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Sample records for adsorption barrier energy

  1. Energy barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, M.

    1991-01-01

    Energy conservation and home insulation may have been off the front pages in recent years, but rising fuel prices and the current crisis in the Mideast remind us once again that it's time to make sure our houses are adequately insulated. Doing so saves money and, to borrow a phrase from that Quaker Oats commercial, It's the right thing to do. Heat always wants to sneak from a warm space to a cold one. In the winter, it's like a convict trying to bust out of the big joint - it looks for any gap, crack or chink that it can slip through. Int he summer, it's more like a burglar trying to break in to your house. Insulation, properly installed, keeps the heat and the cold where you want it. You probably already know that insulation is rated by R-value, which indicates the material's ability to (R)esist the flow of heat. The higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power. But how much is enough The three model national building codes that form the basis for most state and municipal building codes now support a single, recently revised Model Energy Code. This article deals with deciding how much insulation is right for the application and how to install it correctly.

  2. Understanding pH Effects on Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene Adsorption to Iron in Permeable Reactive Barriers for Groundwater Remediation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Farrell, James

    2013-01-01

    Metallic iron filings are becoming increasing used in permeable reactive barriers for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Understanding solution pH effects on rates of reductive dechlorination in permeable reactive barriers is essential for designing remediation systems that can meet treatment objectives under conditions of varying groundwater properties. The objective of this research was to investigate how the solution pH value affects adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) on metallic iron surfaces. Because adsorption is first required before reductive dechlorination can occur, pH effects on halocarbon adsorption energies may explain pH effects on dechlorination rates. Adsorption energies for TCE and PCE were calculated via molecular mechanics simulations using the Universal force field and a self-consistent reaction field charge equilibration scheme. A range in solution pH values was simulated by varying the amount of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on the iron. The potential energies associated TCE and PCE complexes were dominated by electrostatic interactions, and complex formation with the surface was found to result in significant electron transfer from the iron to the adsorbed halocarbons. Adsorbed atomic hydrogen was found to lower the energies of TCE complexes more than those for PCE. Attractions between atomic hydrogen and iron atoms were more favorable when TCE versus PCE was adsorbed to the iron surface. These two findings are consistent with the experimental observation that changes in solution pH affect TCE reaction rates more than those for PCE.

  3. Study of lysozyme mobility and binding free energy during adsorption on a graphene surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, C. Masato; Ma, Heng; Wei, Tao

    2015-04-13

    Understanding protein adsorption is a key to the development of biosensors and anti-biofouling materials. Hydration essentially controls the adsorption process on hydrophobic surfaces, but its effect is complicated by various factors. Here, we present an ideal model system to isolate hydration effects—lysozyme adsorption on a flat hydrophobic graphene surface. Our all-atom molecular dynamics and molecular-mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area computation study reveal that lysozyme on graphene displays much larger diffusivity than in bulk water. Protein's hydration free energy within the first hydration shell is dominated by the protein-water electrostatic interactions and acts as an energy barrier for protein adsorption. On the other hand, the surface tension, especially that from the hydrophobic graphene, can effectively weaken the barrier to promote adsorption.

  4. Market barriers to energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, R.B.; Andersson, B.

    1992-06-01

    Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such ``market barriers`` suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

  5. Market barriers to energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, R.B. ); Andersson, B. )

    1992-06-01

    Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such market barriers'' suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

  6. Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB) for the remediation of groundwater simultaneously contaminated by some chlorinated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Erto, A; Bortone, I; Di Nardo, A; Di Natale, M; Musmarra, D

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) made with activated carbon, namely a Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB), is put forward as an effective technique for the remediation of aquifers simultaneously contaminated by some chlorinated organic compounds. A design procedure, based on a computer code and including different routines, is presented as a tool to accurately describe mass transport within the aquifer and adsorption/desorption phenomena occurring inside the barrier. The remediation of a contaminated aquifer near a solid waste landfill in the district of Napoli (Italy), where Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and Trichloroethylene (TCE) are simultaneously present, is considered as a case study. A complete hydrological and geotechnical site characterization, as well as a number of dedicated adsorption laboratory tests for the determination of activated carbon PCE/TCE adsorption capacity in binary systems, are carried out to support the barrier design. By means of a series of numerical simulations it is possible to determine the optimal barrier location, orientation and dimensions. PABs appear to be an effective remediation tool for the in-situ treatment of an aquifer contaminated by PCE and TCE simultaneously, as the concentration of both compounds flowing out of the barrier is everywhere lower than the regulatory limits on groundwater quality.

  7. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the barriers'' literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  8. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the ``barriers`` literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  9. A procedure to design a Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB) for contaminated groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Erto, A; Lancia, A; Bortone, I; Di Nardo, A; Di Natale, M; Musmarra, D

    2011-01-01

    A procedure to optimize the design of a Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB) for the remediation of a contaminated aquifer is presented in this paper. A computer code, including different routines that describe the groundwater contaminant transport and the pollutant capture by adsorption in unsteady conditions over the barrier solid surface, has been developed. The complete characterization of the chemical-physical interactions between adsorbing solids and the contaminated water, required by the computer code, has been obtained by experimental measurements. A case study in which the procedure developed has been applied to a tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated aquifer near a solid waste landfill, in the district of Napoli (Italy), is also presented and the main dimensions of the barrier (length and width) have been evaluated. Model results show that PAB is effective for the remediation of a PCE-contaminated aquifer, since the concentration of PCE flowing out of the barrier is everywhere always lower than the concentration limit provided for in the Italian regulations on groundwater quality.

  10. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M.; Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C.

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  11. Energy Barriers for Defects in Disordered Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijtmans, Sven; Manning, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    In solids, defects govern flow and failure. In crystals, defects are easily-identified dislocations, while in disordered solids, defects can be found by analyzing the vibrational modes of the system, which are eigenvectors of the matrix describing the linear response. The low frequency modes are typically quasi-localized hybrids of excitations localized at the defects and plane-wave like modes. Additional analysis can separate these components, giving the location of a defect and displacement of particles along that defect. To define an energy barrier for each defect, we displace particles along an isolated defect mode and calculate the energy at which the system transitions to a new energy basin. Different definitions of a new basin, such as a change in the particle contact network or particle displacements above a specific threshold, give different results. We identify several criteria that are consistent and provide a reasonable, robust definition of an energy barrier. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that energy barriers for isolated defects are generally higher than energy barriers for typical quasi-localized modes in the system.

  12. Adsorption energies and prefactor determination for CH3OH adsorption on graphite.

    PubMed

    Doronin, M; Bertin, M; Michaut, X; Philippe, L; Fillion, J-H

    2015-08-28

    In this paper, we have studied adsorption and thermal desorption of methanol CH3OH on graphite surface, with the specific aim to derive from experimental data quantitative parameters that govern the desorption, namely, adsorption energy Eads and prefactor ν of the Polanyi-Wigner law. In low coverage regime, these two values are interconnected and usually the experiments can be reproduced with any couple (Eads, ν), which makes intercomparison between studies difficult since the results depend on the extraction method. Here, we use a method for determining independently the average adsorption energy and a prefactor value that works over a large range of incident methanol coverage, from a limited set of desorption curves performed at different heating rates. In the low coverage regime the procedure is based on a first order kinetic law, and considers an adsorption energy distribution which is not expected to vary with the applied heating rate. In the case of CH3OH multilayers, Eads is determined as 430 meV with a prefactor of 5 × 10(14) s(-1). For CH3OH submonolayers on graphite, adsorption energy of 470 ± 30 meV and a prefactor of (8 ± 3) × 10(16) s(-1) have been found. These last values, which do not change between 0.09 ML and 1 ML initial coverage, suggest that the methanol molecules form island-like structure on the graphite even at low coverage.

  13. Free energy landscapes for the thermodynamic understanding of adsorption-induced deformations and structural transitions in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, D.; Coudert, F.-X.; Boutin, A.

    2012-07-01

    Soft porous crystals are flexible metal-organic frameworks that respond to physical stimuli such as temperature, pressure, and gas adsorption by large changes in their structure and unit cell volume. While they have attracted a lot of interest, molecular simulation methods that directly couple adsorption and large structural deformations in an efficient manner are still lacking. We propose here a new Monte Carlo simulation method based on non-Boltzmann sampling in (guest loading, volume) space using the Wang-Landau algorithm, and show that it can be used to fully characterize the adsorption properties and the material's response to adsorption at thermodynamic equilibrium. We showcase this new method on a simple model of the MIL-53 family of breathing materials, demonstrating its potential and contrasting it with the pitfalls of direct, Boltzmann simulations. We furthermore propose an explanation for the hysteretic nature of adsorption in terms of free energy barriers between the two metastable host phases.

  14. Computation of Adsorption Energies of Some Interstellar Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil, Milan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Gorai, Prasanta; Etim, Emmanuel; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption energies of surface species are most crucial for chemical complexity of interstellar grain mantle. Aim of this work is to study the variation of the adsorption energies depending upon the nature of adsorbent. We use silicate and carbonaceous grains for the absorbents. For silicate grains, we use very simple crystalline ones, namely, Enstatite (MgSiO_3)_n, Ferrosilite (FeSiO_3)_n, Forsterite (Mg_2SiO_4)_n and Fayalite (Fe_2SiO_4)_n. We use n=1, 2, 4, 8 to study the variation of adsorption energies with the increase in cluster size. For carbonaceous grain, we use Coronene (polyaromatic hydrocarbon surface). Adsorption energy of all these species are calculated by means of quantum chemical calculation using self consistent density functional theory (DFT). MPWB1K hybrid meta-functional is employed since it has been proven useful to study the systems with weak interactions such as van der Waals interactions. Optimization are also carried out with MPWB1K/6-311g(d) and MPWB1K/6311g(d,p) and a comparison of adsorption energies are discussed for these two different basis sets. We use crystalline structure of the adsorbent. The adsorbate is placed in the different site of the grain with a suitable distance. The energy of adsorption for a species on the grain surface is defined as follows: E_a_d_s = E_s_s - (E_s_u_r_f_a_c_e + E_s_p_e_c_i_e_s), where E_a_d_s is the adsorption energy, E_s_s is the optimized energy for species placed in a suitable distance from the grain surface, E_s_u_r_f_a_c_e and E_s_p_e_c_i_e_s respectively are the optimized energies of the surface and species separately.

  15. A mechanistic study of H2S adsorption and dissociation on Cu2O(1 1 1) surfaces: Thermochemistry, reaction barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Riguang; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Jingrui; Ling, Lixia; Wang, Baojun

    2012-10-01

    The interaction mechanism of H2S with different Cu2O(1 1 1) surfaces, including perfect, oxygen-vacancy and sulfur-containing surfaces, have been systematically studied using periodic density functional calculations. Different kinds of possible modes of H2S, as well as the resultant SH and S species adsorbed on these surfaces are identified. Two types of pathways via molecular and dissociative adsorption processes are mapped out. Our results show that sulfur species (H2S, SH and S) interact with surface Cu centers; H2S exists in the form of molecular adsorption on perfect and sulfur-containing surfaces; the dissociative adsorption of H2S occurs predominantly on oxygen-vacancy surface, suggesting that oxygen-vacancy exhibits a strong catalytic activity toward the dissociation of H2S. On the other hand, the dissociation processes of the molecular and dissociative adsorption H2S, leading to final product S species on these Cu2O(1 1 1) surfaces, show that the overall dissociation process is exothermic. Meanwhile, with respect to molecular adsorption H2S, the activation barrier and reaction energy of the overall dissociation process on perfect and oxygen-vacancy surfaces indicate that H2S can easily dissociate into S species. Importantly, in the case of dissociative adsorption of H2S, the dissociation of H2S into S species is a spontaneous process with respect to molecular adsorption H2S. However, on sulfur-containing surface, the presence of surface S atom goes against the Hsbnd S bond-breaking process both thermodynamically and kinetically. Finally, the vibrational frequencies for the adsorbed H2S, SH and S species on these surfaces have been obtained, which can be applied to guide surface vibrational spectroscopy in experiment.

  16. Energy barriers for cellular rearrangements in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng; Lopez, J. H.; Schwarz, J. M.; Manning, M. Lisa

    2013-03-01

    The behavior of cellular aggregates strongly influences morphogenesis, cancer growth and wound healing. While single cell mechanics has been extensively studied, the collective dynamics of cells inside a tissue is not well understood. Recent experiments have shown cells in tissues behave like fluids on long timescales and solids on shorter timescales, and exhibit caging behavior at intermediate timescales as they are more tightly packed. These observations are reminiscent of dynamic slowing down and dynamical heterogeneities due to mutual confinement and crowding of particles glassy systems. A common and crucial feature of glassy systems is the existence of a Potential Energy Landscape (PEL) for local rearrangements. For thermal glassy materials, when these barriers are large compared to thermal fluctuations, its rheology is dependent on the PEL and external mechanical driving. In contrast, cells in a tissue are non-thermal and overcome energy barriers in the PEL mainly through local active processes, i.e. making new adhesions and cell shape changes. We numerically map the PEL of a confluent tissue as functions of different transition pathways and single cell properties. Analytical calculations are also performed to find the minimal energy shapes for 2-D confluent cell packings. J.H.L. and J.M.S. are supported by NSF-DMR-0645373.

  17. Energy barriers, entropy barriers, and non-Arrhenius behavior in a minimal glassy model.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Weeks, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    We study glassy dynamics using a simulation of three soft Brownian particles confined to a two-dimensional circular region. If the circular region is large, the disks freely rearrange, but rearrangements are rarer for smaller system sizes. We directly measure a one-dimensional free-energy landscape characterizing the dynamics. This landscape has two local minima corresponding to the two distinct disk configurations, separated by a free-energy barrier that governs the rearrangement rate. We study several different interaction potentials and demonstrate that the free-energy barrier is composed of a potential-energy barrier and an entropic barrier. The heights of both of these barriers depend on temperature and system size, demonstrating how non-Arrhenius behavior can arise close to the glass transition. PMID:27415326

  18. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Study (Appendix A), June 2015

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This study examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This study also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  19. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Report to Congress, June 2015

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This report examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This report also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  20. Nontechnical Barriers to Solar Energy Use: Review of Recent Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.; Zuboy, J.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reviews the nontechnical barriers to solar energy use, drawing on recent literature to help identify key barriers that must be addressed as part of the Technology Acceptance efforts under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar America Initiative. A broad literature search yielded more than 400 references, which were narrowed to 19 recent documents on nontechnical barriers to the use of solar energy and other energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE/RE) technologies. Some of the most frequently identified barriers included lack of government policy supporting EE/RE, lack of information dissemination and consumer awareness about energy and EE/RE, high cost of solar and other EE/RE technologies compared with conventional energy, and inadequate financing options for EE/RE projects.

  1. Surface free energy analysis of adsorbents used for radioiodine adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, C. M.; Román, S.; González, J. F.; Sabio, E.; Ledesma, B.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the surface free energy of biomass-based activated carbons, both fresh and impregnated with triethylenediamine, has been evaluated. The contribution of Lifshitz van der Waals components was determined by the model proposed by van Oss et al. The results obtained allowed predicting the most probable configurations of the impregnant onto the carbon surface and its influence on the subsequent adsorption of radioactive methyl iodide.

  2. Waste-to-energy Systems Institutional Barriers Assessment Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-06-01

    Nontechnical institutional barriers affecting implementation of the waste to energy technology, priorization, of identifed barriers, and utilization of information and data to formulate an institutional research plarr, were identified. The following important results are recorded for commercialized and noncommercialized combustor, siting existing laws, multipurisdictional inaction, permiles and regulations, and the lack of data on environmental impacts.

  3. Equation of Energy Injection to a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuiliang; Weng, Shan; Jin, Qi; Han, Jingyi; Jiang, Boqiong; Wu, Zuliang

    2016-08-01

    The electric energy injection from a pulsed power supply to a planar type of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor at atmospheric pressure was studied. Relations of the energy injection with barrier materials, barrier thickness, peak voltage, gap distance, electrode area, and operation temperature were experimentally investigated. The energy injection is a function of relative permittivity, barrier thickness, peak voltage, gap distance, and electrode area. The influence of operation temperature on energy injection is slight in the range of 27-300 °C but becomes obvious in the range of 300-500 °C. A model was established using which the energy injection can be easily predicted. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11575159), Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. LY13B070004), Program for Zhejiang Leading Team of S&T Innovation (No. 2013TD07), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51206146)

  4. Equation of Energy Injection to a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuiliang; Weng, Shan; Jin, Qi; Han, Jingyi; Jiang, Boqiong; Wu, Zuliang

    2016-08-01

    The electric energy injection from a pulsed power supply to a planar type of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor at atmospheric pressure was studied. Relations of the energy injection with barrier materials, barrier thickness, peak voltage, gap distance, electrode area, and operation temperature were experimentally investigated. The energy injection is a function of relative permittivity, barrier thickness, peak voltage, gap distance, and electrode area. The influence of operation temperature on energy injection is slight in the range of 27–300 °C but becomes obvious in the range of 300–500 °C. A model was established using which the energy injection can be easily predicted. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11575159), Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. LY13B070004), Program for Zhejiang Leading Team of S&T Innovation (No. 2013TD07), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51206146)

  5. Adsorption of water monomer and clusters on platinum(111) terrace and related steps and kinks: I. Configurations, energies, and hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Árnadóttir, Líney; Stuve, Eric M.; Jónsson, Hannes

    2010-10-01

    Adsorption and rotation of water monomer, dimer, and trimer on the (111) terrace, (221) and (322) stepped, and (763) and (854) kinked surfaces of platinum were studied by density functional theory calculations using the PW91 approximation to the energy functional. On the (111) terrace, water monomer and the donor molecule of the dimer and trimer adsorb at atop sites. The per-molecule adsorption energies of the monomer, dimer, and trimer are 0.30, 0.45, and 0.48 eV, respectively. Rotation of monomers, dimers, and trimers on the terrace is facile with energy barriers of 0.02 eV or less. Adsorption on steps and kinks is stronger than on the terrace, as evidenced by monomer adsorption energies of 0.46 to 0.55 eV. On the (221) stepped surface the zigzag extended configuration is most stable with a per-molecule adsorption energy of 0.57 eV. On the (322) stepped surface the dimer, two configurations of the trimer, and the zigzag configuration have similar adsorption energies of 0.55 ± 0.02 eV. Hydrogen bonding is strongest in the dimer and trimer adsorbed on the terrace, with respective energies of 0.30 and 0.27 eV, and accounts for their increased adsorption energies relative to the monomer. Hydrogen bonding is weak to moderate for adsorption at steps, with energies of 0.04 to 0.15 eV, as the much stronger water-metal interactions inhibit adsorption geometries favorable to hydrogen bonding. Correlations of hydrogen bond angles and energies with hydrogen bond lengths are presented. On the basis of these DFT/PW91 results, a model for water cluster formation on the Pt(111) surface can be formulated where kink sites nucleate chains along the top of step edges, consistent with the experimental findings of Morgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 77 (1996) 703.

