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Sample records for adsorbents activated carbon

  1. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  2. Activated carbon adsorbents from waste tires for air quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C.M.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.; Hsi, H.C.

    1999-07-01

    This study evaluates methodologies for utilizing waste tire rubber to produce carbonaceous adsorbents for use in air quality control operations. Such an approach provides a two-fold environmental and economic benefit. A recycling path is developed for waste tire rubber and new adsorbents are produced from a low cost feedstock for use in environmentally-related operations. Bench-scale and pilot-scale quantities of tire-derived activated carbon (TDAC) were produced from waste tire rubber. Raw tire rubber samples and devolatilized tire char were obtained from several US vendors. The raw samples were analyzed using proximate, ultimate, and elemental analyses. Batches of activated carbon samples were prepared using a bench-scale fixed-tubular reactor to prepare {approximately}10 g samples and a fluidized-bed reactor to prepare {approximately}100 g quantities. About 25 kg of activated carbon was also produced at a pilot-scale commercial facility. The resulting TDACs were then characterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77K. The sample surface areas were determined by the BET method, and the pore size distribution (PSD) was evaluated using the BJH model, and a 3-D PSD model. Performance of the TDACs was evaluated in their ability to remove gaseous mercury species from simulated power-plant flue-gas streams, and for the removal of organic compounds (e.g., acetone and 1,1,1-trichloroethane) from flowing gas streams.

  3. Cellulose: A review as natural, modified and activated carbon adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Suhas; Gupta, V K; Carrott, P J M; Singh, Randhir; Chaudhary, Monika; Kushwaha, Sarita

    2016-09-01

    Cellulose is a biodegradable, renewable, non-meltable polymer which is insoluble in most solvents due to hydrogen bonding and crystallinity. Natural cellulose shows lower adsorption capacity as compared to modified cellulose and its capacity can be enhanced by modification usually by chemicals. This review focuses on the utilization of cellulose as an adsorbent in natural/modified form or as a precursor for activated carbon (AC) for adsorbing substances from water. The literature revealed that cellulose can be a promising precursor for production of activated carbon with appreciable surface area (∼1300m(2)g(-1)) and total pore volume (∼0.6cm(3)g(-1)) and the surface area and pore volume varies with the cellulose content. Finally, the purpose of review is to report a few controversies and unresolved questions concerning the preparation/properties of ACs from cellulose and to make aware to readers that there is still considerable scope for future development, characterization and utilization of ACs from cellulose. PMID:27265088

  4. Thermal behaviour of arsenic trioxide adsorbed on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Frederic; De Dobbelaere, Christopher; Hardy, An; Van Bael, Marlies K; Helsen, Lieve

    2009-07-30

    The thermal stability and desorption of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) adsorbed on activated carbon (AC) was investigated as this phenomenon is expected to influence the arsenic release during low temperature pyrolysis of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood waste. Firstly, a thermogravimetric (TG) experiment with arsenolite, an allotropic form of As(2)O(3), was performed. The sample starts to sublime at temperatures lower than 200 degrees C with a sublimation peak temperature of 271 degrees C. Subsequently, TG experiments with samples of As(2)O(3) adsorbed on AC revealed that only very little (max. 6+/-3 wt%) As(2)O(3) was volatilized at temperatures below 280 degrees C, while still 41.6 (+/-5)wt% of the original arsenic concentration was retained at 440 degrees C and 28.5 (+/-3)wt% at 600 degrees C. The major arsenic volatilization occurred between 300 degrees C and 500 degrees C. The kinetic parameters of desorption, activation energy of desorption (E(d)) and pre-exponential factor (A), were determined by fitting an Arrhenius model to the experimental data, resulting in E(d)=69 kJ/mol, A=1.21 x 10(4)s(-1). It can be concluded that the adsorption of As(2)O(3) on AC can contribute to the thermal stabilisation of As(2)O(3). Consequently, during low temperature pyrolysis of CCA wood arsenic release may be prevented by adsorption of As(2)O(3) on the coal-type product formed during the thermal decomposition of the wood. PMID:19136209

  5. Adsorption capacities of activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol vary with activated carbon particle size: Effects of adsorbent and adsorbate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Sakamoto, Asuka; Taniguchi, Takuma; Pan, Long; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-11-15

    The adsorption capacities of nine activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) were evaluated. For some carbons, adsorption capacity substantially increased when carbon particle diameter was decreased from a few tens of micrometers to a few micrometers, whereas for other carbons, the increase of adsorption capacity was small for MIB and moderate for geosmin. An increase of adsorption capacity was observed for other hydrophobic adsorbates besides geosmin and MIB, but not for hydrophilic adsorbates. The parameter values of a shell adsorption model describing the increase of adsorption capacity were negatively correlated with the oxygen content of the carbon among other characteristics. Low oxygen content indicated low hydrophilicity. The increase of adsorption capacity was related to the hydrophobic properties of both adsorbates and activated carbons. For adsorptive removal of hydrophobic micropollutants such as geosmin, it is therefore recommended that less-hydrophilic activated carbons, such as coconut-shell-based carbons, be microground to a particle diameter of a few micrometers to enhance their equilibrium adsorption capacity. In contrast, adsorption by hydrophilic carbons or adsorption of hydrophilic adsorbates occur in the inner pores, and therefore adsorption capacity is unchanged by particle size reduction. PMID:26302219

  6. Adsorption characteristics of benzene on biosolid adsorbent and commercial activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-Lung Chiang; Kuo-Hsiung Lin; Chih-Yu Chen; Ching-Guan Choa; Ching-Shyung Hwu; Nina Lai

    2006-05-15

    This study selected biosolids from a petrochemical wastewater treatment plant as the raw material. The sludge was immersed in 0.5-5 M of zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}) solutions and pyrolyzed at different temperatures and times. Results indicated that the 1-M ZnCl{sub 2}-immersed biosolids pyrolyzed at 500{sup o}C for 30 min could be reused and were optimal biosolid adsorbents for benzene adsorption. Pore volume distribution analysis indicated that the mesopore contributed more than the macropore and micropore in the biosolid adsorbent. The benzene adsorption capacity of the biosolid adsorbent was 65 and 55% of the G206 (granular-activated carbon) and BPL (coal-based activated carbon; Calgon, Carbon Corp.) activated carbons, respectively. Data from the adsorption and desorption cycles indicated that the benzene adsorption capacity of the biosolid adsorbent was insignificantly reduced compared with the first-run capacity of the adsorbent; therefore, the biosolid adsorbent could be reused as a commercial adsorbent, although its production cost is high. 18 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Process for producing an activated carbon adsorbent with integral heat transfer apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A process for producing an integral adsorbent-heat exchanger apparatus useful in ammonia refrigerant heat pump systems. In one embodiment, the process wets an activated carbon particles-solvent mixture with a binder-solvent mixture, presses the binder wetted activated carbon mixture on a metal tube surface and thereafter pyrolyzes the mixture to form a bonded activated carbon matrix adjoined to the tube surface. The integral apparatus can be easily and inexpensively produced by the process in large quantities.

  8. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  9. Evaluation of activated carbon adsorbents for CO{sub 2} capture in gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor C. Drage; James M. Blackman; Cova Pevida; Colin E. Snape

    2009-05-15

    Activated carbon adsorbents have been evaluated at high pressure, up to 4 MPa, to determine their applicability for the removal of CO{sub 2} from syngas generated from gasification. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and diffusion mechanism were demonstrated to be dependent upon the adsorbent outgas conditions. Activated carbons have been demonstrated to have higher adsorption capacities than existing absorption systems up to 12 mmol g{sup -1} at 4 MPa, under strong outgas conditions. Adsorption capacities on a weight basis have been demonstrated to be correlated with the surface area and micropore volume of the materials. However, performance on a volumetric basis is less well-defined and is controlled by the form and bulk density of the adsorbent. Complete cyclic regeneration of the adsorbents has been demonstrated by pressure swing regeneration cycles. 37 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Removal of chromium from tannery industry effluents with (activated carbon and fly ash) adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Rao, S; Lade, H S; Kadam, T A; Ramana, T V; Krishnamacharyulu, S K G; Deshmukh, S; Gyananath, G

    2007-10-01

    Adsorption is a strong choice for removal operations as it is very simple to recover a high quality product from waste sludge. The efficiency of adsorbents like fly ash and activated carbon are tested based on their performance to remove chrome at various pH values, bed heights, and concentration of adsorbents. The removal efficiency was also tested for wastewater characteristics in a pilot plant in addition to the use of adsorbents. The concentration of chromium was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer). The results depicted that the efficiency of removal increased with increasing pH and bed height and decreased with increasing concentration. The removal efficiency with fly ash as an adsorbent was comparatively better than activatedcarbon. Thus, adsorbents can be used for chromium removal from tannery industry effluent. PMID:18476371

  11. Decomposition of adsorbed VX on activated carbons studied by {sup 31}P MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Ishay Columbus; Daniel Waysbort; Liora Shmueli; Ido Nir; Doron Kaplan

    2006-06-15

    The fate of the persistent OP nerve agent O-ethyl S-(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl) methylphosphonothioate (VX) on granular activated carbons that are used for gas filtration was studied by means of 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Four types of activated carbon were used, including coal-based BPL. VX as vapor or liquid was adsorbed on carbon granules, and MAS NMR spectra were recorded periodically. The results show that at least 90% of the adsorbed VX decomposes within 20 days or less to the nontoxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and bis(S-2-diisopropylaminoethane) ((DES){sub 2}). Decomposition occurred irrespective of the phase from which VX was loaded, the presence of metal impregnation on the carbon surface, and the water content of the carbon. Theoretical and practical aspects of the degradation are discussed. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators. PMID:25133545

  13. Decomposition of adsorbed VX on activated carbons studied by 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Ishay; Waysbort, Daniel; Shmueli, Liora; Nir, Ido; Kaplan, Doron

    2006-06-15

    The fate of the persistent OP nerve agent O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) on granular activated carbons that are used for gas filtration was studied by means of 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. VX as vapor or liquid was adsorbed on carbon granules, and MAS NMR spectra were recorded periodically. The results show that at least 90% of the adsorbed VX decomposes within 20 days or less to the nontoxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and bis(S-2-diisopropylaminoethane) {(DES)2}. Decomposition occurred irrespective of the phase from which VX was loaded, the presence of metal impregnation on the carbon surface, and the water content of the carbon. Theoretical and practical aspects of the degradation are discussed. PMID:16830567

  14. Numerical Analysis on Adsorption Characteristics of Activated Carbon/Ethanol Pair in Finned Tube Type Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makimoto, Naoya; Kariya, Keishi; Koyama, Shigeru

    The cycle performance of adsorption cooling system depends on the thermophysical properties of the adsorbent/refrigerant pair and configuration of the adsorber/desorber heat exchanger. In this study, a twodimensional analysis is carried out in order to clarify the performance of the finned tube type adsorber/desorber heat exchanger using a highly porous activated carbon powder (ACP)/ethanol pair. The simulation results show that the average cooling capacity per unit volume of adsorber/desorber heat exchanger and coefficient of performance (COP) can be improved by optimizing fin thickness, fin height, fin pitch and tube diameter. The performance of a single stage adsorption cooling system using ACP/ethanol pair is also compared with that of activated carbon fiber (ACF)/ethanol pair. It is found that the cooling capacities of each adsorbent/refrigerant pair increase with the decrease of adsorption/desorption time and the cooling capacity of ACP/ethanol pair is approximately 2.5 times as much as that of ACF/ethanol pair. It is also shown that COP of ACP/ethanol pair is superior to that of ACF/ethanol pair.

  15. 2-chlorophenol sorption from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and polymeric adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatbandhe, A. S.; Jahagirdar, H. G.; Yenkie, M. K. N.; Deosarkar, S. D.

    2013-08-01

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) one of the chlorophenols (CPs) onto bituminous coal based Filtrasorb-400 grade granular activated carbon and three different types of polymeric adsorbents were studied in aqueous solution in a batch system. Langmuir isotherm models were applied to experimental equilibrium data of 2-CP adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir equilibrium models of 2-CP. Adsorbent monolayer capacity Q Langmuir constant b and adsorption rate constants k a were evaluated. 2-CP adsorption using GAC is very rapid in the first hour of contact where 70-80% of the adsorbate is removed by GAC followed by a slow approach to equilibrium. Whereas in case of polymeric adsorbents 60-65% of the adsorbate is removed in the first 30 min which is then followed by a slow approach to equilibrium. The order of adsorption of 2-CP on different adsorbents used in the study is found to be in following order: F-400 > XAD-1180 > XAD-4 > XAD-7HP.

  16. Adsorption interference in mixtures of trace contaminants flowing through activated carbon adsorber beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, R.; Photinos, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    Adsorption interference in binary and ternary mixtures of trace contaminants in a helium carrier gas flowing through activated carbon adsorber beds are studied. The isothermal transmission, which is the ratio of the outlet to the inlet concentration, of each component is measured. Interference between co-adsorbing gases occurs when the components are adsorbed strongly. Displacement of one component by another is manifested by a transmission greater than unity for the displaced component over some range of eluted volume. Interference is evidenced not only by a reduction of the adsorption capacity of each component in the mixture in comparison with the value obtained in a single-component experiment, but also by a change in the slope of the transmission curve of each component experiment.

  17. A method for preparing ferric activated carbon composites adsorbents to remove arsenic from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao Li; Lin, Y C; Chen, X; Gao, Nai Yun

    2007-09-30

    Iron oxide/activated carbon (FeO/AC) composite adsorbent material, which was used to modify the coal-based activated carbon (AC) 12 x 40, was prepared by the special ferric oxide microcrystal in this study. This composite can be used as the adsorbent to remove arsenic from drinking water, and Langmuir isotherm adsorption equation well describes the experimental adsorption isotherms. Then, the arsenic desorption can subsequently be separated from the medium by using a 1% aqueous NaOH solution. The apparent characters and physical chemistry performances of FeO/AC composite were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch and column adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate and compare the arsenic removal capability of the prepared FeO/AC composite material and virgin activated carbon. It can be concluded that: (1) the main phase present in this composite are magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)), hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) and goethite (alpha-FeO(OH)); (2) the presence of iron oxides did not significantly affect the surface area or the pore structure of the activated carbon; (3) the comparisons between the adsorption isotherms of arsenic from aqueous solution onto the composite and virgin activated carbon showed that the FeO/AC composite behave an excellent capacity of adsorption arsenic than the virgin activated carbon; (4) column adsorption experiments with FeO/AC composite adsorbent showed that the arsenic could be removed to below 0.01 mg/L within 1250 mL empty bed volume when influent concentration was 0.5mg/L. PMID:17434260

  18. REACTIONS OF CHLORITE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON AND WITH VANILLIC ACID AND INDAN ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction between chlorite (CO2(-1)) and vanillic acid, at pH 6.0 in the presence of granular activated carbon (GAC), yielded several reaction products identifiable by GC/MS; no products were found in the absence of GAC. Indan and ClO2 or ClO2(-1) reacted in aqueous solution a...

  19. Visualization and Measurement of Adsorption/Desorption Process of Ethanol in Activated Carbon Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Murata, Kenta; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yasushi

    Adsorption refrigerator is one of the efficient tools for waste heat recovery, because the system is driven by heat at relative low temperature. However, the coefficient of performance is low due to its batch operation and the heat capacity of the adsorber. In order to improve the performance, it is important to optimize the configuration to minimize the amount of driving heat, and to clarify adsorption/desorption phenomena in transient conditions. Neutron radiography was applied to visualize and measure the adsorption amount distribution in an adsorber. The visualization experiments had been performed at the neutron radiography facility of E-2 port of Kyoto University Research Reactor. Activated carbon and ethanol were used as the adsorbent and refrigerant. From the acquired radiographs, adsorption amount was quantitatively measured by applying the umbra method using a checkered neutron absorber with boron powder. Then, transient adsorption and desorption processes of a rectangular adsorber with 84 mm in width, 50 mm in height and 20 mm in depth were visualized. As the result, the effect of fins in the adsorbent layer on the adsorption amount distribution was clearly visualized.

  20. Magnesium oxide nanoparticles on green activated carbon as efficient CO{sub 2} adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Isahak, Wan Nor Roslam; Ramli, Zatil Amali Che; Mohamed Hisham, Mohamed Wahab; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar

    2013-11-27

    This study was focused on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) adsorption ability using Magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported activated carbon based bamboo (BAC). The suitability of MgO as a good CO{sub 2} adsorbent was clarified using Thermodynamic considerations (Gibbs-Helmholtz relationship). The ΔH and ΔG of this reaction were − 117.5 kJ⋅mol{sup −1} and − 65.4 kJ⋅mol{sup −1}, respectively, at standard condition (298 K and 1 atm). The complete characterization of these adsorbent were conducted by using BET, XRD, FTIR, TEM and TPD−CO{sub 2}. The surface areas for MgO nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported BAC were 297.1 m{sup 2}/g and 702.5 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The MgO nanoparticles supported BAC shown better physical and chemical adsorption ability with 39.8 cm{sup 3}/g and 6.5 mmol/g, respectively. The combination of MgO nanoparticle and BAC which previously prepared by chemical method can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions as well as better CO{sub 2} adsorption behavior. Overall, our results indicate that nanoparticles of MgO on BAC posses unique surface chemistry and their high surface reactivity coupled with high surface area allowed them to approach the goal as an efficient CO{sub 2} adsorbent.

  1. Magnesium oxide nanoparticles on green activated carbon as efficient CO2 adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Isahak, Wan Nor Roslam; Ramli, Zatil Amali Che; Mohamed Hisham, Mohamed Wahab; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar

    2013-11-01

    This study was focused on carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption ability using Magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported activated carbon based bamboo (BAC). The suitability of MgO as a good CO2 adsorbent was clarified using Thermodynamic considerations (Gibbs-Helmholtz relationship). The ΔH and ΔG of this reaction were - 117.5 kJṡmol-1 and - 65.4 kJṡmol-1, respectively, at standard condition (298 K and 1 atm). The complete characterization of these adsorbent were conducted by using BET, XRD, FTIR, TEM and TPD-CO2. The surface areas for MgO nanoparticles and MgO nanoparticles supported BAC were 297.1 m2/g and 702.5 m2/g, respectively. The MgO nanoparticles supported BAC shown better physical and chemical adsorption ability with 39.8 cm3/g and 6.5 mmol/g, respectively. The combination of MgO nanoparticle and BAC which previously prepared by chemical method can reduce CO2 emissions as well as better CO2 adsorption behavior. Overall, our results indicate that nanoparticles of MgO on BAC posses unique surface chemistry and their high surface reactivity coupled with high surface area allowed them to approach the goal as an efficient CO2 adsorbent.

  2. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  3. Ceria modified activated carbon: an efficient arsenic removal adsorbent for drinking water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawana, Radha; Somasundar, Yogesh; Iyer, Venkatesh Shankar; Baruwati, Babita

    2016-03-01

    Ceria (CeO2) coated powdered activated carbon was synthesized by a single step chemical process and demonstrated to be a highly efficient adsorbent for the removal of both As(III) and As(V) from water without any pre-oxidation process. The formation of CeO2 on the surface of powdered activated carbon was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The percentage of Ce in the adsorbent was confirmed to be 3.5 % by ICP-OES. The maximum removal capacity for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 10.3 and 12.2 mg/g, respectively. These values are comparable to most of the commercially available adsorbents. 80 % of the removal process was completed within 15 min of contact time in a batch process. More than 95 % removal of both As(III) and As(V) was achieved within an hour. The efficiency of removal was not affected by change in pH (5-9), salinity, hardness, organic (1-4 ppm of humic acid) and inorganic anions (sulphate, nitrate, chloride, bicarbonate and fluoride) excluding phosphate. Presence of 100 ppm phosphate reduced the removal significantly from 90 to 18 %. The equilibrium adsorption pattern of both As(III) and As(V) fitted well with the Freundlich model with R 2 values 0.99 and 0.97, respectively. The material shows reusability greater than three times in a batch process (arsenic concentration reduced below 10 ppb from 330 ppb) and a life of at least 100 L in a column study with 80 g material when tested under natural hard water (TDS 1000 ppm, pH 7.8, hardness 600 ppm as CaCO3) spiked with 330 ppb of arsenic.

  4. Activated carbons and low cost adsorbents for remediation of tri- and hexavalent chromium from water.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Pittman, Charles U

    2006-09-21

    Hexavalent chromium is a well-known highly toxic metal, considered a priority pollutant. Industrial sources of Cr(VI) include leather tanning, cooling tower blowdown, plating, electroplating, anodizing baths, rinse waters, etc. The most common method applied for chromate control is reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent form in acid (pH approximately 2.0) and subsequent hydroxide precipitation of Cr(III) by increasing the pH to approximately 9.0-10.0 using lime. Existing overviews of chromium removal only cover selected technologies that have traditionally been used in chromium removal. Far less attention has been paid to adsorption. Herein, we provide the first review article that provides readers an overview of the sorption capacities of commercial developed carbons and other low cost sorbents for chromium remediation. After an overview of chromium contamination is provided, more than 300 papers on chromium remediation using adsorption are discussed to provide recent information about the most widely used adsorbents applied for chromium remediation. Efforts to establish the adsorption mechanisms of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on various adsorbents are reviewed. Chromium's impact environmental quality, sources of chromium pollution and toxicological/health effects is also briefly introduced. Interpretations of the surface interactions are offered. Particular attention is paid to comparing the sorption efficiency and capacities of commercially available activated carbons to other low cost alternatives, including an extensive table. PMID:16904258

  5. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Hekmati Jah, A; Khodadoust, S; Sahraei, R; Daneshfar, A; Mihandoost, A; Purkait, M K

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%. PMID:22306446

  6. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hekmati Jah, A.; Khodadoust, S.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Mihandoost, A.; Purkait, M. K.

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  7. Carbon dioxide adsorbent study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Baker, B. S.

    1973-01-01

    A study was initiated on the feasibility of using the alkali metal carbonate - bi-carbonate solid-gas reaction to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere of an EVA life support system. The program successfully demonstrates that carbon dioxide concentrations could be maintained below 0.1 mole per cent using this chemistry. Further a practical method for distributing the carbonates in a coherent sheet form capable of repeated regeneration (50 cycles) at modest temperatures (423 K), without loss in activity was also demonstrated. Sufficiently high reaction rates were shown to be possible with the carbonate - bi-carbonate system such that EVA hardware could be readily designed. Experimental and design data were presented on the basis of which two practical units were designed. In addition to conventional thermally regenerative systems very compact units using ambient temperature cyclic vacuum regeneration may also be feasible. For a one man - 8 hour EVA unit regenerated thermally at the base ship a system volume of 14 liters is estimated.

  8. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR EMERGING ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM FUNDAMENTAL ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES - PRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  9. Activated Carbons from Flax Shive and Cotton Gin Waste as Environmental Adsorbents for the Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Trichloroethylene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as a starting material for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this...

  10. Performance of waste activated carbon as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of anionic surfactant from aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep; Pal, Anjali; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Manas

    2003-02-01

    In the present study, different low cost adsorbents were screened for their sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, an anionic surfactant) removal capacity. Waste activated carbon (WAC) from the aqua purifier has shown high efficiency for SDS removal. The performance evaluation in the presence of various ions (Ca2+, SO4(2-), NO3-, and Cl-) and at various pH was studied. Desorption studies were conducted using simple sonication and pH variation technique. Column adsorption studies were performed. SEM and EDS studies were done on the adsorbing material before adsorption, after adsorption and after desorption of SDS. PMID:12638703

  11. Comparison between Brazilian agro-wastes and activated carbon as adsorbents to remove Ni(II) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Dotto, Guilherme Luiz; Meili, Lucas; de Souza Abud, Ana Karla; Tanabe, Eduardo Hiromitsu; Bertuol, Daniel Assumpção; Foletto, Edson Luiz

    2016-01-01

    This research was performed to find an alternative, low-cost, competitive, locally available and efficient adsorbent to treat nickel (Ni) containing effluents. For this purpose, several Brazilian agro-wastes like sugarcane bagasse (SCB), passion fruit wastes (PFW), orange peel (OP) and pineapple peel (PP) were compared with an activated carbon (AC). The adsorbents were characterized. Effects of fundamental factors affecting the adsorption were investigated using batch tests. Kinetic and equilibrium studies were performed using conventional models. It was verified that the adsorption was favored at pH of 6.0 for all agro-wastes, being dependent of the Ni speciation, point of zero charge and surface area of the adsorbents. The Ni removal percentage was in the following order: SCB > OP > AC > PFW > PP. From the kinetic viewpoint, the Elovich model was appropriate to fit the Ni adsorption onto SCB, while for the other adsorbents, the pseudo-first-order model was the most suitable. For all adsorbents, the Langmuir model was the more adequate to represent the equilibrium data, being the maximum adsorption capacities of 64.1 mg g(-1), 60.7 mg g(-1), 63.1 mg g(-1), 48.1 mg g(-1) and 64.3 mg g(-1) for SCB, PFW, OP, PP and AC, respectively. These results indicated that mainly SCB and OP can be used as alternative adsorbents to treat Ni containing effluents. PMID:27232408

  12. Preparation of a new adsorbent from activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) for manufacturing organic-vacbpour respirator cartridge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC) for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores. Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett and Teller’s (BET) technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested for benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granular form. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nm were formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight. PMID:23369424

  13. Performance of magnetic activated carbon composite as peroxymonosulfate activator and regenerable adsorbent via sulfate radical-mediated oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Wen-Da; Lua, Shun-Kuang; Dong, Zhili; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic activated carbon composite (CuFe2O4/AC, MACC) was prepared by a co-precipitation-calcination method. The MACC consisted of porous micro-particle morphology with homogeneously distributed CuFe2O4 and possessed high magnetic saturation moment (8.1 emu g(-1)). The performance of MACC was evaluated as catalyst and regenerable adsorbent via peroxymonosulfate (PMS, Oxone(®)) activation for methylene blue (MB) removal. Optimum CuFe2O4/AC w/w ratio was 1:1.5 giving excellent performance and can be reused for at least 3 cycles. The presence of common inorganic ions, namely Cl(-) and NO3(-) did not exert significant influence on MB degradation but humic acid decreased the MB degradation rate. As a regenerable adsorbent, negligible difference in regeneration efficiency was observed when a higher Oxone(®) dosage was employed but a better efficiency was obtained at a lower MACC loading. The factors hindering complete MACC regeneration are MB adsorption irreversibility and AC surface modification by PMS making it less favorable for subsequent MB adsorption. With an additional mild heat treatment (150 °C) after regeneration, 82% of the active sites were successfully regenerated. A kinetic model incorporating simultaneous first-order desorption, second-order adsorption and pseudo-first order degradation processes was numerically-solved to describe the rate of regeneration. The regeneration rate increased linearly with increasing Oxone(®):MACC ratio. The MACC could potentially serve as a catalyst for PMS activation and regenerable adsorbent. PMID:25463211

  14. Activated carbon prepared from yerba mate used as a novel adsorbent for removal of tannery dye from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Bruno; Weber, Caroline Trevisan; Foletto, Edson Luiz; Paz, Diego Silva; Mazutti, Marcio A; Collazzo, Gabriela Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbon prepared from yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) was used as adsorbent for the removal of tannery dye from aqueous solution. The activated carbon was characterized, and it showed a mesoporous texture, with surface area of 537.4 m2 g(-1). The initial dye concentration, contact time and pH influenced the adsorption capacity. The equilibrium data were in good agreement with both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption kinetics of the tannery dye on activated carbon prepared from yerba mate followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption process was found to be controlled by both external mass-transfer and intraparticle diffusion, but the external diffusion was the dominating process. This work highlights the potential application of activated carbon produced from yerba mate in the field of adsorption. PMID:24350496

  15. 2, 4 dichlorophenol (2, 4-DCP) sorption from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and polymeric adsorbents and studies on effect of temperature on activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ghatbandhe, A S; Yenkie, M K N

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), one of the most commonly used chlorophenol, onto bituminous coal based Filtrasorb-400 grade granular activated carbon, were studied in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to temperature. Uptake capacity of activated carbon found to increase with temperature. Langmuir isotherm models were applied to experimental equilibrium data of 2, 4-DCP adsorption and competitive studies with respect to XAD resin were carried out. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir equilibrium model. Adsorbent monolayer capacity 'Q0, Langmuir constant 'b' and adsorption rate constant 'k(a)' were evaluated at different temperatures for activated carbon adsorption. This data was then used to calculate the energy of activation of adsorption and also the thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy of adsorption, deltaG0, enthalpy of adsorption, deltaH0 and the entropy of adsorption deltaS0. The obtained results showed that the monolayer capacity increases with the increase in temperatures. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters showed that adsorption of 2,4 DCP is an endothermic process. Synthetic resin was not found efficient to adsorb 2,4 DCP compared to activated carbon. The order of adsorption efficiencies of three resins used in the study found as XAD7HP > XAD4 > XAD1180. PMID:19295102

  16. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. PMID:20851447

  17. [Intraoperative chemotherapy with intraperitoneal activated carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C against peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, A; Takahashi, T; Sasabe, T; Itoh, M; Kondoh, S; Seiki, K; Yoneyama, C; Shimotsuma, M; Hagiwara, A; Yamaguchi, T

    1989-08-01

    A new form of dosage (MMC-CH) was composed of activated carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C. Intraperitoneal administration of MMC-CH was tested clinically for prophylactic and therapeutic effects on peritoneal carcinomatosis of gastric cancer. The criteria of MMC-CH's administration were equal or less than 70 years old, more than 40 kg in body weight, no disfunction of liver and kidney, no particular findings in electrocardiography, S2 or S3 in the grade of serosal invasion, P0, P1, P2 or P3 in the grade of peritoneal dissemination, according to the General Rules for the Gastric Cancer Study in Surgery and Pathology by the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer. MMC-CH was given to 44 patients undergoing gastrectomy for gastric cancer in our department from 1985 to 1988. The 44 patients were composed of 12 patients with P0 findings (P0 patients), 8 patients with P1 findings (P1 patients), 12 patients with P2 findings (P2 patients), and 12 patients with P3 findings (P3 patients). MMC-CH at 50 mg/person in terms of mitomycin C was administered intraperitoneally before the operation wound was closed. Fifty-seven patients in our department from 1983 to 1987 for whom the same criteria were applicable and did not receive MMC-CH therapy, served as the control group. The 57 patients were composed of 23 P0 patients, 21 P1 patients, 10 P2 patients, and 3 P3 patients. There was statistically with chi 2 test no significant difference of age, sex, depth of infiltration macroscopically and microscopically defined progression of lymph-nodal metastases between the MMC-CH group and the control group. Survival rate was calculated with Kaplan-Meier's method in the overall patients in each of the MMC-CH group or the control group. The overall survival rate in the MMC-CH group was statistically significantly (p less than 0.01-0.05) higher from day 460 to day 552 and from day 736 to day 800 than that in the control group. Next, the patients were classified into two subgroups

  18. A method for the calculation of the adsorbed phase volume and pseudo-saturation pressure from adsorption isotherm data on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Kandadai; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Ng, Kim Choon; Dutta, Pradip; Prasad, Madhu

    2011-07-21

    We propose a new method for evaluating the adsorbed phase volume during physisorption of several gases on activated carbon specimens. We treat the adsorbed phase as another equilibrium phase which satisfies the Gibbs equation and hence assume that the law of rectilinear diameters is applicable. Since invariably the bulk gas phase densities are known along measured isotherms, the constants of the adsorbed phase volume can be regressed from the experimental data. We take the Dubinin-Astakhov isotherm as the model for verifying our hypothesis since it is one of the few equations that accounts for adsorbed phase volume changes. In addition, the pseudo-saturation pressure in the supercritical region is calculated by letting the index of the temperature term in Dubinin's equation to be temperature dependent. Based on over 50 combinations of activated carbons and adsorbates (nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, hydrocarbons and halocarbon refrigerants) it is observed that the proposed changes fit experimental data quite well. PMID:21670804

  19. Relation Between the Adsorbed Quantity and the Immersion Enthalpy in Catechol Aqueous Solutions on Activated Carbons

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Diego; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An activated carbon, CarbochemTM—PS230, was modified by chemical and thermal treatment in flow of H2, in order to evaluate the influence of the activated carbon chemical characteristics in the adsorption of the catechol. The catechol adsorption in aqueous solution was studied along with the effect of the pH solution in the adsorption process of modified activated carbons and the variation of immersion enthalpy of activated carbons in the aqueous solutions of catechol. The interaction solid-solution is characterized by adsorption isotherms analysis, at 298 K and pH 7, 9 and 11 in order to evaluate the adsorption value above and below that of the catechol pKa. The adsorption capacity of carbons increases when the solution pH decreases. The retained amount increases slightly in the reduced carbon to maximum adsorption pH and diminishes in the oxidized carbon. Similar conclusions are obtained from the immersion enthalpies, whose values increase with the solute quantity retained. In granular activated carbon (CAG), the immersion enthalpies obtained are between 21.5 and 45.7 J·g−1 for catechol aqueous solutions in a range of 20 at 1500 mg·L−1. PMID:22312237

  20. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbons made from Illinois coals and scrap tires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.; Lehmann, C.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Activated carbons for natural gas storage were produced from Illinois bituminous coals (IBC-102 and IBC-106) and scrap tires by physical activation with steam or CO2 and by chemical activation with KOH, H3PO4, or ZnCl2. The products were characterized for N2-BET area, micropore volume, bulk density, pore size distribution, and volumetric methane storage capacity (Vm/Vs). Vm/Vs values for Illinois coal-derived carbons ranged from 54 to 83 cm3/cm3, which are 35-55% of a target value of 150 cm3/cm3. Both granular and pelletized carbons made with preoxidized Illinois coal gave higher micropore volumes and larger Vm/Vs values than those made without preoxidation. This confirmed that preoxidation is a desirable step in the production of carbons from caking materials. Pelletization of preoxidized IBC-106 coal, followed by steam activation, resulted in the highest Vm/Vs value. With roughly the same micropore volume, pelletization alone increased Vm/Vs of coal carbon by 10%. Tire-derived carbons had Vm/Vs values ranging from 44 to 53 cm3/cm3, lower than those of coal carbons due to their lower bulk densities. Pelletization of the tire carbons increased bulk density up to 160%. However, this increase was offset by a decrease in micropore volume of the pelletized materials, presumably due to the pellet binder. As a result, Vm/Vs values were about the same for granular and pelletized tire carbons. Compared with coal carbons, tire carbons had a higher percentage of mesopores and macropores.

  1. A model to predict the adsorber thermal behavior during treatment of volatile organic compounds onto wet activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Pré, P; Delage, F; Le Cloirec, P

    2002-11-01

    A model for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onto a wet activated carbon bed was proposed in this study. This model accounts for temperature changes induced by the reversed and coupled mass-transfer processes of both organic species adsorption and water desorption. Indeed, it was experimentally pointed out that temperature rises, which result from the exothermal nature of the energetic interactions between the organic molecule and the activated carbon surface, are notably reduced when the adsorbent contains an initial moisture of approximately 10% in weight. Moreover, it was shown that water rate desorption was enhanced in the presence of organic vapor. This phenomenon may be explained by the displacement of sorbed water bythe organic molecules, owing to more intensive interactions with the activated carbon surface. The model proposed was elaborated from a previous comprehensive analysis of the diffusion mechanisms governing VOC adsorption at high concentrations onto a dry activated carbon bed. In a similar way, a theoretical approach was developed to model water desorption during drying of a wet activated carbon bed under pure flowing air. At last, a theoretical depiction of both competitive and reverse processes was outlined. The final model fits reasonably with experimental data relative to both breakthrough curves and thermal wave shape along the bed, even if local temperature change calculation may require some further improvement. PMID:12433182

  2. Advanced fire-resistant forms of activated carbon and methods of adsorbing and separating gases using same

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-02-03

    Advanced, fire-resistant activated carbon compositions useful in adsorbing gases; and having vastly improved fire resistance are provided, and methods for synthesizing the compositions are also provided. The advanced compositions have high gas adsorption capacities and rapid adsorption kinetics (comparable to commercially-available activated carbon), without having any intrinsic fire hazard. They also have superior performance to Mordenites in both adsorption capacities and kinetics. In addition, the advanced compositions do not pose the fibrous inhalation hazard that exists with use of Mordenites. The fire-resistant compositions combine activated carbon mixed with one or more hydrated and/or carbonate-containing minerals that release H.sub.2O and/or CO.sub.2 when heated. This effect raises the spontaneous ignition temperature to over 500.degree. C. in most examples, and over 800.degree. C. in some examples. Also provided are methods for removing and/or separating target gases, such as Krypton or Argon, from a gas stream by using such advanced activated carbons.

  3. [Intraoperative chemotherapy against peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer with intraperitoneal activated carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, A; Takahashi, T; Sawai, K; Yamaguchi, T; Iwamoto, A; Yoneyama, C

    1989-02-01

    For prevention and therapy of peritoneal dissemination, a new dosage from (MMC-CH) comprising carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C was given to 44 patients (the MMC-CH group) undergoing gastrectomy for gastric cancer, of which advancing stage was classified into the category of H0, and S2 or S3, and P0, P1, P2 or P3 according to the General Rules for the Gastric Cancer Study. MMC-CH, principally at 50 mg person in terms of mitomycin C was administered intraperitoneally before the surgical wound was closed. Historical control group was composed of 53 patients not given MMC-CH, who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer in the same advancing stage as those of the 44 patients. There was statistically no significant difference of age, sex, depth of infiltration, macroscopically and microscopically defined progression of lymph-nodal metastases, between the MMC-CH group and the historical control group. The survival rate of the overall patients, and each group of the patients with the lesion defined as P0, P1, P2, or P3 was compared with Kaplan-Meier's method between the MMC-CH group and the historical control group. In the MMC-CH group, the survival rates of the overall patients and the patients with P0, P1, or P2 lesion were statistically significantly higher than those in the historical control group. However, the rate of the P3 patients in the MMC-CH group was statistically significantly lower than in the historical control group. PMID:2493221

  4. Biomass-based palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve as gas separation adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Sumathi; Bashir, Mohammed Jk; Akbar, Zinatizadeh Ali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely recognised as a potential low-cost source for the production of high added value materials and proved to be a good precursor for the production of activated carbons. One of such valuable biomasses used for the production of activated carbons is palm shell. Palm shell (endocarp) is an abundant by-product produced from the palm oil industries throughout tropical countries. Palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve has been widely applied in various environmental pollution control technologies, mainly owing to its high adsorption performance, well-developed porosity and low cost, leading to potential applications in gas-phase separation using adsorption processes. This mini-review represents a comprehensive overview of the palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve preparation method, physicochemical properties and feasibility of palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve in gas separation processes. Some of the limitations are outlined and suggestions for future improvements are pointed out. PMID:25804669

  5. Sorption and modeling of mass transfer of toxic chemical vapors in activated-carbon fiber-cloth adsorbers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Sagen, J.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorber coupled with an electrothermal regenerator and a cryogenic condenser was designed and developed to efficiently capture and recover toxic chemical vapors (TCVs) from simulated industrial gas streams. The system was characterized for adsorption by ACFC, electrothermal desorption, and cryogenic condensation to separate acetone and methyl ethyl ketone from gas streams. Adsorption dynamics are numerically modeled to predict system characteristics during scale-up and optimization of the process in the future. The model requires diffusivities of TCVs into an activated-carbon fiber (ACF) as an input. Effective diffusivities of TCVs into ACFs were modeled as a function of temperature, concentration, and pore size distribution. Effective diffusivities for acetone at 65 ??C and 30-60 ppmv were measured using a chromatography method. The energy factor for surface diffusion was determined from comparison between the experimental and modeled effective diffusivities. The modeled effective diffusivities were used in a dispersive computational model to predict mass transfer zones of TCVs in fixed beds of ACFC under realistic conditions for industrial applications.

  6. Effect of the adsorbate kinetic diameter on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for modeling adsorption of organic vapors on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Niknaddaf, Saeid; Hashisho, Zaher

    2012-11-30

    This paper investigates the effect of the kinetic diameter (KD) of the reference adsorbate on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation for predicting the adsorption isotherms of organic vapors on microporous activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms for 13 organic compounds on microporous beaded activated carbon were experimentally measured, and predicted using the D-R model and affinity coefficients. The affinity coefficients calculated based on molar volumes, molecular polarizabilities, and molecular parachors were used to predict the isotherms based on four reference compounds (4.3≤KD≤6.8 Å). The results show that the affinity coefficients are independent of the calculation method if the reference and test adsorbates are from the same organic group. Choosing a reference adsorbate with a KD similar to that of the test adsorbate results in better prediction of the adsorption isotherm. The relative error between the predicted and the measured adsorption isotherms increases as the absolute difference in the kinetic diameters of the reference and test adsorbates increases. Finally, the proposed hypothesis was used to explain reports of inconsistent findings among published articles. The results from this study are important because they allow a more accurate prediction of adsorption capacities of adsorbents which allow for better design of adsorption systems. PMID:23044198

  7. Comparison of nutshell granular activated carbons to commercial adsorbents for the purge-and-trap gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wartelle, L H; Marshall, W E; Toles, C A; Johns, M M

    2000-05-26

    Granular activated carbons (GACs) made from agricultural by-products were investigated as adsorbents for short path thermal desorption gas chromatographic analysis of selected polar and nonpolar organic compounds. GACs made from macadamia nut, black walnut and hazelnut shells were compared to four commercially available adsorbents, namely, Tenax TA, Carboxen 569, Carbosieve SIII and coconut charcoal for their properties in purge-and-trap analysis. Adsorption values and breakthrough volumes were calculated for compounds from C3 and C6-C10. GACs derived from macadamia nut shells were found to adsorb and desorb between 80% (benzene) and 277% (ethylbenzene) more acetone (C3), benzene (C6), toluene (C7), ethyl- (C8), n-propyl- (C9), or sec.-butylbenzenes (C10) purged from water at the 100 ppb level than the commercial adsorbents tested. PMID:10893033

  8. Solid-phase microextraction of phthalate esters in water sample using different activated carbon-polymer monoliths as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Lirio, Stephen; Fu, Chung-Wei; Lin, Jhih-Yun; Hsu, Meng-Ju; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-07-13

    In this study, the application of different activated carbon-polymer (AC-polymer) monoliths as adsorbents for the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of phthalate esters (PAEs) in water sample were investigated. The activated carbon (AC) was embedded in organic polymers, poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (poly(BMA-EDMA)) or poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (poly(STY-DVB)), via a 5-min microwave-assisted or a 15-min water bath heating polymerization. Preliminary investigation on the performance of the native poly(BMA-EDMA) and poly(STY-DVB) demonstrated remarkable adsorption efficiencies for PAEs. However, due to the strong hydrophobic, π-π, and hydrogen bonding interactions between the analytes and polymers, low extraction recoveries were achieved. In contrast, the presence of AC in native polymers not only enhanced the adsorption efficiencies but also assisted the PAE desorption, especially for AC-poly(STY-DVB) with extraction recovery ranged of 76.2-99.3%. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction recoveries for intra-, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 76.5-100.8% (<3.7% RSDs), 77.2-97.6% (<5.6% RSDs) and 75.5-99.7% (<6.2% RSDs), respectively. The developed AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column showed good mechanical stability, which can be reused for more than 30 extraction times without any significant loss in the extraction recoveries of PAEs. The AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column was successfully applied in SPME of PAEs in water sample with extraction recovery ranged of 78.8%-104.6% (<5.5% RSDs). PMID:27237837

  9. EFFECTS OF COVAPORS ON ADSORPTION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF ORGANIC VAPORS ADSORBED ONTO ACTIVATED CARBON FROM FLOWING AIR

    SciTech Connect

    G. WOOD

    2000-12-01

    Published breakthrough time, adsorption rate, and capacity data for components of organic vapor mixtures adsorbed from flows through fixed activated carbon beds have been analyzed. Capacities (as stoichiometric centers of constant pattern breakthrough curves) yielded stoichiometric times {tau}, which are useful for determining elution orders of mixture components. We also calculated adsorption rate coefficients k{sub v} of the Wheeler (or, more general Reaction Kinetic) breakthrough curve equation, when not reported, from breakthrough times and {tau}. Ninety-five k{sub v} (in mixture)/ k{sub v} (single vapor) ratios at similar vapor concentrations were calculated and averaged for elution order categories. For 43 first-eluting vapors the average ratio (1.07) was statistically no different (0.21 standard deviation) than unity, so that we recommend using the single-vapor k{sub v} for such. Forty-seven second-eluting vapor ratios averaged 0.85 (0.24 standard deviation), also not significantly different from unity; however, other evidence and considerations lead us recommend using k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.85 k{sub v} (single vapor). Five third- and fourth-eluting vapors gave an average of 0.56 (0.16 standard deviation) for a recommended k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.56 k{sub v} (single vapor) for such.

  10. Electron shuttle-mediated biotransformation of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine adsorbed to granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Millerick, Kayleigh; Drew, Scott R; Finneran, Kevin T

    2013-08-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) effectively removes hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) from groundwater but generates RDX-laden GAC that must be disposed of or regenerated. Batch reactors containing GAC to which RDX was preadsorbed were used in experiments to test the potential for adsorbed RDX reduction and daughter product formation using (i) chemically reduced anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2QDS), (ii) resting Geobacter metallireducens strain GS-15, and (iii) a combined system containing AQDS and GS-15. Approximately 97.0% of the adsorbed RDX was transformed in each of these experimental systems by 90 h. Chemically reduced AQDS (AH2QDS) transformed 99.2% of adsorbed RDX; formaldehyde was produced rapidly and was stoichiometric (3 mol HCHO per mol RDX). Geobacter metallireducens also reduced RDX with and without AQDS present. This is the first study to demonstrate biological transformation of RDX adsorbed to GAC. Formaldehyde increased and then decreased in biological systems, suggesting a previously unreported capacity for G. metallireducens to oxidize formaldehyde, which was confirmed with resting cell suspensions. These data suggest the masses of GAC waste currently produced by activated carbon at RDX remediation sites can be minimized, decreasing the carbon footprint of the treatment technology. Alternatively, this strategy may be used to develop a Bio-GAC system for ex situ RDX treatment. PMID:23837558

  11. Adsorbability of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoromethane (HFC134a) onto plasma-treated activated carbon in CF{sub 4} and CCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, Seiki; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Ohue, Takashi; Abe, Ikuo

    1997-07-15

    The adsorbability of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC134a), which has been the CFC12 replacement, onto tetrafluoromethane and tetrachloromethane plasma-treated activated carbon (FT-ACs and CT-ACs) was investigated. It is proved that the fluorine and the chlorine, which were produced by plasma treatment, were included into the pores having radii greater than 7.5 {angstrom} and with less than 7.5 {angstrom} by plasma treatment, respectively. The adsorption site of HFC134a onto activated carbon may change with the quantities of fluorine or chlorine on the surface of the activated carbon. The amount of HFC134a adsorbed per unit specific surface area of FT-ACs and CT-ACs slightly increased a little compared to the untreated activated carbon (U-AC). The amount of fluoride ion eluted before the adsorption of HFC134a from the FT-ACs increased with the increasing plasma treatment time. That after the adsorption of HFC134a from only the activated carbon with the shortest plasma treatment time decreased. The amount of chloride ion eluted before the adsorption of HFC134a from the CT-ACs increased after 15 min of plasma treatment, but decreased with 30 min of plasma treatment. The chloride ion amount from the CT-ACs decreased after the adsorption of HCF134a. These results could be explained by the Langmuir constants a and Ws, which represent the adsorption equilibrium constant and the saturated amount of HFC134a adsorbed, respectively. The ratio of fluorine and chlorine species, the adsorption type, the layer interstitial type, and the covalent type, is different based on the plasma treatment time. It is concluded that the amount of HFC134a adsorbed onto the FT-ACs and CT-ACs did not depend upon the change of pore structure by the fluorine and chlorine.

  12. Facile preparation of magnetic separable powdered-activated-carbon/Ni adsorbent and its application in removal of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuanqi; Gondal, Mohammed A; Chang, Xiaofeng; Yamani, Zain H; Li, Nianwu; Lu, Hongling; Ji, Guangbin

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to synthesize magnetic separable Nickel/powdered activated carbon (Ni/PAC) and its application as an adsorbent for removal of PFOS from aqueous solution. In this work, the synthesized adsorbent using simple method was characterized by using X-ray diffractionometer (XRD), surface area and pore size analyzer, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The surface area, pore volume and pore size of synthesized PAC was 1521.8 m(2)g(-1), 0.96 cm(3)g(-1), 2.54 nm, respectively. Different kinetic models: the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, and three adsorption isotherms--Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin--were applied to study the sorption kinetics and isothermal behavior of PFOS onto the surface of an as-prepared adsorbent. The rate constant using the pseudo-second-order model for removal of 150 ppm PFOS was estimated as 8.82×10(-5) and 1.64×10(-4) for PAC and 40% Ni/PAC, respectively. Our results demonstrated that the composite adsorbents exhibited a clear magnetic hysteretic behavior, indicating the potential practical application in magnetic separation of adsorbents from aqueous solution phase as well. PMID:21961696

  13. Study of the adsorption of Cd and Zn onto an activated carbon: Influence of pH, cation concentration, and adsorbent concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, A.; Marzal, P.; Gabaldon, C.; Ferrer, J.

    1999-06-01

    The single adsorption of Cd and Zn from aqueous solutions has been investigated on Scharlau Ca 346 granular activated carbon in a wide range of experimental conditions: pH, metal concentration, and carbon concentration. The results showed the efficiency of the activated carbon as sorbent for both metals. Metal removals increase on raising the pH and carbon concentration, and decrease on raising the initial metal concentration. The adsorption processes have been modeled using the surface complex formation (SCF) Triple Layer Model (TLM). The adsorbent TLM parameters were determined. Modeling has been performed assuming a single surface bidentate species or an overall surface species with fractional stoichiometry. The bidentate stoichiometry successfully predicted cadmium and zinc removals in all the experimental conditions. The Freundlich isotherm has been also checked.

  14. Advanced fire-resistant forms of activated carbon and methods of adsorbing and separating gases using same

    DOEpatents

    Xiong, Yongliang; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-04-19

    A method of removing a target gas from a gas stream is disclosed. The method uses advanced, fire-resistant activated carbon compositions having vastly improved fire resistance. Methods for synthesizing the compositions are also provided. The advanced compositions have high gas adsorption capacities and rapid adsorption kinetics (comparable to commercially-available activated carbon), without having any intrinsic fire hazard.

