable to those typical for the continental boundary layer were observed. Particles concentrations (Diameter <50 nm) were low compared to continental boundary layer conditions with an average concentration of 300 cm-3. The production of sulfuric acid and its subsequently condensation on preexisting particles was examined with the use of a simplistic box model. These calculations suggested that the day-time evolution of the Aitken particle population was governed mainly by coagulation and that particle formation was absent during most days.

  13. Experimental analysis of particle sizes for PIV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Overbrüggen, Timo; Klaas, Michael; Soria, Julio; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    The right choice of seeding particles strongly influences the outcome of a particle-image velocimetry (PIV) measurement. Particles have to scatter enough light to be seen by cameras and follow the flow faithfully. As the flow following behavior depends on the inertia and therefore the size of the particle, smaller particles are desirable. Unfortunately, larger particles possess better light scattering behavior, which is especially important for volumetric PIV measurements. In this paper, the particle response of two exemplary solid particles to an oscillatory air flow created by a piston movement is analyzed and compared to analytic results by Hjelmfelt and Mockros (1966 Appl. Sci. Res. 16 149–61) concerning phase lag and amplitude ratio between particle movement and flow field. To achieve realistic experimental boundary conditions, polydispersed particles are used for the analysis. The analytic results show a strong dependence on the diameter. That is, using the volumetric mean diameter an overestimation of the phase lag of the particles is determined, whereas an underestimation of phase lag is computed for the number mean diameter. Hence, for polydispersed particles a more general analysis than that based on the particle mean diameter is required to determine in detail the particle following behavior.

  14. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  15. WOOD STOVE EMISSIONS: PARTICLE SIZE AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes wood stove particle size and chemical composition data gathered to date. [NOTE: In 1995, EPA estimated that residential wood combustion (RWC), including fireplaces, accounted for a significant fraction of national particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter...

  16. Adsorption of sterically stabilized latex particles at liquid surfaces: effects of steric stabilizer surface coverage, particle size, and chain length on particle wettability.

    PubMed

    Reed, K M; Borovicka, J; Horozov, T S; Paunov, V N; Thompson, K L; Walsh, A; Armes, S P

    2012-05-01

    A series of five near-monodisperse sterically stabilized polystyrene (PS) latexes were synthesized using three well-defined poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) macromonomers with mean degrees of polymerization (DP) of 30, 50, or 70. The surface coverage and grafting density of the PGMA chains on the particle surface were determined using XPS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, respectively. The wettability of individual latex particles adsorbed at the air-water and n-dodecane-water interfaces was studied using both the gel trapping technique and the film calliper method. The particle equilibrium contact angle at both interfaces is relatively insensitive to the mean DP of the PGMA stabilizer chains. For a fixed stabilizer DP of 30, particle contact angles were only weakly dependent on the particle size. The results are consistent with a model of compact hydrated layers of PGMA stabilizer chains at the particle surface over a wide range of grafting densities. Our approach could be utilized for studying the adsorption behavior of a broader range of sterically stabilized inorganic and polymeric particles of practical importance. PMID:22502638

  17. Soil signature simulation of complex mixtures and particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Tyler; Bachmann, Charles M.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Soil reflectance signatures were modeled using the digital imaging and remote sensing image generation model and Blender three-dimensional (3-D) graphic design software. Using these tools, the geometry, radiometry, and chemistry of quartz and magnetite were exploited to model the presence of particle size and porosity effects in the visible and the shortwave infrared spectrum. Using the physics engines within the Blender 3-D graphic design software, physical representations of granular soil scenes were created. Each scene characterized a specific particle distribution and density. Chemical and optical properties of pure quartz and magnetite were assigned to particles in the scene based on particle size. This work presents a model to describe an observed phase-angle dependence of beach sand density. Bidirectional reflectance signatures were simulated for targets of varying size distribution and density. This model provides validation for a phenomenological trade space between density and particle size distribution in complex, heterogeneous soil mixtures. It also confirms the suggestion that directional reflectance signatures can be defined by intimate mixtures that depend on pore spacing. The study demonstrated that by combining realistic target geometry and spectral measurements of pure quartz and magnetite, effects of soil particle size and density could be modeled without functional data fitting or rigorous analysis of material dynamics. This research does not use traditional function-based models for simulation. The combination of realistic geometry, physically viable particle structure, and first-principles ray-tracing enables the ability to represent signature changes that have been observed in experimental observations.

  18. Effect of sonication on the particle size of montmorillonite clays.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandra L; Batista, Tatiana; Schmitt, Carla C; Gessner, Fergus; Neumann, Miguel G

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on the effect of sonication on SAz-1 and SWy-1 montmorillonite suspensions. Changes in the size of the particles of these materials and modifications of their properties have been investigated. The variation of the particle size has been analyzed by DLS (dynamic light scattering). In all cases the clay particles show a bimodal distribution. Sonication resulted in a decrease of the larger modal diameter, as well as a reduction of its volume percentage. Simultaneously, the proportion of the smallest particles increases. After 60 min of sonication, SAz-1 presented a very broad particle size distribution with a modal diameter of 283 nm. On the other hand, the SWy-1 sonicated for 60 min presents a bimodal distribution of particles at 140 and 454 nm. Changes in the properties of the clay suspensions due to sonication were evaluated spectroscopically from dye-clay interactions, using Methylene Blue. The acidic sites present in the interlamellar region, which are responsible for dye protonation, disappeared after sonication of the clay. The changes in the size of the scattering particles and the lack of acidic sites after sonication suggest that sonication induces delamination of the clay particles. PMID:18572177

  19. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Olawoyin, L.

    1995-09-01

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by {sup 222}Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It`s major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented.

  20. Finite size effect of harmonic measure estimation in a DLA model: Variable size of probe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, Anton Yu.; Shchur, Lev N.; Vinokour, Valery M.

    2008-11-01

    A finite size effect in the probing of the harmonic measure in simulation of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) growth is investigated. We introduce a variable size of probe particles, to estimate harmonic measure and extract the fractal dimension of DLA clusters taking two limits, of vanishingly small probe particle size and of infinitely large size of a DLA cluster. We generate 1000 DLA clusters consisting of 50 million particles each, using an off-lattice killing-free algorithm developed in the early work. The introduced method leads to unprecedented accuracy in the estimation of the fractal dimension. We discuss the variation of the probability distribution function with the size of probing particles.

  1. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system.

    PubMed

    Bilici, Mihai A; Toth, Joseph R; Sankaran, R Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain. PMID:25362412

  2. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    SciTech Connect

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-15

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  3. Measuring droplet size distributions from overlapping interferometric particle images.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van der Voort, Dennis; Bertens, Guus; van de Water, Willem

    2015-02-01

    Interferometric particle imaging provides a simple way to measure the probability density function (PDF) of droplet sizes from out-focus images. The optical setup is straightforward, but the interpretation of the data is a problem when particle images overlap. We propose a new way to analyze the images. The emphasis is not on a precise identification of droplets, but on obtaining a good estimate of the PDF of droplet sizes in the case of overlapping particle images. The algorithm is tested using synthetic and experimental data. We next use these methods to measure the PDF of droplet sizes produced by spinning disk aerosol generators. The mean primary droplet diameter agrees with predictions from the literature, but we find a broad distribution of satellite droplet sizes. PMID:25725854

  4. Airborne Particle Size Distribution Measurements at USDOE Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Chittaporn, P.; Heikkinen, M.; Medora, R.; Merrill, R.

    2003-03-27

    There are no long term measurements of the particle size distribution and concentration of airborne radionuclides at any USDOE facility except Fernald. Yet the determinant of lung dose is the particle size, determining the airway and lower lung deposition. Beginning in 2000, continuous (6 to 8 weeks) measurements of the aerosol particle size distribution have been made with a miniature sampler developed under EMSP. Radon gas decays to a chain of four short lived solid radionuclides that attach immediately to the resident atmospheric aerosol. These in turn decay to long lived polonium 210. Alpha emitting polonium is a tracer for any atmospheric aerosol. Six samplers at Fernald and four at QC sites in New Jersey show a difference in both polonium concentration and size distribution with the winter measurements being higher/larger than summer by almost a factor of two at all locations. EMSP USDOE Contract DE FG07 97ER62522.

  5. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  6. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  7. Lung retention and binding of (/sup 14/C)-1-nitropyrene when inhaled by F344 rats as a pure aerosol or adsorbed to carbon black particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, R.K.; Sun, J.D.; Barr, E.B.; Rothenberg, S.J.; Yeh, H.C.

    1989-01-01

    1-Nitropyrene (NP), as found in the environment, is more typically associated with carbonaceous particles than found as an aerosol of the pure compound. To determine whether (and why) an association with particles resulted in prolonged lung retention of NP, rats were exposed to 14C-NP as a pure aerosol or adsorbed on carbon black particles. Total 14C retained in the lung was greater at all times from 0.5 h to 30 d after exposure to 14C-NP adsorbed to carbon black particles than after exposure to pure 14C-NP (p less than .05). The fraction of total 14C in lung bound to carbon black particles decreased steadily with time after exposure, indicating in vivo removal of NP from the particles. At 0.5 h after exposure, the fraction of the estimated deposited 14C that was covalently bound to lung macromolecules was twofold greater for NP adsorbed on carbon black than for pure NP. Covalently bound 14C in lungs increased with time after exposure to 14C-NP adsorbed to carbon black, reaching levels of approximately 1% of the deposited radioactivity at 7-30 d after exposure, whereas levels of covalently bound 14C declined with time after exposure to pure NP. Thus, at 30 d after exposure, the amount of 14C covalently bound to lung macromolecules was approximately 10-fold greater (p less than .05) in rats that inhaled 14C-NP adsorbed on carbon black particles than in rats that inhaled pure 14C-NP aerosols. These results suggest that association of NP with carbon black particles augments the interaction of reactive metabolites of NP with target macromolecules. This phenomenon is thought to be related to the slow release of NP from carbon black particles, and may augment the biological effects of inhaled NP when adsorbed on carbon black or similar particles in the environment.

  8. Influences of Substrate Adhesion and Particle Size on the Shape Memory Effect of Polystyrene Particles.

    PubMed

    Cox, Lewis M; Killgore, Jason P; Li, Zhengwei; Long, Rong; Sanders, Aric W; Xiao, Jianliang; Ding, Yifu

    2016-04-19

    Formulations and applications of micro- and nanoscale polymer particles have proliferated rapidly in recent years, yet knowledge of their mechanical behavior has not grown accordingly. In this study, we examine the ways that compressive strain, substrate surface energy, and particle size influence the shape memory cycle of polystyrene particles. Using nanoimprint lithography, differently sized particles are programmed into highly deformed, temporary shapes in contact with substrates of differing surface energies. Atomic force microscopy is used to obtain in situ measurements of particle shape recovery kinetics, and scanning electron microscopy is employed to assess differences in the profiles of particles at the conclusion of the shape memory cycle. Finally, finite element models are used to investigate the growing impact of surface energies at smaller length scales. Results reveal that the influence of substrate adhesion on particle recovery is size-dependent and can become dominating at submicron length scales. PMID:27023181

  9. Retrieval of particle size distribution from aerosol optical thickness using an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jiandong; Li, Jinxuan

    2015-10-01

    Particle size distribution is essential for describing direct and indirect radiation of aerosols. Because the relationship between the aerosol size distribution and optical thickness (AOT) is an ill-posed Fredholm integral equation of the first type, the traditional techniques for determining such size distributions, such as the Phillips-Twomey regularization method, are often ambiguous. Here, we use an approach based on an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm (IPSO) to retrieve aerosol size distribution. Using AOT data measured by a CE318 sun photometer in Yinchuan, we compared the aerosol size distributions retrieved using a simple genetic algorithm, a basic particle swarm optimization algorithm and the IPSO. Aerosol size distributions for different weather conditions were analyzed, including sunny, dusty and hazy conditions. Our results show that the IPSO-based inversion method retrieved aerosol size distributions under all weather conditions, showing great potential for similar size distribution inversions.

  10. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  11. Particle interaction of lubricated or unlubricated binary mixtures according to their particle size and densification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Joiris, Etienne; Martelli, Sante

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess an experimental approach for technological development of a direct compression formulation. A simple formula was considered composed by an active ingredient, a diluent and a lubricant. The active ingredient and diluent were selected as an example according to their typical densification mechanism: the nitrofurantoine, a fragmenting material, and the cellulose microcrystalline (Vivapur), which is a typical visco-elastic material, equally displaying good bind and disintegrant properties. For each ingredient, samples of different particle size distribution were selected. Initially, tabletability of pure materials was studied by a rotary press without magnesium stearate. Vivapur tabletability decreases with increase in particle size. The addition of magnesium stearate as lubricant decreases tabletability of Vivapur of greater particle size, while it kept unmodified that of Vivapur of lower particle size. Differences in tabletability can be related to differences in particle-particle interactions; for Vivapur of higher particle size (Vivapur 200, 102 and 101), the lower surface area develops lower surface available for bonds, while for Vivapur of lower particle size (99 and 105) the greater surface area allows high particle proximity favouring particle cohesivity. Nitrofurantoine shows great differences in compression behaviour according to its particle size distribution. Large crystals show poorer tabletability than fine crystals, further decreased by lubricant addition. The large crystals poor tabletability is due to their poor compactibility, in spite of high compressibility and plastic intrinsic deformability; in fact, in spite of the high densification tendency, the nature of the involved bonds is very weak. Nitrofurantoine samples were then mixed with Vivapurs in different proportions. Compression behaviour of binary mixes (tabletability and compressibility) was then evaluated according to diluents proportion in the mixes. The

  12. Nano-sized and micro-sized polystyrene particles affect phagocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Prietl, B.; Meindl, C.; Roblegg, E.; Pieber, T. R.; Lanzer, G.; Fröhlich, E.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse effect of nanoparticles may include impairment of phagocyte function. To identify the effect of nanoparticle size on uptake, cytotoxicity, chemotaxis, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, nitric oxide production and myeloperoxidase release, leukocytes isolated from human peripheral blood, monocytes and macrophages were studied. Carboxyl polystyrene (CPS) particles in sizes between 20 and 1,000 nm served as model particles. Twenty nanometers CPS particles were taken up passively, while larger CPS particles entered cells actively and passively. Twenty nanometers CPS were cytotoxic to all phagocytes, ≥500 nm CPS particles only to macrophages. Twenty nanometers CPS particles stimulated IL-8 secretion in human monocytes and induced oxidative burst in monocytes. Five hundred nanometers and 1,000 nm CPS particles stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in monocytes and macrophages, chemotaxis towards a chemotactic stimulus of monocytes and phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and provoked an oxidative burst of granulocytes. At very high concentrations, CPS particles of 20 and 500 nm stimulated myeloperoxidase release of granulocytes and nitric oxide generation in macrophages. Cytotoxic effect could contribute to some of the observed effects. In the absence of cytotoxicity, 500 and 1,000 nm CPS particles appear to influence phagocyte function to a greater extent than particles in other sizes. PMID:24292270

  13. A simple way to measure particle size in fluegases

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, J.F.P.

    1998-03-01

    The size range of particles found in fluegases from stationary emission sources, such as combustion stacks, is an important process parameter. Particle-size range not only affects plume opacity and dispersion modeling, but it is a key factor in the selection and design of air-pollution-control equipment, such as cyclones, bag filters and electrostatic precipitators. The particle-size distribution of a fluegas stream is also a useful parameter for analyzing the performance efficiency of combustion equipment and particulate-removal systems. While several laboratories use costly, laser-beam techniques to carry out this task, no standard method to date has been developed to determine the size range of particles in stationary sources. This article discusses a method (described in US EPA Method 5) in which particles in gases circulating in a stack are collected isokinetically in a filter. Once collected, the particles are measured using an optical microscope. Despite some limitations, this relatively inexpensive method gives reproducible results in many applications. Several are described.

  14. Enhanced size-dependent trapping of particles using microvortices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Kasper, Susan; Papautsky, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Inertial microfluidics has been attracting considerable interest for size-based separation of particles and cells. The inertial forces can be manipulated by expanding the microchannel geometry, leading to formation of microvortices which selectively isolate and trap particles or cells from a mixture. In this work, we aim to enhance our understanding of particle trapping in such microvortices by developing a model of selective particle trapping. Design and operational parameters including flow conditions, size of the trapping region, and target particle concentration are explored to elucidate their influence on trapping behavior. Our results show that the size dependence of trapping is characterized by a threshold Reynolds number, which governs the selective entry of particles into microvortices from the main flow. We show that concentration enhancement on the order of 100,000× and isolation of targets at concentrations in the 1/mL is possible. Ultimately, the insights gained from our systematic investigation suggest optimization solutions that enhance device performance (efficiency, size selectivity, and yield) and are applicable to selective isolation and trapping of large rare cells as well as other applications. PMID:24187531

  15. Diffusion of micrometer-sized soft particles in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Benjamin; Aptowicz, Kevin

    We investigate the diffusion of micrometer sized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) gel particles in confinement. The influence of confinement on the transport of small particles is becoming increasingly important for microfluidics and bio-fluidics. Analytical solutions to this problem are limited to very unique geometries or gross approximations. Computational methods have provided more insight into the problem as well as experimental investigations. However, most research has focused on the hard-sphere problem. In this work, we will explore the diffusion of soft particles in confinement. The dynamics of the particles confined between two parallel walls is captured with video-microscopy. In addition, we use a recently developed technique to measurement confinement of particles in-situ with a precision of 1%. This poster will present some preliminary results of how confinement affects the diffusion of these soft particles. We acknowledge support from Grant DMR-1206231.

  16. Struvite precipitation from urine - Influencing factors on particle size.

    PubMed

    Ronteltap, Mariska; Maurer, Max; Hausherr, Rainer; Gujer, Willi

    2010-03-01

    Struvite crystallisation is a fast and reliable phosphorus removal and recovery process for concentrated waste streams - such as hydrolysed human urine. In order to optimise P-elimination efficiency, it is beneficial to obtain larger particle sizes: they are easier to separate and less prone to wash-out than smaller particles. This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of process parameters on particle size in a single step struvite precipitation. Crystals formed in batch experiments with real hydrolysed urine were shown to have an average size of >90 microm at pH 9 and 20 degrees C. This is reduced to 45 microm when changing stirrer type. Particle size increases with lower supersaturation. The results showed that under otherwise constant conditions, particle size decreases with lower temperature and has a minimum between pH 9 and 10. Deviating trends are observed at pH <8. Struvite formation in a CSTR (continuously stirred tank reactor) process was shown to be a reliable stable process that does not require any pH control. A method based on conductivity measurement is presented to estimate ionic strength, which is needed for equilibrium calculations. PMID:20116825

  17. [Theory and practice of electrospray crystallization in particle size reduction].

    PubMed

    Szunyogh, Tímea; Ambrus, Rita; Szabóné Révész, Piroska

    2015-01-01

    Nowdays, one of the most challenges for the researchers is the formulation of poorly water soluble drugs. Reduction of particle size of active agents to submicron range could result in a faster dissolution rate and higher bioavailability. Integration as crystallization process is an often used particle size decreasing technique. The aim of this study was to show the theoretical background and practical application of the electros pray crystallization as an innovative particle size decreasing technique. Our model drug was the niflumic acid (NIF), which belongs to the BCS Class II. After the optimization of the process parameters, the physico-chemical properties of the samples were characterized. Particle size and shape were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crystalline state of NIF and the samples were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction. Physico-chemical properties were determined using dissolution test from simulated media. The electrospray crytallization resulted in particle size reduction but the aggregation of nanonized NIF crystals (NIF-nano) could not avoid without excipient. Aggregates with poor secondary forces are suitable for production of the interactive physical mixture. It was found that NIF-nano could be well distributed on the surface of the mannitol as carrier and the Poloxamer R protected the NIF-nano crystals (320 nm)from aggregation. Consequently, the physical mixture resulted in product with higher polarity, better wettability and faster dissolution rate of NIF as raw NIF or NIF-nano. PMID:26390735

  18. Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins classifies nanoparticles with different surface properties and size

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Burnum, Kristin E.; Luna, Maria L.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kim, Jong Seo; Qian, Weijun; Moore, Ronald J.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Thrall, Brian D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pounds, Joel G.; Liu, Tao

    2011-12-01

    In biofluids (e.g., blood plasma) nanoparticles are readily embedded in layers of proteins that can affect their biological activity and biocompatibility. Herein, we report a study on the interactions between human plasma proteins and nanoparticles with a controlled systematic variation of properties using stable isotope labeling and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based quantitative proteomics. Novel protocol has been developed to simplify the isolation of nanoparticle bound proteins and improve the reproducibility. Plasma proteins associated with polystyrene nanoparticles with three different surface chemistries and two sizes as well as for four different exposure times (for a total of 24 different samples) were identified and quantified by LC-MS analysis. Quantitative comparison of relative protein abundances were achieved by spiking an 18 O-labeled 'universal reference' into each individually processed unlabeled sample as an internal standard, enabling simultaneous application of both label-free and isotopic labeling quantitation across the sample set. Clustering analysis of the quantitative proteomics data resulted in distinctive pattern that classifies the nanoparticles based on their surface properties and size. In addition, data on the temporal study indicated that the stable protein 'corona' that was isolated for the quantitative analysis appeared to be formed in less than 5 minutes. The comprehensive results obtained herein using quantitative proteomics have potential implications towards predicting nanoparticle biocompatibility.

  19. Particle-Size-Distribution of Nevada Test Site Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G; Ray-Maitra, A

    2007-09-17

    The amount of each size particle in a given soil is called the particle-size distribution (PSD), and the way it feels to the touch is called the soil texture. Sand, silt, and clay are the three particle sizes of mineral material found in soils. Sand is the largest sized particle and it feels gritty; silt is medium sized and it feels floury; and clay is the smallest and if feels sticky. Knowing the particle-size distribution of a soil sample helps to understand many soil properties such as how much water, heat, and nutrients the soil will hold, how fast water and heat will move through the soil, and what kind of structure, bulk density and consistence the soil will have. Furthermore, the native particle-size distribution of the soil in the vicinity of ground zero of a nuclear detonation plays a major role in nuclear fallout. For soils that have a high-sand content, the near-range fallout will be relatively high and the far-range fallout will be relatively light. Whereas, for soils that have a high-silt and high-clay content, the near-range fallout will be significantly lower and the far-range fallout will be significantly higher. As part of a program funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has recently measured the PSDs from the various major areas at the Nevada Test Site where atmospheric detonations and/or nuclear weapon safety tests were performed back in the 50s and 60s. The purpose of this report is to document those results.

  20. Effect of drug content and drug particle size on the change in particle size during tablet compression.

    PubMed

    Kitamori, N; Makino, T

    1979-08-01

    Three size fractions for each of three poorly soluble drugs were compressed into 10 mm diameter tablets of four different dilution ratios. The compression was carried out on a physical testing instrument at four compression levels of 49.0, 98.1, 196.2 and 294.3 MN m-2. The effect of drug content and drug particle size on the change in particle size during tableting was examined by the determination of the dissolution rate for disintegrated tablets. A linear relation was obtained when plotting 1n(T80%) versus drug content. There was a critical particle size where the phenomena of cleavage and bonding during tableting balanced each other, but this varied with drug content. PMID:39988

  1. Influence of particle size distributions on magnetorheological fluid performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, H.; Stoian, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence that size distributions of the magnetic particles might have on the magnetorheological fluid performances. In our study, several size distributions have been tailored first by sieving a micrometric Fe powder in order to obtain narrow distribution powders and then by recomposing the new size distributions (different from Gaussian). We used spherical Fe particles (mesh -325) commercially available. The powder was sieved by means of a sieve shaker using a series of sieves with the following mesh size: 20, 32, 40, 50, 63, 80 micrometers. All magnetic powders were characterized through Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements, particle size analysis and also Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were taken. Magnetorheological (MR) fluids based on the resulted magnetic powders were prepared and studied by means of a rheometer with a magnetorheological module. The MR fluids were measured in magnetic field and in zero magnetic field as well. As we noticed in our previous experiments particles size distribution can also influence the MR fluids performances.

  2. Measurement of non-volatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the non-volatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a non-volatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol, OA (40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a non-volatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon (BC) with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type

  3. STREAMBED PARTICLE SIZE FROM PEBBLE COUNTS USING VISUALLY ESTIMATED SIZE CLSASES: JUNK OR USEFUL DATA?

    EPA Science Inventory

    In large-scale studies, it is often neither feasible nor necessary to obtain the large samples of 400 particles advocated by many geomorphologists to adequately quantify streambed surface particle-size distributions. Synoptic surveys such as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

  4. The Influence of Particle Size on Infrared Reflectance Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2014-06-13

    Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient as well as the particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and then sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3 in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

  5. HDL particle number and size as predictors of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Kontush, Anatol

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that reduced concentrations of circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles can be superior to HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels as a predictor of cardiovascular disease. Measurements of HDL particle numbers, therefore, bear a potential for the improved assessment of cardiovascular risk. Furthermore, such measurement can be relevant for the evaluation of novel therapeutic approaches targeting HDL. Modern in-depth analyses of HDL particle profile may further improve evaluation of cardiovascular risk. Although clinical relevance of circulating concentrations of HDL subpopulations to cardiovascular disease remains controversial, the negative relationship between the number of large HDL particles and cardiovascular disease suggests that assessment of HDL particle profile can be clinically useful. Reduced mean HDL size is equally associated with cardiovascular disease in large-scale clinical studies. Since HDL-C is primarily carried in the circulation by large, lipid-rich HDL particles, the inverse relationship between HDL size and cardiovascular risk can be secondary to those established for plasma levels of HDL particles, HDL-C, and large HDL. The epidemiological data thereby suggest that HDL particle number may represent a more relevant therapeutic target as compared to HDL-C. PMID:26500551

  6. Spontaneous formation of small sized albumin/acacia coacervate particles.

    PubMed

    Burgess, D J; Singh, O N

    1993-07-01

    Microgel coacervate particles form spontaneously on mixing aqueous solutions of oppositely charged albumin and acacia, under specific conditions of pH, ionic strength, and polyion concentration, close to but not at the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield. The mean particle diameter of these coacervate particles is approximately 6 microns when suspended in aqueous media, as determined by HIAC/Royco particle analysis. The geometric standard deviation of the particles falls in the range 1.2-1.9 microns. The particle size was not dependent on the method of emulsification of the coacervate in the equilibrium phase, or on the stirring speed applied during the manufacturing process. The microgel particles were stable on storage, for periods up to forty-six days, without the addition of a chemical cross-linking agent, or the application of heat. Stability was measured with respect to the change in particle size of samples stored at different temperatures. The non-cross-linked microcapsules were also shown to be stable on pH change, to pH values outside the coacervation pH range. At the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield the albumin/acacia system formed a very viscous coacervate phase, which was unsuitable for microcapsule preparation. The rheological properties of albumin/acacia and gelatin/acacia complex coacervates optimized for maximum coacervate yield were compared. The albumin/acacia coacervate was shown to be three orders of magnitude more viscous than the gelatin/acacia system. PMID:8105049

  7. SERS and DFT study of p-hydroxybenzoic acid adsorbed on colloidal silver particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Chen, S J; Li, S; Wei, J J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, normal Raman spectra of p—hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA) powder and its surface—enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra in silver colloidal solutions were measured under near infrared excitation conditions. In theoretical calculation, two models of PHBA adsorbed on the surfaces of silver nanoparticles were established. The Raman frequencies of these two models using density functional theory (DFT) method were calculated, and compared with the experimental results. It was found that the calculated Raman frequencies were in good agreement with experimental values, which indicates that there are two enhanced mechanism physical (electromagnetic, EM) enhancement and chemical (charge—transfer, CT) enhancement, in silver colloidal solutions regarding SERS effect. Furthermore, from high—quality SERS spectrum of PHBA obtained in silver colloids, we inferred that PHBA molecules in silver colloids adsorb onto the metal surfaces through carboxyl at a perpendicular orientation. The combination of SERS spectra and DFT calculation is thus useful for studies of the adsorption—orientation of a molecule on a metal colloid. PMID:26475382

  8. Adsorption of drinking water fluoride on a micron-sized magnetic Fe3O4@Fe-Ti composite adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang; Li, Yingzhen; Wang, Ting-Jie; Jiang, Yanping; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-02-01

    A micron-sized magnetic adsorbent (MMA) for fluoride removal from drinking water was prepared by spray drying and subsequent calcination of a magnetic Fe3O4@Fe-Ti core-shell nanoparticle slurry. The MMA granules had high mechanical strength and stability against water scouring, can be easily separated from the water by a magnet, and had a high selectivity for fluoride versus common co-existing ions and high fluoride removal efficiency in a wide range of initial pH of 3-11. Abundant hydroxyl groups on the MMA surface acted as the active sites for fluoride adsorption, which resulted in a high affinity of the MMA for fluoride. The pH in the adsorption process affected the adsorption significantly. At neutral initial pH, the adsorption isotherm was well fitted with the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacity reached a high value of 41.8 mg/g. At a constant pH of 3, multilayer adsorption of fluoride occurred due to the abundant positive surface charges on the MMA, and the adsorption isotherm was well fitted with the Freundlich model. The MMA had a fast adsorption rate, and adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 2 min. The adsorption kinetics followed a quasi-second order model. The regeneration of the MMA was easy and fast, and can be completed within 2 min. After 10 recycles, the fluoride removal efficiency of the MMA still remained high. These properties showed that the MMA is a promising adsorbent for fluoride removal.

  9. Nanosize cobalt boride particles: Control of the size and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Pileni, M. P.

    1997-02-01

    Cobalt boride is obtained by the reduction of cobalt (2-ethyl hexyl) sulfosuccinate, Co(AOT) 2, by sodium borohydride either in reverse micelles or in a diphasic system. In Co(AOT) 2/Na(AOT)/H 2O reverse micellar solution, the size and polydispersity of the Co 2B particles is controlled by the size of the water droplets, which increases from 4 to 7.5 nm by increasing the water content. In a diphasic system of Co(AOT) 2/isooctane and sodium borohydride in aqueous solution, large and polydisperse particles of cobalt boride are formed (˜ 10 nm), and their magnetization properties are presented. The smallest particles are in a superparamagnetic regime at room temperature, whereas the largest particles show ferromagnetic behavior.

  10. Rapid determination of particle size distribution of microbead catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mirshii, Y.V.; Goos, T.V.; Kaviev, V.M.; Kazahov, G.I.; Klimov, A.V.; Nesmeyanova, T.S.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have developed a rapid method for the determination of the particle size distribution of microbead catalysts by a photosedimentation method. This method is based on a determination of the settling velocity of the particles according to the change in optical density of the suspension as the particles settle. The design of the instrument was modified for application to the analysis of microbead cracking catalysts and microbead zeolites; it was originally developed for studies of particle size distribution in other materials. The measuring part of the AFS-2M photosedimentograph is shown schematically. For the high-zeolite catalysts, the results obtained by photosedimenation analysis are somewhat different from those obtained by the pipette method. The photosedimentation method can also be used in the analysis of microbead zeolites that are intended for use in the fluid-bed recovery of liquid paraffins.

  11. Particle size of airborne mouse crude and defined allergens.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Miyazawa, H; Kamimura, H; Kimura, M; Yamazaki, S

    1989-05-01

    Laboratory animal allergy is a serious occupational diseases of many workers and scientists engaged in animal experimentation. Control measures depend upon characterization of allergens including airborne particles. This study measured the particle size of crude mouse urine and pelt aeroallergens generated in mouse housing rooms and compared them with mouse serum albumin, a defined major allergen. Allergens were detected by specific immunological methods. Most crude and defined allergens (74.5-86.4%) concentrated on a filter with a retention size greater than 7 microns. In distrubed air, allergen concentration increased 1.4 (albumin) to 5 (crude) fold and the proportion of small particles increased from 1.4% in calm air to 4.5% in distrubed air. This information on the generation and size distribution of aeroallergens will be important in the development of effective counter measures. PMID:2724924

  12. Determining Sizes of Particles in a Flow from DPIV Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, M. P.; Mielke, A.; Cadambi, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed method of measuring the size of particles entrained in a flow of a liquid or gas would involve utilization of data from digital particle-image velocimetry (DPIV) of the flow. That is to say, with proper design and operation of a DPIV system, the DPIV data could be processed according to the proposed method to obtain particle sizes in addition to particle velocities. As an additional benefit, one could then compute the mass flux of the entrained particles from the particle sizes and velocities. As in DPIV as practiced heretofore, a pulsed laser beam would be formed into a thin sheet to illuminate a plane of interest in a flow field and the illuminated plane would be observed by means of a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera aimed along a line perpendicular to the illuminated plane. Unlike in DPIV as practiced heretofore, care would be taken to polarize the laser beam so that its electric field would lie in the illuminated plane, for the reason explained in the next paragraph. The proposed method applies, more specifically, to transparent or semitransparent spherical particles that have an index of refraction different from that of the fluid in which they are entrained. The method is based on the established Mie theory, which describes the scattering of light by diffraction, refraction, and specular reflection of light by such particles. In the case of a particle illuminated by polarized light and observed in the arrangement described in the preceding paragraph, the Mie theory shows that the image of the particle on the focal plane of the CCD camera includes two glare spots: one attributable to light reflected toward the camera and one attributable to light refracted toward the camera. The distance between the glare spots is a known function of the size of the particle, the indices of refraction of the particle material, and design parameters of the camera optics. Hence, the size of a particle can be determined from the distance between the glare spots. The

  13. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  14. Silicon carbide particle size effects in alumina-based nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, L.; Sternitzke, M.; Derby, B.

    1996-11-01

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC nanocomposites with a systematic variation in their SiC particle size together with monolithic alumina were produced using conventional powder processing, polymer pyrolysis and hot-pressing. The microstructures of the materials were investigated by means of transmission and scanning electron microscopy and correlated to their mechanical properties. All nanocomposites showed a clear increase in strength over similar grain size alumina but no clear dependence on the size of the SiC nano-reinforcement. However, the fracture toughness of the nanocomposites seems to increase with the SiC particle size but with values little changed from the toughness of monolithic alumina as measured by the Vickers indentation technique. The surface and bulk flaw populations were characterized using a Hertzian indentation technique and a Griffith flaw size analysis of strength data. The investigations revealed a significant difference between the monolithic alumina and nanocomposites. The strength increase in the nanocomposites is explained by the observed decrease in both the surface and processing flaw sizes, which further decreased with decreasing SiC particle size.

  15. Spectral attenuation and backscattering as indicators of average particle size.

    PubMed

    Slade, Wayne Homer; Boss, Emmanuel

    2015-08-20

    Measurements of the particulate beam attenuation coefficient at multiple wavelengths in the ocean typically exhibit a power law dependence on wavelength, and the slope of that power law has been related to the slope of the particle size distribution (PSD), when assumed to be a power law function of particle size. Recently, spectral backscattering coefficient measurements have been made using sensors deployed at moored observatories, on autonomous underwater vehicles, and even retrieved from space-based measurements of remote sensing reflectance. It has been suggested that these backscattering measurements may also be used to obtain information about the shape of the PSD. In this work, we directly compared field-measured PSD with multispectral beam attenuation and backscattering coefficients in a coastal bottom boundary later. The results of this comparison demonstrated that (1) the beam attenuation spectral slope correlates with the average particle size as suggested by theory for idealized particles and PSD; and (2) measurements of spectral backscattering also contain information reflective of the average particle size in spite of large deviations of the PSD from a spectral power law shape. PMID:26368762

  16. The Stickiness of Micrometer-sized Water-ice Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2015-01-01

    Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates), water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-sized region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of μm-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between 114 K and 260 K. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below ~210 K), μm-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of 9.6 m s-1, which is approximately 10 times higher than the sticking threshold of μm-sized silica particles. Furthermore, erosion of the grown ice aggregates is observed for velocities above 15.3 m s-1. A comparison of the experimentally derived sticking threshold with model predictions is performed to determine important material properties of water ice, i.e., the specific surface energy and the viscous relaxation time. Our experimental results indicate that the presence of water ice in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks can enhance the growth of planetesimals by direct sticking of particles.

  17. Ultrasonic characterization of formation damage: effect of particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. A.; Mohammed, A. H.; Jilani, S. Z.; Menouar, H.; Al-Majed, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Permeability of a geological formation such as an oil field can be altered locally during drilling operations through penetration of particulates from the drilling fluid into the formation pores. This can adversely affect the overall production rate by constricting the pores. The composition of these fluids, particularly the sizes of the particulates therein, can be critical from the point of view of controlling the extent of 'damage' to the formation. Using our recently reported ultrasonic mapping technique, we have investigated the depth of particle penetration as a function of particle size and contamination time. An important correlation is observed between the diameters of the 'mud' particles and the pore size distribution in the formation. It is further noted that a substantial layer of 'mud cake' is formed on the surface beyond a certain critical particle size and this subsequently acts as a filter allowing only some finer particles to continue penetrating into the formation. The results are discussed in the context of bridging action at the pores.