  6. Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment :

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie; Kirby, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

  7. Low barrier kinetics: dependence on observables and free energy surface.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hairong; Gruebele, Martin

    2006-01-30

    Dynamics on free energy surfaces with high activation barriers are usually treated by few-state kinetics models, yielding characteristic rate coefficients and amplitudes depending on the connectivity of the states. When the barriers are low (< 3 kT), the assumption of instantaneous equilibration of the transition state, and hence, the few-state kinetics treatment, break down. Langevin dynamics is used here to explore the characteristic trends that occur in such cases, as a function of barrier height, number of barriers, dimensionality of the free energy surface, and switching functions that describe how spectroscopic probes vary from reactant to product. The result is a systematic phenomenological description of low barrier kinetics and dynamics.

  8. Energy barriers and cell migration in confluent tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng; Lopez, J. H.; Schwarz, J. M.; Manning, M. Lisa

    2014-03-01

    Biological processes such as embryogensis, tumorigenesis and wound healing require cells to move within a tissue. While the migration of single cells has been extensively studied, it has remained unclear how single cell properties control migration through a confluent tissue. We develop numerical and theoretical models to calculate energy barriers to cell rearrangements, which govern cell motility. In contrast to sheared foams where energy barriers are power-law distributed, energy barriers in tissues are exponentially distributed and depend systematically on the cell's number of neighbors. Using simple extensions of `trap' and `Soft Glassy Rheology' models, we demonstrate that these energy barrier distributions give rise to glassy behavior and use the models to make testable predictions for two-time correlation functions and caging times. We incorporate these ideas into a continuum model that combines glassy rheology with active polarization to better understand collective migration in epithelial sheets.

  9. Radiant Barriers Save Energy in Buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Langley Research Center needed to coat the Echo 1 satellite with a fine mist of vaporized metal, and collaborated with industry to create "radiant barrier technology." In 2010, Ryan Garrett learned about a new version of the technology resistant to oxidation and founded RadiaSource in Ogden, Utah, to provide the NASA-derived technology for applications in homes, warehouses, gymnasiums, and agricultural settings.

  10. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T

    2016-04-28

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc (*) = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc (*) controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  11. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T.

    2016-04-01

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc* = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc* controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  12. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  13. Fermi level pinning and the charge transfer contribution to the energy of adsorption at semiconducting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krukowski, Stanisław; Kempisty, Paweł; Strak, Paweł; Sakowski, Konrad

    2014-01-28

    It is shown that charge transfer, the process analogous to formation of semiconductor p-n junction, contributes significantly to adsorption energy at semiconductor surfaces. For the processes without the charge transfer, such as molecular adsorption of closed shell systems, the adsorption energy is determined by the bonding only. In the case involving charge transfer, such as open shell systems like metal atoms or the dissociating molecules, the energy attains different value for the Fermi level differently pinned. The Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulation of species adsorption at different surfaces, such as SiC(0001) or GaN(0001) confirms these predictions: the molecular adsorption is independent on the coverage, while the dissociative process adsorption energy varies by several electronvolts.

  14. Densely-packed ZnTPPs Monolayer on the Rutile TiO2(110)-(1×1) Surface: Adsorption Behavior and Energy Level Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Sylvie; Ruggieri, Charles; Bartynski, Robert; Martínez, José Ignacio; Flores, Fernando; Ortega, José

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of a densely packed Zinc(II) tetraphenylporphyrin monolayer on a rutile TiO2(110)-(1×1) surface has been studied using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods, aimed at analyzing the relation between adsorption behavior and barrier height formation. The adsorption configuration of ZnTPP was determined from scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) imaging, density functional theory (DFT) calculations and STM image simulation. The corresponding energy alignment was experimentally determined from X-ray and UV-photoemission spectroscopies and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. These results were found in good agreement with an appropriately corrected DFT model, pointing to the importance of local bonding and intermolecular interactions in the establishment of barrier heights. PMID:26998188

  15. Renewable energy technologies adoption in Kazakhstan: potentials, barriers and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatayev, Marat; Marazza, Diego; Contin, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The growth in environmental pollution alongside an increasing demand for electricity in Kazakhstan calls for a higher level of renewable energy penetration into national power systems. Kazakhstan has great potential for renewable energies from wind, solar, hydro and biomass resources that can be exploited for electricity production. In 2013, the Kazakhstani Ministry of Energy initiated a new power development plan, which aims to bring the share of renewable energy to 3% by 2020 rising to 30% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The current contribution of renewable energy resources in the national electricity mix, however, is less than 1%. As a developing country, Kazakhstan has faced a number of barriers to increase renewable energy use, which have to be analysed and translated into a comprehensive renewable energy policy framework. This study presents an overview of the current conditions of renewable energy development in Kazakhstan. Secondly, it identifies and describes the main barriers that prevent diffusion of renewable energy technologies in Kazakhstan. Finally, the paper provides solutions to overcome specific barriers in order to successfully develop a renewable energy technology sector in Kazakhstan.

  16. Rate constants, timescales, and free energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, Peter; Wales, David; Segall, Anca; Lai, Yi-An; Schön, J. Christian; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz; Andresen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The traditional connection between rate constants and free energy landscapes is extended to define effective free energy landscapes relevant on any chosen timescale. Although the Eyring-Polanyi transition state theory specifies a fixed timescale of τ=h/kBT}, we introduce instead the timescale of interest for the system in question, e.g. the observation time. The utility of drawing such landscapes using a variety of timescales is illustrated by the example of Holliday junction resolution. The resulting free energy landscapes are easier to interpret, clearly reveal observation time dependent effects like coalescence of short-lived states, and reveal features of interest for the specific system more clearly.

  17. Quantum Mechanical Free Energy Barrier for an Enzymatic Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rod, Thomas H.; Ryde, Ulf

    2005-04-01

    We discuss problems related to in silico studies of enzymes and show that accurate and converged free energy changes for complex chemical reactions can be computed if a method based on a thermodynamic cycle is employed. The method combines the sampling speed of molecular mechanics with the accuracy of a high-level quantum mechanics method. We use the method to compute the free energy barrier for a methyl transfer reaction catalyzed by the enzyme catechol O-methyltransferase at the level of density functional theory. The surrounding protein and solvent are found to have a profound effect on the reaction, and we show that energies can be extrapolated easily from one basis set and exchange-correlation functional to another. Using this procedure we calculate a barrier of 69 kJ/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 75 kJ/mol.

  18. Developing effective rockfall protection barriers for low energy impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentani, Alessio; Giacomini, Anna; Buzzi, Olivier; Govoni, Laura; Gottardi, Guido; Fityus, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Recently, important progresses have been made towards the development of high capacity rockfall barriers (100 kJ - 8000 kJ). The interest of researchers and practitioners is now turning to the development of fences of minor capacity, whose use becomes essential in areas where rockfall events generally have low intensity and the use of high capacity barriers would be accompanied by excessive costs and high environmental impact. Low energy barriers can also provide a cost-effective solution even in areas where high energies events are expected. Results of full-scale tests are vital to any investigation on the behaviour of these structures. An experimental set-up has been developed at The University of Newcastle (AUS), to investigate the response of low energy rockfall barrier prototypes to low energy impacts. The Australian territory, and in particular New South Wales, is in fact characterised by rockfall events of low-to-medium intensity (50 kJ - 500 kJ) and the need of protection structures working within such energy range, is particularly felt [1]. The experiments involved the impact of a test block onto three spans, low energy barrier prototypes, made of steel structural posts, fully fixed at the base, side cables and a steel meshwork constituted by a double twist hexagonal wire net [2]. Test data enabled the development, calibration and assessment of FE models [3], on which non-linear and dynamic analyses have been performed addressing the effect of the block size. Results have shown that the response of the structure is strongly governed by the net. Data from tests conducted on the sole net and on the entire barrier showed in fact a similar trend, different to what typically observed for high capacity barriers, whose behaviour is also led by the presence of uphill cables and brakes. In particular, the numerical analyses have demonstrated a dependence of the net performance on the block size. In particular, a loss of capacity in the order of 50% occurred as the

  19. Scaling Properties of Adsorption Energies for Hydrogen-Containing Molecules on Transition-Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abild-Pedersen, F.; Greeley, J.; Studt, F.; Rossmeisl, J.; Munter, T. R.; Moses, P. G.; Skúlason, E.; Bligaard, T.; Nørskov, J. K.

    2007-07-01

    Density functional theory calculations are presented for CHx, x=0,1,2,3, NHx, x=0,1,2, OHx, x=0,1, and SHx, x=0,1 adsorption on a range of close-packed and stepped transition-metal surfaces. We find that the adsorption energy of any of the molecules considered scales approximately with the adsorption energy of the central, C, N, O, or S atom, the scaling constant depending only on x. A model is proposed to understand this behavior. The scaling model is developed into a general framework for estimating the reaction energies for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

  20. Energy management action plan: Developing a strategy for overcoming institutional barriers to municipal energy conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Energy offices working to improve efficiency of local government facilities face not only technical tasks, but institutional barriers, such as budget structures that do not reward efficiency, a low awareness of energy issues, and purchasing procedures based only on minimizing initial cost. The bureau, in working to remove such barriers in San Francisco, has identified 37 institutional barriers in areas such as operations & maintenance, purchasing, and facility design; these barriers were then reorganized into three groupings-- policy & attitudes, budget & incentives, and awareness & information-- and mapped. This map shows that the barriers mutually reinforce each other, and that a holistic approach is required for permanent change. The city`s recreation & parks department was used as a model department, and information about facility energy use was compiled into a departmental energy review. Staff interviews showed how barriers affect conservation. The bureau then generated ideas for projects to remove specific barriers and rated them according to potential impact and the resources required to implement them. Four of the six projects selected focused on maintenance staff: a cost- sharing lighting retrofit program, a boiler efficiency program, a departmental energy tracking system, and a budgetary incentive program for conservation. The other two projects are city-wide: promotion of a new term contract supplying energy-efficient light materials, and publication/distribution of ENERGY NEWS newsletter. A general methodology, the EMAP Strategy Guide, has been created to assist other energy offices in developing EMAPs.

  1. Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

  2. Optimization of adsorption processes for climate control and thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, S; Yang, S; Kim, H; Wang, EN

    2014-10-01

    Adsorption based heat-pumps have received significant interest owing to their promise of higher efficiencies and energy savings when coupled with waste heat and solar energy compared to conventional heating and cooling systems. While adsorption systems have been widely studied through computational analysis and experiments, general design guidelines to enhance their overall performance have not been proposed. In this work, we identified conditions suitable for the maximum utilization of the adsorbent to enhance the performance of both intermittent as well as continuously operating adsorption systems. A detailed computational model was developed based on a general framework governing adsorption dynamics in a single adsorption layer and pellet. We then validated the computational analysis using experiments with a model system of zeolite 13X-water for different operating conditions. A dimensional analysis was subsequently carried out to optimize adsorption performance for any desired operating condition, which is determined by the choice of adsorbent-vapor pair, adsorption duration, operational pressure, intercrystalline porosity, adsorbent crystal size, and intracrystalline vapor diffusivity. The scaling analysis identifies the critical dimensionless parameters and provides a simple guideline to determine the most suitable geometry for the adsorbent particles. Based on this selection criterion, the computational model was used to demonstrate maximum utilization of the adsorbent for any given operational condition. By considering a wide range of parametric variations for performance optimization, these results offer important insights for designing adsorption beds for heating and cooling systems. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solar and laser energy conversion with Schottky barrier solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y.-C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices have been fabricated for solar and short-wavelength laser energy conversion using the thin metal film-semiconductor (Schottky barrier) approach. Studies of the metal film optical characteristics and the voltage outputs were emphasized. Air mass zero efficiencies of 8 to 9% in GaAs and laser conversion efficiencies of 25% at 4880 A in GaAs(0.6)P(0.4) are presently measured, with projected efficiencies of 15 and 45%, respectively. The techniques, if applied successfully to semiconductor thin films, could have an impact in solar energy terrestrial application.

  4. Deformation energy of a toroidal nucleus and plane fragmentation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchard, C.; Royer, G.

    1996-02-01

    The path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes is investigated using a one-parameter shape sequence. The deformation energy is determined within the analytical expressions obtained for the various shape-dependent functions and the generalized rotating liquid drop model taking into account the proximity energy and the temperature. With increasing mass and angular momentum, a potential well appears in the toroidal shape path. For the heaviest systems, the pocket is large and locally favourable with respect to the plane fragmentation barriers which might allow the formation of evanescent toroidal systems which would rapidly decay in several fragments to minimize the surface tension.

  5. Nucleosome positioning by genomic excluding-energy barriers

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Pascale; Chevereau, Guillaume; Vaillant, Cédric; Audit, Benjamin; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Marilley, Monique; Bouvet, Philippe; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Recent genome-wide nucleosome mappings along with bioinformatics studies have confirmed that the DNA sequence plays a more important role in the collective organization of nucleosomes in vivo than previously thought. Yet in living cells, this organization also results from the action of various external factors like DNA-binding proteins and chromatin remodelers. To decipher the code for intrinsic chromatin organization, there is thus a need for in vitro experiments to bridge the gap between computational models of nucleosome sequence preferences and in vivo nucleosome occupancy data. Here we combine atomic force microscopy in liquid and theoretical modeling to demonstrate that a major sequence signaling in vivo are high-energy barriers that locally inhibit nucleosome formation rather than favorable positioning motifs. We show that these genomic excluding-energy barriers condition the collective assembly of neighboring nucleosomes consistently with equilibrium statistical ordering principles. The analysis of two gene promoter regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human genome indicates that these genomic barriers direct the intrinsic nucleosome occupancy of regulatory sites, thereby contributing to gene expression regulation. PMID:20018700

  6. Summary of Workshop: Barriers to Energy Efficient Residential Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max

    2008-01-10

    The objectives for this workshop were to bring together those with different viewpoints on the implementation of energy efficient ventilation in homes to share their perspectives. The primary benefit of the workshop is to allow the participants to get a broader understanding of the issues involved and thereby make themselves more able to achieve their own goals in this area. In order to achieve this objective each participant was asked to address four objectives from their point of view: (1) Drivers for energy efficient residential ventilation: Why is this an important issue? Who cares about it? Where is the demand: occupants, utilities, regulation, programs, etc? What does sustainability mean in this context? (2) Markets & Technologies: What products, services and systems are out there? What kinds of things are in the pipeline? What is being installed now? Are there regional or other trends? What are the technology interactions with other equipment and the envelope? (3) Barriers to Implementation: What is stopping decision makers from implementing energy-efficient residential ventilation systems? What kind of barriers are there: technological, cost, informational, structural, etc. What is the critical path? (4) Solutions: What can be done to overcome the barriers and how can/should we do it? What is the role of public vs. private institutions? Where can investments be made to save energy while improving the indoor environment? Ten participants prepared presentations for the workshop. Those presentations are included in sections at the end of this workshop report. These presentations provided the principal context for the discussions that happened during the workshop. Critical path issues were raised and potential solutions discussed during the workshop. As a secondary objective they have listed key issues and some potential consensus items which resulted from the discussions.

  7. Vibrational energy transfer near a dissociative adsorption transition state: State-to-state study of HCl collisions at Au(111).