  15. Synthesis of nickel sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as a novel adsorbent for the competitive removal of Methylene blue and Safranin-O.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Pakniat, M; Mahmoudi, Z; Hajati, S; Sahraei, R; Daneshfar, A

    2014-04-01

    Nickel sulfide nanoparticle-loaded activated carbon (NiS-NP-AC) were synthesized as a novel adsorbent for simultaneous and rapid adsorption of Methylene blue (MB) and Safranin-O (SO), as most together compounds in wastewater. NiS-NP-AC was characterized using different techniques such as UV-visible, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The surface area of the adsorbent was found to be very high (1018m(2)/g according BET). By using central composite design (CCD), the effects of variables such as pH, adsorbent dosage, MB concentration, SO concentration and contact time on binary dyes removal were examined and optimized values were found to be 8.1, 0.022g, 17.8mg/L, and 5mg/L and 5.46min, respectively. The very short time required for the dyes removal makes this novel adsorbent as a promising tool for wastewater treatment applications. Different models were applied to analyze experimental isotherm data. Modified-extended Langmuir model showed good fit to equilibrium data with maximum adsorption capacity at 0.022g of adsorbent. An empirical extension of competitive modified-extended Langmuir model was proposed to predict the simultaneous adsorption behavior of MB and SO. Kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data at various adsorbent dosages and initial dyes concentrations. It was seen that pseudo-second-order equation is suitable to fit the experimental data. Individual removalof each dye was also studied. PMID:24412794

  16. Mesoporous carbon nanomaterials as environmental adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pranav K; Gan, Lihua; Liu, Mingxian; Rao, Nageswara N

    2014-02-01

    The transportation and diffusion of the guest objects or molecules in the porous carbon nanomaterials can be facilitated by reducing the pathway and resistance. The reduced pathway depends on the porous nature of carbon nanomaterials. Classification of porous carbon materials by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has given a new opportunity to design the pores as per their applicability and to understand the mobility of ions, atoms, and molecules in the porous network of carbon materials and also advanced their countless applicability. However, synthesis of carbon nanomaterials with a desired porous network is still a great challenge. Although, remarkable developments have taken place in the recent years, control over the pores size and/or hierarchical porous architectures, especially in the synthesis of carbon nanospheres (CNSs) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMCs) is still intriguing. The micro and mesoporous CNSs and OMCs have been prepared by a variety of procedures and over a wide range of compositions using various different surfactant templates and carbon precursors etc. The mechanisms of formation of micromesopore in the CNSs and OMCs are still evolving. On the other hand, the urge for adsorbents with very high adsorption capacities for removing contaminants from water is growing steadily. In this review, we address the state-of-the-art synthesis of micro and mesoporous CNSs and OMCs, giving examples of their applications for adsorptive removals of contaminants including our own research studies. PMID:24749459

  17. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  18. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 1. Equilibrium parameters.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2009-10-30

    This study was carried out to investigate the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of a pesticide of the uracil group on powdered activated carbon (PAC). The experiments were conducted at a wide range of initial pesticide concentrations (approximately 5 microg L(-1) to approximately 500 microg L(-1) at pH 7.8), corresponding to equilibrium concentrations of less than 0.1 microg L(-1) for the weakest, which is compatible with the tolerance limits of drinking water. Such a very broad range of initial solute concentrations resulting powdered activated carbon (PAC) concentrations (0.1-5 mg L(-1)) is the main particularity of our study. The application of several monosolute equilibrium models (two, three or more parameters) has generally shown that Bromacil adsorption is probably effective on two types of sites. High reactivity sites (K(L) approximately 10(3) Lmg(-1)) which are 10-20 less present in a carbon surface than lower reactivity sites (K(L) approximately 10 Lmg(-1)), according to the q(m) values calculated by two- or three-parameter models. The maximum capacity of the studied powdered activated carbon (PAC), corresponding to monolayer adsorption, compared to the Bromacil molecule surface, would be between 170 mg g(-1) and 190 mg g(-1). This theoretical value is very close to the experimental q(m) values obtained when using linearized forms of Langmuir, Tóth and Fritz-Schluender models. PMID:19539425

  19. Iron Impregnated Activated Carbon as an Efficient Adsorbent for the Removal of Methylene Blue: Regeneration and Kinetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Irfan; Adnan, Rohana; Wan Ngah, Wan Saime; Mohamed, Norita

    2015-01-01

    In this study, iron impregnated activated carbon (FeAC) was synthesized following an oxidation and iron impregnation of activated carbon (AC). Both the AC and FeAC were characterized by pHZPC and FTIR spectroscopy. The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) by AC and FeAC was examined under various experimental conditions. The FeAC showed up to 95% (higher than AC) MB removal in the pH range of 7–10. Although the reaction kinetics was pseudo–second order, the overall rate was controlled by a number of processes such as film diffusion, pore diffusion and intraparticle diffusion. The activation energy values for the MB uptake by AC and FeAC (21.79 and 14.82 kJ/mol, respectively) revealed a physisorption process. In the regeneration study, FeAC has shown consistently ≥ 90% MB removal even up to 10 repeated cycles. The reusable characteristic of the spent FeAC improved the practical use of activated carbon and can be a breakthrough for continuous flow system applications where it can work effectively without any significant reduction in its performance. PMID:25849291

  20. [Effect of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas on the adsorption behaviors adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon and kinetic analysis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ji-xian; Wang, Tie-feng; Wang, Jin-fu

    2010-05-01

    The influence of SO2 dynamic adsorption behaviors using ZL50 activated carbon for flue gas desulphurization and denitrification under different SO2 volume fraction was investigated experimentally, and the kinetic analysis was conducted by kinetic models. With the increase of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas, the SO2 removal ratio and the activity ratio of ZL50 activated carbon decreased, respectively, and SO2 adsorption rate and capacity increased correspondingly. The calculated results indicate that Bangham model has the best prediction effect, the chemisorption processes of SO2 was significantly affected by catalytic oxidative reaction. The adsorption rate constant of Lagergren's pseudo first order model increased with the increase of inlet SO, volume fraction, which indicated that catalytic oxidative reaction of SO2 adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon may be the rate controlling step in earlier adsorption stage. The Lagergren's and Bangham's initial adsorption rate were deduced and defined, respectively. The Ho's and Elovich's initial adsorption rate were also deduced in this paper. The Bangham's initial adsorption rate values were defined in good agreement with those of experiments. The defined Bangham's adsorptive reaction kinetic model can describe the SO2 dynamic adsorption rate well. The studied results indicated that the SO2 partial order of initial reaction rate was one or adjacent to one, while the O2 and water vapor partial order of initial reaction rate were constants ranging from 0.15-0.20 and 0.45-0.50, respectively. PMID:20623845

  1. REGENERATION AND REACTIVATION OF CARBON ADSORBENTS BY RADIO FREQUENCY INDUCTION HEATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Electrical Properties of Adsorbents: We measured the electric permittivity of four commercially available carbon adsorbents (supplied by Wesvaco Inc) over the radio frequency range (1 to 40 MHz). Westvaco is by far the largest volume supplier of activated carbon...

  2. Three-component competitive adsorption model for fixed-bed and moving-bed granular activated carbon adsorbers. Part I. Model development.

    PubMed

    Schideman, Lance C; Mariñas, Benito J; Snoeyink, Vernon L; Campos, Carlos

    2006-11-01

    Heterogeneous natural organic matter (NOM) present in all natural waters impedes trace organic contaminant adsorption, and predictive modeling of granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorber performance is often compromised by inadequate accounting forthese competitive effects. Thus, a 3-component adsorption model, COMPSORB-GAC, is developed that separately tracks NOM adsorption and its competitive effects as a function of NOM surface loading. In this model, NOM is simplified into two fictive fractions with distinct competitive effects on trace compound adsorption: a smaller, strongly competing fraction that reduces equilibrium capacity and a larger pore-blocking fraction that reduces adsorption kinetics (both external film mass transfer and surface diffusion). COMPSORB-GAC tracks these two NOM fractions, along with the trace compound, and changes adsorption parameters according to the local surface loading of the two NOM fractions. Model parameters are allowed to vary both temporally and spatially to reflect differences in the NOM preloading conditions that occur in GAC columns. This dual-resistance model is based on homogeneous surface diffusion with external film mass-transfer limitations. The governing equations are expressed in a moving-grid finite-difference formulation to accommodate the modeling of spatially varying parameters and moving-bed reactors with counter-current adsorbent flow. A series of short-term adsorption tests with fresh and preloaded GAC is proposed to determine the necessary model input parameters. The accompanying manuscript demonstrates the parameterization procedure and verifies the model with experimental data. PMID:17144314

  3. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 2: Kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2009-10-30

    The application of several monosolute equilibrium models has previously shown that Bromacil adsorption on SA-UF (Norit) powdered activated carbon (PAC) is probably effective on two types of sites. High reactivity sites were found to be 10-20 less present in a carbon surface than lower reactivity sites, according to the q(m) values calculated by isotherm models. The aims of this work were trying, primarily, to identify the kinetic-determinant stage of the sorption of Bromacil at a wide range of initial pesticide concentrations (approximately 5 to approximately 500 microg L(-1) at pH 7.8), and secondly, to specify the rate constants and other useful design parameters for the application in water treatment. It was therefore not possible to specify a priori whether the diffusion or surface reaction is the key step. It shows that many of the tested models which describe the stage of distribution or the surface reaction are correctly applied. However, the diffusivity values (D and D(0)) were found to be constant only constants for some specific experimental concentrations. The HSDM model of surface diffusion in pores was also applied but the values of the diffusion coefficient of surface (D(s)) were widely scattered and reduce significantly with the initial concentration or the equilibrium concentration in Bromacil. The model of surface reaction of pseudo-second order fitted particularly well and led to constant values which are independent of the equilibrium concentration, except for the low concentrations where the constants become significantly more important. This last observation confirms perfectly the hypothesis based on two types of sites as concluded by the equilibrium data (part 1). PMID:19560269

  4. Effect of cation type, alkyl chain length, adsorbate size on adsorption kinetics and isotherms of bromide ionic liquids from aqueous solutions onto microporous fabric and granulated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Safia; Duclaux, Laurent; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Reinert, Laurence; Farooq, Amjad; Yasin, Tariq

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption from aqueous solution of imidazolium, pyrrolidinium and pyridinium based bromide ionic liquids (ILs) having different alkyl chain lengths was investigated on two types of microporous activated carbons: a fabric and a granulated one, well characterized in terms of surface chemistry by "Boehm" titrations and pH of point of zero charge measurements and of porosity by N2 adsorption at 77 K and CO2 adsorption at 273 K. The influence of cation type, alkyl chain length and adsorbate size on the adsorption properties was analyzed by studying kinetics and isotherms of eight different ILs using conductivity measurements. Equilibrium studies were carried out at different temperatures in the range [25-55 °C]. The incorporation of ILs on the AC porosity was studied by N2 adsorption-desorption measurements at 77 K. The experimental adsorption isotherms data showed a good correlation with the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of ILs onto activated carbons was an exothermic process, and that the removal efficiency increased with increase in alkyl chain length, due to the increase in hydrophobicity of long chain ILs cations determined with the evolution of the calculated octanol-water constant (Kow). The negative values of free energies indicated that adsorption of ILs with long chain lengths having hydrophobic cations was more spontaneous at the investigated temperatures. PMID:24929502

  5. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  6. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  7. Determination of imidazole derivatives by micellar electrokinetic chromatography combined with solid-phase microextraction using activated carbon-polymer monolith as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yung-Han; Lirio, Stephen; Li, Chih-Keng; Liu, Wan-Ling; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an effective method for the separation of imidazole derivatives 2-methylimidazole (2-MEI), 4- methylimidazole (4-MEI) and 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI) in caramel colors using cation-selective exhaustive injection and sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CSEI-sweeping-MEKC) was developed. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for the CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method were in the range of 4.3-80μgL(-1) and 14-270μgL(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, a rapid fabrication activated carbon-polymer (AC-polymer) monolithic column as adsorbent for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of imidazole colors was developed. Under the optimized SPME condition, the extraction recoveries for intra-day, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 84.5-95.1% (<6.3% RSDs), 85.6-96.1% (<4.9% RSDs), and 81.3-96.1% (<7.1% RSDs), respectively. The LODs and LOQs of AC-polymer monolithic column combined with CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method were in the range of 33.4-60.4μgL(-1) and 111.7-201.2μgL(-1), respectively. The use of AC-polymer as SPME adsorbent demonstrated the reduction of matrix effect in food samples such as soft drink and alcoholic beverage thereby benefiting successful determination of trace-level caramel colors residues using CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method. The developed AC-polymer monolithic column can be reused for more than 30 times without any significant loss in the extraction recovery for imidazole derivatives. PMID:26363948

  8. Adsorption and Desorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Mixtures on Synthetic Hydrophobic Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Several synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents produced through pyrolysis of polymeric materials are available commercially. Some appear to have advantages over activated carbon for certain adsorption applications. In particular, they can have tailored hydrophobicities that are significantly greater than that of activated carbon, while moderately high surfaces areas are retained. These sorbents are being investigated for possible use in removing trace contaminants and excess carbon dioxide from air in closed habitats, plant growth chambers, and other applications involving purification of humid gas streams. We have analyzed the characteristics of a few of these adsorbents through adsorption and desorption experiments and standard characterization techniques. This paper presents pure and multicomponent adsorption data collected for carbon dioxide and water on two synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents having different hydrophobicities and capillary condensation characteristics. The observations are interpreted through consideration of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the solids and interactions between adsorbed carbon dioxide, water, and the solvent gas.

  9. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 3: Competition with natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2010-10-15

    This study (part 3) was carried out to investigate the effect of the natural organic matter (NOM) concentration on Bromacil (pesticide) adsorption on powdered activated carbon (PAC) in the same experimental conditions as in our previous studies (parts 1 and 2). Our previous findings showed that Bromacil adsorption in buffered pure water (pH 7.8) occurred at two types of site. In the presence of NOM (three kinds), we noted a significant reduction in Bromacil adsorption capacities due to the competitive effects exerted by NOM. Highly reactive sites (or pores) in PAC appeared to be blocked by NOM adsorption, as demonstrated by the application of a pseudo-single solute isotherm and of the simplified ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST), regardless of the initial Bromacil and NOM concentrations. The competing effect of low-molecular weight NOM was found to be greater than the competing effect of high-molecular weight NOM. The pseudo-second order surface-reaction model fitted Bromacil adsorption particularly well, even in the presence of NOM. However, the adsorption-kinetic constant values were found to be independent of the aqueous equilibrium concentration of the target compound, contrary to that observed in pure water. The kinetic data thus confirmed that high reactivity PAC sites were blocked by NOM adsorption. A practical approach concluded this work. PMID:20619963

  10. Cork-based activated carbons as supported adsorbent materials for trace level analysis of ibuprofen and clofibric acid in environmental and biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Neng, N R; Mestre, A S; Carvalho, A P; Nogueira, J M F

    2011-09-16

    In this contribution, powdered activated carbons (ACs) from cork waste were supported for bar adsorptive micro-extraction (BAμE), as novel adsorbent phases for the analysis of polar compounds. By combining this approach with liquid desorption followed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (BAμE(AC)-LD/HPLC-DAD), good analytical performance was achieved using clofibric acid (CLOF) and ibuprofen (IBU) model compounds in environmental and biological matrices. Assays performed on 30 mL water samples spiked at the 25.0 μg L(-1) level yielded recoveries around 80% for CLOF and 95% for IBU, under optimized experimental conditions. The ACs textural and surface chemistry properties were correlated with the results obtained. The analytical performance showed good precision (<15%), suitable detection limits (0.24 and 0.78 μg L(-1) for CLOF and IBU, respectively) and good linear dynamic ranges (r(2)>0.9922) from 1.0 to 600.0 μg L(-1). By using the standard addition methodology, the application of the present approach to environmental water and urine matrices allowed remarkable performance at the trace level. The proposed methodology proved to be a viable alternative for acidic pharmaceuticals analysis, showing to be easy to implement, reliable, sensitive and requiring low sample volume to monitor these priority compounds in environmental and biological matrices. PMID:21820664

  11. Properties and potential environmental applications of carbon adsorbents from waste tire rubber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehmann, C.M.B.; Rameriz, D.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2000-01-01

    The properties of tire-derived carbon adsorbents (TDCA) produced from select tire chars were compared with those derived from an Illinois coal and pistachio nut shells. Chemical analyses of the TDCA indicated that these materials contain metallic elements not present in coal-and nut shell-derived carbons. These metals, introduced during the production of tire rubber, potentially catalyze steam gasification reactions of tire char. TDCA carbons contained larger meso-and macopore volumes than their counterparts derived from coal and nut shell (on the moisture-and ash-free-basis). Adsorptive properties of the tire-derived adsorbent carbons for air separation, gas storage, and gas clean up were also evaluated and compared with those of the coal-and nut shell derived carbons as well as a commercial activated carbon. The results revealed that TDCA carbons are suitable adsorbents for removing vapor-phase mercury from combustion flue gases and hazardous organic compounds from industrial gas streams.

  12. Development of novel activated carbon-based adsorbents for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Radisav D. Vidic

    1999-03-01

    In addition to naturally occurring mercury sources, anthropogenic activities increase the mercury loading to the environment. Although not all produced mercury is dissipated directly into the environment, only minor portions of the total production are stocked or recycled, and the rest of the mercury and its compounds is finally released in some way into atmosphere, surface waters and soil, or ends in landfills dumps, and refuse. Since mercury and its compounds are highly toxic, their presence in the environment constitutes potential impact on all living organisms, including man. The first serious consequence of industrial mercury discharges causing neurological disorder even death occurred in Minimata, Japan in 1953. Systematic studies showed that mercury poisoning is mainly found in fish-eating populations. However, various levels of mercury are also found in food other than fish. During the past several decades, research has been conducted on the evaluation of risks due to exposure to mercury and the development of control technologies for mercury emissions. In 1990, the Clean Air Act Amendments listed mercury, along with 10 other metallic species, as a hazardous air pollutant (HAP). This has further stimulated research for mercury control during the past several years. The impact of mercury on humans, sources of mercury in the environment, current mercury control strategies and the objective of this research are discussed in this section.

  13. Heavy metals and adsorbents effects on activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ong, S A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E

    2004-01-01

    The sorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from synthetic solution by powdered activated carbon (PAC), biomass, rice husk (RH) and activated rice husk (ARH) were investigate under batch conditions. After activated by concentrated nitric acid for 15 hours at 60-65 degrees C, the adsorption capacity for RH was increased. The adsorbents arranged in the increasing order of adsorption capacities to the Langmuir Q degree parameter were biomass > PAC > ARH > RH. The addition of adsorbents in base mix solution had increased the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) activated sludge microorganisms with and without the presence of metals. The increased of SOUR were due to the ability of PAC and RH in reducing the inhibitory effect of metals on microorganisms and provide a reaction site between activated sludge microorganisms and substrates. PMID:15141467

  14. Determination of adsorbable organic fluorine from aqueous environmental samples by adsorption to polystyrene-divinylbenzene based activated carbon and combustion ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andrea; Raue, Brigitte; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen; Worch, Eckhard; Lange, Frank T

    2013-06-21

    A new method for the determination of trace levels of adsorbable organic fluorine (AOF) in water is presented. Even if the individual contributing target compounds are widely unknown, this surrogate parameter is suited to identify typical organofluorine contaminations, such as with polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), and represents a lower boundary of the organofluorine concentration in water bodies. It consists of the adsorption of organofluorine chemicals on a commercially available synthetic polystyrene-divinylbenzene based activated carbon (AC) followed by analysis of the loaded AC by hydropyrolysis combustion ion chromatography (CIC). Inorganic fluorine is displaced by excess nitrate during the extraction step and by washing the loaded activated carbon with an acidic sodium nitrate solution. Due to its high purity the synthetic AC had a very low and reproducible fluorine blank (0.3 μg/g) compared to natural ACs (up to approximately 9 μg/g). Using this AC, fluoride and the internal standard phosphate could be detected free of chromatographic interferences. With a sample volume of 100 mL and 2× 100 mg of AC packed into two extraction columns combined in series, a limit of quantification (LOQ), derived according to the German standard method DIN 32645, of 0.3 μg/L was achieved. The recoveries of six model PFCs were determined from tap water and a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. Except for the extremely polar perfluoroacetic acid (recovery of approximately 10%) the model substances showed fairly good (50% for perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA)) to very good fluorine recoveries (100±20% for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), 6:2 fluorotelomersulfonate (6:2 FTS)), both from tap water and wastewater matrix. This new analytical protocol was exemplarily applied to several surface water and groundwater samples. The obtained AOF values were compared to the fluorine content of 19 target PFCs analyzed by high performance

  15. Characterization of carbonated tricalcium silicate and its sorption capacity for heavy metals: a micron-scale composite adsorbent of active silicate gel and calcite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quanyuan; Hills, Colin D; Yuan, Menghong; Liu, Huanhuan; Tyrer, Mark

    2008-05-01

    Adsorption-based processes are widely used in the treatment of dilute metal-bearing wastewaters. The development of versatile, low-cost adsorbents is the subject of continuing interest. This paper examines the preparation, characterization and performance of a micro-scale composite adsorbent composed of silica gel (15.9 w/w%), calcium silicate hydrate gel (8.2 w/w%) and calcite (75.9 w/w%), produced by the accelerated carbonation of tricalcium silicate (C(3)S, Ca(3)SiO(5)). The Ca/Si ratio of calcium silicate hydrate gel (C-S-H) was determined at 0.12 (DTA/TG), 0.17 ((29)Si solid-state MAS/NMR) and 0.18 (SEM/EDS). The metals-retention capacity for selected Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) and Cr(III) was determined by batch and column sorption experiments utilizing nitrate solutions. The effects of metal ion concentration, pH and contact time on binding ability was investigated by kinetic and equilibrium adsorption isotherm studies. The adsorption capacity for Pb(II), Cr(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II) was found to be 94.4 mg/g, 83.0 mg/g, 52.1 mg/g and 31.4 mg/g, respectively. It is concluded that the composite adsorbent has considerable potential for the treatment of industrial wastewater containing heavy metals. PMID:17950999

  16. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  17. Carbon adsorbents from products of solid fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pokonova, Yu.V.; Grabovskii, A.I.

    1995-01-10

    Total shale phenols (mixture of alkylresorcinols) or their solution in commercial-grade furfural can be used for forming carbon adsorbents with high mechanical strength (up to 97%), high microporosity (up to 0.41 cm{sup 3}{center_dot}cm{sup -3}), and higher sorption capacity. Samples with medium burnout exhibit higher selectivity (than those molded from conventional wood tar) in the recovery of noble metals from multicomponent metal salt solutions. In these parameters they surpass commercial adsorbents as well. Samples with low burnout exhibit high selectivity and separation ability with respect to gas mixtures.

  18. Adsorption of bisphenol-A from aqueous solution onto minerals and carbon adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Lai, Chi-Wei; Su, Ting-Yi

    2006-06-30

    The adsorption behaviors of bisphenol-A, which has been listed as one of endocrine disrupting chemicals, from aqueous solution onto four minerals including andesite, diatomaceous earth, titanium dioxide, and activated bleaching earth, and two activated carbons with coconut-based and coal-based virgins were examined in this work. Based on the adsorption results at the specified conditions, the adsorption capacities of activated carbons are significantly larger than those of mineral adsorbents, implying that the former is effective for removal of the highly hydrophobic adsorbate from the aqueous solution because of its high surface area and low surface polarity. The adsorption capacities of bisphenol-A onto these mineral adsorbents with different pore properties are almost similar in magnitude mainly due to the weakly electrostatic interaction between the mineral surface with negative charge and the target adsorbate with hydrophobic nature. Further, a simplified kinetic model, pseudo-second-order, was tested to investigate the adsorption behaviors of bisphenol-A onto the two common activated carbons at different solution conditions. It was found that the adsorption process could be well described with the pseudo-second-order model. The kinetic parameters of the model obtained in the present work are in line with the pore properties of the two adsorbents. PMID:16343748

  19. Adsorption kinetic and mechanistic studies for pharmaceutical spherical carbon adsorbents: comparison of a brand product and two generics.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Risa; Otsuka, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    The kinetic and mechanistic profiles of three pharmaceutical spherical carbon adsorbents, Kremezin as the brand product and two generics (Merckmezin and spherical carbon adsorbent "Mylan"), were compared. Five non-ionic active pharmaceutical ingredients with molecular weights of 136.1-424.1 Da were used as adsorbates. The results of Boehm titration, the standard method to qualify acidic or basic functional groups on a carbon surface, suggested distinctly different quantitative characteristics of each functional group among the three adsorbents. But those differences do not affect the adsorption to non-ionic adsorbates. The amount of theophylline adsorbed at equilibrium and surface area well correlated, suggesting that adsorptive ability was defined by surface area. In the tested molecular weight range, the order in terms of adsorption kinetics was spherical carbon adsorbent "Mylan">Kremezin>Merkmezin. The adsorption profile in the equilibrium and kinetic experiments, and the lack of an effect of pH on adsorption quantity suggested that the mechanism of adsorption for non-ionic substances to be Langmuir type monolayer adsorption. Kremezin and spherical carbon adsorbent "Mylan" are more likely to adsorb co-administered drugs than Merckmezin. PMID:23261577

  20. Enhanced encapsulation of metoprolol tartrate with carbon nanotubes as adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garala, Kevin; Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-12-01

    A highly water-soluble antihypertensive drug, metoprolol tartrate (MT), was selected as a model drug for preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-impregnated ethyl cellulose (EC) microspheres. The present investigation was aimed to increase encapsulation efficiency of MT with excellent adsorbent properties of MWCNTs. The unique surface area, stiffness, strength and resilience of MWCNTs have drawn much anticipation as carrier for highly water-soluble drugs. Carbon nanotubes drug adsorbate (MWCNTs:MT)-loaded EC microspheres were further optimized by the central composite design of the experiment. The effects of independent variables (MWCNTs:MT and EC:adsorbate) were evaluated on responses like entrapment efficiency (EE) and t 50 (time required for 50% drug release). The optimized batch was compared with drug alone EC microspheres. The results revealed high degree of improvement in encapsulation efficiency for MWCNTs:MT-loaded EC microspheres. In vitro drug release study exhibited complete release form drug alone microspheres within 15 h, while by the same time only 50-60% drug was released for MWCNTs-impregnated EC microspheres. The optimized batch was further characterized by various instrumental analyses such as scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results endorse encapsulation of MWCNTs:MT adsorbate inside the matrix of EC microspheres, which might have resulted in enhanced encapsulation and sustained effect of MT. Hence, MWCNTs can be utilized as novel carriers for extended drug release and enhanced encapsulation of highly water-soluble drug, MT.

  1. Nanoporous-carbon adsorbers for chemical microsensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Siegal, Michael P.; Staton, Alan W.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Yelton, William Graham

    2004-11-01

    Chemical microsensors rely on partitioning of airborne chemicals into films to collect and measure trace quantities of hazardous vapors. Polymer sensor coatings used today are typically slow to respond and difficult to apply reproducibly. The objective of this project was to produce a durable sensor coating material based on graphitic nanoporous-carbon (NPC), a new material first studied at Sandia, for collection and detection of volatile organic compounds (VOC), toxic industrial chemicals (TIC), chemical warfare agents (CWA) and nuclear processing precursors (NPP). Preliminary studies using NPC films on exploratory surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) devices and as a {micro}ChemLab membrane preconcentrator suggested that NPC may outperform existing, irreproducible coatings for SAW sensor and {micro}ChemLab preconcentrator applications. Success of this project will provide a strategic advantage to the development of a robust, manufacturable, highly-sensitive chemical microsensor for public health, industrial, and national security needs. We use pulsed-laser deposition to grow NPC films at room-temperature with negligible residual stress, and hence, can be deposited onto nearly any substrate material to any thickness. Controlled deposition yields reproducible NPC density, morphology, and porosity, without any discernable variation in surface chemistry. NPC coatings > 20 {micro}m thick with density < 5% that of graphite have been demonstrated. NPC can be 'doped' with nearly any metal during growth to provide further enhancements in analyte detection and selectivity. Optimized NPC-coated SAW devices were compared directly to commonly-used polymer coated SAWs for sensitivity to a variety of VOC, TIC, CWA and NPP. In every analyte, NPC outperforms each polymer coating by multiple orders-of-magnitude in detection sensitivity, with improvements ranging from 103 to 108 times greater detection sensitivity! NPC-coated SAW sensors appear capable of detecting most analytes tested to

  2. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  3. Development Trends in Porous Adsorbents for Carbon Capture.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, Bolisetty; Sreedhar, Inkollu; Suresh, Pathi; Raghavan, Kondapuram Vijaya

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of greenhouse gases especially CO2 in the atmosphere leading to global warming with undesirable climate changes has been a serious global concern. Major power generation in the world is from coal based power plants. Carbon capture through pre- and post- combustion technologies with various technical options like adsorption, absorption, membrane separations, and chemical looping combustion with and without oxygen uncoupling have received considerable attention of researchers, environmentalists and the stake holders. Carbon capture from flue gases can be achieved with micro and meso porous adsorbents. This review covers carbonaceous (organic and metal organic frameworks) and noncarbonaceous (inorganic) porous adsorbents for CO2 adsorption at different process conditions and pore sizes. Focus is also given to noncarbonaceous micro and meso porous adsorbents in chemical looping combustion involving insitu CO2 capture at high temperature (>400 °C). Adsorption mechanisms, material characteristics, and synthesis methods are discussed. Attention is given to isosteric heats and characterization techniques. The options to enhance the techno-economic viability of carbon capture techniques by integrating with CO2 utilization to produce industrially important chemicals like ammonia and urea are analyzed. From the reader's perspective, for different classes of materials, each section has been summarized in the form of tables or figures to get a quick glance of the developments. PMID:26422294

  4. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  5. Development of carbon dioxide adsorbent from rice husk char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abang, S.; Janaun, J.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Ikhwan, F. S.

    2016-06-01

    This study was mainly concerned about the development of carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbent from rice husk (RH). Several chemical treatments were used to produce activated rice husk char (RHAC) from RH. Initially the RH was refluxed with 3M of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, activation followed by using 0.5M of zinc chloride (ZnCl2) solution and finally acidic treatment by using 0.1M of hydrochloric acid (HCl). Then, the RHAC was functionalized by using 3-chloropropylamine hydrochloride (3-CPA) and noted as RHN. RHN samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Based on the SEM, the RHN sample had a large pore diameter compared to RH sample after being treated. Based on MIP data, the average pore diameter between RH and RHAC samples were increased significantly from 0.928 microns to 1.017 microns. The RHN sample also had higher total porosity (%) compared to RHAC and RH (58.45%, 47.82% and 45.57% respectively). The total specific surface area of the sample was much increasing from RHO to RHAC (29.17 m2/g and 62.94 m2/g respectively) and slightly being decreasing from RHAC to RHN (58.88 m2/g). FTIR result showed the present of weak band at 1587 cm-1 which demonstrating of the amine group present on the sample. The CO2 capture result showed that the decreasing of operating temperature can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. On the contrary decreasing of CO2 gas flow rate can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. The highest total amount of CO2 adsorbed was 25338.57 mg of CO2/g of RHN sample by using 100 mL/min of gas flow rate at 30oC. Based on adsorption isotherm analysis, the Freundlich isotherm was the best isotherm to describe the CO2 adsorption on the sample.

  6. Development and characterization of activated hydrochars from orange peels as potential adsorbents for emerging organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M E; Ledesma, B; Román, S; Bonelli, P R; Cukierman, A L

    2015-05-01

    Activated hydrochars obtained from the hydrothermal carbonization of orange peels (Citrus sinensis) followed by various thermochemical processing were assessed as adsorbents for emerging contaminants in water. Thermal activation under flows of CO2 or air as well as chemical activation with phosphoric acid were applied to the hydrochars. Their characteristics were analyzed and related to their ability to uptake three pharmaceuticals (diclofenac sodium, salicylic acid and flurbiprofen) considered as emerging contaminants. The hydrothermal carbonization and subsequent activations promoted substantial chemical transformations which affected the surface properties of the activated hydrochars; they exhibited specific surface areas ranging from 300 to ∼620 m(2)/g. Morphological characterization showed the development of coral-like microspheres dominating the surface of most hydrochars. Their ability to adsorb the three pharmaceuticals selected was found largely dependent on whether the molecules were ionized or in their neutral form and on the porosity developed by the new adsorbents. PMID:25742754

  7. Fluoride removal in water by a hybrid adsorbent lanthanum-carbon.

    PubMed

    Vences-Alvarez, Esmeralda; Velazquez-Jimenez, Litza Halla; Chazaro-Ruiz, Luis Felipe; Diaz-Flores, Paola E; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2015-10-01

    Various health problems associated with drinking water containing high fluoride levels, have motivated researchers to develop more efficient adsorbents to remove fluoride from water for beneficial concentrations to human health. The objective of this research was to anchor lanthanum oxyhydroxides on a commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) to remove fluoride from water considering the effect of the solution pH, and the presence of co-existing anions and organic matter. The activated carbon was modified with lanthanum oxyhydroxides by impregnation. SEM and XRD were performed in order to determine the crystal structure and morphology of the La(III) particles anchored on the GAC surface. FT-IR and pK(a)'s distribution were determined in order to elucidate both the possible mechanism of the lanthanum anchorage on the activated carbon surface and the fluoride adsorption mechanism on the modified material. The results showed that lanthanum ions prefer binding to carboxyl and phenolic groups on the activated carbon surface. Potentiometric titrations revealed that the modified carbon (GAC-La) possesses positive charge at a pH lower than 9. The adsorption capacity of the modified GAC increased five times in contrast to an unmodified GAC adsorption capacity at an initial F(-) concentration of 20 mg L(-1). Moreover, the presence of co-existing anions had no effect on the fluoride adsorption capacity at concentrations below 30 mg L(-1), that indicated high F(-) affinity by the modified adsorbent material (GAG-La). PMID:26070190

  8. Adsorbed Methane Film Properties in Nanoporous Carbon Monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Chada, Nagaraju; Beckner, Matthew; Romanos, Jimmy; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase methane storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed natural gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize methane storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis temperature. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis temperature both have large influences on monolith uptakes. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high methane storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument. The saturated film density and the film thickness was determined using linear extrapolation on the high pressure excess adsorption isotherms. The saturated film density was also determined using the monolayer Ono-Kondo model. Film densities ranged from ca. 0.32 g/cm3 - 0.37 g/cm3.The Ono-Kondo model also determines the binding energy of methane. Binding energies were also determined from isosteric heats calculated from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and compared with the Ono-Kondo model method. Binding energies from Ono-Kondo were ca. 7.8 kJ/mol - 10 kJ/mol. Work funded by California Energy Commission Contract #500-08-022.

  9. Adsorbed Natural Gas Storage in Optimized High Surface Area Microporous Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Rash, Tyler; Nordwald, Erik; Shocklee, Joshua Shawn; Wexler, Carlos; Pfeifer, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) is an attractive alternative technology to compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG) for the efficient storage of natural gas, in particular for vehicular applications. In adsorbants engineered to have pores of a few molecular diameters, a strong van der Walls force allows reversible physisorption of methane at low pressures and room temperature. Activated carbons were optimized for storage by varying KOH:C ratio and activation temperature. We also consider the effect of mechanical compression of powders to further enhance the volumetric storage capacity. We will present standard porous material characterization (BET surface area and pore-size distribution from subcritical N2 adsorption) and methane isotherms up to 250 bar at 293K. At sufficiently high pressure, specific surface area, methane binding energy and film density can be extracted from supercritical methane adsorption isotherms. Research supported by the California Energy Commission (500-08-022).

  10. Comparison of physico-chemical characteristics among three pharmaceutical spherical carbon adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Makoto

    2012-12-01

    In this study, various physicochemical characteristics were evaluated for three pharmaceutical spherical carbon adsorbents, Kremezin as a brand product and its generics; Merckmezin and Spherical Carbon Adsorbent "Mylan". Scanning electron microscopic observations, measurements of specific surface area, particle sizes, and pore volume distributions by mercury intrusion porosimetry, and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) analysis were conducted. Compared to Kremezin, Merckmezin is dented with a small pore-rich structure; pores of less than 10nm make up 43% (Kremezin) and 68% (Merckmezin) of total pore volume. On the other hand, Spherical Carbon Adsorbent "Mylan" is porous with macropores. The results of fractal dimension analysis of micropores suggested that the complexity of the internal pore structure is Merckmezin>Kremezin>Spherical Carbon Adsorbent "Mylan". The three spherical carbon adsorbents are physico-chemically different, but clinical studies should be conducted to prove that they are therapeutically equivalent. PMID:22766286

  11. Biomass waste carbon materials as adsorbents for CO2 capture under post-combustion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa; García-Mateos, Francisco José; Rosas, Juana; Rodríguez-Mirasol, José; Cordero, Tomás

    2016-05-01

    A series of porous carbon materials obtained from biomass waste have been synthesized, with different morphologies and structural properties, and evaluated as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture in post-combustion conditions. These carbon materials present CO2 adsorption capacities, at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa, comparable to those obtained by other complex carbon or inorganic materials. Furthermore, CO2 uptakes under these conditions can be well correlated to the narrow micropore volume, derived from the CO2 adsorption data at 0 ºC (VDRCO2). In contrast, CO2 adsorption capacities at 25 ºC and 15 kPa are more related to only pores of sizes lower than 0.7 nm. The capacity values obtained in column adsorption experiments were really promising. An activated carbon fiber obtained from Alcell lignin, FCL, presented a capacity value of 1.3 mmol/g (5.7 %wt). Moreover, the adsorption capacity of this carbon fiber was totally recovered in a very fast desorption cycle at the same operation temperature and total pressure and, therefore, without any additional energy requirement. Thus, these results suggest that the biomass waste used in this work could be successfully valorized as efficient CO2 adsorbent, under post-combustion conditions, showing excellent regeneration performance.

  12. 40 CFR 65.152 - Carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A) for process vents, or § 65.83(a)(1) for high... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon adsorbers used as control... Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.152 Carbon adsorbers used as control devices. (a) Carbon...

  13. 40 CFR 65.152 - Carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A) for process vents, or § 65.83(a)(1) for high... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon adsorbers used as control... Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.152 Carbon adsorbers used as control devices. (a) Carbon...

  14. 40 CFR 65.152 - Carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A) for process vents, or § 65.83(a)(1) for high... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon adsorbers used as control... Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.152 Carbon adsorbers used as control devices. (a) Carbon...

  15. 40 CFR 65.152 - Carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A) for process vents, or § 65.83(a)(1) for high... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon adsorbers used as control... Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.152 Carbon adsorbers used as control devices. (a) Carbon...

  16. 40 CFR 65.152 - Carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A) for process vents, or § 65.83(a)(1) for high... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon adsorbers used as control... Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.152 Carbon adsorbers used as control devices. (a) Carbon...

  17. Affinity Adsorbents Based on Carriers Activated by Epoxy-compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyashchitskii, B. A.; Kuznetsov, P. V.

    1984-10-01

    The review is devoted to the synthesis and applications of affinity adsorbents based on carriers activated by epoxy-compounds. The methods for the introduction of epoxy-groups into carriers of different chemical types are discussed and conditions for the immobilisation of three-dimensional spacers and low-molecular-weight and polymeric ligands on carriers containing epoxy-groups are considered. Data are presented on the properties and applications of adsorbents of this type in affinity chromatography. The bibliography includes 144 references.

  18. Selective adsorption for removal of nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon streams over carbon-based adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarri, Masoud S.

    The ultimate goal of this thesis is to develop a fundamental understanding of the role of surface oxygen functional groups on carbon-based adsorbents in the adsorption of nitrogen compounds that are known to be present in liquid fuels. N2 adsorption was used to characterize pore structures. The surface chemical properties of the adsorbents were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) techniques with a mass spectrometer to identify and quantify the type and concentration of oxygen functional groups on the basis of CO2 and CO evolution profiles. It was found that although surface area and pore size distribution are important for the adsorption process, they are not primary factors in the adsorption of nitrogen compounds. On the other hand, both the type and concentration of surface oxygen-containing functional groups play an important role in determining adsorptive denitrogenation performance. Higher concentrations of the oxygen functional groups on the adsorbents resulted in a higher adsorption capacity for the nitrogen compounds. A fundamental insight was gained into the contributions of different oxygen functional groups by analyzing the changes in the monolayer maximum adsorption capacity, qm, and the adsorption constant, K, for nitrogen compounds on different activated carbons. Acidic functional groups such as carboxylic acids and carboxylic anhydrides appear to contribute more to the adsorption of quinoline, while the basic oxygen functional groups such as carbonyls and quinones enhance the adsorption of indole. Despite the high number of publications on the adsorptive desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, these studies did not consider the presence of coexisting nitrogen compounds. It is well-known that, to achieve ultraclean diesel fuel, sulfur must be reduced to a very low level, where the concentrations of nitrogen and sulfur compounds are comparable. The adsorptive denitrogenation and

  19. Carbon-Based Adsorbents for Postcombustion CO2 Capture: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Creamer, Anne Elise; Gao, Bin

    2016-07-19

    The persistent increase in atmospheric CO2 from anthropogenic sources makes research directed toward carbon capture and storage imperative. Current liquid amine absorption technology has several drawbacks including hazardous byproducts and a high-energy requirement for regeneration; therefore, research is ongoing to develop more practical methods for capturing CO2 in postcombustion scenarios. The unique properties of carbon-based materials make them specifically promising for CO2 adsorption at low temperature and moderate to high partial pressure. This critical review aims to highlight the development of carbon-based solid sorbents for postcombustion CO2 capture. Specifically, it provides an overview of postcombustion CO2 capture processes with solid adsorbents and discusses a variety of carbon-based materials that could be used. This review focuses on low-cost pyrogenic carbon, activated carbon (AC), and metal-carbon composites for CO2 capture. Further, it touches upon the recent progress made to develop metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and carbon nanomaterials and their general CO2 sorption potential. PMID:27257991

  20. Comparison of Analytical Techniques for Analysis of Arsenic Adsorbed on Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Maheswaran, Saravanamuthu; Shutthanandan, V; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Hart, Todd R.; Ngo, H.H.; Vigneswaran, S.

    2006-07-31

    Activated carbon (AC) has been extensively used to remove trace metals, particularly arsenic, from water for a number of years. To date, attempts to quantify directly the concentration of arsenic in activated carbon using non-destructive methods have been limited. High-energy ion beam based particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is ideally suited to investigate the issues regarding the quantification of trace metals in solids. In this study, after the adsorption of arsenic on activated carbon, arsenic concentration in granular activated carbon (GAC) and powder activated carbon (PAC) were quantified using PIXE. The PIXE results were compared with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) measurements. Some differences are observed between these measurements. The differences are greater in the case of GAC compared to PAC. These differences are mainly due to inhomogeneous structure of GAC and PAC, which includes the variable surface properties such as surface area and pore sizes in each granule or particle. The larger differences are mainly due to the increased particle dimensions of GAC compared to PAC and the nature of the internal pore structure of GAC, which results in different amount of arsenic adsorbed on different granules of GAC or even in different regions of one granule. This inhomogenity of arsenic concentration is clearly visible in the arsenic concentration map generated for a single GAC particle using microbeam PIXE.

  1. Carbonized material adsorbents for the removal of mercury from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Charcoal in itself is porous making it an excellent material for activated charcoal manufacture. However, few studies have been conducted in harnessing its potential for adsorption purposes, especially in water treatment. This paper describes the possibility of utilizing charcoal materials from Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) for adsorbing heavy metals like mercury from aqueous solutions of different concentrations. The effect of soaking time, pore analyses and chemical properties on the adsorption capabilities of the carbonized materials were discussed. The pH value and chemical oxygen demand (COD) monitored during the soaking period were also described.

  2. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  3. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  4. Interaction between adsorbed hydrogen and potassium on a carbon nanocone containing material as studied by photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Raaen, Steinar

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen adsorption on a potassium doped carbon nanocone containing material was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and work function measurement. The valence band spectra indicate that there is charge transfer from potassium to carbon. Upon deposition on carbon potassium is in its ionic state for lower doping and shows both ionic and metallic behavior at higher doping. Adsorption of hydrogen facilitates diffusion of potassium on the carbon material as seen by changes in the K{sub 2p} core level spectrum. Variations in the measured sample work function indicate that hydrogen initially adsorb on the K dopants and subsequently adsorb on the carbon cone containing material.

  5. Preparation and characterization of novel carbon dioxide adsorbents based on polyethylenimine-modified Halloysite nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Haohao; Bao, Feng; Gao, Jie; Chen, Tao; Wang, Si; Ma, Rui

    2015-01-01

    New nano-sized carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbents based on Halloysite nanotubes impregnated with polyethylenimine (PEI) were designed and synthesized, which were excellent adsorbents for the capture of CO2 at room temperature and had relatively high CO2 adsorption capacity. The prepared adsorbents were characterized by various techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, gel permeation chromatography, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetry, thermogravimetry-Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption characteristics and capacity were studied at room temperature, the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 156.6 mg/g-PEI was obtained and the optimal adsorption capacity can reach a maximum value of 54.8 mg/g-adsorbent. The experiment indicated that this kind of adsorbent has a high stability at 80°C and PEI-impregnated adsorbents showed good reversibility and stability during cyclic adsorption-regeneration tests. PMID:25381878

  6. Mesoporous carbon adsorbents from melamine-formaldehyde resin using nanocasting technique for CO2 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-06-01

    Mesoporous carbon adsorbents, having high nitrogen content, were synthesized via nanocasting technique with melamine-formaldehyde resin as precursor and mesoporous silica as template. A series of adsorbents were prepared by varying the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700°C. Adsorbents were characterized thoroughly by nitrogen sorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental (CHN) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Boehm titration. Carbonization temperature controlled the properties of the synthesized adsorbents ranging from surface area to their nitrogen content, which play major role in their application as adsorbents for CO2 capture. The nanostructure of these materials was confirmed by XRD and TEM. Their nitrogen content decreased with an increase in carbonization temperature while other properties like surface area, pore volume, thermal stability and surface basicity increased with the carbonization temperature. These materials were evaluated for CO2 adsorption by fixed-bed column adsorption experiments. Adsorbent synthesized at 700°C was found to have the highest surface area and surface basicity along with maximum CO2 adsorption capacity among the synthesized adsorbents. Breakthrough time and CO2 equilibrium adsorption capacity were investigated from the breakthrough curves and were found to decrease with increase in adsorption temperature. Adsorption process for carbon adsorbent-CO2 system was found to be reversible with stable adsorption capacity over four consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. From three isotherm models used to analyze the equilibrium data, Temkin isotherm model presented a nearly perfect fit implying the heterogeneous adsorbent surface. PMID:26040750

  7. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and carbon... absorbers, condensers, or carbon adsorbers to meet a weight-percent emission reduction or parts per...

  8. Extraction of palladium from acidic solutions with the use of carbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Kononova; N.G. Goryaeva; N.B. Dostovalova; S.V. Kachin; A.G. Kholmogorov

    2007-08-15

    We studied the sorption of palladium(II) on LKAU-4, LKAU-7, and BAU carbon adsorbents from model hydrochloric acid solutions and the solutions of spent palladium-containing catalysts. It was found that sorbents based on charcoal (BAU) and anthracite (LKAU-4) were characterized by high sorption capacities for palladium. The kinetics of the saturation of carbon adsorbents with palladium(II) ions was studied, and it was found that more than 60% of the initial amount of Pd(II) was recovered in a 1-h contact of an adsorbent with a model solution. This value for the solutions of spent catalysts was higher than 35%.

  9. Adlayer structure dependent ultrafast desorption dynamics in carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pd (111).

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Young; Xu, Pan; Camillone, Nina R; White, Michael G; Camillone, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    We report our ultrafast photoinduced desorption investigation of the coverage dependence of substrate-adsorbate energy transfer in carbon monoxide adlayers on the (111) surface of palladium. As the CO coverage is increased, the adsorption site population shifts from all threefold hollows (up to 0.33 ML), to bridge and near bridge (>0.5 to 0.6 ML) and finally to mixed threefold hollow plus top site (at saturation at 0.75 ML). We show that between 0.24 and 0.75 ML this progression of binding site motifs is accompanied by two remarkable features in the ultrafast photoinduced desorption of the adsorbates: (i) the desorption probability increases roughly two orders magnitude, and (ii) the adsorbate-substrate energy transfer rate observed in two-pulse correlation experiments varies nonmonotonically, having a minimum at intermediate coverages. Simulations using a phenomenological model to describe the adsorbate-substrate energy transfer in terms of frictional coupling indicate that these features are consistent with an adsorption-site dependent electron-mediated energy coupling strength, ηel, that decreases with binding site in the order: three-fold hollow > bridge and near bridge > top site. This weakening of ηel largely counterbalances the decrease in the desorption activation energy that accompanies this progression of adsorption site motifs, moderating what would otherwise be a rise of several orders of magnitude in the desorption probability. Within this framework, the observed energy transfer rate enhancement at saturation coverage is due to interadsorbate energy transfer from the copopulation of molecules bound in three-fold hollows to their top-site neighbors. PMID:27394118

  10. Adlayer structure dependent ultrafast desorption dynamics in carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pd (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Young; Xu, Pan; Camillone, Nina R.; White, Michael G.; Camillone, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    We report our ultrafast photoinduced desorption investigation of the coverage dependence of substrate-adsorbate energy transfer in carbon monoxide adlayers on the (111) surface of palladium. As the CO coverage is increased, the adsorption site population shifts from all threefold hollows (up to 0.33 ML), to bridge and near bridge (>0.5 to 0.6 ML) and finally to mixed threefold hollow plus top site (at saturation at 0.75 ML). We show that between 0.24 and 0.75 ML this progression of binding site motifs is accompanied by two remarkable features in the ultrafast photoinduced desorption of the adsorbates: (i) the desorption probability increases roughly two orders magnitude, and (ii) the adsorbate-substrate energy transfer rate observed in two-pulse correlation experiments varies nonmonotonically, having a minimum at intermediate coverages. Simulations using a phenomenological model to describe the adsorbate-substrate energy transfer in terms of frictional coupling indicate that these features are consistent with an adsorption-site dependent electron-mediated energy coupling strength, ηel, that decreases with binding site in the order: three-fold hollow > bridge and near bridge > top site. This weakening of ηel largely counterbalances the decrease in the desorption activation energy that accompanies this progression of adsorption site motifs, moderating what would otherwise be a rise of several orders of magnitude in the desorption probability. Within this framework, the observed energy transfer rate enhancement at saturation coverage is due to interadsorbate energy transfer from the copopulation of molecules bound in three-fold hollows to their top-site neighbors.

  11. Development of nitrogen enriched nanostructured carbon adsorbents for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon adsorbents containing high nitrogen content were developed by templating melamine-formaldehyde resin in the pores of mesoporous silica by nanocasting technique. A series of adsorbents were prepared by altering the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700 °C and characterized in terms of their textural and morphological properties. CO2 adsorption performance was investigated at various temperatures from 30 to 100 °C by using a thermogravimetric analyzer under varying CO2 concentrations. Multiple adsorption-desorption experiments were also carried out to investigate the adsorbent regenerability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the development of nanostructured materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and elemental analysis indicated the development of carbon adsorbents having high nitrogen content. The surface area and pore volume of the adsorbent carbonized at 700 °C were found to be 266 m(2) g(-1) and 0.25 cm(3) g(-1) respectively. CO2 uptake profile for the developed adsorbents showed that the maximum CO2 adsorption occurred within ca. 100 s. CO2 uptake of 0.792 mmol g(-1) at 30 °C was exhibited by carbon obtained at 700 °C with complete regenerability in three adsorption-desorption cycles. Furthermore, kinetics of CO2 adsorption on the developed adsorbents was studied by fitting the experimental data of CO2 uptake to three kinetic models with best fit being obtained by fractional order kinetic model with error% within range of 5%. Adsorbent surface was found to be energetically heterogeneous as suggested by Temkin isotherm model. Also the isosteric heat of adsorption for CO2 was observed to increase from ca. 30-44 kJ mol(-1) with increase in surface coverage. PMID:26217886

  12. Epoxide-functionalization of polyethyleneimine for synthesis of stable carbon dioxide adsorbent in temperature swing adsorption.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woosung; Min, Kyungmin; Kim, Chaehoon; Ko, Young Soo; Jeon, Jae Wan; Seo, Hwimin; Park, Yong-Ki; Choi, Minkee

    2016-01-01

    Amine-containing adsorbents have been extensively investigated for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture due to their ability to chemisorb low-concentration carbon dioxide from a wet flue gas. However, earlier studies have focused primarily on the carbon dioxide uptake of adsorbents, and have not demonstrated effective adsorbent regeneration and long-term stability under such conditions. Here, we report the versatile and scalable synthesis of a functionalized-polyethyleneimine (PEI)/silica adsorbent which simultaneously exhibits a large working capacity (2.2 mmol g(-1)) and long-term stability in a practical temperature swing adsorption process (regeneration under 100% carbon dioxide at 120 °C), enabling the separation of concentrated carbon dioxide. We demonstrate that the functionalization of PEI with 1,2-epoxybutane reduces the heat of adsorption and facilitates carbon dioxide desorption (>99%) during regeneration compared with unmodified PEI (76%). Moreover, the functionalization significantly improves long-term adsorbent stability over repeated temperature swing adsorption cycles due to the suppression of urea formation and oxidative amine degradation. PMID:27572662

  13. Binding energies and electronic structures of adsorbed titanium chains on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chih-Kai; Zhao, Jijun; Lu, Jianping

    2002-03-01

    Our calculations based on first principles have shown that titanium is much favored energetically over gold and aluminum to form a continuous chain on a variety of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Results from two zigzag nanotubes, (10,0) and (14,0), and two armchairs, (6,6) and (8,8), indicate that binding energy for a Ti-adsorbed SWNT is generally six to seven eV per unit cell larger than a Au or Al-adsorbed SWNT. Furthermore, the adsorbed Ti chain generates additional states in the band gaps of the two semi-conducting zigzag nanotubes, transforming them into metals.

  14. Copper ions removal from water using functionalized carbon nanotubes–mullite composite as adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Tofighy, Maryam Ahmadzadeh; Mohammadi, Toraj

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • CNTs–mullite composite was prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. • The prepared composite was modified with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan. • The modified CNTs–mullite composites were used as novel adsorbents. • Copper ion removal from water by the prepared adsorbents was performed. • Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was synthesized by direct growth of carbon nanotubes on mullite particles via chemical vapor deposition method using cyclohexanol and ferrocene as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. The carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was oxidized with concentrated nitric acid and functionalized with chitosan and then used as a novel adsorbent for copper ions removal from water. The results demonstrated that modification with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan improves copper ions adsorption capacity of the prepared composite, significantly. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. The carbon nanotubes growth on mullite particles to form the carbon nanotubes–mullite composite with further modification is an inherently safe approach for many promising environmental applications to avoid some concerns regarding environment, health and safety. It was found that the modified carbon nanotubes–mullite composite can be considered as an excellent adsorbent for copper ions removal from water.

  15. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, V; Rajkumar, S; Murugesh, S; Darchen, A

    2012-07-30

    Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies. PMID:22626627

  16. Carbon dioxide adsorbents containing magnesium oxide suitable for use at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Weigel, Scott Jeffrey; Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption of carbon dioxide from gas streams at temperatures in the range of 300 to 500.degree. C. is carried out with a solid adsorbent containing magnesium oxide, preferably promoted with an alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate so that the atomic ratio of alkali metal to magnesium is in the range of 0.006 to 2.60. Preferred adsorbents are made from the precipitate formed on addition of alkali metal and carbonate ions to an aqueous solution of a magnesium salt. Atomic ratios of alkali metal to magnesium can be adjusted by washing the precipitate with water. Low surface area adsorbents can be made by dehydration and CO.sub.2 removal of magnesium hydroxycarbonate, with or without alkali metal promotion. The process is especially valuable in pressure swing adsorption operations.