  18. Fine cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method using nano-sized precursor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Kang, Yun Chan

    Fine-sized Li-Co-Mn-O cathode particles with various ratios of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method using the nano-sized precursor particles. The nano-sized precursor particles of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) particles had finer size than that of the pure LiCoO 2 particles. Manganese component disturbed the growth of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method. The pure LiCoO 2 cathode particles had high initial discharge capacity of 144 mAh g -1. However, the initial discharge capacities of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) cathode particles decreased with increasing the contents of the manganese component. The discharge capacities of the LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased abruptly with increasing the contents of the cobalt component. The pure LiMn 2O 4 cathode particles had the initial discharge capacities of 119 mAh g -1.

  19. Particle size distribution dynamics during precipitative softening: declining solution composition.

    PubMed

    Nason, Jeffrey A; Lawler, Desmond F

    2009-02-01

    Particle removal is a critical step in the treatment of surface water for potable use, and the majority of drinking water treatment plants employ precipitative coagulation processes such as alum and iron "sweep-floc" coagulation or lime softening for particle pre-treatment. Unfortunately, little is quantitatively known about how particle size distributions are shaped by simultaneous precipitation and flocculation. In an earlier paper, we demonstrated the effects of the saturation ratio, the mixing intensity and the seed concentration on the rates of homogeneous nucleation, precipitative growth and flocculation during precipitation of calcium carbonate at constant solution composition using electronic particle counting techniques. In this work, we extend those findings to systems more closely emulating the conditions in actual softening processes (i.e., declining solution composition). Key findings include the strong dependence of the rate of flocculation on the initial saturation ratio and demonstration of the benefits of seeding precipitative softening from the perspective of optimizing the effluent particle size distribution. The mixing intensity during precipitation was also shown to strongly influence the final particle size distribution. Implications of the findings with respect to softening practice are discussed. PMID:18976791

  20. Miniaturization of powder dissolution measurement and estimation of particle size.

    PubMed

    Avdeef, Alex; Tsinman, Konstantin; Tsinman, Oksana; Sun, Na; Voloboy, Dmytro

    2009-11-01

    The objective was to investigate the applicability and limitations of an approach for estimating particle size from powder dissolution measurement using as little as 50 microg of sample in 1 ml of buffer solutions. The powder dissolution profiles of five sparingly-soluble drugs (hydrochlorothiazide, phenazopyridine hydrochloride, 2-naphthoic acid, indomethacin, and dipyridamole) were evaluated with a novel biexponential spherical particle equation and also the Wang-Flanagan spherical particle non-sink equation. The results were compared to particle sizing based on measured specific surface area by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, and also based on Coulter counting. With the exception of hydrochlorothiazide, the model compounds indicated some agglomeration in the dissolution media. The dry-state specific surface area was larger than expected from either the Coulter method or the powder-dissolution data, especially for phenazopyridine hydrochloride. The particle radii estimated by the powder dissolution method ranged from 10 to 68 microm, with equilibrium solubilities spanning from 5 microg/ml (dipyridamole) to 911 microg/ml (hydrochlorothiazide). Powder dissolution data collected with the miniaturized apparatus can be used to determine particle size, with estimated values agreeing reasonably with those measured by the Coulter counter method. PMID:19937817

  1. Size-Dependent Particle Dynamics in Entangled Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Narayanan, Suresh; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-01-19

    Polymer-grafted nanoparticles with diameter d homogeneously dispersed in entangled polymer melts with varying random coil radius R0, but fixed entanglement mesh size a(e), are used to study particle motions in entangled polymers. We focus on materials in the transition region between the continuum regime (d > R0), where the classical Stokes-Einstein (S-E) equation is known to describe polymer drag on particles, and the noncontinuum regime (d < a(e)), in which several recent studies report faster diffusion of particles than expected from continuum S-E analysis, based on the bulk polymer viscosity. Specifically, we consider dynamics of particles with sizes d ≥ a(e) in entangled polymers with varying molecular weight M(w) in order to investigate how the transition from noncontinuum to continuum dynamics occur. We take advantage of favorable enthalpic interactions between SiO2 nanoparticles tethered with PEO molecules and entangled PMMA host polymers to create model nanoparticle-polymer composites, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in entangled polymers. Investigation of the particle dynamics via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy measurements reveals a transition from fast to slow particle motion as the PMMA molecular weight is increased beyond the entanglement threshold, with a much weaker M(w) dependence for M(w) > M(e) than expected from S-E analysis based on bulk viscosity of entangled PMMA melts. We rationalize these observations using a simple force balance analysis around particles and find that nanoparticle motion in entangled melts can be described using a variant of the S-E analysis in which motion of particles is assumed to only disturb subchain entangled host segments with sizes comparable to the particle diameter. PMID:26694953

  2. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  3. Particle sizing in rocket motor studies utilizing hologram image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, David; Powers, John

    1987-01-01

    A technique of obtaining particle size information from holograms of combustion products is described. The holograms are obtained with a pulsed ruby laser through windows in a combustion chamber. The reconstruction is done with a krypton laser with the real image being viewed through a microscope. The particle size information is measured with a Quantimet 720 image processing system which can discriminate various features and perform measurements of the portions of interest in the image. Various problems that arise in the technique are discussed, especially those that are a consequence of the speckle due to the diffuse illumination used in the recording process.

  4. Particle size and velocity measurement in flames by laser anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N. A.; Ungut, A.; Yule, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous droplet size and velocity measurements by a particle counting Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) in kerosene fuel sprays under burning and non-burning conditions are presented. Particle sizes are derived from pulse height analysis of the mean LDA signals and velocities are simultaneously determined by measuring Doppler shift frequencies. The measurements show that droplet velocity is a function of droplet diameter for burning and non-burning conditions, and spatially averaged size distributions are derived from velocity data. A comparison of results obtained under burning and non-burning conditions show changes in size distribution due to preferential vaporization of small droplets, acceleration due to thermal expansion of gases, and corresponding changes in droplet momentum.

  5. Investigation of particles size effects in Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) modelling of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai-Duy, N.; Phan-Thien, N.; Khoo, B. C.

    2015-04-01

    In the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation of suspension, the fluid (solvent) and colloidal particles are replaced by a set of DPD particles and therefore their relative sizes (as measured by their exclusion zones) can affect the maximal packing fraction of the colloidal particles. In this study, we investigate roles of the conservative, dissipative and random forces in this relative size ratio (colloidal/solvent). We propose a mechanism of adjusting the DPD parameters to properly model the solvent phase (the solvent here is supposed to have the same isothermal compressibility to that of water).

  6. Size-dependent dielectrophoretic crossover frequency of spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ping-You; Chen, I-An; Yeh, Che-Kai; Chen, Pin-Yi; Juang, Jia-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been extensively used in lab-on-a-chip systems for trapping, separating, and manipulating of micro particles suspended in a liquid medium. The most widely used analytic model, the dipole model, provides an accurate prediction on the crossover frequency of submicron particles, but cannot explain the significant drop in crossover frequency of larger particles. Here, we present numerical simulations using the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) and finite element method to study the size effect of the DEP crossover frequency of spherical polystyrene particles suspended in de-ionized water. Our results show that the surface conductance due to the electrical double layer plays a key role, and the size dependency of crossover frequency obtained by the MST method agrees reasonably well with published experimental data. The exponents of the power law are approximately -1.0 and -4.3 for smaller (diameter < 4.6 μm) and larger particles (diameter  > 4.6 μm), respectively. The free surface charge distribution reveals that the charge begins accumulating on the particle equator for particle diameters larger than a critical diameter of 4.6 μm, a result not captured by the dipolar approximation. This method may be extended to analyze bioparticles with complex shapes and composition, and provides new insights into the interpretation of dielectrophoresis applications using lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:26909121

  7. Particle Restabilization in Silica/PEG/Ethanol Suspensions: How Strongly do Polymers Need To Adsorb To Stabilize Against Aggregation?

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    We study the effects of increasing the concentration of a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol on the stability of 44 nm diameter silica nanoparticles suspended in ethanol. Polymer concentration, c{sub p}, is increased from zero to that characterizing the polymer melt. Particle stability is accessed through measurement of the particle second-virial coefficient, B{sub -2}, performed by light scattering and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The results show that at low polymer concentration, c{sub p} < 3 wt %, B{sub -2} values are positive, indicating repulsive interactions between particles. B{sub -2} decreases at intermediate concentrations (3 wt % < c{sub p} < 50 wt %), and particles aggregates are formed. At high concentrations (50 wt % < c{sub p}) B{sub -2} increases and stabilizes at a value expected for hard spheres with a diameter near 44 nm, indicating the particles are thermodynamically stable. At intermediate polymer concentrations, rates of aggregation are determined by measuring time-dependent changes in the suspension turbidity, revealing that aggregation is slowed by the necessity of the particles diffusing over a repulsive barrier in the pair potential. The magnitude of the barrier passes through a minimum at c{sub p} {approx} 12 wt % where it has a value of {approx}12kT. These results are understood in terms of a reduction of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attractions with increasing c{sub p}. Depletion attractions are found to play a minor role in particle stability. A model is presented suggesting displacement of weakly adsorbed polymer leads to slow aggregation at intermediate concentration, and we conclude that a general model of depletion restabilization may involve increased strength of polymer adsorption with increasing polymer concentration.

  8. Ammonium-Functionalized Hollow Polymer Particles As a pH-Responsive Adsorbent for Selective Removal of Acid Dye.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yan; Wang, Li; Zhao, Changwen; Chen, Dong; Ma, Yuhong; Yang, Wantai

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a novel type of ammonium-functionalized hollow polymer particles (HPP-NH3(+)) with a high density of ammonium groups in the shell has been specially designed and synthesized. Benefiting from both the high surface area and from the high density of positively charged ammonium groups, the as-prepared HPP-NH3(+) can serve as a selective adsorbent for the removal of negatively charged acid dye (e.g., methyl blue a-MB). The equilibrium adsorption data of a-MB on the HPP-NH3(+) were evaluated using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models, and Langmuir isotherm exhibited a better fit with a maximum adsorption capacity of 406 mg/g. Most importantly, because of the presence of dual functional groups (ammonium and carboxyl groups), the HPP-NH3(+) showed a significant pH-dependent equilibrium adsorption capacity, which increased dramatically from 59 mg/g to 449 mg/g as the solution pH decreased from 9 to 2. This uniqueness makes the dye-adsorbed HPP-NH3(+) can be facilely regenerated under mild condition (in weak alkaline solution, pH 10) to recover both a-MB and the HPP-NH3(+), whereas the recovery of conventional adsorbents is commonly performed under particularly severe conditions. The regenerated HPP-NH3(+) can be reused for dye removal and the dye removal efficiency remained above 98% even after five adsorption-desorption cycles. Because of its high adsorption capacity, pH-sensitivity, easy regeneration, and good reusability, the HPP-NH3(+) has great potential for the application in the field of water treatment, controlled drug release, and pH-responsive delivery. PMID:27302068

  9. Infrared study of the interaction of charged silica particles with TiO2 particles containing adsorbed cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Tripp, Carl P

    2005-03-15

    Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the adsorption of charged silica particles onto TiO(2) particles coated with anionic sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) or cationic poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDADMAC). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that IR spectroscopy has been used to study the interaction of a polymer layer on one particle with a second different particle. The results show that, once adsorbed on the TiO(2) particle, the PDADMAC or the NaPA does not transfer to the silica particles. In the case of NaPA coated TiO(2), positively charged silica particles deposit on the TiO(2) and this is accompanied by a change in the relative intensities of the bands due to COOH and COO(-) groups. From this change in band intensity, it is calculated that only approximately 6% of the COO(-) groups located in the loops and tails bind to the silica particle. This shows that the polymer bridges the two particles through an electrostatic interaction with the outer COO(-) groups. Similarly, in the case of the TiO(2) particles coated with PDADMAC, negatively charged silica deposits on the TiO(2) and this is accompanied by an increase in intensity of the symmetric bending mode of the (+)N(CH(3))(3) group. This change in band intensity arises from the binding of these cationic sites of the polymer to the negative surface sites on the silica. PMID:15752056

  10. Particle size-dependent radical generation from wildland fire smoke.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Stephen S; Castranova, Vince; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Hoover, Mark; Piacitelli, Chris; Gaughan, Denise M

    2007-07-01

    Firefighting, along with construction, mining and agriculture, ranks among the most dangerous occupations. In addition, the work environment of firefighters is unlike that of any other occupation, not only because of the obvious physical hazards but also due to the respiratory and systemic health hazards of smoke inhalation resulting from combustion. A significant amount of research has been devoted to studying municipal firefighters; however, these studies may not be useful in wildland firefighter exposures, because the two work environments are so different. Not only are wildland firefighters exposed to different combustion products, but their exposure profiles are different. The combustion products wildland firefighters are exposed to can vary greatly in characteristics due to the type and amount of material being burned, soil conditions, temperature and exposure time. Smoke inhalation is one of the greatest concerns for firefighter health and it has been shown that the smoke consists of a large number of particles. These smoke particles contain intermediates of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen free radicals, which may pose a potential health risk. Our investigation looked into the involvement of free radicals in smoke toxicity and the relationship between particle size and radical generation. Samples were collected in discrete aerodynamic particle sizes from a wildfire in Alaska, preserved and then shipped to our laboratory for analysis. Electron spin resonance was used to measure carbon-centered as well as hydroxyl radicals produced by a Fenton-like reaction with wildfire smoke. Further study of reactive oxygen species was conducted using analysis of cellular H(2)O(2) generation, lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes and DNA damage. Results demonstrate that coarse size-range particles contained more carbon radicals per unit mass than the ultrafine particles; however, the ultrafine particles generated more *OH radicals in the acellular Fenton-like reaction. The

  11. Particle Size Distribution in Saturn’s Ring C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, Essam A.; Wong, K.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.

    2012-10-01

    Information about particle sizes in Saturn’s rings is provided by two complementary types of Cassini radio occultation measurements. The first is differential extinction of three coherent sinusoidal signals transmitted by Cassini through the rings back to Earth (wavelength = 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm, respectively). The differential measurements strongly constraint three parameters of an assumed power-law size distribution n(a) = n0 (a/a0)q, amin ≤ a ≤ amax: namely, the power law index q, the minimum radius amin, and reference abundance n0 at reference radius a0. The differential measurements are particularly sensitive to radii in the range 0.1 mm < a < 1 m. Complementing this capability, is a second type of measurements that is particularly sensitive to the larger radii 1 m < a < 20 m and their abundance. Signature of the collective near-forward scattering by these particles is captured in power spectrum measurements as broadened component of width, shape, and strength that depend on ring particle sizes, their spatial distribution, and observation geometry. Contributions of ring features of width as small several hundred kilometers can be identified and isolated in the measured spectra for a small subset of Cassini orbits of favorable geometry. We use three inverse scattering algorithms (Bayes, constrained linear inversion, generalized singular-value-decomposition) to recover the size distribution of particles of resolved ring features over the size range 1 m < a < 20 m without assuming an explicit size distribution model. We also investigate consistency of the results with a single power-law model extending over 0.1 mm < a < 20 m and implications to the spatial distribution of ring particles normal to the ring plane (vertical ring thickness). We present example results for selected features across Saturn’s Ring C where little evidence for gravitational wakes is present, hence the approaches above are applicable.

  12. Taylor length-scale size particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Francesco

    The present study investigates the two-way coupling effects of finite-size solid spherical particles on decaying isotropic turbulence using an immersed boundary method. The conventional point particle assumption is valid only in the case of particles with a diameter, dp, much smaller than the Kolmogorov length scale, eta. In a simulation with particles of diameter dp > eta the flow around each particle needs to be resolved. In this study, we use a method similar to that of Uhlmann(2005) [55] that adapts the Immersed Boundary(IB) Method developed by Peskin [38] to simulate the flow around suspended spherical solid particles. The main idea of the method is to distribute a number of Lagrangian points uniformly over the surface of the particle. A force is applied at each Lagrangian point to represent the momentum exchange between the particle and the surrounding fluid. An analytic three-point delta function is used to distribute the force to the Eulerian grid points saddling the spherical surface to satisfy the no-slip condition at each Lagrangian point. Decaying turbulence is simulated in a periodic box with a uniform mesh of up to (512)3 grid points and an initial microscale Reynolds number of up to Relambda0 = 110. We compare the single phase flow (SPF) with particle-laden flows with particles of different diameters. The density of the particle varies from 2.56 to 10 times that of the fluid. The effects of the particles on the temporal development of turbulence kinetic energy E(t), its dissipation rate epsilon( t), its two-way coupling rate of change Ψp( t) and frequency spectra E(o) are discussed. In this study, in contrast to particles with dp < eta [15], particles with dp > eta always increase the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy, epsilon( t). In addition, Ψp(t) is always positive, whereas it can be positive or negative for particles with dp < eta. The balance between these two effects caused E(t) to be smaller than that of the single-phase flow

  13. Endotoxin in Size-Separated Metal Working Fluid Aerosol Particles.

    PubMed

    Dahlman-Höglund, Anna; Lindgren, Åsa; Mattsby-Baltzer, Inger

    2016-08-01

    Patients with airway symptoms working in metal working industries are increasing, despite efforts to improve the environmental air surrounding the machines. Our aim was to analyse the amount of endotoxin in size-separated airborne particles of metal working fluid (MWF) aerosol, by using the personal sampler Sioutas cascade impactor, to compare filter types, and to compare the concentration of airborne endotoxin to that of the corresponding MWFs. In a pilot field study, aerosols were collected in two separate machine halls on totally 10 occasions, using glass fibre and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters in parallel at each station. Airborne endotoxin was distributed over all size fractions. While a major part was found in the largest size fraction (72%, 2.5-10 µm), up to 8% of the airborne endotoxin was detected in the smallest size fraction (<0.25 µm). Comparing the efficiency of the filter types, a significantly higher median endotoxin level was found with glass fibres filters collecting the largest particle-size fraction (1.2-fold) and with PTFE filters collecting the smallest ones (5-fold). The levels of endotoxin in the size-separated airborne particle fractions correlated to those of the MWFs supporting the aerosol-generating machines. Our study indicates that a significant part of inhalable aerosols of MWFs consists of endotoxin-containing particles below the size of intact bacteria, and thus small enough to readily reach the deepest part of the lung. Combined with other chemical irritants of the MWF, exposure to MWF aerosols containing endotoxin pose a risk to respiratory health problems. PMID:27268595

  14. Online submicron particle sizing by dynamic light scattering using autodilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoli, David F.; Elings, V. B.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient production of a wide range of commercial products based on submicron colloidal dispersions would benefit from instrumentation for online particle sizing, permitting real time monitoring and control of the particle size distribution. Recent advances in the technology of dynamic light scattering (DLS), especially improvements in algorithms for inversion of the intensity autocorrelation function, have made it ideally suited to the measurement of simple particle size distributions in the difficult submicron region. Crucial to the success of an online DSL based instrument is a simple mechanism for automatically sampling and diluting the starting concentrated sample suspension, yielding a final concentration which is optimal for the light scattering measurement. A proprietary method and apparatus was developed for performing this function, designed to be used with a DLS based particle sizing instrument. A PC/AT computer is used as a smart controller for the valves in the sampler diluter, as well as an input-output communicator, video display and data storage device. Quantitative results are presented for a latex suspension and an oil-in-water emulsion.

  15. Tracing Particle Size Distribution Curves Using an Analogue Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisschop, F. De; Segaert, O.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes an analog circuit for use in sedimentation analysis of finely divided solid materials. Discusses a method of particle size distribution analysis and provides schematics of the circuit with list of components as well as a discussion about the operation of the circuit. (JM)

  16. Effective particle sizes of cohesive sediment in north Mississippi streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the size of cohesive sediment particles transported in streams is important information for predicting how the sediment and contaminants the sediment may be carrying will be transported by the flow. Cohesive sediments (less than 0.062 mm in diameter) generally are not transported in th...

  17. AIRBORNE PARTICLE SIZES AND SOURCES FOUND IN INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes results of a literature search into the sources, sizes, and concentrations of particles in indoor air, including the various types: plant, animal, mineral, combustion, home/personal care, and radioactive aerosols. This information, presented in a summary figu...

  18. ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF SIZED PARTICLES EMITTED FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses several approaches for obtaining the elemental and, in a few cases, inorganic compound identification in sized particles. The elemental analyses are done by wavelength dispersion x-ray fluorescence (WXRF). Fourier Transform infrared is being used for inorgani...

  19. Particle size distributions in and exhausted from a poultry house

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe a study looking at the full particulate size range of particles in a poultry house. Agricultural particulates are typically thought of as coarse mode dust. But recent emphasis of PM2.5 regulations on pre-cursors such as ammonia and volatile organic compounds increasingly makes it ne...

  20. A combination of size-resolved particle samplers and XRF microprobe technique for single particle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chang-Jin; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    It is important to understand the properties of individual airborne particulates that are determined by the processes of various physicochemical reactions occurring in their generation, transformation, and transport. This study describes the application of the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe technique to the analysis of size-resolved individual particles as well as the results of an experimental study on the comparison of three different particle collection instruments for single particle analysis: a two-stage filter pack, a low pressure Andersen impactor (LPAI), and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). Though LPAI and MOUDI are relatively suitable for multisize-segregated particles sampling compared with the two-stage filter pack sampler, they can easily form particle clusters and finally these particle clusters impede single particle analysis. Even though more particle mass can be collected without overloading on the substrate using MOUDI, by stage rotating, particles are still deposited and form clusters on the concentric circles. When particles are forming a spot (or other shapes of particle cluster), single particle analysis using the XRF micro-beam technique is restricted to individual particles deposited at the edge of the spot. Thus, the sampling duration time depending on the sampler stage should be adjusted for single particle study.

  1. Particle size distribution effects in an irradiated turbulent gas-particle mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mona; Geraci, Gianluca; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Mani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The effects of particle size distribution on thermodynamic and hydrodynamic behavior of solid particle solar receivers, that involve a turbulent mixture of gas and particles in a radiation environment, are investigated, using DNS with point particles. The turbulent flow is seeded with monodisperse and polydisperse particles, where the mass loading and total frontal area of particles are matched between the two systems. The results show that the variability of the Stokes number for polydisperse particles can significantly influence the particle clustering, and consequently the thermal performance of the system. In all cases studied, the preferential concentration is less pronounced for polydisperse as opposed to monodisperse particles. This reduced preferential concentration results in less heating of the particles, but more efficient energy release to the gas phase. Due to their different clustering patterns, polydisperse particles influence the Taylor scale of the flow in the turbulent gas phase. Polydispersity also implies variable thermodynamic and hydrodynamic properties of the particles. Our results show that the thermal behavior of the system with polydisperse particles is set by the integral measures for particle and gas momentum and thermal relaxation times.

  2. Comparison of ice particle size variations across Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Katrin; Hoffmann, Harald; Hibbitts, Karl; Wagner, Roland; Jaumann, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Ratios of band depths of different H2O ice absorptions as measured by the Near Infrared Spectrometer NIMS onboard the Galileo spacecraft [1] have been found to be semi-quantitative indicator of changes in the particle size of ice across the surfaces of the Jovian satellite Ganymede [2]. This method is now applied to Ganymede's neighboring satellite Callisto. On Ganymede, sizes reach from 1 μm near the poles to 1 mm near the equator [2]. Smallest particles occur at latitudes higher than ±30° where the closed magnetic field lines of Ganymede's magnetic field change into open ones and Ganymede's polar caps become apparent. Thus, the formation of these polar caps has often been attributed to brightening effects due to plasma bombardment of the surface [3,4]. Callisto, which does not exhibit an intrinsic magnetic field, however, also shows the same trend as observed on Ganymede with slightly larger particle sizes on Callisto than on Ganymede at low and mid latitude but similar particle sizes in the polar regions. Similar trends in the particle size variations on Callisto and on Ganymede imply that these variations are caused by similar surface processes. Our measurements rather point to a continuous decreasing of ice particle sizes toward the poles on both satellites related to changes of the surface temperatures [5]. Maximum temperatures during the day reach 150 K and 165 K near the equator of Ganymede and Callisto [6, 7], respectively and sublimation of ice particles and crystal growth [8] is expected to be the dominant surface process in these regions. In contrast, polar temperatures do not exceed 80 ± 5 K [5]. Larger particles in the equatorial region of Callisto than on Ganymede could be explained due to the slight higher maximum temperature but also a longer Callistoan day (Callisto: ~ 17 Earth days; Ganymede: ~ 7 Earth days). References: [1] Carlson et al.. (1999) Science 274, 385-388, 1996; [2] Stephan et al., 2009, EPSC, Abstract #EPSC2009-633; [3] Johnson

  3. Evolution of Particle Size Distributions in Fragmentation Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new model of fragmentation based on a probabilistic calculation of the repeated fracture of a particle population. The resulting continuous solution, which is in closed form, gives the evolution of fragmentation products from an initial block, through a scale-invariant power-law relationship to a final comminuted powder. Models for the fragmentation of particles have been developed separately in mainly two different disciplines: the continuous integro-differential equations of batch mineral grinding (Reid, 1965) and the fractal analysis of geophysics (Turcotte, 1986) based on a discrete model with a single probability of fracture. The first gives a time-dependent development of the particle-size distribution, but has resisted a closed-form solution, while the latter leads to the scale-invariant power laws, but with no time dependence. Bird (2009) recently introduced a bridge between these two approaches with a step-wise iterative calculation of the fragmentation products. The development of the particle-size distribution occurs with discrete steps: during each fragmentation event, the particles will repeatedly fracture probabilistically, cascading down the length scales to a final size distribution reached after all particles have failed to further fragment. We have identified this process as the equivalent to a sequence of trials for each particle with a fixed probability of fragmentation. Although the resulting distribution is discrete, it can be reformulated as a continuous distribution in maturity over time and particle size. In our model, Turcotte's power-law distribution emerges at a unique maturation index that defines a regime boundary. Up to this index, the fragmentation is in an erosional regime with the initial particle size setting the scaling. Fragmentation beyond this index is in a regime of comminution with rebreakage of the particles down to the size limit of fracture. The maturation index can increment continuously, for example under

  4. Entropic control of particle sizes during viral self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelnovo, M.; Muriaux, D.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.

    2013-03-01

    Morphologic diversity is observed across all families of viruses. However, these supra-molecular assemblies are produced most of the time in a spontaneous way through complex molecular self-assembly scenarios. The modeling of these phenomena remains a challenging problem within the emerging field of physical virology. We present in this work a theoretical analysis aiming at highlighting the particular role of configuration entropy in the control of viral particle size distribution. Specializing this model to retroviruses such as HIV-1, we predict a new mechanism of entropic control of both RNA uptake into the viral particle and of the particle's size distribution. Evidence of this peculiar behavior has recently been reported experimentally.

  5. Stabilization of Oil-in-Water Emulsions with Noninterfacially Adsorbed Particles.

    PubMed

    Pilapil, Brandy K; Jahandideh, Heidi; Bryant, Steven L; Trifkovic, Milana

    2016-07-19

    Classical (surfactant stabilized) and Pickering (particle stabilized) type emulsions have been widely studied to elucidate the mechanisms by which emulsion stabilization is achieved. In Pickering emulsions, a key defining factor is that the stabilizing particles reside at the liquid-liquid interface providing a mechanical barrier to droplet coalescence. This interfacial adsorption is achieved through the use of nanoparticles that are partially wet by both liquid phases, often through covalent surface modification of or surfactant adsorption to the nanoparticle surfaces. Herein, we demonstrate particle-induced stabilization of an oil-in-water emulsion with fully water wet nanoparticles (no interfacial adsorption) via synergistic interaction with low concentrations of surfactants. Laser scanning confocal microscopy analysis allows for unique and vital insights into the properties of these emulsions via both three-dimensional imaging and real-time monitoring of particle dynamics at the oil-water interface. Investigation of these "non-Pickering" particle stabilized emulsions suggests that the nonadsorbed particles impart stability to the emulsion primarily via entropic forces imparted by the accumulation of silica nanoparticles in the coherent phase between dispersed oil droplets. PMID:27351486

  6. Ultrasonic cavitation for obtainment of nanometric sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A.; Guzmán, R.; Espinosa, J.; Estrada, J.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to determine the possibility of obtaining nanometric size particles of aluminium oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) from commercial micron-sized powders, through the physical principle of ultrasonic cavitation, in order to be used as supply material in coatings made through a process of thermal spray by flame. The tests are performed on a Hielscher UIP 1000hd Ultrasonics equipment, in a 20 micron wave amplitude and in times of 6, 8, 12, 18 and 24 hours. The determination of the particle size is done through image processing using ImageJ software, obtained by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM); while the elemental composition of the processed samples is analyzed through the technique of energy dispersing spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that Al2O3 and TiO2 have a reduction behaviour of the particles size after being subjected to ultrasonic cavitation, however is only reached the nanometric size in the TiO2 samples.

  7. Particle Sizes and Self Gravity Wakes in Saturn's A Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerousek, R. G.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have measured normal optical depths throughout Saturn's rings by stellar occultations covering a wide range of viewing geometries. The UVIS photometer has an effective wavelength of 0.15 µm and a relatively wide (6.0 mrad × 6.4 mrad) field-of-view. VIMS, in occultation mode, measures at an effective wavelength of 2.9 µm and over a single pixel of angular dimensions 0.25 mrad × 0.5 mrad. Occultations measured by VIMS at the same viewing geometry as UVIS occultations overstate the optical depth if particles smaller than 1.22λVIMS/2θ ~ 8.36 mm are present because light diffracted out of the VIMS pixel by those particles is not replaced by neighboring particles. By measuring differential optical depths one can probe the parameters of the ring particle size distribution (i.e. Zebker et al. 1985, Icarus, 64, 531-548). The technique is complicated, however, by the geometric dependence of the optical depth imposed by the non-axisymmetric self-gravity wakes, which are ephemeral elongated aggregates, deformed by Keplerian shear. Beginning with the granola bar wake model of Colwell et al. (2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L07201), we introduce a free parameter τsmall which represents the excess normal optical depth measured by VIMS due to sub-cm particles between the opaque wakes and combine VIMS and UVIS occultations for particle size analysis while simultaneously determining the properties of the wakes. We find that throughout the A Ring the wake properties generally agree with previously published results (Colwell et al. 2006, Hedman et al. 2007, Astron. J., 133, 2624-2629). We find a significant fraction of sub-cm particles in the inner and outer A Ring and in the troughs of density waves near strong Lindblad resonances. While wake properties vary in the halo regions surrounding these resonances, the abundance of sub-cm particles varies little from 124

  8. EFFECT OF PARTICLE DIAMETER ON EXCLUSION-ZONE SIZE

    PubMed Central

    NHAN, D.T.; POLLACK, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Particles and solutes are excluded from the vicinity of hydrophilic surfaces, leaving large microsphere-free regions known as exclusion zones (EZs). Prior work had indicated that EZs could extend to distances of up to several hundred micrometers from the nucleating surface. These observations were made on large, extended surfaces, leaving open the question whether EZ size might depend on the characteristic dimension of the excluding surface. We placed one or few ion-exchange-resin beads whose diameters varied from 15 μm to 300 μm in cuvettes. The beads were suffused with aqueous microsphere suspensions for observing the surfaces’ exclusionary behavior. Results showed a direct relation between bead size and EZ size over the full range of bead diameter, implying a similar relation for smaller particles or molecules, perhaps extending beyond the resolution of the light microscope. PMID:22389653

  9. Determination of atmospheric particle size distribution from forward scattering data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an analytic method of reconstructing the particle size distribution of atmospheric aerosols when no a priori information is available regarding the refractive index of the particles, the analytic form of the distribution, the size range, and the size extremal values. The method applies in principle to angle-dependent scattering data at a fixed wave number, or to wave-number-dependent scattering data at a fixed angle, or to a combination of the two. Some results of an angular scan study of the aureole are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. In conclusion, an analysis is made of the efficiency and accuracy of the method, the uniqueness of the inverse solutions, and the stability of the method relative to experimental noise.

  10. Metrological assessment of a portable analyzer for monitoring the particle size distribution of ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Stabile, Luca; Cauda, Emanuele; Marini, Sara; Buonanno, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    Adverse health effects caused by worker exposure to ultrafine particles have been detected in recent years. The scientific community focuses on the assessment of ultrafine aerosols in different microenvironments in order to determine the related worker exposure/dose levels. To this end, particle size distribution measurements have to be taken along with total particle number concentrations. The latter are obtainable through hand-held monitors. A portable particle size distribution analyzer (Nanoscan SMPS 3910, TSI Inc.) was recently commercialized, but so far no metrological assessment has been performed to characterize its performance with respect to well-established laboratory-based instruments such as the scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) spectrometer. The present paper compares the aerosol monitoring capability of the Nanoscan SMPS to the laboratory SMPS in order to evaluate whether the Nanoscan SMPS is suitable for field experiments designed to characterize particle exposure in different microenvironments. Tests were performed both in a Marple calm air chamber, where fresh diesel particulate matter and atomized dioctyl phthalate particles were monitored, and in microenvironments, where outdoor, urban, indoor aged, and indoor fresh aerosols were measured. Results show that the Nanoscan SMPS is able to properly measure the particle size distribution for each type of aerosol investigated, but it overestimates the total particle number concentration in the case of fresh aerosols. In particular, the test performed in the Marple chamber showed total concentrations up to twice those measured by the laboratory SMPS-likely because of the inability of the Nanoscan SMPS unipolar charger to properly charge aerosols made up of aggregated particles. Based on these findings, when field test exposure studies are conducted, the Nanoscan SMPS should be used in tandem with a condensation particle counter in order to verify and correct the particle size distribution data

  11. Thermal and adsorbate effects on the activity and morphology of size-selected Pdn/TiO2 model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, William E.; Kunkel, William A.; Roberts, F. Sloan; Kane, Matthew; Anderson, Scott L.

    2014-03-01

    Model catalysts containing size-selected Pdn (n = 1,2,4,7,10,16,20,25) deposited on rutile TiO2(110) deactivate during repeated CO oxidation temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) cycles, and the deactivation process has been probed using a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), low-energy ion scattering (ISS), temperature-dependent ion scattering (TD-ISS), annealing experiments, and temperature-programmed desorption following exposure to CO and O2 reactants. Results from such experiments suggest the cluster deactivation proceeds via an alloy-like, strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) effect that chemically modifies the clusters via electronic interactions between the supported metal atoms and Ti from the support. Threshold measurements show that this effect detrimentally affects CO-oxidation activity prior to the formation of an encapsulating overlayer by severely weakening the COPd bond strengths for binding configurations on top of the clusters. Oxidation appears to provide means of partially restoring the clusters to their initial state, but after sufficient exposure to reducing environments and elevated temperatures, all Pdn become covered by an overlayer and begin to electronically and chemically resemble freshly deposited atoms, which are completely inactive towards the probe reaction. In addition, we find evidence of oxygen spillover induced by co-adsorbed CO during TPRs for all active Pdn clusters.

  12. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy on nucleic acids and related compounds adsorbed on colloidal silver particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneipp, K.; Pohle, W.; Fabian, H.

    1991-04-01

    Various nucleic acids and related compounds have been investigated by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on silver sol. The time delay between the addition of the various nucleic acids to the silver sol and the appearance of their SER spectra, i.e. the time needed by the various molecules to adsorb on an active site of the silver surface with an adsorption geometry which allows a SERS enhancement, shows strong differences. For instance, an immediate appearance of SER spectra has been found for DNA, whereas ribonucleic acids (RNAs) demonstrated a strong time delay (up to days) of the appearance of their SER spectra. This delay can be tentatively explained by the higher rigidity of RNA molecules compared with DNA. The more flexible DNA molecules are better adaptable to adsorption on silver than RNAs. The SER spectra of RNAs and DNAs showed strong changes within their relative line intensities as a function of time before they achieved stationary conditions, which indicates a protracted re-arrangement of the large molecules on the silver surface.

  14. Particle Sizes in Saturn's Rings from Cassini Radio Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E. A.; Wong, K. K.; French, R. G.; Rappaport, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    Information about particle sizes in Saturn's rings is provided by differential extinction of three coherent sinusoidal radio signals transmitted by Cassini through the rings back to Earth (wavelength = 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm, respectively). The measurements are particularly sensitive to radii in the range ~0.1 mm < a < ~1 m. Complementary information is provided by measurements of collective near-forward scattering by the particles. The latter is captured in spectrograms of the received signals. Contributions of ring features of width as small several hundred kilometers can be identified and isolated in the measured spectra for a small subset of Cassini orbits of favorable geometry. Spectrograms measurements are sensitive to particles in the radius range ~1 m < a < ~20 m and to spatially correlated aggregates of such particles (gravitational wakes). We use both inverse scattering and modeling techniques to recover the particle size distribution of 57 sub-regions of Saturn's Ring C. Power-law models of maximum particle radius a_max ~ 5 to 6 m, and power-law index 3.15 ≤ q ≤ 3.35 characterize the Ring C background structure, with some subtle variations in the wavy region. Larger a_max ~ 9 m and smaller q ~3.15 characterize the outer ramp region. Surprisingly, even larger sizes amax ~ 25 m appear to populate 4 of the Ring C 'plateaus,' possibly in aggregates form rather than as individual particles. In sharp contrast, particles of comparatively smaller maximum size appear to populate a fifth plateau region. In almost all Ring C regions, the minimum radius a_min consistently falls in the few millimeters range. In ring regions where gravitational wakes are know to be present, such as Rings A and B, the measured spectrograms show evidence for a strong forward scattering component consistent with scattering by spatially correlated and canted 'cylindrical' structures. We constrain the aggregate sizes, their canting angle, and other physical properties using comparisons

  15. Theory and applications of refractive index-based optical microscopy to measure protein mass transfer in spherical adsorbent particles.