    PubMed

    Geweke, Jan; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Rahinov, Igor; Bartels, Christof; Wodtke, Alec M

    2016-08-01

    In this work we seek to examine the nature of collisional energy transfer between HCl and Au(111) for nonreactive scattering events that sample geometries near the transition state for dissociative adsorption by varying both the vibrational and translational energy of the incident HCl molecules in the range near the dissociation barrier. Specifically, we report absolute vibrational excitation probabilities for HCl(v = 0 → 1) and HCl(v = 1 → 2) scattering from clean Au(111) as a function of surface temperature and incidence translational energy. The HCl(v = 2 → 3) channel could not be observed-presumably due to the onset of dissociation. The excitation probabilities can be decomposed into adiabatic and nonadiabatic contributions. We find that both contributions strongly increase with incidence vibrational state by a factor of 24 and 9, respectively. This suggests that V-T as well as V-EHP coupling can be enhanced near the transition state for dissociative adsorption at a metal surface. We also show that previously reported HCl(v = 0 → 1) excitation probabilities [Q. Ran et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 237601 (2007)]-50 times smaller than those reported here-were influenced by erroneous assignment of spectroscopic lines used in the data analysis. PMID:27497574

  8. Vibrational energy transfer near a dissociative adsorption transition state: State-to-state study of HCl collisions at Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geweke, Jan; Shirhatti, Pranav R.; Rahinov, Igor; Bartels, Christof; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we seek to examine the nature of collisional energy transfer between HCl and Au(111) for nonreactive scattering events that sample geometries near the transition state for dissociative adsorption by varying both the vibrational and translational energy of the incident HCl molecules in the range near the dissociation barrier. Specifically, we report absolute vibrational excitation probabilities for HCl(v = 0 → 1) and HCl(v = 1 → 2) scattering from clean Au(111) as a function of surface temperature and incidence translational energy. The HCl(v = 2 → 3) channel could not be observed—presumably due to the onset of dissociation. The excitation probabilities can be decomposed into adiabatic and nonadiabatic contributions. We find that both contributions strongly increase with incidence vibrational state by a factor of 24 and 9, respectively. This suggests that V-T as well as V-EHP coupling can be enhanced near the transition state for dissociative adsorption at a metal surface. We also show that previously reported HCl(v = 0 → 1) excitation probabilities [Q. Ran et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 237601 (2007)]—50 times smaller than those reported here—were influenced by erroneous assignment of spectroscopic lines used in the data analysis.

  9. Anti-terrorist vehicle crash impact energy absorbing barrier

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J.

    1989-01-01

    An anti-terrorist vehicle crash barrier includes side support structures, crushable energy absorbing aluminum honeycomb modules, and an elongated impact-resistant beam extending between, and at its opposite ends through vertical guideways defined by, the side support structures. An actuating mechanism supports the beam at its opposite ends for movement between a lowered barrier-withdrawn position in which a traffic-supporting side of the beam is aligned with a traffic-bearing surface permitting vehicular traffic between the side support structures and over the beam, and a raised barrier-imposed position in which the beam is aligned with horizontal guideways defined in the side support structures above the traffic-bearing surface, providing an obstruction to vehicular traffic between the side support structures. The beam is movable rearwardly in the horizontal guideways with its opposite ends disposed transversely therethrough upon being impacted at its forward side by an incoming vehicle. The crushable modules are replaceably disposed in the horizontal guideways between aft ends thereof and the beam. The beam, replaceable modules, side support structures and actuating mechanism are separate and detached from one another such that the beam and replaceable modules are capable of coacting to disable and stop an incoming vehicle without causing structural damage to the side support structures and actuating mechanism.

  10. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2016-01-28

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that there is a correlation between the alloying energy of an alloy, and the diffusion barriers of the minority component. Alloys with a negative alloying energy may show improved long term stability, despite the fact that there is typically a greater thermodynamic driving force towards dissolution of the solute metal over alloying. In addition to Pt, we find that this trend also appears to hold for alloys based on Al and Pd. PMID:26750475

  11. Truncation-based energy weighting string method for efficiently resolving small energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Carilli, Michael F; Delaney, Kris T; Fredrickson, Glenn H

    2015-08-01

    The string method is a useful numerical technique for resolving minimum energy paths in rare-event barrier-crossing problems. However, when applied to systems with relatively small energy barriers, the string method becomes inconvenient since many images trace out physically uninteresting regions where the barrier has already been crossed and recrossing is unlikely. Energy weighting alleviates this difficulty to an extent, but typical implementations still require the string's endpoints to evolve to stable states that may be far from the barrier, and deciding upon a suitable energy weighting scheme can be an iterative process dependent on both the application and the number of images used. A second difficulty arises when treating nucleation problems: for later images along the string, the nucleus grows to fill the computational domain. These later images are unphysical due to confinement effects and must be discarded. In both cases, computational resources associated with unphysical or uninteresting images are wasted. We present a new energy weighting scheme that eliminates all of the above difficulties by actively truncating the string as it evolves and forcing all images, including the endpoints, to remain within and cover uniformly a desired barrier region. The calculation can proceed in one step without iterating on strategy, requiring only an estimate of an energy value below which images become uninteresting.

  12. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-01

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O2 adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N4 chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O2 adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O2 on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d_{z^2 }, d_{xy}, d_{xz}, and dyz) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O2 adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  13. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-28

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O{sub 2} adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N{sub 4} chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O{sub 2} adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O{sub 2} on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d{sub z{sup 2}}, d{sub xy}, d{sub xz}, and d{sub yz}) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O{sub 2} adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  14. Multi-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.

    1998-01-20

    The optimum conditions for multi-neutron transfer have been studied in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 124}Sn at bombarding energies at and below the Coulomb barrier. The experiments were performed in inverse kinematics with a {sup 124}Sn beam bombarding a {sup 58}Ni target. The particles were identified with respect to mass and Z in the split-pole spectrograph with a hybrid focal plane detector with mass and Z-resolutions of A/{Delta}A = 150 and Z/{Delta}Z = 70. At all energies the transfer of up to 6 neutrons was observed. The yields for these transfer reactions are found to decrease by about a factor of four for each transferred neutron.

  15. Separating effective high density polyethylene segments from olefin block copolymers using high temperature liquid chromatography with a preloaded discrete adsorption promoting solvent barrier.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; Rickard, Mark A; Pearce, Eric; Pangburn, Todd O; Li, Yongfu; Lyons, John W; Cong, Rongjuan; deGroot, A Willem; Meunier, David M

    2016-09-23

    Recent advances in catalyst technology have enabled the synthesis of olefin block copolymers (OBC). One type is a "hard-soft" OBC with a high density polyethylene (HDPE) block and a relatively low density polyethylene (VLDPE) block targeted as thermoplastic elastomers. Presently, one of the major challenges is to fractionate HDPE segments from the other components in an experimental OBC sample (block copolymers and VLDPE segments). Interactive high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) is ineffective for OBC separation as the HDPE segments and block copolymer chains experience nearly identical enthalpic interactions with the stationary phase and co-elute. In this work we have overcome this challenge by using liquid chromatography under the limiting conditions of desorption (LC LCD). A solvent plug (discrete barrier) is introduced in front of the sample which specifically promotes the adsorption of HDPE segments on the stationary phase (porous graphitic carbon). Under selected thermodynamic conditions, VLDPE segments and block copolymer chains crossed the barrier while HDPE segments followed the pore-included barrier solvent and thus enabled separation. The barrier solvent composition was optimized and the chemical composition of fractionated polymer chains was investigated as a function of barrier solvent strength using an online Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) detector. Our study revealed that both the HDPE segments as well as asymmetric block copolymer chains (HDPE block length≫VLDPE block length) are retained in the separation and the barrier strength can be tailored to retain a particular composition. At the optimum barrier solvent composition, this method can be applied to separate effective HDPE segments from the other components, which has been demonstrated using an experimental OBC sample.

  16. Separating effective high density polyethylene segments from olefin block copolymers using high temperature liquid chromatography with a preloaded discrete adsorption promoting solvent barrier.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; Rickard, Mark A; Pearce, Eric; Pangburn, Todd O; Li, Yongfu; Lyons, John W; Cong, Rongjuan; deGroot, A Willem; Meunier, David M

    2016-09-23

    Recent advances in catalyst technology have enabled the synthesis of olefin block copolymers (OBC). One type is a "hard-soft" OBC with a high density polyethylene (HDPE) block and a relatively low density polyethylene (VLDPE) block targeted as thermoplastic elastomers. Presently, one of the major challenges is to fractionate HDPE segments from the other components in an experimental OBC sample (block copolymers and VLDPE segments). Interactive high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) is ineffective for OBC separation as the HDPE segments and block copolymer chains experience nearly identical enthalpic interactions with the stationary phase and co-elute. In this work we have overcome this challenge by using liquid chromatography under the limiting conditions of desorption (LC LCD). A solvent plug (discrete barrier) is introduced in front of the sample which specifically promotes the adsorption of HDPE segments on the stationary phase (porous graphitic carbon). Under selected thermodynamic conditions, VLDPE segments and block copolymer chains crossed the barrier while HDPE segments followed the pore-included barrier solvent and thus enabled separation. The barrier solvent composition was optimized and the chemical composition of fractionated polymer chains was investigated as a function of barrier solvent strength using an online Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) detector. Our study revealed that both the HDPE segments as well as asymmetric block copolymer chains (HDPE block length≫VLDPE block length) are retained in the separation and the barrier strength can be tailored to retain a particular composition. At the optimum barrier solvent composition, this method can be applied to separate effective HDPE segments from the other components, which has been demonstrated using an experimental OBC sample. PMID:27590085

  17. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  18. First-principles calculations of the OH- adsorption energy on perovskite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzuku, Hideo; Ikeno, Hidekazu; Yamada, Ikuya; Yagi, Shunsuke

    2016-08-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) that occurs during water oxidation is of considerable importance as an essential energy conversion reaction for rechargeable metal-air batteries and direct solar water splitting. ABO3 perovskite oxides have been extensively studied because of their high catalytic OER activity. In the present study, the OH- adsorption process on the perovskite surface about different B site cations was investigated by the first-principles calculations. We concluded that the adsorption energy of SrFeO3 surface is larger than that of SrTiO3.

  19. Phenolic resin-based porous carbons for adsorption and energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Nilantha P.

    The main objective of this dissertation research is to develop phenolic resin based carbon materials for range of applications by soft-templating and Stober-like synthesis strategies. Applications Studied in this dissertation are adsorption of CO2, bio-molecular and heavy metal ions, and energy storage devices. Based on that, our goal is to design carbon materials with desired pore structure, high surface area, graphitic domains, incorporated metal nanoparticles, and specific organic groups and heteroatoms. In this dissertation the organic-organic self-assembly of phenolic resins and triblock copolymers under acidic conditions will be used to obtain mesoporous carbons/carbon composites and Stober-like synthesis involving phenolic resins under basic condition will be used to prepare polymer/carbon particles and their composites. The structure of this dissertation consists of an introductory chapter (Chapter 1) discussing the general synthesis of carbon materials, particularly the soft-templating strategy and Stober-like carbon synthesis. Also, Chapter 1 includes a brief outline of applications namely adsorption of CO2, biomolecule and heavy metal ions, and supercapacitors. Chapter 2 discusses the techniques used for characterization of the carbon materials studied. This chapter starts with nitrogen adsorption analysis, which is used to measure the specific surface area, pore volume, distribution of pore sizes, and pore width. In addition to nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution thermogravimetric analysis (HR-TGA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and CHNS elemental analysis (EA) are mentioned too. Chapter 3 is focused on carbon materials for CO2 adsorption. There are different types of porous solid materials such as silicate, MOFs, carbons, and zeolites studied for CO2 adsorption. However, the carbon based materials are considered to be the best candidates for CO 2 adsorption to the industrial point of

  20. Simple energy barrier for component mixture of natural gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubenchikov, Aleksey; Bubenchikov, Mikhail; Matvienko, Oleg; Tarasov, Egor; Usenko, Olesya

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the ability of a test molecule to overcome the energy barrier being in the gap between spherical nanoparticles. Three particles make a primitive structural element of composite porous material. The ability of molecules to converge with nanoparticles and then to move through more powerful repulsion field defines the filtration properties of porous materials. This paper presents the investigation of carbon nanoparticles and molecules of helium and methane bombarding them. Calculations proved that methane molecules can not get through three particles if the gap equals to 3.5 nm. For helium molecules this value makes 1.02 nm. These gaps remain the same when the size of nanoparticles increases. Therefore filters for helium separated from natural gas are to have nanopores within the range from 1.02 nm to 3.5 nm.

  1. Low formation energy and kinetic barrier of Stone-Wales defect in infinite and finite silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjanath, Aaditya; Singh, Abhishek K.

    2014-01-01

    Stone-Wales (SW) defects in materials having hexagonal lattice are the most common topological defects that affect the electronic and mechanical properties. Using first principles density functional theory based calculations, we study the formation energy and kinetic barrier of SW-defect in infinite and finite sheets of silicene. The formation energies as well as the barriers in both the cases are significantly lower than those of graphene. Furthermore, compared with the infinite sheets, the energy barriers and formation energies are lower for finite sheets. However, due to low barriers these defects are expected to heal out of the finite sheets.

  2. Parametric modeling of energy filtering by energy barriers in thermoelectric nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Zianni, Xanthippi E-mail: xzianni@gmail.com; Narducci, Dario

    2015-01-21

    We present a parametric modeling of the thermoelectric transport coefficients based on a model previously used to interpret experimental measurements on the conductivity, σ, and Seebeck coefficient, S, in highly Boron-doped polycrystalline Si, where a very significant thermoelectric power factor (TPF) enhancement was observed. We have derived analytical formalism for the transport coefficients in the presence of an energy barrier assuming thermionic emission over the barrier for (i) non-degenerate and (ii) degenerate one-band semiconductor. Simple generic parametric equations are found that are in agreement with the exact Boltzmann transport formalism in a wide range of parameters. Moreover, we explore the effect of energy barriers in 1-d composite semiconductors in the presence of two phases: (a) the bulk-like phase and (b) the barrier phase. It is pointed out that significant TPF enhancement can be achieved in the composite structure of two phases with different thermal conductivities. The TPF enhancement is estimated as a function of temperature, the Fermi energy position, the type of scattering, and the barrier height. The derived modeling provides guidance for experiments and device design.

  3. Understanding Adsorption-Induced Effects on Platinum Nanoparticles: An Energy-Decomposition Analysis.

    PubMed

    Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Sautet, Philippe; Loffreda, David

    2014-09-18

    Platinum nanoparticle catalysts are used in a myriad of gas-phase, liquid-phase, and electrochemical reactions. Although a high catalytic activity is paramount, stability must also be guaranteed, especially when the nanoparticles are in contact with strongly bound adsorbates. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to accurately calculate adsorption-energy trends on Pt nanoparticles of multiple sizes and morphologies using ab initio methods at affordable computational expenses. Here, through an energy-decomposition analysis in which adsorption processes are regarded as the interplay between pure binding and various compensating core-shell deformations, we show that pure binding is responsible for the overall linear adsorption trends. Conversely, the energetic cost of the deformations is a site-independent, adsorbate-dependent constant value. These two observations and the description of the trends by means of generalized coordination numbers help to significantly reduce the computational expense of simulating large nanoparticles.

  4. Atomistic simulations of the adsorption and migration barriers of Cu adatoms on ZnO surfaces using COMB potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Shan, Tzu-Ray; Devine, Bryce; Lee, Donghwa; Liang, Tao; Hinojosa, Beverly B.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Asthagiri, Aravind; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2012-08-01

    Cu/ZnO heterogeneous systems are used to catalyze the CO2 hydrogenation to methanol, but questions remain about the nature of the active site and the role of Cu-ZnO interactions in the catalyst performance. The way in which ZnO surfaces support Cu clusters and stabilize their active sites is a key factor for maintaining catalyst activity. Processes such as sintering, alloying and encapsulation may play an important role in the activity of the catalyst but are difficult to model directly with density functional theory (DFT). In this work, we report the development of charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potentials to model the Cu/ZnO system. This potential is then used in conjugation with the dimer method, which uses the first derivative of the potential energy and the initial state of the transition to find saddle points, to examine the migration barriers of Cu adatoms on Cu and ZnO surfaces. These findings are validated against the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and published experimental data.

  5. A site energy distribution function from Toth isotherm for adsorption of gases on heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Vasanth; de Castro, M Monteiro; Martinez-Escandell, M; Molina-Sabio, M; Rodriguez-Reinoso, F

    2011-04-01

    A site energy distribution function based on a condensation approximation method is proposed for gas-phase adsorption systems following the Toth isotherm. The proposed model is successfully applied to estimate the site energy distribution of three pitch-based activated carbons (PA, PFeA and PBA) developed in our laboratory and also for other common adsorbent materials for different gas molecules. According to the proposed model the site energy distribution curves of the activated carbons are found to be exponential for hydrogen at 77 K. The site energy distribution of some of the activated carbon fibers, ambersorb, Dowex optipore, 13X Zeolite for different adsorbate molecules represents a quasi-Gaussian curve with a widened left hand side, indicating that most sites have adsorption energies lower than a statistical mean value.

  6. Microgravimetric Analysis Method for Activation-Energy Extraction from Trace-Amount Molecule Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengcheng; Yu, Haitao; Li, Xinxin

    2016-05-01

    Activation-energy (Ea) value for trace-amount adsorption of gas molecules on material is rapidly and inexpensively obtained, for the first time, from a microgravimetric analysis experiment. With the material loaded, a resonant microcantilever is used to record in real time the adsorption process at two temperatures. The kinetic parameter Ea is thereby extracted by solving the Arrhenius equation. As an example, two CO2 capture nanomaterials are examined by the Ea extracting method for evaluation/optimization and, thereby, demonstrating the applicability of the microgravimetric analysis method. The achievement helps to solve the absence in rapid quantitative characterization of sorption kinetics and opens a new route to investigate molecule adsorption processes and materials.

  7. Technical Barriers, Gaps,and Opportunities Related to Home Energy Upgrade Market Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Marcus V.A.

    2011-11-01

    This report outlines the technical barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program.