  17. Adsorbed plasma proteins modulate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on neutrophils in blood.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Barinov, Nikolay A; Kostevich, Valeria A; Smolina, Natalia V; Klinov, Dmitry V; Sokolov, Alexey V

    2016-08-01

    Proteins adsorbed on a surface may affect the interaction of this surface with cells. Here, we studied the binding of human serum albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) and evaluated the impact of PEG-SWCNT treated by these proteins on neutrophils in whole blood samples. Measurements of adsorption parameters revealed tight binding of proteins to PEG-SWCNTs. AFM was employed to directly observe protein binding to sidewalls of PEG-SWCNTs. Fluorescein-labeled IgG was used to ascertain the stability of PEG-SWCNT-IgG complexes in plasma. In blood samples, all plasma proteins mitigated damage of neutrophils observed just after blood exposure to PEG-SWCNTs, while only treatment of PEG-SWCNTs with IgG resulted in dose- and time-dependent enhancement of CNT-induced neutrophil activation and in potentiation of oxidative stress. Our study demonstrates the ability of adsorbed plasma proteins to influence neutrophil response caused by PEG-SWCNTs in whole blood. PMID:27015767

  18. Chemisorption on surfaces — an historical look at a representative adsorbate: carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, John T.

    1994-01-01

    The study of the interaction of molecules with clean surfaces extends back to the work of Irving Langmuir. In this historical account, the development of selected experimental methods for the study of molecular adsorption will be discussed. This will be done by historically reviewing research on one of the most well-studied adsorbate molecules, carbon monoxide. Many of the modern surface science techniques have first been used to study chemisorbed carbon monoxide, and the CO molecule is employed even today as a test molecule for currently developing surface measurement instruments such as the low temperature STM. In addition to being a good test molecule for new surface measurement techniques, adsorbed carbon monoxide is one of the centrally important molecules in the field of heterogeneous catalysis where the production of synthetic fuels and useful organic molecules often depends on the catalytic behavior of the adsorbed CO molecule. Interestingly, the carbon monoxide molecule also serves as a bridge between surface chemistry on the transition metals and the field of organometallic chemistry. Concepts about the chemical bonding and the reactive behavior of CO chemisorbed on transition metal surfaces and CO bound in transition metal carbonyls link these two fields together in a significant manner. The carbon monoxide molecule has been the historical focal point of many endeavors in surface chemistry and surface physics, and research on adsorbed carbon monoxide well represents many of the key advances which characterize the first thirty years of the development of surface science.

  19. Microstructure analysis of complex CuO/ZnO@carbon adsorbers: what are the limits of powder diffraction methods?

    PubMed

    Tseng, J C; Schmidt, W; Sager, U; Däuber, E; Pommerin, A; Weidenthaler, C

    2015-05-14

    Activate carbon impregnated with a mixture of copper oxide and zinc oxide performs well as active adsorber for NO2 removal in automotive cabin air filters. The oxide-loaded activated carbon exhibits superior long-term stability in comparison to pure activated carbon as has been shown in previous studies. The carbon material was loaded only with 2.5 wt% of each metal oxide. Characterization of the oxide nanoparticles within the pores of the activated carbon is difficult because of the rather low concentration of the oxides. Therefore, a systematic study was performed to evaluate the limits of line profile analysis of X-ray powder diffraction patterns. The method allows evaluation of crystalline domain size distributions, crystal defect concentrations and twinning probabilities of nanoscopic materials. Here, the analysis is hampered by the presence of several phases including more or less amorphous carbon. By using physical mixtures of defined copper oxide and zinc oxide particles with activated carbon, potential errors and limits could be identified. The contribution of the activated carbon to the scattering curve was modeled with a convolution of an exponential decay curve, a Chebyshev polynomial, and two Lorentzian peaks. With this approach, domain size distributions can be calculated that are shifted only by about 0.5-1.0 nm for very low loadings (≤4 wt%). Oxide loadings of 4 wt% and 5 wt% allow very reliable analyses from diffraction patterns measured in Bragg-Brentano and Debye-Scherrer geometry, respectively. For the real adsorber material, mean domain sizes have been calculated to be 2.8 nm and 2.4 nm before and after the NO2 removal tests. PMID:25892653

  20. Synthesis of magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Fe-OMC) adsorbent and its evaluation for fuel desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzin Nejad, N.; Shams, E.; Amini, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon adsorbent was synthesized using soft templating method to adsorb sulfur from model oil (dibenzothiophene in n-hexane). Through this research, pluronic F-127, resorcinol-formaldehyde and hydrated iron nitrate were respectively used as soft template, carbon source and iron source. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and transmission electron microscopy. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement revealed the high surface area (810 m2 g-1), maxima pore size of 3.3 nm and large pore volume (1.01 cm3 g-1) of the synthesized sample. The adsorbent showed a maximum adsorption capacity of 111 mg dibenzothiophene g-1 of adsorbent. Sorption process was described by the pseudo-second-order rate equation and could be better fitted by the Freundlich model, showing the heterogeneous feature of the adsorption process. In addition, the adsorption capacity of regenerated adsorbent was 78.6% of the initial level, after five regeneration cycles.

  1. Prussian blue caged in spongiform adsorbents using diatomite and carbon nanotubes for elimination of cesium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baiyang; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Yu, Hongwen; Abe, Yoshiteru

    2012-05-30

    We developed a spongiform adsorbent that contains Prussian blue, which showed a high capacity for eliminating cesium. An in situ synthesizing approach was used to synthesize Prussian blue inside diatomite cavities. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used to form CNT networks that coated the diatomite to seal in the Prussian blue particles. These ternary (CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue) composites were mixed with polyurethane (PU) prepolymers to produce a quaternary (PU/CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue), spongiform adsorbent with an in situ foaming procedure. Prussian blue was permanently immobilized in the cell walls of the spongiform matrix and preferentially adsorbed cesium with a theoretical capacity of 167 mg/g cesium. Cesium was absorbed primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism, and the absorption was accomplished by self-uptake of radioactive water by the quaternary spongiform adsorbent. PMID:22464752

  2. Active manganese oxide: a novel adsorbent for treatment of wastewater containing azo dye.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Dutta, B K; Apak, R

    2009-01-01

    A new variety of active manganese oxide was prepared, characterized, and tested for its potential of adsorbing Congo Red, a dis-azo dye, from aqueous solutions. Both equilibrium and kinetics were investigated over different values of process parameters such as temperature (25-45 degrees C), adsorbent loading (0.4-0.6%), initial dye concentration (50-500 mg/L), presence of salts (sodium sulphate, 500 mg/L) and the oxygen content (MnO(x), x=1.2, 1.33 and 2) of the adsorbent. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Langmuir adsorption capacity of the sorbent (x=1.33) for Congo Red was 38.6 mg/g at room temperature which is substantially higher than those for commercial manganese dioxide, red mud, coir pith, activated carbon, and fly ash. The kinetic data were best interpreted using a pseudo-second order model. The results show that the active manganese oxide used in this work removes the dye by reversible adsorption and has the potential for practical use for remediation of textile industry effluents. PMID:19955624

  3. Adsorption of phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions using carbon nanoporous adsorbent coated with polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbia, Mansoor; Ghaffari, Arezoo

    2009-09-01

    Phenolic compounds are a widespread class of water pollutants that are known to cause serious human health problems; and the demand for effective adsorbents for the removal of toxic compounds is increasing. In this work adsorption of phenol, resorcinol and p-cresol on mesoporous carbon material (CMK-1) and modified with polyaniline polymer (CMK-1/PANI) has been investigated in attempt to explore the possibility of using nanoporous carbon as an efficient adsorbent for pollutants. It was found that CMK-1/PANI exhibits significant adsorption for phenolic derivatives. Batch adsorption studies were carried out to study the effect of various parameters like adsorbent dose, pH, initial concentration and contact time. From the sorption studies it was observed that the uptake of resorcinol was higher than other phenolic derivatives. Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms were used to model the equilibrium adsorption data for phenolic compounds.

  4. REACTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to determine whether aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide react with activated carbon, or with compounds adsorbed on activated carbon, to produce compounds that would not form in the absence of activated carbon. The experimental conditions were...

  5. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  6. PREDICTING PREFERENTIAL ADSORPTION OF ORGANICS BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preferential adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbon from dilute aqueous solutions was studied to develop a comprehensive theoretical basis for predicting adsorption of multicomponent solutes. The research program investigates why some solutes are strong adsorbers, ...

  7. Preparation of ferric-activated sludge-based adsorbent from biological sludge for tetracycline removal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Xu, Guoren; Yu, Huarong; Zhang, Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Ferric activation was novelly used to produce sludge-based adsorbent (SBA) from biological sludge through pyrolysis, and the adsorbents were applied to remove tetracycline from aqueous solution. The pyrolysis temperature and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) greatly influenced the surface area and pore characteristics of SBA. Ferric activation could promote the porous structure development of adsorbents, and the optimum preparation conditions were pyrolysis temperature 750°C and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) 0.5. In batch experiments, ferric-activated SBA showed a higher adsorption capacity for tetracycline than non-activated SBA, because the enhanced mesoporous structure favored the diffusion of tetracycline into the pores, the iron oxides and oxygen-containing functional groups in the adsorbents captured tetracycline by surface complexation. The results indicate that ferric activation is an effective approach for preparing adsorbents from biological sludge to remove tetracycline, providing a potential option for waste resource recovery. PMID:27038265

  8. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  9. A Template-Free, Ultra-Adsorbing, High Surface Area Carbonate Nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Grandfield, Kathryn; Mihranyan, Albert; Strømme, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We report the template-free, low-temperature synthesis of a stable, amorphous, and anhydrous magnesium carbonate nanostructure with pore sizes below 6 nm and a specific surface area of ∼ 800 m2 g−1, substantially surpassing the surface area of all previously described alkali earth metal carbonates. The moisture sorption of the novel nanostructure is featured by a unique set of properties including an adsorption capacity ∼50% larger than that of the hygroscopic zeolite-Y at low relative humidities and with the ability to retain more than 75% of the adsorbed water when the humidity is decreased from 95% to 5% at room temperature. These properties can be regenerated by heat treatment at temperatures below 100°C.The structure is foreseen to become useful in applications such as humidity control, as industrial adsorbents and filters, in drug delivery and catalysis. PMID:23874640

  10. The Impact of Adsorbed Triethylene Glycol on Water Wettability of the {1014} Calcium Carbonate Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R.

    2015-12-01

    Water flooding is increasingly being used as a method of enhanced oil recovery and frequently involves calcium carbonate reservoirs. Very often, thermodynamic conditions in the upper few hundred meters allow for hydrate formation. One possible method of preventing hydrates is to inject hydrate inhibitors such as triethylene glycol (TEG) into the reservoir. Thus, it is of importance to know how such glycols affect water wettability, which is an important factor defining the oil behavior in such reservoirs. Wettability of a surface is defined by the contact angle of a liquid drop on the surface. The stronger the liquid is attracted to the surface, the smaller the wetting angle becomes, implying an increased degree of wetting. Therefore, it is possible to gain qualitative knowledge of the change in wetting properties with respect to external influences by studying corresponding changes in free energy of adsorption of the liquid. In our work [1], we used molecular dynamics (MD) and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) to study how adsorbed TEG on the {1014} calcium carbonate surface affected adsorbed water. We used the changes in density profiles of water to estimate changes in adsorption free energy of water. The adaptive biasing force (ABF) method was applied to TEG to calculate the adsorption free energy of TEG on the calcium carbonate surface. We found that water wetting of the calcium carbonate surface decreased in the presence of adsorbed TEG. [1] - Olsen, R.; Leirvik, K.; Kvamme, B.; Kuznetsova, T. Adsorption Properties of Triethylene Glycol on a Hydrated {1014} Calcite Surface and Its Effect on Adsorbed Water, Langmuir 2015, DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b02228

  11. Surface area of vermiculite with nitrogen and carbon dioxide as adsorbates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J., Jr.; Bohor, B.F.

    1969-01-01

    Surface-area studies were made on several homoionic vermiculites with both nitrogen and carbon dioxide as adsorbates. These studies show that only very slight penetration occurs between individual vermiculite platelets. This is in contrast to an earlier investigation of montmorillonite where it was found that the degree of penetration between layers is quite high, particularly for carbon dioxide, and is governed by the size and charge of the interlayer cation. The inability of these adsorbates to penetrate substantially between vermiculite platelets is due primarily to this mineral's high surface-charge density. The extent of penetration of nitrogen and carbon dioxide at the edges of vermiculite platelets, though slight, is influenced by the coordinated water retained within the sample at a given degassing temperature. Forces between layers are weakened with increasing water content, which permits slightly greater penetration by adsorbate gases. Thus, the surface area of vermiculite, as determined by gas adsorption, is larger than the calculated external surface area based upon particle size and shape considerations. In addition, "extra" surface is provided by the lifting and scrolling of terminal platelets. These morphological features are shown in scanning electron micrographs of a naturally occuring vermiculite. ?? 1969.

  12. Porous, platinum nanoparticle-adsorbed carbon nanotube yarns for efficient fiber solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sen; Ji, Chunyan; Bian, Zuqiang; Yu, Pingrong; Zhang, Luhui; Liu, Dianyi; Shi, Enzheng; Shang, Yuanyuan; Peng, Haitao; Cheng, Qiao; Wang, Dong; Huang, Chunhui; Cao, Anyuan

    2012-08-28

    Pt is a classical catalyst that has been extensively used in fuel cell and solar cell electrodes, owing to its high catalytic activity, good conductivity, and stability. In conventional fiber-shaped solar cells, solid Pt wires are usually adopted as the electrode material. Here, we report a Pt nanoparticle-adsorbed carbon nanotube yarn made by solution adsorption and yarn spinning processes, with uniformly dispersed Pt nanoparticles through the porous nanotube network. We have fabricated TiO(2)-based dye-sensitized fiber solar cells with a Pt-nanotube hybrid yarn as counter electrode and achieved a power conversion efficiency of 4.85% under standard illumination (AM1.5, 100 mW/cm(2)), comparable to the same type of fiber cells with a Pt wire electrode (4.23%). Adsorption of Pt nanoparticles within a porous nanotube yarn results in enhanced Pt-electrolyte interfacial area and significantly reduced charge-transfer resistance across the electrolyte interface, compared to a pure nanotube yarn or Pt wire. Our porous Pt-nanotube hybrid yarns have the potential to reduce the use of noble metals, lower the device weight, and improve the solar cell efficiency. PMID:22861684

  13. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  14. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, carbon... Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices. (a)...

  15. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, carbon... Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices. (a)...

  16. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, carbon... Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices. (a)...

  17. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, carbon... Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices. (a)...

  18. Magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube iron nanocomposites as adsorbents and antibacterial agents for water purification.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook; Garg, Vijayendra K

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges of the 21st century is to provide clean and affordable water through protecting source and purifying polluted waters. This review presents advances made in the synthesis of carbon- and iron-based nanomaterials, graphene-carbon nanotubes-iron oxides, which can remove pollutants and inactivate virus and bacteria efficiently in water. The three-dimensional graphene and graphene oxide based nanostructures exhibit large surface area and sorption sites that provide higher adsorption capacity to remove pollutants than two-dimensional graphene-based adsorbents and other conventional adsorbents. Examples are presented to demonstrate removal of metals (e.g., Cu, Pb, Cr(VI), and As) and organics (e.g., dyes and oil) by grapheme-based nanostructures. Inactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species (e.g., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) is also shown. A mechanism involving the interaction of adsorbents and pollutants is briefly discussed. Magnetic graphene-based nanomaterials can easily be separated from the treated water using an external magnet; however, there are challenges in implementing the graphene-based nanotechnology in treating real water. PMID:26498500

  19. Effects of welding fumes on nuclear air cleaning system carbon adsorber banks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.W.

    1997-08-01

    Standard Technical Specifications for nuclear air cleaning systems include requirements for surveillance tests following fire, painting, or chemical release in areas communicating with the affected system. To conservatively implement this requirement, many plants categorize welding as a chemical release process, and institute controls to ensure that welding fumes do not interact with carbon adsorbers in a filter system. After reviewing research data that indicated welding had a minimal impact on adsorber iodine removal efficiency, further testing was performed with the goal of establishing a welding threshold. It was anticipated that some quantity of weld electrodes could be determined that had a corresponding detrimental impact on iodine removal efficiency for the exposed adsorber. This value could be used to determine a conservative sampling schedule that would allow the station to perform laboratory testing to ensure system degradation did not occur without a full battery of surveillance tests. A series of tests was designed to demonstrate carbon efficiency versus cumulative welding fume exposure. Three series of tests were performed, one for each of three different types of commonly used weld electrodes. Carbon sampling was performed at baseline conditions, and every five pounds of electrode thereafter. Two different laboratory tests were performed for each sample; one in accordance with ASTM 3803/1989 at 95% relative humidity and 30 degrees C, and another using the less rigorous conditions of 70% relative humidity and 80 degrees C. Review of the test data for all three types of electrodes failed to show a significant correlation between carbon efficiency degradation and welding fume exposure. Accordingly, welding is no longer categorized as a `chemical release process` at McGuire Nuclear Station, and limits on welding fume interaction with ventilation systems have been eliminated. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Low temperature conversion of rice husks, eucalyptus sawdust and peach stones for the production of carbon-like adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ayrton F; Cardoso, André de L; Stahl, João A; Diniz, Juraci

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the feasibility of preparing effective adsorbents from unmitigated agroforestry wastes was investigated. Three different kinds of carbon-like materials were produced by low temperature pyrolysis (LTC, <500 degrees C) of the raw materials rice husks, eucalyptus sawdust and peach stones. The carbon-like materials were characterized by instrumental methods (SEM,X-RDS,BET,MAS-RMN,FTIR), physico-chemical adsorption (iodine-, methylene blue- and phenazone-number; acetic acid adsorption isotherm; textile dyes- and carbohydrate adsorption), and heat value determination. The produced materials, which showed appreciable adsorption capacity, can be considered as precursors for the production of active coal or even be used directly as well. PMID:16790341

  1. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ewecharoen, A; Thiravetyan, P; Wendel, E; Bertagnolli, H

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g(-1). X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption. PMID:19576692

  2. Hydrogen storage on high-surface-area carbon monoliths for Adsorb hydrogen Gas Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Pfeifer, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase hydrogen volumetric storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed hydrogen gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize hydrogen storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis atmosphere. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis atmosphere have influences on gravimetric excess adsorption. Compaction temperature has large influences on gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high hydrogen storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument.

  3. Synthesis of porous sulfonated carbon as a potential adsorbent for phenol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Azhagapillai; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed; Srinivasakannan, C

    2015-01-01

    The work reports a facile synthesis procedure for preparation of porous sulfonated carbons and its suitability for adsorption of phenol. The sulfonated carbon was synthesized utilizing a simplified, single-step, shorter duration process by sulfonation, dehydration and carbonization of sucrose in sulfuric acid and tetraethylorthosilicate. The surface and internal structures of the adsorbents were characterized utilizing various characterization techniques to understand the porous nature and surface functional groups of the porous matrix. Adsorption capacity was found to be highest for the sample heat treated at 600 °C, with the maximum adsorption capacity of 440 mg/g at 30 °C. The adsorption isotherms were tested with the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms models to identify the appropriate adsorption mechanism. PMID:26524451

  4. In situ infrared study of adsorbed species during catalytic oxidation and carbon dioxide adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rajesh A.

    2005-11-01

    of the Ni-Re/CeO2 catalyst was reduced by only 20% in the presence of sulfur compared to a 50% reduction with the Ni/CeO 2 catalyst. These results show that Re not only promotes the water-gas shift reaction but also enhances the sulfur tolerance of the Ni/CeO2 catalyst. Novel amine based solid sorbents have been developed to capture CO 2 reversibly using temperature-swing adsorption process. The IR study shows that CO2 adsorbs on amine grafted SBA-15 to form carbonates and bicarbonates. Comparison of monoamine and diamine-grafted SBA-15 showed that diamine grafted SBA-15 provides almost twice the active sites for CO 2 adsorption. The adsorption of SO2 on the amine-grafted SBA-15 revealed that SO2 adsorbs irreversibly and the sorbent cannot be regenerated under normal operating conditions. Results of these studies can be used to enhance the overall conversion of CH4 to H2 thus lowering the cost of H2 product.

  5. Forsterite Carbonation in Wet-scCO2: Dependence on Adsorbed Water Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, J.; Benezeth, P.; Qafoku, O.; Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Bonneville, A.; McGrail, P.; Felmy, A.; Rosso, K.

    2013-12-01

    Capturing and storing CO2 in basaltic formations is one of the most promising options for mitigating atmospheric CO2 emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. These geologic reservoirs have high reactive potential for CO2-mineral trapping due to an abundance of divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4). Recent studies have shown that carbonation of these silicates under wet scCO2 conditions, e. g. encountered near a CO2 injection well, proceeds along a different pathway and is more effective than in CO2-saturated aqueous fluids. The presence of an adsorbed water film on the forsterite surface seems to be key to reactivity towards carbonation. In this study, we employed in situ high pressure IR spectroscopy to investigate the dependence of adsorbed water film thickness on forsterite carbonation chemistry. Post reaction ex situ SEM, TEM, TGA, XRD, and NMR measurements will also be discussed. Several IR titrations were performed of forsterite with water at 50 °C and 90 bar scCO2. Aliquots of water were titrated at 4-hour reaction-time increments. Once a desired total water concentration was reached, data were collected for about another 30 hours. One titration involved 10 additions, which corresponds to 6.8 monolayers of adsorbed water. Clearly, a carbonate was precipitating, and its spectral signature matched magnesite. Another titration involved 8 aliquots, or up to 4.4 monolayers of water. The integrated absorbance under the CO stretching bands of carbonate as a function of time after reaching 4.4 monolayers showed an increase and then a plateau. We are currently unsure of the identity of the carbonate that precipitated, but it could be an amorphous anhydrous phase or magnesite crystals with dimensions of only several nanometers. A third titration only involved 3 additions, or up to 1.6 monolayers of water. The integrated absorbance under the CO stretching bands of carbonate as a function of time after reaching 1.6 monolayers

  6. Carbon Nanotubes-Adsorbed Electrospun PA66 Nanofiber Bundles with Improved Conductivity and Robust Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Guoqiang; Dai, Kun; Liu, Chuntai; Yan, Xingru; Shen, Changyu; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-06-01

    Electrospun polyamide (PA) 66 nanofiber bundles with high conductivity, improved strength, and robust flexibility were successfully manufactured through simply adsorbing multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on the surface of electrospun PA66 nanofibers. The highest electrical conductivity (0.2 S/cm) and tensile strength (103.3 MPa) were achieved for the bundles immersed in the suspension with 0.05 wt % MWNTs, indicating the formation of conductive network from adsorbed MWNTs on the surface of PA66 nanofibers. The decrease of porosity for the bundles immersed in the MWNT dispersion and the formation of hydrogen bond between PA66 nanofibers and MWNTs suggest a superb interfacial interaction, which is responsible for the excellent mechanical properties of the nanocomposite bundles. Furthermore, the resistance fluctuation under bending is less than 3.6%, indicating a high flexibility of the nanocomposite bundles. The resistance of the nanocomposite bundle had a better linear dependence on the temperature applied between 30 and 150 °C. More importantly, such highest working temperature of 150 °C far exceeded that of other polymer-based temperature sensors previously reported. This suggests that such prepared MWNTs-adsorbed electrospun PA66 nanofiber bundles have great potentials in high temperature detectors. PMID:27172292

  7. Preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yang; Ke-Qiang, Qiu

    2009-05-01

    Activated carbons especially used for gaseous adsorption were prepared from Chinesefir sawdust by zinc chloride activation under vacuum condition. The micropore structure, adsorption properties, and surface morphology of activated carbons obtained under atmosphere and vacuum were investigated. The prepared activated carbons were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and nitrogen adsorption. It was found that the structure of the starting material is kept after activation. The activated carbon prepared under vacuum exhibited higher values of the BET surface area (up to 1079 m2 g(-1)) and total pore volume (up to 0.5665 cm3 g(-1)) than those of the activated carbon obtained under atmosphere. This was attributed to the effect of vacuum condition that reduces oxygen in the system and limits the secondary reaction of the organic vapor. The prepared activated carbon has well-developed microstructure and high microporosity. According to the data obtained, Chinese fir sawdust is a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation. The obtained activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent with favorable surface properties. Compared with the traditional chemical activation, vacuum condition demands less energy consumption, simultaneity, and biomass-oil is collected in the procedure more conveniently. FTIR analysis showed that heat treatment would result in the aromatization of the carbon structure. PMID:19534162

  8. Microcystin-LR Adsorption by Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Phillip; Schumann, Russell; Wong, Shiaw Hui

    2001-08-01

    We use a selection of wood-based and coconut-based activated carbons to investigate the factors controlling the removal of the hepatotoxin microcystin-LR (m-LR) from aqueous solutions. The wood carbons contain both micropores and mesopores. The coconut carbons contain micropores only. Confirming previously published observations, we also find that the wood-based carbons adsorb more microcystin than the coconut-based carbons. From a combination of a judicious modification of a wood-based carbon's surface chemistry and of the solution chemistry, we demonstrate that both surface and solution chemistry play minor roles in the adsorption process, with the adsorbent surface chemistry exhibiting less influence than the solution chemistry. Conformational changes at low solution pH probably contribute to the observed increase in adsorption by both classes of adsorbent. At the solution pH of 2.5, the coconut-based carbons exhibit a 400% increased affinity for m-LR compared with 100% increases for the wood-based carbons. In an analysis of the thermodynamics of adsorption, using multiple temperature adsorption chromatography methods, we indicate that m-LR adsorption is an entropy-driven process for each of the carbons, except the most hydrophilic and mesoporous carbon, B1. In this case, exothermic enthalpy contributions to adsorption also exist. From our overall observations, since m-LR contains molecular dimensions in the secondary micropore width range, we demonstrate that it is important to consider both the secondary micropore and the mesopore volumes for the adsorption of m-LR from aqueous solutions. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11446779

  9. Phenol adsorption by activated carbon produced from spent coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cínthia S; Abreu, Anelise L; Silva, Carmen L T; Guerreiro, Mário C

    2011-01-01

    The present work highlights the preparation of activated carbons (ACs) using spent coffee grounds, an agricultural residue, as carbon precursor and two different activating agents: water vapor (ACW) and K(2)CO(3) (ACK). These ACs presented the microporous nature and high surface area (620-950 m(2) g(-1)). The carbons, as well as a commercial activated carbon (CAC) used as reference, were evaluated as phenol adsorbent showing high adsorption capacity (≈150 mg g(-1)). The investigation of the pH solution in the phenol adsorption was also performed. The different activating agents led to AC with distinct morphological properties, surface area and chemical composition, although similar phenol adsorption capacity was verified for both prepared carbons. The production of activated carbons from spent coffee grounds resulted in promising adsorbents for phenol removal while giving a noble destination to the residue. PMID:22105129

  10. The role of adsorbed hydroxyl species in the electrocatalytic carbon monoxide oxidation reaction on platinum.

    PubMed

    Kucernak, Anthony R; Offer, Gregory J

    2008-07-01

    The assumption that "OH(ads)" or other oxygen containing species is formed on polycrystalline or nanoparticulate platinum through a fast and reversible process at relatively low potentials is often made. In this paper we discuss the implications of this assumption and the difficulty in reconciling it with experimental phenomena. We show how presenting chrono-amperometric transients as log-log plots for potentials steps in the presence and absence of an adlayer of carbon monoxide on polycrystalline platinum is particularly useful in understanding the time evolution of the CO oxidation reaction. When using log-log plots a clear power law decay can be observed in the transients both in the presence and absence of an adlayer of carbon monoxide. We explain this as an extension of current theory, such that the rate determining step in both cases is the formation of a hydrogen bonded water-OH(ads) network, strongly influenced by anions, and that CO(ads) oxidation occurs, at least in part by the diffusion of OH(ads) through this network. We hypothesize that, at low potentials the formation of OH(ads) at active sites is fast and reversible but that transport of OH(ads) away from those sites may be rate limiting. The assumption that overall OH(ads) formation on platinum is fast and reversible is therefore highly dependent upon the platinum surface and the experimental conditions and it may not be appropriate for polycrystalline surfaces in sulfuric acid. Therefore, although the formation of OH(ads) on platinum in the absence of strongly adsorbing anions on 'ideal' surfaces is almost certainly fast and reversible, on realistic fuel cell relevant surfaces under non-ideal conditions this assumption cannot be made, and instead the formation of an OH(ads) adlayer may be somewhat slow and is associated with the formation of hydrogen bonded water-OH(ads) networks on the surface. We expect this to be a more realistic description for what occurs during CO(ads) oxidation on fuel cell

  11. Theoretical study of carbon dioxide activation by metals (Co, Cu, Ni) supported on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ha, Nguyen Ngoc; Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Van Khu, Le; Cam, Le Minh

    2015-12-01

    The activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) by catalytic systems comprising a transition metal (Co, Cu,Ni) on an activated carbon (AC) support was investigated using a combination of different theoretical calculation methods: Monte Carlo simulation, DFT and DFT-D, molecular dynamics (MD), and a climbing image nudged elastic band (CI-NEB) method. The results obtained indicate that CO2 is easily adsorbed by AC or MAC (M: Cu, Co, Ni). The results also showed that the process of adsorbing CO2 does not involve a transition state, and that NiAC and CoAC are the most effective of the MAC catalysts at adsorbing CO2. Adsorption on NiAC led to the strongest activation of the C-O bond, while adsorption on CuAC led to the weakest activation. Graphical Abstract Models of CO2 activation on: a)- activated carbon; b)- metal supported activated carbon (M-AC), where M: Co, Cu, Ni. PMID:26637187

  12. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  13. Ultra-Thin Optically Transparent Carbon Electrodes Produced from Layers of Adsorbed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alharthi, Sarah A.; Benavidez, Tomas E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a simple, versatile, and inexpensive procedure to prepare optically transparent carbon electrodes, using proteins as precursors. Upon adsorption, the protein-coated substrates were pyrolyzed under reductive conditions (5% H2) to form ultra-thin, conductive electrodes. Because proteins spontaneously adsorb to interfaces forming uniform layers, the proposed method does not require a precise control of the preparation conditions, specialized instrumentation, or expensive precursors. The resulting electrodes were characterized by a combination of electrochemical, optical, and spectroscopic means. As a proof-of-concept, the optically-transparent electrodes were also used as substrate for the development of an electrochemical glucose biosensor. The proposed films represent a convenient alternative to more sophisticated, and less available, carbon-based nanomaterials. Furthermore, these films could be formed on a variety of substrates, without classical limitations of size or shape. PMID:23421732

  14. The effect of surface modification on heavy metal ion removal from water by carbon nanoporous adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniamerian, M. J.; Moradi, S. E.; Noori, A.; Salahi, H.

    2009-12-01

    In this work, chemically oxidized mesoporous carbon (COMC) with excellent lead adsorption performance was prepared by an acid surface modification method from mesoporous carbon (MC) by wet impregnation method. The structural order and textural properties of the mesoporous materials were studied by XRD, SEM, and nitrogen adsorption. The presence of carboxylic functional groups on the carbon surface was confirmed by FT-IR analysis. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study the effect of adsorbent dose, initial concentration and temperature for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous systems. The adsorption was maximum for the initial pH in the range of 6.5-8.0. The kinetic data were best fitted to the pseudo-second order model. The adsorption of chemically oxidized mesoporous carbon to Pb(II) fits to the Langmuir model. The larger adsorption capacity of chemically oxidized mesoporous carbon for Pb(II) is mainly due to the oxygenous functional groups formed on the surface of COMC which can react with Pb(II) to form salt or complex deposited on the surface of MC.

  15. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  16. Plasma protein adsorbed biomedical polymers: activation of human monocytes and induction of interleukin 1.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, T L; Colton, E; Anderson, J M

    1989-06-01

    These studies involved the evaluation of human monocyte/macrophage activation by biomedical polymers coated with human blood proteins. The biomedical polymers were polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane, woven Dacron fabric, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, Biomer, and tissue culture treated polystyrene as the control. They were adsorbed with human blood proteins: albumin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, hemoglobin, and gamma globulin. The protein adsorbed polymers were evaluated for their potential to activate the monocyte/macrophage cellular population in vitro as assessed by the induction of the monocyte/macrophage inflammatory mediator, Interleukin 1 (IL1). Suppression of IL1 was observed when protein adsorbed polymers were compared to the appropriate protein adsorbed control. Protein adsorbed polymers, when compared to polymers without protein adsorption, stimulated IL1 production. The data presented in this manuscript show the level of induction and secretion of IL1 was dependent on the biomedical polymer and the protein adsorbed, as well as the requirement of lipopolysaccharide. These results show differential interactions occur between the proteins, monocytes/macrophages, and biomedical polymers which alter activation and induction of IL1. PMID:2786877

  17. The effects of adsorbing organic pollutants from super heavy oil wastewater by lignite activated coke.

    PubMed

    Tong, Kun; Lin, Aiguo; Ji, Guodong; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xinghui

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of organic pollutants from super heavy oil wastewater (SHOW) by lignite activated coke (LAC) was investigated. Specifically, the effects of LAC adsorption on pH, BOD5/COD(Cr)(B/C), and the main pollutants before and after adsorption were examined. The removed organic pollutants were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Boehm titrations, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). FTIR spectra indicated that organic pollutants containing -COOH and -NH2 functional groups were adsorbed from the SHOW. Boehm titrations further demonstrated that carboxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, and lactonic groups on the surface of the LAC increased. GC-MS showed that the removed main organic compounds are difficult to be degraded or extremely toxics to aquatic organisms. According to the results of LC-OCD, 30.37 mg/L of dissolved organic carbons were removed by LAC adsorption. Among these, hydrophobic organic contaminants accounted for 25.03 mg/L. Furthermore, LAC adsorption was found to increase pH and B/C ratio of the SHOW. The mechanisms of adsorption were found to involve between the hydrogen bonding and the functional groups of carboxylic, phenolic, and lactonic on the LAC surface. In summary, all these results demonstrated that LAC adsorption can remove bio-refractory DOCs, which is beneficial for biodegradation. PMID:26808249

  18. International Space Station (ISS) Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Desiccant/Adsorbent Bed (DAB) Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reysa, Richard P.; Lumpkin, John P.; Sherif, Dian El; Kay, Robert; Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) is a part of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system. The CDRA provides carbon dioxide (CO2) removal from the ISS on-orbit modules. Currently, the CDRA is the secondary removal system on the ISS, with the primary system being the Russian Vozdukh. Within the CDRA are two desiccant/adsorbent beds (DAB), which perform the carbon dioxide removal function. The DAB adsorbent containment approach required improvements with respect to adsorbent containment. These improvements were implemented through a redesign program and have been implemented on units returning from orbit. This paper presents a DAB design modification implementation description, a hardware performance comparison between the unmodified and modified DAB configurations, and a description of the modified DAB hardware implementation into the on-orbit CDRA.

  19. Kinetics and isotherm analysis of Tropaeoline 000 adsorption onto unsaturated polyester resin (UPR): a non-carbon adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajeev; Sharma, Pooja; Sikarwar, Shalini

    2013-03-01

    The presence of dyes in water is undesirable due to the toxicological impact of their entrance into the food chain. Owing to the recalcitrant nature of dyes to biological oxidation, a tertiary treatment like adsorption is required. In the present study, unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) has been used as a sorbent in the treatment of dye-contaminated water. Different concentrations of Tropaeoline 000 containing water were treated with UPR. The preliminary investigations were carried out by batch adsorption to examine the effects of pH, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and temperature. A plausible mechanism for the ongoing adsorption process and thermodynamic parameters have also been obtained from Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameter showed that the sorption process of Tropaeoline 000 onto activated carbon (AC) and UPR were feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic under studied conditions. The estimated values for (ΔG) are -10.48 × 10(3) and -6.098 × 10(3) kJ mol(-1) over AC and UPR at 303 K (30 °C), indicating towards a spontaneous process. The adsorption process followed pseudo-first-order model. The mass transfer property of the sorption process was studied using Lagergren pseudo-first-order kinetic models. The values of % removal and k (ad) for dye systems were calculated at different temperatures (303-323 K). The mechanism of the adsorption process was determined from the intraparticle diffusion model. PMID:22689095

  20. Impeded repair of abasic site damaged lesions in DNA adsorbed over functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rina; Mondal, Titash; Bhowmick, Anil K; Das, Prolay

    2016-06-01

    The processing of abasic site DNA damage lesions in extracellular DNA in the presence of engineered carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) is demonstrated. The efficacy of the apurinic-apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) in the cleavage of abasic site lesions in the presence of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH) and graphene oxide (GO) are compared. The CNMs were found to perturb the incision activity of APE1. The reason for such perturbation process was anticipated to take place either by the non-specific adsorption of APE1 over the free surface of the CNMs or steric hindrance offered by the CNM-DNA complex. Accordingly, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selectively utilized to block the free surface of the CNM-DNA hybrid material. Further treatment of the CNM-DNA-BSA complex with APE1 resulted in a marginal increase in APE1 efficiency. This indicates that APE1 in solution is unable to process the abasic sites on DNA adsorbed over the CNMs. However, the cleavage activity of APE1 was restored in the presence of non-ionic surfactant (Tween 20) that inhibits adsorption of the DNA on the surface of the CNMs. The conformational deformation of the DNA, along with steric hindrance induced by the CNMs resulted in the inhibition of abasic site DNA repair by APE1. Moreover, appreciable changes in the secondary structure of APE1 adsorbed over the CNMs were observed that contribute further to the repair refractivity of the abasic sites. From a toxicological viewpoint, these findings can be extended to the study of the effect of engineered nanoparticles in the intracellular DNA repair process. PMID:27265379

  1. Easily regenerable solid adsorbents based on polyamines for carbon dioxide capture from the air.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Zhang, Hang; Czaun, Miklos; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya; Olah, George A; Narayanan, S R

    2014-05-01

    Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, particle size, and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from a closed environment, such as a submarine or space vehicles, is essential for life support. The supply of CO2-free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes, while, at the same time, provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle. PMID:24644023

  2. Easily Regenerable Solid Adsorbents Based on Polyamines for Carbon Dioxide Capture from the Air

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppert, A; Zhang, H; Czaun, M; May, RB; Prakash, GKS; Olah, GA; Narayanan, SR

    2014-03-18

    Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, particle size, and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from a closed environment, such as a submarine or space vehicles, is essential for life support. The supply of CO2-free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes, while, at the same time, provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle.

  3. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  4. Regenerable granular carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid adsorbents for diclofenac sodium and carbamazepine removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haoran; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Qian; Nie, Yao; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2013-08-01

    A novel granular carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/alumina (Al2O3) hybrid adsorbent with good sorption and regeneration properties was successfully prepared by mixing CNTs with surfactant Brij 35 and pseudo boehmite, followed by calcining to remove surfactant and form porous granules. Alumina binder increased the mechanical strength, hydrophilicity and porosity of the granular adsorbent, while the dispersed CNTs in the granular adsorbent were responsible for the sorption of diclofenac sodium (DS) and carbamazepine (CBZ). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the CNTs and Al2O3 were mixed well and the porous structure was formed in the granular adsorbent. The high surface area and appropriate pore size of granular CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were favorable for sorption. The sorption of DS decreased with increasing solution pH, while pH had little effect on CBZ sorption. The maximum sorption capacities of CBZ and DS on the CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were 157.4 and 106.5 μmol/g according to the Langmuir fitting. Moreover, the spent CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent can be thermally regenerated at 400 °C in air due to the thermal stability of CNTs. The removal of CBZ and DS changed a little in the initial reuse cycles and then kept relatively constant until tenth cycles. The adsorbed CBZ and DS were decomposed in the regeneration process. This regenerable adsorbent may find potential application in water or wastewater treatment for the removal of some micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals. PMID:23579087

  5. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  6. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  7. Activated carbon monoliths for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chada, Nagaraju; Romanos, Jimmy; Hilton, Ramsey; Suppes, Galen; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    The use of adsorbent storage media for natural gas (methane) vehicles allows for the use of non-cylindrical tanks due to the decreased pressure at which the natural gas is stored. The use of carbon powder as a storage material allows for a high mass of methane stored for mass of sample, but at the cost of the tank volume. Densified carbon monoliths, however, allow for the mass of methane for volume of tank to be optimized. In this work, different activated carbon monoliths have been produced using a polymeric binder, with various synthesis parameters. The methane storage was studied using a home-built, dosing-type instrument. A monolith with optimal parameters has been fabricated. The gravimetric excess adsorption for the optimized monolith was found to be 161 g methane for kg carbon.

  8. Adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids by carbonaceous adsorbents: Effect of carbon surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption by carbonaceous sorbents is among the most feasible processes to remove perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) from drinking and ground waters. However, carbon surface chemistry, which has long been recognized essential for dictating performance of such sorbents, has never been considered for PFOS and PFOA adsorption. Thus, the role of surface chemistry was systematically investigated using sorbents with a wide range in precursor material, pore structure, and surface chemistry. Sorbent surface chemistry overwhelmed physical properties in controlling the extent of uptake. The adsorption affinity was positively correlated carbon surface basicity, suggesting that high acid neutralizing or anion exchange capacity was critical for substantial uptake of PFOS and PFOA. Carbon polarity or hydrophobicity had insignificant impact on the extent of adsorption. Synthetic polymer-based Ambersorb and activated carbon fibers were more effective than activated carbon made of natural materials in removing PFOS and PFOA from aqueous solutions. PMID:25827692

  9. Self-healing and adsorbate-induced removal of defects on graphene and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsetseris, Leonidas; Pantelides, Sokrates

    2009-03-01

    The presence of point defects is known to induce significant changes in the electronic, chemical, transport, and mechanical properties of graphitic systems. Here, we use first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory to describe several adatom-related processes that alter key physical traits of graphene and carbon nanotubes. We find that, while pairs of C adatoms and clusters of four or more self-interstitials stay idle unless the system is heated to very high temperatures, clustering of three C adatoms leads to removal of hillock-like features and creates mobile species, resulting in self-healing of defective structures. We also demonstrate the reactivity of defect pairs using hydrogen and oxygen as prototype adsorbates, and we show that interaction with extrinsic species is an alternative healing mechanism for adatom structures in the above systems. The results relate to the evolution of defects either during growth of carbon nanotubes or during post-growth treatment and operation of related devices. This work was supported in part by DOE Grant DEFG0203ER46096.

  10. Third Sound in Superfluid 4He Films Adsorbed on Packed Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menachekanian, Emin

    Third sound is studied for superfluid films of 4He adsorbed on multiwall carbon nanotubes packed into an annular resonator. The third sound is generated with mechanical oscillation of the cell, and detected with carbon bolometers. A filling curve at temperatures near 250 mK shows oscillations in the third sound velocity, with maxima at the completion of the 4th and 5th atomic layers. Sharp changes in the Q factor of the third sound are found at partial layer fillings. Temperature sweeps at a number of fill points show strong broadening effects on the Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition, and rapidly increasing dissipation, in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Machta and Guyer. At the 4th layer completion there is a sudden reduction of the transition temperature TKT , and then a recovery back to linear variation with fill, although the slope is considerably smaller than the KT prediction. These effects might be related to changes in the gas-liquid coexistence regions.

  11. Water and ion transport in ultra-adsorbing porous magnesium carbonate studied by dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochard, Isabelle; Frykstrand, Sara; Ahlström, Olle; Forsgren, Johan; Strømme, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Porous materials are used in application areas ranging from drug and vaccine delivery, medical implants, molecular sieves and cosmetics to catalysis and humidity control. In the present work, we employed an alternative approach to gain in-depth understanding about water interaction properties in such materials by the use of dielectric spectroscopy and thereby show that it is possible to obtain information that is not accessible from the more commonly employed water interaction analysis techniques. Specifically, the complex dielectric response of Upsalite, a novel, super-hydroscopic, high-surface area, porous magnesium carbonate material was measured in isothermal frequency scans between 10-3 and 106 Hz at controlled relative humidity (RH). We found the dielectric constant of the dry material to be 1.82. The ratio of bound to free water present in Upsalite after adsorption at room temperature was found to be high irrespective of the surrounding humidity with values ranging from ˜67% to ˜90%. We further found that OH- ions are the charge carriers responsible for the electrode polarization observed in the dielectric response and that the amount of these ions that are free to move in the material corresponds to a concentration of the order of 1-10 μmol l-1 independent of RH. Finally, the OH- diffusion coefficient displayed a drastic decrease with decreasing RH, typical of transport in unsaturated conditions. The presented results provide detailed insight about water interactions in the novel water adsorbing material under study and it is foreseen that the employed analysis methods can be used to evaluate other types of moisture adsorbing materials as well as the movement of functional species in the pores of inorganic drug delivery materials and materials tailored for adsorption of harmful charged species.

  12. Removal of toxic Cr(VI) by the adsorption of activated carbons prepared from Simarouba shells.

    PubMed

    Neelavathi, A; Sekhar, K B Chandra; Babu, C Ramesh; Jayaveera, K N

    2004-04-01

    Removal of toxic Cr(VI) in aqueous medium was investigated using activated carbon adsorbents prepared from Simarouba glauca seed shells. The pH effect, Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent dosage and contact time period were studied in batch experiment. The removal of Cr(VI) was in general most effective at pH range 2.0-4.0 and high Cr(VI) concentrations. Activated carbons are prepared at 80050 degrees C temperature. One is non-impregnated and the remaining three are impregnated with zinc chloride in 1:1,1:2,1:3 ratio. Important characteristics of activated carbons are also investigated. The data for all the adsorbents fit well to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The removal of Cr(VI) is around 97% was observed with 1:2 impregnated activated carbon at pH 3.0 where as other adsorbents showed much lower activities. PMID:16649604

  13. Use of industrial by-products and natural media to adsorb nutrients, metals and organic carbon from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Grace, Maebh A; Healy, Mark G; Clifford, Eoghan

    2015-06-15

    Filtration technology is well established in the water sector but is limited by inability to remove targeted contaminants, found in surface and groundwater, which can be damaging to human health. This study optimises the design of filters by examining the efficacy of seven media (fly ash, bottom ash, Bayer residue, granular blast furnace slag (GBS), pyritic fill, granular activated carbon (GAC) and zeolite), to adsorb nitrate, ammonium, total organic carbon (TOC), aluminium, copper (Cu) and phosphorus. Each medium and contaminant was modelled to a Langmuir, Freundlich or Temkin adsorption isotherm, and the impact of pH and temperature (ranging from 10 °C to 29 °C) on their performance was quantified. As retention time within water filters is important in contaminant removal, kinetic studies were carried out to observe the adsorption behaviour over a 24h period. Fly ash and Bayer residue had good TOC, nutrient and Cu adsorption capacity. Granular blast furnace slag and pyritic fill, previously un-investigated in water treatment, showed adsorption potential for all contaminants. In general, pH or temperature adjustment was not necessary to achieve effective adsorption. Kinetic studies showed that at least 60% of adsorption had occurred after 8h for all media. These media show potential for use in a multifunctional water treatment unit for the targeted treatment of specific contaminants. PMID:25777954

  14. Application of carbon foam for heavy metal removal from industrial plating wastewater and toxicity evaluation of the adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Song, Mi-Kyung; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2016-06-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains various types of toxic substances, such as heavy metals, solvents, and cleaning agents. Carbon foam was used as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from real industrial plating wastewater. Its sorption capacity was compared with those of a commercial ion-exchange resin (BC258) and a heavy metal adsorbent (CupriSorb™) in a batch system. The experimental carbon foam has a considerably higher sorption capacity for Cr and Cu than commercial adsorbents for acid/alkali wastewater and cyanide wastewater. Additionally, cytotoxicity test showed that the newly developed adsorbent has low cytotoxic effects on three kinds of human cells. In a pilot plant, the carbon foam had higher sorption capacity for Cr (73.64 g kg(-1)) than for Cu (14.86 g kg(-1)) and Ni (7.74 g kg(-1)) during 350 h of operation time. Oxidation pretreatments using UV/hydrogen peroxide enhance heavy metal removal from plating wastewater containing cyanide compounds. PMID:26999028

  15. Modeling high adsorption capacity and kinetics of organic macromolecules on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kurotobi, Ryuji; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The capacity to adsorb natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) on small particle-size activated carbon (super-powdered activated carbon, SPAC) is higher than that on larger particle-size activated carbon (powdered-activated carbon, PAC). Increased adsorption capacity is likely attributable to the larger external surface area because the NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle; they preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle. In this study, we propose a new isotherm equation, the Shell Adsorption Model (SAM), to explain the higher adsorption capacity on smaller adsorbent particles and to describe quantitatively adsorption isotherms of activated carbons of different particle sizes: PAC and SPAC. The SAM was verified with the experimental data of PSS adsorption kinetics as well as equilibrium. SAM successfully characterized PSS adsorption isotherm data for SPACs and PAC simultaneously with the same model parameters. When SAM was incorporated into an adsorption kinetic model, kinetic decay curves for PSSs adsorbing onto activated carbons of different particle sizes could be simultaneously described with a single kinetics parameter value. On the other hand, when SAM was not incorporated into such an adsorption kinetic model and instead isotherms were described by the Freundlich model, the kinetic decay curves were not well described. The success of the SAM further supports the adsorption mechanism of PSSs preferentially adsorbing near the outer surface of activated carbon particles. PMID:21172719

  16. Ionic liquids adsorbed cellulose electro active paper actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadeva, Suresha K.; Nayak, Jyoti; Kim, Jaehwan

    2009-03-01

    Cellulose has been reported as a smart material that can be used as sensors and actuators. The cellulose smart material is termed as Electro-active paper (EAPap), which is made by regenerating cellulose. However, regeneration of cellulose resulted in reduced performance output of actuators at low humidity levels. To solve this drawback, EAPap bending actuators were made by activating wet cellulose films in three different room temperature ionic liquids BMIPF6, BMICL and BMIBF4. Results showed that the actuator performance was dependent on the type of anions in the ionic liquids and it was in the order of BF4 > Cl > PF6Â. BMIBF4 activated actuator showed the maximum displacement of 3.8 mm with low electrical power consumption at relatively low humidity level. Also, it found that, although size of PF6 anion is larger than BF4 anion it showed the low displacement output due to poor adsorption as indicated the FTIR analysis.

  17. Adsorbed Proteins Influence the Biological Activity and Molecular Targeting of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Debamitra; Sundaram, S. K.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Riley, Brian J.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Kaysen, George A.; Moudgil, Brij M.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2007-11-01

    The possible combination of unique physicochemical properties operating at unique sites of action within cells and tissues has led to considerable uncertainty surrounding nanomaterial toxic potential. Here we have investigated the relative importance of proteins adsorbed onto nanomaterial surfaces in guiding uptake and toxicity to determine whether a priori identification of adsorbed proteins will contribute to nanomaterial toxicity assessment. Albumin was identified as the major protein adsorbed onto single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) following incubation with fetal bovine or human serum/plasma, but not when plasma from the Nagase Analbuminemic Rat (NAR) was used, and precoating SWCNTs with a non-ionic surfactant (Pluronic F127) inhibited albumin adsorption. Damaged or structurally altered albumin is rapidly cleared by scavenger receptors. In the RAW 264.7 macrophage-like model, we observed that SWCNTs inhibited the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 ng/ml, 6 hr) and this anti-inflammatory response was inhibited by fucoidan (scavenger receptor antagonist) and by precoating SWCNTs with Pluronic F127. Fucoidan also reduced the uptake of fluorescent SWCNTs (Alexa647) in RAW 264.7 cells. Albumin-coated SWCNTs reduced LPS-mediated Cox-2 induction. SWCNTs did not appear to reduce binding of a fluorescent LPS (Alexa488) to RAW 264.7 cells. The profile of proteins adsorbed onto amorphous silica (50 – 1000 nm) was qualitatively different, relative to SWCNTs, and coating amorphous silica with Pluronic F127 dramatically reduced protein binding and toxicity. Collectively, these observations are consistent with an important role for adsorbed proteins in guiding nanomaterial disposition and toxicity.

  18. Hydrogasification of carbon adsorbed on sulfur-poisoned dispersed metal catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J.G.; Wood, B.J.

    1993-12-01

    The temperature programmed reaction of 1- to 10-atom hydrogen (TPRH) with carbon deposited on alumina supported Ni, Ru, and Co and on fused Fe catalysts has been developed to examine the effect of sulfur poisoning on coking rates and the nature of the deposited carbon. A new procedure, passivation by carbon deposition on clean reduced metals and low temperature (20--50 C) exposure to recirculate dilute H{sub 2}S with moderate 0.1 atm partial pressure of CO{sub 2} was used to slow the rate of sulfur chemisorption. This method facilitated slow uniform sulfur chemisorption to fractional saturation coverages. Fractional sulfur poisoning generally blocked sites of active surface carbon (or hydrocarbon fragments) while suppressing rates of hydrogasification as shown by the increasing temperatures in the TPRH hydrogasification rate versus temperature spectra. Fractional sulfur poisoning (e.g., half saturation) appears to inhibit H{sub 2} gasification with surface carbon surprisingly without strongly affecting catalytic activity. Sulfur poisoning to saturation levels (defined here as {approximately}1 ppm H{sub 2}S in 1-atm H{sub 2} at 500 C) always results in complete loss of activity and is also marked by the growth of a very unreactive form of carbon.