    PubMed

    Bankston, Theresa E; Stone, Melani C; Carta, Giorgio

    2008-04-25

    This work provides the theoretical foundation and a range of practical application examples of a recently developed method to measure protein mass transfer in adsorbent particles using refractive index-based optical microscopy. A ray-theoretic approach is first used to predict the behavior of light traveling through a particle during transient protein adsorption. When the protein concentration gradient in the particle is sharp, resulting in a steep refractive index gradient, the rays bend and intersect, thereby concentrating light in a sharp ring that marks the position of the adsorption front. This behavior is observed when mass transfer is dominated by pore diffusion and the adsorption isotherm is highly favorable. Applications to protein cation-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and affinity adsorption are then considered using, as examples, the three commercial, agarose-based stationary phases SP-Sepharose-FF, Butyl Sepharose 4FF, and MabSelect. In all three cases, the method provides results that are consistent with measurements based on batch adsorption and previously published data confirming its utility for the determination of protein mass transfer kinetics under a broad range of practically relevant conditions. PMID:18353343

  16. Aspects of droplet and particle size control in miniemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygi-Arslan, Oznur

    Miniemulsion polymerization has become increasingly popular among researchers since it can provide significant advantages over conventional emulsion polymerization in certain cases, such as production of high-solids, low-viscosity latexes with better stability and polymerization of highly water-insoluble monomers. Miniemulsions are relatively stable oil (e.g., monomer) droplets, which can range in size from 50 to 500 nm, and are normally dispersed in an aqueous phase with the aid of a surfactant and a costabilizer. These droplets are the primary locus of the initiation of the polymerization reaction. Since particle formation takes place in the monomer droplets, theoretically, in miniemulsion systems the final particle size can be controlled by the initial droplet size. The miniemulsion preparation process typically generates broad droplet size distributions and there is no complete treatment in the literature regarding the control of the mean droplet size or size distribution. This research aims to control the miniemulsion droplet size and its distribution. In situ emulsification, where the surfactant is synthesized spontaneously at the oil/water interface, has been put forth as a simpler method for the preparation of miniemulsions-like systems. Using the in situ method of preparation, emulsion stability and droplet and particle sizes were monitored and compared with conventional emulsions and miniemulsions. Styrene emulsions prepared by the in situ method do not demonstrate the stability of a comparable miniemulsion. Upon polymerization, the final particle size generated from the in situ emulsion did not differ significantly from the comparable conventional emulsion polymerization; the reaction mechanism for in situ emulsions is more like conventional emulsion polymerization rather than miniemulsion polymerization. Similar results were found when the in situ method was applied to controlled free radical polymerizations (CFRP), which have been advanced as a

  17. Particle size dependent rheological property in magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Pei, Lei; Xuan, Shouhu; Yan, Qifan; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the particle size on the rheological property of magnetic fluid was studied both by the experimental and computer simulation methods. Firstly, the magnetic fluids were prepared by dispersing Fe3O4 nanospheres with size varied from 40 nm to 100 nm and 200 nm in the solution. Then, the rheological properties were investigated and it was found that the relative magnetorheological effects increased with increasing the particle size. Finally, the molecular dynamic simulation was used to analyze the mechanical characteristics of the magnetic fluid and the chain-like model agreed well with the experimental result. The authentic chain-like structure observed by a microscope agreed with the simulation results. The three particles composed of the similar cluster nanostructure, thus they exhibited similar magnetic property. To this end, the unique assembling microstructures was the origination of the mechanical difference. And it was found that the higher MR (magnetorheological) effects of the large particle based magnetic fluid was originated from the stronger assembling microstructure under the applying magnetic field.

  18. Size distribution of airborne particles controls outcome of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Roy M; Giorio, Chiara; Beddows, David C S; Dall'Osto, Manuel

    2010-12-15

    Epidemiological studies typically using wide size range mass metrics (e.g. PM(10)) have demonstrated associations between airborne particulate matter and several adverse health outcomes. This approach ignores the fact that mass concentration may not correlate with regional lung dose, unlike the case of trace gases. When using measured particle size distributions as the basis for calculating regional lung dose, PM(10) mass concentration is found to be a good predictor of the mass dose in all regions of the lung, but is far less predictive of the surface area and particle number dose. On the other hand, measurements of particle number do not well predict mass dose, indicating that the chosen particle metric is likely to determine the health outcomes detectable by an epidemiological study. Consequently, epidemiological studies using mass metrics (PM(2.5) and PM(10)) may fail to recognise important health consequences of particulate matter exposure, leading to an underestimate of the public health consequences of particle exposure. PMID:21109288

  19. THE STICKINESS OF MICROMETER-SIZED WATER-ICE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2015-01-01

    Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates), water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-sized region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of μm-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between 114 K and 260 K. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below ∼210 K), μm-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of 9.6 m s{sup –1}, which is approximately 10 times higher than the sticking threshold of μm-sized silica particles. Furthermore, erosion of the grown ice aggregates is observed for velocities above 15.3 m s{sup –1}. A comparison of the experimentally derived sticking threshold with model predictions is performed to determine important material properties of water ice, i.e., the specific surface energy and the viscous relaxation time. Our experimental results indicate that the presence of water ice in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks can enhance the growth of planetesimals by direct sticking of particles.

  20. The Size Distribution of Arecibo Interstellar Particles and Its Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, David D.; Janches, Diego; Mathews, John D.

    2002-11-01

    Size histograms of all Arecibo ultra-high-frequency radar micrometeors detected in 1997-1998 whose radii were measured by atmospheric drag are presented. Most can be fitted with either a lognormal function or, alternatively, one or more power-law functions. Either form is indicative of significant fragmentation. The interplanetary dust particle (IDP) histogram results are discussed and compared with those considered to be extrasolar particles, including a subset of those deemed to be true interstellar particles (ISPs). The Arecibo IDP power-law results are shown to agree well with those derived from IRAS dust bands and Long-Duration Exposure Facility cratering, thus confirming the applicability of the sample to the derivation of mass estimates. A dichotomy between size histograms of particles with preperihelion Earth encounters and those with postperihelion encounters is evidence that significant size histogram change occurs when the smallest particles, including all ISPs, pass close to the Sun, even if only once. A small sample of previously undetected Arecibo postperihelion ISPs coming from the direction of the known Ulysses gas and dust flow are shown to have a size distribution and solar system dynamical properties similar to other Arecibo ISPs and therefore can be combined with previous ISP results to obtain a more robust sample. Derived mass flux points for the Arecibo ISPs agree well (over 5 orders of magnitude of mass) with a previously derived mass flux distribution function for Ulysses/Galileo spacecraft dust. This combined spacecraft and ground-based mass flux function is then used to infer a number of interesting mass-related solar system and astrophysical quantities.

  1. The effects of aluminum particle size on aluminized propellant combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokhan, Allan

    The goal of this thesis was to: test current ideas regarding the complex behavior of aluminized propellant combustion, extend understanding to conditions not previously clarified, and demonstrate the applicability of the results in the tailoring of propellant formulations to specific applicational needs. The study focused on ammonium perchlorate (AP), hydrocarbon binder, aluminum (Al) formulations. All formulations had 11% polybutadiene (PBAN) binder and 89% solids (i.e., 18% Al and 71% AP). The primary propellant formulations were Al and fine AP (fAP) particle sizes. The values of these variables were chosen according to current practical standards and ideas on how to tailor the Al behavior. Bimodal size distributions were used for AP and Al. For bimodal Al formulations, the coarse Al particle size was 30mum (nominal) and the fine Al particle size was 0.1mum (nominal), and for bimodal AP, the cAP particle size was 400mum (nominal) and the fAP particle size was either 82.5mum or 10mum (nominal). The effects of the Al particle size, Al c/f ratio, fAP particle size and the AP c/f ratio were examined for monomodal and bimodal aluminized propellants. This experimental investigation challenges conventional thinking with regards to the mechanisms involved with Al combustion and provides guidelines in formulating propellants with minimal losses in performance. The results showed the existence of an intense aluminized burning region (ABR) very close to the propellant surface with ultra-fine Al (UFAl) and 3mum Al that encouraged heat feedback to the flame front and to the propellant surface in the form of radiation and conduction. The high burning rates observed with UFAl were part of a continuum of reducing the size of the Al particles, which also lead to the presence of a dense ABR close to the propellant surface. It was also shown that major modification to the burning rates could be achieved by moderate amounts of UFAl and/or significant reduction in the AP c/f ratio. A

  2. Theory of flotation of small and medium-size particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derjaguin, B. V.; Dukhin, S. S.

    1993-08-01

    The paper describes a theory of flotation of small and medium-size particles less than 50μ in radius) when their precipitation on a bubble surface depends more on surface forces than on inertia forces, and deformation of the bubble due to collisions with the particles may be neglected. The approach of the mineral particle to the bubble surface is regarded as taking place in three stages corresponding to movement of the particles through zones 1, 2 and 3. Zone 3 is a liquid wetting layer of such thickness that a positive or negative disjoining pressure arises in this intervening layer between the particle and the bubble. By zone 2 is meant the diffusional boundary layer of the bubble. In zone 1, which comprises the entire liquid outside zone 2, there are no surface forces. Precipitation of the particles is calculated by considering the forces acting in zones 1, 2 and 3. The particles move through zone 1 under the action of gravity and inertia. Analysis of the movement of the particles under the action of these forces gives the critical particle size, below which contact with the bubble surface is impossible, if the surface forces acting in zones 2 and 3 be neglected. The forces acting in zone 2 are ‘diffusio-phoretic’ forces due to the concentration gradient in the diffusional boundary layer. The concentration and electric field intensity distribution in zone 2 is calculated, taking into account ion diffusion to the deformed bubble surface. An examination is made of the ‘equilibrium’ surface forces acting in zone 3 independent of whether the bubble is at rest or in motion. These forces, which determine the behaviour of the thin wetting intervening layer between the bubble and the mineral particle and the height of the force barrier against its rupture, may be represented as results of the disjoining pressure forces acting on various parts of the film. The main components of the disjoining pressure are van der Waals forces, forces of an iono

  3. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  4. Mr Fluids with Nano-Sized Magnetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormann, Cl.; Laun, H. M.; Richter, H. J.

    Recently magnetorheological fluids with nanosized magnetic ferrite particles have become available. Their composition, rheological and magnetic properties are described. A comparison with conventional MR fluids based on micron-sized particles is given. The yield stress of nano-MR fluids can be increased by a moderate magnetic field (0,2 T) by 4000 Pa. It can be modulated by the magnetic field with a response time of less than 5 ms. Details are given on the long term thermal stability at 150 °C, on flow properties at elevated temperatures and at high shear rates. Design principles for MR fluid actuator design are outlined.

  5. Photothermal imaging of nanometer-sized metal particles among scatterers.

    PubMed

    Boyer, David; Tamarat, Philippe; Maali, Abdelhamid; Lounis, Brahim; Orrit, Michel

    2002-08-16

    Ambient optical detection of labeled molecules is limited for fluorescent dyes by photobleaching and for semiconducting nanoparticles by "blinking" effects. Because nanometer-sized metal particles do not optically bleach, they may be useful optical labels if suitable detection signals can be found. We demonstrate far-field optical detection of gold colloids down to diameters of 2.5 nanometers with a photothermal method that combines high-frequency modulation and polarization interference contrast. The photothermal image is immune to the effects of scattering background, which limits particle imaging through Rayleigh scattering to diameters larger than 40 nanometers. PMID:12183624

  6. Counting particles emitted by stratospheric aircraft and measuring size of particles emitted by stratospheric aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James Charles

    1994-01-01

    The ER-2 condensation nuclei counter (CNC) has been modified to reduce the diffusive losses of particles within the instrument. These changes have been successful in improving the counting efficiency of small particles at low pressures. Two techniques for measuring the size distributions of particles with diameters less than 0.17 micrometers have been evaluated. Both of these methods, the differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and the diffusion battery, have fundamental problems that limit their usefulness for stratospheric applications. We cannot recommend either for this application. Newly developed, alternative methods for measuring small particles include inertial separation with a low-loss critical orifice and thin-plate impactor device. This technique is now used to collect particles in the multisample aerosol collector housed in the ER-2 CNC-2, and shows some promise for particle size measurements when coupled with a CNC as a counting device. The modified focused-cavity aerosol spectrometer (FCAS) can determine the size distribution of particles with ambient diameters as small as about 0.07 micrometers. Data from this instrument indicates the presence of a nuclei mode when CNC-2 indicates high concentrations of particles, but cannot resolve important parameters of the distribution.

  7. Fine cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method using nano-sized precursor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Koo, Hye Young; Hong, Seung Kwon; Jo, Eun Byul; Kang, Yun Chan

    Fine-sized Li-Co-Mn-O cathode particles with various ratios of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method using the nano-sized precursor particles. The nano-sized precursor particles of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) particles had finer size than that of the pure LiCoO 2 particles. Manganese component disturbed the growth of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method. The initial discharge capacities of the layered LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) cathode particles decreased from 144 to 136 mAh g -1 when the ratios of Co/Mn components were changed from 1/0 to 0.7/0.3. The mean sizes of the spinel LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased from 650 to 460 nm when the ratios of Mn/Co components were changed from 2/0 to 1.8/0.2. The initial discharge capacities of the LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased from 119 to 86 mAh g -1 when the ratios of Mn/Co components were changed from 2/0 to 1.8/0.2.

  8. Surface activity of Janus particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces: Theoretical and experimental aspects.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, Miguel Angel; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2016-07-01

    Since de Gennes coined in 1992 the term Janus particle (JP), there has been a continued effort to develop this field. The purpose of this review is to present the most relevant theoretical and experimental results obtained so far on the surface activity of amphiphilic JPs at fluid interfaces. The surface activity of JPs at fluid-fluid interfaces can be experimentally determined using two different methods: the classical Langmuir balance or the pendant drop tensiometry. The second method requires much less amount of sample than the first one, but it has also some experimental limitations. In all cases collected here the JPs exhibited a higher surface or interfacial activity than the corresponding homogeneous particles. This reveals the significant advantage of JPs for the stabilization of emulsions and foams. PMID:26094083

  9. Current Development Status of a Particle Size Analyzer for Coated Particle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew T; Hunn, John D; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2007-08-01

    Work was performed to develop a prototype Particle Size Analyzer (PSA) for application to coated particle fuel characterization. This system was based on a light obscuration method and targeted towards high throughput analysis. Although never matured to the point of replacing existing lower throughput optical microscopy shadowgraph methods, the system was successfully applied to automating the counting of large particle samples for increased accuracy in calculating mean particle properties based on measurements of multiparticle samples. The measurement of particle size with the PSA was compared to current shadowgraph techniques and found to result in considerably greater throughput at the cost of larger measurement uncertainty. The current algorithm used by the PSA is more sensitive to particle shape and this is a likely cause of the greater uncertainty when attempting to measure average particle diameter. The use of the PSA to measure particle shape will require further development. Particle transport through the PSA and stability of the light source/detector are key elements in the successful application of this technique. A number of system pitfalls were studied and addressed.

  10. Particle size and pathogenicity in the respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard James

    2013-01-01

    Particle size dictates where aerosolized pathogens deposit in the respiratory tract, thereafter the pathogens potential to cause disease is influenced by tissue tropism, clearance kinetics and the host immunological response. This interplay brings pathogens into contact with a range of tissues spanning the respiratory tract and associated anatomical structures. In animal models, differential deposition within the respiratory tract influences infection kinetics for numerous select agents. Greater numbers of pathogens are required to infect the upper (URT) compared with the lower respiratory tract (LRT), and in comparison the URT infections are protracted with reduced mortality. Pathogenesis in the URT is characterized by infection of the URT lymphoid tissues, cervical lymphadenopathy and septicemia, closely resembling reported human infections of the URT. The olfactory, gastrointestinal, and ophthalmic systems are also infected in a pathogen-dependent manner. The relevant literature is reviewed with respect to particle size and infection of the URT in animal models and humans. PMID:24225380

  11. Inversion method based on stochastic optimization for particle sizing.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Escobar, Juan Jaime; Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana Ibeth; Vargas-Ubera, Javier; Aguilar-Valdés, Félix

    2016-08-01

    A stochastic inverse method is presented based on a hybrid evolutionary optimization algorithm (HEOA) to retrieve a monomodal particle-size distribution (PSD) from the angular distribution of scattered light. By solving an optimization problem, the HEOA (with the Fraunhofer approximation) retrieves the PSD from an intensity pattern generated by Mie theory. The analyzed light-scattering pattern can be attributed to unimodal normal, gamma, or lognormal distribution of spherical particles covering the interval of modal size parameters 46≤α≤150. The HEOA ensures convergence to the near-optimal solution during the optimization of a real-valued objective function by combining the advantages of a multimember evolution strategy and locally weighted linear regression. The numerical results show that our HEOA can be satisfactorily applied to solve the inverse light-scattering problem. PMID:27505357

  12. Comparison of the activities of fine-particle size catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The objectives of Sandia`s fine-particle size catalyst testing project are to evaluate and compare the activities of the fine-particle size catalysts being developed in DOE/PETCs Advanced Research Coal Liquefaction Program by using standard coal liquefaction test procedures. The standard procedures use Blind Canyon coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design with temperatures from 350{degrees}C to 400{degrees}C, reaction times from 20 to 60 minutes, and catalyst loadings up to 1 wt%. Catalytic activity is measured in terms of tetrahydrofuran conversion, heptane conversion, the amount of 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene in the product, and the gas yield. Several catalysts have been evaluated including a commercially available pyrite, a sulfated iron oxide from the University of Pittsburgh, and several preparations of 6-line ferrihydrites from Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Results have demonstrated that significant differences in activity can be detected among these catalysts.

  13. Size segregation in bedload sediment transport at the particle scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, P.; Martin, T.

    2011-12-01

    Bedload, the larger material that is transported in stream channels, has major consequences, for the management of water resources, for environmental sustainability, and for flooding alleviation. Most particularly, in mountains, steep slopes drive intense transport of a wide range of grain sizes. Our ability to compute local and even bulk quantities such as the sediment flux in rivers is poor. One important reason is that grain-grain interactions in stream channels may have been neglected. An arguably most important difficulty pertains to the very wide range of grain size leading to grain size sorting or segregation. This phenomenon largely modifies fluxes and results in patterns that can be seen ubiquitously in nature such as armoring or downstream fining. Most studies have concerned the spontaneous percolation of fine grains into immobile gravels, because of implications for salmonid spawning beds, or stratigraphical interpretation. However when the substrate is moving, the segregation process is different as statistically void openings permit downward percolation of larger particles. This process also named "kinetic sieving" has been studied in industrial contexts where segregation of granular or powder materials is often non-desirable. We present an experimental study of two-size mixtures of coarse spherical glass beads entrained by a shallow turbulent and supercritical water flow down a steep channel with a mobile bed. The particle diameters were 4 and 6mm, the channel width 6.5mm and the channel inclination ranged from 7.5 to 12.5%. The water flow rate and the particle rate were kept constant at the upstream entrance. First only the coarser particle rate was input and adjusted to obtain bed load equilibrium, that is, neither bed degradation nor aggradation over sufficiently long time intervals. Then a low rate of smaller particles (about 1% of the total sediment rate) was introduced to study the spatial and temporal evolution of segregating smaller particles

  14. Particle size distribution dynamics during precipitative softening: constant solution composition.

    PubMed

    Nason, Jeffrey A; Lawler, Desmond F

    2008-08-01

    In the treatment of surface water for potable use, precipitative coagulation (e.g., lime softening, alum or iron sweep coagulation) is widely utilized prior to particle removal processes. The particle size distribution (PSD) formed during such processes is a prime determinant of the removal efficiency for suspended and dissolved contaminants, but little is known quantitatively about how PSDs change by simultaneous precipitation and flocculation. Using precipitative softening as an example, detailed measurements of the PSD (using electronic particle counting) were made during precipitation of CaCO(3) under conditions of constant solution composition. Examination of the time-varying PSDs revealed dramatic changes resulting from nucleation, crystal growth, and flocculation. The influence of the saturation ratio, seed concentration, and mixing intensity on those processes was quantified. Implications with respect to the design and operation of water treatment facilities are discussed. PMID:18656223

  15. Thermal levitation of 10 um size particles in low vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Long Fung Frankie; Kowalski, Nicholas; Parker, Colin; Chin, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    We report on experimental methods for trapping 10 micron-sized ice, glass, ceramic and polyethylene particles with thermophoresis in medium vacuum, at pressures between 5 Torr and 25 Torr. Under appropriate conditions particles can launch and levitate robustly for up to an hour. We describe the experimental setup used to produce the temperature gradient necessary for the levitation, as well as our procedure for generating and introducing ice into the experimental setup. In addition to analyzing the conditions necessary for levitation, and the dependence of levitation on the experimental parameters, we report on the behavior of particles during levitation and ejection, including position and stability, under different pressures and temperatures. We also note a significant discrepancy between theory and data, suggesting the presence of other levitating forces.

  16. The comparative study of particle size distribution in magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timko, M.; Kopčanský, P.; Koneracká, M.; Skumiel, A.; Labowski, M.; Jozefczak, A.; Bica, Doina; Bâlâu, Oana; Vékás, L.; Fannin, P. C.; Giannitsis, A. T.

    2002-01-01

    Water- and physiology-solution-based biocompatible magnetic fluids have been studied in order to determine the size of magnetic particles and their colloidal stability. The results of magnetorheological measurements at room temperature and measurements of the frequency-dependent complex magnetic susceptibility indicate that the fluids have good stability and that the particles are finely dispersed without aggregation. The mean particle diameter for physiology-solution-based magnetic fluid, estimated from measurements of anisttropy of the magnetic susceptibility, was found to be 9.4 nm. This value is in good agreement with an estimate of 11.6 nm obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) particularly when allowance is made for the thickness of surfactant layer (approx. 2 nm).

  17. Laser diffraction particle sizing: Instrument probe volume relocation and elongation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert C.; Buchele, Donald R.; Hovenac, Edward A.; Lock, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The effective probe volume of laser diffraction particle sizing instruments depends on many instrument parameters. In particular the probe volume axial boundaries and its location along laser beam are essentially defined by the onset of a vignetting effect where light scattered at large angles from small particles misses the transform lens. This vignetting effect results in a probe volume that must be inconveniently close to the lens in order to detect smaller diameter particles (less than 100 micrometers). With the addition of an appropriately designed Keplerian telescope, the probe volume may be relocated and elongated. The theory of operation of this supplemental optical system is described. Design considerations for these supplemental optical systems are described, including recommendations for lens specifications, assembly and use. An image transfer system is described which has been designed for use on a Malvern 2600HSD instrument. Experimental validation of this image transfer system is described.

  18. Multiple-Instrument Analyses of Single Micron-Size Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Admon, Uri; Donohue, David; Aigner, Helmut; Tamborini, Gabriele; Bildstein, Olivier; Betti, Maria

    2005-08-01

    Physical, chemical, and isotopic analyses of individual radioactive and other particles in the micron-size range, key tools in environmental research and in nuclear forensics, require the ability to precisely relocate particles of interest (POIs) in the secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) or in another instrument, after having been located, identified, and characterized in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). This article describes the implementation, testing, and evaluation of the triangulation POIs re-location method, based on microscopic reference marks imprinted on or attached to the sample holder, serving as an inherent coordinate system. In SEM-to-SEM and SEM-to-SIMS experiments re-location precision better than 10 [mu]m and 20 [mu]m, respectively, is readily attainable for instruments using standard specimen stages. The method is fast, easy to apply, and facilitates repeated analyses of individual particles in different instruments and laboratories.

  19. Bulk particle size distribution and magnetic properties of particle-sized fractions from loess and paleosol samples in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Yang, Shengli; Yan, Maodu

    2015-01-01

    studies demonstrate that particle size separation based on gravitational settling and detailed rock magnetic measurements of the resulting fractionated samples constitutes an effective approach to evaluating the relative contributions of pedogenic and detrital components in the loess and paleosol sequences on the Chinese Loess Plateau. So far, however, similar work has not been undertaken on the loess deposits in Central Asia. In this paper, 17 loess and paleosol samples from three representative loess sections in Central Asia were separated into four grain size fractions, and then systematic rock magnetic measurements were made on the fractions. Our results demonstrate that the content of the <4 μm fraction in the Central Asian loess deposits is relatively low and that the samples generally have a unimodal particle distribution with a peak in the medium-coarse silt range. We find no significant difference between the particle size distributions obtained by the laser diffraction and the pipette and wet sieving methods. Rock magnetic studies further demonstrate that the medium-coarse silt fraction (e.g., the 20-75 μm fraction) provides the main control on the magnetic properties of the loess and paleosol samples in Central Asia. The contribution of pedogenically produced superparamagnetic (SP) and stable single-domain (SD) magnetic particles to the bulk magnetic properties is very limited. In addition, the coarsest fraction (>75 μm) exhibits the minimum values of χ, χARM, and SIRM, demonstrating that the concentrations of ferrimagnetic grains are not positively correlated with the bulk particle size in the Central Asian loess deposits.

  20. Determination of particle size using measurement of scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A literature search was conducted to determine the state of the art particle size measurement by the light scatter technique. This technique may involve diffraction pattern analysis, location of minima and maxima in angular dependence of scattered light, magnitude of intensity verses angle, forward lobe scattered intensity ratio using two small angles, forward scatter in a small cone, and total scatter. Some of the more modern recordings and detection systems are video, holographic, and systems using optical processing.

  1. Ultrasonic Diffraction Grating Spectroscopy and the Measurement of Particle Size

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2006-12-22

    The results of measurements using ultrasonic diffraction grating spectroscopy (UDGS) are found to be dependent upon the particle size of the slurry. This illustrates the emergence of a new technique for measuring particle size. Theoretical calculations are underway to describe and predict them as well. The ultrasonic grating surface is in contact with the slurry. The diffraction grating was formed by machining triangular grooves with a periodicity of 483 microns on the flat surface of an aluminum unit with send and receive transducers fastened to it. For this experimental configuration, the ultrasonic beam strikes the back of the grating at an incident angle of 30° and produces a transmitted beam of spectral order m = 1 in the slurry. The angle of this transmitted beam changes with frequency and, at the critical frequency of 3.47 MHz, it is located at an angle of 90º. The receive transducer measures the reflected m = 0 beam at an angle of 30°. At a frequency slightly less than the critical frequency, the m = 1 transmitted beam no longer exists and its energy is shared with all other beams. Therefore, due to energy conservation, the signal in the receive transducer exhibits a peak at the critical frequency. During the transition, the wave interacts with the particles of the slurry and ultrasound amplitude is reduced. Therefore, the peak observed by the receive transducer is reduced, compared to that for water. Data have been obtained for slurries of polystyrene spheres, ranging in size from 215 microns to 463 microns, and for weight percentages of 1% to 12%. Polystyrene spheres of different diameter show differing amounts of energy loss and thus, particle size identification is possible.

  2. Particles size segregation and roll waves in dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viroulet, Sylvain; Baker, James; Kokelaar, Peter; Gray, Nico

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical granular flows, such as landslides, snow avalanches and pyroclastic flows commonly involve particles with different sizes which are prone to segregate during the flow. This particle-size segregation may lead to the formation of regions with different frictional properties which can have a feedback on the flow. This study aims to understand this effect in the context of bi-disperse roll waves in shallow granular free-surface flows. Experiments have been performed in a 3 meter long chute using several mixtures of spherical glass beads of diameter 75-150 and 400-600 microns flowing on a rough bed. These show that the waves propagate at constant speed that depends on the initial mixture composition. In addition, during their propagation, a higher concentration of large particles is localized at the front of the waves. A theoretical and numerical approach is presented using depth-averaged equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and depth-averaged small particle concentration. Results without frictional feedback are investigated and compared to those that include the enhanced frictional resistance to motion of the large grains.

  3. Packing fraction of particles with a Weibull size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the void fraction of polydisperse particles with a Weibull (or Rosin-Rammler) size distribution. It is demonstrated that the governing parameters of this distribution can be uniquely related to those of the lognormal distribution. Hence, an existing closed-form expression that predicts the void fraction of particles with a lognormal size distribution can be transformed into an expression for Weibull distributions. Both expressions contain the contraction coefficient β. Likewise the monosized void fraction φ1, it is a physical parameter which depends on the particles' shape and their state of compaction only. Based on a consideration of the scaled binary void contraction, a linear relation for (1 - φ1)β as function of φ1 is proposed, with proportionality constant B, depending on the state of compaction only. This is validated using computational and experimental packing data concerning random close and random loose packing arrangements. Finally, using this β, the closed-form analytical expression governing the void fraction of Weibull distributions is thoroughly compared with empirical data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found. Furthermore, the present analysis yields an algebraic equation relating the void fraction of monosized particles at different compaction states. This expression appears to be in good agreement with a broad collection of random close and random loose packing data.

  4. Particle impactor assembly for size selective high volume air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Langer, Gerhard

    1988-08-16

    Air containing entrained particulate matter is directed through a plurality of parallel, narrow, vertically oriented impactor slots of an inlet element toward an adjacently located, relatively large, dust impaction surface preferably covered with an adhesive material. The air flow turns over the impaction surface, leaving behind the relatively larger particles according to the human thoracic separation system and passes through two elongate exhaust apertures defining the outer bounds of the impaction collection surface to pass through divergent passages which slow down and distribute the air flow, with entrained smaller particles, over a fine filter element that separates the fine particles from the air. The elongate exhaust apertures defining the impaction collection surface are spaced apart by a distance greater than the lengths of elongate impactor slots in the inlet element and are oriented to be normal thereto. By appropriate selection of dimensions and the number of impactor slots air flow through the inlet element is provided a nonuniform velocity distribution with the lower velocities being obtained near the center of the impactor slots, in order to separate out particles larger than a certain predetermined size on the impaction collection surface. The impaction collection surface, even in a moderately sized apparatus, is thus relatively large and permits the prolonged sampling of air for periods extending to four weeks.

  5. Packing fraction of particles with a Weibull size distribution.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H J H

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the void fraction of polydisperse particles with a Weibull (or Rosin-Rammler) size distribution. It is demonstrated that the governing parameters of this distribution can be uniquely related to those of the lognormal distribution. Hence, an existing closed-form expression that predicts the void fraction of particles with a lognormal size distribution can be transformed into an expression for Weibull distributions. Both expressions contain the contraction coefficient β. Likewise the monosized void fraction φ_{1}, it is a physical parameter which depends on the particles' shape and their state of compaction only. Based on a consideration of the scaled binary void contraction, a linear relation for (1-φ_{1})β as function of φ_{1} is proposed, with proportionality constant B, depending on the state of compaction only. This is validated using computational and experimental packing data concerning random close and random loose packing arrangements. Finally, using this β, the closed-form analytical expression governing the void fraction of Weibull distributions is thoroughly compared with empirical data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found. Furthermore, the present analysis yields an algebraic equation relating the void fraction of monosized particles at different compaction states. This expression appears to be in good agreement with a broad collection of random close and random loose packing data. PMID:27575204

  6. Particle Size Control of Polyethylene Glycol Coated Fe Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, B.; Bonder, M. J.; Zhang, Y.; Gallo, D.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2006-03-01

    Recent interest in Fe nanoparticles with high magnetization is driven by their potential use in biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement and hyperthermia treatment of cancer. This study looks at the use of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution to mediate the particle size and therefore control the coercivity of the resulting nanoparticles. Iron nanoparticles were synthesized using an aqueous sodium borohydride reduction of ferrous chloride by a simultaneous introduction of reagents in a Y- junction. The resulting product was collected in a vessel containing a 15 mg/ml carboxyl terminated polyethylene glycol (cPEG) in ethyl alcohol solution located under the Y junction. By varying the length of tubing below the Y junction, the particle size was varied from 5-25 nm. X-ray diffraction data indicates the presence of either amorphous Fe-B or crystalline alpha Fe, depending on the molar ratio of reagents. Magnetic measurements indicate the particles are ferromagnetic with values of coercivity ranging from 200-500 Oe and a saturation magnetization in range of 70-110 emu/g. The XRD shows that the particles are not affected by the polymer coating.

  7. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skovbjerg, L. L.; Hassenkam, T.; Makovicky, E.; Hem, C. P.; Yang, M.; Bovet, N.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2012-12-01

    Chalk is a sedimentary rock consisting mostly of micrometer sized particles of biogenic calcite (CaCO3). It forms the reservoirs for oil in the Danish part of the North Sea and important drinking water aquifers in northern Europe. The interaction between organic molecules and the particle surfaces has a strong influence on the migration of oil in the reservoirs. Adhesion of oil components to chalk particle surfaces is thought to significantly reduce production and efforts are being made to determine the mechanisms behind enhanced/improved oil recovery (EOR/IOR) during water flooding. Aquifers beneath industrial areas can be heavily polluted with organic compounds and similar adsorption mechanisms could influence the geographical extent of the contaminant plume. Chalk, as a sedimentary rock, has been studied extensively for many years but the properties of the particle surfaces, where adsorption takes place, are largely unknown. In this study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that the grain surfaces in offshore and onshore chalk are more heterogeneous than previously assumed. The particles are not simply calcite surfaces but are partially covered by clay that is only 1-4 nm thick. With chemical force mapping (CFM), we have probed the surface using a tip coated with organic molecules to represent a tiny, mono-functionalized oil droplet. The functional groups of the self assembled monolayer on the tip were either -CH3 or -COO-. From maps of adhesion, it is evident that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs.

  8. Production of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. L.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.

    1984-01-01

    The research program achieved two objectives: (1) it has refined and extended the experimental techniques for preparing monodisperse latexes in quantity on the ground up to a particle diameter of 10 microns; and (2) it has demonstrated that a microgravity environment can be used to grow monodisperse latexes to larger sizes, where the limitations in size have yet to be defined. The experimental development of the monodisperse latex reactor (MLR) and the seeded emulsion polymerizations carried out in the laboratory prototype of the flight hardware, as a function of the operational parameters is discussed. The emphasis is directed towards the measurement, interpretation, and modeling of the kinetics of seeded emulsion polymerization and successive seeded emulsion polymerization. The recipe development of seeded emulsion polymerization as a function of particle size is discussed. The equilibrium swelling of latex particles with monomers was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Extensive studies are reported on both the type and concentration of initiators, surfactants, and inhibitors, which eventually led to the development of the flight recipes. The experimental results of the flight experiments are discussed, as well as the experimental development of inhibition of seeded emulsion polymerization in terms of time of inhibition and the effect of inhibitors on the kinetics of polymerization.

  9. Size distribution analysis of influenza virus particles using size exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Judith; Weber, Dennis; Brekel, Dominik; Hundt, Boris; Müller, Egbert

    2016-09-23

    Size exclusion chromatography is a standard method in quality control of biopharmaceutical proteins. In contrast, vaccine analysis is often based on activity assays. The hemagglutination assay is a widely accepted influenza quantification method, providing no insight in the size distribution of virus particles. Capabilities of size exclusion chromatography to complement the hemagglutination assay are investigated. The presented method is comparatively robust regarding different buffer systems, ionic strength and additive concentrations. Addition of 200mM arginine or sodium chloride is necessary to obtain complete virus particle recovery. 0.5 and 1.0M arginine increase the hydrodynamic radius of the whole virus particles by 5nm. Sodium citrate induces virus particle aggregation. Results are confirmed by dynamic light scattering. Retention of a H1N1v strain correlates with DNA contents between 5ng/mL and 670ng/mL. Quantitative elution of the virus preparations is verified on basis of hemagglutination activity. Elution of hemagglutination inducing compounds starts at a flow channel diameter of 7000nm. The universal applicability is demonstrated with three different influenza virus samples, including an industrially produced, pandemic vaccine strain. Size distribution of the pandemic H1N1v 5258, H1N1 PR/8/34, and H3N2 Aichi/2/68 preparations spreads across inter- and intra-particle volume and extends to the secondary interaction dominated range. Thus, virus particle debris seems to induce hemagglutination. Fragments generated by 0.5% Triton™ X-100 treatment increase overall hemagglutination activity. PMID:27578410

  10. Decrease of calorific value and particle size in coal stockpiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sensogut, C.; Ozdeniz, A.H.

    2008-07-01

    During storage of excess amount of coal, they lose both their economical value and cause environmental problems. In this work, two industrial-sized stockpiles were constituted at a coal stockyard of Western Lignite Corporation (WLC) in Tuncbilek, Turkey. The size of the stockpiles, formed as triangle prisms, was about 10 m x 5 m wide with a height of 3 m; each mass being approximately 120 tons of coal in total. Some of the parameters that were effective on the stockpiles were measured in a continuous manner during this experimental work. The calorific losses and the decreases that occurred in particle size due to atmospheric conditions were also examined and detailed as the result of this work.

  11. Geostatistical Interpolation of Particle-Size Curves in Heterogeneous Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnini, A.; Menafoglio, A.; Secchi, P.