  8. NO adsorption and dissociation on palladium clusters: The importance of charged state and metal doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Zhang, Li Mei; Kong, Chun Cai; Yang, Zhi Mao; Chen, Yong Mei

    2016-08-01

    The NO adsorption and dissociation on neutral, charged and Ni-doped Pd13 clusters were studied by using density functional calculations. Our results revealed that NO always prefers to adsorb on the hollow site rather than the top or bridge sites. However, the charge state and Ni doping remarkably influence NO adsorption energy, dissociation barrier and reaction energy. The reaction on Pd13- has the lowest energy barrier and largest reaction energy. The Hirshfeld charge analysis discloses that the origin of the catalytic activity difference is the charge transfer from clusters to NO in the metastable NO adsorption state.

  9. Protecting High Energy Barriers: A New Equation to Regulate Boost Energy in Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is one of the most common tools in computational chemistry. Recently, our group has employed accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) to improve the conformational sampling over conventional molecular dynamics techniques. In the original aMD implementation, sampling is greatly improved by raising energy wells below a predefined energy level. Recently, our group presented an alternative aMD implementation where simulations are accelerated by lowering energy barriers of the potential energy surface. When coupled with thermodynamic integration simulations, this implementation showed very promising results. However, when applied to large systems, such as proteins, the simulation tends to be biased to high energy regions of the potential landscape. The reason for this behavior lies in the boost equation used since the highest energy barriers are dramatically more affected than the lower ones. To address this issue, in this work, we present a new boost equation that prevents oversampling of unfavorable high energy conformational states. The new boost potential provides not only better recovery of statistics throughout the simulation but also enhanced sampling of statistically relevant regions in explicit solvent MD simulations. PMID:22241967

  10. Making AlN(x) Tunnel Barriers Using a Low-Energy Nitrogen-Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama; Kleinsasser, Alan; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry; Lee, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A technique based on accelerating positive nitrogen ions onto an aluminum layer has been demonstrated to be effective in forming thin (<2 nm thick) layers of aluminum nitride (AlN(x)) for use as tunnel barriers in Nb/Al-AlN(x)/Nb superconductor/insulator/ superconductor (SIS) Josephson junctions. AlN(x) is the present material of choice for tunnel barriers because, to a degree greater than that of any other suitable material, it offers the required combination of low leakage current at high current density and greater thermal stability. While ultra-thin AlN films with good thickness and stoichiometry control are easily formed using techniques such as reactive molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, growth temperatures of 900 C are necessary for the dissociative adsorption of nitrogen from either nitrogen (N2) or ammonia (NH3). These growth temperatures are prohibitively high for the formation of tunnel barriers on Nb films because interfacial reactions at temperatures as low as 200 to 300 C degrade device properties. Heretofore, deposition by reactive sputtering and nitridation of thin Al layers with DC and RF nitrogen plasmas have been successfully used to form AlN barriers in SIS junctions. However, precise control over critical current density Jc has proven to be a challenge, as is attaining adequate process reproducibility from system to system. The present ion-beam technique is an alternative to the plasma or reactive sputtering techniques as it provides a highly controlled arrival of reactive species, independent of the electrical conditions of the substrate or vacuum chamber. Independent and accurate control of parameters such as ion energy, flux, species, and direction promises more precise control of film characteristics such as stoichiometry and thickness than is the case with typical plasma processes. In particular, the background pressure during ion-beam nitride growth is 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower, minimizing the formation of

  11. Phenolic resin-based porous carbons for adsorption and energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Nilantha P.

    The main objective of this dissertation research is to develop phenolic resin based carbon materials for range of applications by soft-templating and Stober-like synthesis strategies. Applications Studied in this dissertation are adsorption of CO2, bio-molecular and heavy metal ions, and energy storage devices. Based on that, our goal is to design carbon materials with desired pore structure, high surface area, graphitic domains, incorporated metal nanoparticles, and specific organic groups and heteroatoms. In this dissertation the organic-organic self-assembly of phenolic resins and triblock copolymers under acidic conditions will be used to obtain mesoporous carbons/carbon composites and Stober-like synthesis involving phenolic resins under basic condition will be used to prepare polymer/carbon particles and their composites. The structure of this dissertation consists of an introductory chapter (Chapter 1) discussing the general synthesis of carbon materials, particularly the soft-templating strategy and Stober-like carbon synthesis. Also, Chapter 1 includes a brief outline of applications namely adsorption of CO2, biomolecule and heavy metal ions, and supercapacitors. Chapter 2 discusses the techniques used for characterization of the carbon materials studied. This chapter starts with nitrogen adsorption analysis, which is used to measure the specific surface area, pore volume, distribution of pore sizes, and pore width. In addition to nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution thermogravimetric analysis (HR-TGA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and CHNS elemental analysis (EA) are mentioned too. Chapter 3 is focused on carbon materials for CO2 adsorption. There are different types of porous solid materials such as silicate, MOFs, carbons, and zeolites studied for CO2 adsorption. However, the carbon based materials are considered to be the best candidates for CO 2 adsorption to the industrial point of

  12. Kinetic and geometric isotope effects originating from different adsorption potential energy surfaces: cyclohexane on Rh(111).

    PubMed

    Koitaya, Takanori; Shimizu, Sumera; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Novel isotope effects were observed in desorption kinetics and adsorption geometry of cyclohexane on Rh(111) by the use of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, photoelectron spectroscopy, and spot-profile-analysis low energy electron diffraction. The desorption energy of deuterated cyclohexane (C(6)D(12)) is lower than that of C(6)H(12). In addition, the work function change by adsorbed C(6)D(12) is smaller than that by adsorbed C(6)H(12). These results indicate that C(6)D(12) has a shallower adsorption potential than C(6)H(12) (vertical geometric isotope effect). The lateral geometric isotope effect was also observed in the two-dimensional cyclohexane superstructures as a result of the different repulsive interaction between interfacial dipoles. The observed isotope effects should be ascribed to the quantum nature of hydrogen involved in the C-H···metal interaction.

  13. Identical Binding Energies and Work Functions for Distinct Adsorption Structures: Olympicenes on the Cu(111) Surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Schuler, Bruno; Xu, Yong; Moll, Nikolaj; Meyer, Gerhard; Gross, Leo; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-03-17

    Reliability is one of the major concerns and challenges in designing organic/inorganic interfaces for (opto)electronic applications. Even small structural differences for molecules on substrates can result in a significant variation in the interface functionality, due to the strong correlation between geometry, stability, and electronic structure. Here, we employed state-of-the-art first-principles calculations with van der Waals interactions, in combination with atomic force microscopy experiments, to explore the interaction mechanism for three structurally related olympicene molecules adsorbed on the Cu(111) surface. The substitution of a single atom in the olympicene molecule switches the nature of adsorption from predominantly physisorptive character [olympicene on Cu(111)], to an intermediate state [olympicene-derived ketone on Cu(111)], then to chemisorptive character [olympicene radical on Cu(111)]. Despite the remarkable difference in adsorption structures (by up to 0.9 Å in adsorption height) and different nature of bonding, the olympicene, its ketone, and its radical derivatives have essentially identical binding energies and work functions upon interaction with the metal substrate. Our findings suggest that the stability and work functions of molecular adsorbates could be rendered insensitive to their adsorption structures, which could be a useful property for (opto)electronic applications. PMID:26928143

  14. Barriers to Energy Efficiency and the Uptake of Green Revolving Funds in Canadian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiorano, John; Savan, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the barriers to the implementation of energy efficiency projects in Canadian universities, including access to capital, bounded rationality, hidden costs, imperfect information, risk and split incentives. Methods to address these barriers are investigated, including evaluating the efficacy of…

  15. On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called ``market barriers`` to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland`s attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

  16. On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called market barriers'' to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland's attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

  17. Barriers and opportunities: A review of selected successful energy-efficiency programs

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

    2001-03-20

    In industry, barriers may exist at various points in the decision making process, and in the implementation and management of measures to improve energy efficiency. Barriers may take many forms, and are determined by the business environment and include decision-making processes, energy prices, lack of information, a lack of confidence in the information, or high transaction costs for obtaining reliable information, as well as limited capital availability. Other barriers are the ''invisibility'' of energy efficiency measures and the difficulty of quantifying the impacts, and slow diffusion of innovative technology into markets while firms typically under-invest in R and D, despite the high pay-backs. Various programs try to reduce the barriers to improve the uptake of innovative technologies. A wide array of policies has been used and tested in the industrial sector in industrialized countries, with varying success rates. We review some new approaches to industrial energy efficiency improvement in industrialized countries, focusing on voluntary agreements.

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research supporting Thermal Bypass Air Barrier requirements. Since these were adopted in the 2009 IECC, close to one million homes have been mandated to include this vitally important energy efficiency measure.

  19. Comparative study of fusion barriers using Skyrme interactions and the energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsi, O. N.; Torabi, F.

    2015-12-01

    Using different Skyrme interactions, we have carried out a comparative analysis of fusion barriers for a wide range of interacting nuclei in the framework of semiclassical Skyrme energy density formalism. The results of our calculations reveal that SVI, SII, and SIII Skyrme forces are able to reproduce the empirical values of barrier heights with higher accuracy than the other considered forces in this formalism. It is also shown that the calculated nucleus-nucleus potentials derived from such Skyrme interactions are able to explain the fusion cross sections at energies near and above the barrier.

  20. Energy deposition characteristics of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators: Influence of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, G.; Winkel, R.; Kotsonis, M.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study aimed at the characterization of energy deposition of nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators was carried out. Special attention was given on the effect of the thickness and material used for dielectric barrier. The selected materials for this study were polyimide film (Kapton), polyamide based nylon (PA2200), and silicone rubber. Schlieren measurements were carried out in quiescent air conditions in order to observe density gradients induced by energy deposited. Size of heated area was used to qualify the energy deposition coupled with electrical power measurements performed using the back-current shunt technique. Additionally, light intensity measurements showed a different nature of discharge based upon the material used for barrier, for a fixed thickness and frequency of discharge. Finally, a characterisation study was performed for the three tested materials. Dielectric constant, volume resistivity, and thermal conductivity were measured. Strong trends between the control parameters and the energy deposited into the fluid during the discharge were observed. Results indicate that efficiency of energy deposition mechanism relative to the thickness of the barrier strongly depends upon the material used for the dielectric barrier itself. In general, a high dielectric strength and a low volumetric resistivity are preferred for a barrier, together with a high heat capacitance and a low thermal conductivity coefficient in order to maximize the efficiency of the thermal energy deposition induced by an ns-DBD plasma actuator.

  1. Mesoscale geomorphic change on low energy barrier islands in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. Andrew G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decadal (mesoscale) geomorphic change on sandy barrier islands in the fetch-limited environment of Chesapeake Bay. Low energy barrier islands exist in two settings: on the fringe of marshes and in open water and this analysis shows the various types of barrier island to be genetically related. Barrier islands that face the dominant wind and wave direction (E or W) retreat via barrier translation, preserving the barrier island volume. Those that exist in re-entrants are dominated by longshore transport processes, are strongly affected by sediment supply and are subject to disintegration. Marsh fringe barrier islands are perched on or draped over the surface of the underlying marsh. They migrate landwards via barrier translation during periodic high water events accompanied by large waves (hurricanes and northeasters). The underlying marsh surface erodes under all water levels and the rate of retreat of the barrier island and underlying marsh may take place at different rates, leading to various configurations from perched barrier islands several metres landward of the marsh edge, to barrier islands that have a sandy shoreface extending into the subtidal zone. The coastal configuration during landward retreat of marsh fringe barrier islands is subject to strong local control exerted by the underyling marsh topography. As erosion of marsh promontories occurs and marsh creeks are intersected and bypassed, the configuration is subject to rapid change. Periodic sediment influxes cause spits to develop at re-entrants in the marsh. The spits are initiated as extensions of adjacent marsh fringe barrier islands, but as the sediment volume is finite, the initial drift-aligned spits become sediment-starved and begin to develop a series of swash-aligned cells as they strive for morphodynamic equilibrium. The individual cells are stretched until breaches form in the barrier islands, creating inlets with tidal deltas. At this stage the low

  2. Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    This report presents the key gaps and barriers to implementing residential energy efficiency strategies in the U.S. market, as identified in sessions at the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America 2010 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting held in Denver, Colorado, on July 20-22, 2010.

  3. Energy barriers for point-defect reactions in 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Swaminathan, Narasimhan; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-08-01

    Energy barriers of the key annealing reactions of neutral and charged point defects in SiC are calculated with ab initio density functional theory methods. In order to effectively search for the lowest energy migration paths the preliminary path is first established based on ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. The energy barrier of each hop is then calculated via climbing image nudged elastic band methods for paths guided by the AIMD simulations. The final paths and barriers are determined by comparing different pathways. The annealing reactions have important implications in understanding the amorphization, recovery, and other aspects of the radiation response of SiC. The results are compared with the literature data and experimental results on SiC recovery and amorphization. We propose that the C interstitial and Si antisite annealing reaction may provide a critical barrier that governs both the recovery stage III and amorphization processes.

  4. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland; Perez, Michel

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ˜3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  5. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress.

    PubMed

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S; Morthomas, Julien; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland; Perez, Michel

    2014-07-21

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  6. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Perez, Michel; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland

    2014-07-21

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  7. Energy dependence of the nucleus-nucleus potential close to the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Washiyama, Kouhei; Lacroix, Denis

    2008-08-15

    The nucleus-nucleus interaction potentials in heavy-ion fusion reactions are extracted from the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory for the mass symmetric reactions {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O, {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca, and {sup 48}Ca + {sup 48}Ca and the mass asymmetric reactions {sup 16}O + {sup 40,} {sup 48}Ca, {sup 40}Ca + {sup 48}Ca, {sup 16}O + {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 40}Ca + {sup 90}Zr. When the c.m. energy is much higher than the Coulomb barrier energy, potentials deduced with the microscopic theory identify with the frozen density approximation. As the c.m. energy decreases and approaches the Coulomb barrier, potentials become energy dependent. This dependence indicates dynamical reorganization of internal degrees of freedom and leads to a reduction of the 'apparent' barrier felt by the two nuclei during fusion of the order of 2-3% compared to the frozen density case. Several examples illustrate that the potential landscape changes rapidly when the c.m. energy is in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier energy. The energy dependence is expected to have a significant role on fusion around the Coulomb barrier.

  8. Adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces: site energy distribution functions from Fritz-Schlüender isotherms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kannuchamy Vasanth; Monteiro de Castro, Mateus Carvalho; Martinez-Escandell, Manuel; Molina-Sabio, Miguel; Rodriguez-Reinoso, Francisco

    2010-08-23

    Different site energy distribution functions based on the condensation approximation method are proposed for the liquid-phase or gas-phase adsorption equilibrium data following the Fritz-Schlüender isotherm. Energy distribution functions for the four limiting cases of the Fritz-Schlüender isotherm are also discussed. The proposed models are successfully applied to the experimental equilibrium data of nitrogen molecules at 77 K on a pitch-based activated carbon (PA) and a pitch-based activated carbon containing boron (PBA). An energy distribution function based on FS isotherm containing five parameters suggest a unimodal distribution of binding sites for carbon PA, the binding site energies being distributed as exponential or unimodal, depending on the pressure, in the case of carbon PBA. The advantages of the proposed models are discussed.

  9. Free energy and hidden barriers of the β-sheet structure of prion protein.

    PubMed

    Paz, S Alexis; Abrams, Cameron F

    2015-10-13

    On-the-fly free-energy parametrization is a new collective variable biasing approach akin to metadynamics with one important distinction: rather than acquiring an accelerated distribution via a history-dependent bias potential, sampling on this distribution is achieved from the beginning of the simulation using temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics. In the present work, we compare the performance of both approaches to compute the free-energy profile along a scalar collective variable measuring the H-bond registry of the β-sheet structure of the mouse Prion protein. Both methods agree on the location of the free-energy minimum, but free-energy profiles from well-tempered metadynamics are subject to a much higher degree of statistical noise due to hidden barriers. The sensitivity of metadynamics to hidden barriers is shown to be a consequence of the history dependence of the bias potential, and we detail the nature of these barriers for the prion β-sheet. In contrast, on-the-fly parametrization is much less sensitive to these barriers and thus displays improved convergence behavior relative to that of metadynamics. While hidden barriers are a frequent and central issue in free-energy methods, on-the-fly free-energy parametrization appears to be a robust and preferable method to confront this issue. PMID:26574287

  10. Free energy and hidden barriers of the β-sheet structure of prion protein.

    PubMed

    Paz, S Alexis; Abrams, Cameron F

    2015-10-13

    On-the-fly free-energy parametrization is a new collective variable biasing approach akin to metadynamics with one important distinction: rather than acquiring an accelerated distribution via a history-dependent bias potential, sampling on this distribution is achieved from the beginning of the simulation using temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics. In the present work, we compare the performance of both approaches to compute the free-energy profile along a scalar collective variable measuring the H-bond registry of the β-sheet structure of the mouse Prion protein. Both methods agree on the location of the free-energy minimum, but free-energy profiles from well-tempered metadynamics are subject to a much higher degree of statistical noise due to hidden barriers. The sensitivity of metadynamics to hidden barriers is shown to be a consequence of the history dependence of the bias potential, and we detail the nature of these barriers for the prion β-sheet. In contrast, on-the-fly parametrization is much less sensitive to these barriers and thus displays improved convergence behavior relative to that of metadynamics. While hidden barriers are a frequent and central issue in free-energy methods, on-the-fly free-energy parametrization appears to be a robust and preferable method to confront this issue.