  19. Decolorization/Deodorization of Zein via Activated Carbons and Molecular Sieves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of commercial activated carbons generated from different media and selective microporous zeolites with different pore sizes were used in a batch system to sequester the low molecular weight odor and color contaminants in commercial zein products. Because the adsorbents can also adsorb prot...

  20. Does Moisture Influence the Chemical Detection of Gas Molecules Adsorbed on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ming; Tian, W. Q.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2009-03-01

    In this work, the role of water in the detection of hydrazine (N2H4) by a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated using first principles electronic structure calculations (DFT/GGA--USPP)[1]. This calculation is undertaken to interpret the experimental resistivity measurements for N2H4 adsorbed on SWCNT that reveal an n-type behavior [2]. Our preliminary theoretical studies of the adsorption of N2H4 on SWCNT revealed physisorption for N2H4 and an unaltered band structure for the SWCNT [3]. This prompted us to look into the role of water on the bonding of N2H4 to the SWCNT. We found that, by introducing a monolayer of water film on the (8,0) SWCNT, the adsorption of N2H4 can introduce occupied states near the Fermi level, exhibiting an n-type behavior. However, the introduction of just few water molecules was not sufficient to influence the electronic structure of N2H4/SWCNT. Presently, we are studying the influence of water films on the chemical detection of a variety of other gas molecules (N2, NH3, etc.) by SWCNTs, and the results from such studies will also be reported. [1]. G. Kresse et al. Phys. Rev. B 54, 11169 (1996). [2]. S. Desai, et al. (APS, March 2008). [3]. M. Yu, et al. (APS, March 2008).

  1. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  2. Adsorption of dimethyl trisulfide from aqueous solution on a low-cost adsorbent: thermally activated pinecone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jingge; He, Wei; Fan, Chengxin

    2015-01-01

    Thermally activated pinecone (TAP) was used for the adsorption of dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS) from aqueous solutions, which was proved to be the main odorous in algae-caused black bloom. The effects of adsorbent dosage, adsorbate concentration and contact time on DMTS biosorption were studied. The TAP produced at 600°C exhibited a relatively high surface area (519.69 m2/g) and excellent adsorption capacity. The results show that the adsorption of DMTS was initially fast and that the equilibrium time was 6 h. Higher initial DMTS concentrations led to lower removal percentages but higher adsorption capacity. The removal percentage of DMTS increased and the adsorption capacity of TAP decreased with an increase in adsorbent dosage. The adsorption process conforms well to a pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorption of DMTS is more appropriately described by the Freundlich isotherm ( R 2 =0.996 1) than by the Langmuir isotherm ( R 2 =0.916 9). The results demonstrate that TAP could be an attractive low-cost adsorbent for removing DMTS from water.

  3. Properties of adsorbents prepared by the alkali activation of Aleksandriisk brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Yu.V. Tamarkina; V.G. Kolobrodov; T.G. Shendrik; V.A. Kucherenko

    2009-07-01

    Highly microporous adsorbents (micropore fraction of about 70%) were prepared by the alkali activation-thermolysis (800{sup o}C, 1 h) of brown coal (C{sup daf} = 70.4%) in the presence of potassium hydroxide at the KOH/coal weight ratio R{sub KOH} {le} 2.0 g/g. The dependences of the specific surface areas and adsorption capacities of the adsorbents for methylene blue (A{sub MB}, mg/g), iodine (A{sub I}, mg/g), and hydrogen (A{sub H{sub 2}} wt %) on R{sub KOH} were determined. The adsorbents obtained at R{sub KOH}{ge} 1.0 g/g exhibited developed specific surface areas and good adsorption characteristics (A{sub I} = 1000-1200 mg/g, A{sub MB} = 200-250 mg/g, and A{sub H{sub 2}} {le} 3.16 wt % at 0.33 MPa). The high capacity for hydrogen allowed us to consider brown coal adsorbents as promising materials for use as hydrogen accumulators.

  4. Solid / solution interaction: The effect of carbonate alkalinity on adsorbed thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFlamme, Brian D.; Murray, James W.

    1987-02-01

    Elevated activities of dissolved Th have been found in Soap Lake, an alkaline lake in Eastern Washington. Dissolved 232Th ranges from less than 0.001 to 4.9 dpm/L compared to about 1.3 × 10 -5 dpm/ L in sea water. The enhanced activity in the lake coincides with an increase in carbonate alkalinity. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of pH, ionic strength and carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption on goethite. Thorium (10 -13 M total) in the presence of 5.22 mg/L α-FeOOH and 0.1 M NaNO 3 has an adsorption edge from pH 2-5. At pH 9.0 ± 0.6 the percent Th absorbed on the solid began to decrease from 100% at 100 meq/L carbonate alkalinity and exhibited no adsorption above 300 meq/L. The experimental data were modeled to obtain the intrinsic adsorption equilibrium constants for Th hydrolysis species. These adsorption constants were incorporated in the model to interpret the observed effect of carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption. There are two main effects of the alkalinity. To a significant degree the decrease in Th adsorption is due to competition of HCO -3 and CO 2-3 ions for surface sites. Dissolved Th carbonate complexes also contribute to the increase of Th in solution.

  5. Preparation and performance of chitosan encapsulated activated charcoal (ACCB) adsorbents for small molecules.

    PubMed

    Chandy, T; Sharma, C P

    1993-01-01

    A technique is described to encapsulate activated charcoal for haemoperfusion to be used in an artificial liver support. Activated charcoal was encapsulated within chitosan matrix (ACCB) in different concentrations, and was used as the supports for perfusion of a mixture of solutes, having molecular weight ranges from 60 to 69,000; under a flow rate of 8 ml/min. It seems the ACCB may be a good adsorbent system for the removal of toxic uric acid, creatinine, bilirubin, etc., from solutions; while larger molecules such as albumin are adsorbed less. The encapsulated charcoal did not leach out from the matrix during perfusion, and the system may be useful for detoxification of blood. The haemolytic potential of ACCB has been compatible with polystyrene control tubes. However, further studies are needed to determine their behaviour under clinical conditions. PMID:8263676

  6. Modified Activated Carbon to be Used in Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, M. S.; de Silva, W. R. M.; de Silva, K. M. N.

    2014-11-01

    In this study a novel nano composite of hydroxyapatite nano particles impregnated activated carbon (C-HAp), which was synthesized in our own method, was used in iron adsorption studies. The study was conducted in order to investigate the potential of using C-HAp nanocomposite to be used in clinical detoxifications such as acute iron toxicity where the use of Activated carbon (GAC) is not very effective. Adsorption studies were conducted for synthetic solutions of Fe2+, Fe3+ and iron syrup using GAC, C-HAp and neat HAp as adsorbents. According to the results C-HAp nano composite showed improved properties than GAC in adsorbing Fe2+, Fe3+ and also Fe ions in iron syrup solutions. Thus the results of the in-vitro studies of iron adsorption studies indicated the potential of using C-HAp as an alternative to activated carbon in such clinical applications.

  7. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T.; Gelperin, Alan; Staii, Cristian

    2011-07-12

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  8. Decomposition degree of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and CFC replacements during recovery with surface-modified activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, Seiki; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Abe, Ikuo

    1996-02-10

    The recovery efficiency of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC113) and three CFC replacements (1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, HCFC141b; 1,3-dichloro-1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoro-propane, HCFC225cb; and 2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoro-1-propanol, 5FP) were investigated on the basis of their degree of decomposition and adsorption isotherms. The authors prepared activated carbons with various surface polarities to elucidate the recovery efficiency, the amount adsorbed, and the degree of decomposition. The amount of CFC113 adsorbed onto untreated activated carbon was the largest of all. That of HCFC225cb adsorbed onto activated carbon treated with hydrogen gas was larger than that adsorbed onto untreated activated carbon and activated carbon treated with 6 N nitric acid. The amount of 5FP and HCFC141b adsorbed on the various activated carbons was not substantial. The degree of decomposition of CFC replacements using the untreated activated carbon except for HCFC225cb was the largest of all. In the case without the activated carbon, that of CFC and the CFC replacements increased in the order 5FP, CFC113 or HCFC225cb, and HCFC141b. It is concluded that the recovery of CFC replacements was possible using the surface-modified activated carbons rather than the untreated activated carbon. The degree of decomposition of the CFC replacements during recovery using the activated carbon depends on the relationship between the adsorption site of the surface of the activated carbon and the polarity, hydrophilic site, or hydrophobic site of the CFC replacement molecule.

  9. Mesocarbon Microbead Carbon-Supported Magnesium Hydroxide Nanoparticles: Turning Spent Li-ion Battery Anode into a Highly Efficient Phosphate Adsorbent for Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Xingming; Wu, Feng; Yao, Ying; Yuan, Yifei; Bi, Xuanxuan; Luo, Xiangyi; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Zhang, Cunzhong; Amine, Khalil

    2016-08-24

    Phosphorus in water eutrophication has become a serious problem threatening the environment. However, the development of efficient adsorbents for phosphate removal from water is lagging. In this work, we recovered the waste material, graphitized carbon, from spent lithium ion batteries and modified it with nanostructured Mg(OH)2 on the surface to treat excess phosphate. This phosphate adsorbent shows one of the highest phosphate adsorption capacities to date, 588.4 mg/g (1 order of magnitude higher than previously reported carbon-based adsorbents), and exhibits decent stability. A heterogeneous multilayer adsorption mechanism was proposed on the basis of multiple adsorption results. This highly efficient adsorbent from spent Li-ion batteries displays great potential to be utilized in industry, and the mechanism study paved a way for further design of the adsorbent for phosphate adsorption. PMID:27463402

  10. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:15797395

  11. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  12. Hierarchical Porous and High Surface Area Tubular Carbon as Dye Adsorbent and Capacitor Electrode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Ji, Tuo; Brisbin, Logan; Zhu, Jiahua

    2015-06-10

    Hierarchically porous tubular carbon (HPTC) with large surface area of 1094 m(2)/g has been successfully synthesized by selectively removing lignin from natural wood. No templates or chemicals are involved during the process. By further KOH activation, surface area of activated HPTC reaches up to 2925 m(2)/g. These materials show unprecedented high adsorption capacity toward organic dyes (methylene blue, 838 mg/g; methyl orange, 264 mg/g) and large electrochemical capacitance of >200 F/g. The sustainable feature of the wood precursor and demonstrated superior adsorption and energy storage properties allow promising applications of the processed materials in energy and environmental related fields. PMID:25980528

  13. Adsorption of organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets, carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbons under natural organic matter preloading conditions.

    PubMed

    Ersan, Gamze; Kaya, Yasemin; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-09-15

    The effect of NOM preloading on the adsorption of phenanthrene (PNT) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and graphene oxide nanosheet (GO) was investigated and compared with those of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and two coal based granular activated carbons (GACs). PNT uptake was higher than TCE by all adsorbents on both mass and surface area bases. This was attributed to the hydrophobicity of PNT. The adsorption capacities of PNT and TCE depend on the accessibility of the organic molecules to the inner regions of the adsorbent which was influenced from the molecular size of OCs. The adsorption capacities of all adsorbents decreased as a result of NOM preloading due to site competition and/or pore/interstice blockage. However, among all adsorbents, GO was generally effected least from the NOM preloading for PNT, whereas there was not observed any trend of NOM competition with a specific adsorbent for TCE. In addition, SWCNT was generally affected most from the NOM preloading for TCE and there was not any trend for PNT. The overall results indicated that the fate and transport of organic contaminants by GNSs and CNTs type of nanoadsorbents and GACs in different natural systems will be affected by water quality parameters, characteristics of adsorbent, and properties of adsorbate. PMID:27107611

  14. Seasonally-Active Water on Mars: Vapour, Ice, Adsorbate, and the Possibility of Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    Seasonally-active water can be defined to include any water reservoir that communicates with other reservoirs on time scales of a year or shorter. It is the interaction of these water reservoirs, under the influence of varying solar radiation and in conjunction with surface and atmospheric temperatures, that determines the phase-stability field for water at the surface, and the distribution of water in various forms below, on, and above the surface. The atmosphere is the critical, dynamical link in this cycling system, and also (fortunately) one of the easiest to observe. Viking and Mars Global Surveyor observations paint a strongly asymmetric picture of the global seasonal water cycle, tied proximately to planetary eccentricity, and the existence of residual ice caps of different composition at the two poles. The northern summer experiences the largest water vapour columns, and is associated with sublimation from the northern residual water ice cap. The southern summer residual carbon dioxide ice cap is cold trap for water. Asymmetry in the water cycle is an unsolved problem. Possible solutions may involve the current timing of perihelion (the water cap resides at the pole experiencing the longer but cooler summer), the trapping of water ice in the northern hemisphere by tropical water ice clouds, and the bias in the annual-average, zonal-mean atmospheric circulation resulting from the zonal-mean difference in the elevation of the northern and southern hemispheres. Adsorbed and frozen water have proven harder to constrain. Recent Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer results suggest substantial ground ice in the mid- and high-latitudes, but this water is likely below the seasonal skin depth for two reasons: the GRS results are best fit with such a model, and GCM models of the water cycle produce dramatically unrealistic atmospheric vapour distributions when such a very near surface, GRS-like distribution is initialized - ultimately removing the water to the northern and

  15. Carbon-supported ionic liquids as innovative adsorbents for CO₂ separation from synthetic flue-gas.

    PubMed

    Erto, Alessandro; Silvestre-Albero, Ana; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Balsamo, Marco; Lancia, Amedeo; Montagnaro, Fabio

    2015-06-15

    Fixed-bed thermodynamic CO2 adsorption tests were performed in model flue-gas onto Filtrasorb 400 and Nuchar RGC30 activated carbons (AC) functionalized with [Hmim][BF4] and [Emim][Gly] ionic liquids (IL). A comparative analysis of the CO2 capture results and N2 porosity characterization data evidenced that the use of [Hmim][BF4], a physical solvent for carbon dioxide, ended up into a worsening of the parent AC capture performance, due to a dominating pore blocking effect at all the operating temperatures. Conversely, the less sterically-hindered and amino acid-based [Emim][Gly] IL was effective in increasing the AC capture capacity at 353 K under milder impregnation conditions, the beneficial effect being attributed to both its chemical affinity towards CO2 and low pore volume reduction. The findings derived in this work outline interesting perspectives for the application of amino acid-based IL supported onto activated carbons for CO2 separation under post-combustion conditions, and future research efforts should be focused on the search for AC characterized by optimal pore size distribution and surface properties for IL functionalization. PMID:25710387

  16. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  17. Metal Ion Adsorption by Activated Carbons Made from Pecan Shells: Effect of Oxygen Level During Activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as precursors for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this presenta...

  18. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  19. Optimization of high temperature sulfur impregnation on activated carbon for permanent sequestration of elemental mercury vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Vidic, R.D.; Brown, T.D.

    2000-02-01

    Following previous success with the use of activated carbon impregnated with sulfur at elevated temperatures for elemental mercury control, possible improvements in the impregnation procedure were evaluated in this study. Adsorbents prepared by thoroughly mixing sulfur and activated carbon in the furnace at the initial sulfur-to-carbon ratio (SCR) ranging from 4:1 to 1:2 showed similar adsorptive behavior in a fixed-bed system. Maintaining a stagnant inert atmosphere during the impregnation process improves sulfur deposition resulting in the enhanced dynamic capacity of the adsorbent when compared to other sulfur impregnated carbons. The fate of spent adsorbents was assessed using a toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP). Although mercury concentration in all leachates was below the TCLP limit, virgin activated carbon lost a significant fraction of the adsorbed elemental mercury during storage, while no loss was observed for sulfur-impregnated carbons. This finding suggests that virgin activated carbon may not be appropriate adsorbent for permanent sequestration of anthropogenic elemental mercury emissions.

  20. REGENERATION/REACTIVATION OF CARBON ADSORBENTS BY RADIO FREQUENCY (RF) INDUCTION HEATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We will use the experimental results to verify the numerical models and then use the models in parametric studies to determine the relative importance of each of the governing phenomena: electrical properties, heat transfer, RF applicator and adsorbent bed geometry...

  1. Single walled carbon nanotubes with functionally adsorbed biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T

    2013-12-17

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA or RNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  2. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  3. Performance of Spent Mushroom Farming Waste (SMFW) Activated Carbon for Ni (II) Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desa, N. S. Md; Ghani, Z. Ab; Talib, S. Abdul; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    The feasibility of a low cost agricultural waste of spent mushroom farming waste (SMFW) activated carbon for Ni(II) removal was investigated. The batch adsorption experiments of adsorbent dosage, pH, contact time, metal concentration, and temperature were determined. The samples were shaken at 125 rpm, filtered and analyzed using ICP-OES. The fifty percent of Ni(II) removal was obtained at 0.63 g of adsorbent dosage, pH 5-6 (unadjusted), 60 min contact time, 50 mg/L Ni(II) concentration and 25 °C temperature. The evaluated SMFW activated carbon showed the highest performance on Ni(II) removal compared to commercial Amberlite IRC86 resin and zeolite NK3. The result indicated that SMFW activated carbon is a high potential cation exchange adsorbent and suitable for adsorption process for metal removal. The obtained results contribute toward application of developed SMFW activated carbon in industrial pilot study.

  4. Lung retention and binding of (/sup 14/C)-1-nitropyrene when inhaled by F344 rats as a pure aerosol or adsorbed to carbon black particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, R.K.; Sun, J.D.; Barr, E.B.; Rothenberg, S.J.; Yeh, H.C.

    1989-01-01

    1-Nitropyrene (NP), as found in the environment, is more typically associated with carbonaceous particles than found as an aerosol of the pure compound. To determine whether (and why) an association with particles resulted in prolonged lung retention of NP, rats were exposed to 14C-NP as a pure aerosol or adsorbed on carbon black particles. Total 14C retained in the lung was greater at all times from 0.5 h to 30 d after exposure to 14C-NP adsorbed to carbon black particles than after exposure to pure 14C-NP (p less than .05). The fraction of total 14C in lung bound to carbon black particles decreased steadily with time after exposure, indicating in vivo removal of NP from the particles. At 0.5 h after exposure, the fraction of the estimated deposited 14C that was covalently bound to lung macromolecules was twofold greater for NP adsorbed on carbon black than for pure NP. Covalently bound 14C in lungs increased with time after exposure to 14C-NP adsorbed to carbon black, reaching levels of approximately 1% of the deposited radioactivity at 7-30 d after exposure, whereas levels of covalently bound 14C declined with time after exposure to pure NP. Thus, at 30 d after exposure, the amount of 14C covalently bound to lung macromolecules was approximately 10-fold greater (p less than .05) in rats that inhaled 14C-NP adsorbed on carbon black particles than in rats that inhaled pure 14C-NP aerosols. These results suggest that association of NP with carbon black particles augments the interaction of reactive metabolites of NP with target macromolecules. This phenomenon is thought to be related to the slow release of NP from carbon black particles, and may augment the biological effects of inhaled NP when adsorbed on carbon black or similar particles in the environment.

  5. Effects of adsorbents and copper(II) on activated sludge microorganisms and sequencing batch reactor treatment process.

    PubMed

    Ong, S A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E

    2003-10-31

    Wastewater treatment systems employing simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation processes have proven to be effective in treating toxic pollutants present in industrial wastewater. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of Cu(II) and the efficacy of the powdered activated carbon (PAC) and activated rice husk (ARH) in reducing the toxic effect of Cu(II) on the activated sludge microorganisms. The ARH was prepared by treatment with concentrated nitric acid for 15 h at 60-65 degrees C. The sequencing batch reactor (SBR) systems were operated with FILL, REACT, SETTLE, DRAW and IDLE modes in the ratio of 0.5:3.5:1:0.75:0.25 for a cycle time of 6 h. The Cu(II) and COD removal efficiency were 90 and 85%, respectively, in the SBR system containing 10 mg/l Cu(II) with the addition of 143 mg/l PAC or 1.0 g PAC per cycle. In the case of 715 mg/l ARH or 5.0 g ARH per cycle addition, the Cu(II) and COD removal efficiency were 85 and 92%, respectively. ARH can be used as an alternate adsorbent to PAC in the simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation wastewater treatment process for the removal of Cu(II). The specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) and kinetic studies show that the addition of PAC and ARH reduce the toxic effect of Cu(II) on the activated sludge microorganisms. PMID:14573344

  6. The origin of the low efficiency of carbon removal from the Nickel/Yttrium-Stabilized Zirconia triple-phase boundary by adsorbed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxing; Yang, Zongxian

    2015-04-01

    Carbon removal from the anode triple-phase boundary (TPB) of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) by adsorbed water molecule was studied using the density functional calculations, and a detailed dynamic picture was presented. It is found that the adsorbed H2O molecule can dissociate easily at the Ni/YSZ interface and on the YSZ part compared with the Ni part and react with the interface carbon to form the CHO species. The dissociation process of CHO to CH and O is more favorable as compared with that of CHO to CO and H. The CH fragment can easily diffuse to the O vacancy formed in the dynamic reaction processes and dissociate into C and H, which regenerates carbon at the interface. This might be the main reasons for the low efficiency of carbon removal from the TPB of Ni/YSZ by adsorbed water.

  7. Cooperation between adsorbates accounts for the activation of atomic layer deposition reactions.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Mahdi; Elliott, Simon D

    2015-04-14

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a technique for producing conformal layers of nanometre-scale thickness, used commercially in non-planar electronics and increasingly in other high-tech industries. ALD depends on self-limiting surface chemistry but the mechanistic reasons for this are not understood in detail. Here we demonstrate, by first-principle calculations of growth of HfO2 from Hf(N(CH3)2)4-H2O and HfCl4-H2O and growth of Al2O3 from Al(CH3)3-H2O, that, for all these precursors, co-adsorption plays an important role in ALD. By this we mean that previously-inert adsorbed fragments can become reactive once sufficient numbers of molecules adsorb in their neighbourhood during either precursor pulse. Through the calculated activation energies, this 'cooperative' mechanism is shown to have a profound influence on proton transfer and ligand desorption, which are crucial steps in the ALD cycle. Depletion of reactive species and increasing coordination cause these reactions to self-limit during one precursor pulse, but to be re-activated via the cooperative effect in the next pulse. This explains the self-limiting nature of ALD. PMID:25786200

  8. Water/carbonate stripping for CO.sub.2 capture adsorber regeneration and CO.sub.2 delivery to photoautotrophs

    DOEpatents

    Chance, Ronald; Koros, William J.; McCool, Benjamin; Noel, James

    2015-08-11

    The invention provides systems and methods for the delivery of carbon to photoautotrophs. The invention utilizes low energy regeneration of adsorbent for CO.sub.2 capture and provides for effective CO.sub.2 loading into liquids useful for photoautotroph growth and/or production of photosynthetic products, such as biofuels, via photoautotrophic culture media. The inventive system comprises a fluid/membrane/fluid contactor that provides selective transfer of molecular CO.sub.2 via a dense (non-porous) membrane from a carbonate-based CO.sub.2 snipping solution to a culture medium where the CO.sub.2 is consumed by a photoautotroph for the production of biofuels, biofuel precursors or other commercial products.

  9. EFFECTS OF ACTIVATED CARBON ON THE REACTIONS OF FREE CHLORINE WITH PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of prechlorination in drinking water treatment results in contact of free chlorine with activated carbon which has been added to remove organic compounds from water. The chlorine then reacts with the carbon and adsorbed compounds. Free chlorine reacts readily with a group...

  10. Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

  11. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  12. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  13. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  14. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  15. Removal of acutely hazardous pharmaceuticals from water using multi-template imprinted polymer adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Avinash; Chopra, Nikita; Krupadam, Reddithota J

    2014-05-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer adsorbent has been prepared to remove a group of recalcitrant and acutely hazardous (p-type) chemicals from water and wastewaters. The polymer adsorbent exhibited twofold higher adsorption capacity than the commercially used polystyrene divinylbenzene resin (XAD) and powdered activated carbon adsorbents. Higher adsorption capacity of the polymer adsorbent was explained on the basis of high specific surface area formed during molecular imprinting process. Freundlich isotherms drawn showed that the adsorption of p-type chemicals onto polymer adsorbent was kinetically faster than the other reference adsorbents. Matrix effect on adsorption of p-type chemicals was minimal, and also polymer adsorbent was amenable to regeneration by washing with water/methanol (3:1, v/v) solution. The polymer adsorbent was unaltered in its adsorption capacity up to 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption, which will be more desirable in cost reduction of treatment compared with single-time-use activated carbon. PMID:24499987

  16. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. PMID:16852056

  17. Adsorption of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Studies were undertaken of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols from aqueous solution on granular activated carbon (Filtrasorb-400, 30 x 40 mesh). Single-component equilibrium adsorption data on the eight compounds in two concentration ranges at pH 7.0 fit the Langmuir equation better than the Freundlich equation. The adsorptive capacities at pH 7.0 increase from pentachlorophenol to trichlorophenols and are fairly constant from trichlorophenols to monochlorophenols. The adsorption process was found to be exothermic for pentachlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and endothermic for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol. Equilibrium measurements were also conducted for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 4-chlorophenol over a wide pH range. A surface complexation model was proposed to describe the effect of pH on adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on activated carbon. The simulations of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Batch kinetics studies were conducted of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols on granular activated carbon. The results show that the surface reaction model best describes both the short-term and long-term kinetics, while the external film diffusion model describes the short-term kinetics data very well and the linear-driving-force approximation improved its performance for the long-term kinetics. Multicomponent adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon was investigated in the micromolar equilibrium concentration range. The Langmuir competitive and Ideal Adsorbed Solution (IAS) models were tested for their performance on the three binary systems of pentachlorophenol/2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and the tertiary system of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and found to fail to predict the two-component adsorption equilibria of the former two binary systems and the tertiary system.

  18. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  19. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  20. Single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption on activated carbon of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abdel daiem, Mahmoud M; Rivera-Utrilla, José; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel; Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl

    2015-12-15

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption of phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) on two activated carbons with different chemical natures and similar textural characteristics. The adsorption mechanism was also elucidated by analyzing the influence of solution pH and ionic strength. The activated carbons demonstrated high adsorption capacity to remove all micropollutants due to the presence of active sites on their surfaces, which increase dispersive interactions between the activated carbon graphene layers and the aromatic ring of pollutants. The adsorption capacity of the activated carbons increased in the order: DPAadsorbents. In most cases, the adsorption of contaminants is favored at acid pH (pH<5) due to the establishment of attractive electrostatic interactions. In dynamic regime, the amount of pollutant adsorbed was much higher for PA, followed by DPA, and was approximately similar for BPA, 2,4-D, and MCPA. Finally, the amount of BPA and DPA adsorbed on activated carbon decreased by around 50% and 70% in the presence of DPA and BPA, respectively, indicating that both compounds are adsorbed on the same adsorption sites of the activated carbon. PMID:26282767

  1. Effects of surface chemistry of activated carbon on the adsorption of aromatics containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating functional groups

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This study deals with the effects of chemical surface treatment of active carbons on their capacity to adsorb different organic pollutants in water. In particular, it explores the role of electrostatic adsorbate/adsorbent interactions and the consequences of the amphoteric nature of carbon surfaces. We contrast the behavior of chemically different carbons in adsorbing vastly different aromatic solutes. For example, nitrobenzene is a very weak Lewis acid that possesses the electron-withdrawing NO{sub 2} group, while aniline is a predominantly cationic species at pH < 4.6 that also possesses the electron-donating NH{sub 2} group.

  2. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal by acid modified waste activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2009-11-15

    Fresh activated carbon (AC) and waste activated carbon (WAC) were pretreated by heating with mineral acids (sulfuric acid and nitric acid) at high temperature to prepare several grades of adsorbents to evaluate their performance on Cr(VI) removal from aqueous phase. Effects of temperature, agitation speed and pH were tested, and optimum conditions were evaluated. Kinetic study was performed under optimum conditions with several grades of modified adsorbents to know the rates of adsorption. Batch adsorption equilibrium data followed both, Freuindlich and Langmuir isotherms. Maximum adsorption capacity (q(max)) of the selected adsorbents treated with sulfuric acid (MWAC 1) and nitric acid (MWAC 2), calculated from Langmuir isotherm are 7.485 and 10.929 mg/g, respectively. Nitric acid treated adsorbent (MWAC 2) was used for column study to determine the constants of bed depth service time (BDST) model for adsorption column design. PMID:19553008

  3. Activated carbon from leather shaving wastes and its application in removal of toxic materials.

    PubMed

    Kantarli, Ismail Cem; Yanik, Jale

    2010-07-15

    In this study, utilization of a solid waste as raw material for activated carbon production was investigated. For this purpose, activated carbons were produced from chromium and vegetable tanned leather shaving wastes by physical and chemical activation methods. A detailed analysis of the surface properties of the activated carbons including acidity, total surface area, extent of microporosity and mesoporosity was presented. The activated carbon produced from vegetable tanned leather shaving waste produced has a higher surface area and micropore volume than the activated carbon produced from chromium tanned leather shaving waste. The potential application of activated carbons obtained from vegetable tanned shavings as adsorbent for removal of water pollutants have been checked for phenol, methylene blue, and Cr(VI). Adsorption capacities of activated carbons were found to be comparable to that of activated carbons derived from biomass. PMID:20382474

  4. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C.

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  5. Adsorption of Reactive Red M-2BE dye from water solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernando M; Bergmann, Carlos P; Fernandes, Thais H M; Lima, Eder C; Royer, Betina; Calvete, Tatiana; Fagan, Solange B

    2011-09-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and powdered activated carbon were used as adsorbents for the successful removal of Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of pH, shaking time and temperature on adsorption capacity were studied. In the acidic pH region (pH 2.0), the adsorption of the dye was favourable using both adsorbents. The contact time to obtain equilibrium at 298K was fixed at 1h for both adsorbents. The activation energy of the adsorption process was evaluated from 298 to 323K for both adsorbents. The Avrami fractional-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental data compared with pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order kinetic adsorption models. For Reactive Red M-2BE dye, the equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. Simulated dyehouse effluents were used to check the applicability of the proposed adsorbents for effluent treatment. PMID:21724329

  6. Isotope microscopy visualization of the adsorption profile of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Asuka; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-09-16

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon may enhance its equilibrium adsorption capacity for small molecules and micropollutants, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, as well as for macromolecules and natural organic matter. Shell adsorption, in which adsorbates do not completely penetrate the adsorbent but instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the adsorbent, may explain this enhancement in equilibrium adsorption capacity. Here, we used isotope microscopy and deuterium-doped MIB and geosmin to directly visualize the solid-phase adsorbate concentration profiles of MIB and geosmin in carbon particles. The deuterium/hydrogen ratio, which we used as an index of the solid-phase concentration of MIB and geosmin, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of carbon particles. Solid-phase concentrations of MIB and geosmin obtained from the deuterium/hydrogen ratio roughly agreed with those predicted by shell adsorption model analyses of isotherm data. The direct visualization of the localization of micropollutant adsorbates in activated carbon particles provided direct evidence of shell adsorption. PMID:25162630

  7. Magnetic nanoporous carbon as an adsorbent for the extraction of phthalate esters in environmental water and aloe juice samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Hao, Yunhui; Ren, Yiqian; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2015-05-01

    In this work, magnetic nanoporous carbon with high surface area and ordered structure was synthesized using cheap commercial silica gel as template and sucrose as the carbon source. The prepared magnetic nanoporous carbon was firstly used as an adsorbent for the extraction of phthalate esters, including diethyl phthalate, diallyl phthalate, and di-n-propyl-phthalate, from lake water and aloe juice samples. Several parameters that could affect the extraction efficiency were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection of the method (S/N = 3) was 0.10 ng/mL for water sample and 0.20 ng/mL for aloe juice sample. The linearity was observed over the concentration range of 0.50-150.0 and 1.0-200.0 ng/mL for water and aloe juice samples, respectively. The results showed that the magnetic nanoporous carbon has a high adsorptive capability toward the target phthalate esters in water and aloe juice samples. PMID:25677269

  8. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon. PMID:24898563

  9. Polypyrrole/cobalt ferrite/multiwalled carbon nanotubes as an adsorbent for removing uranium ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Zhu, Jiahui; Tan, Lichao; Jing, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jingyuan; Song, Dalei; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Emelchenko, G A; Wang, Jun

    2016-05-31

    A novel rod-like, dual-shell structural adsorbent of polypyrrole/cobalt ferrite/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PPy/CoFe2O4/MWCNTs) was successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal method, which could easily separate uranium(vi) ions with an external magnetic field. The structure and morphology of PPy/CoFe2O4/MWCNTs were characterized by VSM, XRD, XPS TEM and FT-IR. The results proved that the dual-shell structure was obtained in which a shell of cobalt ferrite and polypyrrole formed around the MWCNTs core. In batch adsorption experiments, including pH, equilibrium time and temperature on uranium adsorption, were investigated. The main results show that the PPy/CoFe2O4/MWCNTs composite has a higher affinity towards the uptake of uranium(vi) from aqueous solutions. The highest adsorption capacity reached was 148.8 mg U per g at pH 7. A kinetic analysis showed that the adsorption process was best described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The uranium sorption equilibrium data correlated well with the Langmuir sorption isotherm model in the thermodynamic analysis. 0.5 mol per L NaHCO3 was used as the desorbent and good adsorption properties were shown after the desorption procedures were repeated three times. Thus, PPy/CoFe2O4/MWCNTs was an excellent adsorbent for removing uranium(vi) ions. PMID:27169495

  10. Adsorption of enzymes to stimuli-responsive polymer brushes: Influence of brush conformation on adsorbed amount and biocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Meike; Bittrich, Eva; König, Ulla; Rajeev, Bhadra Lakshmi; Müller, Martin; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Thomas, Sabu; Stamm, Manfred; Uhlmann, Petra

    2016-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte brushes can be utilized to immobilize enzymes on macroscopic surfaces. This report investigates the influence of the pH value of the surrounding medium on the amount and the activity of enzymes adsorbed to poly(2-vinylpyridine) and poly(acrylic acid) brushes, as well as the creation of thermoresponsive biocatalytically active coatings via the adsorption of enzymes onto a mixed brush consisting of a polyelectrolyte and temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacryl amide). Spectroscopic ellipsometry and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to monitor the adsorption process. Additionally, infrared spectra are evaluated in terms of the secondary structure of the enzymes. Glucose oxidase is used as a model enzyme, where the enzymatic activity is measured after different adsorption conditions. Poly(acrylic acid) brushes generally adsorb larger amounts of enzyme, while less glucose oxidase is found on poly(2-vinylpyridine), which however exhibits higher specific activity. This difference in activity could be attributed to a difference in secondary structure of the adsorbed enzyme. For glucose oxidase adsorbed to mixed brushes, switching of enzymatic activity between an active state at 20°C and a less active state at 40°C as compared to the free enzyme in solution is observed. However, this switching is strongly depending on pH in mixed brushes of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(N-isopropylacryl amide) due to interactions between the polymers. PMID:27447452

  11. Activated boron nitride as an effective adsorbent for metal ions and organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Xiao, Xing; Xu, Xuewen; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xue, Yanming; Jin, Peng; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2013-01-01

    Novel activated boron nitride (BN) as an effective adsorbent for pollutants in water and air has been reported in the present work. The activated BN was synthesized by a simple structure-directed method that enabled us to control the surface area, pore volume, crystal defects and surface groups. The obtained BN exhibits an super high surface area of 2078 m(2)/g, a large pore volume of 1.66 cm(3)/g and a special multimodal microporous/mesoporous structure located at ~ 1.3, ~ 2.7, and ~ 3.9 nm, respectively. More importantly, the novel activated BN exhibits an excellent adsorption performance for various metal ions (Cr(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Ce(3+), Pb(2+)) and organic pollutants (tetracycline, methyl orange and congo red) in water, as well as volatile organic compounds (benzene) in air. The excellent reusability of the activated BN has also been confirmed. All the features render the activated BN a promising material suitable for environmental remediation. PMID:24220570

  12. Activated boron nitride as an effective adsorbent for metal ions and organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Xiao, Xing; Xu, Xuewen; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xue, Yanming; Jin, Peng; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2013-11-01

    Novel activated boron nitride (BN) as an effective adsorbent for pollutants in water and air has been reported in the present work. The activated BN was synthesized by a simple structure-directed method that enabled us to control the surface area, pore volume, crystal defects and surface groups. The obtained BN exhibits an super high surface area of 2078 m2/g, a large pore volume of 1.66 cm3/g and a special multimodal microporous/mesoporous structure located at ~ 1.3, ~ 2.7, and ~ 3.9 nm, respectively. More importantly, the novel activated BN exhibits an excellent adsorption performance for various metal ions (Cr3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Ce3+, Pb2+) and organic pollutants (tetracycline, methyl orange and congo red) in water, as well as volatile organic compounds (benzene) in air. The excellent reusability of the activated BN has also been confirmed. All the features render the activated BN a promising material suitable for environmental remediation.

  13. Activated boron nitride as an effective adsorbent for metal ions and organic pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Xiao, Xing; Xu, Xuewen; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xue, Yanming; Jin, Peng; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2013-01-01

    Novel activated boron nitride (BN) as an effective adsorbent for pollutants in water and air has been reported in the present work. The activated BN was synthesized by a simple structure-directed method that enabled us to control the surface area, pore volume, crystal defects and surface groups. The obtained BN exhibits an super high surface area of 2078 m2/g, a large pore volume of 1.66 cm3/g and a special multimodal microporous/mesoporous structure located at ~ 1.3, ~ 2.7, and ~ 3.9 nm, respectively. More importantly, the novel activated BN exhibits an excellent adsorption performance for various metal ions (Cr3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Ce3+, Pb2+) and organic pollutants (tetracycline, methyl orange and congo red) in water, as well as volatile organic compounds (benzene) in air. The excellent reusability of the activated BN has also been confirmed. All the features render the activated BN a promising material suitable for environmental remediation. PMID:24220570

  14. Hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation by pressure-swing adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Pan, C.Y.; McMinis, C.W.; Ivory, J.; Ghosh, D.

    1998-07-01

    Hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation by pressure-swing adsorption (PSA) was studied experimentally. The high efficiency of hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation was illustrated by hydrogen separation using fine-powder-activated carbon and molecular sieve as adsorbents. The adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of the hollow-fiber adsorbers were determined. The pressure drop of the gas flowing through the adsorbers was also examined. The adsorbers were tested for hydrogen separation from nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and a multicomponent gas mixture simulating ammonia synthesis purge gas. The PSA systems using the hollow-fiber adsorbers were very effective for hydrogen purification. The high separation efficiency is derived from the fast mass-transfer rate and low pressure drop, two key features of hollow-fiber-based adsorbers.

  15. Hybridization of poly(rI) with poly(rC) adsorbed to the carbon nanotube surface.

    PubMed

    Karachevtsev, Maksym V; Gladchenko, Galyna O; Leontiev, Victor S; Karachevtsev, Victor A

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization of homopolynucleotide poly(rC) adsorbed to the carbon nanotube surface with poly(rI) free in solution has been studied by absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics method. It was found that hybridization on the nanotube surface has a slow kinetics, the behavior of which differs essentially from fast hybridization of free polymers. The duplex obtained is characterized with the reduced thermostability and a lower hyperchromic coefficient than it was observed when the duplex was formed in the absence of the nanotube. These features point to the imperfectness in the structure of the duplex hybridized on the nanotube surface. Computer simulation showed that the strong interaction of nitrogen bases with the nanotube surface weakens significantly hybridization of two complementary oligomers, as the surface prevents the necessary conformational mobility of the polymer to be hybridized. PMID:24690381

  16. Hybridization of poly(rI) with poly(rC) adsorbed to the carbon nanotube surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization of homopolynucleotide poly(rC) adsorbed to the carbon nanotube surface with poly(rI) free in solution has been studied by absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics method. It was found that hybridization on the nanotube surface has a slow kinetics, the behavior of which differs essentially from fast hybridization of free polymers. The duplex obtained is characterized with the reduced thermostability and a lower hyperchromic coefficient than it was observed when the duplex was formed in the absence of the nanotube. These features point to the imperfectness in the structure of the duplex hybridized on the nanotube surface. Computer simulation showed that the strong interaction of nitrogen bases with the nanotube surface weakens significantly hybridization of two complementary oligomers, as the surface prevents the necessary conformational mobility of the polymer to be hybridized. PMID:24690381

  17. Hybridization of poly(rI) with poly(rC) adsorbed to the carbon nanotube surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtsev, Maksym V.; Gladchenko, Galyna O.; Leontiev, Victor S.; Karachevtsev, Victor A.

    2014-04-01

    Hybridization of homopolynucleotide poly(rC) adsorbed to the carbon nanotube surface with poly(rI) free in solution has been studied by absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics method. It was found that hybridization on the nanotube surface has a slow kinetics, the behavior of which differs essentially from fast hybridization of free polymers. The duplex obtained is characterized with the reduced thermostability and a lower hyperchromic coefficient than it was observed when the duplex was formed in the absence of the nanotube. These features point to the imperfectness in the structure of the duplex hybridized on the nanotube surface. Computer simulation showed that the strong interaction of nitrogen bases with the nanotube surface weakens significantly hybridization of two complementary oligomers, as the surface prevents the necessary conformational mobility of the polymer to be hybridized.

  18. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  20. Preparation and characterization of humic acid-carbon hybrid materials as adsorbents for organic micro-pollutants.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Emad K; Abdel Ghafar, Hany H; Moursy, Ahmed S; Langford, Cooper H; Bedair, Ahmed H; Achari, Gopal

    2015-08-01

    The present work involves the preparation of novel adsorbent materials by the insolubilization and hybridization of humic acid (HA) with carbon. The prepared materials were characterized by N2 adsorption, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, solid-state (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry on wetted samples. The water solubility of these materials and the lack of effect of oxidants were also confirmed. With this background, the adsorption capacities toward phenol, 2,4,6-tricholrophenol, and atrazine were evaluated, using these as model compounds for organic micropollutants of concern in water. Experimental results show that the prepared materials are mesoporous and have a higher surface area than humic acid and even than the porous carbon in the case of carbon coating. They retain the basic features of the starting materials with lowered functional group content. Moreover, there are interesting new features. NMR relaxometry shows that equilibration of water uptake is very fast, making use in water simple. They have higher adsorption capacities than the pure materials, and they can be applied under a wide range of environmental conditions. PMID:25874433

  1. Breakthrough CO₂ adsorption in bio-based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Shahkarami, Sepideh; Azargohar, Ramin; Dalai, Ajay K; Soltan, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the effects of different methods of activation on CO2 adsorption performance of activated carbon were studied. Activated carbons were prepared from biochar, obtained from fast pyrolysis of white wood, using three different activation methods of steam activation, CO2 activation and Potassium hydroxide (KOH) activation. CO2 adsorption behavior of the produced activated carbons was studied in a fixed-bed reactor set-up at atmospheric pressure, temperature range of 25-65°C and inlet CO2 concentration range of 10-30 mol% in He to determine the effects of the surface area, porosity and surface chemistry on adsorption capacity of the samples. Characterization of the micropore and mesopore texture was carried out using N2 and CO2 adsorption at 77 and 273 K, respectively. Central composite design was used to evaluate the combined effects of temperature and concentration of CO2 on the adsorption behavior of the adsorbents. The KOH activated carbon with a total micropore volume of 0.62 cm(3)/g and surface area of 1400 m(2)/g had the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 1.8 mol/kg due to its microporous structure and high surface area under the optimized experimental conditions of 30 mol% CO2 and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbents in multi-cyclic adsorption process was also assessed and the adsorption capacity of KOH and CO2 activated carbons remained remarkably stable after 50 cycles with low temperature (160°C) regeneration. PMID:26257348

  2. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents. PMID:24080293

  3. Chars pyrolyzed from oil palm wastes for activated carbon preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Lua, A.C.; Guo, J.

    1999-01-01

    Chars pyrolyzed from extracted oil palm fibers for the preparation of activated carbons were studied. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and hold time on density, porosity, yield, BET and micropore surface areas, total pore volume, and pore size distributions of chars were investigated. The optimum conditions for pyrolysis were found to be at a pyrolysis temperature of 850 C for a hold time of 3.5 h. Scanning electron micrographs of the char surfaces verified the presence of porosities. The experimental results showed that it was feasible to produce chars with high BET and micropore surface areas from extracted oil palm fibers. The resulting chars will be subjected to steam or carbon dioxide activation to prepare activated carbons for use as gas adsorbents for air pollution control.

  4. [Effects of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection's activated carbon adsorption technology on officinal components].

    PubMed

    Zhou, En-li; Wang, Ren-jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Wei; Xu, Dian-hong; Hu, Yang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Bi, Yu-an; Xiao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    With the diversion rate of ginkgolide A, B, K as comprehensive evaluation indexes, the amount of activated carbon, ad- sorption time, mix rate, and adsorption temperature were selected as factors, orthogonal design which based on the evaluation method of information entropy was used to optimize activated carbon adsorption technology of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection. Opti- mized adsorption conditions were as follows: adsorbed 30 min with 0.2% activated carbon in 25 °C, 40 r ·min⁻¹, validation test re- sult display. The optimum extraction condition was stable and feasible, it will provide a basis for ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection' activated carbon adsorption process. PMID:27062815

  5. Performance evaluation of waste activated carbon on atrazine removal from contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pranab Kumar; Philip, Ligy

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the potential of spent activated carbon from water purifier (Aqua Guard, India) for the removal of atrazine (2 chloro-4 ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1, 3, 5 triazine) from wastewaters was evaluated. Different grades of spent activated carbon were prepared by various pretreatments. Based on kinetic and equilibrium study results, spent activated carbon with a grain size of 0.3-0.5 mm and washed with distilled water (designated as WAC) was selected for fixed column studies. Batch adsorption equilibrium data followed both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm. Fixed bed adsorption column with spent activated carbon as adsorbent was used as a polishing unit for the removal of atrazine from the effluent of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating atrazine bearing domestic wastewater. Growth of bacteria on the surface of WAC was observed during column study and bacterial activity enhanced the effectiveness of adsorbent on atrazine removal from wastewater. PMID:15913015

  6. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  7. Removal of cationic heavy metal from aqueous solution by activated carbon impregnated with anionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chi K; Park, Donghee; Woo, Seung H; Park, Jong M

    2009-05-30

    To increase their capacity to adsorb heavy metals, activated carbons were impregnated with the anionic surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), or dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium (DSS). Surfactant-impregnated activated carbons removed Cd(II) at up to 0.198 mmol g(-1), which was more than an order of magnitude better than the Cd(II) removal performance of activated carbon without surfactant (i.e., 0.016 mmol g(-1)) even at optimal pH (i.e., pH 6). The capacity of the activated carbon to adsorb Cd(II) increased in proportion to the quantity of surfactant with which they were impregnated. The kinetics of the adsorption of Cd(II) onto the surfactant-impregnated activated carbon was best described by a pseudo-second-order model, and was described better by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm than by the Langmuir isotherm. The surface charge of activated carbon was negative in all pH ranges tested (2-6). These results indicate that surface modification with anionic surfactant could be used to significantly enhance the capacity of activated carbon to adsorb cations. PMID:19022570

  8. Optical and electrical characterizations of nanocomposite film of titania adsorbed onto oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Feng, Yiyu; Wu, Zigang; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori; Yoshino, Katsumi

    2005-07-01

    Composite film containing titania electrostatically linked to oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (TiO2-s-MWNTs) was prepared from a suspension of TiO2 nanoparticles in soluble carbon nanotubes. The structure of the film was analysed principally by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron micrography and x-ray diffraction. The optical and electrical characterizations of the film were investigated by UV-vis spectrum, photoluminescence and photoconductivity. The enhancement of photocurrent in the TiO2-s-MWNT film is discussed by taking the photoinduced charge transfer between the MWNT and TiO2 into consideration.

  9. Adsorption of ethanol onto activated carbon: Modeling and consequent interpretations based on statistical physics treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzid, Mohamed; Sellaoui, Lotfi; Khalfaoui, Mohamed; Belmabrouk, Hafedh; Lamine, Abdelmottaleb Ben

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we studied the adsorption of ethanol on three types of activated carbon, namely parent Maxsorb III and two chemically modified activated carbons (H2-Maxsorb III and KOH-H2-Maxsorb III). This investigation has been conducted on the basis of the grand canonical formalism in statistical physics and on simplified assumptions. This led to three parameter equations describing the adsorption of ethanol onto the three types of activated carbon. There was a good correlation between experimental data and results obtained by the new proposed equation. The parameters characterizing the adsorption isotherm were the number of adsorbed molecules (s) per site n, the density of the receptor sites per unit mass of the adsorbent Nm, and the energetic parameter p1/2. They were estimated for the studied systems by a non linear least square regression. The results show that the ethanol molecules were adsorbed in perpendicular (or non parallel) position to the adsorbent surface. The magnitude of the calculated adsorption energies reveals that ethanol is physisorbed onto activated carbon. Both van der Waals and hydrogen interactions were involved in the adsorption process. The calculated values of the specific surface AS, proved that the three types of activated carbon have a highly microporous surface.

  10. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON ADSORPTIVE CAPACITY AND EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY OF GRANULATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR THREE ORTHO-SUBSTITUTED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorptive capacity of activated carbon for several organic compounds was found to be strongly influenced by the presence of molecular oxygen. This influence is manifested by the polymerization of adsorbate on the surface of activated carbon. As a result, GAC exhibits much high...

  11. EFFECT OF HEAT ON THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF AN ACTIVATED CARBON FOR DECOLORIZING/DEODORIZING YELLOW ZEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Freundlich model was evaluated for use to assess the effect of heat on the adsorption capacity of an activated carbon for decolorizing/deodorizing corn zein. Because zein protein and its color/odor components are all adsorbed by activated carbon, a method to monitor their removal was needed. Y...

  12. One-, Two-, and Three-Dimensional Physics with Films Adsorbed on Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilches, Oscar

    2007-10-01

    Carbon nanotube bundles are formed by mostly parallel arrays of single-wall, closed-end carbon nanotubes of about one nanometer diameter and micrometer length, each bundle having from about 30 to over a hundred nanotubes. The nanotubes in the bundles are not of uniform diameter, which leads to bundles not being perfect stacks of nanotubes. On these bundles, one-, two-, and three-dimensional forms of matter can be formed by physisorption. In this presentation I will give a brief introduction to the changes in the solid-liquid-vapor phase diagram of simple substances brought in by dimensionality, followed by introducing carbon nanotube bundles and physisorption. I will use results from current measurements of adsorption isotherms, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction to illustrate to what extent theoretical expectations and experimental results agree (and disagree). I will conclude this presentation with comments on future experiments using a single carbon nanotube as a physisorption substrate. The work described is being carried out in collaboration with David Cobden, Subramanian Ramachandran, and Zenghui Wang.

  13. Commensurate Phases of Kr Adsorbed on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Mamadou T.; Maiga, Sidi M.; Gatica, Silvina M.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we show that Krypton atoms form a commensurate solid (CS) phase with a fractional coverage of one krypton atom per every four carbons on zigzag carbon nanotubes. This is a unique phase, different from the √{3} × √{3} R30° CS monolayer formed on graphite, which has a lower coverage of one krypton atom per every six carbons. Our prediction disagrees with experiments that observe in nanotubes the same solid structure found on graphite. In order to address this discrepancy, we simulated adsorption of Kr on zigzag and armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes with radii ranging from 4.7 to 28.83 Å. Our simulations confirm that the CS of coverage 1/4 forms on medium-sized zigzag nanotubes. We also found the 1/6-coverage solid on graphene, which represents the infinite-radius limit of a nanotube. Our findings are key to experiments of adsorption on nanotubes where the interpretation and justification of the results are based on the monolayer coverage, such as mass or conductance isotherms measurements.

  14. Adsorbent 2D and 3D carbon matrices with protected magnetic iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, N. L. V.; Escote, M. T.; Valentini, A.; McCafferty, L.; Stolojan, V.; Beliatis, M.; Mills, C. A.; Rhodes, R.; Smith, C. T. G.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the synthesis of two and three dimensional carbonaceous sponges produced directly from graphene oxide (GO) into which functionalized iron nanoparticles can be introduced to render it magnetic. This simple, low cost procedure, wherein an iron polymeric resin precursor is introduced into the carbon framework, results in carbon-based materials with specific surface areas of the order of 93 and 66 m2 g-1, compared to approx. 4 m2 g-1 for graphite, decorated with ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles giving coercivity fields postulated to be 216 and 98 Oe, values typical for ferrite magnets, for 3.2 and 13.5 wt% Fe respectively. The strongly magnetic iron nanoparticles are robustly anchored to the GO sheets by a layer of residual graphite, on the order of 5 nm, formed during the pyrolysis of the precursor material. The applicability of the carbon sponges is demonstrated in their ability to absorb, store and subsequently elute an organic dye, Rhodamine B, from water as required. It is possible to regenerate the carbon-iron hybrid material after adsorption by eluting the dye with a solvent to which it has a high affinity, such as ethanol. The use of a carbon framework opens the hybrid materials to further chemical functionalization, for enhanced chemical uptake of contaminants, or co-decoration with, for example, silver nanoparticles for bactericidal properties. Such analytical properties, combined with the material's magnetic character, offer solutions for environmental decontamination at land and sea, wastewater purification, solvent extraction, and for the concentration of dilute species.