    2013-12-01

    We address the problem of predicting the spatial field of particle-size curves (PSCs) from measurements associated with soil samples collected at a discrete set of locations within an aquifer system. Proper estimates of the full PSC are relevant to applications related to groundwater hydrology, soil science and geochemistry and aimed at modeling physical and chemical processes occurring in heterogeneous earth systems. Hence, we focus on providing kriging estimates of the entire PSC at unsampled locations. To this end, we treat particle-size curves as cumulative distribution functions, model their densities as functional compositional data and analyze them by embedding these into the Hilbert space of compositional functions endowed with the Aitchison geometry. On this basis, we develop a new geostatistical methodology for the analysis of spatially dependent functional compositional data. Our functional compositional kriging (FCK) approach allows providing predictions at unsampled location of the entire particle-size curve, together with a quantification of the associated uncertainty, by fully exploiting both the functional form of the data and their compositional nature. This is a key advantage of our approach with respect to traditional methodologies, which treat only a set of selected features (e.g., quantiles) of PSCs. Embedding the full PSC into a geostatistical analysis enables one to provide a complete characterization of the spatial distribution of lithotypes in a reservoir, eventually leading to improved predictions of soil hydraulic attributes through pedotransfer functions as well as of soil geochemical parameters which are relevant in sorption/desorption and cation exchange processes. We test our new method on PSCs sampled along a borehole located within an alluvial aquifer near the city of Tuebingen, Germany. The quality of FCK predictions is assessed through leave-one-out cross-validation. A comparison between hydraulic conductivity estimates obtained

  12. Reactivity of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs, NPAHs and OPAHs) adsorbed on natural aerosol particles exposed to atmospheric oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringuet, Johany; Albinet, Alexandre; Leoz-Garziandia, Eva; Budzinski, Hélène; Villenave, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Reactivity of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) adsorbed on natural aerosol particles exposed to different atmospheric oxidants (O3, OH and NO2/O3 mixture) was studied. Decay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and formation/decay of oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) and nitrated PAHs (NPAHs) were monitored. Overall, benzo[a]pyrene appeared to be the most reactive PAH (degradation of 50%). Only its nitrated derivative, 6-nitrobenzo[a]pyrene, was significantly formed explaining just 0.4% of reacted benzo[a]pyrene. No other nitrated or oxygenated benzo[a]pyrene derivatives were detected. Interestingly, B[e]P and In[1,2,3,c,d]P, which are usually considered as quite stable PAHs, also underwent decay in all experiments. In presence of O3, ketones were significantly formed but their amount was not totally explained by decay of parent PAH. These results suggest that PAH derivatives could be formed from the reaction of other compounds than their direct parent PAHs and raise the question to know if the oxidation of methyl-PAHs, identified in vehicle-exhausts, could constitute this missing source of OPAHs. NPAHs were significantly formed in presence of O3/NO2 and OH. Surprisingly, NPAH formation was clearly observed during O3 experiments. Nitrated species, already associated with aerosol particles (NO3-, NO2-) or formed by ozonation of particulate nitrogen organic matter, could react with PAHs to form NPAHs. Heterogeneous formation of 2-nitropyrene from pyrene oxidation was for the first time observed, questioning its use as an indicator of NPAH formation in gaseous phase. Equally, formation of 2-nitrofluoranthene by heterogeneous reaction of fluoranthene with O3/NO2 was clearly shown, while only its formation by homogeneous processes (gaseous phase) is reported in the literature. Finally, results obtained highlighted the dependence of heterogeneous PAH reactivity with the substrate nature and the importance to focus reactivity studies on natural particles, whatever the

  13. FIELD COMPARISONS OF DUAL SMPS-APS SYSTEMS TO MEASURE INDOOR-OUTDOOR PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous measurements of particle size distributions across multiple locations can provide critical information to accurately assess human exposure to particles. These data are very useful to describe indoor-outdoor particle relationships, outdoor particle penetration thro...

  14. Correlating Cellulose Nanocrystal Particle Size and Surface Area.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Andreas; Chen, Maohui; Couillard, Martin; Jakubek, Zygmunt J; Leng, Tianyang; Johnston, Linda J

    2016-06-21

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are negatively charged nanorods that present challenges for characterization of particle size distribution and surface area-two of the common parameters for characterizing nanomaterials. CNC size distributions have been measured by two microscopy methods: atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The agreement between the two methods is good for length measurements, after taking into consideration tip-convolution effects for AFM. However, TEM widths are almost twice as large as AFM heights-an effect that we hypothesize is due to counting of a larger fraction of laterally associated CNCs in the TEM images. Overall, the difficulty of selecting individual particles for analysis and possible bias due to selection of a specific particle size during sample deposition are the main limitations associated with the microscopy measurements. The microscopy results were compared to Z-average data from dynamic light scattering, which is a useful method for routine analysis and for examining trends in size as a function of sample treatment. Measurements as a function of sonication energy were used to provide information on the presence of aggregates in the sample. Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR was employed to estimate the surface area of CNCs based on the ratio of integrated spectral intensities of resonances stemming from C4 sites at the crystallite surfaces and from all C4 sites. Our approach was adapted from the application of solid-state NMR to characterize larger cellulose microfibers and appears to provide a useful estimate that overcomes the limitations of using the BET method for measuring surface areas of highly aggregated nanomaterials. The solid-state NMR results show that the lateral dimension of the CNCs is consistent with that of elementary cellulose crystallites. PMID:27228219

  15. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  16. Counting Particles Emitted by Stratospheric Aircraft and Measuring Size of Particles Emitted by Stratospheric Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James Charles

    1994-01-01

    There were two principal objectives of the cooperative agreement between NASA and the University of Denver. The first goal was to modify the design of the ER-2 condensation nuclei counter (CNC) so that the effective lower detection limit would be improved at high altitudes. This improvement was sought because, in the instrument used prior to 1993, diffusion losses prevented the smallest detectable particles from reaching the detection volume of the instrument during operation at low pressure. Therefore, in spite of the sensor's ability to detect particles as small as 0.008 microns in diameter, many of these particles were lost in transport to the sensing region and were not counted. Most of the particles emitted by aircraft are smaller than 0.1 micron in diameter. At the start date of this work, May 1990, continuous sizing techniques available on the ER-2 were only capable of detecting particles larger than 0.17 micron. Thus, the second objective of this work was to evaluate candidate sizing techniques in an effort to gain additional information concerning the size of particles emitted by aircraft.

  17. Light induced heterogeneous ozone processing on the pesticides adsorbed on silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Désert, M.; Quivet, E.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    In France, in 2010, the sales of pesticides reached 1.8 billion euros for 61 900 tons of active ingredients, positioning France as a first European consumer of pesticides, as reported by the European Crop Protection Association. About 19 million hectares of crops are sprayed annually with pesticides, i.e., 35% of the total surface area of France. This corresponds to an average pesticide dose of 3.2 kg ha-1. The consumption of herbicide and fungicide is favoured in comparison to the use of insecticides in France and the other European countries, as well. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences the atmospheric fate of these compounds such as their photo-chemical degradation. There is much uncertainty concerning the behavior of the pesticides in the atmosphere. Especially, there is a gap of knowledge concerning the degradation of the pesticides induced by heterogeneous reactions in absence and especially in presence of solar light. Considering that most of the pesticides currently used are semi-volatile, it is of crucial importance to investigate the heterogeneous reactivity of particulate pesticides with light and with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and OH radical. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the light induced heterogeneous ozonation of suspended pesticide particles. 8 pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin and tetraconazole) were chosen for their physico-chemical properties and their concentration levels in the PACA (Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) region, France. Silica particles with well-known properties were chosen as model particles of atmospheric relevance. Kinetic rate constants were determined to allow estimate the atmospheric lifetimes relating to ozone. The rate constants were determined as follows: k = (6.6 × 0.2) 10-19, (7.2 × 0.3) 10-19, (5.1 × 0.5) 10-19, (3.9 × 0.3) 10-19 [cm3 molecules-1 s-1] for Cyprodinil

  18. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  19. Particle size influences aerosol deposition in guinea pigs during bronchoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Praud, J.P.; Macquin-Mavier, I.; Wirquin, V.; Meignan, M.; Harf, A.

    1986-03-01

    The role of two factors determining the deposition of aerosols in the respiratory tract was investigated: the particle size and the nature of the airflow in the airways. An aerosol of Tc99 m-DTPA was generated, with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of either 3 ..mu..m (Bird nebulizer) or 0.5 ..mu..m (Jouan nebulizer). The vehicle was either saline (S) or histamine (H) at a concentration which was previously shown to induce a 50% decrease of specific airway conductance. Spontaneously breathing guinea pigs were exposed during 2 minutes to the aerosol, then killed and the radioactivity in the pharynx, the trachea, the large bronchi and the remaining parenchyma was measured. Results are evaluated as the percentage of total radioactivity in the respiratory tract (mean +/- SEM). Analysis of variance showed that there was a significant difference in the pattern of deposition for large particles (3 ..mu..m) during bronchoconstriction: the more proximal deposition can be ascribed to inertial impaction. Particle size should be clearly defined during histamine challenge in experimental animals.

  20. Chemically generated convective transport of micron sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-11-01

    A variety of chemical and biological applications require manipulation of micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules. Increasing the size of particles up to a micron reduces performance of techniques based on diffusive transport. Directional transport of cargo toward detecting elements reduces the delivery time and improves performance of sensing devices. We demonstrate how chemical reactions can be used to organize fluid flows carrying particles toward the assigned destinations. Convection is driven by density variations caused by a chemical reaction occurring at a catalyst or enzyme-covered target site. If the reaction causes a reduction in fluid density, as in the case of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, then fluid and suspended cargo is drawn toward the target along the bottom surface. The intensity of the fluid flow and the time of cargo delivery are controlled by the amount of reagent in the system. After the reagent has been consumed, the fluid pump stops and particles are found aggregated on and around the enzyme-coated patch. The pumps are reusable, being reactivated upon injection of additional reagent. The developed technique can be implemented in lab-on-a-chip devices for transportation of micro-scale object immersed in solution.

  1. Particle Size and Structural Arrangement of Suspended Cohesive Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Zhang, G.; Reed, A. H.; Furukawa, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal environments are often characterized by high concentrations of cohesive sediments influenced by the loaded organic matter (particularly extracellular polymeric substances (EPS)), salt, and hydrodynamic disturbance. The size and structural variation of suspended cohesive sediments due to flocculation and/or disaggregation is of key importance for understanding a variety of sediment transport processes (e.g., settling, breakage, survivability) in littoral environments and the geotechnical/geophysical properties of the bottom bed. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of sediment floc behavior and correlate the clay-EPS-ion interaction mechanisms with their structures, a series of sediment samples were synthesized in laboratory using four pure clays (i.e., kaolinite, illite, Ca-montmorillonite, and Na-montmorillonite), three EPS (cationic, neutral, and anionic) at different concentrations, and saltwater of different salinity under different hydrodynamic conditions. Particle size analysis of the pure clays, clay-EPS, and clay-salt flocs under three hydrodynamic conditions demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory that pure clays and clay-EPS mixtures exhibit lognormal, multimodal (i.e., 2-4 levels consisting of primary particle, flocculi, microfloc, and macrofloc) particle size distributions (PSDs) within the size range of ~0.1 to ~500 μm. The presence of EPS causes the formation of macroflocs (>200 μm) and can significantly increase the mean particle size by several orders of magnitude through flocculation, assisted by electrostatic forces, ion-dipole, van der Waals forces, and other mechanisms. The change in size of the pure clay flocs in saltwater showed different trends: Due to the clays' different properties and interaction mechanisms with EPS, their PSDs and size changes are also different in different flow conditions: the hydrodynamic turbulence may promote the flocculation of Ca-montmorillonite, but break kaolinite and Na

  2. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution of vehicle exhaust ultrafine particles].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-qiang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Sun, Zai; Cai, Zhi-liang; Yang, Wen-jun

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations obtained from three different vehicles were measured using fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and automobile exhaust gas analyzer. UFP number concentration and size distribution were studied at different idle driving speeds. The results showed that at a low idle speed of 800 rmin-1 , the emission particle number concentration was the lowest and showed a increasing trend with the increase of idle speed. The majority of exhaust particles were in Nuclear mode and Aitken mode. The peak sizes were dominated by 10 nm and 50 nm. Particle number concentration showed a significantly sharp increase during the vehicle acceleration process, and was then kept stable when the speed was stable. In the range of 0. 4 m axial distance from the end of the exhaust pipe, the particle number concentration decayed rapidly after dilution, but it was not obvious in the range of 0. 4-1 m. The number concentration was larger than the background concentration. Concentration of exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NO showed a reducing trend with the increase of idle speed,which was in contrast to the emission trend of particle number concentration. PMID:25518646

  3. Screen bowl centrifuge: a high-efficiency particle size separator

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, M.K.; Zhang, B.; Khanna, N.; Palit, A.; Dube, B.

    2008-05-15

    Over the years, screen bowl centrifuges have been widely used for dewatering fine coal in coal preparation plants in the United States and elsewhere. It is generally recognized in the engineering and scientific communities that screen bowl centrifuges provide some degree of particle size separation while dewatering fine coal in a common application. However, the extent of differential partitioning of coarse and fine particles achievable by a screen bowl centrifuge has not been systematically studied in the past. The present investigation was aimed at conducting a parametric study using a statistically designed experimental program to better understand and optimize the size classification performance of a screen bowl centrifuge. A continuously operating screen bowl centrifuge having a bowl diameter of 0.5 m was used for this study at the Illinois Coal Development Park. Three key operating parameters, i.e., feed flow rate, feed solid content and pool depth, were varied to conduct a total of 17 experiments using a three-level factorial test matrix. Some of the best size separation performances achieved in this study may be described as having an imperfection value of 0.13 at an effective separation size (d(50c)) of 38 mu m and an imperfection value of 0.27 at an effective separation size (d(50c)) of 2.8 mu m. Due to an effective separation of ultrafine high ash materials, the ash content of the screen bowl feed was reduced from 22.3% to a minimum of 8.84% with a combustible recovery of 84.1% and an ash rejection of 71.6%. A higher combustible recovery of 92.1% was achieved at a product ash content of 12.5% with a d(50c) of 2.8 mu m and imperfection of 0.27.

  4. Measuring the specific surface area of natural and manmade glasses: effects of formation process, morphology, and particle size

    SciTech Connect

    Papelis, Charalambos; Um, Wooyong; Russel, Charles E.; Chapman, Jenny B.

    2003-03-28

    The specific surface area of natural and manmade solid materials is a key parameter controlling important interfacial processes in natural environments and engineered systems, including dissolution reactions and sorption processes at solid-fluid interfaces. To improve our ability to quantify the release of trace elements trapped in natural glasses, the release of hazardous compounds trapped in manmade glasses, or the release of radionuclides from nuclear melt glass, we measured the specific surface area of natural and manmade glasses as a function of particle size, morphology, and composition. Volcanic ash, volcanic tuff, tektites, obsidian glass, and in situ vitrified rock were analyzed. Specific surface area estimates were obtained using krypton as gas adsorbent and the BET model. The range of surface areas measured exceeded three orders of magnitude. A tektite sample had the highest surface area (1.65 m2/g), while one of the samples of in situ vitrified rock had the lowest surf ace area (0.0016 m2/g). The specific surface area of the samples was a function of particle size, decreasing with increasing particle size. Different types of materials, however, showed variable dependence on particle size, and could be assigned to one of three distinct groups: (1) samples with low surface area dependence on particle size and surface areas approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the surface area of smooth spheres of equivalent size. The specific surface area of these materials was attributed mostly to internal porosity and surface roughness. (2) samples that showed a trend of decreasing surface area dependence on particle size as the particle size increased. The minimum specific surface area of these materials was between 0.1 and 0.01 m2/g and was also attributed to internal porosity and surface roughness. (3) samples whose surface area showed a monotonic decrease with increasing particle size, never reaching an ultimate surface area limit within the particle

  5. Residual Particle Sizes of Evaporating Droplets: Ammonium Sulfate and Aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, N.; Galloway, M. M.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    The reactions of carbonyls like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde, with ammonium salts have been proposed as significant sources of atmospheric organic aerosol. Aerosol containing these compounds was generated in the laboratory using the Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG). The particles were completely dried before they were measured using a SMPS system. The nonvolatile fraction of the resulting aerosol was measured. The drying times were varied between two and twenty minutes, and for ammonium sulfate and glyoxal reactions, minimum residual particle sizes were reached after 3.5 minutes. Reactions of glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and methylglyoxal with ammonium sulfate appeared to have lower non-volatile fractions remaining at higher starting concentrations, suggesting that a constant 'excess volume,' likely water, was present in the residual particles that could not be evaporated even after 20 minutes of drying. These excess volumes were not observed in our previous experiments with aldehydes but no ammonium sulfate present. At the highest concentrations tested (100 uM), non-volatile fractions of aldehydes present in residual particles were 16 (±17) %, 41 (±28) %, and 17(±32) % for glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and methylglyoxal, respectively.

  6. Tokamak dust particle size and surface area measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    The INEEL has analyzed a variety of dust samples from experimental tokamaks: General Atomics` DII-D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Alcator CMOD, and Princeton`s TFTR. These dust samples were collected and analyzed because of the importance of dust to safety. The dust may contain tritium, be activated, be chemically toxic, and chemically reactive. The INEEL has carried out numerous characterization procedures on the samples yielding information useful both to tokamak designers and to safety researchers. Two different methods were used for particle characterization: optical microscopy (count based) and laser based volumetric diffraction (mass based). Surface area of the dust samples was measured using Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, BET, a gas adsorption technique. The purpose of this paper is to present the correlation between the particle size measurements and the surface area measurements for tokamak dust.

  7. Optimization of nanoparticle core size for magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Matthew R.; Minard, Kevin R.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a powerful new diagnostic visualization platform designed for measuring the amount and location of superparamagnetic nanoscale molecular probes (NMPs) in biological tissues. Promising initial results indicate that MPI can be extremely sensitive and fast, with good spatial resolution for imaging human patients or live animals. Here, we present modeling results that show how MPI sensitivity and spatial resolution both depend on NMP-core physical properties, and how MPI performance can be effectively optimized through rational core design. Monodisperse magnetite cores are attractive since they are readily produced with a biocompatible coating and controllable size that facilitates quantitative imaging.

  8. Effects of AP particle size on combustion response to crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.; Strand, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for the linearized velocity-coupled combustion response function. The model treats elements of response to perturbations in pressure, in composition due to the heterogeneity of composite propellants, and in crossflow velocity. The effects of AP particle size are accounted for in terms of effects on controlling ballistics properties and in terms of fluctuations in propellant composition. There are two facets of the crossflow problem: the effect of crossflow velocity on the various response elements, and the response to velocity perturbations. Both are dealt with in this paper. Important trends derived from series of parametric computations are described.

  9. Size and shape of industrial Pd catalyst particles using size-selected clusters as mass standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearmain, D.; Park, S. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Abdela, A.; Palmer, R. E.; Li, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    The complexity of the morphology of industrial catalysts presents a significant challenge to rapid screening techniques. Here, we propose a strategy in determining three-dimensional shape of industrial catalyst particles using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) as a quantitative probe and size-selected clusters as mass standards. We show that through STEM image intensity analysis, this approach allows us to evaluate the number of atoms within each particle and thus gain insight into the overall 3D morphology of the catalyst particles. It is found that the industrial Pd catalysts on carbon blacks have hemispherical shape, in contrast to the spherical shape of Pd clusters formed in the gas phase and soft-landed on supports.

  10. Polymer-Particle Nanocomposites: Size and Dispersion Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Joseph

    Polymer-particle nanocomposites are used in industrial processes to enhance a broad range of material properties (e.g. mechanical, optical, electrical and gas permeability properties). This dissertation will focus on explanation and quantification of mechanical property improvements upon the addition of nanoparticles to polymeric materials. Nanoparticles, as enhancers of mechanical properties, are ubiquitous in synthetic and natural materials (e.g. automobile tires, packaging, bone), however, to date, there is no thorough understanding of the mechanism of their action. In this dissertation, silica (SiO2) nanoparticles, both bare and grafted with polystyrene (PS), are studied in polymeric matrices. Several variables of interest are considered, including particle dispersion state, particle size, length and density of grafted polymer chains, and volume fraction of SiO2. Polymer grafted nanoparticles behave akin to block copolymers, and this is critically leveraged to systematically vary nanoparticle dispersion and examine its role on the mechanical reinforcement in polymer based nanocomposites in the melt state. Rheology unequivocally shows that reinforcement is maximized by the formation of a transient, but long-lived, percolating polymer-particle network with the particles serving as the network junctions. The effects of dispersion and weight fraction of filler on nanocomposite mechanical properties are also studied in a bare particle system. Due to the interest in directional properties for many different materials, different means of inducing directional ordering of particle structures are also studied. Using a combination of electron microscopy and x-ray scattering, it is shown that shearing anisotropic NP assemblies (sheets or strings) causes them to orient, one in front of the other, into macroscopic two-dimensional structures along the flow direction. In contrast, no such flow-induced ordering occurs for well dispersed NPs or spherical NP aggregates! This work

  11. Effects of particle size and velocity on burial depth of airborne particles in glass fiber filters

    SciTech Connect

    Higby, D.P.

    1984-11-01

    Air sampling for particulate radioactive material involves collecting airborne particles on a filter and then determining the amount of radioactivity collected per unit volume of air drawn through the filter. The amount of radioactivity collected is frequently determined by directly measuring the radiation emitted from the particles collected on the filter. Counting losses caused by the particle becoming buried in the filter matrix may cause concentrations of airborne particulate radioactive materials to be underestimated by as much as 50%. Furthermore, the dose calculation for inhaled radionuclides will also be affected. The present study was designed to evaluate the extent to which particle size and sampling velocity influence burial depth in glass-fiber filters. Aerosols of high-fired /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ were collected at various sampling velocities on glass-fiber filters. The fraction of alpha counts lost due to burial was determined as the ratio of activity detected by direct alpha count to the quantity determined by photon spectrometry. The results show that burial of airborne particles collected on glass-fiber filters appears to be a weak function of sampling velocity and particle size. Counting losses ranged from 0 to 25%. A correction that assumes losses of 10 to 15% would ensure that the concentration of airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides would not be underestimated when glass-fiber filters are used. 32 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  12. Effect of varying total mixed ration particle size on rumen digesta and fecal particle size and digestibility in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Maulfair, D D; Fustini, M; Heinrichs, A J

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of feeding rations of different particle sizes on rumen digesta and fecal matter particle size. Four rumen-cannulated, multiparous, Holstein cows (104±15 d in milk) were randomly assigned to treatments in a 4×4 Latin square design. The diets consisted of 29.4% corn silage, 22.9% ground corn, 17.6% alfalfa haylage, and 11.8% dry grass hay [20% of forage dry matter (DM)] on a DM basis. Dry grass hay was chopped to 4 different lengths to vary the total mixed ration (TMR) particle size. Geometric mean particle sizes of the rations were 4.46, 5.10, 5.32, and 5.84 mm for short, medium, long, and extra long diets, respectively. The ration affected rumen digesta particle size for particles ≥3.35 mm, and had no effect on distribution of particles <3.35 mm. All rumen digesta particle size fractions varied by time after feeding, with soluble particle fractions increasing immediately after feeding and 0.15, 0.6, and 1.18-mm particle size fractions decreasing slightly after feeding. Particle fractions >1.18 mm had ration by time interactions. Fecal neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and indigestible NDF concentrations decreased with increasing TMR particle size. Fecal particle size expressed as total geometric mean particle length followed this same tendency. Fecal particle size, expressed as retained geometric mean particle length, averaged 1.13 mm with more than 36% of particles being larger than 1.18 mm. All fecal nutrient concentrations measured were significantly affected by time after feeding, with NDF and indigestible NDF increasing after feeding and peaking at about 12h later and then decreasing to preprandial levels. Starch concentrations were determined to have the opposite effect. Additionally, apparent digestibility of diet nutrients was analyzed and DM digestibility tended to decrease with increasing TMR particle size, whereas other nutrient digestibilities were not different among rations. These results

  13. Size Resolved High Temperature Oxidation Kinetics of Nano-Sized Titanium and Zirconium Particles.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yichen; Jacob, Rohit J; Li, Shuiqing; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-06-18

    While ultrafine metal particles offer the possibility of very high energy density fuels, there is considerable uncertainty in the mechanism by which metal nanoparticles burn, and few studies that have examined the size dependence to their kinetics at the nanoscale. In this work we quantify the size dependence to the burning rate of titanium and zirconium nanoparticles. Nanoparticles in the range of 20-150 nm were produced via pulsed laser ablation, and then in-flight size-selected using differential electrical mobility. The size-selected oxide free metal particles were directly injected into the post flame region of a laminar flame to create a high temperature (1700-2500 K) oxidizing environment. The reaction was monitored using high-speed videography by tracking the emission from individual nanoparticles. We find that sintering occurs prior to significant reaction, and that once sintering is accounted for, the rate of combustion follows a near nearly (diameter)(1) power-law dependence. Additionally, Arrhenius parameters for the combustion of these nanoparticles were evaluated by measuring the burn times at different ambient temperatures. The optical emission from combustion was also used to model the oxidation process, which we find can be reasonably described with a kinetically controlled shrinking core model. PMID:25914926

  14. Particle Size Effect in Granular Composite Aluminum/tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Po-Hsun; Wang, Sophia; Vitali, Efrem; Herbold, Eric B.; Benson, David J.; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2009-12-01

    Compressive dynamic strength and fracture pattern of Al-W granular composites with an identical weight ratio of Al (23.8 wt%) and W (76.2 wt%) with different porosities, size and shape of W component were investigated at strain rates 1000-1500 l/s. Samples were fabricated by Cold Isostatic Pressing. A dynamic strength of composites with fine W particles (100 MPa) was significantly larger than the strength of composite with the coarse W particles (75 MPa) at the same porosity 26% (samples with porosity 15% with coarse W particles exhibited a higher strength of 175 MPa). Morphology of W inclusions had a strong effect on dynamic strength. Samples with W wires arranged in axial direction (diameter 100 microns) and porosity 16%) with the same volume content of components had a dynamic strength of 350 MPa. Dynamic behavior was numerically simulated using computer code Raven, demonstrating a strain hardening effect due to in situ densification which was observed experimentally for cold isostatically pressed Al and Al-coarse W powders.

  15. Influence of the Polyvinyl Pyrrolidone Concentration on Particle Size and Dispersion of ZnS Nanoparticles Synthesized by Microwave Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Nayereh; Saion, Elias; Erfani, Maryam; Rezaee, Khadijeh; Bahmanrokh, Ghazaleh; Drummen, Gregor P. C.; Bahrami, Afarin; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2012-01-01

    Zinc sulfide semiconductor nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone via a simple microwave irradiation method. The effect of the polymer concentration and the type of sulfur source on the particle size and dispersion of the final ZnS nanoparticle product was carefully examined. Microwave heating generally occurs by two main mechanisms: dipolar polarization of water and ionic conduction of precursors. The introduction of the polymer affects the heating rate by restriction of the rotational motion of dipole molecules and immobilization of ions. Consequently, our results show that the presence of the polymer strongly affects the nucleation and growth rates of the ZnS nanoparticles and therefore determines the average particle size and the dispersion. Moreover, we found that PVP adsorbed on the surface of the ZnS nanoparticles by interaction of the C–N and C=O with the nanoparticle’s surface, thereby affording protection from agglomeration by steric hindrance. Generally, with increasing PVP concentration, mono-dispersed colloidal solutions were obtained and at the optimal PVP concentration (5%), sufficiently small size and narrow size distributions were obtained from both sodium sulfide and thioacetamide sulfur sources. Finally, the sulfur source directly influences the reaction mechanism and the final particle morphology, as well as the average size. PMID:23202906

  16. Experimental investigation of suspended particles transport through porous media: particle and grain size effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quansheng; Cui, Xianze; Zhang, Chengyuan; Huang, Shibing

    2016-01-01

    Particle and grain size may influence the transportation and deposition characteristics of particles within pollutant transport and within granular filters that are typically used in wastewater treatment. We conducted two-dimensional sandbox experiments using quartz powder as the particles and quartz sand as the porous medium to study the response of transportation and deposition formation to changes in particle diameter (ds, with median diameter 18, 41, and 82 μm) and grain diameter (dp, with median diameter 0.36, 1.25, and 2.82 mm) considering a wide range of diameter ratios (ds/dp) from 0.0064 to 0.228. Particles were suspended in deionized water, and quartz sand was used as the porous medium, which was meticulously cleaned to minimize any physicochemical and impurities effects that could result in indeterminate results. After the experiments, the particle concentration of the effluent and particle mass per gram of dry sands were measured to explore changes in transportation and deposition characteristics under different conditions. In addition, a micro-analysis was conducted to better analyse the results on a mesoscopic scale. The experimental observation analyses indicate that different diameter ratios (ds/dp) may lead to different deposit formations. As ds/dp increased, the deposit formation changed from 'Random Deposition Type' to 'Gradient Deposition Type', and eventually became 'Inlet Deposition Type'. PMID:26323505

  17. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol removal using superfine powdered activated carbon: shell adsorption and branched-pore kinetic model analysis and optimal particle size.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku

    2013-05-15

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin are naturally occurring compounds responsible for musty-earthy taste and odor in public drinking-water supplies, a severe problem faced by many utilities throughout the world. In this study, we investigated adsorptive removal of these compounds by superfine powdered activation carbon (SPAC, particle size <1 μm) produced by novel micro-grinding of powdered activated carbon; we also discuss the optimization of carbon particle size to efficiently enhance the adsorptive removal. After grinding, the absorptive capacity remained unchanged for a 2007 carbon sample and was increased for a 2010 carbon sample; the capacity increase was quantitatively described by the shell adsorption model, in which MIB and geosmin adsorbed more in the exterior of a carbon particle than in the center. The extremely high uptake rates of MIB and geosmin by SPAC were simulated well by a combination of the branched-pore kinetic model and the shell adsorption model, in which intraparticle diffusion through macropores was followed by diffusion from macropore to micropore. Simulations suggested that D40 was on the whole the best characteristic diameter to represent a size-disperse group of adsorbent particles; D40 is the diameter through which 40% of the particles by volume pass. Therefore, D40 can be used as an index for evaluating the improvement of adsorptive removal that resulted from pulverization. The dose required for a certain percentage removal of MIB or geosmin decreased linearly with carbon particle size (D40), but the dose reduction became less effective as the activated carbon was ground down to smaller sizes around a critical value of D40. For a 60-min contact time, critical D40 was 2-2.5 μm for MIB and 0.4-0.5 μm for geosmin. The smaller critical D40 was when the shorter the carbon-water contact time was or the slower the intraparticle mass transfer rate of an adsorbate was. PMID:23528781

  18. Differential proteomic analysis of mouse macrophages exposed to adsorbate-loaded heavy fuel oil derived combustion particles using an automated sample-preparation workflow.

    PubMed

    Kanashova, Tamara; Popp, Oliver; Orasche, Jürgen; Karg, Erwin; Harndorf, Horst; Stengel, Benjamin; Sklorz, Martin; Streibel, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Ralf; Dittmar, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Ship diesel combustion particles are known to cause broad cytotoxic effects and thereby strongly impact human health. Particles from heavy fuel oil (HFO) operated ships are considered as particularly dangerous. However, little is known about the relevant components of the ship emission particles. In particular, it is interesting to know if the particle cores, consisting of soot and metal oxides, or the adsorbate layers, consisting of semi- and low-volatile organic compounds and salts, are more relevant. We therefore sought to relate the adsorbates and the core composition of HFO combustion particles to the early cellular responses, allowing for the development of measures that counteract their detrimental effects. Hence, the semi-volatile coating of HFO-operated ship diesel engine particles was removed by stepwise thermal stripping using different temperatures. RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to native and thermally stripped particles in submersed culture. Proteomic changes were monitored by two different quantitative mass spectrometry approaches, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and dimethyl labeling. Our data revealed that cells reacted differently to native or stripped HFO combustion particles. Cells exposed to thermally stripped particles showed a very differential reaction with respect to the composition of the individual chemical load of the particle. The cellular reactions of the HFO particles included reaction to oxidative stress, reorganization of the cytoskeleton and changes in endocytosis. Cells exposed to the 280 °C treated particles showed an induction of RNA-related processes, a number of mitochondria-associated processes as well as DNA damage response, while the exposure to 580 °C treated HFO particles mainly induced the regulation of intracellular transport. In summary, our analysis based on a highly reproducible automated proteomic sample-preparation procedure shows a diverse cellular response, depending on the

  19. Compaction processes in granular beds composed of different particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, C. A.; Greenaway, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    A piston impacting a granular bed will cause the material to compact; the strength of a granular bed is significant during weak impact relating to piston speeds of 100m/s. The strength associated with the granular structure is described as the intergranular stress; this is the resistance of a granular bed to compaction which can be measured by carefully constructing experiments. The compaction process may then be modeled by solving a hyperbolic system of equations that utilizes these data to close the system. The compaction behavior of a porous material is particle-size dependent; to accurately describe the response of two granular beds that may be of different particle sizes and distributions, it is essential that the intergranular stress is derived for each particle bed. This work uses recent compaction experiments to derive intergranular stress curves for prepressed conventional HMX material that is of nonuniform distribution with a mean diameter of 40μm and a microfine HMX of more uniform distribution of mean diameter <5μm. Steady-state compaction waves in the solid material are analyzed: initially the solid is assumed to behave as an incompressible medium. The speed and extent of compaction can be simply determined through the solution of a quadratic equation. Following this, the assumption is relaxed allowing changes in solid-phase density; a complicated equation of state makes the use of numerical methods mandatory. The speed of steady-state waves in HMX due to low impact compaction can be determined within 2% accuracy using the simple closed solution based on solid incompressibility, which is a function of the initial material porosity and density, piston speed, and the intergranular stress of the granular bed. This analysis reveals the difference between the weak impact response of a coarse nonuniform bed and a fine almost uniform granular bed that are initially loaded to 75% of the theoretical maximum density. The fine particle beds have increased

  20. Γ-Al₂O₃-based nanocomposite adsorbents for arsenic(V) removal: assessing performance, toxicity and particle leakage.

    PubMed

    Onnby, Linda; Svensson, Christian; Mbundi, Lubinda; Busquets, Rosa; Cundy, Andrew; Kirsebom, Harald

    2014-03-01

    The generation and development of effective adsorption materials for arsenic removal are urgently needed due to acute arsenic contamination of water sources in many regions around the world. In the search for these new adsorbents, the application of nanomaterials or nanocomposites, and especially the use of nanoparticles (NPs), has proven increasingly attractive. While the adsorptive performance of a range of nanocomposite and nanomaterial-based systems has been extensively reviewed in previously-published literature, the stability of these systems in terms of NP release, i.e. the ability of the nanomaterial or nanocomposite to retain incorporated NPs, is less well understood. Here we examine the performance of nanocomposites comprised of aluminium oxide nanoparticles (AluNPs) incorporated in macroporous polyacrylamide-based cryogels (n-Alu-cryo, where n indicates the percentage of AluNPs in the polymer material (n=0-6%, w/v)) for As(V) adsorption, and evaluate AluNP leakage before and after the use of these materials. A range of techniques is utilised and assessed (SEM, TEM, mass weight change, PIXE and in vitro toxicity studies). The 4-Alu-cryo nanocomposite was shown to be optimal for minimising AluNP losses while maximising As(V) removal. From the same nanocomposite we were further able to show that NP losses were not detectable at the AluNP concentrations used in the study. Toxicity tests revealed that no cytotoxic effects could be observed. The cryogel-AluNPs composites were not only effective in As(V) removal but also in immobilising the AluNPs. More challenging flow-through conditions for the evaluation of NP leakage could be included as a next step in a continued study assessing particle loss and subsequent toxicity. PMID:24370695

  1. A global data set of soil particle size properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Robert S.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Levine, Elissa R.

    1991-01-01

    A standardized global data set of soil horizon thicknesses and textures (particle size distributions) was compiled. This data set will be used by the improved ground hydrology parameterization designed for the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model (GISS GCM) Model 3. The data set specifies the top and bottom depths and the percent abundance of sand, silt, and clay of individual soil horizons in each of the 106 soil types cataloged for nine continental divisions. When combined with the World Soil Data File, the result is a global data set of variations in physical properties throughout the soil profile. These properties are important in the determination of water storage in individual soil horizons and exchange of water with the lower atmosphere. The incorporation of this data set into the GISS GCM should improve model performance by including more realistic variability in land-surface properties.

  2. Particle-size distribution in soils of West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumov, E. V.

    2010-03-01

    The particle-size distribution in soils sampled near Russian polar stations in West Antarctica has been studied. It is shown that the soils of the Subantarctic zone (the Bellingshausen Station on King George Island) are characterized by a higher content of silt and clay in the fine earth fraction and by a higher content of the fine earth fraction in comparison with the soils of the proper Antarctic tundra barrens near the Lenin-gradskaya Station and the Antarctic cold desert near the Russkaya Station. In the latter soils, the content of rock fragments is higher than that in the soils of the Antarctic tundra barrens. In the soils of the tundra barrens, a considerable accumulation of fine earth may take place in large cavities (hollows) on the stony bedrock surface. Desert pavements are formed in both types of Antarctic landscapes.