  11. Physical and chemical nature of the scaling relations between adsorption energies of atoms on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Calle-Vallejo, F; Martínez, J I; García-Lastra, J M; Rossmeisl, J; Koper, M T M

    2012-03-16

    Despite their importance in physics and chemistry, the origin and extent of the scaling relations between the energetics of adsorbed species on surfaces remain elusive. We demonstrate here that scalability is not exclusive to adsorbed atoms and their hydrogenated species but rather a general phenomenon between any set of adsorbates bound similarly to the surface. On the example of the near-surface alloys of Pt, we show that scalability is a result of identical variations of adsorption energies with respect to the valence configuration of both the surface components and the adsorbates. PMID:22540492

  12. Necessity of an energy barrier for self-correction of Abelian quantum doubles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kómár, Anna; Landon-Cardinal, Olivier; Temme, Kristan

    2016-05-01

    We rigorously establish an Arrhenius law for the mixing time of quantum doubles based on any Abelian group Zd. We have made the concept of the energy barrier therein mathematically well defined; it is related to the minimum energy cost the environment has to provide to the system in order to produce a generalized Pauli error, maximized for any generalized Pauli errors, not only logical operators. We evaluate this generalized energy barrier in Abelian quantum double models and find it to be a constant independent of system size. Thus, we rule out the possibility of entropic protection for this broad group of models.

  13. Factors Affecting Energy Barriers for Pyramidal Inversion in Amines and Phosphines: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate exercise in computational chemistry that investigates the energy barrier for pyramidal inversion of amines and phosphines is presented. Semiempirical calculations (PM3) of the ground-state and transition-state energies for NR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] and PR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] allow…

  14. Calculation and visualization of free energy barriers for several VOCs and TNT in HKUST-1.

    PubMed

    Sarkisov, Lev

    2012-11-28

    A simple protocol based on a lattice representation of the porous space is proposed to locate and characterize the free energy bottle-necks in rigid metal organic frameworks. As an illustration we apply this method to HKUST-1 to demonstrate that there are impassable free energy barriers for molecules of trinitrotoluene in this structure. PMID:23069936

  15. Financing Projects That Use Clean-Energy Technologies. An Overview of Barriers and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D. P.; McKenna, J. J.; Murphy, L. M.

    2005-10-01

    This technical paper describes the importance of project financing for clean-energy technology deployment. It describes the key challenges in financing clean-energy technology projects, including technical risks, credit worthiness risk, revenue security risk, market competition, scale and related cost, as well as first-steps to overcome those barriers.

  16. Field-dependent energy barriers in Co/CoO core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, P.; Kechrakos, D.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2016-02-01

    We perform atomistic modeling of Co/CoO nanoparticles with a diameter of a few nanometers and realistic values of the exchange and anisotropy parameters in order to study the field-dependent energy barriers under forward and backward reversal of the magnetization. The barriers are extracted from the constrained energy minimization using the integration of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations and the Lagrange multiplier method. We show that the applied field and the interface exchange strength have opposite effects on the values of the energy barriers. In particular, while the backward (forward) energy barrier increases (decreases) linearly with the strength of the interface exchange coupling, it decreases (increases) almost quadratically with the applied magnetic field. Our results are in good agreement with the well-known Meiklejohn-Bean model of exchange bias, and allow us to analyze the limits of applicability of the macrospin approach to the study of energy barriers in core-shell Co/CoO nanoparticles.

  17. Sign preference in ion-induced nucleation: contributions to the free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Keasler, Samuel J; Kim, Hyunmi; Chen, Bin

    2012-11-01

    We have performed a series of computer simulations using the AVUS-HR approach to better understand the origin of the sign preference in ion-induced nucleation. In particular, we emphasize the importance of distinguishing between the total formation free energy of a cluster, and the nucleation free energy, which involves only those steps contributing to the free energy barrier. We have separately considered how the ion-water potential energy, the water-water potential energy, and the entropy contribute to both the cluster formation free energy, and the nucleation free energy. These simulations have shown that while the ion-water potential energies make the largest contribution to the formation free energy difference between positive and negative ions, the entropy is the contribution leading to lower nucleation free energy barriers for negative ions. The primary reason for this is the larger stable (but precritical) clusters formed around negative ions. We have further shown that the distinction between formation and nucleation free energies is of particular importance when comparing small cations with larger anions where the formation free energies can be much lower for the cationic clusters, even though the nucleation barriers are lower for the anionic clusters.

  18. Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Energy Efficient Heat Engines Program

    SciTech Connect

    Katherine Faber

    2004-10-31

    This program aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of the microstructural, mechanical, and chemical properties of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based coatings for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (AS800) substrates and optimize such coatings for environmental barriers. The program consisted of three tasks: processing of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings, phase and microstructural development, and life-limiting phenomena. Northwestern University formed a cross-functional team with Lehigh University, Honeywell Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The major accomplishments are: (1) Conditions for the plasma spray of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and its alloys were optimized to provide maximum density and thickness. (2) Adherent small particle plasma spray coatings of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be routinely prepared. (3) Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be stabilized against its disruptive phase transformation to 1400 C by the addition of one or more oxides of Al, La, and/or Nb. (4) Residual stresses in the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings were measured using X-rays and changed with thermal exposure. (5) Properly doped coatings are more resistant against thermal cycling than undoped coatings, and can be cycled many thousand times without spallation. (6) Water vapor testing in the ORNL Keiser Rig of adherent coatings showed that undoped Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} is not an effective barrier at preventing chemical changes to the AS800. (7) Limited water vapor testing of doped and adherent coatings, which had successfully survived many thermal cycles, showed that in the water vapor environment, de-cohesion may occur.

  19. Energies of the adsorption of functional groups to calcium carbonate polymorphs: the importance of -OH and -COOH groups.

    PubMed

    Okhrimenko, D V; Nissenbaum, J; Andersson, M P; Olsson, M H M; Stipp, S L S

    2013-09-01

    The adsorption behavior of calcium carbonate is an important factor in many processes in nature, industry, and biological systems. We determined and compared the adsorption energies for a series of small molecules of different sizes and polarities (i.e., water, several alcohols, and acetic acid) on three synthetic CaCO3 polymorphs (calcite, aragonite, and vaterite). We measured isosteric heats of adsorption from vapor adsorption isotherms for 273 < T < 293 K, and we used XRD and SEM to confirm that samples did not change phase during the experiments. Density functional calculations and molecular dynamics simulations complemented the experimental results and aided interpretation. Alcohols with molecular mass greater than that of methanol bind more strongly to the calcium carbonate polymorphs than water and acetic acid. The adsorption energies for the alcohols are typical of chemisorption and indicate alcohol displacement of water from calcium carbonate surfaces. This explains why organisms favor biomolecules that contain alcohol functional groups (-OH) to control which polymorph they use, the crystal face and orientation, and the particle shape and size in biomineralization processes. This new insight is also very useful in understanding organic molecule adsorption mechanisms in soils, sediments, and rocks, which is important for predicting the behavior of mineral-fluid interactions when the challenge is to remediate contaminated groundwater aquifers or to produce oil and gas from reservoirs.

  20. Metal-phthalocyanine ordered layers on Au(110): Metal-dependent adsorption energy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimi, Lorenzo Angelucci, Marco; Gargiani, Pierluigi; Betti, Maria Grazia; Montoro, Silvia; Mariani, Carlo

    2014-06-28

    Iron-phthalocyanine and cobalt-phthalocyanine chains, assembled along the Au(110)-(1×2) reconstructed channels, present a strong interaction with the Au metallic states, via the central metal ion. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy from the metal-2p core-levels and valence band high-resolution ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy bring to light signatures of the interaction of the metal-phthalocyanine single-layer with gold. The charge transfer from Au to the molecule causes the emerging of a metal-2p core level component at lower binding energy with respect to that measured in the molecular thin films, while the core-levels associated to the organic macrocycle (C and N 1s) are less influenced by the adsorption, and the macrocycles stabilize the interaction, inducing a strong interface dipole. Temperature Programmed Desorption experiments and photoemission as a function of temperature allow to estimate the adsorption energy for the thin-films, mainly due to the molecule-molecule van der Waals interaction, while the FePc and CoPc single-layers remain adsorbed on the Au surface up to at least 820 K.

  1. The energy barrier at noble metal/TiO{sub 2} junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein-Babaei, F. E-mail: fhbabaei@yahoo.com; Lajvardi, Mehdi M. Alaei-Sheini, Navid

    2015-02-23

    Nobel metal/TiO{sub 2} structures are used as catalysts in chemical reactors, active components in TiO{sub 2}-based electronic devices, and connections between such devices and the outside circuitry. Here, we investigate the energy barrier at the junctions between vacuum-deposited Ag, Au, and Pt thin films and TiO{sub 2} layers by recording their electrical current vs. voltage diagrams and spectra of optical responses. Deposited Au/, Pt/, and Ag/TiO{sub 2} behave like contacts with zero junction energy barriers, but the thermal annealing of the reverse-biased devices for an hour at 523 K in air converts them to Schottky diodes with high junction energy barriers, decreasing their reverse electric currents up to 10{sup 6} times. Similar thermal processing in vacuum or pure argon proved ineffective. The highest energy barrier and the lowest reverse current among the devices examined belong to the annealed Ag/TiO{sub 2} contacts. The observed electronic features are described based on the physicochemical parameters of the constituting materials. The formation of higher junction barriers with rutile than with anatase is demonstrated.

  2. The energy barrier at noble metal/TiO2 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Babaei, F.; Lajvardi, Mehdi M.; Alaei-Sheini, Navid

    2015-02-01

    Nobel metal/TiO2 structures are used as catalysts in chemical reactors, active components in TiO2-based electronic devices, and connections between such devices and the outside circuitry. Here, we investigate the energy barrier at the junctions between vacuum-deposited Ag, Au, and Pt thin films and TiO2 layers by recording their electrical current vs. voltage diagrams and spectra of optical responses. Deposited Au/, Pt/, and Ag/TiO2 behave like contacts with zero junction energy barriers, but the thermal annealing of the reverse-biased devices for an hour at 523 K in air converts them to Schottky diodes with high junction energy barriers, decreasing their reverse electric currents up to 106 times. Similar thermal processing in vacuum or pure argon proved ineffective. The highest energy barrier and the lowest reverse current among the devices examined belong to the annealed Ag/TiO2 contacts. The observed electronic features are described based on the physicochemical parameters of the constituting materials. The formation of higher junction barriers with rutile than with anatase is demonstrated.

  3. Effect of intergranular interactions on thermal energy barrier distribution in perpendicular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Bertram, H. Neal; Schabes, Manfred E.

    2002-05-01

    Micromagnetic simulations have been performed to simulate dynamic hysteresis loops in perpendicular media. Thermal energy barrier distributions have been calculated. For a fixed percentage of magnetization switched, a linear variation between the scaled applied field Ha(t)/HK and ln(f0t)1/2 is found. Without including intergranular magnetostatic interactions, intergranular exchange coupling reduces the thermal energy barrier distribution width, compared to the physical volume distribution width. However, the magnetostatic interactions increase the energy barrier width substantially. The increase is significantly reduced at smaller magnetostatic interactions. For the effective volume of 50% magnetization switched (V50), the results show V50=√ almost independent of intergranular magnetostatic and exchange interactions.

  4. Calculation of free energy barriers to the fusion of small vesicles.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Schick, M

    2008-03-01

    The fusion of small vesicles, either with a planar bilayer or with one another, is studied using a microscopic model in which the bilayers are composed of hexagonal- and lamellar-forming amphiphiles. The free energy of the system is obtained within the self-consistent field approximation. We find that the free energy barrier to form the initial stalk is hardly affected by the radius of the vesicle, but that the barrier to expand the hemifusion diaphragm and form a fusion pore decreases rapidly as the radius decreases. As a consequence, once the initial barrier to stalk formation is overcome, one which we estimate at 13 k(B)T for biological membranes, fusion involving small vesicles should proceed with little or no further input of energy.

  5. Analyzing Barriers to Energy Conservation in Residences and Offices: The Rewire Program at the University of Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Leah C.; Mildenberger, Matto; Savan, Beth; Kolenda, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Conducting a barriers analysis is an important first step when designing proenvironmental behavior change interventions. Yet, detailed information on common barriers to energy conservation campaigns remains unavailable. Using a pair of original surveys, we leverage the theory of planned behavior to report on the most important barriers for…

  6. Direct measurement of free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Frank G.

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to measure the free-energy barrier W(sup *), the activation energy, and activation entropy to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous solids, independent of the energy barrier to growth. The method allows one to determine the temperature dependence of W(sup *), and the effect of the preparation conditions of the initial amorphous phase, the dopants, and the crystallization methds on W(sup *). The method is applied to determine the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. For thermally induced nucleation in a-Si thin films with annealing temperatures in the range of from 824 to 983 K, the free-energy barrier W(sup *) to nucleation of silicon crystals is about 2.0 - 2.1 eV regardless of the preparation conditions of the films. The observation supports the idea that a-Si transforms into an intermediate amorphous state through the structural relaxation prior to the onset of nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. The observation also indicates that the activation entropy may be an insignificant part of the free-energy barrier for the nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. Compared with the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in undoped a-Si films, a significant reduction is observed in the free-energy barrier to nucleation in Cu-doped a-Si films. For a-Si under irradiation of Xe(2+) at 10(exp 5) eV, the free-energy barrier to ion-induced nucleation of crystallites is shown to be about half of the value associated with thermal-induced nucleation of crystallites in a-Si under the otherwise same conditions, which is much more significant than previously expected. The present method has a general kinetic basis; it thus should be equally applicable to nucleation of crystallites in any amorphous elemental semiconductors and semiconductor alloys, metallic and polymeric glasses, and to nucleation of crystallites in melts and solutions.

  7. Measurement of the adsorption energy difference between ortho- and para-D2 on an amorphous ice surface.

    PubMed

    Amiaud, L; Momeni, A; Dulieu, F; Fillion, J H; Matar, E; Lemaire, J-L

    2008-02-01

    Molecular hydrogen interaction on water ice surfaces is a major process taking place in interstellar dense clouds. By coupling laser detection and classical thermal desorption spectroscopy, it is possible to study the effect of rotation of D(2) on adsorption on amorphous solid water ice surfaces. The desorption profiles of ortho- and para-D(2) are different. This difference is due to a shift in the adsorption energy distribution of the two lowest rotational states. Molecules in J''=1 rotational state are on average more strongly bound to the ice surface than those in J''=0 rotational state. This energy difference is estimated to be 1.4+/-0.3 meV. This value is in agreement with previous calculation and interpretation. The nonspherical wave function J'' =1 has an interaction with the asymmetric part of the adsorption potential and contributes positively in the binding energy.

  8. Finessing the fracture energy barrier in ballistic seed dispersal.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Robert D

    2012-04-01

    Fracture is a highly dissipative process in which much of the stored elastic energy is consumed in the creation of new surfaces. Surprisingly, many plants use fracture to launch their seeds despite its seemingly prohibitive energy cost. Here we use Impatiens glandulifera as model case to study the impact of fracture on a plant's throwing capacity. I. glandulifera launches its seeds with speeds up to 4 m/s using cracks to trigger an explosive release of stored elastic energy. We find that the seed pod is optimally designed to minimize the cost of fracture. These characteristics may account for its success at invading Europe and North America. PMID:22431608

  9. Elastic scattering of {sup 9}Li on {sup 208}Pb at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Cubero, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Lay, J. A.; Moro, A. M.; Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Tengblad, O.; Buchmann, L.; Shotter, A.; Walden, P.; Diget, D. G.; Fulton, B.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Mukha, I.

    2011-10-28

    We have studied the dynamical effects of the halo structure of {sup 11}Li on the scattering on heavy targets at energies around the Coulomb barrier. This experiment was performed at ISAC-II at TRIUMF with a world record in production of the post-accelerated {sup 11}Li beam. As part of this study we report here on the first measurement of the elastic cross section of the core nucleus, i.e. {sup 9}Li on {sup 208}Pb, at energies around the Coulomb barrier. A preliminary optical model analysis has been performed in order to extract a global optical potential to describe the measured angular distributions.

  10. Adsorption of Organic Compounds to Diesel Soot: Frontal Analysis and Polyparameter Linear Free-Energy Relationship.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; MacFarlane, John K; Gschwend, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Black carbons (BCs) dominate the sorption of many hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in soils and sediments, thereby reducing the HOCs' mobilities and bioavailabilities. However, we do not have data for diverse HOCs' sorption to BC because it is time-consuming and labor-intensive to obtain isotherms on soot and other BCs. In this study, we developed a frontal analysis chromatographic method to investigate the adsorption of 21 organic compounds with diverse functional groups to NIST diesel soot. This method was precise and time-efficient, typically taking only a few hours to obtain an isotherm. Based on 102 soot-carbon normalized sorption coefficients (KsootC) acquired at different sorbate concentrations, a sorbate-activity-dependent polyparameter linear free-energy relationship was established: logKsootC = (3.74 ± 0.11)V + ((-0.35 ± 0.02)log ai)E + (-0.62 ± 0.10)A + (-3.35 ± 0.11)B + (-1.45 ± 0.09); (N = 102, R(2) = 0.96, SE = 0.18), where V, E, A, and B are the sorbate's McGowan's characteristic volume, excess molar refraction, and hydrogen acidity and basicity, respectively; and ai is the sorbate's aqueous activity reflecting the system's approach to saturation. The difference in dispersive interactions with the soot versus with the water was the dominant factor encouraging adsorption, and H-bonding interactions discouraged this process. Using this relationship, soot-water and sediment-water or soil-water adsorption coefficients of HOCs of interest (PAHs and PCBs) were estimated and compared with the results reported in the literature. PMID:26587648

  11. Technical Barriers, Gaps, and Opportunities Related to Home Energy Upgrade Market Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, M. V. A.