  15. Adsorbent 2D and 3D carbon matrices with protected magnetic iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carreño, N L V; Escote, M T; Valentini, A; McCafferty, L; Stolojan, V; Beliatis, M; Mills, C A; Rhodes, R; Smith, C T G; Silva, S R P

    2015-11-01

    We report on the synthesis of two and three dimensional carbonaceous sponges produced directly from graphene oxide (GO) into which functionalized iron nanoparticles can be introduced to render it magnetic. This simple, low cost procedure, wherein an iron polymeric resin precursor is introduced into the carbon framework, results in carbon-based materials with specific surface areas of the order of 93 and 66 m(2) g(-1), compared to approx. 4 m(2) g(-1) for graphite, decorated with ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles giving coercivity fields postulated to be 216 and 98 Oe, values typical for ferrite magnets, for 3.2 and 13.5 wt% Fe respectively. The strongly magnetic iron nanoparticles are robustly anchored to the GO sheets by a layer of residual graphite, on the order of 5 nm, formed during the pyrolysis of the precursor material. The applicability of the carbon sponges is demonstrated in their ability to absorb, store and subsequently elute an organic dye, Rhodamine B, from water as required. It is possible to regenerate the carbon-iron hybrid material after adsorption by eluting the dye with a solvent to which it has a high affinity, such as ethanol. The use of a carbon framework opens the hybrid materials to further chemical functionalization, for enhanced chemical uptake of contaminants, or co-decoration with, for example, silver nanoparticles for bactericidal properties. Such analytical properties, combined with the material's magnetic character, offer solutions for environmental decontamination at land and sea, wastewater purification, solvent extraction, and for the concentration of dilute species. PMID:26441224

  16. Activated carbons from potato peels: The role of activation agent and carbonization temperature of biomass on their use as sorbents for bisphenol A uptake from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arampatzidou, An; Deliyanni, Eleni A.

    2015-04-01

    Activated carbons prepared from potato peels, a solid waste by product, and activated with different activating chemicals, have been studied for the adsorption of an endocrine disruptor (Bisphenol-A) from aqueous solutions. The potato peels biomass was activated with phosphoric acid, KOH and ZnCl2. The different activating chemicals were tested in order the better activation agent to be found. The carbons were carbonized by pyrolysis, in one step procedure, at three different temperatures in order the role of the temperature of carbonization to be pointed out. The porous texture and the surface chemistry of the prepared activated carbons were characterized by Nitrogen adsorption (BET), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), thermal analysis (DTA) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pH, the adsorbent dose, the initial bisphenol A concentration and temperature. Equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as the change of enthalpy (ΔH0), entropy (ΔS0) and Gibb's free energy (ΔG0) of adsorption systems were also evaluated. The adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was found to be 450 mg g-1 at an initial pH 3 at 25 °C for the phosphoric acid activated carbon, that make the activated carbon a promising adsorbent material.

  17. Activated carbon to the rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of activated carbon from asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandah, Munther Issa; Shawabkeh, Reyad; Al-Zboon, Mahmoud Ar'ef

    2006-11-01

    Asphalt (cheap and available in huge amount in Jordan) was converted into activated carbon powder by chemical treatment with sulphuric and nitric acids at 450 °C. The final product was characterized and found effective as adsorbent material. Its cation exchange capacity reaches 191.2 meq/100-g carbons when treated with 30 wt% acid/asphalt ratio without airflow rate injection and 208 meq/100-g carbons when 6.5 ml air/min was injected into the surface of the asphalt during activation at the same acid/asphalt weight ratio of 30 and temperature 450 °C. The zero point of charge for this product was found to be stable at pH value around 3 in the range of initial pH between 3 and 10.

  19. The stability and electronic structure of lithium adsorbed in triplet form of (5.0) carbon nanotubes and (5.0) boron nitrogen nanotubes: Density functional theory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke Jing; Shao, Qing Yi; Zhang, Juan; Yao, Xin Hua

    2016-07-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the stability and electronic structure of lithium (Li) adsorbed in triplet form of (5.0) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and (5.0) boron nitrogen nanotubes (BNNTs). We have mainly found that three (5.0) tubes are covalently connected. The triplet form is an energetically stable semiconductor. Li atom can be chemically adsorbed in the triplet form of nanotubes (NTs). Meanwhile, upon the adsorption of Li, the triplet form convert into metal. Hence, the triplet form can improve reactivity and sensitivity of NTs to Li significantly.

  20. Applications for activated carbons from waste tires: Natural gas storage and air pollution control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, T.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas storage for natural gas vehicles and the separation and removal of gaseous contaminants from gas streams represent two emerging applications for carbon adsorbents. A possible precursor for such adsorbents is waste tires. In this study, activated carbon has been developed from waste tires and tested for its methane storage capacity and SO2 removal from a simulated flue-gas. Tire-derived carbons exhibit methane adsorption capacities (g/g) within 10% of a relatively expensive commercial activated carbon; however, their methane storage capacities (Vm/Vs) are almost 60% lower. The unactivated tire char exhibits SO2 adsorption kinetics similar to a commercial carbon used for flue-gas clean-up. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.; Brady, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal analysis techniques have been used at the ISGS as an aid in the development and characterization of carbon adsorbents. Promising adsorbents from fly ash, tires, and Illinois coals have been produced for various applications. Process conditions determined in the preparation of gram quantities of carbons were used as guides in the preparation of larger samples. TG techniques developed to characterize the carbon adsorbents included the measurement of the kinetics of SO2 adsorption, the performance of rapid proximate analyses, and the determination of equilibrium methane adsorption capacities. Thermal regeneration of carbons was assessed by TG to predict the life cycle of carbon adsorbents in different applications. TPD was used to determine the nature of surface functional groups and their effect on a carbon's adsorption properties.

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of paramagnetic centers in carbon-fumed silica adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Savchenko, D. V.; Shanina, B. D.; Kalabukhova, E. N.; Sitnikov, A. A.; Lysenko, V. S.; Tertykh, V. A.

    2014-04-07

    Fumed silica A-300 was carbonized by means of pyrolysis of CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. The obtained initial SiO{sub 2}:C nanopowders of black color, with an average diameter of 14–16 nm and carbon (C) concentration 7 wt. %, subjected to the oxidation and passivation treatment were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the temperature range 4–400 K. Two EPR signals of Lorentzian lineshape with nearly equal g-factors and different linewidth were observed in the initial, oxidized, and passivated SiO{sub 2}:C nanopowders. The two-component EPR spectrum was explained by the presence of C in two electronic states. The intensive narrow EPR signal, which has a temperature-dependent intensity, linewidth, and resonance field position, was attributed to the carbon-related defect with non-localized electron hopping between neighboring C-dangling bonds. The striking effect is that the temperature dependence of the EPR linewidth demonstrates the motional narrowing of the EPR signal at very low temperatures from 4 K to 20 K, which is not typically for nonmetallic materials and was explained by the quantum character of C layer conductivity in the SiO{sub 2}:C. The observed peaks in the temperature dependence of the conduction electron EPR signal integral intensity in the high-temperature range 200–440 K was explained by the presence of the C nanodots at the surface of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and the ejection of electrons from the confinement energy levels of C quantum dot when the temperature becomes comparable to the confinement energy.

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of paramagnetic centers in carbon-fumed silica adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, D. V.; Shanina, B. D.; Kalabukhova, E. N.; Sitnikov, A. A.; Lysenko, V. S.; Tertykh, V. A.

    2014-04-01

    Fumed silica A-300 was carbonized by means of pyrolysis of CH2Cl2. The obtained initial SiO2:C nanopowders of black color, with an average diameter of 14-16 nm and carbon (C) concentration 7 wt. %, subjected to the oxidation and passivation treatment were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the temperature range 4-400 K. Two EPR signals of Lorentzian lineshape with nearly equal g-factors and different linewidth were observed in the initial, oxidized, and passivated SiO2:C nanopowders. The two-component EPR spectrum was explained by the presence of C in two electronic states. The intensive narrow EPR signal, which has a temperature-dependent intensity, linewidth, and resonance field position, was attributed to the carbon-related defect with non-localized electron hopping between neighboring C-dangling bonds. The striking effect is that the temperature dependence of the EPR linewidth demonstrates the motional narrowing of the EPR signal at very low temperatures from 4 K to 20 K, which is not typically for nonmetallic materials and was explained by the quantum character of C layer conductivity in the SiO2:C. The observed peaks in the temperature dependence of the conduction electron EPR signal integral intensity in the high-temperature range 200-440 K was explained by the presence of the C nanodots at the surface of SiO2 nanoparticles and the ejection of electrons from the confinement energy levels of C quantum dot when the temperature becomes comparable to the confinement energy.

  4. Importance of structural and chemical heterogeneity of activated carbon surfaces for adsorption of dibenzothiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Ania, C.O.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2005-08-16

    The performance of various activated carbons obtained from different carbon precursors (i.e., plastic waste, coal, and wood) as adsorbents for the desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels was evaluated. To increase surface heterogeneity, the carbon surface was modified by oxidation with ammonium persulfate. The results showed the importance of activated carbon pore sizes and surface chemistry for the adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) from liquid phase. Adsorption of DBT on activated carbons is governed by two types of contributions: physical and chemical interactions. The former include dispersive interactions in the microporous network of the carbons. While the volume of micropores governs the amount physisorbed, mesopores control the kinetics of the process. On the other hand, introduction of surface functional groups enhances the performance of the activated carbons as a result of specific interactions between the acidic centers of the carbon and the basic structure of DBT molecule as well as sulfur-sulfur interactions.

  5. Surface heterogeneity effects of activated carbons on the kinetics of paracetamol removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, B.; Cabrita, I.; Mestre, A. S.; Parra, J. B.; Pires, J.; Carvalho, A. P.; Ania, C. O.

    2010-06-01

    The removal of a compound with therapeutic activity (paracetamol) from aqueous solutions using chemically modified activated carbons has been investigated. The chemical nature of the activated carbon material was modified by wet oxidation, so as to study the effect of the carbon surface chemistry and composition on the removal of paracetamol. The surface heterogeneity of the carbon created upon oxidation was found to be a determinant in the adsorption capability of the modified adsorbents, as well as in the rate of paracetamol removal. The experimental kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. The parameters obtained were linked to the textural and chemical features of the activated carbons. After oxidation the wettability of the carbon is enhanced, which favors the transfer of paracetamol molecules to the carbon pores (smaller boundary layer thickness). At the same time the overall adsorption rate and removal efficiency are reduced in the oxidized carbon due to the competitive effect of water molecules.

  6. Molecular recognition using corona phase complexes made of synthetic polymers adsorbed on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P.; Barone, Paul W.; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W.; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Hilmer, Andrew J.; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C.; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A.; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Şen, Fatih; Şen, Selda; Croy, Robert G.; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Heller, Daniel A.; Essigmann, John M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding molecular recognition is of fundamental importance in applications such as therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensor design. The most common recognition motifs involve biological macromolecules such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to biorecognition consists of a unique three-dimensional structure formed by a folded and constrained bioheteropolymer that creates a binding pocket, or an interface, able to recognize a specific molecule. Here, we show that synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymer-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and oestradiol. In each case, the recognition was predicted using a two-dimensional thermodynamic model of surface interactions in which the dissociation constants can be tuned by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatiotemporal sensors based on modulation of the carbon nanotube photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages.

  7. Third Sound Generation in Superfluid 4He Films Adsorbed on Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaia, Vito; Menachekanian, Emin; Williams, Gary

    2014-03-01

    A technique is developed for generating third sound in superfluid 4He films coating the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Third sound is a thickness and temperature wave of the helium film, and in our case we detect the temperature oscillations with a carbon resistance bolometer. The nanotubes are packed in an annular resonator that is vibrated with a mechanical shaker assembly consisting of a permanent magnet mounted on springs, and surrounded by a superconducting coil. The coil is driven with an oscillating current, vibrating the cell at that frequency. Sweeping the drive frequency over the range 100-200 Hz excites the resonant third sound mode of the cell, seen as a high-Q signal in the FFT analysis of the bolometer signal. A problem with our original cell was that the mechanical drive would also shake the dilution refrigerator cooling the cell to low temperatures, and increasing the drive would start to heat up the refrigerator and the cell, which were rigidly coupled together. A new configuration now suspends the cell as a pendulum on a string, with thermal contact made by copper wires. Piezo sensor measurements show this reduces the vibration reaching the refrigerator by two orders of magnitude, which should allow measurements at lower temperatures.

  8. Low-cost adsorbent derived and in situ nitrogen/iron co-doped carbon as efficient oxygen reduction catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chun; Wei, Liling; Su, Min; Wang, Gang; Shen, Jianquan

    2016-08-01

    A novel low-cost adsorbent derived and in situ nitrogen/iron co-doped carbon (N/Fe-C) with three-dimensional porous structure is employed as efficient oxygen reduction catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The electrochemical active area is significantly improved to 617.19m(2)g(-1) in N/Fe-C by Fe-doping. And N/Fe-C (4.21at.% N, 0.11at.% Fe) exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity with the oxygen reduction potential of -0.07V (vs. Ag/AgCl) which is comparable to commercial Pt/C. In MFCs tests, the maximum power density and output voltage with N/Fe-C are enhanced to 745mWm(-2) and 562mV (external resistance 1kΩ), which are 11% and 0.72% higher than Pt/C (0.5mgPtcm(-2)), respectively. Besides, the long-term stability of N/Fe-C retains better for more than one week. Moreover, the charge transfer resistance (Rct) values are recorded by the impedance measurements, and the low Rct of N/Fe-C is also result in better catalytic activity. PMID:27155262

  9. Production of activated carbons from waste tyres for low temperature NOx control.

    PubMed

    Al-Rahbi, Amal S; Williams, Paul T

    2016-03-01

    Waste tyres were pyrolysed in a bench scale reactor and the product chars were chemically activated with alkali chemical agents, KOH, K2CO3, NaOH and Na2CO3 to produce waste tyre derived activated carbons. The activated carbon products were then examined in terms of their ability to adsorb NOx (NO) at low temperature (25°C) from a simulated industrial process flue gas. This study investigates the influence of surface area and porosity of the carbons produced with the different alkali chemical activating agents on NO capture from the simulated flue gas. The influence of varying the chemical activation conditions on the porous texture and corresponding NO removal from the flue gas was studied. The activated carbon sorbents were characterized in relation to BET surface area, micropore and mesopore volumes and chemical composition. The highest NO removal efficiency for the waste tyre derived activated carbons was ∼75% which was obtained with the adsorbent treated with KOH which correlated with both the highest BET surface area and largest micropore volume. In contrast, the waste tyre derived activated carbons prepared using K2CO3, NaOH and Na2CO3 alkali activating agents appeared to have little influence on NO removal from the flue gases. The results suggest problematic waste tyres, have the potential to be converted to activated carbons with NOx removal efficiency comparable with conventionally produced carbons. PMID:26856444

  10. Comparing graphene, carbon nanotubes, and superfine powdered activated carbon as adsorptive coating materials for microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Ellerie, Jaclyn R; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2013-10-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), nano-graphene platelets (NGPs), and superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) were comparatively evaluated for their applicability as adsorptive coatings on microfiltration membranes. The objective was to determine which materials were capable of contaminant removal while causing minimal flux reduction. Methylene blue and atrazine were the model contaminants. When applied as membrane coatings, MWCNTs had minimal retention capabilities for the model contaminants, and S-PAC had the fastest removal. The membrane coating approach was also compared with a stirred vessel configuration, in which the adsorbent was added to a stirred flask preceding the membrane cell. Direct application of the adsorbent to the membrane constituted a greater initial reduction in permeate concentrations of the model contaminants than with the stirred flask setup. All adsorbents except S-PAC showed flux reductions less than 5% after application as thin-layer membrane coatings, and flux recovery after membrane backwashing was greater than 90% for all materials and masses tested. PMID:23911830

  11. Adsorption of methylene blue and Congo red from aqueous solution by activated carbon and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Szlachta, M; Wójtowicz, P

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the adsorption removal of dyes by powdered activated carbon (PAC, Norit) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, Chinese Academy of Science) from an aqueous solution. Methylene blue (MB) and Congo red (CR) were selected as model compounds. The adsorbents tested have a high surface area (PAC 835 m(2)/g, MWCNTs 358 m(2)/g) and a well-developed porous structure which enabled the effective treatment of dye-contaminated waters and wastewaters. To evaluate the capacity of PAC and MWCNTs to adsorb dyes, a series of batch adsorption experiments was performed. Both adsorbents exhibited a high adsorptive capacity for MB and CR, and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model, with the maximum adsorption capacity up to 400 mg/g for MB and 500 mg/g for CR. The separation factor, RL, revealed the favorable nature of the adsorption process under experimental conditions. The kinetics of adsorption was studied at various initial dye concentrations and solution temperatures. The pseudo-second-order model was used for determining the adsorption kinetics of MB and CR. The data obtained show that adsorption of both dyes was rapid in the initial stage and followed by slower processing to reach the plateau. The uptake of dyes increased with contact time, irrespective of their initial concentration and solution temperature. However, changes in the solution temperature did not significantly influence dye removal. PMID:24292474

  12. Adsorption properties of CFC and CFC replacements on activated carbon containing introduced ionic fluoride and chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, Seiki; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Abe, Ikuo

    1996-10-15

    Plasma technology has been available for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) decomposition or etching of silicone. The adsorption properties of CFC (CFC113) and CFC replacements (HCFC141b, HCFC225cb, and 5FP) on several kinds of plasma-treated activated carbons (P-ACs) prepared under different treatment gases were investigated using the adsorption isotherms, the limiting pore volume and the affinity coefficient and energy of adsorption calculated by the Dubinin-Radushkevich plot, and the quality and kinds of introduced fluoride and chloride. The dissolved fluoride and chloride atoms were introduced to the surface of activated carbon by CFC113, HCFC141b, and HCFC225cb, while the dissolved fluoride atoms were those from 5FP and tetrafluoromethane. The adsorbed amount of CFC and CFC replacements, except for 5FP, on P-ACs was larger than that on U-AC. The specific adsorption site on plasma-treated activated carbon of the CFC and CFC replacements was the fluoride atoms which were introduced by plasma treatment. It is concluded that the plasma-treated activated carbon was suitable for the recovery of CFC and CFC replacements, because the adsorbed amount of CFC and CFC replacements was larger than that on untreated activated carbon, and the adsorbed CFC and CFC replacements on activated carbon were decomposed by the plasma treatment.

  13. Study on the removal of pesticide in agricultural run off by granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Jusoh, Ahmad; Hartini, W J H; Ali, Nora'aini; Endut, A

    2011-05-01

    In this batch study, the adsorption of malathion by using granular activated carbon with different parameters due to the particle size, dosage of carbons, as well as the initial concentration of malathion was investigated. Batch tests were carried out to determine the potential and the effectiveness of granular activated carbon (GAC) in removal of pesticide in agricultural run off. The granular activated carbon; coconut shell and palm shells were used and analyzed as the adsorbent material. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms models were applied to describe the characteristics of adsorption behavior. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model and Freundlich model with maximum adsorption capacity of 909.1mg/g. The results indicate that the GAC could be used to effectively adsorb pesticide (malathion) from agricultural runoff. PMID:21232934

  14. [Comparison study on adsorption of middle molecular substances with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Wan, Jianxin; Huang, Xiangqian; Zeng, Qiao; Tang, Jing

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) are very favorable to the adsorption of middle molecular substances in the hemoperfusion because of their multiporous structure, large surface area and high reactivity, which are beneficial to the excellent absorption properties. The purpose of this study was to study the MWCTs on the adsorption capacity of the middle molecular substances. Vitamin B12 (VB12) was selected as a model of the middle molecular substances. The morphologies of MWCTs and activated carbon from commercial "carbon kidney" were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption behavior of VB12 was compared to each other with UV-visible absorption spectra. The MWCTs formed a sophistaicate gap structure, and compared to the activated carbon, MWCTs had a larger surface area. By Langmuir equation and Freundlich equation fitting analysis, VB12 adsorption on MWCTs is fit for multi-molecular layer adsorption, and the adsorption type of activated carbon is more inclined to the model corresponding to Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The adsorption rate of MWCTs is faster than that of the activated carbon and the adsorption capacity is greater, which could be expected to become the new adsorbent in the hemoperfusion. PMID:21936376

  15. First-Principles Electronic Structure Calculations of N2H4 Adsorbed on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M.; Tian, W. Q.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2008-03-01

    Recent experiments conducted by Desai et al. [1] reveal that single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks exposed to N2H4 vapor at various pressures exhibit considerable drop in resistance with respect to the pristine sample. Experimental findings reveal: (i) n-type behavior for the adsorption of N2H4/SWCNT, and (ii) the binding of N2H4 on SWCNT as chemisorption. In the present work, we have performed first-principles electronic structure calculations [2] for the N2H4 adsorbed on the (14, 0) SWCNT, where several orientations for the N2H4 molecule were considered. Calculations for the combined system were performed using 3 unit cells with the DFT/GGA and ultra soft pseudo-potentials. Our calculations reveal: (i) the binding of N2H4 on SWCNT as physisorption, and (ii) the electronic structure of SWCNT to be practically unaltered by the adsorption of N2H4, suggesting that there will not be a dramatic drop in resistance for N2H4/SWCNT. This is in disagreement with the experimental findings. To further understand the experimental observations, we will discuss mechanisms that may alter the binding nature of N2H4 on SWCNT. [1] S. Desai, G. Sumanasekera, et al. (APS, March 2008). [2] G. Kresse and J. Furthmuller, Phys. Rev. B 54, 11169 (1996).

  16. Solid-state NMR and ESR studies of activated carbons produced from pecan shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbon from pecan shells has shown promise as an adsorbent in water treatment and sugar refining. However, the chemistry of the material is complex and not fully understood. We report here the application of solid state NMR and ESR to study the chemical structure, mobility, and pore volu...

  17. Sorption of metal ions from multicomponent aqueous solutions by activated carbons produced from waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonova, L.P.; Goba, V.E.; Kovtun, M.F.; Tarasenko, Y.A.; Khavryuchenko, V.D.; Lyubchik, S.B.; Boiko, A.N.

    2008-08-15

    Activated carbons produced by thermal treatment of a mixture of sunflower husks, low-grade coal, and refinery waste were studied as adsorbents of transition ion metals from aqueous solutions of various compositions. The optimal conditions and the mechanism of sorption, as well as the structure of the sorbents, were studied.

  18. EVALUATING THE USE OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON AT PASSAIC VALLEY, NEW JERSEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An 11,500 cu m/day (3MGD) side stream of treated Passaic River water was routed to three pressure vessels in parallel, each containing a different commercial brand of granular activated carbon. For 13 weeks the virgin adsorbents were monitored for the following parameters: organi...

  19. Two confined phases of argon adsorbed inside open single walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Zygmunt J; Simard, Benoit

    2004-07-01

    Isothermal adsorption of Ar on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been studied at 77 and 87 K. The SWNTs have been grown by laser vaporization of a graphite pellet containing 0.6% (atomic) Ni/Co catalyst. The nanotubes have been prepared for argon adsorption measurements by prolonged outgassing of as-grown material in a vacuum at room temperature (295 K), at elevated temperatures of up to 475 K, and by oxidization for 2 h in dry air at 470 K. Formation of two condensed phases of Ar in the interior of SWNTs has been observed at 77 K. The low-density phase is formed at 155(5) microTorr, while the high-density phase, at 120(5) microTorr. At 87 K, only a single phase has been observed at 185(5) microTorr. Condensation at both 77 and 87 K appears to be the first-order phase transition. Onset of the quasi-one-dimensional linear (one-channel) phase and the quasi-two-dimensional monolayer (six-channel) phase formation on the external surface of bundles has been observed at 77 K near 0.0017 and 0.8 Torr, respectively, and at 87 K near 0.018 and 5 Torr, respectively. Isosteric heats of adsorption for the one-channel phase, the first external layer, and the second external layer have been determined to be equal to 137, 107, and 70 meV, respectively. PMID:16459613

  20. Hierarchical N-Doped Carbon as CO2 Adsorbent with High CO2 Selectivity from Rationally Designed Polypyrrole Precursor.

    PubMed

    To, John W F; He, Jiajun; Mei, Jianguo; Haghpanah, Reza; Chen, Zheng; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Chen, Shucheng; Bae, Won-Gyu; Pan, Lijia; Tok, Jeffrey B-H; Wilcox, Jennifer; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-01-27

    Carbon capture and sequestration from point sources is an important component in the CO2 emission mitigation portfolio. In particular, sorbents with both high capacity and selectivity are required for reducing the cost of carbon capture. Although physisorbents have the advantage of low energy consumption for regeneration, it remains a challenge to obtain both high capacity and sufficient CO2/N2 selectivity at the same time. Here, we report the controlled synthesis of a novel N-doped hierarchical carbon that exhibits record-high Henry's law CO2/N2 selectivity among physisorptive carbons while having a high CO2 adsorption capacity. Specifically, our synthesis involves the rational design of a modified pyrrole molecule that can co-assemble with the soft Pluronic template via hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions to give rise to mesopores followed by carbonization. The low-temperature carbonization and activation processes allow for the development of ultrasmall pores (d < 0.5 nm) and preservation of nitrogen moieties, essential for enhanced CO2 affinity. Furthermore, our described work provides a strategy to initiate developments of rationally designed porous conjugated polymer structures and carbon-based materials for various potential applications. PMID:26717034

  1. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon. PMID:25881437

  2. Competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds onto activated carbon in fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Sulaymon, Abbas H; Ahmed, Kawther W

    2008-01-15

    For a multicomponent competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds, a mathematical model was builtto describe the mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed column with activated carbon. The effects of competitive adsorption equilibrium constant, axial dispersion, external mass transfer, and intraparticle diffusion resistance on the breakthrough curve were studied for weakly adsorbed compound (furfural) and strongly adsorbed compounds (parachlorophenol and phenol). Experiments were carried out to remove the furfural and phenolic compound from aqueous solution. The equilibrium data and intraparticle diffusion coefficients obtained from separate experiments in a batch adsorber, by fitting the experimental data with theoretical model. The results show that the mathematical model includes external mass transfer and pore diffusion using nonlinear isotherms and provides a good description of the adsorption process for furfural and phenolic compounds in a fixed bed adsorber. PMID:18284136

  3. Novel electro-fenton approach for regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Jennifer A; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Manríquez Rocha, Juan; Bustos, Erika; Rodríguez, Adrián; Cruz, Julio C; Arriaga, L G; Godínez, Luis A

    2013-07-16

    An electro-Fenton-based method was used to promote the regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) previously adsorbed with toluene. Electrochemical regeneration experiments were carried out using a standard laboratory electrochemical cell with carbon paste electrodes and a batch electrochemical reactor. For each system, a comparison was made using FeSO4 as a precursor salt in solution (homogeneous system) and an Fe-loaded ion-exchange resin (Purolite C-100, heterogeneous system), both in combination with electrogenerated H2O2 at the GAC cathode. In the two cases, high regeneration efficiencies were obtained in the presence of iron using appropriate conditions of applied potential and adsorption-polarization time. Consecutive loading and regeneration cycles of GAC were performed in the reactor without great loss of the adsorption properties, only reducing the regeneration efficiency by 1% per cycle during 10 cycles of treatment. Considering that, in the proposed resin-containing process, the use of Fe salts is avoided and that GAC cathodic polarization results in efficient cleaning and regeneration of the adsorbent material, this novel electro-Fenton approach could constitute an excellent alternative for regenerating activated carbon when compared to conventional methods. PMID:23782426

  4. Resistively-Heated Microlith-based Adsorber for Carbon Dioxide and Trace Contaminant Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, S.; Walsh, D.; Perry, J.

    2005-01-01

    An integrated sorber-based Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) prototype was designed, fabricated and tested. It corresponds to a 7-person load. Performance over several adsorption/regeneration cycles was examined. Vacuum regenerations at effective time/temperature conditions, and estimated power requirements were experimentally verified for the combined CO2/trace contaminant removal prototype. The current paper details the design and performance of this prototype during initial testing at CO2 and trace contaminant concentrations in the existing CDRA, downstream of the drier. Additional long-term performance characterization is planned at NASA. Potential system design options permitting associated weight, volume savings and logistic benefits, especially as relevant for long-duration space flight, are reviewed. The technology consisted of a sorption bed with sorbent- coated metal meshes, trademarked and patented as Microlith by Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI). By contrast the current CO2 removal system on the International Space Station employs pellet beds. Preliminary bench scale performance data (without direct resistive heating) for simultaneous CO2 and trace contaminant removal was reviewed in SAE 2004-01-2442. In the prototype, the meshes were directly electrically heated for rapid response and accurate temperature control. This allowed regeneration via resistive heating with the potential for shorter regeneration times, reduced power requirement, and net energy savings vs. conventional systems. A novel flow arrangement, for removing both CO2 and trace contaminants within the same bed, was demonstrated. Thus, the need for a separate trace contaminant unit was eliminated resulting in an opportunity for significant weight savings. Unlike the current disposable charcoal bed, zeolites for trace contaminant removal are amenable to periodic regeneration.

  5. Preparation and characterization of a novel adsorbent from Moringa oleifera leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Olugbenga Solomon; Adegoke, Kayode Adesina; Akinyunni, Opeyemi Omowumi

    2015-10-01

    A new and novel adsorbent was obtained by impregnation of Moringa oleifera leaf in H2SO4 and NaOH, respectively. Prepared adsorbents were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR, SEM, TGA and EDX analyses, respectively. The effects of operational parameters, such as pH, moisture content, ash content, porosity and iodine number on these adsorbents were investigated and compared with those of commercial activated carbon (CAC). EDX results of acid activated M. oleifera leaf have the highest percentage of carbon by weight (69.40 %) and (76.11 %) by atom, respectively. Proximate analysis showed that the fixed carbon content of acid activated M. oleifera leaf (69.14 ± 0.01) was the highest of all adsorbents studied. Conclusively, the present investigation shows that acid activated M. oleifera leaf is a good alternative adsorbent that could be used in lieu of CAC for recovery of dyes and heavy metal from aqueous solutions and other separation techniques.

  6. Desorption kinetics of N,N-dimethylformamide vapor from granular activated carbon and hydrophobic zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Ching-Yuan Chang; Wen-Tien Tsai; Horng-Chia Lee

    1996-07-01

    Such thermodynamic properties as enthalpy, free energy, and entropy of adsorption have been computed for N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) vapor on two commercial adsorbents: coconut shell Type PCB of activated carbon and Type DAY of hydrophobic zeolite. The computation is based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherms obtained at 293, 303, and 313 K as reported by Tsai et al. The laden adsorbents were regenerated with hot inert nitrogen gas and studied by thermal gravimetric analysis at three different heating rates. The apparent activation energies (E{sub des}) of thermal desorption were determined by using the Friedman method. The zeolite DAY has an adsorption potential higher than that of activated carbon PCB as indicated by the more negative value of the adsorption enthalpy of DMF vapor. The average value of E{sub des} of zeolite DAY is larger than that of activated carbon PCB.

  7. Wet oxidative regeneration of activated carbon loaded with reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Shende, R V; Mahajani, V V

    2002-01-01

    Wet Oxidative Regeneration (WOR) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with the reactive dyes, namely chemictive brilliant blue R and cibacron turquoise blue G, was studied. Attempts were made to regenerate the loaded carbons designated now as spent carbon. A slurry (10% w/v) of spent carbon in distilled water was oxidized by wet oxidation in the temperature range of 150-250 degrees C using oxygen partial pressures between 0.69-1.38 MPa in an 1 1 SS 316 autoclave. The percent regeneration was determined from a ratio, X(RC)/X(VC), corresponding to an equilibrium adsorption capacity of regenerated carbon/equilibrium adsorption capacity of virgin carbon from an initial adsorption period of 3 h. It was observed that the regeneration mainly occurred due to the oxidation of the adsorbates taking place on the surface of carbon. It was possible to regenerate the spent GAC and PAC to the extent of more than 98% (approximately X(RC)/X(VC) > 0.98) by wet oxidation. After four consecutive cycles of adsorption and regeneration using the same stocks of GAC, carbon weight loss observed at 200 degrees C was about 40%. SEM studies of the regenerated carbon showed widening of the pores and loss of structure between the adjacent pores as compared with the virgin carbon. PAC was found to be more suitable as compared with GAC for the adsorption and wet oxidative regeneration processes to treat the aqueous solution containing lower concentration of unhydrolyzed reactive dye. The suitability of wet oxidative regeneration is demonstrated at a bench scale to treat the synthetic reactive dye solution. PMID:11942707

  8. Thick-Film Carbon Dioxide Sensor via Anodic Adsorbate Stripping Technique and Its Structural Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Photinon, Kanokorn; Wang, Shih-Han; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2009-01-01

    A three-electrode based CO2 sensor was fabricated using thick-film technology. The performance of this sensor was further enhanced by incorporating platinum nanoparticles onto the working electrode surface. An eight-fold increase in the signal output was obtained from the electrode with the platinum nanoparticles. The sensing output was linearly related to the CO2 presented. Stability measurements demonstrated that the decline of the active surface area and the sensitivity of the sensor were 8% and 13%, respectively, over a two week period of time. The sensor response appeared to be a structural dependence of the crystallographic orientation of platinum electrode. PMID:22399993

  9. Tailoring fly ash activated with bentonite as adsorbent for complex wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visa, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Used as adsorbent, alkali fly ash represents a low cost solution for advanced wastewater treatment. The alkali treatment raises sustainability issues therefore, in this research we aim to replace alkali fly ash with washed fly ash (FAw). For improving the adsorption capacity of washed fly ash, bentonite powder (B) was added, as a natural adsorbent with a composition almost identical to the fly ash. The new adsorbent was characterized by AFM, XRD, FTIR, SEM, EDS and the surface energy was evaluated by contact angle measurements. For understanding the complex adsorption process on this mixed substrate, preliminary tests were developed on synthetic wastewaters containing a single pollutant system (heavy metal), binary (two-heavy metals) and ternary (dye and two heavy metals) systems. Experiments were done on synthetic wastewaters containing methylene blue, cadmium and copper, using FAw, B and their powder mixtures. The pseudo-second order kinetics could well model all the processes, indicating a good adsorbent material which can be used for the pollutants removal from wastewater. After adsorption the substrates loaded with pollutants, annealed at 500 °C can be reused for padding in stone blocks.

  10. Adsorption of phenol and reactive dye from aqueous solution on activated carbons derived from solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kyuya; Namba, Akio; Mukai, Shin R; Tamon, Hajime; Ariyadejwanich, Pisit; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2004-04-01

    Activated carbons were produced from several solid wastes, namely, waste PET, waste tires, refuse derived fuel and wastes generated during lactic acid fermentation from garbage. Activated carbons having various pore size distributions were obtained by the conventional steam-activation method and via the pre-treatment method (i.e., mixture of raw materials with a metal salt, carbonization and acid treatment prior to steam-activation) that was proposed by the authors. The liquid-phase adsorption characteristics of organic compounds from aqueous solution on the activated carbons were determined to confirm the applicability of these carbons, where phenol and a reactive dye, Black5, were employed as representative adsorbates. The hydrophobic surface of the carbons prepared was also confirmed by water vapor adsorption. The characteristics of a typical commercial activated carbon were also measured and compared. It was found that the activated carbons with plentiful mesopores prepared from PET and waste tires had quite high adsorption capacity for large molecules. Therefore they are useful for wastewater treatment, especially, for removal of bulky adsorbates. PMID:15026233

  11. Adsorption and destruction of PCDD/Fs using surface-functionalized activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J D; Hung, P C; Zhang, Z; Chang, M B; Yan, Z; Rood, M J

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbon adsorbs polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs) from gas streams but can simultaneously generate PCDD/Fs via de novo synthesis, increasing an already serious disposal problem for the spent sorbent. To increase activated carbon's PCDD/F sorption capacity and lifetime while reducing the impact of hazardous waste, it is beneficial to develop carbon-based sorbents that simultaneously destroy PCDD/Fs while adsorbing the toxic chemicals from gas streams. In this work, hydrogen-treated and surface-functionalized (i.e., oxygen, bromine, nitrogen, and sulfur) activated carbons are tested in a bench-scale reactor as adsorbents for PCDD/Fs. All tested carbons adsorb PCDD/F efficiently, with international toxic equivalent removal efficiencies exceeding 99% and mass removal efficiencies exceeding 98% for all but one tested material. Hydrogen-treated materials caused negligible destruction and possible generation of PCDD/Fs, with total mass balances between 100% and 107%. All tested surface-functionalized carbons, regardless of functionality, destroyed PCDD/Fs, with total mass balances between 73% and 96%. Free radicals on the carbon surface provided by different functional groups may contribute to PCDD/F destruction, as has been hypothesized in the literature. Surface-functionalized materials preferentially destroyed higher-order (more chlorine) congeners, supporting a dechlorination mechanism as opposed to oxidation. Carbons impregnated with sulfur are particularly effective at destroying PCDD/Fs, with destruction efficiency improving with increasing sulfur content to as high as 27%. This is relevant because sulfur-treated carbons are used for mercury adsorption, increasing the possibility of multi-pollutant control. PMID:25150825

  12. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  13. Active carbons and clean briquettes from the modified Kansk-Achinsk brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kuznetsova, L.I.; Kontzevoi, A.A.; Pozharnikov, V.A.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of modification of Kansk Achinsk Brown coal by means of chemical and mechanical pretreatments as well as by hydrolyzed lignin addition on coal briquetting was studied. Coal briquettes were then pyrolyzed and steam activated at 700--800 C to prepare the active carbons. The main focus was to analyze how macromolecular structure of brown coal affect the properties of briquettes and the sorption and mechanical properties of activated carbons and to investigate the potential for the production of clean briquetted fuel and high performance carbon adsorbents through the directive modification of coal.

  14. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  15. CO2 adsorption on chemically modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Caglayan, Burcu Selen; Aksoylu, A Erhan

    2013-05-15

    CO2 adsorption capacity of a commercial activated carbon was improved by using HNO3 oxidation, air oxidation, alkali impregnation and heat treatment under helium gas atmosphere. The surface functional groups produced were investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS). CO2 adsorption capacities of the samples were determined by gravimetric analyses for 25-200°C temperature range. DRIFTS studies revealed the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the HNO3 oxidized adsorbents. Increased aromatization and uniform distribution of the Na particles were observed on the samples prepared by Na2CO3 impregnation onto HNO3 oxidized AC support. The adsorption capacities of the nonimpregnated samples were increased by high temperature helium treatments or by increasing the adsorption temperature; both leading to decomposition of surface oxygen groups, forming sites that can easily adsorb CO2. The adsorption capacity loss due to cyclic adsorption/desorption procedures was overcome with further surface stabilization of Na2CO3 modified samples with high temperature He treatments. With Na2CO3 impregnation the mass uptakes of the adsorbents at 20 bars and 25 °C were improved by 8 and 7 folds and at 1 bar were increased 15 and 16 folds, on the average, compared to their air oxidized and nitric acid oxidized supports, respectively. PMID:23500788

  16. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  17. Comparative study of carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbon: Physicochemical properties and adsorption capacities.

    PubMed

    Gangupomu, Roja Haritha; Sattler, Melanie L; Ramirez, David

    2016-01-25

    The overall goal was to determine an optimum pre-treatment condition for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to facilitate air pollutant adsorption. Various combinations of heat and chemical pre-treatment were explored, and toluene was tested as an example hazardous air pollutant adsorbate. Specific objectives were (1) to characterize raw and pre-treated single-wall (SW) and multi-wall (MW) CNTs and compare their physical/chemical properties to commercially available granular activated carbon (GAC), (2) to determine the adsorption capacities for toluene onto pre-treated CNTs vs. GAC. CNTs were purified via heat-treatment at 400 °C in steam, followed by nitric acid treatment (3N, 5N, 11N, 16N) for 3-12 h to create openings to facilitate adsorption onto interior CNT sites. For SWNT, Raman spectroscopy showed that acid treatment removed impurities up to a point, but amorphous carbon reformed with 10h-6N acid treatment. Surface area of SWNTs with 3 h-3N acid treatment (1347 m(2)/g) was higher than the raw sample (1136 m(2)/g), and their toluene maximum adsorption capacity was comparable to GAC. When bed effluent reached 10% of inlet concentration (breakthrough indicating time for bed cleaning), SWNTs had adsorbed 240 mg/g of toluene, compared to 150 mg/g for GAC. Physical/chemical analyses showed no substantial difference for pre-treated vs. raw MWNTs. PMID:26476807

  18. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  19. Studies on characterization and removal of methylene blue with Delonix regia plant litters activated carbon encapsulated nano metal oxide.

    PubMed

    Daniel, S; Syed Shabudeen, P S; Basker, A

    2015-07-01

    An advanced adsorbent material prepared by encapsulating nano-metaloxide on an activated carbon of Delonix regia plant litters was tested for its efficiency and superiority as an improved, advanced activated carbon material. It was subjected to modern instrumental techniques to evolve its morphology and its structure by FTIR, SEM, TEM, XRD, EDAX and BET studies. The size of MgO particles was in the range of 20 nm-25 nm. The surface area of nano composite was 632 m2 g(-1). Experimental results, based on batch mode of experiments, indicated that the adsorbent could remove 90% dye for the adsorbent dosage of 100 mg, at pH 7.0 and contact time of 120 min. The adsorption equilibrium data were well correlated for both, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The monolayer adsorption capacity Qo was found to be 14.425 mg g(-1) for the composite. The kinetic adsorption data fitted the pseudo first order modeled by Lagergren and also intra particle diffusion. Removal efficiency of the composite adsorbent was higher than the uncoated adsorbents. Regeneration of exhausted adsorbent showed considerable improved variation in comparison to normal activated carbon materials. PMID:26364472

  20. Ionic liquid coated carbon nanospheres as a new adsorbent for fast solid phase extraction of trace copper and lead from sea water, wastewater, street dust and spice samples.

    PubMed

    Tokalıoğlu, Şerife; Yavuz, Emre; Şahan, Halil; Çolak, Süleyman Gökhan; Ocakoğlu, Kasım; Kaçer, Mehmet; Patat, Şaban

    2016-10-01

    In this study a new adsorbent, ionic liquid (1,8-naphthalene monoimide bearing imidazolium salt) coated carbon nanospheres, was synthesized for the first time and it was used for the solid phase extraction of copper and lead from various samples prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The ionic liquid, carbon nanospheres and ionic liquid coated carbon nanospheres were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller surface area and zeta potential measurements. Various parameters for method optimization such as pH, adsorption and elution contact times, eluent volume, type and concentration, centrifuge time, sample volume, adsorption capacity and possible interfering ion effects were tested. The optimum pH was 6. The preconcentration factor, detection limits, adsorption capacity and precision (as RSD%) of the method were found to be 300-fold, 0.30µgL(-1), 60mgg(-1) and 1.1% for copper and 300-fold, 1.76µgL(-1); 50.3mgg(-1) and 2.2%, for lead, respectively. The effect of contact time results showed that copper and lead were adsorbed and desorbed from the adsorbent without vortexing. The equilibrium between analyte and adsorbent is reached very quickly. The method was rather selective for matrix ions in high concentrations. The accuracy of the developed method was confirmed by analyzing certified reference materials (LGC6016 Estuarine Water, Reference Material 8704 Buffalo River Sediment, and BCR-482 Lichen) and by spiking sea water, wastewater, street dust and spice samples. PMID:27474302

  1. Application of a high-throughput analyzer in evaluating solid adsorbents for post-combustion carbon capture via multicomponent adsorption of CO2, N2, and H2O.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jarad A; McDonald, Thomas M; Bae, Tae-Hyun; Bachman, Jonathan E; Sumida, Kenji; Dutton, Justin J; Kaye, Steven S; Long, Jeffrey R

    2015-04-15

    Despite the large number of metal-organic frameworks that have been studied in the context of post-combustion carbon capture, adsorption equilibria of gas mixtures including CO2, N2, and H2O, which are the three biggest components of the flue gas emanating from a coal- or natural gas-fired power plant, have never been reported. Here, we disclose the design and validation of a high-throughput multicomponent adsorption instrument that can measure equilibrium adsorption isotherms for mixtures of gases at conditions that are representative of an actual flue gas from a power plant. This instrument is used to study 15 different metal-organic frameworks, zeolites, mesoporous silicas, and activated carbons representative of the broad range of solid adsorbents that have received attention for CO2 capture. While the multicomponent results presented in this work provide many interesting fundamental insights, only adsorbents functionalized with alkylamines are shown to have any significant CO2 capacity in the presence of N2 and H2O at equilibrium partial pressures similar to those expected in a carbon capture process. Most significantly, the amine-appended metal organic framework mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) (mmen = N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine, dobpdc (4-) = 4,4'-dioxido-3,3'-biphenyldicarboxylate) exhibits a record CO2 capacity of 4.2 ± 0.2 mmol/g (16 wt %) at 0.1 bar and 40 °C in the presence of a high partial pressure of H2O. PMID:25844924

  2. Application of a High-Throughput Analyzer in Evaluating Solid Adsorbents for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture via Multicomponent Adsorption of CO2, N-2, and H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, JA; McDonald, TM; Bae, TH; Bachman, JE; Sumida, K; Dutton, JJ; Kaye, SS; Long, JR

    2015-04-15

    Despite the large number of metal-organic frameworks that have been studied in the context of post-combustion carbon capture, adsorption equilibria of gas mixtures including CO2, N-2, and H2O, which are the three biggest components of the flue gas emanating from a coal- or natural gas-fired power plant, have never been reported. Here, we disclose the design and validation of a high-throughput multicomponent adsorption instrument that can measure equilibrium adsorption isotherms for mixtures of gases at conditions that are representative of an actual flue gas from a power plant. This instrument is used to study 15 different metal-organic frameworks, zeolites, mesoporous silicas, and activated carbons representative of the broad range of solid adsorbents that have received attention for CO2 capture. While the multicomponent results presented in this work provide many interesting fundamental insights, only adsorbents functionalized with alkylamines are shown to have any significant CO2 capacity in the presence of N-2 and H2O at equilibrium partial pressures similar to those expected in a carbon capture process. Most significantly, the amine-appended metal organic framework mmen-Mg-2(dobpdc) (mmen = N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine, dobpdc (4-) = 4,4'-dioxido-3,3'-biphenyldicarboxylate) exhibits a record CO2 capacity of 4.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/g (16 wt %) at 0.1 bar and 40 degrees C in the presence of a high partial pressure of H2O.

  3. Effect of calcium on adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Shang, Junteng; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng; Gao, Hong

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium ion on the adsorption of humic acid (HA) (as a target pollutant) by powered activated carbon. The HA adsorption isotherms at different pH and kinetics of two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), were performed. It was showed that the adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for HA was markedly enhanced when Ca(2+) was doped into HA. Also, HA and Ca(2+) taken as nitrate were tested on the uptake of each other respectively and it was showed that the adsorbed amounts of both of them were significantly promoted when HA and calcium co-existed. Furthermore, the adsorbed amount of HA slightly decreased with the increasing of Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of calcium increased with the increasing of HA concentration, but all above the amounts without addition. Finally, the change of pH before and after adsorption process is studied. In the two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), pH had a small rise, but the extent of pH of later solution was bigger. PMID:25078809

  4. Sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate on activated carbons and resin: Kinetic and isotherm study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Zhang, Ruiqi; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2009-03-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) have increasingly attracted global concerns in recent years due to their global distribution, persistence, strong bioaccumulation and potential toxicity. The feasibility of using powder activated carbon (PAC), granular activated carbon (GAC) and anion-exchange resin (AI400) to remove PFOS and PFOA from water was investigated with regard to their sorption kinetics and isotherms. Sorption kinetic results show that the adsorbent size influenced greatly the sorption velocity, and both the GAC and AI400 required over 168h to achieve the equilibrium, much longer than 4h for the PAC. Two kinetic models were adopted to describe the experimental data, and the pseudo-second-order model well described the sorption of PFOS and PFOA on the three adsorbents. The sorption isotherms show that the GAC had the lowest sorption capacity both for PFOS and PFOA among the three adsorbents, while the PAC and AI400 possessed the highest sorption capacity of 1.04mmolg(-1) for PFOS and 2.92mmolg(-1) for PFOA according to the Langmuir fitting. Based on the sorption behaviors and the characteristics of the adsorbents and adsorbates, ion exchange and electrostatic interaction as well as hydrophobic interaction were deduced to be involved in the sorption, and some hemi-micelles and micelles possibly formed in the intraparticle pores. PMID:19095279

  5. Adsorption of Direct Blue 53 dye from aqueous solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Prola, Lizie D T; Machado, Fernando M; Bergmann, Carlos P; de Souza, Felipe E; Gally, Caline R; Lima, Eder C; Adebayo, Matthew A; Dias, Silvio L P; Calvete, Tatiana

    2013-11-30

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and powder activated carbon (PAC) were used as adsorbents for adsorption of Direct Blue 53 dye (DB-53) from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised using Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of initial pH, contact time and temperature on adsorption capacity of the adsorbents were investigated. At pH 2.0, optimum adsorption of the dye was achieved by both adsorbents. Equilibrium contact times of 3 and 4 h were achieved by MWCNT and PAC adsorbents, respectively. The general order kinetic model provided the best fit of the experimental data compared to pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic adsorption models. For DB-53 dye, the equilibrium data (298-323 K) were best fitted to the Sips isotherm model. The maximum sorption capacity for adsorption of the dye occurred at 323 K, with the values of 409.4 and 135.2 mg g(-1) for MWCNT and PAC, respectively. Studies of adsorption/desorption were conducted and the results showed that DB-53 loaded MWCNT could be regenerated (97.85%) using a mixture 50% acetone + 50% of 3 mol L(-1) NaOH. Simulated dye house effluents were used to evaluate the application of the adsorbents for effluent treatment (removal of 99.87% and 97.00% for MWCNT and PAC, respectively, were recorded). PMID:24076517

  6. K2S-activated carbons developed from coal and their methane adsorption behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan-Yan; Yang, Wen; Chu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    The main purpose of this work is to prepare various activated carbons by K2S activation of coal with size fractions of 60-80 meshes, and investigate the microporosity development and corresponding methane storage capacities. Raw coal is mixed with K2S powder, and then heated at 750 °C-900 °C for 30 min-150 min in N2 atmosphere to produce the adsorbents. The texture and surface morphology are characterized by a N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm at 77 K and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical properties of carbons are confirmed by ultimate analysis. The crystal structure and degree of graphitization are tested by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra. The relationship between sulfur content and the specific surface area of the adsorbents is also determined. K2S activation is helps to bring about better development of pore texture. These adsorbents are microporous materials with textural parameters increasing in a range of specific surface area 72.27 m2/g-657.7 m2/g and micropore volume 0.035 cm3/g-0.334 cm3/g. The ability of activated carbons to adsorb methane is measured at 298 K and at pressures up to 5.0 MPa by a volumetric method. The Langmuir model fits the experimental data well. It is concluded that the high specific surface area and micropore volume of activated carbons do determine methane adsorption capacity. The adsorbents obtained at 800 °C for 90 min with K2S/raw coal mass ratios of 1.0 and 1.2 show the highest methane adsorption capacities amounting to 106.98 mg/g and 106.17 mg/g, respectively.

  7. Characterization of the surface chemical properties of activated carbons for catalyst preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    The demands placed on activated carbon based technologies have outpaced fundamental studies of the relationship between the surface properties of carbons and their performance as adsorbents or as catalyst supports. This research is directed toward an understanding how the surface functionalities of activated carbons affect the catalytic phase impregnated onto the carbon support. The surface functionalities were characterized by acidity measurements employing gaseous base adsorption and aqueous base neutralization procedures. The results were examined with a simple amphoteric surface ionization model. An alternative technique to conventional potentiometric titration, designated mass titration, was developed. Employing this method, the point of zero charge (PZC) of the adsorbent was determined by the asymptotic pH value in the plot of pH vs. mass fraction of solid added to water. The methodology developed here for evaluating the PZC was used to investigate the effects of surface treatment with nitric acid on the PZC of carbons. The PZC decreased from 10 for the untreated carbon to 3.5 for the carbon receiving the most intense oxidation treatment. The carbon supported nickel precursors derived from the ion exchange procedures were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and their properties as a gasification catalyst were evaluated. The hydrogen consumption during TPR increased and the ignition temperature decreased as either the acidity of the carbon support increased or the PZC decreased. It is proposed that the PZC can be used as an index to characterize the carbon surface as a suitable support for a heterogeneous catalyst.