  3. Particle size and X-ray analysis of Feldspar, Calvert, Ball, and Jordan soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Pipette analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques were employed to characterize the particle size distribution and clay mineral content of the feldspar, calvert, ball, and jordan soils. In general, the ball, calvert, and jordan soils were primarily clay size particles composed of kaolinite and illite whereas the feldspar soil was primarily silt-size particles composed of quartz and feldspar minerals.

  4. Vertical variation of ice particle size in convective cloud tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Cairns, Brian; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Yorks, John E.

    2016-05-01

    A novel technique is used to estimate derivatives of ice effective radius with respect to height near convective cloud tops (dre/dz) from airborne shortwave reflectance measurements and lidar. Values of dre/dz are about -6 μm/km for cloud tops below the homogeneous freezing level, increasing to near 0 μm/km above the estimated level of neutral buoyancy. Retrieved dre/dz compares well with previously documented remote sensing and in situ estimates. Effective radii decrease with increasing cloud top height, while cloud top extinction increases. This is consistent with weaker size sorting in high, dense cloud tops above the level of neutral buoyancy where fewer large particles are present and with stronger size sorting in lower cloud tops that are less dense. The results also confirm that cloud top trends of effective radius can generally be used as surrogates for trends with height within convective cloud tops. These results provide valuable observational targets for model evaluation.

  5. Vertical Variation of Ice Particle Size in Convective Cloud Tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Cairns, Brian; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Yorks, John E.

    2016-01-01

    A novel technique is used to estimate derivatives of ice effective radius with respect to height near convective cloud tops (dr(sub e)/dz) from airborne shortwave reflectance measurements and lidar. Values of dr(sub e)/dz are about -6 micrometer/km for cloud tops below the homogeneous freezing level, increasing to near 0 micrometer/km above the estimated level of neutral buoyancy. Retrieved dr(sub e)/dz compares well with previously documented remote sensing and in situ estimates. Effective radii decrease with increasing cloud top height, while cloud top extinction increases. This is consistent with weaker size sorting in high, dense cloud tops above the level of neutral buoyancy where fewer large particles are present and with stronger size sorting in lower cloud tops that are less dense. The results also confirm that cloud top trends of effective radius can generally be used as surrogates for trends with height within convective cloud tops. These results provide valuable observational targets for model evaluation.

  6. Ultrafine particle size as a tracer for aircraft turbine emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Erin A.; Gould, Timothy; Hartin, Kris; Fruin, Scott A.; Simpson, Christopher D.; Yost, Michael G.; Larson, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafine particle number (UFPN) and size distributions, black carbon, and nitrogen dioxide concentrations were measured downwind of two of the busiest airports in the world, Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (ATL - Atlanta, GA) using a mobile monitoring platform. Transects were located between 5 km and 10 km from the ATL and LAX airports. In addition, measurements were taken at 43 additional urban neighborhood locations in each city and on freeways. We found a 3-5 fold increase in UFPN concentrations in transects under the landing approach path to both airports relative to surrounding urban areas with similar ground traffic characteristics. The latter UFPN concentrations measured were distinct in size distributional properties from both freeways and across urban neighborhoods, clearly indicating different sources. Elevated concentrations of Black Carbon (BC) and NO2 were also observed on airport transects, and the corresponding pattern of elevated BC was consistent with the observed excess UFPN concentrations relative to other urban locations.

  7. Intrinsic speckle noise in in-line particle holography due to polydisperse and continuous particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Philip J.; Hobson, Peter R.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2000-08-01

    In-line particle holography is subject to image deterioration due to intrinsic speckle noise. The resulting reduction in the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the replayed image can become critical for applications such as holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) and 3D visualisation of marine plankton. Work has been done to extend the mono-disperse model relevant to HPV to include poly-disperse particle fields appropriate for the visualisation of marine plankton. Continuous and discrete particle fields are both considered. It is found that random walk statistics still apply for the poly-disperse case. The speckle field is simply the summation of the individual speckle patters due to each scatter size. Therefor the characteristic speckle parameter (which encompasses particle diameter, concentration and sample depth) is alos just the summation of the individual speckle parameters. This reduces the SNR calculation to the same form as for the mono-disperse case. For the continuous situation three distributions, power, exponential and Gaussian are discussed with the resulting SNR calcuated. The work presented here was performed as part of the Holomar project to produce a working underwater holographic camera for recording plankton.

  8. Influence of particle size on performance of a pilot-scale fixed-bed gasification system.

    PubMed

    Yin, Renzhan; Liu, Ronghou; Wu, Jinkai; Wu, Xiaowu; Sun, Chen; Wu, Ceng

    2012-09-01

    The effect of particle size on the gasification performance of a pilot-scale (25 kg/h) downdraft fixed bed gasification system was investigated using prunings from peach trees at five different size fractions (below 1, 1-2, 2-4, 4-6 and 6-8 cm). The gas and hydrocarbon compositions were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. With increasing particle size, gas yield increased while tar and dust content decreased. The lower heating value of the gas decreased slightly with particle size. At a smaller particle size, more hydrocarbons were detected in the producer gas. Hydrogen and carbon dioxide contents increased with the decrease in particle size, reaching 16.09% and 14.36% at particle size below 1cm, respectively. Prunings with a particle size of 1-2 cm were favorable for gasification in the downdraft gasifier used in this study. PMID:22728176

  9. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  10. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul; Qin, Hongyi; Kim, Taesung

    2016-04-01

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution by analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements. PMID:27131717

  11. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul; Qin, Hongyi; Kim, Taesung

    2016-04-01

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution by analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements.

  12. Particle Size Concentration Distribution and Influences on Exhaled Breath Particles in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Fang; Huang, Sheng-Hsiu; Wang, Yu-Ling; Chen, Chun-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Humans produce exhaled breath particles (EBPs) during various breath activities, such as normal breathing, coughing, talking, and sneezing. Airborne transmission risk exists when EBPs have attached pathogens. Until recently, few investigations had evaluated the size and concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients with different ventilation mode settings. This study thus broke new ground by not only evaluating the size concentration distributions of EBPs in mechanically ventilated patients, but also investigating the relationship between EBP level and positive expiratory end airway pressure (PEEP), tidal volume, and pneumonia. This investigation recruited mechanically ventilated patients, with and without pneumonia, aged 20 years old and above, from the respiratory intensive care unit of a medical center. Concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed with an optical particle analyzer. This study finds that EBP concentrations from mechanically ventilated patients during normal breathing were in the range 0.47–2,554.04 particles/breath (0.001–4.644 particles/mL). EBP concentrations did not differ significantly between the volume control and pressure control modes of the ventilation settings in the mechanically ventilated patients. The patient EBPs were sized below 5 µm, and 80% of them ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 µm. The EBPs concentrations in patients with high PEEP (> 5 cmH2O) clearly exceeded those in patients with low PEEP (≤ 5 cmH2O). Additionally, a significant negative association existed between pneumonia duration and EBPs concentration. However, tidal volume was not related to EBPs concentration. PMID:24475230

  13. Carbon-based phytoplankton size classes retrieved via ocean color estimates of the particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, Tihomir S.; Milutinović, Svetlana; Marinov, Irina; Cabré, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their important roles in biogeochemical cycles, phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) have been the aim of an increasing number of ocean color algorithms. Yet, none of the existing methods are based on phytoplankton carbon (C) biomass, which is a fundamental biogeochemical and ecological variable and the "unit of accounting" in Earth system models. We present a novel bio-optical algorithm to retrieve size-partitioned phytoplankton carbon from ocean color satellite data. The algorithm is based on existing methods to estimate particle volume from a power-law particle size distribution (PSD). Volume is converted to carbon concentrations using a compilation of allometric relationships. We quantify absolute and fractional biomass in three PFTs based on size - picophytoplankton (0.5-2 µm in diameter), nanophytoplankton (2-20 µm) and microphytoplankton (20-50 µm). The mean spatial distributions of total phytoplankton C biomass and individual PFTs, derived from global SeaWiFS monthly ocean color data, are consistent with current understanding of oceanic ecosystems, i.e., oligotrophic regions are characterized by low biomass and dominance of picoplankton, whereas eutrophic regions have high biomass to which nanoplankton and microplankton contribute relatively larger fractions. Global climatological, spatially integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass standing stock estimates using our PSD-based approach yield ˜ 0.25 Gt of C, consistent with analogous estimates from two other ocean color algorithms and several state-of-the-art Earth system models. Satisfactory in situ closure observed between PSD and POC measurements lends support to the theoretical basis of the PSD-based algorithm. Uncertainty budget analyses indicate that absolute carbon concentration uncertainties are driven by the PSD parameter No which determines particle number concentration to first order, while uncertainties in PFTs' fractional contributions to total C biomass

  14. Comprehensive understanding of nano-sized particle separation processes using nanoparticle tracking analysis.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Desmond F; Youn, Sungmin; Zhu, Tongren; Kim, Ijung; Lau, Boris L T

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of nano-sized particle separation processes has been limited by difficulties of nanoparticle characterization. In this study, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) was deployed to evaluate the absolute particle size distributions in laboratory scale flocculation and filtration experiments with silver nanoparticles. The results from NTA were consistent with standard theories of particle destabilization and transport. Direct observations of changes in absolute particle size distributions from NTA enhance both qualitative and quantitative understanding of particle separation processes of nano-sized particles. PMID:26676021

  15. Particle capture by aquatic vegetation modeled in flume experiments: the effects of particle size, stem density, biofilm, and flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerwin, R.; Fauria, K.; Nover, D.; Schladow, G.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetated floodplains and wetlands can trap and remove particles from suspension thereby affecting water quality, land accretion, and wetland functioning. However, the rate of particle removal by vegetation remains poorly characterized, especially for fine particles. In this study, we monitored particle concentration and size distribution (1.25 - 250 µm diameter suspended road dust) in a laboratory flume as flow velocity, plant stem density, initial particle concentration, and the presence of biofilm on vegetation were varied. We characterized change in particle concentration through time by calculating decay constants, termed capture rates. Based on our experiments, we found that suspended particle concentration decayed more rapidly in the presence, rather than in the absence, of vegetation. Additionally, particle capture rates increased with stem density, particle size, and the presence of biofilm, while decreasing with flow velocity. These results demonstrate that low flow velocities and the presence of biofilm optimize particle capture by vegetation. Our results are relevant to floodplain and wetland restoration efforts.

  16. Effect of four different size reduction methods on the particle size, solubility enhancement and physical stability of nicergoline nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Martena, Valentina; Shegokar, Ranjita; Di Martino, Piera; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nicergoline, a poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient, possesses vaso-active properties which causes peripheral and central vasodilatation. In this study, nanocrystals of nicergoline were prepared in an aqueous solution of polysorbate 80 (nanosuspension) by using four different laboratory scale size reduction techniques: high pressure homogenization (HPH), bead milling (BM) and combination techniques (high pressure homogenization followed by bead milling HPH + BM, and bead milling followed by high pressure homogenization BM + HPH). Nanocrystals were investigated regarding to their mean particles size, zeta potential and particle dissolution. A short term physical stability study on nanocrystals stored at three different temperatures (4, 20 and 40 °C) was performed to evaluate the tendency to change in particle size, aggregation and zeta potential. The size reduction technique and the process parameters like milling time, number of homogenization cycles and pressure greatly affected the size of nanocrystals. Among the techniques used, the combination techniques showed superior and consistent particle size reduction compared to the other two methods, HPH + BM and BM + HPH giving nanocrystals of a mean particle size of 260 and 353 nm, respectively. The particle dissolution was increased for any nanocrystals samples, but it was particularly increased by HPH and combination techniques. Independently to the production method, nicergoline nanocrystals showed slight increase in particle size over the time, but remained below 500 nm at 20 °C and refrigeration conditions. PMID:23815299

  17. The permeability of poly-disperse porous media and effective particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markicevic, B. I.; Preston, C.; Osterroth, S.; Iliev, O.; Hurwitz, M.

    2015-11-01

    The interactions between the fluid and solid phases in porous media account for the openness and length of the flow path that the fluid needs to travel within. The same reasoning applies for both mono- and poly-disperse media, and is reflected in the adoption of the same permeability models. The only difference is that an effective particle size diameter has to be used for the poly-disperse samples. A filtration experiment is used to form a particle layer, filter cake, consisting of particles of different sizes. Both inflow and outflow particle size distribution are measured by particle counting method, and from their difference, the particle size distribution in the cake is determined. In a set of experiments, the filtration history is altered by changing (i) filtration medium; (ii) suspension flow rate; and (iii) particle concentration, where in all cases investigated the cake permeability remains constant. In order to predict the permeability of poly-disperse cake from the analytical models, the particle size distribution moments are calculated, and the permeability is found for each moment. Comparing the experimental to the analytical permeability values the effective particle size is found, where the permeability calculated by using the harmonic mean of the particle size distribution reproduces the permeability experimental value best. Finally, in the parametric study, reducing the cake porosity and/or lowering the particle retention shifts effective particle size used in the permeability model toward higher moments of the particle size distribution function.

  18. Laboratory study of the particle-size distribution of Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Su, Peng-hao; Hou, Chun-yan; Sun, Dan; Feng, Dao-lun; Halldorson, Thor; Ding, Yong-sheng; Li, Yi-fan; Tomy, Gregg T

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory measurements for particle-size distribution of Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) were performed in a 0.5 m(3) sealed room at 25 °C. BDE-209 was manually bounded to ambient particles. An electrostatic field-sampler was employed to collect particles. The number of collected particles (n(i,j), i and j was the class of particle diameter and applied voltage on electrostatic field-sampler sampler, respectively) and the corresponding mass of BDE-209 in collected particles (m(∑i,j)) were determined in a series of 6 experiments. The particle-size distribution coefficient (ki) was calculated through equations related to n(i,j) and m(∑i,j), and the particle-size distribution of BDE-209 was determined by ki·n(i,j). Results revealed that BDE-209 distributed in particles of all size and were not affiliated with fine particles as in field measurements. The particle size-fraction should be taken into account when discussing the particle-size distribution of BDE-209 in ambient air due to the normalized coefficients (normalized to k1) and were approximately in the same order of magnitude for each diameter class. The method described in the present study was deemed feasible in determining the particle-size distribution of BDE-209 from vaporization sources and helpful to understanding the instinct rule of particle-size distribution of BDE-209, and potentially feasible for other SVOCs. PMID:26363326

  19. Particle size effects on protein and virus-like particle adsorption on perfusion chromatography media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The resin structure, chromatographic behavior, and adsorption kinetics of proteins and virus-like-particles (VLPs) are studied for POROS HS 20 and POROS HS 50 (23 and 52 μm mean diameter, respectively) to determine the effects of particle size on perfusion chromatography and to determine the predictive ability of available models. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) show similar structures for the two resins, both containing 200-1000 nm pores that transect a network of much smaller pores. For non-binding conditions, trends of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) as a function of reduced velocity are consistent with perfusion. The estimated intraparticle flow fractions for these conditions are 0.0018 and 0.00063 for POROS HS 20 and HS 50, respectively. For strong binding conditions, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) shows asymmetrical intraparticle concentrations profiles and enhanced rates of IgG adsorption on POROS HS 20 at 1000 cm/h. The corresponding effective diffusivity under flow is 2-3 times larger than for non-flow conditions and much larger than observed for POROS HS 50, consistent with available models. For VLPs, however, adsorption is confined to a thin layer near the particle surface for both resins, suggesting that the bound VLPs block the pores. PMID:25512122

  20. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on the Rheology of Dispersed Systems.

    PubMed

    Luckham; Ukeje

    1999-12-15

    The rheological properties of aqueous polystyrene latex dispersions from three synthetic batches, with nearly the same z-average particle sizes, 400 nm, but varying degrees of polydispersity, 0.085, 0.301, and 0.485, respectively, were systematically investigated using steady-state shear and oscillatory shear measurements. The particles were sized with photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy and were stabilized sterically with PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer (Synperonic F127). Results from steady-state shear measurements show that the viscosities of the systems exhibit shear-thinning behavior at high solid fractions. However, the degree of shear thinning depends on the breadth of particle size distribution, with the narrowest distribution suspension exhibiting the highest degree of shear thinning. The Herschel-Bulkley relationship best describes the flow curves. The relative viscosities as a function of volume fraction data were compared, and it was found that the broadest distribution suspension had the lowest viscosity for a given volume fraction. In addition, the data were fitted to the Krieger-Dougherty equation for hard spheres. A reasonable agreement of theory with experiment is observed, particularly and surprisingly for the very broad distribution. However, when the contribution to the volume due to the adsorbed polymer layer is considered, the agreement between experiment and theory becomes closer for all the suspensions, although the agreement for the broad distribution suspension is now worse. Fitting the Dougherty-Krieger theory to the experimental data based on our experimental maximum packing fractions gives very good agreement for all the systems studied. From oscillatory shear measurements, the moduli were obtained as a function of frequency at various latex volume fractions. The results show general change of the dispersions from viscous (G" > G') at low volume fractions (0.25-0.30) to moderately elastic (G' > G") at

  1. Sizing of individual aerosol particles using TAOS (Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) pattern total intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zallie, J. T.; Aptowicz, K. B.; Martin, S.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The morphology of single aerosol particles has been explored previously using the TAOS (Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) technique, which captures angularly resolved scattering patterns. Particle size is known to strongly influence the light scattering properties of aerosols and therefore is a critical parameter to discern from the TAOS patterns. In this work, T-matrix simulation of light scattering from spherical and spheroidal particles is used to explore the possibility of sizing particles from the total light scattering signal detected using the TAOS technique. Scattering patterns were calculated for particles that span various particle sizes, spheroidal shapes, complex refractive indices and particles orientations representative of atmospheric aerosol distributions. A power law relationship between particle size and total scattering intensity was found that could crudely size particles but with significant error.

  2. Discrete element method modeling of the triboelectric charging of polyethylene particles: Can particle size distribution and segregation reduce the charging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopka, Ladislav; Kosek, Juraj

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene particles of various sizes are present in industrial gas-dispersion reactors and downstream processing units. The contact of the particles with a device wall as well as the mutual particle collisions cause electrons on the particle surface to redistribute in the system. The undesirable triboelectric charging results in several operational problems and safety risks in industrial systems, for example in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor. We studied the charging of polyethylene particles caused by the particle-particle interactions in gas. Our model employs the Discrete Element Method (DEM) describing the particle dynamics and incorporates the ‘Trapped Electron Approach’ as the physical basis for the considered charging mechanism. The model predicts the particle charge distribution for systems with various particle size distributions and various level of segregation. Simulation results are in a qualitative agreement with experimental observations of similar particulate systems specifically in two aspects: 1) Big particles tend to gain positive charge and small particles the negative one. 2) The wider the particle size distribution is, the more pronounced is the charging process. Our results suggest that not only the size distribution, but also the effect of the spatial segregation of the polyethylene particles significantly influence the resulting charge distribution ‘generated’ in the system. The level of particle segregation as well as the particle size distribution of polyethylene particles can be in practice adjusted by the choice of supported catalysts, by the conditions in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor and by the fluid dynamics. We also attempt to predict how the reactor temperature affects the triboelectric charging of particles.

  3. Design of a Particle Shadowgraph Velocimetry and Size (PSVS) System to Determine Particle Size and Density Distributions (PSDD) in Hanford Nuclear Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Howe, Daniel T.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ

    2012-01-10

    An accurate particle size and density distribution (PSDD) for nuclear tank wastes is an essential piece of information that helps determine the engineering requirements for a host of waste management unit operations including tank mixing, pipeline transport, and filtration. The existing approach has involved a laborious approach in which individual particles are identified using SEM/XRD methods and the density of these materials obtained from the technical literature. Further, some methods simply approximate individual particle densities by assuming chemical composition rather than actual measurements of particle density. A particle shadowgraph velocimetry and size (PSVS) system has been designed to obtain representative PSDDs for a broad range of Hanford tank waste materials existing as both individual particles and agglomerates. The PSVS utilizes optical hardware, a temperature controlled settling column, and particle introduction chamber to accurately and reproducibly obtain images of settling particles. Image analysis software then provides a highly accurate determination of both particle terminal velocity and equivalent spherical particle diameter. The particle/agglomerate density is then calculated from Newton’s terminal settling theory. The PSVS was designed to accurately image particle/agglomerate sizes between 10-1000µm and particle/agglomerate densities ranging from 1.4-11.5g/cm3 where the maximum terminal velocity does not exceed 20cm/s. Preliminary testing was completed and results were in good agreement with terminal settling theory. Recent results of this method development are presented, as well as experimental design, and future proposed work.

  4. Carbon-based phytoplankton size classes retrieved via ocean color estimates of the particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, T. S.; Milutinović, S.; Marinov, I.; Cabré, A.

    2015-05-01

    Owing to their important roles in biogeochemical cycles, phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) have been the aim of an increasing number of ocean color algorithms. Yet, none of the existing methods are based on phytoplankton carbon (C) biomass, which is a fundamental biogeochemical and ecological variable and the "unit of accounting" in Earth System models. We present a novel bio-optical algorithm to retrieve size-partitioned phytoplankton carbon from ocean color satellite data. The algorithm is based on existing algorithms to estimate particle volume from a power-law particle size distribution (PSD). Volume is converted to carbon concentrations using a compilation of allometric relationships. We quantify absolute and fractional biomass in three PFTs based on size - picophytoplankton (0.5-2 μm in diameter), nanophytoplankton (2-20 μm) and microphytoplankton (20-50 μm). The mean spatial distributions of total phytoplankton C biomass and individual PFTs, derived from global SeaWiFS monthly ocean color data, are consistent with current understanding of oceanic ecosystems, i.e. oligotrophic regions are characterized by low biomass and dominance of picoplankton, whereas eutrophic regions have large biomass to which nanoplankton and microplankton contribute relatively larger fractions. Global spatially integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass standing stock estimates using our PSD-based approach yield on average ~0.2-0.3 Gt of C, consistent with analogous estimates from two other ocean color algorithms, and several state-of-the-art Earth System models. However, the range of phytoplankton C biomass spatial variability globally is larger than estimated by any other models considered here, because the PSD-based algorithm is not a priori empirically constrained and introduces improvement over the assumptions of the other approaches. Satisfactory in situ closure observed between PSD and POC measurements lends support to the theoretical basis of the PSD-based algorithm

  5. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, M.; Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Weber, P.; Webb, C.

    2005-08-25

    Discusses the full useful life exhaust emission performance of a NOx (nitrogen oxides) adsorber and diesel particle filter equipped light-duty and medium-duty engine using ultra low sulfur diesel fuel.

  6. Particle-size segregation in dense granular avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, John Mark Nicholas Timm; Gajjar, Parmesh; Kokelaar, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Particles of differing sizes are notoriously prone to segregate, which is a chronic problem in the manufacture of a wide variety of products that are used by billions of people worldwide every day. Segregation is the single most important factor in product non-uniformity, which can lead to significant handling problems as well as complete batches being discarded at huge financial loss. It is generally regarded that the most important mechanism for segregation is the combination of kinetic sieving and squeeze expulsion in shallow granular avalanches. These free-surface flows are more common than one might expect, often forming part of more complicated flows in drums, heaps and silos, where there is mass exchange with underlying regions of static or slowly moving grains. The combination of segregation and solid-fluid granular phase transitions creates incredibly complicated and beautiful patterns in the resulting deposits, but a full understanding of such effects lies beyond our capabilities at present. This paper reviews recent advances in our ability to model the basic segregation processes in a single avalanche (without mass exchange) and the subtle feedback effects that they can have on the bulk flow. This is particularly important for geophysical applications, where segregation can spontaneously self-channelize and lubricate the flow, significantly enhancing the run-out of debris-flows, pyroclastic flows, rock-falls and snow-slab avalanches.

  7. Event-based total suspended sediment particle size distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jennifer; Sattar, Ahmed M. A.; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Warner, Richard C.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most challenging modelling tasks in hydrology is prediction of the total suspended sediment particle size distribution (TSS-PSD) in stormwater runoff generated from exposed soil surfaces at active construction sites and surface mining operations. The main objective of this study is to employ gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop a new model with the ability to more accurately predict the TSS-PSD by taking advantage of both event-specific and site-specific factors in the model. To compile the data for this study, laboratory scale experiments using rainfall simulators were conducted on fourteen different soils to obtain TSS-PSD. This data is supplemented with field data from three construction sites in Ontario over a period of two years to capture the effect of transport and deposition within the site. The combined data sets provide a wide range of key overlooked site-specific and storm event-specific factors. Both parent soil and TSS-PSD in runoff are quantified by fitting each to a lognormal distribution. Compared to existing regression models, the developed model more accurately predicted the TSS-PSD using a more comprehensive list of key model input parameters. Employment of the new model will increase the efficiency of deployment of required best management practices, designed based on TSS-PSD, to minimize potential adverse effects of construction site runoff on aquatic life in the receiving watercourses.

  8. SMALL SIZE-RANGE EXTENSION OF AN OPTICAL PARTICLE COUNTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The object of the study was to improve the small particle sensitivity and resolution of a white light optical particle counter. The particular counter chosen for study was the Model 208 manufactured by Climet Instruments.

  9. Effects of interfacial charge and the particle size of titanate nanotube-supported Pt nanoparticles on the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsai-Chin; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Li, Pei-Hua; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Lin, Chiu-Hsun

    2013-03-22

    The oxidation state and size of Pt nanoparticles attached to alkali metal titanate nanotubes (MTNTs=M2Ti3O7, M = Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Cs(+)) via ion exchange (indicated by the added label '-IE') and wet impregnation (indicated by the added label '-IMP') methods varied systematically with the cation of the MTNTs. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the binding energy of Pt was reduced to a low value when the support was changed from LiTNTs to CsTNTs, yielding a Pt(δ-) oxidation state. Thus, a space charge layer (SCL) was constructed at the interface between the Pt particle and MTNT support; the former carried the negative charge, and the alkali cation and proton in the hydroxyl group of the latter carried the positive charge. Due to a higher M/Ti atomic ratio in MTNTs, a higher electron density accumulated on Pt particles in Pt/MTNTs-IMP than on those in Pt/MTNTs-IE. Sub-ambient temperature temperature-programmed reduction and transmission electron microscopy revealed that because of the difference in reducibility of PtOx/MTNTs, the mean Pt particle size followed the order Pt/CsTNTs > Pt/KTNTs > Pt/NaTNTs > Pt/LiTNTs and Pt/MTNTs-IMP > Pt/MTNTs-IE. DRIFTS (diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy) showed that owing to its interaction with SCL, cinnamaldehyde adsorbed on Pt mainly through the C=C bond at the Pt-MTNT interfaces, and the small Pt particles in Pt/LiTNTs adsorbed three times more cinnamaldehyde than those in Pt/CsTNTs. Due to the competition between the adsorption of cinnamaldehyde and C=C activation, Pt/KTNT-IMP is the most active Pt/MTNT catalysts, achieving a conversion of 100% in the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde at 2 atm and 313 K. The carbonyl stretching of adsorbed cinnamaldehyde was almost unperturbed by adsorption (at 1705 cm(-1)), suggesting that Pt(δ-) and the π electrons in the carbonyl group repel each other, so the CH=O group points upward and away from the Pt surface, preventing it from being

  10. Effects of interfacial charge and the particle size of titanate nanotube-supported Pt nanoparticles on the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Tsai-Chin; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Li, Pei-Hua; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Lin, Chiu-Hsun

    2013-03-01

    The oxidation state and size of Pt nanoparticles attached to alkali metal titanate nanotubes (MTNTs=M2Ti3O7, M = Li+, Na+, K+, Cs+) via ion exchange (indicated by the added label ‘-IE’) and wet impregnation (indicated by the added label ‘-IMP’) methods varied systematically with the cation of the MTNTs. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the binding energy of Pt was reduced to a low value when the support was changed from LiTNTs to CsTNTs, yielding a Ptδ- oxidation state. Thus, a space charge layer (SCL) was constructed at the interface between the Pt particle and MTNT support; the former carried the negative charge, and the alkali cation and proton in the hydroxyl group of the latter carried the positive charge. Due to a higher M/Ti atomic ratio in MTNTs, a higher electron density accumulated on Pt particles in Pt/MTNTs-IMP than on those in Pt/MTNTs-IE. Sub-ambient temperature temperature-programmed reduction and transmission electron microscopy revealed that because of the difference in reducibility of PtOx/MTNTs, the mean Pt particle size followed the order Pt/CsTNTs > Pt/KTNTs > Pt/NaTNTs > Pt/LiTNTs and Pt/MTNTs-IMP > Pt/MTNTs-IE. DRIFTS (diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy) showed that owing to its interaction with SCL, cinnamaldehyde adsorbed on Pt mainly through the C=C bond at the Pt-MTNT interfaces, and the small Pt particles in Pt/LiTNTs adsorbed three times more cinnamaldehyde than those in Pt/CsTNTs. Due to the competition between the adsorption of cinnamaldehyde and C=C activation, Pt/KTNT-IMP is the most active Pt/MTNT catalysts, achieving a conversion of 100% in the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde at 2 atm and 313 K. The carbonyl stretching of adsorbed cinnamaldehyde was almost unperturbed by adsorption (at 1705 cm-1), suggesting that Ptδ- and the π electrons in the carbonyl group repel each other, so the CH=O group points upward and away from the Pt surface, preventing it from being hydrogenated and

  11. Toxicogenomic analysis of the particle dose- and size-response relationship of silica particles-induced toxicity in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Jin, Tingting; Jin, Yachao; Wu, Leihong; Hu, Bin; Tian, Yu; Fan, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between particle size and toxicity of silica particles (SP) with diameters of 30, 70, and 300 nm, which is essential to the safe design and application of SP. Data obtained from histopathological examinations suggested that SP of these sizes can all induce acute inflammation in the liver. In vivo imaging showed that intravenously administrated SP are mainly present in the liver, spleen and intestinal tract. Interestingly, in gene expression analysis, the cellular response pathways activated in the liver are predominantly conserved independently of particle dose when the same size SP are administered or are conserved independently of particle size, surface area and particle number when nano- or submicro-sized SP are administered at their toxic doses. Meanwhile, integrated analysis of transcriptomics, previous metabonomics and conventional toxicological results support the view that SP can result in inflammatory and oxidative stress, generate mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis by neutrophil-mediated liver injury.

  12. Magnetic microgels, a promising candidate for enhanced magnetic adsorbent particles in bioseparation: synthesis, physicochemical characterization, and separation performance.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Rodica; Socoliuc, Vlad; Craciunescu, Izabell; Petran, Anca; Paulus, Anja; Franzreb, Matthias; Vasile, Eugeniu; Vekas, Ladislau

    2015-02-01

    For specific applications in the field of high gradient magnetic separation of biomaterials, magnetic nanoparticle clusters of controlled size and high magnetic moment in an external magnetic field are of particular interest. We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic microgels designed for magnetic separation purposes, as well as the separation efficiency of the obtained microgel particles. High magnetization magnetic microgels with superparamagnetic behaviour were obtained in a two-step synthesis procedure by a miniemulsion technique using highly stable ferrofluid on a volatile nonpolar carrier. Spherical clusters of closely packed hydrophobic oleic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were coated with cross linked polymer shells of polyacrylic acid, poly-N-isopropylacrylamide, and poly-3-acrylamidopropyl trimethylammonium chloride. The morphology, size distribution, chemical surface composition, and magnetic properties of the magnetic microgels were determined using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Magnetically induced phase condensation in aqueous suspensions of magnetic microgels was investigated by optical microscopy and static light scattering. The condensed phase consists of elongated oblong structures oriented in the direction of the external magnetic field and may grow up to several microns in thickness and tens or even hundreds of microns in length. The dependence of phase condensation magnetic supersaturation on the magnetic field intensity was determined. The experiments using high gradient magnetic separation show high values of separation efficiency (99.9-99.97%) for the magnetic microgels. PMID:25519891

  13. The effect of particle size on hydrolysis reaction rates and rheological properties in cellulosic slurries.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Rajesh K; Eric Berson, R

    2007-04-01

    The effect of varying initial particle sizes on enzymatic hydrolysis rates and rheological properties of sawdust slurries is investigated. Slurries with four particle size ranges (33 microm < x < or = 75 microm, 150 microm < x < or = 180 microm, 295 microm < x < or = 425 microm, and 590 microm < x < or = 850 microm) were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis using an enzyme dosage of 15 filter paper units per gram of cellulose at 50 degrees C and 250 rpm in shaker flasks. At lower initial particle sizes, higher enzymatic reaction rates and conversions of cellulose to glucose were observed. After 72 h 50 and 55% more glucose was produced from the smallest size particles than the largest size ones, for initial solids concentration of 10 and 13% (w/w), respectively. The effect of initial particle size on viscosity over a range of shear was also investigated. For equivalent initial solids concentration, smaller particle sizes result in lower viscosities such that at a concentration of 10% (w/w), the viscosity decreased from 3000 cP for 150 microm < x < or = 180 microm particle size slurries to 61.4 cP for 33 microm < x < or = 75 microm particle size slurries. Results indicate particle size reduction may provide a means for reducing the long residence time required for the enzymatic hydrolysis step in the conversion of biomass to ethanol. Furthermore, the corresponding reduction in viscosity may allow for higher solids loading and reduced reactor sizes during large-scale processing. PMID:18478396

  14. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till Westphal, Saskia; Woitok, Anna; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean {+-} standard deviation, 3.19 {+-} 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 {+-} 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 {+-} 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 {+-} 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 {+-} 0.55 cm; P < 0.001). The greatest volume of ablation was achieved by performing embolization with 40-{mu}m particles before RFA (group 1a; 20.97 {+-} 9.65 cm{sup 3}). At histology, 40-{mu}m microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-{mu}m microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-{mu}m microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  15. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+) pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins. PMID:23251688

  16. Performance and operating envelope of imaging and scattering particle sizing instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.

    1987-01-01

    Scattering and imaging type particle sizing instruments are analyzed in terms of their ability to make accurate determinations of particle size distributions, number density, and total mass. Sources of counting and sizing errors are explained. Ways are described of identifying these errors and how these errors can effect the measurements.

  17. Particle size distribution and characteristics of heavy metals in road-deposited sediments from Beijing Olympic Park.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Shi, Anbang; Zhang, Xiaoran

    2015-06-01

    Due to rapid urbanization and industrialization, heavy metals in road-deposited sediments (RDSs) of parks are emitted into the terrestrial, atmospheric, and water environment, and have a severe impact on residents' and tourists' health. To identify the distribution and characteristic of heavy metals in RDS and to assess the road environmental quality in Chinese parks, samples were collected from Beijing Olympic Park in the present study. The results indicated that particles with small grain size (<150 μm) were the dominant fraction. The length of dry period was one of the main factors affecting the particle size distribution, as indicated by the variation of size fraction with the increase of dry days. The amount of heavy metal (i.e., Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) content was the largest in particles with small size (<150 μm) among all samples. Specifically, the percentage of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd in these particles was 74.7%, 55.5%, 56.6% and 71.3%, respectively. Heavy metals adsorbed in sediments may mainly be contributed by road traffic emissions. The contamination levels of Pb and Cd were higher than Cu and Zn on the basis of the mean heavy metal contents. Specifically, the geoaccumulation index (Igeo) decreased in the order: Cd>Pb>Cu>Zn. This study analyzed the mobility of heavy metals in sediments using partial sequential extraction with the Tessier procedure. The results revealed that the apparent mobility and potential metal bioavailability of heavy metals in the sediments, based on the exchangeable and carbonate fractions, decreased in the order: Cd>Zn≈Pb>Cu. PMID:26040749

  18. Mobility particle size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedensohler, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Sonntag, A.; Weinhold, K.; Merkel, M.; Wehner, B.; Tuch, T.; Pfeifer, S.; Fiebig, M.; Fjäraa, A. M.; Asmi, E.; Sellegri, K.; Depuy, R.; Venzac, H.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.; Aalto, P.; Ogren, J. A.; Swietlicki, E.; Williams, P.; Roldin, P.; Quincey, P.; Hüglin, C.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, S.; Grüning, C.; Faloon, K.; Beddows, D.; Harrison, R.; Monahan, C.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Marinoni, A.; Horn, H.-G.; Keck, L.; Jiang, J.; Scheckman, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, C. S.; Moerman, M.; Henzing, B.; de Leeuw, G.; Löschau, G.; Bastian, S.

    2012-03-01

    Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards and guidelines with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry to perform long-term atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations include continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyzer. We compared commercial and custom-made inversion routines to calculate the particle number size distributions from the measured electrical mobility distribution. All inversion routines are comparable within few per cent uncertainty for a given set of raw data. Furthermore, this work summarizes the results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research) and ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) to determine present uncertainties especially of custom-built mobility particle size spectrometers. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the particle number size distributions from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility particle size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of around ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. For particles larger than 200 nm, the uncertainty range increased to 30%, which could not be explained. The network reference mobility spectrometers with identical design agreed within ±4% in the peak particle number concentration

  19. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacakova, B.; Mantlikova, A.; Niznansky, D.; Kubickova, S.; Vejpravova, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic response of single-domain nanoparticles (NPs) in concentrated systems is strongly affected by mutual interparticle interactions. However, particle proximity significantly influences single-particle effective anisotropy. To solve which of these two phenomena plays a dominant role in the magnetic response of real NP systems, systematic study on samples with well-defined parameters is required. In our work, we prepared a series of nanocomposites constituted of highly-crystalline and well-isolated CoFe2O4 NPs embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix using a single-molecule precursor method. This preparation method enabled us to reach a wide interval of particle size and concentration. We observed that the characteristic parameters of the single-domain state (coercivity, blocking temperature) and dipole–dipole interaction energy ({{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} ) scaled with each other and increased with increasing {{≤ft({{d}\\text{XRD}}/r\\right)}3} , where d XRD was the NP diameter and r was the interparticle distance. Our results are in excellent agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle growth. Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of {{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} acting as an additional energetic barrier to the superspin reversal or as an average static field did not sufficiently explain how the concentrated NP systems responded to an external magnetic field. Alternations in the blocking temperature and coercivity of our NP systems accounted for reformed relaxations of the NP superspins and modified effective anisotropy energy of the interacting NPs. Therefore, the concept of modified NP effective anisotropy explains the magnetic response of our concentrated NP systems better than the concept of the energy barrier influenced by interparticle interactions.