    2011-11-01

    This report outlines the technical barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program. The objective of this report is to outline the technical1 barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program. This information will be used to provide guidance for new research necessary to enable the success of the approaches. Investigation for this report was conducted via publications related to home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, and a series of interviews with subject matter experts (contractors, consultants, program managers, manufacturers, trade organization representatives, and real estate agents). These experts specified technical barriers and gaps, and offered suggestions for how the technical community might address them. The potential benefits of home energy upgrades are many and varied: reduced energy use and costs; improved comfort, durability, and safety; increased property value; and job creation. Nevertheless, home energy upgrades do not comprise a large part of the overall home improvement market. Residential energy efficiency is the most complex climate intervention option to deliver because the market failures are many and transaction costs are high (Climate Change Capital 2009). The key reasons that energy efficiency investment is not being delivered are: (1) The opportunity is highly fragmented; and (2) The energy efficiency assets are nonstatus, low-visibility investments that are not properly valued. There are significant barriers to mobilizing the investment in home energy upgrades, including the 'hassle factor' (the time and effort required to identify and secure improvement works), access to financing, and the opportunity cost of

  12. Chemically accurate energy barriers of small gas molecules moving through hexagonal water rings.

    PubMed

    Hjertenæs, Eirik; Trinh, Thuat T; Koch, Henrik

    2016-07-21

    We present chemically accurate potential energy curves of CH4, CO2 and H2 moving through hexagonal water rings, calculated by CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ with counterpoise correction. The barriers are extracted from a potential energy surface obtained by allowing the water ring to expand while the gas molecule diffuses through. State-of-the-art XC-functionals are evaluated against the CCSD(T) potential energy surface.

  13. Removing the barrier to the calculation of activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesele, Oluwaseun O.; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-10-01

    Approaches for directly calculating the activation energy for a chemical reaction from a simulation at a single temperature are explored with applications to both classical and quantum systems. The activation energy is obtained from a time correlation function that can be evaluated from the same molecular dynamics trajectories or quantum dynamics used to evaluate the rate constant itself and thus requires essentially no extra computational work.

  14. Estimation of protein folding free energy barriers from calorimetric data by multi-model Bayesian analysis.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Athi N; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Muñoz, Victor; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2011-10-14

    The realization that folding free energy barriers can be small enough to result in significant population of the species at the barrier top has sprouted in several methods to estimate folding barriers from equilibrium experiments. Some of these approaches are based on fitting the experimental thermogram measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to a one-dimensional representation of the folding free-energy surface (FES). Different physical models have been used to represent the FES: (1) a Landau quartic polynomial as a function of the total enthalpy, which acts as an order parameter; (2) the projection onto a structural order parameter (i.e. number of native residues or native contacts) of the free energy of all the conformations generated by Ising-like statistical mechanical models; and (3) mean-field models that define conformational entropy and stabilization energy as functions of a continuous local order parameter. The fundamental question that emerges is how can we obtain robust, model-independent estimates of the thermodynamic folding barrier from the analysis of DSC experiments. Here we address this issue by comparing the performance of various FES models in interpreting the thermogram of a protein with a marginal folding barrier. We chose the small α-helical protein PDD, which folds-unfolds in microseconds crossing a free energy barrier previously estimated as ~1 RT. The fits of the PDD thermogram to the various models and assumptions produce FES with a consistently small free energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded ensembles. However, the fits vary in quality as well as in the estimated barrier. Applying Bayesian probabilistic analysis we rank the fit performance using a statistically rigorous criterion that leads to a global estimate of the folding barrier and its precision, which for PDD is 1.3 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1). This result confirms that PDD folds over a minor barrier consistent with the downhill folding regime. We have further

  15. State Successes: Using Outreach and Eduction to Transcend Barriers to Wind Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.; Flowers, L.

    2010-05-01

    Many states projected to contribute significantly to the United States' 20% wind energy by 2030 goal have not yet achieved a first wind farm, and many more have not yet hit the 100-MW mark. These states are struggling with basic barriers of the need for understanding of the wind resource; wind energy benefits and impacts; economic development, water, and carbon impacts; issues such as transmission, utility integration, siting, and wildlife; involvement of key constituents such as the electrical sector, the ag sector, and county commissioners; effective policy; and an educated public and an educated workforce. Other states have partially transcended these barriers and are encountering organized pushback; NIMBYism; siting problems such as zoning, permitting, and environmental issues; and interstate barriers such as transmission.

  16. Ab initio calculations of free-energy reaction barriers.

    PubMed

    Bucko, T

    2008-02-13

    The theoretical description of chemical reactions was until recently limited to a 'static' approach in which important parameters such as the rate constant are deduced from the local topology of the potential energy surface close to minima and saddle points. Such an approach has, however, serious limitations. The growing computational power allows us now to use advanced simulation techniques to determine entropic effects accurately for medium-sized systems at ab initio level. Recently, we have implemented free-energy simulation techniques based on molecular dynamics, in particular on the blue-moon ensemble technique and on metadynamics, in the popular DFT code VASP. In the thermodynamic integration (blue-moon ensemble) technique, the free-energy profile is calculated as the path integral over the restoring forces along a parametrized reaction coordinate. In metadynamics, an image of the free-energy surface is constructed on the fly during the simulation by adding small repulsive Gaussian-shaped hills to the Lagrangian driving the dynamics. The two methods are tested on a simple chemical reaction-the nucleophilic substitution of methyl chloride by a chlorine anion.

  17. Ab initio calculations of free-energy reaction barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucko, T.

    2008-02-01

    The theoretical description of chemical reactions was until recently limited to a 'static' approach in which important parameters such as the rate constant are deduced from the local topology of the potential energy surface close to minima and saddle points. Such an approach has, however, serious limitations. The growing computational power allows us now to use advanced simulation techniques to determine entropic effects accurately for medium-sized systems at ab initio level. Recently, we have implemented free-energy simulation techniques based on molecular dynamics, in particular on the blue-moon ensemble technique and on metadynamics, in the popular DFT code VASP. In the thermodynamic integration (blue-moon ensemble) technique, the free-energy profile is calculated as the path integral over the restoring forces along a parametrized reaction coordinate. In metadynamics, an image of the free-energy surface is constructed on the fly during the simulation by adding small repulsive Gaussian-shaped hills to the Lagrangian driving the dynamics. The two methods are tested on a simple chemical reaction—the nucleophilic substitution of methyl chloride by a chlorine anion.

  18. Analysis of the barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Thomas Elisha

    Native American lands have significant renewable energy resource potential that could serve to ensure energy security and a low carbon energy future for the benefit of tribes as well as the United States. Economic and energy development needs in Native American communities match the energy potential. A disproportionate amount of Native American households have no access to electricity, which is correlated with high poverty and unemployment rates. Despite the vast resources and need for energy, the potential for renewable energy development has not fully materialized. This research explores this subject through three separate articles: 1) a case study of the Navajo Nation that suggests economic viability is not the only significant factor for low adoption of renewable energy on Navajo lands; 2) an expert elicitation of tribal renewable energy experts of what they view as barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands; and 3) a reevaluation of Native Nation Building Theory to include external forces and the role that inter-tribal collaboration plays with renewable energy development by Native nations. Major findings from this research suggests that 1) many Native nations lack the technical and legal capacity to develop renewable energy; 2) inter-tribal collaboration can provide opportunities for sharing resources and building technical, legal, and political capacity; and 3) financing and funding remains a considerable barrier to renewable energy development on tribal lands.

  19. Energy efficiency in surmounting the central energy barrier: a quantum dynamics study of the OH + CH3 → O + CH4 reaction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Pengxiu; Meng, Fanbin; Wang, Yuping; Wang, Dunyou

    2015-02-21

    The present quantum dynamics study of the OH + CH3 shows that, for this "central" (slightly early) barrier reaction, it is the vibrational energy of the reactant OH that is more effective in promoting the reactivity than the translational energy; while previous studies show that, for its forward reaction O + CH4 also with a "central" (slightly late) barrier, it is the translational energy that is more effective in surmounting the energy barrier than the vibrational energy. Since both barriers deviate only slightly from the center of the potential energy surface, these findings indicate that for these two reactions with more-or-less central barriers, a small change of the barrier location can greatly affect which energy form determines the reaction reactivity. This study also shows that both the rotational excitation states of OH and CH3 hinder the reactivity.

  20. Estimating free-energy barrier heights for an ultrafast folding protein from calorimetric and kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Henry, Eric R; Kubelka, Jan; Hofrichter, James; Muñoz, Victor; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Eaton, William A

    2008-05-15

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the temperature dependence of the absolute heat capacity of the 35-residue subdomain of the villin headpiece, a protein that folds in 5 mus and is therefore assumed to have a small free-energy barrier separating folded and unfolded states. To obtain an estimate of the barrier height from the calorimetric data, two models, a variable-barrier model and an Ising-like model, were used to fit the heat capacity in excess of the folded state over the temperature range 15-125 degrees C. The variable-barrier model is based on an empirical mathematical form for the density of states, with four adjustable parameters and the enthalpy (H) as a reaction coordinate. The Ising-like model is based on the inter-residue contact map of the X-ray structure with exact enumeration of approximately 10(5) possible conformations, with two adjustable parameters in the partition function, and either the fraction of native contacts (Q) or the number of ordered residues (P) as reaction coordinates. The variable-barrier model provides an excellent fit to the data and yields a barrier height at the folding temperature ranging from 0.4 to 1.1 kcal mol(-1), while the Ising-like model provides a less good fit and yields barrier heights of 2.3 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) and 2.1 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) for the Q and P reaction coordinates, respectively. In both models, the barrier to folding increases with increasing temperature. Assuming a sufficiently large activation energy for diffusion on the free-energy surfaces, both models are consistent with the observation of a temperature-independent folding rate in previously published laser temperature-jump experiments. Analysis of this kinetic data, using an approximate form for the pre-exponential factor of Kramers theory and the 70 ns relaxation time for the fast phase that precedes the unfolding/refolding relaxation to determine the diffusion coefficient, results in a barrier height of 1.6 +/- 0.3 kcal mol

  1. Energy Savings Certificate Markets: Opportunities and Implementation Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, B.; Bird, L.; Barbose, G.

    2009-07-01

    Early experiences with energy savings certificates (ESCs) have revealed their merits and the challenges associated with them. While in the United States ESC markets have yet to gain significant traction, lessons can be drawn from early experiences in the states of Connecticut and New York, as well as from established markets in Italy, France, and elsewhere. The staying power of European examples demonstrates that ESCs can help initiate more efficiency projects. This article compares ESCs with renewable energy certificates (RECs), looks at the unique opportunities and challenges they present, and reviews solutions and best practices demonstrated by early ESC markets. Three major potential ESC market types are also reviewed: compliance, voluntary, and carbon. Additionally, factors that will benefit ESC markets in the United States are examined: new state EEPS policies, public interest in tools to mitigate climate change, and the growing interest in a voluntary market for ESCs.

  2. Consistent energy barrier distributions in magnetic particle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslett, O.; Ruta, S.; Chantrell, R. W.; Barker, J.; Friedman, G.; Hovorka, O.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate long-time thermal activation behaviour in magnetic particle chains of variable length. Chains are modelled as Stoner-Wohlfarth particles coupled by dipolar interactions. Thermal activation is described as a hopping process over a multidimensional energy landscape using the discrete orientation model limit of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics. The underlying master equation is solved by diagonalising the associated transition matrix, which allows the evaluation of distributions of time scales of intrinsic thermal activation modes and their energy representation. It is shown that as a result of the interaction dependence of these distributions, increasing the particle chain length can lead to acceleration or deceleration of the overall relaxation process depending on the initialisation procedure.

  3. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A. E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S–C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  4. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  5. Adsorption energies for a nanoporous carbon from gas-solid chromatography and molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rybolt, Thomas R; Ziegler, Katherine A; Thomas, Howard E; Boyd, Jennifer L; Ridgeway, Mark E

    2006-04-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to obtain second gas-solid virial coefficients, B2s, in the temperature range 342-613 K for methane, ethane, propane, butane, 2-methylpropane, chloromethane, chlorodifluoromethane, dichloromethane, and dichlorodifluoromethane. The adsorbent used was Carbosieve S-III (Supelco), a carbon powder with fairly uniform, predominately 0.55 nm slit width pores and a N2 BET surface area of 995 m2/g. The temperature dependence of B2s was used to determine experimental values of the gas-solid interaction energy, E*, for each of these molecular adsorbates. MM2 and MM3 molecular mechanics calculations were used to determine the gas-solid interaction energy, E*(cal), for each of the molecules on various flat and nanoporous model surfaces. The flat model consisted of three parallel graphene layers with each graphene layer containing 127 interconnected benzene rings. The nanoporous model consisted of two sets of three parallel graphene layers adjacent to one another but separated to represent the pore diameter. A variety of calculated adsorption energies, E*(cal), were compared and correlated to the experimental E* values. It was determined that simple molecular mechanics could be used to calculate an attraction energy parameter between an adsorbed molecule and the carbon surface. The best correlation between the E*(cal) and E* values was provided by a 0.50 nm nanoporous model using MM2 parameters.

  6. Universal Pinning Energy Barrier for Driven Domain Walls in Thin Ferromagnetic Films.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, V; Mougin, A; Bustingorry, S; Savero Torres, W; Gorchon, J; Kolton, A B; Lemaître, A; Jamet, J-P

    2016-07-29

    We report a comparative study of magnetic field driven domain wall motion in thin films made of different magnetic materials for a wide range of field and temperature. The full thermally activated creep motion, observed below the depinning threshold, is shown to be described by a unique universal energy barrier function. Our findings should be relevant for other systems whose dynamics can be modeled by elastic interfaces moving on disordered energy landscapes. PMID:27517790

  7. Efficiency of an electrostatic barrier in an electron beam energy recuperator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapa, A. N.

    1993-06-01

    The efficiency of an intense electron beam energy recuperator with a potential minimum is analyzed. The value of "an electrostatic barrier perveance" is shown to be characteristic of the potential minimum efficiency. The optimum condition for an three-electrode recuperator are formulated. Two recuperators with different geometries of the electrodes, which form an electrostatic barrier, are compared experimentally. The first geometry is optimal, the second one coincides with that used on the LEAR electron cooling device. For high magnitudes of the collector perveance, a four-electrode recuperator is suggested.

  8. Probing the fusion of 7Li with 64Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Md. Moin; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Nanal, V.; Pal, S.; Shrivastava, A.; Saha, S.; Pillay, R. G.

    2016-04-01

    Background: The stable isotopes of Li, 6Li6 and 7Li, have two-body cluster structures of α +d and α +t with α -separation energies or breakup thresholds at 1.47 and 2.47 MeV, respectively. The weak binding of these projectiles introduces several new reaction channels not usually observed in the case of strongly bound projectiles. The impact of these breakup or breakup-like reaction channels on fusion, the dominant reaction process at near-barrier energies, with different target masses is of current interest. Purpose: Our purpose is to explore the fusion, at above and below the Coulmb barrier, of 7Li with 64Ni target in order to understand the effect of breakup or breakup-like processes with medium-mass target in comparison with 6Li, which has a lower breakup threshold. Measurement: The total fusion (TF) excitation of the weakly bound projectile 7Li with the medium-mass target 64Ni has been measured at the near-barrier energies (0.8 to 2 VB). The measurement was performed using the online characteristic γ -ray detection method. The complete fusion (CF) excitation function for the system was obtained using the x n -evaporation channels with the help of statistical model predictions. Results: At the above barrier energies CF cross sections exhibit an average suppression of about 6.5% compared to the one-dimensional barrier penetration model (1DBPM) predictions, while the model describes the measured TF cross section well. But below the barrier, both TF and CF show enhancements compared to 1DBPM predictions. Unlike 6Li, enhancement of CF for 7Li could not be explained by inelastic coupling alone. Conclusion: Whereas the σTF cross sections are almost the same for both the systems in the above barrier region, the suppression of σCF at above the barrier is less for the 7Li+64Ni system than for the 6+64Ni system. Also direct cluster transfer has been identified as the probable source for producing large enhancement in TF cross sections.

  9. Direct measurement of energy barriers on rough and heterogeneous solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, T.B.; LaGow, J.; Connelly, G.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper will deal with the phenomenon of energy barriers to the spread of liquids on solids. These barriers often manifest themselves as a {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} of a sessile drop as liquid is added to it. That is, the volume of the drop increases, but the diameter does not. Thus the advancing contact angle ({theta}{sub a}) increases to a maximum. At the point where the hydrostatic pressure in the drop overcomes the {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} force the diameter suddenly increases and the drop relaxes to a metastable configuration which has a lower {theta}{sub a}. Energy barriers should be considered in many applications such as the spreading of liquid adhesives where thorough wetting is the goal. The interfacial forces involved are both long-range Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) forces and short-range acid-base (AB) forces. The authors will describe how they measure the energy barriers on real surfaces directly and resolve them into their LW and AB components.

  10. Overcoming Codes and Standards Barriers to Innovations in Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Pamala C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2015-02-15

    In this journal article, the authors discuss approaches to overcoming building code barriers to energy-efficiency innovations in home construction. Building codes have been a highly motivational force for increasing the energy efficiency of new homes in the United States in recent years. But as quickly as the codes seem to be changing, new products are coming to the market at an even more rapid pace, sometimes offering approaches and construction techniques unthought of when the current code was first proposed, which might have been several years before its adoption by various jurisdictions. Due to this delay, the codes themselves can become barriers to innovations that might otherwise be helping to further increase the efficiency, comfort, health or durability of new homes. . The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America, a program dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of America’s housing stock through research and education, is working with the U.S. housing industry through its research teams to help builders identify and remove code barriers to innovation in the home construction industry. The article addresses several approaches that builders use to achieve approval for innovative building techniques when code barriers appear to exist.