  8. Quantification of bioregeneration of activated carbon and activated rice husk loaded with phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ng, S L; Seng, C E; Lim, P E

    2009-06-01

    The bioregeneration efficiencies of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and pyrolyzed rice husk loaded with phenol and p-nitrophenol were quantified by oxygen uptake measurements using the respirometry technique in two approaches: (i) simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation and (ii) sequential adsorption and biodegradation. It was found that the applicability of the simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation approach was constrained by the requirement of adsorption preceding biodegradation in order to determine the initial adsorbent loading accurately. The sequential adsorption and biodegradation approach provides a good estimate of the upper limit of the bioregeneration efficiency for the loaded adsorbent in the simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation processes. The results showed that the mean bioregeneration efficiencies for PAC loaded with phenol and p-nitrophenol, respectively, obtained using the two approaches were in good agreement. PMID:19307013

  9. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from demineralized tyre char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Prasad, Guddu R.; Joshi, Parth.; Zala, Ranjitsingh S.; Gokhale, Siddharth S.; Manocha, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon is the most adsorbing material for industrial waste water treatment. For wider applications, the main consideration is to manufacture activated carbon from low cost precursors, which are easily available and cost effective. One such source is scrap tyres. Recently much effort has been devoted to the thermal degradation of tyres into gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons and solid char residue, all of which have the potential to be processed into valuable products. As for solid residue, char can be used either as low-grade reinforcing filler or as activated carbon. The product recovered by a typical pyrolysis of tyres are usually, 33-38 wt% pyrolytic char, 38-55 wt% oil and 10-30 wt% solid fractions. In the present work activated carbon was prepared from pyrolyzed tyre char (PC). Demineralization involves the dissolution of metal into acids i.e. HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4 and in base i.e. NaOH. Different concentration of acid and base were used. Sodium hydroxide showed maximum amount of metal oxide removal. Further the concentration of sodium hydroxide was varied from 1N to 6N. As the concentration of acid are increased demineralization increases. 6N Sodium hydroxide is found to be more effective demineralising agent of tyre char.

  10. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  11. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2009-06-09

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  12. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  13. Design of activated carbon/activated carbon asymmetric capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro-Prado, Isabel; Salinas-Torres, David; Ruiz Rosas, Ramiro; Morallon, Emilia; Cazorla-Amoros, Diego

    2016-03-01

    Supercapacitors are energy storage devices that offer a high power density and a low energy density in comparison with batteries. Their limited energy density can be overcome by using asymmetric configuration in mass electrodes, where each electrode works within their maximum available potential window, rendering the maximum voltage output of the system. Such asymmetric capacitors must be optimized through careful electrochemical characterization of the electrodes for accurate determination of the capacitance and the potential stability limits. The results of the characterization are then used for optimizing mass ratio of the electrodes from the balance of stored charge. The reliability of the design largely depends on the approach taken for the electrochemical characterization. Therefore, the performance could be lower than expected and even the system could break down, if a well thought out procedure is not followed. In this work, a procedure for the development of asymmetric supercapacitors based on activated carbons is detailed. Three activated carbon materials with different textural properties and surface chemistry have been systematically characterized in neutral aqueous electrolyte. The asymmetric configuration of the masses of both electrodes in the supercapacitor has allowed to cover a higher potential window, resulting in an increase of the energy density of the three devices studied when compared with the symmetric systems, and an improved cycle life.

  14. Activated carbon derived from carbon residue from biomass gasification and its application for dye adsorption: Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Maneerung, Thawatchai; Liew, Johan; Dai, Yanjun; Kawi, Sibudjing; Chong, Clive; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC) as an effective and low-cost adsorbent was successfully prepared from carbon residue (or char, one of the by-products from woody biomass gasification) via physical activation. The surface area of char was significantly increased from 172.24 to 776.46m(2)/g after steam activation at 900°C. The obtained activated carbons were then employed for the adsorption of dye (Rhodamine B) and it was found that activated carbon obtained from steam activation exhibited the highest adsorption capability, which is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and the abundance of hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups on the activated carbon surface. Moreover, it was also found that the adsorption capability significantly increased under the basic condition, which can be attributed to the increased electrostatic interaction between the deprotonated (negatively charged) activated carbon and dye molecules. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted into different adsorption isotherms and found to fit well with Langmuir model (indicating that dye molecules form monolayer coverage on activated carbon) with a maximum monolayer adsorption capability of 189.83mg/g, whereas the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. PMID:26512858

  15. Adsorption and solid catalysed reaction between activated carbon impregnated with SnO 2 and CO at ordinary temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyuke, Sunny E.; Ahmadun, Fakhru'l.-Razi

    2002-02-01

    We have used pressure swing adsorption (PSA) measurements to study the reaction of CO adsorbed from H 2/CO (75/25 vol.%) onto an activated carbon-tin(IV) oxide (AC-SnO 2) catalyst to form gaseous CO 2. Unimpregnated pure activated carbon was used for comparison. Our data fit well to Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with a rate constant of 0.022 s -1 and an equilibrium constant of 1.04, indicating first-order kinetics. We conclude that chemisorption takes place preferentially on the adsorbed O - sites produced during the thermal pre-treatment of the catalyst.

  16. Mercury binding on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bihter Padak; Michael Brunetti; Amanda Lewis; Jennifer Wilcox

    2006-11-15

    Density functional theory has been employed for the modeling of activated carbon (AC) using a fused-benzene ring cluster approach. Oxygen functional groups have been investigated for their promotion of effective elemental mercury binding on AC surface sites. Lactone and carbonyl functional groups yield the highest mercury binding energies. Further, the addition of halogen atoms has been considered to the modeled surface, and has been found to increase the AC's mercury adsorption capacity. The mercury binding energies increase with the addition of the following halogen atoms, F {gt} Cl {gt} Br {gt} I, with the fluorine addition being the most promising halogen for increasing mercury adsorption.

  17. Henry`s law gas-solid chromatography and correlations of virial coefficients for hydrocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons, ethers, and sulfur hexafluoride adsorbed onto carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Rybolt, T.R.; Epperson, M.T.; Weaver, H.W.; Thomas, H.E.; Clare, S.E.; Manning, B.M.; McClung, J.T.

    1995-07-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to determine the Henry`s law second gas-solid virial coefficients within the temperature range of 314--615 K for ethane, propane, butane, isobutane, pentane, hexane, heptane, chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, tetrachloromethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12), methyl ether, ethyl ether, and sulfur hexafluoride with Carbopack B, a microporous carbon adsorbent. The temperature dependence of the second gas-solid virial coefficients of these adsorbates was used in conjunction with analyses based on a graphical method, a single-surface numeric integration method, a single-surface analytic expression method, and a two-surface analytic expression method to determine the gas-solid interaction energies and other parameters. The interaction energies were correlated with a ratio of the critical temperature divided by the square root of the critical pressure. The four methods were compared in their abilities to successfully calculate second gas-solid virial coefficient values.

  18. In vitro adsorption removal of paraquat by activated carbon and cation exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Kitakouji, M.; Miyoshi, T.; Tanada, M.S.; Nakamura, T. )

    1989-06-01

    With the modernization of agriculture, environmental pollution and accidental poisoning by agricultural chemicals have become a great social problem. With the remarkable increase in the amount of paraquat used, the number of deaths by swallowing of paraquat has also increased in recent years. Presently, an effective antidote and treatment for paraquat poisoning is not available. For primary treatment, administration of an adsorbent is done at the same time as gastrointestinal lavage. As an adsorbent for paraquat poisoning, the efficacy of activated carbon, Fuller's Earth, bentonite, and a cation exchange resin have been reported. In this work, the authors discuss the adsorption characteristics of paraquat in artificial gastric juice and normal saline solution.

  19. Aqueous phase adsorption of different sized molecules on activated carbon fibers: Effect of textural properties.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Yogendra N; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Joshi, Harish C; Srivastava, Anurag; Verma, Nishith

    2016-07-01

    The effect that the textural properties of rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs), such as the BET surface area and pore size distribution (PSD), have on the adsorption of differently sized molecules, namely, brilliant yellow (BY), methyl orange (MO) and phenol (PH), was investigated in the aqueous phase. ACF samples with different BET areas and PSDs were produced by steam-activating carbonized fibers for different activation times (0.25, 0.5, and 1 h). The samples activated for 0.25 h were predominantly microporous, whereas those activated for relatively longer times contained hierarchical micro-mesopores. The adsorption capacities of the ACFs for the adsorbate increased with increasing BET surface area and pore volume, and ranged from 51 to 1306 mg/g depending on the textural properties of the ACFs and adsorbate size. The adsorption capacities of the hierarchical ACF samples followed the order BY > MO > PH. Interestingly, the number of molecules adsorbed by the ACFs followed the reverse order: PH > MO > BY. This anomaly was attributed to the increasing molecular weight of the PH, MO and BY molecules. The equilibrium adsorption data were described using the Langmuir isotherm. This study shows that suitable textural modifications to ACFs are required for the efficient aqueous phase removal of an adsorbate. PMID:27107386

  20. Application of activated carbon derived from scrap tires for adsorption of Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Shuangxi; Zhu, Tan

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon derived from solid hazardous waste scrap tires was evaluated as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal. The adsorption process with respect to operating parameters was investigated to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC) for Rhodamine B (RhB). Systematic research including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic studies was performed. The results showed that APTC was a potential adsorbent for RhB with a higher adsorption capacity than most adsorbents. Solution pH and temperature exert significant influence while ionic strength showed little effect on the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data obey Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed intra-particle diffusion model with more than one process affecting the adsorption process. Thermodynamic study confirmed that the adsorption was a physisorption process with spontaneous, endothermic and random characteristics. PMID:21179969

  1. Adsorption of monoaromatic compounds and pharmaceutical antibiotics on carbon nanotubes activated by KOH etching.

    PubMed

    Ji, Liangliang; Shao, Yun; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2010-08-15

    The relatively low surface area and micropore volume of carbon nanotubes limit their potential application as effective adsorbents for hydrophobic organic contaminants. In this study, KOH dry etching was explored to prepare activated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) for adsorption of model monoaromatic compounds (phenol and nitrobenzene) and pharmaceutical antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and tylosin) in aqueous solutions. With activation, the specific surface area was increased from 410.7 m(2)/g to 652.8 m(2)/g for SWNT and from 157.3 m(2)/g to 422.6 m(2)/g for MWNT, and substantial pore volumes were created for the activated samples. Consistently, adsorption of the test solutes was enhanced 2-3 times on SWNT and 3-8 times on MWNT. Moreover, the activated carbon nanotubes showed improved adsorption reversibility for the selected monoaromatics, as compared with the pristine counterparts, which was attributed to the more interconnected pore structure and less pore deformation of the activated adsorbents. This is the first study on the adsorption/desorption of aqueous organic contaminants by KOH-activated carbon nanotubes. The findings indicate that KOH etching is a useful activation method to improve the adsorption affinity and adsorption reversibility of organic contaminants on carbon nanotubes. PMID:20704245

  2. Inhibition of nitrobenzene adsorption by water cluster formation at acidic oxygen functional groups on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuichi; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki

    2008-06-15

    The inhibition effect of nitrobenzene adsorption by water clusters formed at the acidic groups on activated carbon was examined in aqueous and n-hexane solution. The activated carbon was oxidized with nitric acid to introduce CO complexes and then outgassed in helium flow at 1273 K to remove them completely without changing the structural properties of the carbon as a reference adsorbent. The amounts of acidic functional groups were determined by applying Boehm titration. A relative humidity of 95% was used to adsorb water onto the carbon surface. Strong adsorption of water onto the oxidized carbon can be observed by thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorption kinetic rate was estimated to be controlled by diffusion from the kinetic analysis. Significant decline in both capacity and kinetic rate for nitrobenzene adsorption onto the oxidized carbon was also observed in n-hexane solution by preadsorption of water to the carbon surface, whereas it was not detected for the outgassed carbons. These results might reveal that water molecules forming clusters at the CO complexes inhibited the entrance of nitrobenzene into the interparticles of the carbon. PMID:18440013

  3. Kinetic Assembly of Near-IR Active Gold Nanoclusters using Weakly Adsorbing Polymers to Control Size

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Jasmine M.; Murthy, Avinash K.; Ingram, Davis R.; Nguyen, Robin; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2013-01-01

    Clusters of metal nanoparticles with an overall size less than 100 nm and high metal loadings for strong optical functionality, are of interest in various fields including microelectronics, sensors, optoelectronics and biomedical imaging and therapeutics. Herein we assemble ~5 nm gold particles into clusters with controlled size, as small as 30 nm and up to 100 nm, which contain only small amounts of polymeric stabilizers. The assembly is kinetically controlled with weakly adsorbing polymers, PLA(2K)-b-PEG(10K)-b-PLA(2K) or PEG (MW = 3350), by manipulating electrostatic, van der Waals (VDW), steric, and depletion forces. The cluster size and optical properties are tuned as a function of particle volume fractions and polymer/gold ratios to modulate the interparticle interactions. The close spacing between the constituent gold nanoparticles and high gold loadings (80–85% w/w gold) produce a strong absorbance cross section of ~9×10−15 m2 in the NIR at 700 nm. This morphology results from VDW and depletion attractive interactions that exclude the weakly adsorbed polymeric stabilizer from the cluster interior. The generality of this kinetic assembly platform is demonstrated for gold nanoparticles with a range of surface charges from highly negative to neutral, with the two different polymers. PMID:20361735

  4. Density-functional theory study of interactions between water and carbon monoxide adsorbed on platinum under electrochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Juan A.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki

    2009-08-01

    In the study of CO poisoning of the platinum-based hydrogen anode in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell, a key issue that has eluded our understanding is the interactions of CO adsorbed on Pt surfaces and solvent H 2O. Our density-functional theory calculations reveal a new interpretation of the adsorbed state of CO and its interaction with water under electrochemical conditions, which rationalizes the observed quantitative relationship between infrared intensities for adsorbed bridging CO (bridge) and water exhibiting a high-frequency O-H stretch (ca. 3650 cm -1). The theoretical modeling indicates that the observed feature is due to a water molecule firmly hydrogen-bonded to CO (bridge).

  5. Catalytic combustion of dry carbon monoxide by external power activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño, C.; Prince, J. C.

    2000-03-01

    The catalytic combustion of dry carbon monoxide and air in a planar stagnation-point flow over a platinum foil with external power is studied in this paper. The reduced heterogeneous kinetics are modelled with the dissociative adsorption of the molecular oxygen and the non-dissociative adsorption of CO, together with a surface reaction of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type and the desorption reaction of the adsorbed product, CO 2(s). The resulting governing equations have been numerically integrated and the whole S-shaped response curve has been obtained as a function of the mixture initial concentration. The critical conditions for the catalytic ignition and extinction are deduced using high activation energy asymptotics of the desorption kinetics of the most efficient adsorbed reactant, CO(s). We obtained a very good agreement between the numerical and asymptotic results for the ignition and extinction conditions. In general, the ignition process can be well modelled without reactant consumption, while extinction occurs in the partial diffusion-controlled regime, with a finite non-zero concentration of carbon monoxide close to the plate.

  6. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications. PMID:27131811

  7. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  8. Non-dissociative activation of chemisorbed dinitrogen on Ni(110) by co-adsorbed lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao Temprano, Israel; Jenkins, Stephen J.; King, David A.

    2013-11-14

    Weakening the intramolecular N–N bond is essential to promote direct hydrogenation of adsorbed N{sub 2} on catalyst surfaces. The interaction of N{sub 2} with Li on Ni(110) surfaces has been investigated. We show that the N–N bond is significantly weakened with increasing Li coverage, evidenced by large redshifts in N–N stretch frequency of up to 380 cm{sup −1} compared to the gas phase. Some increased thermal stability of the most weakened N{sub 2,ads} states is also observed. We speculate that the various observed redshifts in N–N stretch frequency are associated with an enhanced backfilling of the 2π* antibonding orbital of N{sub 2} due to both the Li-induced surface electrostatic field, and the formation of Li{sub x}(N{sub 2}){sub y} surface complexes.

  9. Sorption performance and mechanism of a sludge-derived char as porous carbon-based hybrid adsorbent for benzene derivatives in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingjun; Xiong, Ya; Sun, Lianpeng; Tian, Shuanghong; Xu, Xianyan; Zhao, Cunyuan; Luo, Rongshu; Yang, Xin; Shih, Kaimin; Liu, Haiyang

    2014-06-15

    A porous sludge-derived char was prepared by a new one-step pyrolytic process with citric acid-ZnCl2 mixed fabricating-pore agents. The sludge-derived char was confirmed to be a hierarchically porous hybrid adsorbent containing-elemental carbon, -highly carbonized organic species and -inorganic ash with a great surface area of 792.4m(2)g(-1). It was used as a carbon-based hybrid adsorbent for four benzene derivatives including 4-chlorophenol, phenol, benzoic acid and 4-hydroxylbenzoic acid in aqueous solution. Results showed that their sorption isotherms were nonlinear at low concentrations and linear at high concentrations. The sorption performance could be described by a multiple sorption model (QT=QA+KPCe). The order of these partition sorption coefficients (KP) of these benzene derivatives was consistent with their octanol-water partition coefficients (logKow), but those saturated amounts (QA) were inconsistent with their logKow. The inconstancy was found to be considerably dependent on the preferential interaction of benzoic acid with SiO2 in the sludge-derived char. Quantum theoretical calculation confirmed that the preferential interaction was attributed to the formation of hydrogen bonds (1.61 and 1.69Å) and new Si-O bonds (1.83 and 1.87Å) between the carboxyl of benzoic acid and the SiO2 surface in the sorption process. PMID:24793296

  10. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds.

    PubMed

    Bandosz, Teresa J; Petit, Camille

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH(3) adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Brønsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air. PMID:19615690

  11. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bandosz, T.J.; Petit, C.

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH{sub 3} adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Bronsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air.

  12. Characterization and ciprofloxacin adsorption properties of activated carbons prepared from biomass wastes by H3PO4 activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Li, Hong; Li, Guangci; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Xuebing

    2016-10-01

    As biomass wastes, Arundo donax Linn and pomelo peel were used as precursors for activated carbons (ALAC and PPAC) preparation by phosphoric acid activation. The pore structure and surface acidic functional groups of both carbons were characterized by nitrogen adsorption/desorption experiment, NH3-temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A batch of experiments was carried out to investigate the adsorption performances of ciprofloxacin under different conditions. Results showed that PPAC exhibited larger surface area (1252m(2)/g) and larger portion of mesoporous, while ALAC was typical of microporous materials. Results from NH3-TPD suggested that ALAC was characteristic of more acidic functional group than PPAC. The maximum monolayer adsorption capability was 244mg/g for ALAC and 400mg/L for PPAC. Kinetics studies showed intra-particle diffusion was not the unique rate-controlling step. Boundary layer resistance existed between adsorbent and adsorbate. PMID:27034157

  13. Catalytic supports on the base of activated anthracites and synthetic carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubchik, S. B.; Tikhonova, L. P.; Tarasenko, Yu. A.; Galushko, O. L.; Galushko, L. Ya.; Fonseca, I. M.

    2006-06-01

    Selective adsorption of platinum group metals (PMG) on activated carbons from a multi-component model and technological solutions was proposed for the preparation of heterogeneous-supported catalysts. Activated natural anthracites and a nitrogen-containing synthetic carbon are considered as carriers for Pd-supported catalysts. Their catalytic activity was studied in the Pd-catalyzed reactions of hydrogen peroxide decomposition and chloride ions oxidation by manganese(III). On the base of the obtained results, novel high sensitive analytical methods both for direct determination of supported-metal quantity and palladium oxidation states on the surface of spent adsorbents are suggested.

  14. Is there a Difference in Van Der Waals Interactions between Rare Gas Atoms Adsorbed on Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Mandeltort, Lynn; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yates, John T.; Cole, Milton W.; Johnson, J. Karl

    2013-03-01

    Differences in polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT) that binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programmed desorption of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected DFT are in good agreement with experiments.

  15. Synthesis of magnetic oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube-κ-carrageenan-Fe3O4 nanocomposite adsorbent and its application in cationic Methylene Blue dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Duman, Osman; Tunç, Sibel; Polat, Tülin Gürkan; Bozoğlan, Bahar Kancı

    2016-08-20

    In this study, magnetic oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube (OMWCNT)-Fe3O4 and OMWCNT-κ-carrageenan-Fe3O4 nanocomposites were synthesized and used as adsorbent for the removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution. Magnetic nanocomposites were characterized by using of specific surface area, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry, thermal gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope measurements. The results of characterization analyses exhibited that OMWCNT was successfully modified with κ-carrageenan. Furthermore, OMWCNT-Fe3O4 and OMWCNT-κ-carrageenan-Fe3O4 nanocomposites were of a super-paramagnetic property. Adsorption studies revealed that the data of adsorption kinetics and isotherm were well fitted by the pseudo second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model, respectively. The adsorption amounts of magnetic adsorbents increased with contact time and initial dye concentration. Compared with magnetic OMWCNT-Fe3O4 nanocomposite, magnetic OMWCNT-κ-carrageenan-Fe3O4 nanocomposite showed a better adsorption performance for the removal of MB from aqueous solution. Therefore, OMWCNT-κ-carrageenan-Fe3O4 nanocomposite may be used as a magnetic adsorbent to remove the cationic dyes from wastewaters. PMID:27178911

  16. Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube nanocomposite as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II) in various matrices.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar Tarigh, Ghazale; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2013-10-15

    Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube (MMWCNT) nanocomposite was synthesized and used as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II). The properties of MMWCNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). This adsorbent was found to be advantageous over conventional solid phase extraction (SPE) in terms of operational simplicity and low time-consuming. MMWCNT, carrying target metals, was easily separated from the aqueous solutions with the help of an external magnet; so, no filtration or centrifugation was necessary. After extraction and collection of MMWCNT, the adsorbed analytes were eluted and analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of different sorption/desorption parameters. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits and enhancement factors of the proposed method for Pb and Mn were 1.0 and 0.6 µg L(-1), 390 and 697 respectively. The presented procedure was successfully applied for determination of Pb(II) and Mn (II) contents in lipstick, rice samples and accuracy was evaluated analyzing a certified reference material Seronorm(™) Urine LOT NO2525. PMID:24054657

  17. Adsorption of basic dyes onto activated carbon using microcolumns

    SciTech Connect

    El Qada, E.N.; Allen, S.J.; Walker, G.M.

    2006-08-16

    Column studies for the adsorption of basic dyes (methylene blue, basic red, and basic yellow) onto PAC2 (activated carbon produced from bituminous coal using steam activation) and F400 were undertaken in fixed-bed microcolumns. Experimental data were correlated using the bed depth service time (BDST) model. The effect of bisolute interactions on the performance of microcolumn fixed beds was studied. The BDST model was successful in describing the breakthrough curves for the adsorption of MB onto PAC2 and predicts the experimental data with a good degree of accuracy. The results emphasized that the interactions and competition for the available binding sites have considerable influence on the efficiency of adsorbents to remove dyes from the solution.

  18. In vitro binding of zearalenone to different adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Dante J; Di Marco, Liliana; Oliver, Guillermo; Bardón, Alicia

    2005-03-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a potent estrogenic metabolite produced by some Fusarium species. No treatment has been successfully employed to get rid of the ZEA contained in foods. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability (adsorptive power) of five adsorbents--activated carbon, bentonite, talc, sandstone, and calcium sulfate--to trap ZEA in vitro. Activated carbon was the best adsorbent, binding 100% ZEA (pH 3 and 7.3) at 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1% dose levels. Bentonite, talc,and calcium sulfate were less efficient than activated carbon but still could bind ZEA to some extent. On the other hand, sandstone was inactive in the experimental conditions employed. Our results indicate that activated carbon could be a good candidate for detoxification of ZEA present in foods. PMID:15771192

  19. SORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms and rate of elemental mercury (HgO) capture by activated carbons have been studied using a bench-scale apparatus. Three types of activated carbons, two of which are thermally activated (PC-100 and FGD) and one with elemental sulfur (S) impregnated in it (HGR), were...

  20. Characteristics of competitive adsorption between 2-methylisoborneol and natural organic matter on superfine and conventionally sized powdered activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Nakao, Soichi; Knappe, Detlef R U; Matsushita, Taku

    2012-10-01

    When treating water with activated carbon, natural organic matter (NOM) is not only a target for adsorptive removal but also an inhibitory substance that reduces the removal efficiency of trace compounds, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), through adsorption competition. Recently, superfine (submicron-sized) activated carbon (SPAC) was developed by wet-milling commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC) to a smaller particle size. It was reported that SPAC has a larger NOM adsorption capacity than PAC because NOM mainly adsorbs close to the external adsorbent particle surface (shell adsorption mechanism). Thus, SPAC with its larger specific external surface area can adsorb more NOM than PAC. The effect of higher NOM uptake on the adsorptive removal of MIB has, however, not been investigated. Results of this study show that adsorption competition between NOM and MIB did not increase when NOM uptake increased due to carbon size reduction; i.e., the increased NOM uptake by SPAC did not result in a decrease in MIB adsorption capacity beyond that obtained as a result of NOM adsorption by PAC. A simple estimation method for determining the adsorbed amount of competing NOM (NOM that reduces MIB adsorption) is presented based on the simplified equivalent background compound (EBC) method. Furthermore, the mechanism of adsorption competition is discussed based on results obtained with the simplified EBC method and the shell adsorption mechanism. Competing NOM, which likely comprises a small portion of NOM, adsorbs in internal pores of activated carbon particles as MIB does, thereby reducing the MIB adsorption capacity to a similar extent regardless of adsorbent particle size. SPAC application can be advantageous because enhanced NOM removal does not translate into less effective removal of MIB. Molecular size distribution data of NOM suggest that the competing NOM has a molecular weight similar to that of the target compound. PMID:22763287

  1. Magnetic porous carbon derived from a Zn/Co bimetallic metal-organic framework as an adsorbent for the extraction of chlorophenols from water and honey tea samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Menghua; Wang, Junmin; Jiao, Caina; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    A novel magnetic porous carbon derived from a bimetallic metal-organic framework, Zn/Co-MPC, was prepared by introducing cobalt into ZIF-8. Magnetic porous carbon that possesses magnetic properties and a large specific surface area was firstly fabricated by the direct carbonization of Zn/Co-ZIF-8. The prepared magnetic porous carbon material was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared magnetic porous carbon was used as a magnetic solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the enrichment of chlorophenols from water and honey tea samples before high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Several experimental parameters that could influence the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, good linearities (r > 0.9957) for all calibration curves were obtained with low limits of detection, which are in the range of 0.1-0.2 ng mL(-1) for all the analytes. The results showed that the prepared magnetic porous carbon had an excellent adsorption capability toward the target analytes. PMID:26991637

  2. Liquid Phase Adsorption of α-Tocopherol by Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Ming, Chu Chi; Sundang, Murni

    α-Tocopherol or commonly called vitamin E can be found in major commercial vegetable oils such as soya oil and palm oil. However the existence in these oil is in low concentration. The recovery of low concentration of α-tocopherol from palm oils is increasingly popular. Adsorption technique for the recovery of α-tocopherol from palm oil is believed to be much lower in cost and more effective. As a case study in this work, activated carbon is chosen as the adsorbent and ethanol as the solvent. The adsorption equilibria of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was conducted in batch and the concentration of α-tocopherol was identified by LCMS. Langmuirian monolayer adsorption theory was used for the analysis of the isotherm equilibria. The adsorptivity of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was identified. The adsorption equilibria at low concentration found to be linear. The breakthrough curve was then generated using model assuming isothermal, single transition trace component with intraparticle diffusion. Sensitivity test on the curve indicated that the system is very sensitive to changes in diffusitivity and passive to changes on the equilibrium constant.

  3. Studies and characterisations of various activated carbons used for carbon/carbon supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamby, J.; Taberna, P. L.; Simon, P.; Fauvarque, J. F.; Chesneau, M.

    Various activated carbons from the PICA Company have been tested in supercapacitor cells in order to compare their performances. The differences measured in terms of specific capacitance and cell resistance are presented. Porosity measurements made on activated carbon powders and electrode allowed a better understanding of the electrochemical behaviour of these activated carbons. In this way, the PICACTIF SC carbon was found to be an interesting active material for supercapacitors, with a specific capacitance as high as 125 F/g.

  4. Low-cost adsorbents for heavy metals uptake from contaminated water: a review.

    PubMed

    Babel, Sandhya; Kurniawan, Tonni Agustiono

    2003-02-28

    In this article, the technical feasibility of various low-cost adsorbents for heavy metal removal from contaminated water has been reviewed. Instead of using commercial activated carbon, researchers have worked on inexpensive materials, such as chitosan, zeolites, and other adsorbents, which have high adsorption capacity and are locally available. The results of their removal performance are compared to that of activated carbon and are presented in this study. It is evident from our literature survey of about 100 papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for certain metal ions as compared to activated carbon. Adsorbents that stand out for high adsorption capacities are chitosan (815, 273, 250 mg/g of Hg(2+), Cr(6+), and Cd(2+), respectively), zeolites (175 and 137 mg/g of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+), respectively), waste slurry (1030, 560, 540 mg/g of Pb(2+), Hg(2+), and Cr(6+), respectively), and lignin (1865 mg/g of Pb(2+)). These adsorbents are suitable for inorganic effluent treatment containing the metal ions mentioned previously. It is important to note that the adsorption capacities of the adsorbents presented in this paper vary, depending on the characteristics of the individual adsorbent, the extent of chemical modifications, and the concentration of adsorbate. PMID:12573840

  5. Comparison of adsorption behavior of PCDD/Fs on carbon nanotubes and activated carbons in a bench-scale dioxin generating system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xujian; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Shuaixi; Zhao, Xiyuan; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2015-07-01

    Porous carbon-based materials are commonly used to remove various organic and inorganic pollutants from gaseous and liquid effluents and products. In this study, the adsorption of dioxins on both activated carbons and multi-walled carbon nanotube was internally compared, via series of bench scale experiments. A laboratory-scale dioxin generator was applied to generate PCDD/Fs with constant concentration (8.3 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3)). The results confirm that high-chlorinated congeners are more easily adsorbed on both activated carbons and carbon nanotubes than low-chlorinated congeners. Carbon nanotubes also achieved higher adsorption efficiency than activated carbons even though they have smaller BET-surface. Carbon nanotubes reached the total removal efficiency over 86.8 % to be compared with removal efficiencies of only 70.0 and 54.2 % for the two other activated carbons tested. In addition, because of different adsorption mechanisms, the removal efficiencies of carbon nanotubes dropped more slowly with time than was the case for activated carbons. It could be attributed to the abundant mesopores distributed in the surface of carbon nanotubes. They enhanced the pore filled process of dioxin molecules during adsorption. In addition, strong interactions between the two benzene rings of dioxin molecules and the hexagonal arrays of carbon atoms in the surface make carbon nanotubes have bigger adsorption capacity. PMID:25728198

  6. Carbonaceous adsorbents in cryosorption pump applications; Future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. Vijai; Kasthurirengan, S.; Udgata, S. S.; Gangradey, R.; Krishnamoorthy, V.; Surendra, Bhati

    2013-06-01

    Use of granular activated carbon in commercial cryosorption pumps is now, more or less well established. The development of advanced polymeric precursor based activated carbon adsorbents in various forms has opened a flood gate of possibilities vis-a-vis improvements in performance of cryosorption pumps, both in rate of adsorption and their ultimate capacity. This paper gives a summary of indigenous efforts towards this direction.

  7. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  8. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal—a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-07-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 g of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment.

  9. Partitioning and removal of dioxin-like congeners in flue gases treated with activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kai Hsien; Chang, Shu Hao; Huang, Chia Hua; Huang, Hung Chi; Chang, Moo Been

    2006-08-01

    Activated carbon adsorption is commonly used to control dioxin-like congener (PCDD/Fs and PCBs) emissions. Partitioning of PCDD/Fs and PCBs between vapor and solid phases and their removal efficiencies achieved with existing air pollution control devices (APCDs) at a large-scale municipal waste incinerator (MWI) and an industrial waste incinerator (IWI) are evaluated via intensive stack sampling and analysis. Those two facilities investigated are equipped with activated carbon injection (ACI) with bag filter (BF) and fixed activated carbon bed (FACB) as major PCDD/F control devices, respectively. Average PCDD/F and PCB concentrations of stack gas with ACI+BF as APCDs are 0.031 and 0.006ng-TEQ/Nm(3), and that achieved with FACB are 1.74 and 0.19ng-TEQ/Nm(3) in MWI and IWI, respectively. The results show that FACB could reduce vapor-phase PCDD/Fs and PCBs concentrations in flue gas, while the ACI+BF can effectively adsorb the vapor-phase dioxin-like congener and collect the solid-phase PCDD/Fs and PCBs in the meantime. Additionally, the results of the pilot-scale adsorption system (PAS) experimentation indicate that each gram activated carbon adsorbs 105-115ng-PCDD/Fs and each surface area (m(2)) of activated carbon adsorbs 10-25ng-PCDD/Fs. Based on the results of PAS experimentation, this study confirms that the surface area of mesopore+macropore (20-200A) of the activated carbon is a critical factor affecting PCDD/F adsorption capacity. PMID:16488462

  10. Preparation of Granular Red Mud Adsorbent using Different Binders by Microwave Pore - Making and Activation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thiquynhxuan; Wang, Hanrui; Ju, Shaohua; Peng, Jinhui; Zhou, Liexing; Wang, Shixing; Yin, Shaohua; Liu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    In this work, microwave energy is used for preparing a granular red mud (GRM) adsorbent made of red mud with different binders, such as starch, sodium silicate and cement. The effects of the preparation parameters, such as binder type, binder addition ratio, microwave heating temperature, microwave power and holding time, on the absorption property of GRM are investigated. The BET surface area, strength, pore structure, XRD and SEM of the GRM absorbent are analyzed. The results show that the microwave roasting has a good effect on pore-making of GRM, especially when using organic binder. Both the BET surface area and the strength of GRM obtained by microwave heating are significantly higher than that by conventional heating. The optimum conditions are obtained as follows: 6:100 (w/w) of starch to red mud ratio, microwave roasting with a power of 2.6 kW at 500℃ for holding time of 30 min. The BET surface area, pore volume and average pore diameter of GRM prepared at the optimum conditions are 15.58 m2/g, 0.0337 cm3/g and 3.1693 A0, respectively.

  11. Control of acid gases using a fluidized bed adsorber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Bo-Chin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Yeh, Chia-Lin

    2003-08-01

    During incineration, secondary pollutants such as acid gases, organic compounds, heavy metals and particulates are generated. Among these pollutants, the acid gases, including sulfur oxides (SO(x)) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), can cause corrosion of the incinerator piping and can generate acid rain after being emitted to the atmosphere. To address this problem, the present study used a novel combination of air pollution control devices (APCDs), composed of a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter. The major objective of the work is to demonstrate the performance of a fluidized bed adsorber for removal of acid gases from flue gas of an incinerator. The adsorbents added in the fluidized bed adsorber were mainly granular activated carbon (AC; with or without chemical treatment) and with calcium oxide used as an additive. The advantages of a fluidized bed reactor for high mass transfer and high gas-solid contact can enhance the removal of acid gases when using a dry method. On the other hand, because the fluidized bed can filter particles, fine particles prior to and after passing through the fluidized bed adsorber were investigated. The competing adsorption on activated carbon between different characteristics of pollutants was also given preliminary discussion. The results indicate that the removal efficiencies of the investigated acid gases, SO(2) and HCl, are higher than 94 and 87%, respectively. Thus, a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter has the potential to replace conventional APCDs, even when there are other pollutants at the same time. PMID:12935758

  12. Recent studies on activated carbons and fly ashes from Turkish resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ayhan Demirbas; Gulsin Arslan; Erol Pehlivan

    2006-05-15

    This article deals with adsorptive properties of activated carbons (ACs) and fly ashes from Turkish coal and biomass resources. ACs because of their high surface area, microporous character and the chemical nature of their surface have been considered potential adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewater. Pyrolysis is an established process method for preparation of activated carbon from biomass. The bio-char is can be used as AC. The adsorption properties of ACs were strictly defined by the physicochemical nature of their surface and their texture, i.e., pore volume, pore size distribution, surface area. It is well known that the pH of the solution-adsorbant mixture is an important variable in the adsorption process. Fly ash has the highest adsorption capacity (198.2 mg/g for Cd(II)). Almond shell AC has the lowest adsorption capacity (2.7 mg/g).

  13. Dynamic adsorption of organic solvent vapors onto a packed bed of activated carbon cloth

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Lin, Y.C.; Lu, F.C.

    1999-02-01

    The adsorption behavior of organic compound vapors onto a packed bed of activated carbon cloth (ACC) has been investigated. Three types of ACCs have been employed: KF1500, FT200-20, and E-ACC. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) used in this study are acetone, dichloromethane, acrylonitrile, and n-hexane. The operating parameters studied are temperature of adsorber, weight of ACC, relative humidity of fluid, inlet concentration of VOCs, and total volumetric flow rate of gas stream. A simple theoretical model, originally introduced by Yoon and Nelson, has been utilized to simulate the breakthrough curve of VOC vapor on an adsorption column packed with activated carbon cloth. A modified model is proposed to predict the adsorption behavior of an adsorber at different temperatures.

  14. Removal of crystal violet from water by magnetically modified activated carbon and nanomagnetic iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Hamidzadeh, Soheila; Torabbeigi, Marzieh; Shahtaheri, Seyed Jamaleddin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetically modified activated carbon, which synthesized by nanomagnetic iron oxide, was used for fast and effective removal of Crystal Violet from aqueous solutions. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of nano-adsorbent showed that the average sizes of adsorbent are less than 100 nm. The various parameters, affecting on adsorption process, were examined including pH and temperature of dye solution, dose of adsorbent, and contact time. Then, thermodynamic parameters of sorption were calculated. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to fit the resulting data. Adsorption kinetics was consistent with a pseudo second order equation. Thermodynamic parameters of adsorption, ∆H(0), and ∆S(0) were calculated. Also, for further investigations, nano magnetic iron oxides was synthesized and used as adsorbent. Sorption capacities were depending on the temperature varied from 44.7 to 67.1 mg/g and from 12.7 to 16.5 mg/g for magnetically modified activated carbon and nanomagnetic iron oxide, respectively. PMID:25699186

  15. Use of ZIF-8-derived nanoporous carbon as the adsorbent for the solid phase extraction of carbamate pesticides prior to high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lin; Liu, Xingli; Wang, Juntao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a chemically and thermally robust and highly porous zeolite-type metal-organic framework, zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8), was used as both a precursor and a template and furfuryl alcohol as a second precursor to synthesize a nanoporous carbon. The prepared ZIF-8-derived nanoporous carbon was used as the solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the extraction of carbamate pesticides from cabbage and water samples. The adsorbed analytes were eluted with acetonitrile for the determination by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection. The high surface area, high porosity, good stability and fast adsorption/desorption kinetics of the material enabled it to have a high adsorption capacity and good adsorption performance. Under optimum conditions, good linearity for the analytes in the range of 0.5-100 ng g(-1) and 0.05-20 ng mL(-1) existed for cabbage and water samples with the correlation coefficients of 0.9968-0.9980 and 0.9990-0.9995, respectively. The limits of detection (S/N=3) for the analytes were in the range of 0.25-0.1 ng g(-1) and 0.01-0.02 ng mL(-1) for the cabbage and water samples, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for intra-day and the inter-day determinations of the analytes were below 7.0% and 12.5%, respectively. PMID:26003698

  16. The structure of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the NaCl(100) surface—A combined LEED and DFT-D/vdW-DF study

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Jochen; Vogt, Birgit

    2014-12-07

    The structure of the first layer CO adsorbed on NaCl(100) is investigated experimentally by means of quantitative low-energy electron diffraction at 25 K, and theoretically by means of density functional theory. Consistent with earlier helium atom diffraction results, the monolayer structure has p(2×1) symmetry with a glide-plane along the longer axis of the unit cell. The structure analysis confirms the binding of CO via the carbon end to the NaCl(100) surface. The vertical distance of carbon above Na{sup +} is 2.58 ± 0.08 Å, in good agreement with geometry optimizations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory, and 0.15 Å lower than predicted in calculations based on the nonlocal van der Waals density functional.

  17. The structure of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the NaCl(100) surface—a combined LEED and DFT-D/vdW-DF study.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Jochen; Vogt, Birgit

    2014-12-01

    The structure of the first layer CO adsorbed on NaCl(100) is investigated experimentally by means of quantitative low-energy electron diffraction at 25 K, and theoretically by means of density functional theory. Consistent with earlier helium atom diffraction results, the monolayer structure has p(2×1) symmetry with a glide-plane along the longer axis of the unit cell. The structure analysis confirms the binding of CO via the carbon end to the NaCl(100) surface. The vertical distance of carbon above Na(+) is 2.58 ± 0.08 Å, in good agreement with geometry optimizations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory, and 0.15 Å lower than predicted in calculations based on the nonlocal van der Waals density functional. PMID:25481162

  18. Preparation of ultrafine magnetic biochar and activated carbon for pharmaceutical adsorption and subsequent degradation by ball milling.

    PubMed

    Shan, Danna; Deng, Shubo; Zhao, Tianning; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yujue; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang; Winglee, Judy; Wiesner, Mark R

    2016-03-15

    Ball milling was used to prepare two ultrafine magnetic biochar/Fe3O4 and activated carbon (AC)/Fe3O4 hybrid materials targeted for use in pharmaceutical removal by adsorption and mechanochemical degradation of pharmaceutical compounds. Both hybrid adsorbents prepared after 2h milling exhibited high removal of carbamazepine (CBZ), and were easily separated magnetically. These adsorbents exhibited fast adsorption of CBZ and tetracycline (TC) in the initial 1h. The biochar/Fe3O4 had a maximum adsorption capacity of 62.7mg/g for CBZ and 94.2mg/g for TC, while values obtained for AC/Fe3O4 were 135.1mg/g for CBZ and 45.3mg/g for TC respectively when data were fitted using the Langmuir expression. Solution pH values slightly affected the sorption of TC on the adsorbents, while CBZ sorption was almost pH-independent. The spent adsorbents with adsorbed CBZ and TC were milled to degrade the adsorbed pollutants. The adsorbed TC itself was over 97% degraded after 3h of milling, while about half of adsorbed CBZ were remained. The addition of quartz sand was found to improve the mechanochemical degradation of CBZ on biochar/Fe3O4, and its degradation percent was up to 98.4% at the dose of 0.3g quarts sand/g adsorbent. This research provided an easy method to prepare ultrafine magnetic adsorbents for the effective removal of typical pharmaceuticals from water or wastewater and degrade them using ball milling. PMID:26685062

  19. Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

    2005-09-30

    lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal

  20. Removal of Trichloroethylene by Activated Carbon in the Presence and Absence of TiO2 Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are emerging as a new type of contaminant in water and wastewater. The fate of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) in a granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorber and their impact on the removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) by GAC was investigated...

  1. Barrier properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) membranes containing carbon nanotubes or activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Surdo, Erin M; Khan, Iftheker A; Choudhury, Atif A; Saleh, Navid B; Arnold, William A

    2011-04-15

    Carbon nanotube addition has been shown to improve the mechanical properties of some polymers. Because of their unique adsorptive properties, carbon nanotubes may also improve the barrier performance of polymers used in contaminant containment. This study compares the barrier performance of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to that for PVA containing powdered activated carbon (PAC). Raw and surface-functionalized versions of each sorbent were tested for their abilities to adsorb 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene and Cu(2+), representing the important hydrophobic organic and heavy metal contaminant classes, as they diffused across the PVA. In both cases, PAC (for 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene) and functionalized PAC (for Cu(2+)) outperformed SWCNTs on a per mass basis by trapping more of the contaminants within the barrier membrane. Kinetics of sorption are important in evaluating barrier properties, and poor performance of SWCNT-containing membranes as 1,2,4-TCB barriers is attributed to kinetic limitations. PMID:21349636

  2. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Activated Carbon-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1999-04-23

    Previous work focused on the production of carbon fiber composites and subsequently activating them to induce adsorbent properties. One problem related to this approach is the difficulty of uniformly activating large composites. In order to overcome this problem, composites have been made from pre-activated fibers. The loss of surface area upon forming the composites after activation of the fibers was investigated. The electrical resistivity and strength of these composites were compared to those made by activation after forming. It was found that the surface area is reduced by about 35% by forming the composite from pre-activated fibers. However, the properties of the activated sample are very uniform: the variation in surface area is less than {+-}0.5%. So, although the surface area is somewhat reduced, it is believed that making composites from pre-activated fibers could be useful in applications where the BET surface area is not required to be very high. The strength of the composites produced from pre-activated fibers is lower than for composites activated after forming when the carbon burnoff is below 45%. For higher burnoffs, the strength of composites made with pre-activated fibers is as good or better. In both cases, there is a dramatic decrease in strength when the fiber:binder ratio is reduced below 4:1. The electrical resistivity is slightly higher for composites made from pre-activated fibers than for composites that are activated after forming, other parameters being constant (P-200 fibers, similar carbon burnoffs). For both types of composite the resistivity was also found to increase with carbon burnoff. This is attributed to breakage of the fiber causing shorter conductive paths. The electrical resistivity also increases when the binder content is lowered, which suggests that there are fewer solid contact points between the fibers.

  3. Adsorption of chlorine dioxide gas on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Ryan, Shawn P; Snyder, Emily Gibb; Serre, Shannon D; Touati, Abderrahmane; Clayton, Matthew J

    2010-08-01

    Research and field experience with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas to decontaminate structures contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores and other microorganisms have demonstrated the effectiveness of this sterilant technology. However, because of its hazardous properties, the unreacted ClO2, gas must be contained and captured during fumigation events. Although activated carbon has been used during some decontamination events to capture the ClO2 gas, no data are available to quantify the performance of the activated carbon in terms of adsorption capacity and other sorbent property operational features. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine and compare the ClO2 adsorption capacities of five different types of activated carbon as a function of the challenge ClO2 concentration. Tests were also conducted to investigate other sorbent properties, including screening tests to determine gaseous species desorbed from the saturated sorbent upon warming (to provide an indication of how immobile the ClO2 gas and related compounds are once captured on the sorbent). In the adsorption tests, ClO2 gas was measured continuously using a photometric-based instrument, and these measurements were verified with a noncontinuous method utilizing wet chemistry analysis. The results show that the simple activated carbons (not impregnated or containing other activated sorbent materials) were the most effective, with maximum adsorption capacities of approximately 110 mg/g. In the desorption tests, there was minimal release of ClO(2) from all sorbents tested, but desorption levels of chlorine (Cl2) gas (detected as chloride) varied, with a maximum release of nearly 15% of the mass of ClO2 adsorbed. PMID:20842929

  4. Removal of toxic chemicals from water with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Activated carbon was effective in removing fish toxicants and anesthetics from water solutions. Its capacity to adsorb 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), antimycin, NoxfishA? (5% rotenone), Dibrorms, juglone, MSa??222, and benzocaine ranged from 0.1 to 64 mg per gram of carbon. The adsorptive capacity (end point considered as a significant discharge) of activated carbon for removal of TFM was determined at column depths of 15, 30, and 60 cm; temperatures of 7, 12, 17, and 22 C; pH's of 6.5, 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5; and flow rates of 50, 78, 100, 200, and 940 ml/min. Adsorptive capacity increased when the contact time was increased by reducing the flow rate or increasing the column depth. The adsorptive capacity was not significantly influenced by temperature but was substantially higher at pH 6.5 than at the other pH's tested. A practical and efficient filter for purifying chemically treated water was developed.

  5. Magnetite decorated activated carbon composites for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Saini, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon decorated with magnetite (ACMG) nanoparticles composites have been prepared by facile method via impregnation of AC with stable dispersion of superparamagnetic MG nanoparticles followed by drying. These composites exhibit both magnetic and porosity behavior which can be easily optimized by controlling the weight ratio of two phases. The structural, magnetic, thermal and morphological properties of these as synthesized ACMG samples were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR, VSM and SEM techniques. The ACMG powder has been used for water purification having methylene blue (MB) dye as an impurity. The nanoporosity of these composites allow rapid adsorption of MB and their magnetic behavior helps in single step separation of MB adsorbed ACMG particles by the application of external magnetic field.

  6. Influence of sorption on sound propagation in granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Rodolfo; Umnova, Olga

    2016-08-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) has numerous applications due to its ability to adsorb and desorb gas molecules. Recently, it has been shown to exhibit unusually high low frequency sound absorption. This behavior is determined by both the multi-scale nature of the material, i.e., the existence of three scales of heterogeneities, and physical processes specific to micro- and nanometer-size pores, i.e., rarefaction and sorption effects. To account for these processes a model for sound propagation in GAC is developed in this work. A methodology for characterizing GAC which includes optical granulometry, flow resistivity measurements, and the derivation of the inner-particle model parameters from acoustical and non-acoustical measurements is also presented. The model agrees with measurements of normal incidence surface impedance and sound absorption coefficient on three different GAC samples. PMID:27586708

  7. Agricultural Waste as Sources for Mercury Adsorbents in Gas Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plants have resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream where it adsorbs the mer...

  8. Agricultural By-products as Mercury Adsorbents in Gas Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plans have resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream where is adsorbs the merc...

  9. DESIGNING FIXED-BED ADSORBERS TO REMOVE MIXTURES OF ORGANICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A liquid-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) pilot plant and a full-scale GAC adsorber were designed, built, and operated in order to evaluate their performance for treating a groundwater contaminated with several volatile and synthetic organic chemicals. Several empty bed con...

  10. Adsorption equilibria of chlorinated organic solvents onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J.H.; Choi, D.K.; Kim, S.H.

    1998-04-01

    Adsorption equilibria of dichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene on activated carbon were obtained by a static volumetric technique. Isotherms were measured for the pure vapors in the temperature range from 283 to 363 K and pressures up to 60 kPa for dichloromethane, 16 kPa for 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 7 kPa for trichloroethylene, respectively. The Toth and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations were used to correlate experimental isotherms. Thermodynamic properties such as the isosteric heat of adsorption and the henry`s constant were calculated. It was found that the values of isosteric heat of adsorption were varied with surface loading. Also, the Henry`s constant showed that the order of adsorption affinity is 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and dichloromethane. By employing the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation, the limiting volume of the adsorbed space, which equals micropore volume, was determined, and its value was found to be approximately independent of adsorbates.

  11. Effect of temperature on the desorption and decomposition of mustard from activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, C.J.; Buchanan, J.H.; Mahle, J.J.; Buettner, L.C.; Wagner, G.W.

    1999-12-07

    Experimental data are reported for the desorption of bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, (a sulfur mustard or HD) and its decomposition products from activated coconut shell carbon (CSC). The results show that under equilibrium conditions changes in the HD partial pressure are affected primarily by its loading and temperature of the adsorbent. The partial pressure of adsorbed HD is found to increase by about a decade for each 25 C increase in temperature for CSC containing 0.01--0.1 g/g HD. Adsorption equilibria of HD appear to be little affected by coadsorbed water. Although complicated by its decomposition, the distribution of adsorbed HD (of known amount) appears to occupy pores of similar energy whether dry or in the presence of adsorbed water. On dry CSC adsorbed HD appears stable, while in the presence of water its decomposition is marked by hydrolysis at low temperature and thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures. The principal volatile products desorbed are 1,4-thioxane, 2-chloroethyl vinyl sulfide and 1,4-dithiane, with the latter favoring elevated temperatures.

  12. Arsenic removal from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto iron oxide/activated carbon magnetic composite

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work the adsorption features of activated carbon and the magnetic properties of iron oxides were combined in a composite to produce magnetic adsorbent. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption behavior of arsenate onto the synthetic magnetic adsorbent. The effects of initial solution pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and co-existing anionic component on the adsorption of arsenate were investigated. The results showed that the removal percentage of arsenate could be over 95% in the conditions of adsorbent dosage 5.0 g/L, initial solution pH 3.0-8.0, and contact time 1 h. Under the experimental conditions, phosphate and silicate caused greater decrease in arsenate removal percentage among the anions, and sulfate had almost no effect on the adsorption of arsenate. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of arsenate was illustrated by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the arsenate adsorption data was tested. Both the models adequately describe the experimental data. Moreover, the magnetic composite adsorbent could be easily recovered from the medium by an external magnetic field. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by arsenate. PMID:24602339

  13. Enhanced adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate by bamboo-derived granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shubo; Nie, Yao; Du, Ziwen; Huang, Qian; Meng, Pingping; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2015-01-23

    A bamboo-derived granular activated carbon with large pores was successfully prepared by KOH activation, and used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) from aqueous solution. The granular activated carbon prepared at the KOH/C mass ratio of 4 and activation temperature of 900°C had fast and high adsorption for PFOS and PFOA. Their adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 24h, which was attributed to their fast diffusion in the micron-sized pores of activated carbon. This granular activated carbon exhibited the maximum adsorbed amount of 2.32mmol/g for PFOS and 1.15mmol/g for PFOA at pH 5.0, much higher than other granular and powdered activated carbons reported. The activated carbon prepared under the severe activation condition contained many enlarged pores, favorable for the adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. In addition, the spent activated carbon was hardly regenerated in NaOH/NaCl solution, while the regeneration efficiency was significantly enhanced in hot water and methanol/ethanol solution, indicating that hydrophobic interaction was mainly responsible for the adsorption. The regeneration percent was up to 98% using 50% ethanol solution at 45°C. PMID:24721493

  14. Effect of surface characteristics of wood-based activated carbons on adsorption of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Adib, F.; Bagreev, A.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-06-15

    Three wood-based commercial activated carbons supplied by Westvaco were studied as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide. The initial materials were characterized using sorption of nitrogen, Boehm titration, potentiometric titration, water sorption, thermal analysis, and temperature-programmed desorption. The breakthrough tests were done at low concentrations of H{sub 2}S in the input gas to simulate conditions in water pollution control plants where carbon beds are used as odor adsorbents. In spite of apparent general similarities in the origin of the materials, method of activation, surface chemistry, and porosity, significant differences in their performance as hydrogen sulfide adsorbents were observed. Results show that the combined effect of the presence of pores large enough to accommodate surface functional groups and small enough to have the film of water at relatively low pressure contributes to oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. Moreover, there are features of activated carbon surfaces such as local environment of acidic/basic groups along with the presence of alkali metals which are important to the oxidation process.