  20. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Pacakova, B; Mantlikova, A; Niznansky, D; Kubickova, S; Vejpravova, J

    2016-05-25

    Magnetic response of single-domain nanoparticles (NPs) in concentrated systems is strongly affected by mutual interparticle interactions. However, particle proximity significantly influences single-particle effective anisotropy. To solve which of these two phenomena plays a dominant role in the magnetic response of real NP systems, systematic study on samples with well-defined parameters is required. In our work, we prepared a series of nanocomposites constituted of highly-crystalline and well-isolated CoFe2O4 NPs embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix using a single-molecule precursor method. This preparation method enabled us to reach a wide interval of particle size and concentration. We observed that the characteristic parameters of the single-domain state (coercivity, blocking temperature) and dipole-dipole interaction energy ([Formula: see text]) scaled with each other and increased with increasing [Formula: see text], where d XRD was the NP diameter and r was the interparticle distance. Our results are in excellent agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle growth. Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of [Formula: see text] acting as an additional energetic barrier to the superspin reversal or as an average static field did not sufficiently explain how the concentrated NP systems responded to an external magnetic field. Alternations in the blocking temperature and coercivity of our NP systems accounted for reformed relaxations of the NP superspins and modified effective anisotropy energy of the interacting NPs. Therefore, the concept of modified NP effective anisotropy explains the magnetic response of our concentrated NP systems better than the concept of the energy barrier influenced by interparticle interactions. PMID:27122013

  1. Influence of particle size on physical and sensory attributes of mango pulp powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Kadam, D. M.; Chadha, S.; Wilson, R. A.; Gupta, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    The present investigation was aimed to observe the effect of particle size on physical, sensory and thermal properties of foam-mat dried mango pulp powder. Mango pulp of Dussehri variety was foam-mat dried using 3% egg white at 65ºC. Dried foam-mats were pulverized and passed through a sieve shaker for obtaining three grades of powder with 50, 60, and 85 mesh size sieves. The particle size of these samples measured using laser diffraction particle size analyzer ranged from 191.26 to 296.19 μm. The data was analysed statistically using ANOVA of SAS. There was a linear increase in lightness (`L' value) with a decrease in particle size, however, `a' value decreased with a decrease in particle size, indicating the decrease in redness. An increase in bulk density and decrease in water solubility index and water absorption index % were observed with a decrease in particle size. Particle size had a significant effect on sensory parameters. Particle size in the range of 258.01 to 264.60μmwas found most acceptable with respect to sensory characteristics. This finding can be exploited for various commercial applicationswhere powder quality is dependent on the particle size and has foremost priority for end users.

  2. Size and temperature dependent plasmons of quantum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Mufei; Rakov, Nikifor

    2015-08-01

    This work reports on the influences of temperature changes on plasmons of metallic particles that are so small that electric carriers in the conduction band are forced to be at discrete sub-bands due to quantum confinement. In the framework of the electron-in-a-box model and with an every-electron-count computational scheme, the spatial electric distribution inside the particle is calculated. In the calculations, the intra-subband fluctuations are taken into account. The numerical results have shown that the small-particle plasmon frequency shifts with the temperature. The findings suggest that it would be possible to control the plasmons of quantum particles externally.

  3. Measurement of asphaltene particle size distributions in crude oils diluted with n-heptane

    SciTech Connect

    Ferworn, K.A.; Svrcek, W.Y.; Mehrotra, A.K. )

    1993-05-01

    The formation and growth of asphaltene particles from heavy crude oils diluted with n-heptane at 22 C and atmospheric pressure was studied using a laser particle analyzer. The results obtained with six crude oil samples indicate that the asphaltene precipitation is an instantaneous process leading to a unimodal, log-normal distribution. At typical laboratory conditions, the particles remained essentially unaltered in size and population density. A vast majority of the particles were noted to be far from round in shape, with the mean particle size ranging from 4.5 to 291 [mu]m. It was found that the oil-to-diluent ratio is an important parameter in determining the size of the generated asphaltene particles; higher dilution ratios yielded larger particles. The mean asphaltene particle size was also found to increase with the average molar mass and the asphaltene content of crude oils.

  4. Comparison and assessment of four sediment particle-size analysis methodologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment particle-size analysis is a fundamental component of a wide variety of environmental disciplines such as sediment transport dynamics, subsurface and groundwater flow, lacustrine depositional history, and nutrient transport. There are several readily available methods for measuring particle ...

  5. Metals leachability from medical waste incinerator fly ash: A case study on particle size comparison.

    PubMed

    Sukandar, Sukandar; Yasuda, Kenji; Tanaka, Masaru; Aoyama, Isao

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents the results from a study of metals leachability of medical waste incinerator fly ash in Japan on the basis of particle size. Sequential extraction and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analysis were carried out in order to quantify the leaching amount of metals in each categorized particle size. Sequential extraction was also subjected to identify the preference of binding matrix of metals. The results of sequential extraction showed an increase both exchangeable and carbonate associated chromium concentrations in the bigger particle size fractions. Likewise, concentrations of carbonate matrix of arsenic and tin tended to increase in the bigger particle size fractions. In contrast, exchangeable associated cadmium as well as both exchangeable and carbonate matrices of barium were found higher in the smaller particle size fractions. However, no correlation was found in Kendal-tau correlation analysis between particle size of the ash and metals leachability of the TCLP. PMID:16631284

  6. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds. PMID:25521409

  7. Development of high-productivity, strong cation-exchange adsorbers for protein capture by graft polymerization from membranes with different pore sizes

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Robinson, Julie R.; Hobley, Eboni; Husson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the surface modification of macroporous membranes using ATRP (atom transfer radical polymerization) to create cation-exchange adsorbers with high protein binding capacity at high product throughput. The work is motivated by the need for a more economical and rapid capture step in downstream processing of protein therapeutics. Membranes with three reported nominal pore sizes (0.2, 0.45, 1.0 μm) were modified with poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) tentacles, to create a high density of protein binding sites. A special formulation was used in which the monomer was protected by a crown ether to enable surface-initiated ATRP of this cationic polyelectrolyte. Success with modification was supported by chemical analysis using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and indirectly by measurement of pure water flux as a function of polymerization time. Uniformity of modification within the membranes was visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Static and dynamic binding capacities were measured using lysozyme protein to allow comparisons with reported performance data for commercial cation-exchange materials. Dynamic binding capacities were measured for flow rates ranging from 13 to 109 column volumes (CV)/min. Results show that this unique ATRP formulation can be used to fabricate cation-exchange membrane adsorbers with dynamic binding capacities as high as 70 mg/mL at a throughput of 100 CV/min and unprecedented productivity of 300 mg/mL/min. PMID:23175597

  8. Electromagnetic Wave Absorption On Powder Sheets: Effect Of Thickness And Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S. H.; Cho, E. K.; Cho, H. J.; Lee, J. J.; Sohn, K. Y.; Nam, J. M.; Moon, B. G.; Song, Y. S.; Park, W. W.

    2008-04-01

    Complex permeability and power absorption of electromagnetic wave absorber have been studied by varying the particle size of soft-magnetic powder and thickness of consolidated powder sheet. Relative permeability increased proportional to the particle size in <100 MHz range. But, as the frequency increased, the relative permeability of the sheet made of smaller particles decreased slower than that of larger particles. This is due to the increasing contribution of eddy current loss with increasing frequency.

  9. An experimental and theoretical study of the seepage migration of suspended particles with different sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bing; Xu, Tao; Guo, Zhiguang

    2016-08-01

    This study experimentally investigates the effect of particle size, particle concentration and flow velocity on the migration of suspended particles of size 1.02-47 μm in porous media. The results show that at the same flow velocity, the peak values of the breakthrough curves decrease and corresponding pore volumes increase slightly with increasing particles size. The migration velocity of smaller suspended particles is even greater than water flow velocity, which is attributed to the size exclusion effect. With increase of the injected particle concentration, the deposition coefficients of small single particles increase at first and then tend to a steady state or even decrease slightly, explained by the maximum retention concentration. The dispersivity of small particles decreases with increasing velocity. However, at a high flow velocity, the hydrodynamic dispersivity becomes increasingly dominant with the increase of particle size. The deposition coefficients for large-sized particles are higher than those for small-sized particles, which is attributed to considerable mass removal due to straining. An analytical solution, considering the release effect of sorbed particles, is developed to account for the one-dimensional flow and dispersive effect using a source function method, and then three transport parameters—dispersivity, deposition coefficient and release coefficient—are fitted using the experimental results. Finally, suspended-particle migration is predicted by the proposed model for short-time constant-concentration injection and repeated three-pulse injection. Overall, particle size has a significant effect on the seepage migration parameters of suspended particles in porous media such as the particle velocity, dispersivity and deposition coefficient.

  10. Particle diffusion in active fluids is non-monotonic in size.

    PubMed

    Patteson, Alison E; Gopinath, Arvind; Purohit, Prashant K; Arratia, Paulo E

    2016-02-28

    We experimentally investigate the effect of particle size on the motion of passive polystyrene spheres in suspensions of Escherichia coli. Using particles covering a range of sizes from 0.6 to 39 microns, we probe particle dynamics at both short and long time scales. In all cases, the particles exhibit super-diffusive ballistic behavior at short times before eventually transitioning to diffusive behavior. Surprisingly, we find a regime in which larger particles can diffuse faster than smaller particles: the particle long-time effective diffusivity exhibits a peak in particle size, which is a deviation from classical thermal diffusion. We also find that the active contribution to particle diffusion is controlled by a dimensionless parameter, the Péclet number. A minimal model qualitatively explains the existence of the effective diffusivity peak and its dependence on bacterial concentration. Our results have broad implications on characterizing active fluids using concepts drawn from classical thermodynamics. PMID:26797039

  11. Variation of particle number concentration and size distributions at the urban environment in Vilnius (Lithuania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulevicius, Vidmantas; Byčenkienë, Steigvilë; Plauškaitë, Kristina; Dudoitis, Vadimas

    2013-05-01

    This study presents results of research on urban aerosol particles with a focus on the particle size distribution and the aerosol particle number concentration (PNC). The real time measurements of the aerosol PNC in the size range of 9-840 nm were performed at the urban background site using a Condensed Particle Counter and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Strong diurnal patterns in aerosol PNC were evident as a direct effect of three sources of the aerosol particles (nucleation, traffic, and residential heating appliances). The traffic exhaust emissions were a major contributor of the pollution observed at the roadside site that was dominated by the nucleation mode particles, while particles formed due to the residential heating appliances and secondary formation processes contributed to the accumulation mode particles and could impact the variation of PNC and its size distribution during the same day.

  12. The effect of particle size and porosity on spectral contrast in the mid-infrared

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salisbury, J.W.; Eastes, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Contrary to previous work, we find that the decreasing intensity of fundamental molecular vibration bands with decreasing particle size is due primarily to increasing porosity of the finer particle size ranges, rather than to particle size per se. This implies that laser reflectance measurements from orbiting spacecraft should avoid loss of spectral contrast for fine particulate surfaces, because such measurements near zero phase angle will benefit from the opposition effect. ?? 1985.

  13. Lattice Constant Dependence on Particle Size for Ceria prepared from a Citrate Sol-Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, V. N.; Farrell, R. A.; Sexton, A. M.; Morris, M. A.

    2006-02-01

    High surface area ceria nanoparticles have been prepared using a citrate solgel precipitation method. Changes to the particle size have been made by calcining the ceria powders at different temperatures, and X-ray methods used to determine their lattice parameters. The particle sizes have been assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the lattice parameter found to fall with decreasing particle size. The results are discussed in the light of the role played by surface tension effects.

  14. The effect of particle size on the rheological properties of polyamide 6/biochar composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Tim; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar K.

    2015-05-01

    To assess the potential of biochar as filler for thermoplastic materials and to optimize its processing conditions, composites of polyamide 6 and biochar were produced by extrusion followed by injection moulding. Biochar was prepared by grinding and ball-milling, respectively before addition to the polymer. The different biochar treatments resulted in strong differences in the mean particle size as well as the particle size distribution. The size of the filler particle significantly influences the flow behaviour of the melt.

  15. Anomalous change of Airy disk with changing size of spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Linchao; Zhang, Fugen; Meng, Rui; Xu, Jie; Zuo, Chenze; Ge, Baozhen

    2016-02-01

    Use of laser diffraction is considered as a method of reliable principle and mature technique in measurements of particle size distributions. It is generally accepted that for a certain relative refractive index, the size of the scattering pattern (also called Airy disk) of spherical particles monotonically decreases with increasing particle size. This fine structure forms the foundation of the laser diffraction method. Here we show that the Airy disk size of non-absorbing spherical particles becomes larger with increasing particle size in certain size ranges. To learn more about this anomalous change of Airy disk (ACAD), we present images of Airy disk and curves of Airy disk size versus particle size for spherical particles of different relative refractive indices by using Mie theory. These figures reveal that ACAD occurs periodically for non-absorbing particles and will disappear when the absorbing efficiency is higher than certain value. Then by using geometrical optics (GO) approximation, we derive the analytical formulae for the bounds of the size ranges where ACAD occurs. From the formulae, we obtain laws of ACAD as follows: (1) for non-absorbing particles, ACAD occurs periodically, and when the particle size tends to infinity, the period tends to a certain value. As the relative refractive index increases, (2) the particle size ranges where ACAD occurs shift to smaller values, (3) the period of ACAD becomes smaller, and (4) the width of the size ranges where ACAD occurs becomes narrower. In addition, we can predict from the formulae that ACAD also exists for particles whose relative refractive index is smaller than 1.

  16. Calibration of single particle sizing velocimeters using photomask reticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Holve, D. J.; Hovenac, E. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of photomask reticle calibration standards for single particle instruments is discussed. The calibration method studied involves the use of photomask reticles where the particle artifacts are actually disks of chrome thin film in the clear field reticles produced by photolithography and etching processes. Consideration is given to various aspects of theory, design, and performance.

  17. Method for preparing spherical thermoplastic particles of uniform size

    DOEpatents

    Day, J.R.

    1975-11-17

    Spherical particles of thermoplastic material of virtually uniform roundness and diameter are prepared by cutting monofilaments of a selected diameter into rod-like segments of a selected uniform length which are then heated in a viscous liquid to effect the formation of the spherical particles.

  18. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols II: particle size distributions as a function of time.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Guilmette, Raymond A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing DU from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluate particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using proportional counting, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements were quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 microm and a large size mode between 2 and 15 microm. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 microm shortly after perforation to around 1 microm at the end of the 2-h sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles. PMID:19204485

  19. Gold-polyaniline composites: Part II. Effects of nanometer sized particles

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jon A.; Josowicz, Mira A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Janata, Jiri

    2005-09-01

    The amount of electronic charge transferred between gold particles and polyaniline depends not only on the electron affinity of the two materials but also on the size of the gold particles. As measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for particles < 5 nm the binding energy of the electrons is size dependent. This nano-effect has its origin in the electrostatics of particles. It is demonstrated as a measurable shift of the binding energy of the Au4f7/2 photoelectrons emitted from Au particles embedded in a polyaniline matrix. Gold nanoparticle size was evaluated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-07-05

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  1. Cellulosic biomass pretreatment and sugar yields as a function of biomass particle size.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Michael J; Tran, Huu M; Stavila, Vitalie; Knierim, Bernhard; George, Anthe; Auer, Manfred; Adams, Paul D; Hadi, Masood Z

    2014-01-01

    Three lignocellulosic pretreatment techniques (ammonia fiber expansion, dilute acid and ionic liquid) are compared with respect to saccharification efficiency, particle size and biomass composition. In particular, the effects of switchgrass particle size (32-200) on each pretreatment regime are examined. Physical properties of untreated and pretreated samples are characterized using crystallinity, surface accessibility measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. At every particle size tested, ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment results in greater cell wall disruption, reduced crystallinity, increased accessible surface area, and higher saccharification efficiencies compared with dilute acid and AFEX pretreatments. The advantages of using IL pretreatment are greatest at larger particle sizes (>75 µm). PMID:24971883

  2. Focusing dynamics of finite-sized particles in confined microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Nan; Huang, Di; Cheng, Jie; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Xinjie; Tang, Wenlai; Ni, Zhonghua

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the focusing dynamics of finite-sized particles in spiral microfluidic channels. The experimental results demonstrated that, unlike for the dynamics of point-sized particles, the Dean flow contributes little to the lateral migration of finite-sized particles. With interests in applying inertial focusing to biomedical applications, the dynamics of finite-sized tumor cells with an added deformability feature were explored and compared with the dynamics of rigid particles. It was found that the deformation of the cells would slow down the inward shifting of the focused cell array. This improved understanding may serve as an important supplement to the knowledge of existing inertial focusing mechanisms.

  3. Cellulosic Biomass Pretreatment and Sugar Yields as a Function of Biomass Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Stavila, Vitalie; Knierim, Bernhard; George, Anthe; Auer, Manfred; Adams, Paul D.; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    Three lignocellulosic pretreatment techniques (ammonia fiber expansion, dilute acid and ionic liquid) are compared with respect to saccharification efficiency, particle size and biomass composition. In particular, the effects of switchgrass particle size (32–200) on each pretreatment regime are examined. Physical properties of untreated and pretreated samples are characterized using crystallinity, surface accessibility measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. At every particle size tested, ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment results in greater cell wall disruption, reduced crystallinity, increased accessible surface area, and higher saccharification efficiencies compared with dilute acid and AFEX pretreatments. The advantages of using IL pretreatment are greatest at larger particle sizes (>75 µm). PMID:24971883

  4. Transport and Aggregation of Nanoparticles in Packed Beds: Effects of Pore Velocity and Initially-Fed Particle Size on Transient Particle Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Ngoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    Aggregation of colloidal particles in flow through porous media has received careful consideration, as it reduces particle breakthrough due to pore clogging and sedimentation. Additionally, in unstable colloidal systems, deposition of colloidal aggregates on the pore surfaces can create sub-surfaces for further colloidal attachment. This phenomenon is known as ripening effect. In this study, transient particle size distributions of nano-particle systems, propagating in a bed packed with spheres are numerically investigated. In our simulation, only pair interactions are considered, and the aggregation rate is varied with the relative position of two particles in a pair. The packed bed consists of spheres of known size, randomly packed in a simulation box. To generate the velocity field of water inside the porous medium, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used. In conjunction with that, the trajectories of thousands of massless particles moving with the flow under convection and diffusion are recorded employing a Lagrangian framework. While pore clogging is neglected, we draw attention to the change of the distribution of particle size under different pore velocities and different initially-fed particle sizes.

  5. Dissolution kinetics of sub-millimeter Composition B detonation residues: role of particle size and particle wetting.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Mark E; Schaefer, Charles E; Andaya, Christina; Lazouskaya, Volha; Fallis, Steve; Wang, Chao; Jin, Yan

    2012-07-01

    The dissolution of the 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) from microscale particles (<250μm) of the explosive formulation Composition B was examined and compared to dissolution from macroscopic particles (>0.5mm). The dissolution of explosives from detonation soot was also examined. The measured mass transfer coefficients for the microscale particles were one to two orders of magnitude greater than the macroscopic particles. When normalized to particle surface area, mass transfer coefficients of microscale and macroscale particles were similar, indicating that the bulk dissolution processes were similar throughout the examined size range. However, an inverse relationship was observed between the particle diameter and the RDX:TNT mass transfer rate coefficient ratio for dry-attritted particles, which suggests that RDX may be more readily dissolved (relative to TNT) in microscale particles compared to macroscale particles. Aqueous weathering of larger Composition B residues generated particles that possessed mass transfer coefficients that were on the order of 5- to 20-fold higher than dry-attritted particles of all sizes, even when normalized to particle surface area. These aqueous weathered particles also possessed a fourfold lower absolute zeta-potential than dry-attritted particles, which is indicative that they were less hydrophobic (and hence, more wettable) than dry-attritted particles. The increased wettability of these particles provides a plausible explanation for the observed enhanced dissolution. The wetting history and the processes by which particles are produced (e.g., dry physical attrition vs. aqueous weathering) of Composition B residues should be considered when calculating mass transfer rates for fate and transport modeling. PMID:22483856

  6. Control over Particle Size Distribution by Autoclaving Poloxamer-Stabilized Trimyristin Nanodispersions.

    PubMed

    Göke, Katrin; Roese, Elin; Arnold, Andreas; Kuntsche, Judith; Bunjes, Heike

    2016-09-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are under investigation as delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs. The particle size in these dispersions strongly influences important pharmaceutical properties like biodistribution and drug loading capacity; it should be below 500 nm for direct injection into the bloodstream. Consequently, small particles with a narrow particle size distribution are desired. Hitherto, there are, however, only limited possibilities for the preparation of monodisperse, pharmaceutically relevant dispersions. In this work, the effect of autoclaving at 121 °C on the particle size distribution of lipid nanoemulsions and -suspensions consisting of the pharmaceutically relevant components trimyristin and poloxamer 188 was studied. Additionally, the amount of emulsifier needed to stabilize both untreated and autoclaved particles was assessed. In our study, four dispersions of mean particle sizes from 45 to 150 nm were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization. The particle size distribution before and after autoclaving was characterized using static and dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission electron microscopy. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation was used for particle size distribution analyses and for the determination of free poloxamer 188. Upon autoclaving, the mean particle size increased to up to 200 nm, but not proportionally to the initial size. At the same time, the particle size distribution width decreased remarkably. Heat treatment thus seems to be a promising approach to achieve the desired narrow particle size distribution of such dispersions. Related to the lipid content, suspension particles needed more emulsifier for stabilization than emulsion droplets, and smaller particles more than larger ones. PMID:27463039

  7. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  8. Characterization and Safety of Uniform Particle Size NovaSil Clay as a Potential Aflatoxin Enterosorbent

    PubMed Central

    Marroquín-Cardona, A.; Deng, Y.; Garcia-Mazcorro, J.; Johnson, N.M.; Mitchell, N.; Tang, L.; Robinson, A.; Taylor, J.; Wang, J.-S.; Phillips, T.D.

    2011-01-01

    NovaSil (NS) clay, a common anti-caking agent in animal feeds, has been shown to adsorb aflatoxins and diminish their bioavailability in multiple animal models. The safety of long-term dietary exposure to NS has also been demonstrated in a 6-month sub-chronic study in rats and in a 3-month intervention in humans highly exposed to aflatoxins. Uniform particle size NovaSil (UPSN) is a refined material derived from parent NS; it contains lower levels of dioxins/furans, and has been selected for a more consistent uniform particle size. Nevertheless, the efficacy and potential safety/toxicity of UPSN for long term-use has not yet been determined. In this research, 4-week-old male and female Sprague Dawley rats were fed rations free of clay (control) and containing UPSN at low dose (0.25%) and high dose (2%) for 13 weeks. AFB1 sorption characteristics remained the same for both clays. When compared to the control, total body weight gain was unaffected in either sex at the doses tested. No UPSN-dependent differences in relative organ weights or gross appearance were observed. Isolated differences between UPSN groups and the control were observed for some biochemical parameters and selected vitamins and minerals. None of these differences were dose-dependent, and all parameters fell between ranges reported as normal for rats less than 6 month old. The Na/K ratio, Na and vitamin E concentrations were the only parameters that were increased in both males and females in the low dose and high dose UPSN groups. Serum Zn levels in males from the 2% UPSN treatment were lower compared to the control. Serum K levels were lower in the males of UPSN groups than in the control. However, neither Na/K ratio, K, nor Zn values were dose dependent and fell outside ranges reported as normal. These results suggest that dietary inclusion of UPSN at levels as high as 2% (w/w) does not result in overt toxicity. Nevertheless, further research on the effects of clays on Na, Zn, K and vitamin E is

  9. [Mineral Spectrum Change Analysis under the Conditions of Different Particle Size].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-xia; Wu, Jian; Zhou, Liang-guang; Hou, Lan-gong; Wang, Dong; Cao, Min

    2015-03-01

    Mineral particle size is an important factor affecting mineral spectrum characteristics, so to explore the changes of the mineral spectrum curves under different particle sizes and the spectrum difference of different minerals under the same particle size are the keys of hyperspectral remote sensing information mineral identification and the theoretical basis of research on spectral differences of different particle -sizes. Six kinds of collected minerals were observed by spectrometer to get the reflectivity spectrum curve and first order differential spectral curve under different particle sizes, and the spectral characteristics of various kinds of minerals under different particle sizes were analyzed. At the same time, spectrum difference of different mineral under the same particle size was compared to explore possible wavelengths of hyperspectral remote sensing mineral identify. Results show that the spectrum curves of various minerals have a larger difference with the change of the particle size, but change law is not the same. The whole spectrum curve of hypersthene will be decreased with the increase of particle size, and the spectrum curve at a specific wavelength range of antigorite, hematite, kaolinite and chlorite will be decreased with the increase of particle size, and there is no direct correlation between the spectrum of olivine and the particle size. Under the same size, different mineral spectral reflectance change a lot in most band range and it provides the possibility for high precision identification of mineral. Antigorite, kaolinite and chlorite all have more absorption peaks of narrow width and smaller intensity than the other minerals. Spectrum curves of hematite, olivine and hypersthene are relatively smooth, and the number of the absorption and reflection peaks is relatively small. This study aims at providing basic data and theoretical support for mineral spectral library construction and mineral hyperspectral identification technology

  10. Mathematical model parameters for describing the particle size spectra of knife-milled corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Miu, P.I.; Igathanathane, C.

    2009-09-01

    Particle size distributions of Corn stover (Zea mays L.) created by a knife mill were determined using integral classifying screens with sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating at speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates ranging from 1 to 9 kg min_1. Particle distributions were classified using American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) standardised sieves for forage analysis that incorporated a horizontal sieving motion. The sieves were made from machined-aluminium with their thickness proportional to the sieve opening dimensions. A wide range of analytical descriptors that could be used to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions were examined. The correlation coefficients between geometric mean length and screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.980, 0.612, and _0.027, respectively. Screen size and feed rate directly influenced particle size, whereas operating speed had a weak indirect relation with particle size. The Rosin Rammler equation fitted the chopped corn stover size distribution data with coefficient of determination (R2) > 0.978. This indicated that particle size distribution of corn stover was well-fit by the Rosin Rammler function. This can be attributed to the fact that Rosin Rammler expression was well suited to the skewed distribution of particle sizes. Skewed distributions occurred when significant quantities of particles, either finer or coarser, existed or were removed from region of the predominant size. The mass relative span was slightly greater than 1, which indicated that it was a borderline narrow to wide distribution of particle sizes. The uniformity coefficient was <4.0 for 19.0 50.8 mm screens, which indicated particles of relatively uniform size. Knife mill chopping of corn stover produced fine-skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 50.8 mm screens. Size-related parameters, namely, geometric mean length, Rosin Rammler size parameter, median length, effective length, and

  11. Dense medium radiative transfer theory for two scattering layers with a Rayleigh distribution of particle sizes

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.; Tsang, Leung; Winebrenner, D.P. )

    1993-03-01

    Dense medium radiative transfer theory is applied to a three-layer model consisting of two scattering layers overlying a homogeneous half space with a size distribution of particles in each layer. A model with a distribution of sizes gives quite different results than those obtained from a model with a single size. The size distribution is especially important in the low frequency limit when scattering is strongly dependent on particle size. The size distribution and absorption characteristics also affect the extinction behavior as a function of fractional volume. Theoretical results are also compared with experimental data. The sizes, permittivities, and densities used in the numerical illustrations are typical values for snow.

  12. Effect of Gold Particle Size on Steam Reforming of Methanol Over Au/CeO2-ZrO2 Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Pandian; Kim, Dong Ha; Park, Eun Duck

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effect of the particle size of gold on steam reforming of methanol over Au/CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts. Gold was loaded onto CeO2-ZrO2 through deposition-precipitation. The average particle size (2-12 nm) of the gold was controlled by thermal reduction under H2 at various temperatures and by chemical reduction with various reducing agents. The catalytic activity decreased significantly with increasing particle size of the gold. The turnover frequency at the interface between gold and a support appeared to be independent of particle size in the range 2-5 nm, which implies that the perimeter of the particle may be the active site for this reaction. Methanol adsorption and conversion over these catalysts were also investigated with in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. Analytical results for various adsorbed intermediate species during methanol conversion suggests that transformation of methoxy species is facilitated by use of smaller gold particles. PMID:27483761

  13. Particle size effect for metal pollution analysis of atmospherically deposited dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rajhi, M. A.; Al-Shayeb, S. M.; Seaward, M. R. D.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    The metallic compositions of 231 atmospherically deposited dust samples obtained from widely-differing environments in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia, have been investigated in relation to the particle size distributions. Sample data are presented which show that particle size classification is very important when analysing dust samples for atmospheric metal pollution studies. By cross-correlation and comparison, it was found that the best way to express the results of the metal concentration trend was as an average of particle ratios. Correlations between the six metals studied, namely Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Li, were found for every particle size (eight categories) and reveal that the metal concentrations increased as the particle size decreased. On the basis of this work, it is strongly recommended that future international standards for metal pollutants in atmospherically deposited dusts should be based on particle size fractions.

  14. Influence of initial particle size on the magnetostriction of sintered cobalt ferrite derived from nanocrystalline powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaja Mohaideen, K.; Joy, P. A.

    2013-11-01

    The role of initial particle size on the magnetostriction coefficient of sintered cobalt ferrite derived from nanocrystalline powders is studied. Nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite with different sizes in the range 3-80 nm are synthesized by an autocombustion method using metal nitrates and glycine. It has been observed that the initial particle size of the starting powders has a strong influence on the magnetostrictive behavior of sintered cobalt ferrite. Highest magnetostrictive strain and strain derivative are obtained for sintered ferrite derived from nanoparticles of size < 5 nm. The results show that higher magnetostriction coefficient for sintered cobalt ferrite can be achieved by compacting nanocrystalline particles of very small size.

  15. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  16. Ammonium production during the nitrogen-fixing process by wild Paenibacillus strains and cell-free extract adsorbed on nano TiO₂ particles.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Dariush; Emtiazi, Giti

    2010-08-01

    During the nitrogen-fixing process, ammonia (NH₃) is incorporated into glutamate to yield glutamine and is generally not secreted. However, in this study, NH₃- excreting strains of nitrogen-fixing Paenibacillus were isolated from soil. The ammonium production by the Paenibacillus strains was assayed in different experiments (dry biomass, wet biomass, cell-free extract, and cell-free extract adsorbed on nano TiO₂ particles) inside an innovative bioreactor containing capsules of N₂ and H₂. In addition, the effects of different N₂ and H₂ treatments on the formation of NH₃ were assayed. The results showed that the dry biomass of the strains produced the most NH₃. The dry biomass of the Paenibacillus strain E produced the most NH₃ at 1.50, 0.34, and 0.27 micrometer NH₃/mg biomass/h in the presence of N₂ + H₂, N₂, and H₂, respectively, indicating that a combined effluent of N₂ and H₂ was vital for NH₃ production. Notwithstanding, a cell-free extract (CFE) adsorbed on nano TiO₂ particles produced the most NH₃ and preserved the enzyme activities for a longer period of time, where the NH₃ production was 2.45 micrometer/mg CFE/h over 17 h. Therefore, the present study provides a new, simple, and inexpensive method of NH₃ production. PMID:20798591

  17. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  18. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on Micromechanical Properties of thin Nanoparticulate Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Nina; Schilde, Carsten; Kwade, Arno

    In this study the production of thin nanoparticulate coatings on solid stainless-steel substrates using dip-coating was investigated. Defined particle sizes and particle size distributions of Al2O3-nanoparticles were adjusted by stirred media milling using various operating parameters. Using nanoindentation the influence of particle size and width of the particle size distribution on the mechanical properties was investigated. In particular the establishment of nanoindentation routines for particulate thin films in contrast to hard coatings is discussed. Nanoindentation appears to be an efficient method for analysing mechanical properties of said thin coatings. It will be shown, that the influence of the substrate can be neglected for small indent depth while the coating's surface roughness influences the employed routine of the nanoindentation. The effect of the median particle size and the width of the particle size distribution on the coating structure and the micromechanical coating properties will be discussed. As a result, the maximum indentation force decreases with decreasing particle size but rises again once the nanoparticles reach very small sizes. A change in the width of the particle size distribution influences the micromechanical properties and coating structure as well.

  19. A review: Different methods producing different particles size and distribution in synthesis of calcium carbonate nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulimai, N. H.; Rusop, M.; Alrokayan, Salman A. H.; Khan, Haseeb A.

    2016-07-01

    Carbonates exist as 73 percent of world crust carbon. Abundance and bioavailability of Calcium Carbonates offer reliable resources, costs saving and environmental friendly potentials in its applications. Studies proven nano-sized Calcium Cabonate (nCC) employs a more significant characteristics compared to larger sizes. Properties of nCC is affected by the dispersion of the particles in which agglomeration occurs. It is important to gain more understanding of the conditions contributing or stunting the agglomeration to gain more control of the particles morphology and dynamic. A few recent studies with different methods to prepare calcium carbonate nanoparticles were listed in Table 1 .Particle size and dispersity of calcium carbonate are affected by different conditions of its preparation. Other factors such as mechanical aggression, concentration of solution, temperature of precipitation, pH of reaction are all contributing factors towards particle sizes and distribution.

  20. OPTICAL INSTRUMENT FOR IN-STACK MONITORING OF PARTICLE SIZE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new light scattering instrument for in-situ measurements of particulates in the 0.2 to 10.0 micrometer diameter size range is described. Two modes of scattering are used, each with two wavelengths of light, to generate five size fractions by volume from a distribution of partic...

  1. Operating envelopes of particle sizing instrumentation used for icing research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.

    1987-01-01

    The Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe are analyzed in terms of their ability to make accurate determinations of water droplet size distributions. Sources of counting and sizing errors are explained. The paper describes ways of identifying these errors and how they can affect measurement.

  2. Particle size distribution measurements of manganese-doped ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, Yvonne; Cölfen, Helmut; Hofmann, Heinrich; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2009-05-15

    We performed particle size and particle size distribution measurements for L-cysteine-stabilized ZnS/Mn nanoparticles in the size region below 10 nm. For this we applied transmission electron microscopy (TEM), analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (aF-FFF) measurements, and we calculated particle sizes with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and the shift of the band gap absorption in the UV-vis spectrum. The different methods are explained, and their limitations are discussed, with the conclusion that only a combination of different techniques can yield a realistic and complete picture about the size distribution of the sample. From these methods TEM, AUC, DLS, and aF-FFF measure the actual particle size distribution either in dispersion or after drying of the sample, whereas the particle size obtained from XRD patterns and with the help of the band gap widening corresponds to the average size of the crystal domains within the particles. We obtained particle size distributions with their maximum between 3 and 7 nm and a mean crystallite size of 3.5-4 nm. PMID:19374425

  3. 'Crystal Collimator' Measurement of CESR particle-beam Source Size

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K.D.; Bazarov, Ivan; White, Jeffrey; Revesz, Peter

    2004-05-12

    We have measured electron and positron beam source size at CHESS when the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) is run dedicated for the production of synchrotron radiation. Horizontal source size at several beamlines is expected to shrink by a factor of two but synchrotron (visible) light measurements only provide the vertical size. Therefore a 'crystal collimator' using two Bragg reflection in dispersive (+,+) orientation has been built to image the horizontal (vertical) source by passing x-rays parallel to within 5 microradians to an imaging screen and camera. With the 'crystal collimator' we observe rms sizes of 1.2 mm horizontal by 0.28 mm vertical, in good agreement with the 1.27 mm size calculated from lattice functions, and 0.26 mm observed using a synchrotron light interferometer.

  4. Improved cholesterol phenotype analysis by a model relating lipoprotein life cycle processes to particle size[S

    PubMed Central

    van Schalkwijk, Daniël B.; de Graaf, Albert A.; van Ommen, Ben; van Bochove, Kees; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Havekes, Louis M.; van de Pas, Niek C. A.; Hoefsloot, Huub C. J.; van der Greef, Jan; Freidig, Andreas P.