  11. Unstable modes in supercooled and normal liquids: Density of states, energy barriers, and self-diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, T.

    1994-09-01

    The unstable mode density of states <ρu(ω;T)> is obtained from computer simulation and is analyzed, theoretically and empirically, over a broad range of supercooled and normal liquid temperatures in the unit density Lennard-Jones liquid. The functional form of <ρu(ω;T)> is determined and the ω, T dependence is seen to be consistent with a theory given by us previously. The parameters in the theory are determined and are related to the topological features of the potential energy surface in the configuration space; it appears that diffusion involves a low degree of cooperativity at all but the lowest temperatures. It is shown that analysis of <ρu(ω;T)> yields considerable information about the energy barriers to diffusion, namely, a characteristic ω-dependent energy and the distribution of barrier heights, gν(E). The improved description of <ρu(ω;T)> obtained in the paper is used to implement normal mode theory of the self-diffusion constant D(T) with no undetermined constants; agreement with simulation in the supercooled liquid is excellent. Use of a lower frequency cutoff on the contribution of unstable modes to diffusion, in an attempt to remove spurious contributions from anharmonicities unrelated to barrier crossing, yields the Zwanzig-Bassler temperature dependence for D(T). It is argued that the distribution of barriers plays a crucial role in determining the T dependence of the self-diffusion constant.

  12. Market barriers to energy efficiency: A critical reappraisal of the rationale for public policies to promote energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Golove, W.H.; Eto, J.H.

    1996-03-01

    This report reviews current perspectives on market barriers to energy efficiency. Ratepayer-funded utility energy-efficiency programs are likely to change in scope, size, and nature as the deregulation process proceeds; the authors research focuses on understanding to what extent some form of future intervention may be warranted and how they might judge the success of particular interventions, especially those funded by ratepayers. They find that challenges to the existence of market barriers have, for the most part, failed to provide a testable alternative explanation for evidence suggesting that there is a substantial ``efficiency gap`` between a consumer`s actual investments in energy efficiency and those that appear to be in the consumer`s own interest. They then suggest that differences of opinion about the appropriateness of public policies stem not from disputes about whether market barriers exist, but from different perceptions of the magnitude of the barriers, and the efficacy and (possibly unintended) consequences of policies designed to overcome them. They conclude that there are compelling justifications for future energy-efficiency policies. Nevertheless, in order to succeed, they must be based on a sound understanding of the market problems they seek to correct and a realistic assessment of their likely efficacy. This understanding can only emerge from detailed investigations of the current operation of individual markets.

  13. Current-induced changes of migration energy barriers in graphene and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obodo, J. T.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-05-01

    An electron current can move atoms in a nanoscale device with important consequences for the device operation and breakdown. We perform first principles calculations aimed at evaluating the possibility of changing the energy barriers for atom migration in carbon-based systems. In particular, we consider the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although the current-induced forces are large for both the systems, in graphene the force component along the migration path is small and therefore the barrier height is little affected by the current flow. In contrast, the same barrier is significantly reduced in carbon nanotubes as the current increases. Our work also provides a real-system numerical demonstration that current-induced forces within density functional theory are non-conservative.An electron current can move atoms in a nanoscale device with important consequences for the device operation and breakdown. We perform first principles calculations aimed at evaluating the possibility of changing the energy barriers for atom migration in carbon-based systems. In particular, we consider the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although the current-induced forces are large for both the systems, in graphene the force component along the migration path is small and therefore the barrier height is little affected by the current flow. In contrast, the same barrier is significantly reduced in carbon nanotubes as the current increases. Our work also provides a real-system numerical demonstration that current-induced forces within density functional theory are non-conservative. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR00534A

  14. Free energy barrier for dissociation of the guanosine monophosphate anion in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornetta, Lucas M.; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio; Varella, Márcio T. do N.

    2016-08-01

    We report free energy barriers for the ground-state dissociation of the guanosine nucleotide anion in solution, employing implicit and explicit solvation models. The latter was based on the Free Energy Perturbation technique and Monte Carlo simulations. For the lowest-energy structure, both solvation models indicate a solvent-induced transition from a dipole-bound state in the gas phase to a π∗ valence state in solution. The free barrier estimates obtained from explicit and implicit solvation are in fair agreement with each other, although significantly overestimated in comparison to a previously reported explicit solvation model based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Accounting for corrections related to the different DFT functionals used in the present and previous studies significantly improves the agreement. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  15. Energy dependent sticking coefficients of trimethylamine on Si(001)-Influence of the datively bonded intermediate state on the adsorption dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipponer, M. A.; Reutzel, M.; Dürr, M.; Höfer, U.

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption dynamics of the datively bonded trimethylamine (TMA) on Si(001) was investigated by means of molecular beam techniques. The initial sticking probability s0 of TMA on Si(001) was measured as a function of kinetic energy at two different surface temperatures (230 and 550 K). At given surface temperature, s0 was found to decrease with increasing kinetic energy (0.1 to 0.6 eV) indicating a non-activated reaction channel. At increased surface temperature, s0 is reduced due to the onset of desorption into the gas phase. The energy dependence of s0 is compared to the results for the adsorption of tetrahydrofuran (THF) on Si(001), which reacts via a datively bonded intermediate into a covalently bound final state. As s0 follows the same energy dependence both for TMA and THF, the datively bonded intermediate state is concluded to dominate the reaction dynamics in the latter case as well.

  16. Potential of mean force calculation of the free energy of adsorption of Type I winter flounder antifreeze protein on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Keith; Alan Salter, E.; Wesley Edmunds, R.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej

    2010-04-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that inhibit ice growth without changing the melting point of ice. In this work, we study the detailed molecular mechanism of interactions between the hydrophobic side of the winter flounder (WF) AFP and two mutants, AAAA and SSSS, in which threonine residues are substituted by serines and alanines, respectively. Umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations of the separation of the proteins from the (2 0 1) surface in an explicit water box is carried out to calculate the potential of mean force free energies of adsorption using AMBER10i. We estimate wild-type WF's free energy of adsorption to ice to be about -12.0 kcal/mol. Gas-phase pseudopotential plane-wave calculations of methane adsorption onto select surfaces of ice are also carried out under periodic boundary conditions to address the possible enthalpic role of WF's methyl groups in binding. The contributions of hydrophobic residues to the free energy of adsorption are discussed.

  17. Opportunities and barriers for a crop-based energy sector in Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klupfel, Ellen Joanne

    This study investigates the existing opportunities and barriers for expanding the crop-based energy sector in Ontario. The investigation takes place at a time when growing concerns about sustainability---environmental, social, and economic---are encouraging the exploration of alternatives to energy systems based on fossil fuels, and concerns around the future viability of rural communities are making agriculturally-based and rural-based energy production systems attractive to many. To explore opportunities and barriers for the crop-based energy sector, this thesis addresses the question: What is the political-economic context within which the crop-based energy sector operates in Ontario? Taking an institutional approach, the study involved 26 interviews with individuals whose organizations influence Ontario's crop-based energy sector (that includes the biofuels ethanol and biodiesel), developed a model outlining relationships between the crop-based energy sector and other sectors of the economy, as well as the state, and implemented a survey of Ontario Members of Provincial Parliament's perspectives on biofuels. This research examines the balance of power of knowledge, production, security, finance, and technology for Ontario's crop-based energy sector. The overall balance of power currently rests with the petroleum sector. Through force field analysis, the study also identifies the key opportunities and barriers for the growth and development of the biofuels sector. These opportunities include climate change and rural development agendas, and the barriers include the petroleum sector, cost of production, and some sectors of the state. A few overarching conclusions emerge from this research: (1) Change in Ontario's crop-based energy sector is driven foremost by political and economic forces; (2) Climate change is the most significant driving force for the development and expansion of Ontario's crop-based energy sector; (3) Production cost and resistance from the

  18. Adsorption energies of poly(ethylene oxide)-based surfactants and nanoparticles on an air-water surface.

    PubMed

    Zell, Zachary A; Isa, Lucio; Ilg, Patrick; Leal, L Gary; Squires, Todd M

    2014-01-14

    The self-assembly of polymer-based surfactants and nanoparticles on fluid-fluid interfaces is central to many applications, including dispersion stabilization, creation of novel 2D materials, and surface patterning. Very often these processes involve compressing interfacial monolayers of particles or polymers to obtain a desired material microstructure. At high surface pressures, however, even highly interfacially active objects can desorb from the interface. Methods of directly measuring the energy which keeps the polymer or particles bound to the interface (adsorption/desorption energies) are therefore of high interest for these processes. Moreover, though a geometric description linking adsorption energy and wetting properties through the definition of a contact angle can be established for rigid nano- or microparticles, such a description breaks down for deformable or aggregating objects. Here, we demonstrate a technique to quantify desorption energies directly, by comparing surface pressure-density compression measurements using a Wilhelmy plate and a custom-microfabricated deflection tensiometer. We focus on poly(ethylene oxide)-based polymers and nanoparticles. For PEO-based homo- and copolymers, the adsorption energy of PEO chains scales linearly with molecular weight and can be tuned by changing the subphase composition. Moreover, the desorption surface pressure of PEO-stabilized nanoparticles corresponds to the saturation surface pressure for spontaneously adsorbed monolayers, yielding trapping energies of ∼10(3) k(B)T. PMID:24328531

  19. Calculating Transition Energy Barriers and Characterizing Activation States for Steps of Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ryham, Rolf J; Klotz, Thomas S; Yao, Lihan; Cohen, Fredric S

    2016-03-01

    We use continuum mechanics to calculate an entire least energy pathway of membrane fusion, from stalk formation, to pore creation, and through fusion pore enlargement. The model assumes that each structure in the pathway is axially symmetric. The static continuum stalk structure agrees quantitatively with experimental stalk architecture. Calculations show that in a stalk, the distal monolayer is stretched and the stored stretching energy is significantly less than the tilt energy of an unstretched distal monolayer. The string method is used to determine the energy of the transition barriers that separate intermediate states and the dynamics of two bilayers as they pass through them. Hemifusion requires a small amount of energy independently of lipid composition, while direct transition from a stalk to a fusion pore without a hemifusion intermediate is highly improbable. Hemifusion diaphragm expansion is spontaneous for distal monolayers containing at least two lipid components, given sufficiently negative diaphragm spontaneous curvature. Conversely, diaphragms formed from single-component distal monolayers do not expand without the continual injection of energy. We identify a diaphragm radius, below which central pore expansion is spontaneous. For larger diaphragms, prior studies have shown that pore expansion is not axisymmetric, and here our calculations supply an upper bound for the energy of the barrier against pore formation. The major energy-requiring deformations in the steps of fusion are: widening of a hydrophobic fissure in bilayers for stalk formation, splay within the expanding hemifusion diaphragm, and fissure widening initiating pore formation in a hemifusion diaphragm.

  20. Calculating Transition Energy Barriers and Characterizing Activation States for Steps of Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ryham, Rolf J; Klotz, Thomas S; Yao, Lihan; Cohen, Fredric S

    2016-03-01

    We use continuum mechanics to calculate an entire least energy pathway of membrane fusion, from stalk formation, to pore creation, and through fusion pore enlargement. The model assumes that each structure in the pathway is axially symmetric. The static continuum stalk structure agrees quantitatively with experimental stalk architecture. Calculations show that in a stalk, the distal monolayer is stretched and the stored stretching energy is significantly less than the tilt energy of an unstretched distal monolayer. The string method is used to determine the energy of the transition barriers that separate intermediate states and the dynamics of two bilayers as they pass through them. Hemifusion requires a small amount of energy independently of lipid composition, while direct transition from a stalk to a fusion pore without a hemifusion intermediate is highly improbable. Hemifusion diaphragm expansion is spontaneous for distal monolayers containing at least two lipid components, given sufficiently negative diaphragm spontaneous curvature. Conversely, diaphragms formed from single-component distal monolayers do not expand without the continual injection of energy. We identify a diaphragm radius, below which central pore expansion is spontaneous. For larger diaphragms, prior studies have shown that pore expansion is not axisymmetric, and here our calculations supply an upper bound for the energy of the barrier against pore formation. The major energy-requiring deformations in the steps of fusion are: widening of a hydrophobic fissure in bilayers for stalk formation, splay within the expanding hemifusion diaphragm, and fissure widening initiating pore formation in a hemifusion diaphragm. PMID:26958888

  1. Energy Transfer of Excitons Between Quantum Wells Separated by a Wide Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    LYO,SUNGKWUN K.

    1999-12-06

    We present a microscopic theory of the excitonic Stokes and anti-Stokes energy transfer mechanisms between two widely separated unequal quantum wells with a large energy mismatch ({Delta}) at low temperatures (T). Exciton transfer through dipolar coupling, photon-exchange coupling and over-barrier ionization of the excitons through exciton-exciton Auger processes are examined. The energy transfer rate is calculated as a function of T and the center-to-center distance d between the two wells. The rates depend sensitively on T for plane-wave excitons. For located excitons, the rates depend on T only through the T-dependence of the localization radius.

  2. Random free energy barrier hopping model for ac conduction in chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murti, Ram; Tripathi, S. K.; Goyal, Navdeep; Prakash, Satya

    2016-03-01

    The random free energy barrier hopping model is proposed to explain the ac conductivity (σac) of chalcogenide glasses. The Coulomb correlation is consistently accounted for in the polarizability and defect distribution functions and the relaxation time is augmented to include the overlapping of hopping particle wave functions. It is observed that ac and dc conduction in chalcogenides are due to same mechanism and Meyer-Neldel (MN) rule is the consequence of temperature dependence of hopping barriers. The exponential parameter s is calculated and it is found that s is subjected to sample preparation and measurement conditions and its value can be less than or greater than one. The calculated results for a - Se, As2S3, As2Se3 and As2Te3 are found in close agreement with the experimental data. The bipolaron and single polaron hopping contributions dominates at lower and higher temperatures respectively and in addition to high energy optical phonons, low energy optical and high energy acoustic phonons also contribute to the hopping process. The variations of hopping distance with temperature is also studied. The estimated defect number density and static barrier heights are compared with other existing calculations.

  3. How to determine the adsorption energy of the surfactant's hydrophilic head? How to estimate easily the surface activity of every simple surfactant?

    PubMed

    Karakashev, Stoyan I

    2014-10-15

    A definite way to determine the adsorption energy of the surfactant's hydrophilic head on the air water interface is presented. For this purpose, the Davies adsorption theory and the most advanced version of Helfand-Frish-Lebowitz adsorption theory were applied to the surface tension isotherms of homologous series of sodium alkyl sulfate (CnH2n+1SO4Na, n=7-12), thus deriving the equilibrium adsorption constant, the cross-sectional area of the surfactant molecule, the interaction coefficient and the cohesion constant versus the number of the carbon atoms into the alkyl sulfate molecule. Thus, the total adsorption energy of each particular homolog was calculated in line with the latest development of the adsorption theory, thus calculating the dimensionless adsorption energy of the hydrophilic head Ehead/kBT. In our particular case (SO4(-)) we calculated Ehead/kBT=-2.79, which indicates the strong propensity of the SO4(-) to be surrounded by water molecules. The procedure for calculation Ehead/kBT does not depend on the charge of the hydrophilic head. Similarly, we calculated Ehead/kBT of another six well known in the literature hydrophilic heads (COOH, OH, DMPO, DEPO, N(CH3)3(+), and NH3(+)), indicating that the adsorption energy of the CH2 group depends slightly on the type of the hydrophilic head, but it affects substantially the adsorption energy of the whole surfactant molecule. Finally, we defined and validated a parameter called adsorption capacity of surfactants with simple molecular structure, for easy estimation of their surface activity. Linear dependence between the CMC of ionic surfactants and their adsorption capacity was established.

  4. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  5. Discrete site surface complexation constants for lanthanide adsorption to bacteria as determined by experiments and linear free energy relationships.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Bryne T; Magennis, Marisa; Olive, Valerie; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Ellam, Robert M

    2010-01-15

    Bacteria are abundant in many natural and engineered environments where they are thought to exert important controls on the cycling, mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity of metal contaminants. In order to probe their role in moderating the behavior of lanthanides, pH-dependent adsorption edges of 13 individual lanthanides and yttrium to the Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans were used to generate discrete site surface complexation constants. The calculated surface complexation constants were compared with stability constants estimated using linear free energy relationships based on a number of hydroxyl-containing ligands. The experimental data suggests that lanthanide adsorption edges below pH 6.5 are consistent with adsorption to phosphate groups for the light and some of the middle lanthanides (La to Gd), whereas some of the middle and heavy lanthanides appear to favor carboxyl co-ordination (Tb to Yb), although exceptions occur in each grouping. The experimentally derived surface complexation constants for carboxyl coordination were of similar magnitude to stability constants estimated from linear free energy correlations using fulvic acid stability constants. The implication is that the adsorption of lanthanides to bacterial surfaces could be modeled reasonably well using lanthanide stability constants for natural organic matter, except perhaps at low pH where phosphate binding dominates. PMID:20000843

  6. Observation of the one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Gehring, J.

    1995-08-01

    It was suggested many years ago that when two heavy nuclei are in contact during a grazing collision, the transfer of several correlated neutron-pairs could occur. Despite considerable experimental effort, however, so far only cross sections for up to four-neutron transfers have been uniquely identified. The main difficulties in the study of multi-neutron transfer reactions are the small cross sections encountered at incident energies close to the barrier, and various experimental uncertainties which can complicate the analysis of these reactions. We have for the first time found evidence for multi-neutron transfer reactions covering the full sequence from one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo.