  15. Oil palm biomass-based adsorbents for the removal of water pollutants--a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanweer; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ghazali, Arniza; Sulaiman, Othman; Hashim, Rokiah

    2011-07-01

    This article presents a review on the role of oil palm biomass (trunks, fronds, leaves, empty fruit bunches, shells, etc.) as adsorbents in the removal of water pollutants such as acid and basic dyes, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, various gaseous pollutants, and so on. Numerous studies on adsorption properties of various low-cost adsorbents, such as agricultural wastes and its based activated carbons, have been reported in recent years. Studies have shown that oil palm-based adsorbent, among the low-cost adsorbents mentioned, is the most promising adsorbent for removing water pollutants. Further, these bioadsorbents can be chemically modified for better efficiency and can undergo multiple reuses to enhance their applicability at an industrial scale. It is evident from a literature survey of more than 100 recent papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants. The conclusion is been drawn from the reviewed literature, and suggestions for future research are proposed. PMID:21929380

  16. The role of beaded activated carbon's pore size distribution on heel formation during cyclic adsorption/desorption of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The effect of activated carbon's pore size distribution (PSD) on heel formation during adsorption of organic vapors was investigated. Five commercially available beaded activated carbons (BAC) with varying PSDs (30-88% microporous) were investigated. Virgin samples had similar elemental compositions but different PSDs, which allowed for isolating the contribution of carbon's microporosity to heel formation. Heel formation was linearly correlated (R(2)=0.91) with BAC micropore volume; heel for the BAC with the lowest micropore volume was 20% lower than the BAC with the highest micropore volume. Meanwhile, first cycle adsorption capacities and breakthrough times correlated linearly (R(2)=0.87 and 0.93, respectively) with BAC total pore volume. Micropore volume reduction for all BACs confirmed that heel accumulation takes place in the highest energy pores. Overall, these results show that a greater portion of adsorbed species are converted into heel on highly microporous adsorbents due to higher share of high energy adsorption sites in their structure. This differs from mesoporous adsorbents (low microporosity) in which large pores contribute to adsorption but not to heel formation, resulting in longer adsorbent lifetime. Thus, activated carbon with high adsorption capacity and high mesopore fraction is particularly desirable for organic vapor application involving extended adsorption/regeneration cycling. PMID:27173087

  17. Adsorption of malachite green on groundnut shell waste based powdered activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, R.; Ramteke, D.S. Wate, S.R.

    2007-07-01

    In the present technologically fast changing situation related to waste management practices, it is desirable that disposal of plant waste should be done in a scientific manner by keeping in view economic and pollution considerations. This is only possible when the plant waste has the potential to be used as raw material for some useful product. In the present study, groundnut shell, an agricultural waste, was used for the preparation of an adsorbent by chemical activation using ZnCl{sub 2} under optimized conditions and its comparative characterisation was conducted with commercially available powdered activated carbon (CPAC) for its physical, chemical and adsorption properties. The groundnut shell based powdered activated carbon (GSPAC) has a higher surface area, iodine and methylene blue number compared to CPAC. Both of the carbons were used for the removal of malachite green dye from aqueous solution and the effect of various operating variables, viz. adsorbent dose (0.1-1 g l{sup -1}), contact time (5-120 min) and adsorbate concentrations (100-200 mg l{sup -1}) on the removal of dye, has been studied. The experimental results indicate that at a dose of 0.5 g l{sup -1} and initial concentration of 100 mg l{sup -1}, GSPAC showed 94.5% removal of the dye in 30 min equilibrium time, while CPAC removed 96% of the dye in 15 min. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the linearized forms of Freundlich, Langmuir and BET equations to determine maximum adsorptive capacities. The equilibrium data fit well to the Freundlich isotherm, although the BET isotherm also showed higher correlation for both of the carbons. The results of comparative adsorption capacity of both carbons indicate that groundnut shell can be used as a low-cost alternative to commercial powdered activated carbon in aqueous solution for dye removal.

  18. Adsorption properties of biomass-based activated carbon prepared with spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Ouyang, Feng

    2013-03-01

    Activated carbon prepared from spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation had been employed as the adsorbent for ethylene and n-butane at room temperature. Prepared activated carbon was characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. It was confirmed that pore structure played an important role during the adsorption testes. Adsorption isotherms of ethylene and n-butane fitted well with Langmuir equation. The prepared samples owned better adsorption capacity for n-butane than commercial activated carbon. Isosteric heats of adsorptions at different coverage were calculated through Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Micropore filling effect was explained in a thermodynamic way.

  19. Optimization of nickel adsorption from aqueous solution by using activated carbon prepared from waste apricot by chemical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, S.; Önal, Y.; Akmil-Başar, C.; Bilmez-Erdemoğlu, S.; Sarıcı-Özdemir, Ç.; Köseoğlu, E.; İçduygu, G.

    2005-12-01

    Waste apricot supplied by Malatya apricot plant (Turkey) was activated by using chemical activation method and K 2CO 3 was chosen for this purpose. Activation temperature was varied over the temperature range of 400-900 °C and N 2 atmosphere was used with 10 °C/min heat rate. The maximum surface area (1214 m 2/g) and micropore volume (0.355 cm 3/g) were obtained at 900 °C, but activated carbon was predominantly microporous at 700 °C. The resulting activated carbons were used for removal of Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution and adsorption properties have been investigated under various conditions such as pH, activation temperature, adsorbent dosage and nickel concentration. Adsorption parameters were determined by using Langmuir model. Optimal condition was determined as; pH 5, 0.7 g/10 ml adsorbent dosage, 10 mg/l Ni(II) concentration and 60 min contact time. The results indicate that the effective uptake of Ni(II) ions was obtained by activating the carbon at 900 °C.

  20. Removal of CO2 in a multistage fluidized bed reactor by diethanol amine impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipa; Samal, Debi Prasad; Meikap, Bhim C

    2016-07-28

    To mitigate the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2), we have developed and designed a four-stage fluidized bed reactor. There is a counter current exchange between solid adsorbent and gas flow. In this present investigation diethanol amine (DEA) impregnated activated carbon made from green coconut shell was used as adsorbent. This type of adsorbent not only adsorbs CO2 due to the presence of pore but also chemically reacts with CO2 and form secondary zwitterions. Sampling and analysis of CO2 was performed using Orsat apparatus. The effect of initial CO2 concentration, gas velocity, solid rate, weir height etc. on removal efficiency of CO2 have been investigated and presented. The percentage removal of CO2 has been found close to 80% under low gas flow rate (0.188 m/s), high solid flow rate (4.12 kg/h) and weir height of 50 mm. From this result it has been found out that multistage fluidized bed reactor may be a suitable equipment for removal of CO2 from flue gas. PMID:27163861

  1. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  2. Enhanced Raman spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on carbon-doped TiO₂ obtained from titanium carbide: a visible-light-assisted renewable substrate.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Vankayala; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2012-08-01

    Titanium carbide (TiC) is an electrically conducting material with favorable electrochemical properties. In the present studies, carbon-doped TiO(2) (C-TiO(2)) has been synthesized from TiC particles, as well as TiC films coated on stainless steel substrate via thermal annealing under various conditions. Several C-TiO(2) substrates are synthesized by varying experimental conditions and characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic techniques. C-TiO(2) in the dry state (in powder form as well as in film form) is subsequently used as a substrate for enhancing Raman signals corresponding to 4-mercaptobenzoic acid and 4-nitrothiophenol by utilizing chemical enhancement based on charge-transfer interactions. Carbon, a nonmetal dopant in TiO(2), improves the intensities of Raman signals, compared to undoped TiO(2). Significant dependence of Raman intensity on carbon doping is observed. Ameliorated performance obtained using C-TiO(2) is attributed to the presence of surface defects that originate due to carbon as a dopant, which, in turn, triggers charge transfer between TiO(2) and analyte. The C-TiO(2) substrates are subsequently regenerated for repetitive use by illuminating an analyte-adsorbed substrate with visible light for a period of 5 h. PMID:22738214

  3. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  4. Rhodamine B removal with activated carbons obtained from lignocellulosic waste.

    PubMed

    da Silva Lacerda, Viviane; López-Sotelo, Juan B; Correa-Guimarães, Adriana; Hernández-Navarro, Salvador; Sánchez-Báscones, Mercedes; Navas-Gracia, Luis M; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2015-05-15

    By-products from the wax production process from carnauba palm (leaves), from the extraction of oil from macauba seeds (endocarp) and from pine nut production (shell) have been assessed for activated carbon production, using H3PO4 or CaCl2 for their chemical activation. The resulting activated charcoals have been thoroughly characterized by elemental and thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron scanning microscopy and N2 adsorption behavior. Subsequently, their adsorption capacity for the removal of rhodamine B (RhB) from aqueous solutions has been evaluated by studying different parameters: contact time, pH, adsorbent dose, initial dye concentration and solution temperature. The adsorption of RhB followed Freundlich's model in all cases. Kinetic studies indicate that the pseudo-second order model can be used for describing the dynamics of the adsorption process. Thermodynamic parameters have also been evaluated, indicating its endothermic and spontaneous nature. Finally, a preliminary analysis of the impact of cellulose content in the carbon precursor materials has been conducted, by using a mixture of native cellulose with one of the lignocellulosic materials. PMID:25770964

  5. [Analysis of organochlorine pesticides and pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables by gas chromatography-electron capture detection coupled with solid-phase extraction using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haixiang; Jia, Yanxia; Ding, Mingyu; Sun, Dajiang; Zhao, Mengbin

    2011-05-01

    A multi-residue analytical method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbent was developed. The determination of 6 organochlorine pesticides and 7 pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables (including cucumber, cherry tomato, cabbage, lettuce, purple cabbage, leek, shallot and onion) was carried out by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). The GC-ECD method used two columns (HP-50 and HP-1) and two ECD detectors. The HP-50 column was used for the analysis and the HP-1 column for validation. The clean-up conditions were optimized. The analytes were extracted by acetonitrile, and the extract was cleaned up by the MWCNTs SPE cartridge. The extract was re-dissolved by hexane, eluted with acetone-hexane (7:3, v/v) from the columns. The recoveries were over 70% for the 11 pesticides in the 13 pesticides. The results indicated that the MWCNTs SPE cartridge was efficient for 8 vegetable samples, because it reduced the contamination of the coloring materials to GC-ECD. The experimental results showed the MWCNTs SPE cartridge can adsorb the coloring materials and the eluant was nearly colorless. PMID:21847981

  6. Magnetized graphene layers synthesized on the carbon nanofibers as novel adsorbent for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Rezvani-Eivari, Mostafa; Amiri, Amirhassan; Baghayeri, Mehdi; Ghaemi, Ferial

    2016-09-23

    The application of magnetized graphene (G) layers synthesized on the carbon nanofibers (CNFs) (m-G/CNF) was investigated as novel adsorbent for the magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Six important parameters, affecting the extraction efficiency of PAHs, including: amount of adsorbent, adsorption and desorption times, type and volume of the eluent solvent and salt content of the sample were evaluated. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained as: 5min for extraction time, 20mg for sorbent amount, dichloromethane as desorption solvent, 1mL for desorption solvent volume, 5min for desorption time and 15% (w/v) for NaCl concentration. Good performance data were obtained at the optimized conditions. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges from 0.012 to 100ngmL(-1) with correlation coefficients (r) between 0.9950 and 0.9967 for all the analytes. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) of the proposed method for the studied PAHs were 0.004-0.03ngmL(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for five replicates at two concentration levels (0.1 and 50ngmL(-1)) of PAHs were ranged from 3.4 to 5.7%. Appropriate relative recovery values, in the range of 95.5-99.9%, were also obtained for the real water sample analysis. PMID:27578405

  7. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  8. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  9. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  10. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  11. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature... regeneration cycle, and the temperature of the carbon-bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of the... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers,...

  12. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  13. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  14. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide onto activated carbon fibers: effect of pore structure and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguo; Kwon, Seokjoon; Borguet, Eric; Vidic, Radisav

    2005-12-15

    To understand the nature of H2S adsorption onto carbon surfaces under dry and anoxic conditions, the effects of carbon pore structure and surface chemistry were studied using activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structures and surface areas. Surface pretreatments, including oxidation and heattreatment, were conducted before adsorption/desorption tests in a fixed-bed reactor. Raw ACFs with higher surface area showed greater adsorption and retention of sulfur, and heat treatment further enhanced adsorption and retention of sulfur. The retained amount of hydrogen sulfide correlated well with the amount of basic functional groups on the carbon surface, while the desorbed amount reflected the effect of pore structure. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the retained sulfurous compounds were strongly bonded to the carbon surface. In addition, surface chemistry of the sorbent might determine the predominant form of adsorbate on the surface. PMID:16475362

  15. Removal of perfluorinated surfactants by sorption onto granular activated carbon, zeolite and sludge.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Herrera, Valeria; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2008-08-01

    Perfluorinated surfactants are emerging pollutants of increasing public health and environmental concern due to recent reports of their world-wide distribution, environmental persistence and bioaccumulation potential. Treatment methods for the removal of anionic perfluorochemical (PFC) surfactants from industrial effluents are needed to minimize the environmental release of these pollutants. Removal of PFC surfactants from aqueous solutions by sorption onto various types of granular activated carbon was investigated. Three anionic PFC surfactants, i.e., perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), were evaluated for the ability to adsorb onto activated carbon. Additionally, the sorptive capacity of zeolites and sludge for PFOS was compared to that of granular activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms were determined at constant ionic strength in a pH 7.2 phosphate buffer at 30 degrees C. Sorption of PFOS onto activated carbon was stronger than PFOA and PFBS, suggesting that the length of the fluorocarbon chain and the nature of the functional group influenced sorption of the anionic surfactants. Among all adsorbents evaluated in this study, activated carbon (Freundlich K(F) values=36.7-60.9) showed the highest affinity for PFOS at low aqueous equilibrium concentrations, followed by the hydrophobic, high-silica zeolite NaY (Si/Al 80, K(F)=31.8), and anaerobic sludge (K(F)=0.95-1.85). Activated carbon also displayed a superior sorptive capacity at high soluble concentrations of the surfactant (up to 80 mg l(-1)). These findings indicate that activated carbon adsorption is a promising treatment technique for the removal of PFOS from dilute aqueous streams. PMID:18511099

  16. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  17. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Investigation of the adsorption of blood plasma proteins by activated carbon fiber material

    SciTech Connect

    Eretskaya, E.V.; Nikolaev, V.G.; Sergeev, V.P.; Stefanov, A.V.; Vovyanko, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the adsorption of fibrinogen, albumin, and gamma globulin by carbon fibrous materials by physical immobilization of protein ligands on their surface. The adsorption of proteins from model solutions under standard conditions was studied by an indirect method according to the decrease in the concentration of the adsorbate in solution, determining the protein content. The adsorption of the same proteins from the plasma and their desorption from activated carbon fibrous materials were estimated by a direct radiometric method using /sup 125/I-labeled proteins.

  19. Preparation of Surface Adsorbed and Impregnated Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube/Nylon-6 Nanofiber Composites and Investigation of their Gas Sensing Ability

    PubMed Central

    Lala, Neeta L.; Thavasi, Velmurugan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-01-01

    We have prepared electrospun Nylon-6 nanofibers via electrospinning, and adsorbed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) onto the surface of Nylon-6 fibers using Triton® X-100 to form a MWCNTs/Nylon-6 nanofiber composite. The dispersed MWCNTs have been found to be stable in hexafluoroisopropanol for several months without precipitation. A MWCNTs/Nylon-6 nanofiber composite based chemical sensor has demonstrated its responsiveness towards a wide range of solvent vapours at room temperature and only mg quantities of MWCNTs were expended. The large surface area and porous nature of the electrospun Nylon-6/MWCNT nanofibers facilitates greater analyte permeability. The experimental analysis has indicated that the dipole moment, functional group and vapour pressure of the analytes determine the magnitude of the responsiveness. PMID:22389589

  20. Surface activity of Janus particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces: Theoretical and experimental aspects.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, Miguel Angel; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2016-07-01

    Since de Gennes coined in 1992 the term Janus particle (JP), there has been a continued effort to develop this field. The purpose of this review is to present the most relevant theoretical and experimental results obtained so far on the surface activity of amphiphilic JPs at fluid interfaces. The surface activity of JPs at fluid-fluid interfaces can be experimentally determined using two different methods: the classical Langmuir balance or the pendant drop tensiometry. The second method requires much less amount of sample than the first one, but it has also some experimental limitations. In all cases collected here the JPs exhibited a higher surface or interfacial activity than the corresponding homogeneous particles. This reveals the significant advantage of JPs for the stabilization of emulsions and foams. PMID:26094083

  1. Preparation of granular activated carbons from yellow mombin fruit stones for CO2 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Fiuza, Raildo Alves; Medeiros de Jesus Neto, Raimundo; Correia, Laise Bacelar; Carvalho Andrade, Heloysa Martins

    2015-09-15

    Stones of yellow mombin, a native fruit of the tropical America and West Indies, were used as starting materials to produce activated carbons, subsequently used as adsorbent for CO2 capture. The carbonaceous materials were either chemically activated with HNO3, H3PO4 and KOH or physically activated with CO2. The carbon samples were characterized by SEM, EDX, TG/DTA, Raman spectroscopy, physical adsorption for textural analysis and by acid-base titrations. The CO2 adsorption capacity and adsorption cycles were investigated by TG. The results indicate that the capacity of CO2 adsorption may be maximized on highly basic surfaces of micropores smaller than 1 nm. The KOH activated carbon showed high and stable capacity of CO2 adsorption after 10 cycles. PMID:26182993

  2. Changes in14c activity over time during vacuum distillation of carbon from rock pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davidson, G.R.; Yang, I.C.

    1999-01-01

    The radiocarbon activity of carbon collected by vacuum distillation from a single partially saturated tuff began to decline after approximately 60% of the water and carbon had been extracted. Disproportionate changes in 14C activity and ??13C during distillation rule out simple isotopic fractionation as a causative explanation. Additional phenomena such as matrix diffusion and ion exclusion in micropores may play a role in altering the isotopic value of extracted carbon, but neither can fully account for the observed changes. The most plausible explanation is that distillation recovers carbon from an adsorbed phase that is depleted in 14C relative to DIC in the bulk pore water. ?? 1999 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  3. A facile enzymatic synthesis of geranyl propionate by physically adsorbed Candida rugosa lipase onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Nur Royhaila; Buang, Nor Aziah; Mahat, Naji Arafat; Lok, Yen Yen; Huyop, Fahrul; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Abdul Wahab, Roswanira

    2015-05-01

    In view of several disadvantages as well as adverse effects associated with the use of chemical processes for producing esters, alternative techniques such as the utilization of enzymes on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), have been suggested. In this study, the oxidative MWCNTs prepared using a mixture of HNO3 and H2SO4 (1:3 v/v) were used as a supportive material for the immobilization of Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) through physical adsorption process. The resulting CRL-MWCNTs biocatalysts were utilized for synthesizing geranyl propionate, an important ester for flavoring agent as well as in fragrances. Enzymatic esterification of geraniol with propionic acid was carried out using heptane as a solvent and the efficiency of CRL-MWCNTs as a biocatalyst was compared with the free CRL, considering the incubation time, temperature, molar ratio of acid:alcohol, presence of desiccant as well as its reusability. It was found that the CRL-MWCNTs resulted in a 2-fold improvement in the percentage of conversion of geranyl propionate when compared with the free CRL, demonstrating the highest yield of geranyl propionate at 6h at 55°C, molar ratio acid: alcohol of 1:5 and with the presence of 1.0g desiccant. It was evident that the CRL-MWCNTs biocatalyst could be reused for up to 6 times before a 50% reduction in catalytic efficiency was observed. Hence, it appears that the facile physical adsorption of CRL onto F-MWCNTs has improved the activity and stability of CRL as well as served as an alternative method for the synthesis of geranyl propionate. PMID:25837507

  4. Characterization of activated carbon prepared from chicken waste and coal

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhang; Hong Cui; Riko Ozao; Yan Cao; Bobby I.-T. Chen; Chia-Wei Wang; Wei-Ping Pan

    2007-12-15

    Activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from chicken waste (CW) and coal (E-coal) blended at the ratios of 100:0, 80:20, 50:50, 20:80, and 0:100. The process included carbonization in flowing gaseous nitrogen (300 mL min{sup -1}) at ca. 430{sup o}C for 60 min and successive steam activation (0.1 mL min{sup -1} water injection with a flow of N{sub 2} at 100 mL min{sup -1}) at 650{sup o}C for 30 min. Chicken waste is low in sulfur content but is high in volatile matter (about 55 wt %), and ACs with higher specific surface area were more successfully obtained by mixing with coal. The specific surface area of the CW/Coal blend AC can be estimated by SSA{sub BET} = -65.8x{sup 2} + 158x + 168, where SSA{sub BET} is the specific surface area in m{sup 2} g{sup -1} as determined by the BET method using CO{sub 2} as the adsorbent, where x is the coal fraction by weight in the CW/coal blend ranging from 0.0 to 1.0 (e.g., x = 0.0 signifies the blend contains no coal and x = 1.0 signifies the blend consists of 100% coal). 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Natural gas cleanup: Evaluation of a molecular sieve carbon as a pressure swing adsorbent for the separation of methane/nitrogen mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, R.W.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the results of a preliminary evaluation to determine the technical feasibility of using a molecular sieve carbon manufactured by the Takeda Chemical Company of Japan in a pressure owing adsorption cycle for upgrading natural gas (methane) contaminated with nitrogen. Adsorption tests were conducted using this adsorbent in two, four, and five-step adsorption cycles. Separation performance was evaluated in terms of product purity, product recovery, and sorbent productivity for all tests. The tests were conducted in a small, single-column adsorption apparatus that held 120 grams of the adsorbent. Test variables included adsorption pressure, pressurization rate, purge rate and volume, feed rate, and flow direction in the steps from which the product was collected. Sorbent regeneration was accomplished by purging the column with the feed gas mixture for all but one test series where a pure methane purge was used. The ratio between the volumes of the pressurization gas and the purge gas streams was found to be an important factor in determining separation performance. Flow rates in the various cycle steps had no significant effect. Countercurrent flow in the blow-down and purge steps improved separation performance. Separation performance appears to improve with increasing adsorption pressure, but because there are a number of interrelated variables that are also effected by pressure, further testing will be needed to verify this. The work demonstrates that a molecular sieve carbon can be used to separate a mixture of methane and nitrogen when used in a pressure swing cycle with regeneration by purge. Further work is needed to increase product purity and product recovery.

  6. VERUCLAY – a new type of photo-adsorbent active in the visible light range: modification of montmorillonite surface with organic surfactant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Montmorillonite K10 was treated with VeruSOL-3, a biodegradable and food-grade surfactant mixture of coconut oil, castor oil and citrus extracts, to manufacture a benign catalytic adsorbent that is active in the visible light. Veruclay was characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, UVDRS, a...

  7. Changes of the porous structure of activated carbons applied in a filter bed pilot operation.

    PubMed

    Gauden, P A; Szmechtig-Gauden, E; Rychlicki, G; Duber, S; Garbacz, J K; Buczkowski, R

    2006-03-15

    The paper investigates the changes in porosity (i.e., in the accessible adsorption capacity of carbonaceous adsorbents for pollutants during filter bed maturation) of three activated carbons applied in a filter bed pilot operation. The results of this investigation may help to reduce operating costs, increase granular activated carbon bed life, maximize the useful life of biofilters, and understand the mechanism of water purification by carbon adsorbents. The analysis of the pore structure was limited to the first year of service of the beds, since this was when the largest decrease in the available pore capacity occurred. Low-temperature nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to evaluate the structural parameters and pore size distributions (PSDs) of carbon samples (virgin (reference) and mature adsorbents for different periods of water treatment) on the basis of the Nguyen and Do (ND) method and density functional theory (DFT). These results were compared with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) investigations (PSDs calculated by Glatter's indirect transformation method (ITP)). The results show that in general, the ND and ITP methods lead to almost the same qualitative distribution curve behavior. Moreover, the enthalpy of immersion in water, mercury porosimetry, densities (true and apparent), and the analysis of ash are reported and compared to explain the decrease in adsorptive capacity of the carbons investigated. On the other hand, the efficacy of TOC (total organic carbon, i.e., a quantity describing the complex matrix of organic material present in natural waters) removal and the bacteria count were analyzed to explain the role of adsorption in the elimination of contaminants from water. Finally, a mechanism of organic matter removal was suggested on the basis of the above-mentioned experimental data and compared with mechanisms reported by other authors. PMID:16198363

  8. Adsorption of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans on activated carbon from hexane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu-Jian; Buekens, Alfons; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ni, Ming-Jiang; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2016-02-01

    Activated carbon is widely used to abate dioxins and dioxin-like compounds from flue gas. Comparing commercial samples regarding their potential to adsorb dioxins may proceed by using test columns, yet it takes many measurements to characterise the retention and breakthrough of dioxins. In this study, commercial activated carbon samples are evaluated during tests to remove trace amounts of dioxins dissolved in n-hexane. The solution was prepared from fly ash collected from a municipal solid waste incinerator. The key variables selected were the concentration of dioxins in n-hexane and the dosage of activated carbon. Both polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) showed very high removal efficiencies (94.7%-98.0% for PCDDs and 99.7%-99.8% for PCDFs). The presence of a large excess of n-hexane solvent had little effect on the removal efficiency of PCDD/Fs. The adsorbed PCDD/Fs showed a linear correlation (R(2) > 0.98) with the initial concentrations. Comparative analysis of adsorption isotherms showed that a linear Henry isotherm fitted better the experimental data (R(2) = 0.99 both for PCDDs and PCDFs) than the more usual Freundlich isotherm (R(2) = 0.88 for PCDDs and 0.77 for PCDFs). Finally, the results of fingerprint analysis indicated that dioxin fingerprint (weight proportion of different congeners) on activated carbon after adsorption did not change from that in hexane. PMID:26476048

  9. Thermal and adsorbate effects on the activity and morphology of size-selected Pdn/TiO2 model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, William E.; Kunkel, William A.; Roberts, F. Sloan; Kane, Matthew; Anderson, Scott L.

    2014-03-01

    Model catalysts containing size-selected Pdn (n = 1,2,4,7,10,16,20,25) deposited on rutile TiO2(110) deactivate during repeated CO oxidation temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) cycles, and the deactivation process has been probed using a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), low-energy ion scattering (ISS), temperature-dependent ion scattering (TD-ISS), annealing experiments, and temperature-programmed desorption following exposure to CO and O2 reactants. Results from such experiments suggest the cluster deactivation proceeds via an alloy-like, strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) effect that chemically modifies the clusters via electronic interactions between the supported metal atoms and Ti from the support. Threshold measurements show that this effect detrimentally affects CO-oxidation activity prior to the formation of an encapsulating overlayer by severely weakening the COPd bond strengths for binding configurations on top of the clusters. Oxidation appears to provide means of partially restoring the clusters to their initial state, but after sufficient exposure to reducing environments and elevated temperatures, all Pdn become covered by an overlayer and begin to electronically and chemically resemble freshly deposited atoms, which are completely inactive towards the probe reaction. In addition, we find evidence of oxygen spillover induced by co-adsorbed CO during TPRs for all active Pdn clusters.

  10. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the results of research in which novel activated carbons have been examined for their efficacy in water treatment and, specifically, for the adsorption of a common herbicide and wood preservative, sodium pentachlorophenolate. To place this work in context, the introduction will discuss first some of the considerations of using activated carbons for water treatment, and then certain aspects of the authors research that has led to this particular topic.

  11. Targeted Mutagenesis and Combinatorial Library Screening Enables Control of Protein Orientation on Surfaces and Increased Activity of Adsorbed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Teran, Carlos A; Carlin, Kevin B; Efimenko, Kirill; Genzer, Jan; Rao, Balaji M

    2016-08-30

    While nonspecific adsorption is widely used for immobilizing proteins on solid surfaces, the random nature of protein adsorption may reduce the activity of immobilized proteins due to occlusion of the active site. We hypothesized that the orientation a protein assumes on a given surface can be controlled by systematically introducing mutations into a region distant from its active site, thereby retaining activity of the immobilized protein. To test this hypothesis, we generated a combinatorial protein library by randomizing six targeted residues in a binding protein derived from highly stable, nonimmunoglobulin Sso7d scaffold; mutations were targeted in a region that is distant from the binding site. This library was screened to isolate binders that retain binding to its cognate target (chicken immunoglobulin Y, cIgY) as well as exhibit adsorption on unmodified silica at pH 7.4 and high ionic strength conditions. A single mutant, Sso7d-2B5, was selected for further characterization. Sso7d-2B5 retained binding to cIgY with an apparent dissociation constant similar to that of the parent protein; both mutant and parent proteins saturated the surface of silica with similar densities. Strikingly, however, silica beads coated with Sso7d-2B5 could achieve up to 7-fold higher capture of cIgY than beads coated with the parent protein. These results strongly suggest that mutations introduced in Sso7d-2B5 alter its orientation relative to the parent protein, when adsorbed on silica surfaces. Our approach also provides a generalizable strategy for introducing mutations in proteins so as to improve their activity upon immobilization, and has direct relevance to development of protein-based biosensors and biocatalysts. PMID:27490089

  12. Ultrasound-assisted adsorption of 4-dodecylbenzene sulfonate from aqueous solutions by corn cob activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Milenković, D D; Bojić, A Lj; Veljković, V B

    2013-05-01

    This study was aimed at removal of 4-dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS) ions from aqueous solutions by ultrasound-assisted adsorption onto the carbonized corn cob (AC). The main attention was focused on modeling the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption of DBS onto the AC. The AC was prepared from ground dried corn cob by carbonization and activation by carbon dioxide at 880°C for 2h in a rotary furnace. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted by the Langmuir model in both the absence and the presence of ultrasound (US). The maximum adsorption capacities of the adsorbent for DBS, calculated from the Langmuir isotherms, were 29.41mg/g and 27.78mg/g in the presence of US and its absence, respectively. The adsorption process in the absence and the presence of US obeyed the pseudo second-order kinetics. The intraparticular diffusion model indicated that the adsorption of DBS ions on the AC was diffusion controlled as well as that US promoted intraparticular diffusion. The ΔG° values, -24.03kJ/mol, -25.78kJ/mol and -27.78kJ/mol, were negative at all operating temperatures, verifying that the adsorption of DBS ions was spontaneous and thermodynamically favorable. The positive value of ΔS°=187J/molK indicated the increased randomness at the adsorbent-adsorbate interface during the adsorption of DBS ions by the AC. PMID:23187067

  13. Removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum refinery wastewater through adsorption on modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ben Hariz, Ichrak; Al Ayni, Foued; Monser, Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of sulfur compounds from petroleum refinery wastewater on a chemically modified activated carbon (MAC) was investigated. The modification technique (nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and thermal modification) enhanced the removal capacity of carbon and therefore decreases cost-effective removal of sulfide from refinery wastewater. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data were determined for sulfur removal from real refinery wastewater. The data were evaluated according to several adsorption isotherm and kinetics models. The Freundlich isotherm fitted well with the equilibrium data of sulfur on different adsorbents, whereas the kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second-order model. Insights of sulfide removal mechanisms indicated that the sorption was controlled through the intraparticle diffusion mechanism with a significant contribution of film diffusion. The MAC adsorbent was found to have an effective removal capacity of approximately 2.5 times that of non-modified carbon. Using different MAC, sulfides were eliminated with a removal capacity of 52 mg g(-1). Therefore, MAC can be utilized as an effective and less expensive adsorbent for the reduction of sulfur in refinery wastewater. PMID:25353943

  14. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  15. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.

  16. Activated Carbons From Grape Seeds By Chemical Activation With Potassium Carbonate And Potassium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okman, Irem; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay; Erdem, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Activated carbons were produced from grape seed using either potassium carbonate (K2CO3) or potassium hydroxide (KOH). The carbonization experiments were accomplished at 600 and 800 °C. The effects of the experimental conditions (i.e., type of activation reagents, reagent concentrations, and carbonization temperatures) on the yields and the properties of these activated carbons were analyzed under identical conditions. An increase in the temperature at the same concentrations for both K2CO3 and KOH led to a decrease in the yields of the activated carbons. The lowest activated carbon yields were obtained at 800 °C at the highest reagent concentration (100 wt%) for both K2CO3 and KOH. The activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1238 m2g-1 was obtained at 800 °C in K2CO3 concentration of 50 wt% while KOH produced the activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1222 m2g-1 in a concentration of 25wt% at 800 °C. The obtained activated carbons were mainly microporous.

  17. Reconstruction of adsorption potential in Polanyi-based models and application to various adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bingjun; Zhang, Huichun

    2014-06-17

    The equilibrium Polanyi adsorption potential was reconstructed as ε = -RT ln(Ca(or H)/δ) to correlate the characteristic energy (E) of Polanyi-based models (qe = f[ε/E]) with the properties or structures of absorbates, where qe is the equilibriumn adsorption capacity, Ca(or H) is the converted concentration from the equilibrium aqueous concentration at the same activity and corresponds to the adsorption from the gas or n-hexadecane (HD) phase by the water-wet adsorbent, and "δ" is an arbitrary divisor to converge the model fitting. Subsequently, the modified Dubinin-Astakhov model based on the reconstructed ε was applied to aqueous adsorption on activated carbon, black carbon, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and polymeric resin. The fitting results yielded intrinsic characteristic energies Ea, derived from aqueous-to-gas phase conversion, or EH, derived from aqueous-to-HD phase conversion, which reflect the contributions of the overall or specific adsorbate-adsorbent interactions to the adsorption. Effects of the adsorbate and adsorbent properties on Ea or EH then emerge that are unrevealed by the original characteristic energy (Eo), i.e., adsorbates with tendency to form stronger interactions with an adsorbent have larger Ea and EH. Additionally, comparison of Ea and EH allows quantitative analysis of the contributions of nonspecific interactions, that is, a significant relationship was established between the nonspecific interactions and Abraham's descriptors for the adsorption of all 32 solutes on the four different adsorbents: (Ea - EH) = 24.7 × V + 9.7 × S - 19.3 (R(2) = 0.97), where V is McGowan's characteristic volume for adsorbates, and S reflects the adsorbate's polarity/polarizability. PMID:24815932

  18. Microwave-assisted regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-09-01

    Microwave heating was used in the regeneration of methylene blue-loaded activated carbons produced from fibers (PFAC), empty fruit bunches (EFBAC) and shell (PSAC) of oil palm. The dye-loaded carbons were treated in a modified conventional microwave oven operated at 2450 MHz and irradiation time of 2, 3 and 5 min. The virgin properties of the origin and regenerated activated carbons were characterized by pore structural analysis and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement and determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue (MB). Microwave irradiation preserved the pore structure, original active sites and adsorption capacity of the regenerated activated carbons. The carbon yield and the monolayer adsorption capacities for MB were maintained at 68.35-82.84% and 154.65-195.22 mg/g, even after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. The findings revealed the potential of microwave heating for regeneration of spent activated carbons. PMID:22728787

  19. Contaminant removal from enclosed atmospheres by regenerable adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, R. L.; Mcnulty, K. J.; Freedland, G. M.; Turk, A.; Nwankwo, J.

    1974-01-01

    A system for removing contaminants from spacecraft atmospheres was studied, which utilizes catalyst-impregnated activated carbon followed by in-situ regeneration by low-temperature catalytic oxidation of the adsorbed contaminants. Platinum was deposited on activated carbon by liquid phase impregnation with chloroplatinic acid, followed by drying and high-temperature reduction. Results were obtained for the seven selected spacecraft contaminants by means of three experimental test systems. The results indicate that the contaminants could be removed by oxidation with very little loss in adsorptive capacity. The advantages of a catalyst-impregnated carbon for oxidative regeneration are found to be significant enough to warrent its use.

  20. Factors affecting the adsorption of xenon on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Underhill, D.W.; DiCello, D.C.; Scaglia, L.A.; Watson, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    The presence of water vapor was found to interfere strongly with the dynamic adsorption of /sup 133/Xe on coconut-base activated charcoal. The percent loss in the xenon adsorption coefficient was similar to values reported earlier for the adsorption of krypton on humidified charcoal. Attempts to increase the adsorption of xenon by (a) using a petroleum-based adsorbent with an extremely high surface area and (b) by impregnation of the adsorbent with iodine were not successful.

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  2. Pore size distribution analysis of activated carbons prepared from coconut shell using methane adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadpour, A.; Okhovat, A.; Darabi Mahboub, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    The application of Stoeckli theory to determine pore size distribution (PSD) of activated carbons using high pressure methane adsorption data is explored. Coconut shell was used as a raw material for the preparation of 16 different activated carbon samples. Four samples with higher methane adsorption were selected and nitrogen adsorption on these adsorbents was also investigated. Some differences are found between the PSD obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms and their PSD resulting from the same analysis using methane adsorption data. It is suggested that these differences may arise from the specific interactions between nitrogen molecules and activated carbon surfaces; therefore caution is required in the interpretation of PSD obtained from the nitrogen isotherm data.

  3. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  4. Dye adsorption onto activated carbons from tyre rubber waste using surface coverage analysis.

    PubMed

    Mui, Edward L K; Cheung, W H; Valix, Marjorie; McKay, Gordon

    2010-07-15

    Two types of activated carbons from tyre char (with or without sulphuric acid treatment) were produced via carbon dioxide activation with BET surface areas in the range 59-1118 m(2)/g. Other characterisation tests include micropore and mesopore surface areas and volumes, pH, and elemental compositions, particularly heteroatoms such as nitrogen and sulphur. They were correlated to the adsorption capacity which were in the range of 0.45-0.71 mmol/g (untreated) and 0.62-0.84 mmol/g (acid-treated) for Acid Blue 25. In the case of larger-sized molecules like Acid Yellow 117, capacities were in the range of 0.23-0.42 mmol/g (untreated) and 0.29-0.40 mmol/g (acid-treated). Some tyre carbons exhibit a more superior performance than a microporous, commercial activated carbon (Calgon F400). By modelling the dye adsorption equilibrium data, the Redlich-Peterson isotherm is adopted as it has the lowest SSE. Based on the surface coverage analysis, a novel molecular orientation modelling of adsorbed dyes has been proposed and correlated with surface area and surface charge. For the acid dyes used in this study, molecules were likely to be adsorbed by the mesopore areas. PMID:20416883

  5. Equilibria of 1,1,2,-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.Y.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1995-07-01

    ChloroFluoroCarbons (CFCs) are now considered to be the prime contribution to stratospheric ozone depletion. As a result, the use of activated carbons to adsorb specific CFCs has received great attention. In this paper, the equilibrium adsorption characteristics of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane vapor on different-shaped carbons were studied. Adsorption isotherms of 1,2,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane on an activated carbon pellet and an activated carbon felt were measured. The equilibria of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane on the activated carbon pellet having a dual pore structure were expressed by the Redlich-Peterson equation, and equilibrium constants were expressed as functions of temperature from 298 to 393 K. On the other hand, the equilibria of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane on the activated carbon felt having a relatively uniform pore structure were interpreted by the Dubinin-Radushkevich correlation based on the micropore volume filling theory. The affinity coefficient was correlated by the molar polarization.

  6. Removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine precursors with powdered activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Ersan, Mahmut Selim; Uzun, Habibullah; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the roles of powdered activated carbon (PAC) characteristics (i.e., surface chemistry, pore size distribution, and surface area) in the removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potential (FP) in surface and wastewater-impacted waters. Also, the effects of natural attenuation of NDMA precursors in surface waters, NDMA FP concentration, and carbon dose on the removal of NDMA FP by PAC were evaluated. Finally, the removal of NDMA FP by PAC at two full-scale DWTPs was monitored. Wastewater-impacted and surface water samples were collected to conduct adsorption experiments using different PACs and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with a wide range of physicochemical characteristics. The removal efficiency of NDMA FP by PAC was significantly higher in wastewater-impacted than surface waters. Adsorbable NDMA precursors showed a size distribution in the waters tested; the adsorbable fraction included precursors accessing the pore size regions of 10-20 Å and <10 Å. Basic carbons showed higher removal of NDMA FP than acidic carbons on a surface area basis. The overall removal of NDMA FP by PAC on a mass basis depended on the surface area, pore size distribution and pHPZC. Thus, PACs with hybrid characteristics (micro and mesoporous), higher surface areas, and basic surface chemistry are more likely to be effective for NDMA precursor control by PAC adsorption. The application of PAC in DWTPs for taste and odor control resulted in an additional 20% removal of NDMA FP for the PAC doses of 7-10 mg/L. The natural attenuation of NDMA precursors through a combination of processes (biodegradation, photolysis and adsorption) decreased their adsorbability and removal by PAC adsorption. PMID:26584342

  7. High-performances carbonaceous adsorbents for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weigang; Fierro, Vanessa; Aylon, E.; Izquierdo, M. T.; Celzard, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) with controlled microporosity have been prepared and their H2 storage performances have been tested in a gravimetric device. Such adsorbents are natural Chinese anthracites chemically activated with alkaline hydroxides, NaOH or KOH. Outstanding total storage capacities of hydrogen, as high as 6.6wt.% equivalent to excess capacity of 6.2 wt.%, have been obtained at 4MPa for some of these adsorbents. These values of hydrogen adsorption are among the best, if not the highest, ever published so far in the open literature. They are well above those of some commercial materials, e.g. Maxsorb-3, considered as a reference of high-performance adsorbent for hydrogen adsorption. Such exceptional storage capacities may be ascribed to a higher volume of micropores (< 2nm).

  8. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process. PMID:25084579

  9. Removal of micro pollutants using activated biochars and powdered activated carbon in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Jung, C.; Han, J.; Son, A.; Yoon, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that emerging micropollutants containing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs); bisphenol A, 17 α-ethinylestradiol, 17 β-estradiol and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs); sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, ibuprofen, atenolol, benzophenone, benzotriazole, caffeine, gemfibrozil, primidone, triclocarban in water have been linked to ecological impacts, even at trace concentrations (sub ug/L). Adsorption with adsorbent such as activated carbon having a high-binding affinity has been widely used to eliminate various contaminants in the aqueous phase. Recently, an efficient treatment strategy for EDCs and PPCPs has been considered by using cost effective adsorption particularly with biochar in aqueous environmentIn this study, the objective of this study is to determine the removal of 13 target EDCs/PPCPs having different physicochemical properties by a biochar at various water quality conditions (pH (3.5, 7, and 10.5), background ions (NaCl, CaCl2, Na₂SO₄), ionic strength, natural organic matter (NOM)). The activated biochar produced in a laboratory was also characterized by using conventional analytical methods as well as advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, which answer how these properties determine the competitive adsorption characteristics and mechanisms of EDCs and PPCPs.The primary findings suggest that micropollutants can be removed more effectively by the biochar than the commercially available powdered activated carbon. At pH values below the pKa of each compound, the adsorption affinity toward adsorbents increased significantly with the pH, whereas the adsorption affinity decreased significantly at the pH above the pKa values. Na+ did not significantly impact adsorption, while increasing the concentration of Ca2+lead to increase in the adsorption of these micropollutants. NOM adsorption with humic acids on these adsorbents disturbed adsorption capacity of the target compounds as

  10. Pilot-scale study of powdered activated carbon recirculation for micropollutant removal.

    PubMed

    Meinel, F; Sperlich, A; Jekel, M

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) is a promising technique for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) from treated wastewater. To enhance the adsorption efficiency, PAC is recycled back into the adsorption stage. This technique was examined in pilot scale in comparison to a reference without recirculation. Coagulation with Fe(3+) was carried out simultaneously to adsorption. Extensive OMP measurements showed that recirculation significantly increased OMP eliminations. Thus, significant PAC savings were feasible. The PAC concentration in the contact reactor proved to be an important operating parameter that can be surrogated by the easily measurable total suspended solids (TSS) concentration. OMP eliminations increased with increasing TSS concentrations. At 20 mg PAC L(-1) and 2.8 g TSS L(-1) in the contact reactor, well-adsorbable carbamazepine was eliminated by 97%, moderately adsorbable diclofenac was eliminated by 92% and poorly-adsorbable acesulfame was eliminated by 54% in comparison to 49%, 35% and 18%, respectively, without recirculation. The recirculation system represents an efficient technique, as the PAC's adsorption capacity is practically completely used. Small PAC dosages yield high OMP eliminations. Poorly-adsorbable gabapentin was eliminated to an unexpectedly high degree. A laboratory-scale biomass inhibition study showed that aerobic biodegradation removed gabapentin in addition to adsorption. PMID:27533867

  11. Adsorption and desorption of mixtures of organic vapors on beaded activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Hashisho, Zaher; Philips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2012-08-01

    In this study, adsorption and desorption of mixtures of organic compounds commonly emitted from automotive painting operations were experimentally studied. A mixture of two alkanes and a mixture of eight organic compounds were adsorbed onto beaded activated carbon (BAC) and then thermally desorbed under nitrogen. Following both adsorption and regeneration, samples of the BAC were chemically extracted. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to quantify the compounds in the adsorption and desorption gas streams and in the BAC extracts. In general, for both adsorbate mixtures, competitive adsorption resulted in displacing low boiling point compounds by high boiling point compounds during adsorption. In addition to boiling point, adsorbate structure and functionality affected adsorption dynamics. High boiling point compounds such as n-decane and 2,2-dimethylpropylbenzene were not completely desorbed after three hours regeneration at 288 °C indicating that these two compounds contributed to heel accumulation on the BAC. Additional compounds not present in the mixtures were detected in the extract of regenerated BAC possibly due to decomposition or other reactions during regeneration. Closure analysis based on breakthrough curves, solvent extraction of BAC and mass balance on the reactor provided consistent results of the amount of adsorbates on the BAC after adsorption and/or regeneration. PMID:22742925

  12. Removal of VOCs from humidified gas streams using activated carbon cloth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Rood, M.J.; Larson, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of relative humidity (RH) on the adsorption of soluble (acetone) and insoluble (benzene) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with activated carbon cloths (ACC). A gravimetric balance was used in conjunction with a gas chromatograph/mass spectrophotometer to determine the individual amounts of water and VOC adsorbed on an ACC sample. RH values from 0 to 90% and organic concentrations from 350 to 1000 ppmv were examined. The presence of water vapor in the gas-stream along with acetone (350 and 500 ppmv) had little effect on the adsorption capacity of acetone even at 90% RH. Water vapor in the gas stream had little effect on the adsorption capacity of benzene (500 ppmv) until about 65% RH, when a rapid decrease resulted in the adsorption capacity of benzene with increasing RH. This RH was also about where capillary condensation of water vapor occurs within ACC pores. Water vapor condenses within the ACC pores, making them unavailable for benzene adsorption. Increasing benzene concentration can have a significant effect on the amount of water vapor adsorbed. At 86% RH and 500 ppmv, 284 mg/g water was adsorbed, while at 86% RH and 1000 ppmv, only 165 mg/g water was adsorbed. Water vapor was more inhibitory for benzene adsorption as benzene concentration in the gas stream decreased. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  13. Valorization of agricultural waste into activated carbons and its adsorption characteristics for heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koubaissy, Bachar; Toufaily, Joumana; Cheikh, Safaa; Hassan, Malak; Hamieh, Tayssir

    2014-03-01

    Activated carbon derived from pine cones waste was prepared by carbonization at 450°C, activated by different activating agents: ZnCl 2, H 2 SO 4 and NaOH, and then pyrolyzed at 600°C. Adsorption of Cr VI and other heavy metals (Mn II, Fe II, Cu II) on activated carbons was investigated to evaluate the adsorption properties. Special attention was paid to the effects of carbon surface functionalities that were analyzed by FT-IR and zeta potential study. Moreover, XRD study of activated carbon was also carried out. Results had shown that activated carbon by NaOH was the best adsorbent for removal of chromium VI from wastewater. The solid-solution interaction was determined by analyzing the adsorption isotherms at room temperature at different pH. When pH is above 4, the removal fraction of Cr (VI) ions decreased with the increase of pH. The removal fraction of Cr (VI) ions decreased below pH 4. The preferable removal of Cu (II) over Mn(II) and Fe (II) could be due to its lower affinity to solvent.Pseudo-second order equation provided the better correlation for the adsorption kinetics data. Equilibrium isotherms were determined by Fowler-Guggenheim model.

  14. Kinetics and equilibrium adsorption study of p-nitrophenol onto activated carbon derived from walnut peel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Fang; Bai, Song

    2015-01-01

    An original activated carbon prepared from walnut peel, which was activated by zinc chloride, was modified with ammonium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide in order to contrast the adsorption property of the three different activated carbons. The experiment used a static adsorption test for p-nitrophenol. The effects of parameters such as initial concentration, contact time and pH value on amount adsorbed and removal are discussed in depth. The thermodynamic data of adsorption were analyzed by Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic data of adsorption were measured by the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the pseudo-second-order kinetics models. The results indicated that the alkalized carbon samples derived from walnut peel had a better performance than the original activated carbon treated with zinc chloride. It was found that adsorption equilibrium time was 6 h. The maximum removal rate of activated carbon treated with zinc chloride for p-nitrophenol was 87.3% at pH 3,whereas the maximum removal rate of the two modified activated carbon materials was found to be 90.8% (alkalized with ammonium hydroxide) and 92.0% (alkalized with sodium hydroxide) at the same pH. The adsorption data of the zinc chloride activated carbon were fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model. The two alkalized activated carbon samples were fitted well to the Freundlich model. The pseudo-second-order dynamics equation provided better explanation of the adsorption dynamics data of the three activated carbons than the pseudo-first-order dynamics equation. PMID:26676011

  15. Effect of activated carbon surface oxygen- and/or nitrogen-containing groups on adsorption of copper(II) ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Biniak, S.; Pakula, M.; Szymanski, G.S.; Swiatkowski, A.

    1999-08-31

    The adsorption properties of a modified activated carbon with various oxygen-and/or nitrogen-containing surface groups toward copper ions was studied. Previously de-ashed and chemically modified commercial activated carbon D-43/1 (carbo-Tech, Essen, Germany) was used. The chemical properties of the modified carbon surface were estimated by standard neutralization titration with HCl, NaOH, and HaOC{sub 2}{sub 5}. The adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions on three modified activated carbons from aqueous CuSO{sub 4} solution of various pH was measured. The carbon samples with adsorbed Cu{sup 2+} ions were analyzed by spectroscopic methods (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). In addition, an electrochemical measurement (cyclic voltammetry) was performed using powdered activated carbon electrodes. While the modification procedures employed alter the surface only slightly, they strongly influence the surface chemical structure. Basic groups are predominant in the heat-treated samples; acidic functional groups are predominant in the oxidized sample. Both the copper cation adsorption studies and the spectral and electrochemical measurements show that adsorbed ions interact with the carbon surface in different ways. The number of adsorbed ions depends on the nature and quantity of surface acid-base functionalities and on the pH equilibrium in the aqueous solution. The possible mechanisms of interactions between metal ions and carbon surface functionalities are summarized and discussed.

  16. Arsenic removal by modified activated carbons with iron hydro(oxide) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vitela-Rodriguez, Alma Veronica; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2013-01-15

    Different activated carbons modified with iron hydro(oxide) nanoparticles were tested for their ability to adsorb arsenic from water. Adsorption isotherms were determined at As (V) concentrations < 1 ppm, with varying pH (6, 7, 8) and temperature (25 and 35 °C). Also, competition effect of anions on the As (V) adsorption capacity was evaluated using groundwater. The surface areas of the modified activated carbons ranged from 632 m(2) g(-1) to 1101 m(2) g(-1), and their maximum arsenic adsorption capacity varied from 370 μg g(-1) to 1250 μg g(-1). Temperature had no significant effect on arsenic adsorption; however, arsenic adsorption decreased 32% when the solution pH increased from 6 to 8. In addition, when groundwater was used in the experiments, the arsenic adsorption considerably decreased due to the presence of competing anions (mainly SO(4)(2-), Cl(-) and F(-)) for active sites. The data from kinetic studies fitted well to the pseudo-second-order model (r(2) = 0.98-0.99). The results indicated that sample CAZ-M had faster kinetics than the other two materials in the first 10 min. However, sample F400-M was only 5.5% slower than CAZ-M. The results of this study show that iron modified activated carbons are efficient adsorbents for arsenic at concentrations lower than 300 μg L(-1). PMID:23146335

  17. Adsorption of benzene, cyclohexane and hexane on ordered mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Dou, Baojuan; Zhang, Zhongshen; Wang, Junhui; Liu, Haier; Hao, Zhengping

    2015-04-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) with high specific surface area and large pore volume was synthesized and tested for use as an adsorbent for volatile organic compound (VOC) disposal. Benzene, cyclohexane and hexane were selected as typical adsorbates due to their different molecular sizes and extensive utilization in industrial processes. In spite of their structural differences, high adsorption amounts were achieved for all three adsorbates, as the pore size of OMC is large enough for the access of these VOCs. In addition, the unusual bimodal-like pore size distribution gives the adsorbates a higher diffusion rate compared with conventional adsorbents such as activated carbon and carbon molecular sieve. Kinetic analysis suggests that the adsorption barriers mainly originated from the difficulty of VOC vapor molecules entering the pore channels of adsorbents. Therefore, its superior adsorption ability toward VOCs, together with a high diffusion rate, makes the ordered mesoporous carbon a promising potential adsorbent for VOC disposal. PMID:25872710

  18. Adsorption of SO2 on bituminous coal char and activated carbon fiber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeBarr, J.A.; Lizzio, A.A.; Daley, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The SO2 adsorption behaviors of activated carbons produced from Illinois coal and of commercially prepared activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were compared. There was no relation between surface area of coal-based carbons and SO2 adsorption, whereas adsorption of SO2 on the series of ACFs was inversely proportional to N2 BET surface area. Higher surface area ACFs had wider pores and adsorbed less SO2; thus, pore size distribution is thought to play a significant role in SO2 adsorption for these materials. Oxidation with HNO3 and/or H2SO4, followed by heat treatment at 700-925 ??C to remove carbon-oxygen complexes, resulted in increased SO2 adsorption for both coal chars and ACFs. This behavior was explained by an increase in the available number of free sites, previously occupied by oxygen and now available for SO2 adsorption. The use of nitrogen-containing functional groups on ACFs of proper pore size shows promise for further increasing SO2 adsorption capacities. Knowledge of the relationship among the number of free sites, pore size, and surface chemistry on corresponding SO2 adsorption should lead to the development of more efficient adsorbents prepared from either coal or ACFs.