    2009-01-01

    Increased plasma cholesterol is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lipoprotein particles transport both cholesterol and triglycerides through the blood. It is thought that the size distribution of these particles codetermines cardiovascular disease risk. New types of measurements can determine the concentration of many lipoprotein size-classes but exactly how each small class relates to disease risk is difficult to clear up. Because relating physiological process status to disease risk seems promising, we propose investigating how lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes depend on particle size. To do this, we introduced a novel model framework (Particle Profiler) and evaluated its feasibility. The framework was tested using existing stable isotope flux data. The model framework implementation we present here reproduced the flux data and derived lipoprotein size pattern changes that corresponded to measured changes. It also sensitively indicated changes in lipoprotein metabolism between patient groups that are biologically plausible. Finally, the model was able to reproduce the cholesterol and triglyceride phenotype of known genetic diseases like familial hypercholesterolemia and familial hyperchylomicronemia. In the future, Particle Profiler can be applied for analyzing detailed lipoprotein size profile data and deriving rates of various lipolysis and uptake processes if an independent production estimate is given. PMID:19515990

  5. Effects of surface charge, micro-bubble size and particle size on removal efficiency of electro-flotation.

    PubMed

    Han, M Y; Kim, M K; Ahn, H J

    2006-01-01

    Flotation is a water treatment alternative to sedimentation, and uses small bubbles to remove low-density particles from potable water and wastewater. The effect of zeta potential, bubble size and particle size on removal efficiency of the electro-flotation process was investigated because previous model-simulations indicated that these attributes are critical for high collision efficiency between micro-bubbles and particles. Solutions containing Al3+ as the metal ion were subjected to various conditions. The zeta potentials of bubbles and particles were similar under identical conditions, and their charges were influenced by metal ion concentration and pH. Maximum removal efficiency was 98 and 12% in the presence and absence of flocculation, respectively. Removal efficiency was higher when particle size was similar to bubble size. These results agree with modelling simulations and indicate that collision efficiency is greater when the zeta potential of one is negative and that of the other is positive and when their sizes are similar. PMID:16752773

  6. Variation of particle size distribution in Saturn's rings and search for density waves in Uranus rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    A bimodal size distribution for particles in Saturn's rings has been determined via an analysis of PPS, UVS and RSS occultation data. The variation of the size distribution in featureless regions indicates that the dust variation is nearly constant in the Saturn's rings and exhibits a slight anti-correlation with 1 cm sized particles. Sub-centimeter sized particles increase outward in the rings, with a maximum in the B ring, similar to the variation of 1 cm sized particles. However, the ratio of subcentimeter sized particles to 1 cm sized particles does not vary significantly in the rings. Janus 5:4 density wave differs significantly from the featureless regions. The amount of dust is greater by a factor of about 2. Both dust and sub-centimeter sized particles are strongly anti-correlated with 1 cm sized particles. Partial formation of gaps is evident for both sub- and supra-centimeter sized particles, consistent with the predictions of Goldreich and Tremaine (1978). Dust is insensitive to the gravitational torque associated with the resonance. The results are also consistent with Dones (1987). In wave regions, large particles collide and produce dust and do not break up into smaller particles. The author searched the Uranian rings, via time series analysis methods, to identify periodic phenomena in the rings. A possible wave-like feature has been identified in both the {epsilon} and the {delta} rings of Uranus. A density wave has been identified in the inner half of the {delta} ring. It implies the existence of a moonlet between the {gamma} and {delta} rings and a possible shepherd for the outer edge of the {gamma} ring and an inner shepherd for the {delta} ring. Comparison of density waves in the two ring systems are similar, indicating the similarity of the local ring environments.

  7. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  8. Coupled resonances allow studying the aging of adhesive contacts between a QCM surface and single, micrometer-sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschel, Astrid; Langhoff, Arne; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2015-12-01

    Interparticle contacts and contacts between particles and surfaces are known to change over time. The contact area, the contact stiffness, and the contact strength usually increase as the contact ages. Contact aging is mostly driven by capillary forces, but also by plastic deformation. Making use of acoustic resonators, we have studied the stiffness of contacts between the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and individual, micrometer-sized particles adsorbed to the resonator surface. Studying single particles avoids ensemble-averaging. Central to the analysis is the coupled resonance, occurring when a surface-attached particle together with the link forms a resonator of its own. If the frequency of this second resonator comes close to one of the crystal’s overtones, plots of shifts in resonance bandwidth versus overtone order display a resonance curve. This secondary resonance is caused by the coupling between the particle’s resonance and the main resonance. One can read the frequency of the coupled resonance from this plot. Similarly, resonance curves are observed in plots of frequency and bandwidth versus time, if the contact stiffness varies smoothly with time. Because the coupled resonance is a characteristic feature, it is easily identified even in cases where frequency shifts of some other origin are superimposed onto the data. For the cases studied here, the links stiffened while they dried. Interestingly, the efficiency of coupling between the particle resonance and the main resonance decreased at the same time. This can be explained with an increase in the link’s bending stiffness. The analysis highlights that a QCM experiment amounts to vibrational spectroscopy on surface-attached particles. Among the application examples is the adsorption and drying of a lycopodium spore. Clearly, the technique is also applicable to problems of bioadhesion.

  9. The influence of particle size on the rheological properties of plate-like iron particle based magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Kruti; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-01-01

    This work is devoted to the dependence of particle size on magnetorheological properties of magnetorheological fluid (MRF) consisting of plate-like iron particles suspended in a carrier liquid with two aspects. One aspect is to study the influence of the particle size on the rheological properties of the MRF, and the other is to investigate the influence of small-sized particles on the large-sized MRF. In order to achieve this goal, firstly, two different types of MR suspensions have been constituted by a plate-like iron particle; one is small with an average particle size of 2 μm in diameter, and the other is large with an average particle size of 19 μm in diameter. In this work, these are denoted as S-MRF and L-MRF, respectively. Secondly, in order to check the influence of the small particle size of the large-sized MR fluid, three different weight fractions of bidisperse MRF samples are prepared. The structural and morphology of plate-like iron particles are described in detail. The magnetic properties of these MR fluids are carried out at room temperature using the magnetometer, followed by the investigation on the field-dependent rheological properties of these MR fluids. It is observed that in both the S-MRF and L-MRF, the yield stress and viscosity is increased by the increasing particle size, which directly shows a correlation with the fluid magnetization. It is also identified from the test of the bidisperse MRF samples that the yield and viscosity depend on the weight fraction due to the magnetostatic interaction between the two different sizes of particles. Based on the rheological properties, some figures of merit are derived for the proposed MRF samples, which are important in the design of the application device. The sedimentation experiments for MRF samples are performed to check the stability of the MRF each day. With the basic rheological properties and sedimentation experiments, it is clearly demonstrated that the bidisperse MR suspension with a

  10. Effect of particle size on the dissolution behaviors of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kyung Rok; Lee, Eunhee; Jeong, Seong Hoon; Park, Eun-Seok

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the effects of the particle size of various poorly water-soluble drugs on their dissolution behavior through physicochemical and mathematical analysis. As model drugs, hydrochlorothiazide, aceclofenac, ibuprofen and a discovery candidate were selected. The materials were crystallized using an evaporation method and milled without transformation behavior of crystal forms. The particles were sieved and divided into four size groups (< 45 μm, 45∼150 μm, 150∼250 μm, and 250∼600 μm). The specific surface area with regard to the particle size was measured using a BET surface area measurement. The specific surface area increased with decreasing particle size of the drug, resulting in an increase in dissolution rate. During the initial period of the dissolution study, significant differences in dissolution rate were observed according to the particle size and specific surface areas. On the other hand, in the later stages, the surface-specific dissolution rate was almost consistent regardless of the particle size. These observations were evaluated mathematically and the results suggested that the dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs is strongly related to the particle size distribution. Moreover, physicochemical analysis helped explain the effect of particle size on the dissolution profiles. PMID:22864741

  11. IN-SITU AERODYNAMIC SIZING OF AEROSOL PARTICLES WITH THE SPART ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single particle aerodynamic relaxation time (SPART) analyzer has been developed to measure the aerodynamic size distribution of aerosol particulates in the range 0.1 to 10.0 micrometer in diameter. The analyzer sizes and counts individual suspended particles and droplets from s...

  12. Wheat bran particle size influence on phytochemical extractability and antioxidant properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is unknown if particle size plays a role in extracting health promoting compounds in wheat bran because the extraction of antioxidant and phenolic compounds with particle size reduction has not been well documented. In this study, unmilled whole bran (coarse treatment) was compared to whole bran ...

  13. Effect of Heating Temperature on Particle Size Distribution in Hard and Soft Wheat Flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The particle sizes of soft and hard wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) flours at isothermal temperatures were determined by laser diffraction analyzer.  Flour sample were suspended in water at temperatures ranging from 30°C to 80°C, for 20 to 60 min.  All flour particles exhibited trimodal size distributi...

  14. A query for effective mean particle size of dry and high moisture corns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighteen dry and high moisture corns submitted to the University of Wisconsin Soil and Forage Analysis Laboratory (Marshfield, WI) for routine analysis were retained for mean particle size (MPS) and chemistry determinations. Mean particle size of corns was determined by the methods of the American S...

  15. COMPARISON OF TWO PARTICLE-SIZE SPECTROMETERS FOR AMBIENT AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS. (R827354C002)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an ongoing debate on the question which size fraction of particles in ambient air may be responsible for human health effects observed in epidemiological studies. Since there is no single instrument available for the measurement of the particle-size distribution over ...

  16. Estimates of the size of particles in Saturn's rings and their cosmogonic implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Near infrared ice band measurements, radar and radio observations, and implications of the size estimates of particles in Saturn's rings are discussed. The measurements are compared to the Poynting-Robetson effect and a possible mechanism by which the size of the particles may significantly change after the initial formulation of the material in the rings is proposed.

  17. Preparation of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene of submicron particle size

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P.; Moody, Gordon L.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the preparation of very small particle size, relatively pure 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). Particles of TATB prepared according to the disclosed method are of submicron size and have a surface area in the range from about 3.8 to 27 square meters per gram.

  18. Preparation of 1,3,5-triamo-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene of submicron particle size

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P.; Moody, Gordon L.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    2001-05-01

    A method is disclosed for the preparation of very small particle size, relatively pure 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). Particles of TATB prepared according to the disclosed method are of submicron size and have a surface area in the range from about 3.8 to 27 square meters per gram.

  19. Processing, mixing, and particle size reduction of forages for dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, A J; Buckmaster, D R; Lammers, B P

    1999-01-01

    Adequate forage amounts in both physical and chemical forms are necessary for proper ruminal function in dairy cows. Under conditions in which total amounts of forage or particle size of the forage are reduced, cows spend less time ruminating and have a decreased amount of buoyant digesta in the rumen. These factors reduce saliva production and allow ruminal pH to fall, depressing activity of cellulolytic bacteria and causing a prolonged period of low ruminal pH. Insufficient particle size of the diet decreases the ruminal acetate-to-propionate ratio and reduces ruminal pH. The mean particle size of the diet, the variation in particle size, and the amount of chemical fiber (i.e., NDF or ADF) are all nutritionally important for dairy cows. Defining amounts and physical characteristics of fiber is important in balancing dairy cattle diets. Because particle size plays such an important role in digestion and animal performance, it must be an important consideration from harvest through feeding. Forages should not be reduced in particle size beyond what is necessary to achieve minimal storage losses and what can be accommodated by existing equipment. Forage and total mixed ration (TMR) particle sizes are potentially reduced in size by all phases of harvesting, storing, taking out of storage, mixing, and delivery of feed to the dairy cow. Mixing feed causes a reduction in size of all feed particles and is directly related to TMR mixing time; field studies show that the longest particles (>27 mm) may be reduced in size by 50%. Forage and TMR particle size as fed to the cows should be periodically monitored to maintain adequate nutrition for the dairy cow. PMID:10064042

  20. Uptake of nitric acid by sub-micron-sized ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, O. P.; Cziczo, D. J.; Morgan, A. M.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Niedziela, R. F.

    The uptake of gas phase nitric acid by half-micron-diameter ice crystals has been studied at 230 K by measuring the nitrate content of ice particles which have been exposed to 5 × 10-6 torr of nitric acid in a low temperature flow tube. A cold NaOH-coated denuder is used to distinguish gas-phase nitric acid from adsorbed nitric acid. Ice particle diameters were determined by fitting measured aerosol infrared extinction spectra to spectra calculated via Mie theory, and their number density is measured directly with a CN counter. Under conditions in which the surface is saturated and not all the gas-phase nitric acid adsorbs, the measured uptakes are 1.2 × 1014 molecules/cm² where the surface area is the geometric area of the particles. Within experimental uncertainties, this surface coverage is the same as that measured on thin films of ice formed by freezing liquid water. These results are the first quantitative study of the nitric acid uptake capacity of ice particles, and they provide additional support to the suggestion that ice and snow provide a route for the efficient scavenging of nitric acid from the atmosphere.

  1. Particle sizes in Comet Bennett /1970 II/. [radiation pressure models for coma and tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    The particle size distribution in the coma and tail of Comet Bennett has been determined by several methods, each sensitive to a particular size range. It is confirmed that a minimum value of the particle density, size, and radiation pressure efficiency function exists at about .00003 to .00010 g/sq cm. The existence of such a cutoff is probably due to the decreasing radiation pressure efficiency for particles smaller than the wavelength of the light being scattered. An exact determination of this cutoff may allow identification of the particle type.

  2. A technique to measure the size of particles in laser Doppler velocimetry applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    A method to measure the size of particles in Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) applications is discussed. Since in LDV the velocity of the flow is assocated with the velocity of particles to establish how well they follow the flow, in the present method the interferometric probe volume is surrounded by a larger beam of different polarization or wavelength. The particle size is then measured from the absolute intensity scattered from the large beam by particles crossing the fringes. Experiments using polystrene particles between 1.1 and 3.3 microns and larger glass beads are reported. It is shown that the method has an excellent size resolution and its accuracy is better than 10% for the particle size studied.

  3. Particle size effect for cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts based on in situ CO chemisorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Frøseth, Vidar; Chen, De; Holmen, Anders

    2016-06-01

    The cobalt particle size effect on activity and selectivity for CO hydrogenation was revisited on cobalt catalysts supported on a large variety of supports at 483 K, 1.85 bar, and H2/CO/Ar = 15/1.5/33.5 Nml/min. The size dependence of the activity and selectivity was analyzed in terms of site coverage and rate constants based on SSITKA experimental results. It was found that the Co particle size index estimated by the conventional method, namely, ex situ hydrogen chemisorption, could not correlate well the activity and selectivity as a function of the particle size index. The same holds for the site coverage of CO and intermediates leading to methane formation. However, the cobalt particle size index based on in situ CO chemisorption measured at 373 K provides a good correlation for turnover frequencies (TOFs) at reaction conditions. It was observed that TOF for CO conversion (TOFCO) increased with increasing particle size index of cobalt and SSITKA experiments showed that this was possibly due to increased site coverage of CO. The TOF for methane formation (TOFCH4) increased with particle size and remained constant at higher particle sizes possibly due to combined effect from the site coverage of intermediates leading to methane (θCHx) and the pseudo-first-order rate constant (kt). The results suggest that the support can play an important role for the size dependence of the activity and selectivity of CO hydrogenation on Co catalysts.

  4. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  5. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    PubMed

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated. PMID:23028013

  6. PARTICLE-SIZE DEPENDENT EFFICIENCY OF AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of tests with media filters, electrostatic filters, and electronic air cleaners. t also discusses results from system qualification tests to detect system artifacts. he collection efficiency of air cleaners as a function of particle diameter must be known ...

  7. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  8. Size control of rhodium particles of silica-supported catalysts using water-in-oil microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Masahiro; Hanaoka, Toshiaki; Kim, Won Young; Nagata, Hideo; Wakabayashi, Katsuhiko

    1997-11-01

    Effects of components of water-in-oil microemulsions on rhodium particle sizes of silica-supported rhodium catalysts were investigated in the catalyst preparation method using microemulsion. In the case of the microemulsion of polyoxyethylene(23)dodecyl ether/ n-alcohols/RhCl 3 aq., the rhodium particle size increased from 3.4 to 5.0 nm as the specific permittivity of the organic solvent increased. The chain length of hydrophilic group of polyoxyethylene- p-nonylphenyl ether ( n = 5 to 15) employed as surfactants had an effect on the rhodium particle size where the rhodium size ranged between 2.0 and 3.6 nm. The rhodium particle size was 1.5 nm in the case of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfocuccinate and this value was found to be the smallest. These results could be interpreted in terms of the adsorption of the surfactant on rhodium-hydrazine particle surface.

  9. Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles

    SciTech Connect

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-07-07

    Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

  10. Limitations on the use of laser velocimeter signals for particle sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, K. L.; Myer, F. C.; Mikasa, M. F.; Phillips, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the complex relationship existing between the diameter of a particle, its index of refraction, and the output signal of a fringe-type laser velocimeter, and describes a special purpose laser velocimeter for aerosol sizing that determines aerosol size distributions on the basis of Farmer's (1973) relationship between visibility and particle size. In experiments with particles of known size, this relationship is in qualitative agreement with the experimentally observed results, the main differences being that (1) the visibility does not assume a minimum value of zero, as predicted, and (2) the visibility value above which there is no ambiguity in the corresponding fringe spacing is higher than that predicted.

  11. Experimental and theoretical study of dielectrophoretic particle trapping in arrays of insulating structures: Effect of particle size and shape.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Espinosa, Mario A; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H

    2015-05-01

    Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) employs insulating structures embedded in a microchannel to produce electric field gradients. This contribution presents a detailed analysis of the regions within an iDEP system where particles are likely to be retained due to dielectrophoretic trapping in a microchannel with an array of cylindrical insulating structures. The effects of particle size and shape on dielectrophoretic trapping were analyzed by employing 1 and 2 μm polystyrene particles and Escherichia coli cells. This research aims to study the mechanism behind dielectrophoretic trapping and develop a deeper understanding of iDEP systems. Mathematical modeling with COMSOL Multiphysics was employed to assess electrokinetic and dielectrophoretic particle velocities. Experiments were carried out to determine the location of dielectrophoretic barriers that block particle motion within an iDEP microchannel; this supported the estimation of a correction factor to match experiments and simulations. Particle velocities were predicted with the model, demonstrating how the different forces acting on the particles are in equilibrium when particle trapping occurs. The results showed that particle size and shape have a significant effect on the magnitude, location, and shape of the regions of dielectrophoretic trapping of particles, which are defined by DEP isovelocity lines and EK isovelocity lines. PMID:25487065

  12. Coalbed methane adsorption and desorption characteristics related to coal particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Yan, Feng; Wen, Yang; Wei, Chu

    2016-06-01

    Effects of particle size on CH4 and CO2 adsorption and desorption characteristics of coals are investigated at 308 K and pressures up to 5.0 MPa. The gas adsorption and desorption isotherms of coals with particle sizes ranging from 250 μm to 840 μm are measured via the volumetric method, and the Langmuir model is used to analyse the experimental results. Coal particle size is found to have an obvious effect on the coal pore structure. With the decrease of coal particle size in the process of grinding, the pore accessibility of the coal, including the specific surface area and pore volume, increases. Hence, coal with smaller particle size has higher specific surface area and higher pore volume. The ability of adsorption was highly related to the pore structure of coal, and coal particle size has a significant influence on coal adsorption/desorption characteristics, including adsorption capacity and desorption hysteresis for CH4 and CO2, i.e., coal with a smaller particle size achieves higher adsorption capacity, while the sample with a larger particle size has lower adsorption capacity. Further, coal with larger particle size is also found to have relatively large desorption hysteresis. In addition, dynamic adsorption performances of the samples are carried out at 298 K and at pressures of 0.1 MPa and 0.5 MPa, respectively, and the results indicate that with the increase of particle size, the difference between CO2 and CH4 adsorption capacities of the samples decreases. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB201202).

  13. Design of a Particle Shadow-graph Velocimetry and Size (PSVS) System to Determine Particle Size and Density Distributions in Hanford Nuclear Tank Wastes - 12280

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, M.S.; Blanchard, J.; Erikson, R.L.; Kurath, D.E.; Howe, D.T.; Adkins, H.; Jenks, J.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate particle size and density distributions for nuclear tank waste materials are essential information that helps determine the engineering requirements for a host of waste management unit operations (e.g., tank mixing, pipeline transport, and filtration). The most prevalent approach for determining particle size and density distribution is highly laborious and involves identifying individual particles using scanning electron microscope/x-ray diffraction and then acquiring the density of the materials from the technical literature. Other methods simply approximate individual particle densities by assuming chemical composition, rather than obtaining actual measurements of particle density. To overcome these limitations, a Particle Shadow-graph Velocimetry and Size (PSVS) system has been designed to simultaneously obtain particle size and density distributions for a broad range of Hanford tank waste materials existing as both individual particles and agglomerates. The PSVS system uses optical hardware, a temperature-controlled settling column, and particle introduction chamber to accurately and reproducibly obtain images of settling particles. Image analysis software provides a highly accurate determination of both particle terminal velocity and equivalent spherical particle diameter. The particle density is then calculated from Newton's terminal settling theory. The PSVS system was designed to accurately image particle/agglomerate sizes between 10 and 1000 μm and particle/agglomerate densities ranging from 1.4 to 11.5 g/cm{sup 3}, where the maximum terminal velocity does not exceed 10 cm/s. Preliminary testing was completed with standard materials and results were in good agreement with terminal settling theory. Recent results of this method development are presented, as well as experimental design. The primary goal of these PSVS system tests was to obtain accurate and reproducible particle size and velocity measurements to estimate particle densities within

  14. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schladitz, A.; Merkel, M.; Bastian, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-12-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The aim of the new feature is to conduct unattended quality control experiments under field conditions at remote air quality monitoring or research stations. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter removing the diffusive particles approximately smaller than 25 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. The other feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. An exemplary one-year data set is presented for the measurement site Annaberg-Buchholz as part of the Saxon air quality monitoring network. The total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer overestimates the particle number concentration by only 2% (grand average offset). Furthermore, tolerance criteria are presented to judge the performance of the mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the particle number concentration. An upgrade of a mobility particle size spectrometer with an automated function control enhances the quality of long-term particle number size distribution measurements. Quality assured measurements are a precondition for intercomparison studies of different sites. Comparable measurements will improve cohort health and also climate-relevant research studies.

  15. Measurement of snow particle size and speed in powder snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yoichi; Nishimura, Kouichi; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Bellot, Hervé; Thibert, Emmanuel; Ravanat, Xavier; Fontaine, Firmin

    2015-04-01

    Generally snow avalanches consist a dense-flow layer at the bottom and a powder snow cloud on top. Snow particle size and speed are key parameters to describe the turbulent condition in the powder cloud, however, the information on the particles were not well investigated. In this study, we observed powder snow avalanches using a snow particle counter (SPC) to measure the particle size and speed. The SPC is an optical device consisting a laser diode and photodiode; a pulse signal proportional to its diameter is generated resulting from a snow particle passing through the sensing volume. In general use, the signals are sent to a transducer and divided into 32 size classes based on particle diameter to observe the snow particle size distribution and mass flux at 1-s intervals. In this study, the direct output signal from the transducer was also acquired at a high frequency to obtain the original pulse signal produced by each snow particle. Then the speed of each particle can be calculated using the peak of the pulse, which corresponds to particle diameter and the duration over which the particle passes through the sampling area. We also employed an ultrasonic anemometer to measure air flow speed. Both sensors were installed at the Col du Lautaret Pass in the French Alps. The results of the particle size and speed distribution were then compared with airflow movement in the powder cloud. The ratio of the particle and airflow speeds changed by the particle size distribution and the distance from the dense-flow layer.

  16. Ion acoustic and dust acoustic waves at finite size of plasma particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Pavel A. Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2015-03-15

    We consider the influence of the finite size of ions on the properties of classic plasmas. We focus our attention at the ion acoustic waves for electron-ion plasmas. We also consider the dusty plasmas where we account the finite size of ions and particles of dust and consider the dispersion of dust acoustic waves. The finite size of particles is a classical effect as well as the Coulomb interaction. The finite size of particles considerably contributes to the properties of the dense plasmas in the small wavelength limit. Low temperature dense plasmas, revealing the quantum effects, are also affected by the finite size of plasma particles. Consequently, it is important to consider the finite size of ions in the quantum plasmas as well.

  17. Characterization of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis for Quantification and Sizing of Submicron Particles of Therapeutic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Krueger, Aaron B; Barnard, James G; Qi, Wei; Carpenter, John F

    2015-08-01

    Submicron particles may play important roles in therapeutic protein product quality, stability, and adverse effects in patients. However, quantitation of these particles has been challenging. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) is capable of both sizing and counting submicron particles. We investigated the effects of product and instrument parameters on NTA results for nanoparticle standards and therapeutic protein samples. To obtain proper particle size distributions, complete tracking numbers of at least 200 and 400 were required for latex nanobeads and protein nanoparticles, respectively. In addition, when set at suboptimal values, the minimum expected particle size parameter led to inaccurate sizing and counting for all particles types investigated. A syringe pump allowed for higher sampling volumes, and results were reproducible for nanoparticle sizing and counts at flow rates ≤7 μL/min. Finally, because therapeutic protein products are being formulated at relatively high protein concentrations, we investigated the effects of protein concentration on nanoparticle characterization. With high protein concentrations, nanoparticle sizing was not affected, whereas particle concentrations were significantly reduced. Linear relationships between particle count and dilution factor were obtained when a high protein concentration formulation was diluted into particle-free solutions at the same protein concentrations, but not when dilutions were made into buffer. PMID:26017684

  18. Role of Surface Area, Primary Particle Size, and Crystal Phase on Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Dispersion Properties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing nanoparticle dispersions and understanding the effect of parameters that alter dispersion properties are important for both environmental applications and toxicity investigations. The role of particle surface area, primary particle size, and crystal phase on TiO2 nanoparticle dispersion properties is reported. Hydrodynamic size, zeta potential, and isoelectric point (IEP) of ten laboratory synthesized TiO2 samples, and one commercial Degussa TiO2 sample (P25) dispersed in different solutions were characterized. Solution ionic strength and pH affect titania dispersion properties. The effect of monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (MgCl2) inert electrolytes on dispersion properties was quantified through their contribution to ionic strength. Increasing titania particle surface area resulted in a decrease in solution pH. At fixed pH, increasing the particle surface area enhanced the collision frequency between particles and led to a higher degree of agglomeration. In addition to the synthesis method, TiO2 isoelectric point was found to be dependent on particle size. As anatase TiO2 primary particle size increased from 6 nm to 104 nm, its IEP decreased from 6.0 to 3.8 that also results in changes in dispersion zeta potential and hydrodynamic size. In contrast to particle size, TiO2 nanoparticle IEP was found to be insensitive to particle crystal structure. PMID:27502650

  19. Particle Size Distributions During Laboratory-Scale Biomass Burns and Prescribed Burns Using Fast Response Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Hosseini, E.; Li, Q.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, W.; Princevac, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    2010-12-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion in an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date particle size distributions reported from prior studies varies not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distribution in a well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern US fuels and compare with that from prescribed burns. The combustion laboratory at the USDA Forest Service’s Fire Science Laboratory (FSL), Missoula, MT provided repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for particle size distribution study. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which is attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing volume size distribution from FMPS and APS measurement ~30 % of particle volume was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 µm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most of fuels gave unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using slopes in MCE vs geometric mean diameter from each mode of combustion than only using MCE values. Prescribed burns were carried out at wildland managed by military bases. Evolution of particle distribution in and out of the plume will be compared with particle distribution from lab scale burning.

  20. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S.; Qi, L.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, W.; Mahalingam, S.; Princevac, M.; Jung, H.

    2010-04-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distribution in a well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern US fuels. The combustion facility at the USDA Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory (FSL), Missoula, MT provided repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for particle size distribution study. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which was attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing volume size distribution from Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) measurements, ~30% of particle volume was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most of fuels gave unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using slopes in Modified Combustion Efficiency (MCE) vs. geometric mean diameter from each mode of combustion than only using MCE values.

  1. Synthesis and optical properties of quantum-size metal sulfide particles in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Patel, R.C.; Kaufman, P.; Joyce-Pruden, C.; O'Leary, N. )

    1993-04-01

    During the past decade, small-particle' research has become quite popular in various fields of chemistry and physics. The recognition of quantum-size effects in very small colloidal particles has led to renewed interest in this area. Small particles' are clusters of atoms or molecules ranging in size from 1 nm to almost 10 nm or having agglomeration numbers from 10 up to a few hundred. In other words, small particles fall in size between single atoms or molecules and bulk materials. The agglomeration number specifies the number of individual atoms or molecules in a given cluster. The research in this area is interdisciplinary, and it links colloidal science and molecular chemistry. The symbiosis of these two areas of research has revealed some intriguing characteristics of small particles. This experiment illustrates the following: simple colloidal techniques for the preparation of two different types of quantum-size metal sulfide particles; the blue shift of the measured optical absorption spectra when the particle size is decreased in the quantum-size regime; and use of a simple quantum mechanical model to calculate the particle size from the absorption onset measured for CdS.

  2. Tuning Aerosol Particle Size Distribution of Metered Dose Inhalers Using Cosolvents and Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Imran Y.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of these studies was to understand the influence of cosolvent and surfactant contributions to particle size distributions emitted from solution metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) based on the propellant HFA 227. Methods. Two sets of formulations were prepared: (a) pMDIs-HFA 227 containing cosolvent (5–15% w/w ethanol) with constant surfactant (pluronic) concentration and (b) pMDIs-HFA 227 containing surfactant (0–5.45% w/w pluronic) with constant cosolvent concentration. Particle size distributions emitted from these pMDIs were analyzed using aerodynamic characterization (inertial impaction) and laser diffraction methods. Results. Both cosolvent and surfactant concentrations were positively correlated with median particle sizes; that is, drug particle size increased with increasing ethanol and pluronic concentrations. However, evaluation of particle size distributions showed that cosolvent caused reduction in the fine particle mode magnitude while the surfactant caused a shift in the mode position. These findings highlight the different mechanisms by which these components influence droplet formation and demonstrate the ability to utilize the different effects in formulations of pMDI-HFA 227 for independently modulating particle sizes in the respirable region. Conclusion. Potentially, the formulation design window generated using these excipients in combination could be used to match the particle size output of reformulated products to preexisting pMDI products. PMID:23984381

  3. Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of AlN Coatings: Influence of Aluminum Feedstock Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-03-01

    Feedstock powder characteristics (size distribution, morphology, shape, specific mass, and injection rate) are considered to be one of the key factors in controlling plasma-sprayed coatings microstructure and properties. The influence of feedstock powder characteristics to control the reaction and coatings microstructure in reactive plasma spraying process (RPS) is still unclear. This study, investigated the influence of feedstock particle size in RPS of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings, through plasma nitriding of aluminum (Al) feedstock powders. It was possible to fabricate AlN-based coatings through plasma nitriding of all kinds of Al powders in atmospheric plasma spray (APS) process. The nitriding ratio was improved with decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder, due to improving the nitriding reaction during flight. However, decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder suppressed the coatings thickness. Due to the loss of the powder during the injection, the excessive vaporization of fine Al particles and the completing nitriding reaction of some fine Al particles during flight. The feedstock particle size directly affects on the nitriding, melting, flowability, and the vaporization behaviors of Al powders during spraying. It concluded that using smaller particle size powders is useful for improving the nitriding ratio and not suitable for fabrication thick AlN coatings in reactive plasma spray process. To fabricate thick AlN coatings through RPS, enhancing the nitriding reaction of Al powders with large particle size during spraying is required.

  4. Uncertainty in volcanic ash particle size distribution and implications for infrared remote sensing and airspace management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Western, L.; Watson, M.; Francis, P. N.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic ash particle size distributions are critical in determining the fate of airborne ash in drifting clouds. A significant amount of global airspace is managed using dispersion models that rely on a single ash particle size distribution, derived from a single source - Hobbs et al., 1991. This is clearly wholly inadequate given the range of magmatic compositions and eruptive styles that volcanoes present. Available measurements of airborne ash lognormal particle size distributions show geometric standard deviation values that range from 1.0 - 2.5, with others showing mainly polymodal distributions. This paucity of data pertaining to airborne sampling of volcanic ash results in large uncertainties both when using an assumed distribution to retrieve mass loadings from satellite observations and when prescribing particle size distributions of ash in dispersion models. Uncertainty in the particle size distribution can yield order of magnitude differences to mass loading retrievals of an ash cloud from satellite observations, a result that can easily reclassify zones of airspace closure. The uncertainty arises from the assumptions made when defining both the geometric particle size and particle single scattering properties in terms of an effective radius. This has significant implications for airspace management and emphasises the need for an improved quantification of airborne volcanic ash particle size distributions.

  5. Intensity and polarization of light scattered by size distributions of randomly oriented nonspherical particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M. I.; Travis, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of light scattering by small particles are important in many diverse fields of science and engineering. In many cases of practical interest, scattering particles are nonspherical and are distributed over sizes and orientations. However, accurate light scattering computations for ensembles of nonspherical particles are difficult and time-consuming, and the literature in which such calculations are reported is rather scarce. In this paper, the T-matrix approach, as extended recently to randomly oriented particles, is used to calculate rigorously light scattering by size distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles. To model the variation of particle sizes in real ensembles, we use a power law distribution typical of some terrestrial aerosols. Contour plots of intensity and degree of linear polarization for polydisperse prolate and oblate spheroids of different aspect ratios and effective equivalent-sphere size parameters from 0 to 10 are calculated and compared with calculations for equivalent spheres. The angular scattering behavior of nonspherical polydispersions is found to be greatly different from that of spheres, while the scattering properties of oblate and prolate spheroids of the same aspect ratio are similar. With increasing particle size, both intensity and polarization become more shape-dependent. In general, nonspherical particles are stronger side scatterers and weaker backscatterers than equivalent spheres. With increasing aspect ratio of nonspherical particles polarization tends to be predominantly positive. Possible effects of particle nonsphericity on optical remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols are discussed.

  6. Thermal properties of size-selective nanoparticles: Effect of the particle size on Einstein temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Anderson, R. M.; Duan, Z.; Chill, S.; Crooks, R. M.; Henkelman, G.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing size related thermal properties of nanoclusters is challenging due to the requirement to accurately control both their average sizes and the size distributions. In this work, temperature-dependent Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy and the phenomenological bond-order-length-strength (BOLS) model were employed to investigate the size-dependent Einstein temperature of Au nanoclusters. Theoretical calculations of Einstein temperature and average bond distance for clusters with different sizes agree quantitatively with experiment. The BOLS model is thus useful for predictive understanding of structure and thermal properties in well-defined metal clusters.

  7. A method of simultaneously measuring particle shape parameter and aerodynamic size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Zhang, JinBi; Zheng, HaiYang; Wang, YingPing; Fang, Li

    2016-08-01

    For the purpose of classification of airborne particles, this paper describes an experimental apparatus for simultaneously measuring shape characteristics and aerodynamic size at single particle level. The shape of a particle is indicated through near forward scattering light collected by 3 PMTs placed at 120-degree offset azimuthal angles and the aerodynamic diameter is obtained by time-of-flight that a particle takes to traverse double laser beams. Laboratory experiments are performed on sampled aerosol particles in spherical, cuboid and elongated shape, and preliminary results indicate that the experimental apparatus has a good capability of discriminating between spherical and irregular particles. A variance factor of scattered light related to shape of ambient airborne particles under different conditions are also presented, which can be modeled using lognormal probability density distribution. Combined with aerodynamic size information, these results suggest potential uses in environmental aerosol monitoring for characterizing constituents of particles.

  8. Mars Dust: Characterization of Particle Size and Electrostatic Charge Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Saini, D.; Biris, A. S.; Sriama, P. K.; Calle, C.; Buhler, C.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the latest pictures of Mars surface sent by NASA's Spirit rover in early January, 2004, show very cohesive, "mud-like" dust layers. Significant amounts of dust clouds are present in the atmosphere of Mars [1-4]. NASA spacecraft missions to Mars confirmed hypotheses from telescopic work that changes observed in the planet's surface markings are caused by wind-driven redistribution of dust. In these dust storms, particles with a wide range of diameters (less than 1 micrometer to 50 micrometers) are a serious problem to solar cells, spacecraft, and spacesuits. Dust storms may cover the entire planet for an extended period of time [5]. It is highly probable that the particles are charged electrostatically by triboelectrification and by UV irradiation.

  9. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    PubMed

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior. PMID:25669282

  10. Laboratory and field evaluations of the LISST-100 instrument for suspended particle size determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Cheng, R.T.; Wang, P.-F.; Richter, K.

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology have resulted in a new instrument that is designed for in-situ determination of particle size spectra. Such an instrument that can measure undisturbed particle size distributions is much needed for sediment transport studies. The LISST-100 (Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry) uses the principle of laser diffraction to obtain the size distribution and volume concentration of suspended material in 32 size classes logarithmically spaced between 1.25 and 250 ??m. This paper describes a laboratory evaluation of the ability of LISST-100 to determine particle sizes using suspensions of single size, artificial particles. Findings show the instrument is able to determine particle size to within about 10% with increasing error as particle size increases. The instrument determines volume (or mass) concentration using a volume conversion factor Cv. This volume conversion factor is theoretically a constant. In the laboratory evaluation Cv is found to vary by a factor of about three over the particle size range between 5 and 200 ??m. Results from field studies in South San Francisco Bay show that values of mass concentration of suspended marine sediments estimated by LISST-100 agree favorably with estimates from optical backscatterance sensors if an appropriate value of Cv, according to mean size, is used and the assumed average particle (aggregate) density is carefully chosen. Analyses of size distribution of suspended materials in South San Francisco Bay over multiple tide cycles suggest the likelihood of different sources of sediment because of different size characteristics during flood and ebb cycles. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. Determination of particle size using measurement of scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Scatter from glass beads placed on a mirror was measured using a quartz lamp and laser. Data were obtained in the plane containing the normal to the surface and the incident beam. For the quartz lamp the best correlation can be obtained for data measured at a zenith of 55 deg and 180 deg from the incident beam. The best correlation when the laser is used is obtained at about the same position. However, the correlation variables are angular spacing of the minimums of the data versus the size. Whereas, with the quartz lamp the correlation variables are the amount of scattered energy versus size.