  19. Static and dynamic adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution using spherical carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargavi, R.; Kadirvelu, K.; Kumar, N. S.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate spherical carbon and modified spherical carbon for the removal of phenol from aqueous solution in static and dynamic studies under various conditions. It explores mainly two adsorbents, that is, activated spherical carbon (ASC) and modified activated spherical carbon (SSC). SEM characterization of both the adsorbents showed a clear change in the physical and chemical properties of the modified adsorbent from its precursor activated carbon. Both the adsorbents are subjected to static mode adsorption studies and after a comparison based on isotherm analysis; more efficient adsorbent is screened for column mode adsorption studies. The phenol removal increased for modified carbon. The aim of carrying out column mode studies will aid in ascertaining the practical applicability of the adsorbent in the real system and therefore, to assess the effect of various process variables, viz., bed height of the adsorbent, flow rate and initial concentration of the adsorbate on breakthrough time and adsorption capacity. The column studies generated data were modeled using the empirical relationship based on Bohart-Adams model. At the end, the option of regenerating the adsorbent was also explored using sodium hydroxide with the aim of minimize the hazardous generated and also to reuse the adsorbent material for many cycles without affecting original properties. Adsorbent regeneration efficiency of 72% was achieved. This investigation reveals that the material used as an adsorbent is very effective with high adsorption capacities and also possible to use in the real contaminated system.

  20. Performances of toluene removal by activated carbon derived from durian shell.

    PubMed

    Tham, Y J; Latif, Puziah Abdul; Abdullah, A M; Shamala-Devi, A; Taufiq-Yap, Y H

    2011-01-01

    In the effort to find alternative low cost adsorbent for volatile organic vapors has prompted this research in assessing the effectiveness of activated carbon produced from durian shell in removing toluene vapors. Durian shells were impregnated with different concentrations of H3PO4 followed by carbonization at 500 °C for 20 min under nitrogen atmosphere. The prepared durian shell activated carbon (DSAC) was characterized for its physical and chemical properties. The removal efficiency of toluene by DSAC was performed using different toluene concentrations. Results showed that the highest BET surface area of the produced DSAC was 1404 m2/g. Highest removal efficiency of toluene vapors was achieved by using DSAC impregnated with 30% of acid concentration heated at 500 °C for 20 min heating duration. However, there is insignificant difference between removal efficiency of toluene by DSAC and different toluene concentrations. The toluene adsorption by DSAC was better fitted into Freundlich model. PMID:20884200

  1. Granular activated carbon for removal of organic matter and turbidity from secondary wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hatt, J W; Germain, E; Judd, S J

    2013-01-01

    A range of commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) media have been assessed as pretreatment technologies for a downstream microfiltration (MF) process. Media were assessed on the basis of reduction in both organic matter and turbidity, since these are known to cause fouling in MF membranes. Isotherm adsorption analysis through jar testing with supplementary column trials revealed a wide variation between the different adsorbent materials with regard to organics removal and adsorption kinetics. Comparison with previous work using powdered activated carbon (PAC) revealed that for organic removal above 60% the use of GAC media incurs a significantly lower carbon usage rate than PAC. All GACs tested achieved a minimum of 80% turbidity removal. This combination of turbidity and organic removal suggests that GAC would be expected to provide a significant reduction in fouling of a downstream MF process with improved product water quality. PMID:23306264

  2. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Haijie; Liu, Enhui; Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  3. Activation and splitting of carbon dioxide on the surface of an inorganic electride material

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yoshitake; Hirayama, Hiroyuki; Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah; Torrisi, Antonio; Sushko, Peter V.; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Activation of carbon dioxide is the most important step in its conversion into valuable chemicals. Surfaces of stable oxide with a low work function may be promising for this purpose. Here we report that the surfaces of the inorganic electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e−)4 activate and split carbon dioxide at room temperature. This behaviour is attributed to a high concentration of localized electrons in the near-surface region and a corrugation of the surface that can trap oxygen atoms and strained carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide molecules. The [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e−)4 surface exposed to carbon dioxide is studied using temperature-programmed desorption, and spectroscopic methods. The results of these measurements, corroborated with ab initio simulations, show that both carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide adsorb on the [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e−)4 surface at RT and above and adopt unusual configurations that result in desorption of molecular carbon monoxide and atomic oxygen upon heating. PMID:23986101

  4. Effect of Ultrasound on Bisphenol A Adsorption on the Granular Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myunghee Lim,; Younggyu Son,; Mingcan Cui,; Jeehyeong Khim,

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of ultrasound (power, frequency) on bisphenol A (BPA) adsorption on granular activated carbon (GAC). The result of adsorption isotherm in a BPA solution, using sonicated GAC (at 35 kHz) can more successfully adsorb BPA than sonicated GAC (at 300 kHz) and the original GAC. At low frequency GAC has a high cavitation effect. Therefore, the amount of adsorbed BPA at a low frequency was higher than at a high frequency. In isotherm experiments, ultrasound can enhance the adsorption process in GAC in both frequencies (35 and 300 kHz). These results agree with other previous researches. The effect of power intensity in the adsorption of BPA is increased the adsorption of BPA with increasing power. The optimum power exists and differs from frequencies because the cavitation effect is not the same with different frequencies.

  5. Experimental study of a three-adsorber sorption refrigerator for utilization of renewable sources of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitovich, A. P.

    2013-03-01

    A three-adsorber refrigerator has been created and experimentally tested, in which use is made of a composite sorbent consisting of activated carbon fiber and alkali salts. This sorbent has a high capacity of storage of refrigeration characteristic of chemical coolers and a high sorption rate characteristic of adsorption refrigerators. The sorbent structure makes it possible to effect a convective intrapore process of cooling of the sorbent through intense two-phase heat transfer. A three-adsorber refrigerator has a higher refrigeration efficiency and smaller mass and overall dimensions than a traditional two-stage four-adsorber refrigerator.

  6. Adsorption of Selected Pharmaceutical Compounds onto Activated Carbon in Dilute Aqueous Solutions Exemplified by Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, and Sulfamethoxazole

    PubMed Central

    Chang, E.-E.; Wan, Jan-Chi; Liang, Chung-Huei; Dai, Yung-Dun; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of three pharmaceuticals, namely, acetaminophen, diclofenac, and sulfamethoxazole onto granular activated carbon (GAC), was investigated. To study competitive adsorption, both dynamic and steady-state adsorption experiments were conducted by careful selection of pharmaceuticals with various affinities and molecular size. The effective diffusion coefficient of the adsorbate was increased with decease in particle size of GAC. The adsorption affinity represented as Langmuir was consistent with the ranking of the octanol-water partition coefficient, Kow. The adsorption behavior in binary or tertiary systems could be described by competition adsorption. In the binary system adsorption replacement occurred, under which the adsorbate with the smaller Kow was replaced by the one with larger Kow. Results also indicated that portion of the micropores could be occupied only by the small target compound, but not the larger adsorbates. In multiple-component systems the competition adsorption might significantly be affected by the macropores and less by the meso- or micropores. PMID:26078989

  7. Application of central composite design for simultaneous removal of methylene blue and Pb2+ ions by walnut wood activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Mazaheri, H.; Khodadoust, S.; Hajati, S.; Purkait, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbon was prepared from walnut wood which was locally available, non-toxic, abundant and cheap. This new adsorbent was characterized using BET, FTIR and SEM. Point of zero charge (pHpzc) and oxygen containing functional groups were also determined. The prepared adsorbent was applied for simultaneous removal of Pb2+ ions and methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solution. The prominent effect and interaction of variables such as amount of adsorbent, contact time, concentration of MB and Pb2+ ions were optimized by central composite design. The equilibrium data obtained at optimum condition were fitted to conventional isotherm models and found that Langmuir model was the best fitted isotherm. Kinetic data were fitted using various models. It was revealed that the adsorption rate follows pseudo-second order kinetic model and intraparticle diffusion model.

  8. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  9. Utility of adsorbents in the purification of drinking water: a review of characterization, efficiency and safety evaluation of various adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Shashi Prabha; Gopal, Krishna; Bersillon, J L

    2009-05-01

    Clean drinking water is one of the implicit requisites fora healthy human population. However the growing industrialization and extensive use of chemicals for various concerns, has increased the burden of unwanted pollutants in the drinking water of developing countries like India. The entry of potentially hazardous substances into the biota has been magnifying day by day. In the absence of a possible stoppage of these, otherwise, useful chemicals, the only way to maintain safer water bodies is to develop efficient purifying technologies. One such immensely beneficial procedure that has been in use is that of purification of water using 'adsorbents'. Indigenous minerals and natural plants products have potential for removing many pollutants viz. fluoride, arsenic, nitrate, heavy metals, pesticides as well as trihalomethanes. Adsorbents which are derived from carbon, alumina, zeolite, clay minerals, iron ores, industrial by products, and natural products viz. parts of the plants, herbs and algal biomass offer promising potential of removal. In the recent years attention has been paid to develop process involving screening/pretreatment/activation/impregnation using alkalies, acids, alum, lime, manganese dioxide, ferric chloride and other chemicals which are found to enhance their adsorbing efficiency. Chemical characterization of these adsorbents recapitulates the mechanism of the process. It is imperative to observe that capacities of the adsorbents may vary depending on the characteristics, chemical modifications and concentration of the individual adsorbent. Removal kinetics is found to be based on the experimental conditions viz. pH, concentration of the adsorbate, quantity of the adsorbent and temperature. It is suggested that isotherm model is suitable tool to assess the adsorption capacities in batch and column modes. Safety evaluation and risk assessment of the process/products may be useful to provide guidelines for its sustainable disposal. PMID:20120453

  10. CORRELATIONS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SURFACE DIFFUSIVITIES OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS ADSORBED ONTO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential column batch reactor (DCBR) experiments in organic-free water were conducted for the following volatile organic compounds (VOCs): trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, cis-1,2 dichlorethene, and toluene. Surface diffusion was required to explain the rate of uptake for ...

  11. Adsorption studies of recalcitrant compounds of molasses spentwash on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Figaro, S; Louisy-Louis, S; Lambert, J; Ehrhardt, J-J; Ouensanga, A; Gaspard, S

    2006-10-01

    Due to high levels of residual chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the effluent of molasses spentwash (MSW) after anaerobic treatment, acceptable COD levels for discharge cannot be achieved without some form of post-treatment. In this study, the particulate composition of molasses spentwash after anaerobic digestion (MSWD), is characterised as to its particle size distribution, using micro- and ultrafiltration and three activated carbons are characterised as to their ability to reduce significantly the COD of MSWD effluent. The activated carbons tested as adsorbent, were characterised by XPS spectroscopy, elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, and acid-base titration using the Boehm's method. Adsorption of phenol, used here as a reference compound, and of some organic compounds contained in MSWD (gallic acid, tannic acid, and melanoidin, respectively), was studied. It was clearly demonstrated that an activated carbon with a significant distribution of both micropores and mesopores and a significant amount of macropores that are assumed to act as conduits providing access to micro- and mesopores, have a good adsorption efficiency for compounds such as tannic acid and melanoidins. It is a good adsorbent for melanoidin and coloured compounds of MSWD, which represents a large source of the aqueous pollution in sugar cane industries. PMID:16987542

  12. Adsorption of iodine from COIL waste gas on soaked coal-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junbo; Hao, Shan; Gao, Liping

    2014-04-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) has wide application prospects in military, industrial and medical treatment fields as a second generation gas chemical laser to follow the first HF/DF chemical laser. However, a COIL releases large amounts of gas, such as helium, oxygen, chlorine and iodine. Chlorides have a serious corrosive effect on the system, especially iodine vapor crystallization, which seriously endangers the normal use of vacuum systems, and radioactive methyl iodide, which is hazardous to operators and pollutes the environment. The use of soaked coal-based activated carbon as an adsorbent for removing methyl iodine is proposed, while it is proposed that coal-based activated carbon is an effective adsorbent for removing stable iodine. The research conducted in this work shows that iodine residues are less than 0.5 μg ml-1 after the adsorption treatment and the decontamination factor of the coal-based activated carbon for removing stable iodine is more than 1000. Using this method can achieve the purpose of removing harmful iodine, satisfy the requirements for engineering applications, and also be applied to other nuclear power plant flue gas treatments.

  13. Adsorption of selected pharmaceuticals and an endocrine disrupting compound by granular activated carbon. 2. Model prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Peldszus, S.; Huck, P.M.

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of two representative pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) naproxen and carbamazepine and one endocrine disrupting compound (EDC) nonylphenol was studied in pilot-scale granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorbers using post-sedimentation (PS) water from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. The GAC adsorbents were coal-based Calgon Filtrasorb 400 and coconut shell-based PICA CTIF TE. Acidic naproxen broke through fastest while nonylphenol was removed best, which was consistent with the degree to which fouling affected compound removals. Model predictions and experimental data were generally in good agreement for all three compounds, which demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of the pore and surface diffusion model (PSDM) used in combination with the time-variable parameter approach for predicting removals at environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., ng/L range). Sensitivity analyses suggested that accurate determination of film diffusion coefficients was critical for predicting breakthrough for naproxen and carbamazepine, in particular when high removals are targeted. Model simulations demonstrated that GAC carbon usage rates (CURs) for naproxen were substantially influenced by the empty bed contact time (EBCT) at the investigated conditions. Model-based comparisons between GAC CURs and minimum CURs for powdered activated carbon (PAC) applications suggested that PAC would be most appropriate for achieving 90% removal of naproxen, whereas GAC would be more suitable for nonylphenol. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Photodynamic therapy effect of zinc monoamino phthalocyanine-folic acid conjugate adsorbed on single walled carbon nanotubes on melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbodu, Racheal O.; Ndhundhuma, Ivy; Karsten, Aletta; Nyokong, Tebello

    2015-02-01

    This work reports on the photodynamic therapy effect of zinc monoamino phthalocyanine linked to folic acid represented as ZnMAPc-FA, which was further immobilized onto single walled carbon nanotube represented as ZnMAPc-FA-SWCNT on melanoma A375 cell line, the effect of SWCNT-FA (without ZnMAPc) was also examined. All the compounds were non-toxic to the melanoma A375 cell line in the absence of light. Upon irradiation of the melanoma A375 cell line with a 676 nm diode laser at a power density of 98 mW/cm2 at 5 J/cm2 about 60% and 63% cell death was observed in the presence of ZnMAPc-FA and ZnMAPc-FA-SWCNT respectively. SWCNT-FA had no significant photodynamic therapy or photothermal effect to the cell, only 23% of cell death was observed after irradiation.

  15. Adsorption of lead ions on composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1996-04-01

    A fundamental study about the application of biopolymers to the recovery of lead from dilute solution was carried out. A membranous composite biopolymer adsorbent containing two kind of biopolymers, alginic acid (AA) and humic acid (HA), was prepared. HA, which has high solubility in water, was almost completely immobilized in the adsorbent by a combination of calcium alginate gel and activated carbon powder. A general model for complexation between divalent metal ions and acidic sites on biopolymers was applied to explain the adsorption mechanism of lead on the adsorbent (HA-M). The results showed that the complexation constants and the complexation capacities of lead-AA and lead-HA systems were scarcely influenced by immobilization.

  16. XAS and XPS Characterization of Mercury Binding on Brominated Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson,N.; Attwood, B.; Scheckel, K.

    2007-01-01

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to be quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when burning Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to determine information about the speciation and binding of mercury on two commercially available brominated activated carbons. The results are compared with similar analysis of a conventional (non-halogenated) and chlorinated activated carbon. Both the XAS and XPS results indicate that the mercury, though introduced as elemental vapor, is consistently bound on the carbon in the oxidized form. The conventional and chlorinated activated carbons appeared to contain mercury bound to chlorinated sites and possibly to sulfate species that have been incorporated onto the carbon from adsorbed SO{sub 2}. The mercury-containing brominated sorbents appear to contain mercury bound primarily at bromination sites. The mechanism of capture for the sorbents likely consists of surface-enhanced oxidation of the elemental mercury vapor via interaction with surface-bound halide species with subsequent binding by surface halide or sulfate species.

  17. XAS and XPS characterization of mercury binding on brominated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Nick D. Hutson; Brian C. Attwood; Kirk G. Scheckel

    2007-03-01

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to be quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when burning Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to determine information about the speciation and binding of mercury on two commercially available brominated activated carbons. The results are compared with similar analysis of a conventional (non-halogenated) and chlorinated activated carbon. Both the XAS and XPS results indicate that the mercury, though introduced as elemental vapor, is consistently bound on the carbon in the oxidized form. The conventional and chlorinated activated carbons appeared to contain mercury bound to chlorinated sites and possibly to sulfate species that have been incorporated onto the carbon from adsorbed SO{sub 2}. The mercury-containing brominated sorbents appear to contain mercury bound primarily at bromination sites. The mechanism of capture for the sorbents likely consists of surface-enhanced oxidation of the elemental mercury vapor via interaction with surface-bound halide species with subsequent binding by surface halide or sulfate species. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Adsorption characteristics of selected hydrophilic and hydrophobic micropollutants in water using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung-Woo; Choi, Dae-Jin; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Her, Namguk; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we investigated adsorption characteristics of nine selected micropollutants (six pharmaceuticals, two pesticides, and one endocrine disruptor) in water using an activated carbon. The effects of carbon dosage, contact time, pH, DOM (dissolved organic matter), and temperature on the adsorption removal of micropollutants were examined. Increasing carbon dosage and contact time enhanced the removal of micropollutants. Sorption coefficients of hydrophilic compounds (caffeine, acetaminophen, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfamethazine) fit a linear isotherm and hydrophobic compounds (naproxen, diclofenac, 2, 4-D, triclocarban, and atrazine) fit a Freundlich isotherm. The removal of hydrophobic pollutants and caffeine were independent of pH changes, but acetaminophen, sulfamethazine, and sulfamethoxazole were adsorbed by mainly electrostatic interaction with activated carbon and so were affected by pH. The decrease in adsorption removal in surface water samples was observed and this decrease was more significant for hydrophobic than hydrophilic compounds. The decline in the adsorption capacity in surface water samples is caused by the competitive inhibition of DOM with micropollutants onto activated carbon. Low temperature (5°C) also decreased the adsorption removal of micropollutants, and affected hydrophobic compounds more than hydrophilic compounds. The results obtained in this study can be applied to optimize the adsorption capacities of micropollutants using activated carbon in water treatment process. PMID:24572271

  19. Preparation of Bamboo Chars and Bamboo Activated Carbons to Remove Color and COD from Ink Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hata, Motohide; Amano, Yoshimasa; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Machida, Motoi

    2016-01-01

    Bamboo chars and bamboo activated carbons prepared by steam activation were applied for ink wastewater treatment. Bamboo char at 800 °C was the best for the removal of color and chemical oxygen demand (COD) from ink wastewater compared to bamboo chars at 300 to 700 °C due to higher surface area and mesopore volume. Bamboo activated carbon at 600 °C (S600) was the best compared to bamboo activated carbon at 800 °C (S800), although S800 had larger surface area (1108 m(2)/g) than S600 (734 m(2)/g). S600 had higher mesopore volume (0.20 cm(3)/g) than S800 (0.16 cm(3)/g) and therefore achieved higher color and COD removal. All bamboo activated carbons showed higher color and COD removal efficiency than commercial activated carbon. In addition, S600 had the superior adsorption capacity for methylene blue (0.89 mmol/g). Therefore, bamboo is a suitable material to prepare adsorbents for removal of organic pollutants. PMID:26803031

  20. Preparation of activated carbons with mesopores by use of organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshio; Yoshizawa, Noriko; Furuta, Takeshi

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbons are commercially produced by steam or CO{sub 2} activation of coal, coconut shell and so on. In general the carbons obtained give pores with a broad range of distribution. The objective of this study was to prepare activated carbons from coal by use of various organometallic compounds. The carbons were evaluated for pore size by nitrogen adsorption experiments.

  1. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sanip, S. M.; Saidin, M. A. R.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-03-11

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetric differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydrogen adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will be helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using the fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type method. The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range, R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume. The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operating pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of +-0.01 bar. High purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is between 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of the adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and other non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate the hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbon with a surface area of 644.87 m{sup 2}/g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m{sup 2}/g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the

  2. Carbon nanotube sponges as a solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the enrichment and determination of polychlorinated biphenyls at trace levels in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Jia-Bin; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2016-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) sponges has recently attracted considerable attention in numerous fields because of its excellent properties, such as high porosity, light weight, and large surface area. The potential of CNT sponges for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of organic pollutants at trace levels was investigated in this study for the first time. Seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were selected as analytes, and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was employed for the detection. We optimized important parameters that may influence the efficiency of SPE, including the kind and volume of elution solvent, sample pH, and sample flow rate and volume. Under optimized conditions, low limits of detection (0.72-1.98ngL(-1)), wide range of linearity (10-1000ngL(-1)) and good repeatability (2.69-6.85%, n=5) were obtained. CNT sponges exhibited higher extraction performance than other adsorbent materials under the optimized conditions. Real environmental water samples were analyzed, and satisfactory recoveries (81.1-119.1%) were achieved. All these results demonstrated that CNT sponges are suitable SPE material for the enrichment and sensitive determination of PCBs at trace levels. PMID:27591590

  3. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  4. EPA'S RESEARCH PROGRAM IN GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research into Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) for use in drinking water treatment has a long history in the Drinking Water Research Division and its predecessor organizations. tudies were conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service in the late fifties and early sixties to examine...

  5. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported (i.e., pesticides and herbicides, synthetic organic chemicals, and trihalom...

  6. ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF KRAFT BLEACHING EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of color and organic contaminants by adsorption on activated carbon from the effluent of a kraft pulp bleaching plant was investigated in a pilot plant. The caustic bleach effluent, which contains 80% of the color from pulp bleaching, was decolorized successfully when...

  7. Kinetic modeling of liquid-phase adsorption of Congo red dye using guava leaf-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojedokun, Adedamola Titi; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2016-02-01

    Guava leaf, a waste material, was treated and activated to prepare adsorbent. The adsorbent was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques. The carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from guava leaf had appreciable carbon content (86.84 %). The adsorption of Congo red dye onto guava leaf-based activated carbon (GLAC) was studied in this research. Experimental data were analyzed by four different model equations: Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms and it was found to fit Freundlich equation most. Adsorption rate constants were determined using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion model equations. The results clearly showed that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Intraparticle diffusion was involved in the adsorption process. The mean energy of adsorption calculated from D-R isotherm confirmed the involvement of physical adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters were obtained and it was found that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC was an exothermic and spontaneous process at the temperatures under investigation. The maximum adsorption of CR dye by GLAC was found to be 47.62 mg/g. The study shows that GLAC is an effective adsorbent for the adsorption of CR dye from aqueous solution.

  8. Making Activated Carbon for Storing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Serio, Michael A.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid disks of microporous activated carbon, produced by a method that enables optimization of pore structure, have been investigated as means of storing gas (especially hydrogen for use as a fuel) at relatively low pressure through adsorption on pore surfaces. For hydrogen and other gases of practical interest, a narrow distribution of pore sizes <2 nm is preferable. The present method is a variant of a previously patented method of cyclic chemisorption and desorption in which a piece of carbon is alternately (1) heated to the lower of two elevated temperatures in air or other oxidizing gas, causing the formation of stable carbon/oxygen surface complexes; then (2) heated to the higher of the two elevated temperatures in flowing helium or other inert gas, causing the desorption of the surface complexes in the form of carbon monoxide. In the present method, pore structure is optimized partly by heating to a temperature of 1,100 C during carbonization. Another aspect of the method exploits the finding that for each gas-storage pressure, gas-storage capacity can be maximized by burning off a specific proportion (typically between 10 and 20 weight percent) of the carbon during the cyclic chemisorption/desorption process.

  9. Density functional theory study of epoxy polymer chains adsorbing onto single-walled carbon nanotubes: electronic and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Ahangari, Morteza Ghorbanzadeh; Fereidoon, Abdolhosein; Ganji, Masoud Darvish

    2013-08-01

    We performed first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the effect of epoxy monomer content on the electronic and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Our calculation results reveal that interfacial interaction increases with increasing numbers of epoxy monomers on the surface of SWCNTs. Furthermore, density of states (DOS) results showed no orbital hybridization between the epoxy monomers and nanotubes. Mulliken charge analysis shows that the epoxy polymer carries a positive charge that is directly proportional to the number of monomers. The Young's modulus of the nanotubes was also studied as a function of monomer content. It was found that, with increasing number of monomers on the nanotubes, the Young's modulus first decreases and then approaches a constant value. The results of a SWCNT pullout simulation suggest that the interfacial shear stress of the epoxy/SWCNT complex is approximately 68 MPa. These results agreed well with experimental results, thus proving that the simulation methods used in this study are viable. PMID:23609226

  10. Fabrication of Isolated Metal-Organic Polyhedra in Confined Cavities: Adsorbents/Catalysts with Unusual Dispersity and Activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ying-Hu; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Yan, Ni; Jiang, Yao; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Bing; Li, Jian-Rong

    2016-05-18

    Metal-organic polyhedra (MOPs) have attracted great attention due to their intriguing structure. However, the applications of MOPs are severely hindered by two shortcomings, namely low dispersity and poor stability. Here we report the introduction of four MOPs (constructed from dicopper and carboxylates) to cavity-structured mesoporous silica SBA-16 via a double-solvent strategy to overcome both shortcomings simultaneously. By judicious design, the dimension of MOPs is just between the size of cavities and entrances of SBA-16, MOP molecules are thus confined in the cavities. This leads to the formation of isolated MOPs with unusual dispersion, making the active sites highly accessible. Hence, the adsorption capacity on carbon dioxide and propene as well as catalytic performance on ring opening are much superior to bulk MOPs. More importantly, the structure and catalytic activity of MOPs in confined cavities are well preserved after exposure to humid atmosphere, whereas those of bulk MOPs are degraded seriously. PMID:27049737

  11. Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption on Activated Carbon through Manipulation of Surface Oxygen Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John; Qu, Deyang; Foster, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    Passive energy storage is a necessary component for balancing the lifecycle budget with new forms of green energy. The work presented describes how surface oxygen groups (SOG) on granulated activated carbon have been manipulated using Nitric Acid in a controlled, stepwise fashion. The structure and surface functionality of the activated carbon samples were characterized using DRIFTS, Raman Spectroscopy and Porosimetry. Total surface area was found to increase proportionally with the removal of heteroatom material, exposing previously insulated active sites responsible for SOG attachment. Broad oxide peaks were deconvoluted and analyzed, allowing for absolute identification of evolving functionality at each oxidation stage. SOGs were maximized on the third oxidation cycle with the presence of conjugated aromatic, phenol, lactone, and carboxylic acid groups. FSN Zonyl nonionic was applied to all oxidized samples at various concentrations. Total adsorbed surfactant was quantified for each concentration / oxidation scheme using attenuated total reflection. The relative quantity and polarity of chemisorbed surfactant were qualitatively assessed for each equilibrium concentration.

  12. Effects of temperature on adsorption and oxidative degradation of bisphenol A in an acid-treated iron-amended granular activated carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study suggests a combined adsorption and Fenton oxidation using an acid treated Fe-amended granular activated carbon (Fe-GAC) for effective removal of bisphenol A in water. When the Fe-GAC adsorbs and is saturated with BPA in water, Fenton oxidation of BPA occurs in ...

  13. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  14. Effect of the porous structure of activated carbon on the adsorption kinetics of gold(I) cyanide complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimova, P. I.; Grebennikov, S. F.; Gur'yanov, V. V.; Fedyukevich, V. A.; Vorob'ev-Desyatovskii, N. V.

    2014-06-01

    The effect the porous structure of activated carbons obtained from furfural and coconut shells has on the kinetics of [Au(CN)2]- ion adsorption is studied. Effective diffusion coefficients for [Au(CN)2]- anions in transport and adsorbing pores and mass transfer coefficients in a transport system of the pores and in microporous zones are calculated using the statistical moments of the kinetic curve.

  15. Sorption of DOM and hydrophobic organic compounds onto sewage-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Karin; Li, Loretta Y

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of stormwater via sorption has the potential to remove both colloidal and dissolved pollutants. Previous research shows that activated carbon produced from sewage sludge is very efficient in sorbing hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), frequently detected in stormwater. The aim of this research was to determine whether the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) has a negative effect on the adsorption of HOCs onto sludge-based activated carbon (SBAC) in batch adsorption tests. Batch adsorption tests were used to investigate the influence of two types of DOM - soil organic matter and humic acid (HA) technical standard - on the sorption of HOCs onto SBAC, and whether preloading adsorbent and adsorbates with DOM affects HOC sorption. The results indicate that soil DOM and HAs do not have a significant negative effect on the adsorption of HOCs under tested experimental conditions, except for a highly hydrophobic compound. In addition, preloading SBAC or HOCs with DOM did not lead to lower adsorption of HOCs. Batch adsorption tests appear to be inefficient for investigating DOM effects on HOC adsorption, as saturating the carbon is difficult because of high SBAC adsorption capacity and low HOC solubility, so that limited competition occurs on the sorbent. PMID:27533860

  16. Optimization of magnetic powdered activated carbon for aqueous Hg(II) removal and magnetic recovery.

    PubMed

    Faulconer, Emily K; von Reitzenstein, Natalia V Hoogesteijn; Mazyck, David W

    2012-01-15

    Activated carbon is known to adsorb aqueous Hg(II). MPAC (magnetic powdered activated carbon) has the potential to remove aqueous Hg to less than 0.2 μg/L while being magnetically recoverable. Magnetic recapture allows simple sorbent separation from the waste stream while an isolated waste potentially allows for mercury recycling. MPAC Hg-removal performance is verified by mercury mass balance, calculated by quantifying adsorbed, volatilized, and residual aqueous mercury. The batch reactor contained a sealed mercury-carbon contact chamber with mixing and constant N(2) (g) headspace flow to an oxidizing trap. Mercury adsorption was performed using spiked ultrapure water (100 μg/L Hg). Mercury concentrations were obtained using EPA method 245.1 and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy. MPAC synthesis was optimized for Hg removal and sorbent recovery according to the variables: C:Fe, thermal oxidation temperature and time. The 3:1 C:Fe preserved most of the original sorbent surface area. As indicated by XRD patterns, thermal oxidation reduced the amorphous characteristic of the iron oxides but did not improve sorbent recovery and damaged porosity at higher oxidation temperatures. Therefore, the optimal synthesis variables, 3:1 C:Fe mass ratio without thermal oxidation, which can achieve 92.5% (± 8.3%) sorbent recovery and 96.3% (± 9%) Hg removal. The mass balance has been closed to within approximately ± 15%. PMID:22104766

  17. LSER model for organic compounds adsorption by single-walled carbon nanotubes: Comparison with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangquan; Sun, Weiling; Ni, Jinren

    2015-11-01

    LSER models for organic compounds adsorption by single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon were successfully developed. The cavity formation and dispersion interactions (vV), hydrogen bond acidity interactions (bB) and π-/n-electron interactions (eE) are the most influential adsorption mechanisms. SWCNTs is more polarizable, less polar, more hydrophobic, and has weaker hydrogen bond accepting and donating abilities than MWCNTs and AC. Compared with SWCNTs and MWCNTs, AC has much less hydrophobic and less hydrophilic adsorption sites. The regression coefficients (e, s, a, b, v) vary in different ways with increasing chemical saturation. Nonspecific interactions (represented by eE and vV) have great positive contribution to organic compounds adsorption, and follow the order of SWCNTs > MWCNTs > AC, while hydrogen bond interactions (represented by aA and bB) demonstrate negative contribution. These models will be valuable for understanding adsorption mechanisms, comparing adsorbent characteristics, and selecting the proper adsorbents for certain organic compounds. PMID:26319510

  18. [Adsorption and desorption of dyes by waste-polymer-derived activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Lian, Fei; Liu, Chang; Li, Guo-Guang; Liu, Yi-Fu; Li, Yong; Zhu, Ling-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons with high surface area were prepared from three waste polymers, i. e., tire rubber, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyethyleneterephtalate (PET), by KOH activation. The adsorption/desorption characteristics of dyes (methylene blue and methyl orange) on the carbons were studied. The effects of pH, ionic strength and surface surfactants in the solution on the dye adsorption were also investigated. The results indicated that the carbons derived from PVC and PET exhibited high surface area of 2 666 and 2 831 m2 x g(-1). Their mesopore volume were as high as 1.06 and 1.30 cm3 g(-1), respectively. 98.5% and 97.0% of methylene blue and methyl orange were removed in 15 min by PVC carbon, and that of 99.5% and 95.0% for PET carbon. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity to these dyes was more than 2 mmol x g(-1), much higher than that of commercial activated carbon F400. Compared with Freundlich model, the adsorption data was fitted better by Langmiur model, indicating monolayer coverage on the carbons. The adsorption was highly dependent on solution pH, ionic strength and concentration of surface surfactants. The activated carbons exhibited higher adsorption to methylene blue than that of methyl orange, and it was very hard for both of the dyes to be desorbed. The observation in this study demonstrated that activated carbons derived from polymer waste could be effective adsorbents for the treatment of wastewater with dyes. PMID:22452203

  19. The biomass derived activated carbon for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, S. T.; Selvan, R. Kalai; Melo, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the activated carbon was prepared from biowaste of Eichhornia crassipes by chemical activation method using KOH as the activating agent at various carbonization temperatures (600 °C, 700 °C and 800 °C). The disordered nature, morphology and surface functional groups of ACs were examined by XRD, SEM and FT-IR. The electrochemical properties of AC electrodes were studied in 1M H2SO4 in the potential range of -0.2 to 0.8 V using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques in a three electrode system. Subsequently, the fabricated supercapacitor using AC electrode delivered the higher specific capacitance and energy density of 509 F/g at current density of 1 mA/cm2 and 17 Wh/kg at power density of 0.416 W/g.

  20. Evaluation of techniques for removal of spacecraft contaminants from activated carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, K. J.; Goldsmith, R. L.; Goldsmith, G. A.; Hoover, P. R.; Nwankwo, J. N.; Turk, A.

    1977-01-01

    Alternative techniques for the regeneration of carbon contaminated with various spacecraft contaminants were evaluated. Four different modes of regeneration were evaluated: (1) thermal desorption via vacuum, (2) thermal desorption via nitrogen purge, (3) in-situ catalytic oxidation of adsorbed contaminants, and (4) in-situ non-catalytic oxidation of adsorbed contaminants.

  1. Supercapacitor Electrodes from Activated Carbon Monoliths and Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolah, B. N. M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Deraman, M.; Basri, N. H.; Farma, R.; Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    Binderless monoliths of supercapacitor electrodes were prepared by the carbonization (N2) and activation (CO2) of green monoliths (GMs). GMs were made from mixtures of self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) of fibers from oil palm empty fruit bunches and a combination of 5 & 6% KOH and 0, 5 & 6% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by weight. The electrodes from GMs containing CNTs were found to have lower specific BET surface area (SBET). The electrochemical behavior of the supercapacitor fabricated using the prepared electrodes were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD). In general an addition of CNTs into the GMs reduces the equivalent series resistance (ESR) value of the cells. A cell fabricated using electrodes from GM with 5% CNT and 5% KOH was found to have the largest reduction of ESR value than that from the others GMs containing CNT. The cell has steeper Warburg's slope than that from its respective non-CNT GM, which reflect the smaller resistance for electrolyte ions to move into pores of electrodes despite these electrodes having largest reduction in specific BET surface area. The cell also has the smallest reduction of specific capacitance (Csp) and maintains the specific power range despite a reduction in the specific energy range due to the CNT addition.

  2. Effect of activated carbon on microbial bioavailability of phenanthrene in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Hunter, W.; Tao, S.; Crowley, D.; Gan, J.

    2009-11-15

    Bioavailability is a governing factor that controls the rate of biological degradation of hydrophobic organic contaminants in soil. Among the solid phases that can adsorb hydrophobic organic contaminants in soil, black carbon (BC) exerts a particularly significant effect on phase distribution. However, knowledge on the effect of BC on the microbial availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil is still limited. In the present study, the effect of a coal-derived activated carbon on the bioavailability of phenanthrene (PHE) during its degradation by Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 was measured in three soils. The freely dissolved concentration of PHE was concurrently determined in soil solutions using disposable polydimethylsiloxane fibers. The results showed that PHE mineralization was significantly inhibited after addition of activated carbon in all test soils. After 216 h, only 5.20, 5.83, and 6.85% of PHE was degraded in the 0.5% BC-amended soils initially containing organic carbon at 0.23, 2.1, and 7.1%, respectively. Significant correlation was found between PHE degradability and freely dissolved concentration, suggesting that BC affected PHE bioavailability by decreasing chemical activity. The effect of activated carbon in the amended soils was attributed to its enhancement of soil surface areas and pore volumes. Results from the present study clearly highlighted the importance of BC for influencing the microbial availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils.

  3. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄. PMID:27483572

  4. Carbon dioxide (C{sup 16}O{sub 2} and C{sup 18}O{sub 2}) adsorption in zeolite Y materials: effect of cation, adsorbed water and particle size

    SciTech Connect

    Pragati Galhotra; Juan G. Navea; Sarah C. Larsen; Vicki H. Grassian

    2009-07-01

    In this study, CO{sub 2} adsorption in the presence and absence of co-adsorbed H{sub 2}O was investigated in zeolite Y. Several different zeolite Y materials were investigated including commercial NaY, commercial NaY ion-exchanged with Ba{sup 2+} and nanocrystalline NaY; herein referred to as NaY, BaY and nano-NaY. Following heating of these zeolites to 573 K and cooling to room temperature, CO{sub 2} was adsorbed as a function of pressure. FTIR spectra show that a majority of CO{sub 2} adsorbs in the pores of these three zeolites (NaY, BaY and nano-NaY) in a linear complex with the exchangeable cation, as indicated by the intense absorption band near 2350 cm{sup -1}, assigned to the 3 asymmetric stretch of adsorbed CO{sub 2}. Most interestingly is the formation of carbonate and bicarbonate on the external surface of nano-NaY zeolites as indicated by the presence of several broad absorption bands in the 1200-1800 cm{sup -1} region, suggesting unique sites for CO{sub 2} adsorption on the surface of the nanomaterial. For the other two zeolite materials investigated, bicarbonate formation is only evident in BaY zeolite in the presence of co-adsorbed water. Adsorption of {sup 18}O-labeled carbon dioxide and theoretical quantum chemical calculations confirm these assignments and conclusions. 28 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Theoretical study on the adsorption of phenol on activated carbon using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Cam, Le Minh; Van Khu, Le; Ha, Nguyen Ngoc

    2013-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed at the PBE/DZP level using the DFT-D2 method were utilized to investigate the adsorption of phenol on pristine activated carbon (AC) and on activated carbon functionalized with OH, CHO, or COOH groups. Over the pristine AC, the phenol molecule undergoes weak physical adsorption due to van der Waals interactions between the aromatic part of the phenol and the basal planes of the AC. Among the three functional groups used to functionalize the AC, the carboxylic group was found to interact most strongly with the hydroxyl group of phenol. These results suggest that functionalized AC-COOH has great potential for use in environmental applications as an adsorbent of phenol molecules in aqueous phases. PMID:23918222

  6. The adsorption onto fibrous activated carbon applications to water and air treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Le Cloirec, P.; Brasquet, C.; Subrenat, E.

    1996-12-31

    The adsorption of polluted fluids is performed by fiber activated carbon (FAC). The adsorption is carried out in a batch or dynamic reactor. Classic models are applied and kinetic constants are calculated. Results showed that the performances of FAC are significantly higher than that of granular activated carbon (GAC) in terms of adsorption velocity and selectivity. The breakthrough curves obtained with FAC adsorbers are particularly steep, suggesting a smaller mass transfer resistance than GAC. The adsorption zone in the FAC bed is about 3.4 mm and is not really dependent on the water flow rate within the studied range. Applications are developed in water and air treatments. Examples are given in the micropollutants removal of an aqueous solution. Air loaded with VOC or/and odorous molecules is treated by fibers. Regeneration of this material is performed by heating by joule effects or electromagnetic induction. Theses original approaches to water or air treatment processes are successfully put to use.

  7. The adsorption onto fibrous activated carbon - applications to water and air treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Le Cloirec, P.; Subrenat, E.

    1996-10-01

    The adsorption of polluted fluids is performed by fiber activated carbon (FAC). The adsorption is carried out in a batch or dynamic reactor. Classic model`s are applied and kinetic constants are calculated. Results showed that the performances of FAC are significantly higher than that of granular activated carbon (GAC) in terms of adsorption velocity. and selectivity. The breakthrough curves obtained with FAC adsorbers are particularly steep, suggesting a smaller mass transfer resistance than GAC. The adsorption zone in the FAC bed is about 3.4 mm and is not really dependent on the water flow rare within the studied range. Applications are developed in water and air treatments. Examples are given in the micropollutants removal of an aqueous solution. Air loaded with VOC or/and odorous molecules is treated by fibers. Regeneration of this material is performed by heating by joule effects or electromagnetic induction. These original approaches to water or air treatment processes are successfully put to use.

  8. Nonhomogeneity effects in adsorption from gas and liquid phases on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derylo-Marczewska, A.; Marczewski, A.W.

    1999-05-25

    The process of adsorption of dissociating organic substances from dilute aqueous solutions on various activated carbons is studied. The investigated adsorbents have different pore structure and chemical properties of the surface. The characteristics of activated carbons are determined from nitrogen and benzene isotherms and potentiometric titration data. The properties of pore structure--BET specific surface area, the total pore volume, the external surface area, the micropore volume, and the density of surface charge--are evaluated. The isotherms of benzoic acid adsorption from the aqueous phase are measured for a wide range of solution pH and constant ionic strength by using the static method. The liquid adsorption data are analyzed in terms of the theory of adsorption on heterogeneous solids.

  9. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  10. Numerical analysis of the effect of the kind of activating agent and the impregnation ratio on the parameters of the microporous structure of the active carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Mirosław

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the results of the research on the application of the LBET class adsorption models with the fast multivariant identification procedure as a tool for analysing the microporous structure of the active carbons obtained by chemical activation using potassium and sodium hydroxides as an activator. The proposed technique of the fast multivariant fitting of the LBET class models to the empirical adsorption data was employed particularly to evaluate the impact of the used activator and the impregnation ratio on the obtained microporous structure of the carbonaceous adsorbents.

  11. Kinetics of adsorption with granular, powdered, and fibrous activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shmidt, J.L.; Pimenov, A.V.; Lieberman, A.I.; Cheh, H.Y.

    1997-08-01

    The properties of three different types of activated carbon, fibrous, powdered, and granular, were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The adsorption rate of the activated carbon fiber was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than that of the granular activated carbon, and one order of magnitude higher than that of the powdered activated carbon. Diffusion coefficients of methylene blue in the fibrous, powdered, and granular activated carbons were determined experimentally. A new method for estimating the meso- and macropore surface areas in these carbons was proposed.

  12. Activated carbons as potentially useful non-nutritive additives to prevent the effect of fumonisin B1 on sodium bentonite activity against chronic aflatoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Monge, María Del Pilar; Magnoli, Alejandra Paola; Bergesio, Maria Virginia; Tancredi, Nestor; Magnoli, Carina E; Chiacchiera, Stella Maris

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) are mycotoxins that often co-occur in feedstuffs. The ingestion of AFB1 causes aflatoxicosis in humans and animals. Sodium bentonite (NaB), a cheap non-nutritive unselective sequestering agent incorporated in animal diets, can effectively prevent aflatoxicosis. Fumonisins are responsible for equine leukoencephalomalacia and porcine pulmonary oedema, and often have subclinical toxic effects in poultries. Fumonisin B1 and aflatoxin B1 are both strongly adsorbed in vitro on sodium bentonite. Co-adsorption studies, carried out with a weight ratio of FB1 to AFB1 that mimics the natural occurrence (200:1), showed that FB1 greatly decreases the in vitro ability of NaB to adsorb AFB1. The ability of two activated carbons to adsorb FB1 was also investigated. Both carbons showed high affinity for FB1. A complex behaviour of the FB1 adsorption isotherms with pH was observed. In vitro results suggest that under natural contamination levels of AFB1 and FB1, a mixture of activated carbon and sodium bentonite might be potentially useful for prevention of sub-acute aflatoxicosis. PMID:27159550

  13. Adsorbent comparisons for anesthetic gas capture in hospital air emissions.

    PubMed

    Mehrata, Mina; Moralejo, Carol; Anderson, William A

    2016-08-23

    For the development of emission control strategies, activated carbon, zeolite, molecular sieves, and a silica gel were tested for adsorption of the newer anesthetic gases isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane from air. The activated carbon Norit GCA 48 was selected for the best performance, and adsorption isotherms at room temperature were developed for the three anesthetics. Equilibrium capacities for this carbon were in the range of 500 to 1,000 mg g(-1) for these anesthetics at partial pressures ranging from 5 to 45 Torr, with the most volatile compound (desflurane) showing the least favorable adsorption. Activated carbons are therefore suggested for use as effective adsorbents in emission control of these anesthetic gases from hospitals. PMID:27222158

  14. Glycerol electro-oxidation over glassy-carbon-supported Au nanoparticles: direct influence of the carbon support on the electrode catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Janaina F; Gasparotto, Luiz H S; Tremiliosi-Filho, Germano

    2013-07-01

    Glycerol is at present abundantly co-produced in the biodiesel fabrication and can be used as fuel in Direct Glycerol Fuel Cells (DGFC) for cogeneration of electricity, value-added chemicals and heat. With this motivation, in the present work, we investigated at a fundamental level the oxidation of glycerol over glassy carbon (GC) supported Au nanoparticles in alkaline medium using cyclic voltammetry. By controlling the Au deposition time, we varied the GC supported Au coverage from 0.4% to 30% maintaining a regular particle size distribution with a mean particle size of about 200 nm. An influence of the carbon support on the activity of the GC-supported Au nanoparticles was evidenced. Results from studies on the oxidation of glycerol and ethylene glycol on Au and Pt nanoparticles supported on a glassy carbon, highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and dimensionally stable anode under different pH conditions indicate that the carbon support participates actively in the oxidation of glycerol and other alcohols. We propose that active oxygenated species are gradually formed on the glassy carbon by potential cycling (up to the saturation of the carbon area) and these oxygenated species are additional oxygen suppliers for the oxidation of glycerol residues adsorbed on the Au particles, following a mechanism consisting of the synergism of two active elements: gold and carbon. PMID:23666524

  15. Removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solution by cattle manure compost (CMC) derived activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qingrong; Chen, Qinghua; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki; Mochidzuki, Kazuhiro; Sakoda, Akiyoshi

    2009-04-01

    The activated carbons (ACs) prepared from cattle manure compost (CMC) with various pore structure and surface chemistry were used to remove phenol and methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of two organic contaminants onto the ACs were investigated and the schematic models for the adsorptive processes were proposed. The result shows that the removal of functional groups from ACs surface leads to decreasing both rate constants for phenol and MB adsorption. It also causes the decrement of MB adsorption capacity. However, the decrease of surface functional groups was found to result in the increase of phenol adsorption capacity. In our schematic model for adsorptive processes, the presence of acidic functional groups on the surface of carbon is assumed to act as channels for diffusion of adsorbate molecules onto small pores, therefore, promotes the adsorption rate of both phenol and MB. In phenol solution, water molecules firstly adsorb on surface oxygen groups by H-bonding and subsequently form water clusters, which cause partial blockage of the micropores, deduce electrons from the π-electron system of the carbon basal planes, hence, impede or prevent phenol adsorption. On the contrary, in MB solution, the oxygen groups prefer to combine with MB + cations than water molecules, which lead to the increase of MB adsorption capacity.

  16. Removal of ammonia from air on molybdenum and tungsten oxide modified activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Petit, Camille; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2008-04-15

    Microporous coconut-based activated carbon was impregnated with solutions of ammonium metatungstate or ammonium molybdate and then calcined in air in order to convert the salts into their corresponding oxides. The surface of those materials was characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermal analysis. The results indicated a significant increase in surface acidity related to the presence of tungsten or molybdenum oxides. On the materials obtained, adsorption of ammonia from either dry or moist air was carried out. The oxides distributed on the surface provided Lewis and/or Brønsted centers for interactions with ammonia molecules or ammonium ions. Water on the surface of carbon or in the gas phase increased the amount of ammonia adsorbed via involvement of Brønsted-type interactions and/or by leading to the formation of molybdate or tungstate salts on the surface. Although the amount of ammonia adsorbed is closely related to the number of moles of oxides and their acidic centers, the carbon surface also contributes to the adsorption via providing small pores where ammonia can be dissolved in the water film. PMID:18497162

  17. Removal of chromium(VI) from wastewater using phosphoric acid treated activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganthi, N.

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon prepared by phosphoric acid treatment of tamarind nuts (seeds) was investigated for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The characteristics of phosphorylated tamarind nut carbon (PTNC) were evaluated for porosity and surface area. The effect of contact time, pH, adsorbent dose and particle size variation were studied to evaluate the potential applicability of carbon for treating Cr(VI) containing wastewater. The adsorbent data were modeled by Langmiur and Freundlich classical adsorption isotherms. The kinetic studies showed that Cr(VI) adsorption on PTNC was in compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption studies indicated that ion-exchange mechanism was operating. The continuous adsorption was studied in glass columns of 2.5 cm diameter using electroplating wastewater to ascertain the practical applicability of PTNC in large scale. The mechanism of adsorption was found to be ion-exchange process and was supported by FTIR spectroscopy. The surface modification after adsorption was confirmed by SEM studies.

  18. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies. PMID:25644627

  19. APPRAISAL OF POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESSES FOR MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powdered activated carbon has been the subject of several developmental efforts directed towards producing improved methods for treating municipal wastewaters. Granular activated carbon has proven itself as an effective means of reducing dissolved organic contaminant levels, but ...

  20. Removal of iodide from water by chlorination and subsequent adsorption on powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Mariya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine oxidation followed by treatment with activated carbon was studied as a possible method for removing radioactive iodine from water. Chlorination time, chlorine dose, the presence of natural organic matter (NOM), the presence of bromide ion (Br⁻), and carbon particle size strongly affected iodine removal. Treatment with superfine powdered activated carbon (SPAC) after 10-min oxidation with chlorine (1 mg-Cl₂/L) removed 90% of the iodine in NOM-containing water (dissolved organic carbon concentration, 1.5 mg-C/L). Iodine removal in NOM-containing water increased with increasing chlorine dose up to 0.1 mg-Cl₂/L but decreased at chlorine doses of >1.0 mg-Cl₂/L. At a low chlorine dose, nonadsorbable iodide ion (I⁻) was oxidized to adsorbable hypoiodous acid (HOI). When the chlorine dose was increased, some of the HOI reacted with NOM to form adsorbable organic iodine (organic-I). Increasing the chlorine dose further did not enhance iodine removal, owing to the formation of nonadsorbable iodate ion (IO₃⁻). Co-existing Br⁻ depressed iodine removal, particularly in NOM-free water, because hypobromous acid (HOBr) formed and catalyzed the oxidation of HOI to IO₃⁻. However, the effect of Br⁻ was small in the NOM-containing water because organic-I formed instead of IO₃⁻. SPAC (median particle diameter, 0.62 μm) had a higher equilibrium adsorption capacity for organic-I than did conventional PAC (median diameter, 18.9 μm), but the capacities of PAC and SPAC for HOI were similar. The reason for the higher equilibrium adsorption capacity for organic-I was that organic-I was adsorbed principally on the exterior of the PAC particles and not inside the PAC particles, as indicated by direct visualization of the solid-phase iodine concentration profiles in PAC particles by field emission electron probe microanalysis. In contrast, HOI was adsorbed evenly throughout the entire PAC particle. PMID:25462731