  12. Particle Size Effect on Wetting Kinetics of a Nanosuspension Drop: MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Baiou; Webb, Edmund

    The behavior of nano-fluids, or fluid suspensions containing nanoparticles, has garnered tremendous attention recently for applications in advanced manufacturing. In our previous results from MD simulations, for a wetting system with different advancing contact angles, cases where self-pinning was observed were compared to cases where it was not and relevant forces on particles at the contact line were computed. To advance this work, the roles of particle size and particle loading are examined. Results presented illustrate how particle size affects spreading kinetics and how this connects to dynamic droplet morphology and relevant forces that exist nearby the contact line region. Furthermore, increased particle size in simulations permits a more detailed investigation of particle/substrate interfacial contributions to behavior observed at the advancing contact line. Based on changes in spreading kinetics with particle size, forces between the particle and liquid front are predicted and compared to those computed from simulations. At high loading, particle/particle interactions become relevant and forces computed between particles entrained to an advancing contact line will be presented.

  13. Particle size, size distribution and morphological evaluation of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GRP) industrial by-product.

    PubMed

    Mazzoli, Alida; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2014-12-01

    The waste management of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GRP) materials, in particular those made with thermosetting resins, is a critical issue for the composites industry because these materials cannot be reprocessed. Therefore, most thermosetting GRP waste is presently sent to landfill, in spite of the significant environmental impact caused by their disposal in this way. The limited GRP waste recycling worldwide is mostly due to its intrinsic thermosetting properties, lack of characterization data and unavailability of viable recycling and recovery routes. One of the possibility for re-using GRP industrial by-product is in form of powder as a partial aggregate replacement or filler addition in cement based composites for applications in sustainable construction materials and technologies. However, the feasibility of this kind of reutilization strongly depends on the morphology and particle size distribution of a powder made up of polymer granules and glass fibers. In the present study, the use of image analysis method, based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ImageJ processing program, is proposed in order to evaluate the morphology of the particles and measure the particle size and size distribution of fine GRP waste powder. The obtained results show a great potential of such a method in order to be considered as a standardized method of measurement and analysis in order to characterize the grain size and size distribution of GRP particles before exploiting any compatibility issue for its recycling management. PMID:25195092

  14. Micrometer-scale 3-D shape characterization of eight cements: Particle shape and cement chemistry, and the effect of particle shape on laser diffraction particle size measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan, S.T.; Nie, X.; Stutzman, P.E.; Garboczi, E.J.

    2010-05-15

    Eight different portland cements were imaged on a synchrotron beam line at Brookhaven National Laboratory using X-ray microcomputed tomography at a voxel size of about 1 mum per cubic voxel edge. The particles ranged in size roughly between 10 mum and 100 mum. The shape and size of individual particles were computationally analyzed using spherical harmonic analysis. The particle shape difference between cements was small but significant, as judged by several different quantitative shape measures, including the particle length, width, and thickness distributions. It was found that the average shape of cement particles was closely correlated with the volume fraction of C{sub 3}S (alite) and C{sub 2}S (belite) making up the cement powder. It is shown that the non-spherical particle shape of the cements strongly influence laser diffraction results, at least in the sieve size range of 20 mum to 38 mum. Since laser diffraction particle size measurement is being increasingly used by the cement industry, while cement chemistry is always a main factor in cement production, these results could have important implications for how this kind of particle size measurement should be understood and used in the cement industry.

  15. Concentration, Size Distribution, and Infectivity of Airborne Particles Carrying Swine Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Carmen; Raynor, Peter C.; Davies, Peter R.; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    When pathogens become airborne, they travel associated with particles of different size and composition. Particle size determines the distance across which pathogens can be transported, as well as the site of deposition and the survivability of the pathogen. Despite the importance of this information, the size distribution of particles bearing viruses emitted by infectious animals remains unknown. In this study we characterized the concentration and size distribution of inhalable particles that transport influenza A virus (IAV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) generated by acutely infected pigs and assessed virus viability for each particle size range. Aerosols from experimentally infected pigs were sampled for 24 days using an Andersen cascade impactor able to separate particles by size (ranging from 0.4 to 10 micrometer (μm) in diameter). Air samples collected for the first 9, 20 and the last 3 days of the study were analyzed for IAV, PRRSV and PEDV, respectively, using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantified as geometric mean copies/m3 within each size range. IAV was detected in all particle size ranges in quantities ranging from 5.5x102 (in particles ranging from 1.1 to 2.1μm) to 4.3x105 RNA copies/m3 in the largest particles (9.0–10.0μm). PRRSV was detected in all size ranges except particles between 0.7 and 2.1μm in quantities ranging from 6x102 (0.4–0.7μm) to 5.1x104 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). PEDV, an enteric virus, was detected in all particle sizes and in higher quantities than IAV and PRRSV (p < 0.0001) ranging from 1.3x106 (0.4–0.7μm) to 3.5x108 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). Infectious status was demonstrated for the 3 viruses, and in the case of IAV and PRRSV, viruses were isolated from particles larger than 2.1μm. In summary, our results indicated that airborne PEDV, IAV and PRRSV can be found in a wide range of

  16. Two-phase dynamics of volcanic eruptions: Particle size distribution and the conditions for choking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya M.; Bercovici, David; Michaut, Chloé

    2015-03-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are studied using a two-phase model of polydisperse suspensions of solid particles in gas. Eruption velocities depend on choking conditions in the volcanic conduit, which depend on acoustic wave propagation that is, in turn, influenced by the particle size distribution in the two-phase mixture. The acoustic wave spectrum is divided into three regions of superfast short waves moving at the pure gas sound speed, purely attenuated domain at intermediate wavelengths, and slower long waves for a dusty pseudogas. The addition of solid phases with differing particle sizes qualitatively preserves the features of two-phase acoustic wave dispersion, although it narrows the regions of short-fast and intermediate-blocked waves. Choking conditions, however, strongly depend on the number and size distribution of solid phases. Changes in particle sizes lead to variations in the choking conditions, which determine the eruption velocities and the resulting height of the erupting column. Smaller particles always exit the choking point faster than big particles, as expected. Even though particle-particle interaction is neglected, the particle distributions influence each other by momentum exchange through the gas. Therefore, the structure of the dispersion relation as well as the eruption or choking velocities and subsequent column height and particle deposition bear information on how eruption dynamics are controlled by size distribution and relative volume fractions of small and big particles. We suggest that unimodal distributions, with one dominant small particle size, favor development of vertical plinian eruptions, while bimodal distributions, with a comparable mean size, lead to pyroclastic lateral flows.

  17. Effects of particle size on magnetostrictive properties of magnetostrictive composites with low particulate volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xufeng; Guan, Xinchun; Ou, Jinping

    2009-03-01

    In the past ten years, there have been several investigations on the effects of particle size on magnetostrictive properties of polymer-bonded Terfenol-D composites, but they didn't get an agreement. To solve the conflict among them, Terfenol-D/unsaturated polyester resin composite samples were prepared from Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2 powder with 20% volume fraction in six particle-size ranges (30-53, 53-150, 150-300, 300-450, 450-500 and 30-500μm). Then their magnetostrictive properties were tested. The results indicate the 53-150μm distribution presents the largest static and dynamic magnetostriction among the five monodispersed distribution samples. But the 30-500μm (polydispersed) distribution shows even larger response than 53-150μm distribution. It indicates the particle size level plays a doubleedged sword on magnetostrictive properties of magnetostrictive composites. The existence of the optimal particle size to prepare polymer-bonded Terfenol-D, whose composition is Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2, is resulted from the competition between the positive effects and negative effects of increasing particle size. At small particle size level, the voids and the demagnetization effect decrease significantly with increasing particle size and leads to the increase of magnetostriction; while at lager particle size level, the percentage of single-crystal particles and packing density becomes increasingly smaller with increasing particle size and results in the decrease of magnetostriction. The reason for the other scholars got different results is analyzed.

  18. Effects of lint cleaning on lint trash particle size distribution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton quality trash measurements used today typically yield a single value for trash parameters for a lint sample (i.e. High Volume Instrument – percent area; Advanced Fiber Information System – total count, trash size, dust count, trash count, and visible foreign matter). A Cotton Trash Identifica...

  19. Particle size-dependent leakage and losses of aerosols in respirators.

    PubMed

    Holton, P M; Tackett, D L; Willeke, K

    1987-10-01

    Measuring particle size-dependent leakage into and losses inside a respirator reveals the deposition mechanisms occurring at the leak site and the flow dynamics inside the respirator. This study investigated particle size-dependent leakage and deposition within the mask by examining the leakage into the mask for different hole locations, probe locations, hole shapes, hole lengths and hole sizes. The shape of the leak has an effect on particle size-dependent leakage. Probe and leak location tests indicated that not only does the total measured leakage change but also the size-dependence of the leakage changes depending on the leak and probe locations. When the leak site is in the chin area, the clean air entering through the filters at the chin helps to carry the inward leakage into the breathing zone. Particle size-dependent leakage does occur and is due to both inertial entry losses at the leak site and within the mask, and diffusional losses within the mask and leak site. Particle size-dependent curves change shape as the hole size changes with relatively more larger particles entering through the small hole size. PMID:3687729

  20. A Review of Discrete Element Method (DEM) Particle Shapes and Size Distributions for Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to develop models of lunar soil mechanics, this report reviews two topics that are important to discrete element method (DEM) modeling the behavior of soils (such as lunar soils): (1) methods of modeling particle shapes and (2) analytical representations of particle size distribution. The choice of particle shape complexity is driven primarily by opposing tradeoffs with total number of particles, computer memory, and total simulation computer processing time. The choice is also dependent on available DEM software capabilities. For example, PFC2D/PFC3D and EDEM support clustering of spheres; MIMES incorporates superquadric particle shapes; and BLOKS3D provides polyhedra shapes. Most commercial and custom DEM software supports some type of complex particle shape beyond the standard sphere. Convex polyhedra, clusters of spheres and single parametric particle shapes such as the ellipsoid, polyellipsoid, and superquadric, are all motivated by the desire to introduce asymmetry into the particle shape, as well as edges and corners, in order to better simulate actual granular particle shapes and behavior. An empirical particle size distribution (PSD) formula is shown to fit desert sand data from Bagnold. Particle size data of JSC-1a obtained from a fine particle analyzer at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is also fitted to a similar empirical PSD function.

  1. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  2. Particle size reduction in debris flows: Laboratory experiments compared with field data from Inyo Creek, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabnia, O.; Sklar, L. S.; Mclaughlin, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Rock particles in debris flows are reduced in size through abrasion and fracture. Wear of coarse sediments results in production of finer particles, which alter the bulk material rheology and influence flow dynamics and runout distance. Particle wear also affects the size distribution of coarse particles, transforming the initial sediment size distribution produced on hillslopes into that delivered to the fluvial channel network. A better understanding of the controls on particle wear in debris flows would aid in the inferring flow conditions from debris flow deposits, in estimating the initial size of sediments entrained in the flow, and in modeling debris flow dynamics and mapping hazards. The rate of particle size reduction with distance traveled should depend on the intensity of particle interactions with other particles and the flow boundary, and on rock resistance to wear. We seek a geomorphic transport law to predict rate of particle wear with debris flow travel distance as a function of particle size distribution, flow depth, channel slope, fluid composition and rock strength. Here we use four rotating drums to create laboratory debris flows across a range of scales. Drum diameters range from 0.2 to 4.0 m, with the largest drum able to accommodate up to 2 Mg of material, including boulders. Each drum has vanes along the boundary to prevent sliding. Initial experiments use angular clasts of durable granodiorite; later experiments will use less resistant rock types. Shear rate is varied by changing drum rotational velocity. We begin experiments with well-sorted coarse particle size distributions, which are allowed to evolve through particle wear. The fluid is initially clear water, which rapidly acquires fine-grained wear products. After each travel increment all coarse particles (mass > 0.4 g) are weighed individually. We quantify particle wear rates using statistics of size and mass distributions, and by fitting various comminution functions to the data

  3. Particle mobility size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedensohler, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Sonntag, A.; Weinhold, K.; Merkel, M.; Wehner, B.; Tuch, T.; Pfeifer, S.; Fiebig, M.; Fjäraa, A. M.; Asmi, E.; Sellegri, K.; Depuy, R.; Venzac, H.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.; Aalto, P.; Ogren, J. A.; Swietlicki, E.; Roldin, P.; Williams, P.; Quincey, P.; Hüglin, C.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, S.; Grüning, C.; Faloon, K.; Beddows, D.; Harrison, R. M.; Monahan, C.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Marinoni, A.; Horn, H.-G.; Keck, L.; Jiang, J.; Scheckman, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, C. S.; Moerman, M.; Henzing, B.; de Leeuw, G.

    2010-12-01

    Particle mobility size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide application in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. This article results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research). Under controlled laboratory conditions, the number size distribution from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. Instruments with identical design agreed within ±3% in the peak number concentration when all settings were done carefully. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry for atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations are given for atmospheric measurements including continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyser. In cooperation with EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Program), a new uniform data structure was introduced for saving and disseminating the data within EMEP. This structure contains three levels: raw data, processed data, and final particle size distributions. Importantly, we recommend reporting raw measurements including all relevant instrument parameters as well as a complete documentation on all data transformation and correction steps. These technical and data structure standards aim to enhance the quality of long-term size distribution measurements, their comparability between

  4. Particle size and surfactant effects on chemical mechanical polishing of glass using silica-based slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zefang; Liu Weili; Song Zhitang

    2010-10-01

    This study explores the effect of particle size and surfactant on the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of glass using colloidal silica-based slurry. It was found that the material removal rate strongly depends on the particle size and the types of surfactants and that the rms roughness was independent of particle size and correlated to surfactants. On the basis of polishing results, it was concluded that the main polishing mechanism was changed from indentation mechanism to surface-area mechanism, with the variation of particle size. In addition, the molecular structure, charge type, and lubricating effect of the surfactants play an important role in the dispersion of abrasive particles and in the CMP performance.

  5. Radial particle-size segregation during packing of particulates into cylindrical containers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ripple, C.D.; James, R.V.; Rubin, J.

    1973-01-01

    In a series of experiments, soil materials were placed in long cylindrical containers, using various packing procedures. Soil columns produced by deposition and simultaneous vibratory compaction were dense and axially uniform, but showed significant radial segregation of particle sizes. Similar results were obtained with deposition and simultaneous impact-type compaction when the impacts resulted in significant container "bouncing". The latter procedure, modified to minimize "bouncing" produced dense, uniform soil columns, showing little radial particle-size segregation. Other procedures tested (deposition alone and deposition followed by compaction) did not result in radial segregation, but produced columns showing either relatively low or axially nonuniform densities. Current data suggest that radial particle-size segregation is mainly due to vibration-induced particle circulation in which particles of various sizes have different circulation rates and paths. ?? 1973.

  6. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  7. Comprehensive Characterization Of Ultrafine Particulate Emission From 2007 Diesel Engines: PM Size Distribution, Loading And Indidividual Particle Size And Composition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyuk, A.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Imre, D.; Shimpi, S.; Warey, A.

    2006-12-01

    The strong absorption of solar radiation by black carbon (BC) impacts the atmospheric radiative balance in a complex and significant manner. One of the most important sources of BC is vehicular emissions, of which diesel represents a significant fraction. To address this issue the EPA has issues new stringent regulations that will be in effect in 2007, limiting the amount of particulate mass that can be emitted by diesel engines. The new engines are equipped with aftertreatments that reduce PM emissions to the point, where filter measurements are subject to significant artifacts and characterization by other techniques presents new challenges. We will present the results of the multidisciplinary study conducted at the Cummins Technical Center in which a suite of instruments was deployed to yield comprehensive, temporally resolved information on the diesel exhaust particle loadings and properties in real-time: Particle size distributions were measured by Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Total particle diameter concentration was obtained using Electrical Aerosol Detector (EAD). Laser Induced Incandescence and photoacoustic techniques were used to monitor the PM soot content. Single Particle Laser Ablation Time-of- flight Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT) provided the aerodynamic diameter and chemical composition of individual diesel exhaust particles. Measurements were conducted on a number of heavy duty diesel engines operated under variety of operating conditions, including FTP transient cycles, ramped-modal cycles and steady states runs. We have also characterized PM emissions during diesel particulate filter regeneration cycles. We will present a comparison of PM characteristics observed during identical cycles, but with and without the use of aftertreatment. A total of approximately 100,000 individual particles were sized and their composition characterized by SPLAT. The aerodynamic size distributions of the characterized

  8. Particle-size distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and its implications for health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Y.; Xu, T.; Li, X.; Cheng, T.; Yang, X.; Sun, X.; Chen, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order better to understand the particle-size distribution of particulate PBDEs and their deposition pattern in human respiratory tract, we made an one year campaign 2012-2013 for the measurement of size-resolved aerosol particles at Shanghai urban site. The results showed that particulate PBDEs exhibited a bimodal distribution with a mode peak in the accumulation particle size range and the second mode peak in the coarse particle size ranges. As the number of bromine atoms in the molecule increased, accumulation mode peak intensity increased while coarse mode peak intensity decreased. This change was the consistent with the variation of PBDEs' sub-cooled vapor pressure. Absorption and adsorption process dominated the distribution of PBDEs among the different size particles. Evaluated deposition flux of Σ13PBDE was 26.8 pg h-1, in which coarse particles contributed most PBDEs in head and tracheobronchial regions, while fine mode particles contributed major PBDEs in the alveoli region. In associated with the fact that fine particles can penetrate deeper into the respiratory system, fine particle-bound highly brominated PBDEs can be inhaled more deeply into human lungs and cause a greater risk to human health.

  9. Size distribution of particle-associated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their implications for health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Yan; Xu, Tingting; Li, Xiang; Cheng, Tiantao; Yang, Xin; Sun, Xiaomin; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-03-01

    In order to better understand the size distribution of particle-associated PBDEs and their deposition pattern in the human respiratory tract, we carried out a 1-year campaign during 2012-2013 for the measurement of size-resolved particles at the urban site of Shanghai. The results showed that particulate PBDEs exhibited a bimodal distribution with a mode peak in the accumulation particle size range and the second mode peak in the coarse particle size ranges. As the number of bromine atoms in the molecule increases, accumulation-mode peak intensity increased while coarse-mode peak intensity decreased. This change was consistent with the variation of PBDEs' subcooled vapor pressure. Absorption and adsorption processes dominated the distribution of PBDEs among the different size particles. The evaluated deposition flux of Σ13 PBDEs was 26.8 pg h-1, in which coarse particles contributed most PBDEs in head and tracheobronchial regions, while fine-mode particles contributed major PBDEs in the alveoli region. In association with the fact that fine particles can penetrate deeper into the respiratory system, fine-particle-bound highly brominated PBDEs can be inhaled more deeply into human lungs and cause a greater risk to human health.

  10. Individual Aerosol Particles from Biomass Burning in Southern Africa. 1; Compositions and Size Distributions of Carbonaceous Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posfai, Mihaly; Simonics, Renata; Li, Jia; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2003-01-01

    Individual aerosol particles in smoke plumes from biomass fires and in regional hazes in southern Africa were studied using analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which allowed detailed characterization of carbonaceous particle types in smoke and determination of changes in particle properties and concentrations during smoke aging. Based on composition, morphology, and microstructure, three distinct types of carbonaceous particles were present in the smoke: organic particles with inorganic (K-salt) inclusions, tar ball particles, and soot. The relative number concentrations of organic particles were largest in young smoke, whereas tar balls were dominant in a slightly aged (1 hour) smoke from a smoldering fire. Flaming fires emitted relatively more soot particles than smoldering fires, but soot was a minor constituent of all studied plumes. Further aging caused the accumulation of sulfate on organic and soot particles, as indicated by the large number of internally mixed organic/sulfate and soot/sulfate particles in the regional haze. Externally mixed ammonium sulfate particles dominated in the boundary layer hazes, whereas organic/sulfate particles were the most abundant type in the upper hazes. Apparently, elevated haze layers were more strongly affected by biomass smoke than those within the boundary layer. Based on size distributions and the observed patterns of internal mixing, we hypothesize that organic and soot particles are the cloud-nucleating constituents of biomass smoke aerosols. Sea-salt particles dominated in the samples taken in stratus clouds over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Namibia, whereas a distinct haze layer above the clouds consisted of aged biomass smoke particles.

  11. Effects of Particle Sizes on Sintering Behavior of 316L Stainless Steel Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong Yong; Lee, Shi W.; Park, Seong Jin; Kwon, Young-Sam; Otsuka, Isamu

    2013-03-01

    In rapidly evolving powder injection molding technology, the wide prevalence of various microstructures demands the powders of smaller particle sizes. The effects of particle size on the sintering behavior are critical to not only shape retention of microstructure but also its mechanical properties. This study investigates the effects of three different particle sizes on the sintering behavior of the 316L stainless steel (STS316L) samples, prepared by powder injection molding, via the dilatometry experiments. For this purpose, the STS316L powders of three different mean particle sizes, i.e., 2.97, 4.16, and 8.04 μm, were produced for STS316L. The samples for the dilatometry test were prepared through powder-binder mixing, injection molding, and solvent and thermal debinding. Dilatometry experiments were carried out with the samples in a H2 atmosphere at three different heating rates of 3, 6, and 10 K/min. The shrinkage data obtained by dilatometry experiments was collected and analyzed to help understand the densification and the sintering behaviors in terms of particles size and heating rate. The master sintering curve (MSC) model was used to quantify the effects of particle sizes. In addition, we investigated the microstructure evolutions in terms of particles sizes.

  12. A novel method for size uniform 200nm particles: multimetallic particles and in vitro gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, Lamar; Ford, Kris; Superfine, Richard

    2008-10-01

    We report on the fabrication of arrays of mono- and multimetallic particles via metal evaporation onto lithographically patterned posts. Metal particles evaporated on cylindrical structures 0.20μm in diameter and 0.33μm tall are released via photoresist dissolution, resulting in freely suspended, shape defined particles. These Post-Particles have highly tunable composition, as demonstrated by our deposition of five different multimetallic particle blends. We calculate the susceptibility and magnetization of 200nm Fe particles in an applied 0.081T magnetic field. In order to evaluate their usefulness as magnetofection agents an antisense oligonucleotide designed to correct the aberrant splicing of enhanced green fluorescent protein mRNA was successfully attached to Fe Post-Particles via a polyethyleneimine linker and transfected into a modified HeLa cell line.

  13. The effect of particle size on the morphology and thermodynamics of diblock copolymer/tethered-particle membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Edwards, Brian J.

    2015-06-07

    A combination of self-consistent field theory and density functional theory was used to examine the effect of particle size on the stable, 3-dimensional equilibrium morphologies formed by diblock copolymers with a tethered nanoparticle attached either between the two blocks or at the end of one of the blocks. Particle size was varied between one and four tenths of the radius of gyration of the diblock polymer chain for neutral particles as well as those either favoring or disfavoring segments of the copolymer blocks. Phase diagrams were constructed and analyzed in terms of thermodynamic diagrams to understand the physics associated with the molecular-level self-assembly processes. Typical morphologies were observed, such as lamellar, spheroidal, cylindrical, gyroidal, and perforated lamellar, with the primary concentration region of the tethered particles being influenced heavily by particle size and tethering location, strength of the particle-segment energetic interactions, chain length, and copolymer radius of gyration. The effect of the simulation box size on the observed morphology and system thermodynamics was also investigated, indicating possible effects of confinement upon the system self-assembly processes.

  14. Influence of Particle Size on Reaction Selectivity in Cyclohexene Hydrogenation and Dehydrogenation over Silica-Supported Monodisperse Pt Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rioux, R. M.; Hsu, B. B.; Grass, M. E.; Song, H.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-11

    The role of particle size during the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of cyclohexene (10 Torr C{sub 6}H{sub 10}, 200-600 Torr H{sub 2}, and 273-650 K) was studied over a series of monodisperse Pt/SBA-15 catalysts. The conversion of cyclohexene in the presence of excess H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}:C{sub 6}H{sub 10} ratio = 20-60) is characterized by three regimes: hydrogenation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane at low temperature (< 423 K), an intermediate temperature range in which both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation occur; and a high temperature regime in which the dehydrogenation of cyclohexene dominates (> 573 K). The rate of both reactions demonstrated maxima with temperature, regardless of Pt particle size. For the hydrogenation of cyclohexene, a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (apparent negative activation energy) was observed. Hydrogenation is structure insensitive at low temperatures, and apparently structure sensitive in the non-Arrhenius regime; the origin of the particle-size dependent reactivity with temperature is attributed to a change in the coverage of reactive hydrogen. Small particles were more active for dehydrogenation and had lower apparent activation energies than large particles. The selectivity can be controlled by changing the particle size, which is attributed to the structure sensitivity of both reactions in the temperature regime where hydrogenation and dehydrogenation are catalyzed simultaneously.

  15. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul G.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  16. Deconvolution of the particle size distribution of ProRoot MTA and MTA Angelus

    PubMed Central

    Ha, William Nguyen; Shakibaie, Fardad; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cements contain two types of particles, namely Portland cement (PC) (nominally 80% w/w) and bismuth oxide (BO) (20%). This study aims to determine the particle size distribution (PSD) of PC and BO found in MTA. Materials and methods The PSDs of ProRoot MTA (MTA-P) and MTA Angelus (MTA-A) powder were determined using laser diffraction, and compared to samples of PC (at three different particle sizes) and BO. The non-linear least squares method was used to deconvolute the PSDs into the constituents. MTA-P and MTA-A powders were also assessed with scanning electron microscopy. Results BO showed a near Gaussian distribution for particle size, with a mode distribution peak at 10.48 μm. PC samples milled to differing degrees of fineness had mode distribution peaks from 19.31 down to 4.88 μm. MTA-P had a complex PSD composed of both fine and large PC particles, with BO at an intermediate size, whereas MTA-A had only small BO particles and large PC particles. Conclusions The PSD of MTA cement products is bimodal or more complex, which has implications for understanding how particle size influences the overall properties of the material. Smaller particles may be reactive PC or unreactive radiopaque agent. Manufacturers should disclose particle size information for PC and radiopaque agents to prevent simplistic conclusions being drawn from statements of average particle size for MTA materials. PMID:27335899

  17. Particle sizing by weighted measurements of scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of a measurement method, applicable to a poly-dispersion of particles, in which the intensity of scattered light at any angle is weighted by a factor proportional to that angle. Determination is then made of four angles at which the weighted intensity is four fractions of the maximum intensity. These yield four characteristic diameters, i.e., the diameters of the volume/area mean (D sub 32 the Sauter mean) and the volume/diameter mean (D sub 31); the diameters at cumulative volume fractions of 0.5 (D sub v0.5 the volume median) and 0.75 (D sub v0.75). They also yield the volume dispersion of diameters. Mie scattering computations show that an average diameter less than three micrometers cannot be accurately measured. The results are relatively insensitive to extraneous background light and to the nature of the diameter distribution. Also described is an experimental method of verifying the conclusions by using two microscopic slides coated with polystyrene microspheres to simulate the particles and the background.

  18. Ultrafine particle size distributions near freeways: Effects of differing wind directions on exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kozawa, Kathleen H.; Winer, Arthur M.; Fruin, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    High ambient ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations may play an important role in the adverse health effects associated with living near busy roadways. However, UFP size distributions change rapidly as vehicle emissions dilute and age. These size changes can influence UFP lung deposition rates and dose because deposition in the respiratory system is a strong function of particle size. Few studies to date have measured and characterized changes in near-road UFP size distributions in real-time, thus missing transient variations in size distribution due to short-term fluctuations in wind speed, direction, or particle dynamics. In this study we measured important wind direction effects on near-freeway UFP size distributions and gradients using a mobile platform with 5-s time resolution. Compared to more commonly measured perpendicular (downwind) conditions, parallel wind conditions appeared to promote formation of broader and larger size distributions of roughly one-half the particle concentration. Particles during more parallel wind conditions also changed less in size with downwind distance and the fraction of lung-deposited particle number was calculated to be 15% lower than for downwind conditions, giving a combined decrease of about 60%. In addition, a multivariate analysis of several variables found meteorology, particularly wind direction and temperature, to be important in predicting UFP concentrations within 150 m of a freeway (R2 = 0.46, p = 0.014). PMID:24415904

  19. Quantitative reflectance spectra of solid powders as a function of particle size.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tanya L; Brauer, Carolyn S; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A; Tonkyn, Russell G; Ertel, Alyssa B; Johnson, Timothy J; Richardson, Robert L

    2015-05-20

    We have recently developed vetted methods for obtaining quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra using a commercial integrating sphere. In this paper, the effects of particle size on the spectral properties are analyzed for several samples such as ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and sodium sulfate as well as one organic compound, lactose. We prepared multiple size fractions for each sample and confirmed the mean sizes using optical microscopy. Most species displayed a wide range of spectral behavior depending on the mean particle size. General trends of reflectance versus particle size are observed such as increased albedo for smaller particles: for most wavelengths, the reflectivity drops with increased size, sometimes displaying a factor of 4 or more drop in reflectivity along with a loss of spectral contrast. In the longwave infrared, several species with symmetric anions or cations exhibited reststrahlen features whose amplitude was nearly invariant with particle size, at least for intermediate and large size sample fractions: that is, ≳150  μm. Trends of other types of bands (Christiansen minima, transparency features) are also investigated as well as quantitative analysis of the observed relationship between reflectance versus particle diameter. PMID:26192525

  20. Scale invariant hydrodynamic focusing and sorting of inertial particles by size in spiral micro channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallapragada, Phanindra; Hasabnis, Nilesh; Katuri, Kalyan; Sudarsanam, Senbagaraman; Joshi, Ketaki; Ramasubramanian, Melur

    2015-08-01

    The hydrodynamic separation of spherical particles in flows at low Reynolds numbers is a very active area of research in microfluidic engineering due to the many important biomedical applications. In particular, curved channels such as spiral channels are of growing interest because the lift and drag force exerted on inertial particles can be used to hydrodynamically separate the particles. In this paper we present a scale invariant classification of the lateral focusing of particles in highly curved spiral micro channels with a square cross section. We then use this scale invariant classification to demonstrate the separation of particles in two-particle mixtures across a large range of sizes. We thus show that our results can be used to systematically design the geometry of devices and select flow parameters to separate particles by size in a mixture.

  1. A crossover study comparing the effect of particle size on the distribution of radiocolloid in patients.

    PubMed

    Kloiber, R; Damtew, B; Rosenthall, L

    1981-05-01

    Two radiocolloid preparations, differing in particle size by a factor of 5 to 20, were compared in each of 15 patients. The smaller colloid, measuring less than 80 nm, showed a relative decrease in the calculated target to background ratios for the liver and spleen and an increase for the bone marrow. The increased uptake of the smaller particle in the bone marrow, as measured by the bone marrow to soft-tissue background ratio, was about 50% higher than that of the larger colloidal particles. Comparable marrow images can be obtained in a half to a third of the time with the smaller particle size for a given administered dose. PMID:6452980

  2. A crossover study comparing the effect of particle size on the distribution of radiocolloid in patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kloiber, R.; Damtew, B.; Rosenthall, L.

    1981-05-01

    Two radiocolloid preparations, differing in particle size by a factor of 5 to 20, were compared in each of 15 patients. The smaller colloid, measuring less than 80 nm, showed a relative decrease in the calculated target to background ratios for the liver and spleen and an increase for the bone marrow. The increased uptake of the smaller particle in the bone marrow, as measured by the bone marrow to soft-tissue background ratio, was about 50% higher than that of the larger colloidal particles. Comparable marrow images can be obtained in a half to a third of the time with the smaller particle size for a given administered dose.

  3. Atomic-scale modeling of particle size effects for the oxygen reduction reaction on Pt.

    SciTech Connect

    Tritsaris, G. A.; Greeley, J.; Rossmeisl, J.; Norskov, J. K.

    2011-07-01

    We estimate the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction on platinum nanoparticles of sizes of practical importance. The proposed model explicitly accounts for surface irregularities and their effect on the activity of neighboring sites. The model reproduces the experimentally observed trends in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component in understanding particle size effects on the activity of catalytic nanoparticles.

  4. Probing surface characteristics of diffusion-limited-aggregation clusters with particles of variable size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, A. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a technique for probing the harmonic measure of a diffusion-limited-aggregation (DLA) cluster surface with variable-size particles and generate 1000 clusters with 50×106 particles using an original off-lattice killing-free algorithm. Taking, in sequence, the limit of the vanishing size of the probing particles and then sending the growing cluster size to infinity, we achieve unprecedented accuracy in determining the fractal dimension D=1.7100(2) crucial to the characterization of the geometric properties of DLA clusters.

  5. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  6. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process. PMID:27104527

  7. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of −0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process. PMID:27104527

  8. Uniform nano-sized valsartan for dissolution and bioavailability enhancement: influence of particle size and crystalline state.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuping; Sun, Hongrui; Che, Erxi; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Sun, Changshan; Wang, Siling

    2013-01-30

    The central purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of drug particle size and crystalline state on valsartan (VAL) formulations in order to improve its dissolution and bioavailability. VAL microsuspension (mean size 22 μm) and nanosuspension (30-80nm) were prepared by high speed dispersing and anti-solvent precipitation method and converted into powders through spray drying. Differential scanning calorimetry studies indicated amorphization of VAL in the spray-dried valsartan nanosuspension (SD-VAL-Nano) but recrystallization occurred after 6 months storage at room temperature. The spray-dried valsartan microsuspension (SD-VAL-Micro) conserved the crystalline form. The VAL dissolution rate and extent were markedly enhanced with both SD-VAL-Micro and SD-VAL-Nano as compared to crude VAL crystals over the pH range of 1.2-6.8. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats demonstrated a 2.5-fold increase in oral bioavailability in the case of SD-VAL-Nano compared with the commercial product while the SD-VAL-Micro provided a much less desirable pharmacokinetic profile. In conclusion, reducing particle size to the nano-scale appears to be a worthwhile and promising approach to obtain VAL products with optimum bioavailability. In addition, the impact of crystalline state on the bioavailability of nano-sized VAL might be not as big as that of particle size. PMID:23266761

  9. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-09-10

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast ({>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes ({alpha} values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 A fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes {>=}1 pr cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}) and (b) fast CMEs were {approx}1.3-1.4 compared to {approx}1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and {approx}2 for the peak 1-8 A fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of {approx}0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  10. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  11. Particle size and energetics of gouge from earthquake rupture zones.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brent; Dewers, Thomas; Reches, Ze'ev; Brune, James

    2005-04-01

    Grain size reduction and gouge formation are found to be ubiquitous in brittle faults at all scales, and most slip along mature faults is observed to have been localized within gouge zones. This fine-grain gouge is thought to control earthquake instability, and thus understanding its properties is central to an understanding of the earthquake process. Here we show that gouge from the San Andreas fault, California, with approximately 160 km slip, and the rupture zone of a recent earthquake in a South African mine with only approximately 0.4 m slip, display similar characteristics, in that ultrafine grains approach the nanometre scale, gouge surface areas approach 80 m2 g(-1), and grain size distribution is non-fractal. These observations challenge the common perception that gouge texture is fractal and that gouge surface energy is a negligible contributor to the earthquake energy budget. We propose that the observed fine-grain gouge is not related to quasi-static cumulative slip, but is instead formed by dynamic rock pulverization during the propagation of a single earthquake. PMID:15815626

  12. Values of Particle Size Particle Density & Slurry Viscosity to use in Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    JEWETT, J R

    2002-01-30

    Recommended values have been developed for particle size distribution, particle density, and slurry viscosity that maybe used in slurry flow calculations that support the design of the piping system that is being modified to deliver Hanford wastes from the underground storage tanks to the planned Waste Treatment Plant for vitrification. The objective of this document is to provide recommended values for three waste properties to be used in a planned revision of the Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis. These properties are particle size distribution (PSD), particle density, and slurry viscosity. In this document, the results of laboratory and engineering studies will be collated and summarized to provide a succinct source of physical property data for use in the hydraulic analysis of the transfer system.

  13. An optical particle size spectrometer for aircraft-borne measurements in IAGOS-CARIBIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, M.; Weigelt, A.; Assmann, D.; Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Conrath, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Heintzenberg, J.; Wiedensohler, A.; Martinsson, B. G.; Deshler, T.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Zahn, A.

    2015-11-01

    The particle number size distribution is an important parameter to characterize the atmospheric aerosol and its influence on the Earth's climate. Here we describe a new Optical Particle Size Spectrometer (OPSS) for measurements of the accumulation mode particle number size