  7. Formation of hyperdeformed states in capture reactions at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zubov, A. S.; Antonenko, N. V.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Scheid, W.

    2010-09-15

    The high-spin hyperdeformed nuclear states treated as dinuclear or quasimolecular configurations are suggested to be directly populated in heavy ion collisions at sub-barrier energies. Tunneling through the Coulomb barrier is considered using the quantum diffusion approach based on the formalism of reduced density matrix. The reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 86}Kr,{sup 124}Sn,{sup 136}Xe,{sup 138}Ba,{sup 140}Ce, {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni, and {sup 40,48}Ca+{sup 40,48}Ca, are suggested for populating high-spin hyperdeformed states. The partial production and identification cross sections for the hyperdeformed states are calculated as the functions of bombarding energy.

  8. Nucleon exchange mechanism in heavy-ion collisions at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, B.; Ayik, S.; Lacroix, D.

    2011-06-15

    Nucleon drift and diffusion mechanisms in central collisions of asymmetric heavy ions at near-barrier energies are investigated in the framework of a stochastic mean-field approach. Expressions for diffusion and drift coefficients for nucleon transfer deduced from the stochastic mean-field approach in the semiclassical approximation have similar forms familiar from the phenomenological nucleon exchange model. The variance of fragment mass distribution agrees with the empirical formula {sigma}{sub AA}{sup 2}(t)=N{sub exc}(t). The comparison with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations shows that below barrier energies, the drift coefficient in the semiclassical approximation underestimates the mean number of nucleon transfer obtained in the quantal framework. Motion of the window in the dinuclear system has a significant effect on the nucleon transfer in asymmetric collisions.

  9. Heavy-ion fusion hindrance at extreme sub-barrier energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. L.; Back, B. B.; Esbensen, H.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Misicu, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Collon, P.; Davids, C. N.; Greene, J.; Henderson, D. J.; Jisonna, L.; Kurtz, S.; Lister, C. J.; Notani, M.; Paul, M.; Pardo, R.; Peterson, D.; Seweryniak, D.; Shumard, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wang, X.; Zhu, S.; Physics; National Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Univ. of Notre Dame; Hebrew Univ.; Northwestern Univ.; Michigan State Univ.

    2006-01-01

    There are many new results in the study of the heavy-ion fusion hindrance phenomenon at extreme sub-barrier energies since Fusion03. Some of them have been published. Presented are some new results, including the first evidence in fusion hindrance for a system with small negative Q-value, {sup 28}Si + {sup 64}Ni, and the impact of fusion hindrance on reactions of interest to astrophysics.

  10. Barriers to Incorporating Climate Change Science into High School and Community College Energy Course Offerings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, C.

    2013-05-01

    In reviewing studies evaluating trends in greenhouse gasses, weather, climate and/or ecosystems, it becomes apparent that climate change is a reality. It has also become evident that the energy sector accounts for most of the greenhouse gas emissions with worldwide emissions of carbon dioxide increasing by 31 percent from 1990 to 2005, higher than in the previous thousands of years. While energy courses and topics are presented in high school and community college classes the topic of Climate Change Science is not always a part of the conversation. During the summer of 2011 and 2012, research undergraduates conducted interviews with a total of 39 national community college and 8 high school instructors who participated in a two week Sustainable Energy Education Training (SEET) workshop. Interview questions addressed the barriers and opportunities to the incorporation of climate change as a dimension of an energy/renewable energy curriculum. Barriers found included: there is not enough instruction time to include it; some school administrators including community members do not recognize climate change issues; quality information about climate change geared to students is difficult to find; and, most climate change information is too scientific for most audiences. A Solution to some barriers included dialogue on sustainability as a common ground in recognizing environmental changes/concerns among educators, administrators and community members. Sustainability discussions are already supported in school business courses as well as in technical education. In conclusion, we cannot expect climate change to dissipate without humans making more informed energy and environmental choices. With global population growth producing greater emissions resulting in increased climate change, we must include the topic of climate change to students in high school and community college classrooms, preparing our next generation of leaders and workforce to be equipped to find solutions

  11. Barriers on the propagation of renewable energy sources and sustainable solid waste management practices in Greece.

    PubMed

    Boemi, Sn; Papadopoulos, Am; Karagiannidis, A; Kontogianni, S

    2010-11-01

    Renewable energy sources (RES), excluding large hydroelectric plants, currently produce 4.21% of total electricity production in Greece. Even when considering the additional production from large hydroelectric plants, which accounts for some 7.8%, the distance to be covered towards the objective of 20% electricity produced from RES by 2010 and respectively towards 20% of total energy production by 2020 is discouraging. The potential, however, does exist; unfortunately so do serious barriers. On the other hand, solid waste management (SWM) is an issue that generates continuously increasing interest due to the extra amounts of solid waste generated; the lack of existing disposal facilities with adequate infrastructure and integrated management plans, also often accompanied by legislative and institutional gaps. However, socio-economic and public awareness problems are still met in the planning and implementation of RES and SWM projects, together with the lack of a complete national cadastre and a spatial development master plan, specifying areas eligible for RES and SWM development. Specific barriers occur for individual RES and the on-going inclusion of waste-derived renewable energy in the examined palette further increases the complexity of the entire issue. The consolidated study of this broad set of barriers was a main task of the present study which was carried out within the frame of a Hellenic-Canadian research project; the main results will be discussed herein. PMID:20630941

  12. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  13. Barriers on the propagation of renewable energy sources and sustainable solid waste management practices in Greece.

    PubMed

    Boemi, Sn; Papadopoulos, Am; Karagiannidis, A; Kontogianni, S

    2010-11-01

    Renewable energy sources (RES), excluding large hydroelectric plants, currently produce 4.21% of total electricity production in Greece. Even when considering the additional production from large hydroelectric plants, which accounts for some 7.8%, the distance to be covered towards the objective of 20% electricity produced from RES by 2010 and respectively towards 20% of total energy production by 2020 is discouraging. The potential, however, does exist; unfortunately so do serious barriers. On the other hand, solid waste management (SWM) is an issue that generates continuously increasing interest due to the extra amounts of solid waste generated; the lack of existing disposal facilities with adequate infrastructure and integrated management plans, also often accompanied by legislative and institutional gaps. However, socio-economic and public awareness problems are still met in the planning and implementation of RES and SWM projects, together with the lack of a complete national cadastre and a spatial development master plan, specifying areas eligible for RES and SWM development. Specific barriers occur for individual RES and the on-going inclusion of waste-derived renewable energy in the examined palette further increases the complexity of the entire issue. The consolidated study of this broad set of barriers was a main task of the present study which was carried out within the frame of a Hellenic-Canadian research project; the main results will be discussed herein.

  14. Switching Energy Barrier and Current Reduction in MTJs with Composite Free Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Makarov, Alexander; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the properties of a penta-layer magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with a composite soft layer by exhaustive micromagnetic simulations. The structure CoFe/spacer (1nm)/Py (4nm)/spacer (1nm)/ CoFe (Py is Ni81Fe19) with an elliptical cross-section (major axes 90nm and 35nm, correspondingly) is considered. The system with the composite soft layer is obtained by removing a central stripe of 5nm width from the monolithic free layer. The MTJ with a composite free layer switches two to three times faster than the one with a monolithic layer [1]. We have found that in the MTJ structure with the composite layer the switching energy barrier is decreased and becomes equal to the shape anisotropy energy barrier responsible for thermal stability. This results in a switching current density reduction. The physical reasons for the switching energy barrier reduction are discussed.[4pt] [1] A. Makarov et al., Phys. Status Solidi RRL 5, No. 12, 420-422 (2011).

  15. Facile synthesis of ultrahigh-surface-area hollow carbon nanospheres for enhanced adsorption and energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Tang, Zhiwei; Huang, Siqi; Chen, Luyi; Liang, Yeru; Mai, Weicong; Zhong, Hui; Fu, Ruowen; Wu, Dingcai

    2015-01-01

    Exceptionally large surface area and well-defined nanostructure are both critical in the field of nanoporous carbons for challenging energy and environmental issues. The pursuit of ultrahigh surface area while maintaining definite nanostructure remains a formidable challenge because extensive creation of pores will undoubtedly give rise to the damage of nanostructures, especially below 100 nm. Here we report that high surface area of up to 3,022 m2 g−1 can be achieved for hollow carbon nanospheres with an outer diameter of 69 nm by a simple carbonization procedure with carefully selected carbon precursors and carbonization conditions. The tailor-made pore structure of hollow carbon nanospheres enables target-oriented applications, as exemplified by their enhanced adsorption capability towards organic vapours, and electrochemical performances as electrodes for supercapacitors and sulphur host materials for lithium–sulphur batteries. The facile approach may open the doors for preparation of highly porous carbons with desired nanostructure for numerous applications. PMID:26072734

  16. Tunnel spin polarization versus energy for clean and doped Al2O3 barriers.

    PubMed

    Park, B G; Banerjee, T; Lodder, J C; Jansen, R

    2007-11-23

    The variation of the tunnel spin-polarization (TSP) with energy is determined using a magnetic tunnel transistor, allowing quantification of the energy dependent TSP separately for both ferromagnet/insulator interfaces and direct correlation with the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) measured in the same device. The intrinsic TSP is reduced below the Fermi level, and more strongly so for tunneling into empty states above the Fermi level. For artificially doped barriers, the low bias TMR decreases due to defect-assisted tunneling. Yet, this mechanism becomes ineffective at large bias, where instead inelastic spin scattering causes a strong TMR decay.

  17. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  18. Analytical energy-barrier-dependent Voc model for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Carranza, A.; Nolasco, J. C.; Reininghaus, N.; Geißendörfer, S.; Vehse, M.; Parisi, J.; Gutowski, J.; Voss, T.

    2016-07-01

    We show that the open circuit voltage (Voc) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells can be described by an analytical energy-barrier-dependent equation, considering thermionic emission as the physical mechanism determining the recombination current. For this purpose, the current-voltage characteristics of two device structures, i.e., a-Si:H(n)/a-Si:H(i)/a-Si:H(p)/AZO p-i-n solar cells with different p-doping concentrations and a-Si:H(n)/a-Si:H(i)/AZO Schottky structures with different intrinsic layer thicknesses, were analyzed in dark and under illumination, respectively. The calculated barrier in the p-i-n devices is consistent with the difference between the work function of the p-layer and the conduction band edge of the i-layer at the interface in thermal equilibrium.

  19. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Klein, Michael L; Shinoda, Wataru

    2015-12-28

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle-vesicle, vesicle-planar, and planar-planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  20. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Shinoda, Wataru; Klein, Michael L.

    2015-12-28

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle–vesicle, vesicle–planar, and planar–planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  1. Fusion of Si28+Si28,30: Different trends at sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnoli, G.; Stefanini, A. M.; Esbensen, H.; Jiang, C. L.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; Fioretto, E.; Grebosz, J.; Haas, F.; Jia, H. M.; Mazzocco, M.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatović, T.; Montanari, D.; Parascandolo, C.; Scarlassara, F.; Strano, E.; Szilner, S.; Torresi, D.

    2014-10-01

    Background: The fusion excitation function of the system Si28+Si28 at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier is known only down to ≃15 mb. This precludes any information on both coupling effects on sub-barrier cross sections and the possible appearance of hindrance. For Si28+Si30 even if the fusion cross section is measured down to ≃50 μb, the evidence of hindrance is marginal. Both systems have positive fusion Q values. While Si28 has a deformed oblate shape, Si30 is spherical. Purpose: We investigate 1. the possible influence of the different structure of the two Si isotopes on the fusion excitation functions in the deep sub-barrier region and 2. whether hindrance exists in the Si+Si systems and whether it is strong enough to generate an S-factor maximum, thus allowing a comparison with lighter heavy-ion systems of astrophysical interest. Methods: Si28 beams from the XTU Tandem accelerator of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro were used. The setup was based on an electrostatic beam separator, and fusion evaporation residues (ER) were detected at very forward angles. Angular distributions of ER were measured. Results: Fusion cross sections of Si28+Si28 have been obtained down to ≃600 nb. The slope of the excitation function has a clear irregularity below the barrier, but no indication of a S-factor maximum is found. For Si28+Si30 the previous data have been confirmed and two smaller cross sections have been measured down to ≃4 μb. The trend of the S-factor reinforces the previous weak evidence of hindrance. Conclusions: The sub-barrier cross sections for Si28+Si28 are overestimated by coupled-channels calculations based on a standard Woods-Saxon potential, except for the lowest energies. Calculations using the M3Y+repulsion potential are adjusted to fit the Si28+Si28 and the existing Si30+Si30 data. An additional weak imaginary potential (probably simulating the effect of the oblate Si28 deformation) is required to fit the low-energy trend of

  2. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, Tigran M; Snyder, James A; Yancey, Jeremy A; Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG-X-GTGT host-guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard-Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid-liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  3. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Abramyan, Tigran M.; Snyder, James A.; Yancey, Jeremy A.; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG–X–GTGT host–guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard–Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid–liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  4. Driven diffusion against electrostatic or effective energy barrier across α-hemolysin

    SciTech Connect

    Ansalone, Patrizio; Chinappi, Mauro; Rondoni, Lamberto; Cecconi, Fabio

    2015-10-21

    We analyze the translocation of a charged particle across an α-Hemolysin (αHL) pore in the framework of a driven diffusion over an extended energy barrier generated by the electrical charges of the αHL. A one-dimensional electrostatic potential is extracted from the full 3D solution of the Poisson’s equation. We characterize the particle transport under the action of a constant forcing by studying the statistics of the translocation time. We derive an analytical expression of translocation time average that compares well with the results from Brownian dynamic simulations of driven particles over the electrostatic potential. Moreover, we show that the translocation time distributions can be perfectly described by a simple theory which replaces the true barrier by an equivalent structureless square barrier. Remarkably, our approach maintains its accuracy also for low-applied voltage regimes where the usual inverse-Gaussian approximation fails. Finally, we discuss how the comparison between the simulated time distributions and their theoretical prediction results to be greatly simplified when using the notion of the empirical Laplace transform technique.

  5. Energy efficient engine, high pressure turbine thermal barrier coating. Support technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duderstadt, E. C.; Agarwal, P.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the work performed on a thermal barrier coating support technology task of the Energy Efficient Engine Component Development Program. A thermal barrier coating (TBC) system consisting of a Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond cost layer and ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic layer was selected from eight candidate coating systems on the basis of laboratory tests. The selection was based on coating microstructure, crystallographic phase composition, tensile bond and bend test results, erosion and impact test results, furnace exposure, thermal cycle, and high velocity dynamic oxidation test results. Procedures were developed for applying the selected TBC to CF6-50, high pressure turbine blades and vanes. Coated HPT components were tested in three kinds of tests. Stage 1 blades were tested in a cascade cyclic test rig, Stage 2 blades were component high cycle fatigue tested to qualify thermal barrier coated blades for engine testing, and Stage 2 blades and Stage 1 and 2 vanes were run in factory engine tests. After completion of the 1000 cycle engine test, the TBC on the blades was in excellent condition over all of the platform and airfoil except at the leading edge above midspan on the suction side of the airfoil. The coating damage appeared to be caused by particle impingement; adjacent blades without TBC also showed evidence of particle impingement.

  6. Evolution of fusion hindrance for asymmetric systems at deep sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, A.; Mahata, K.; Pandit, S. K.; Nanal, V.; Ichikawa, T.; Hagino, K.; Navin, A.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Parkar, V. V.; Ramachandran, K.; Rout, P. C.; Kumar, Abhinav; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of fusion cross-sections of 7Li and 12C with 198Pt at deep sub-barrier energies are reported to unravel the role of the entrance channel in the occurrence of fusion hindrance. The onset of fusion hindrance has been clearly observed in 12C +198Pt system but not in 7Li +198Pt system, within the measured energy range. Emergence of the hindrance, moving from lighter (6,7Li) to heavier (12C, 16O) projectiles is explained employing a model that considers a gradual transition from a sudden to adiabatic regime at low energies. The model calculation reveals a weak effect of the damping of coupling to collective motion for the present systems as compared to that obtained for systems with heavier projectiles.

  7. Experimental study of the 13C+12C fusion reaction at deep sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, D.; Chilug, A. I.; Straticiuc, M.; Trache, L.; Chesneanu, D.; Toma, S.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Gomoiu, C.; Zhang, N. T.; Tang, X.; Li, Y. J.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions between light nuclei such as carbon and oxygen isotopes have been studied because of their significance for a wide variety of stellar burning scenarios. One important stellar reaction is 12C+12C, but it is difficult to measure it in the Gamow window because of very low cross sections and several resonances occurring. Hints can be obtained from the study of 13C+12C reaction. We have measured this process by an activation method for energies down to Ecm=2.5 MeV using 13C beams from the Bucharest 3 MV tandetron and gamma-ray deactivation measurements in our low and ultralow background laboratories, the latter located in a salt mine about 100 km north of Bucharest. Results obtained so far are shown and discussed in connection with the possibility to go even further down in energy and with the interpretation of the reaction mechanism at such deep sub-barrier energies.

  8. Adsorption of carbon dioxide on Al12X clusters studied by density functional theory: effect of charge and doping.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Ju, Xue-Hai

    2013-11-27

    The adsorption of a CO2 molecule on neutral and charged X-centered icosahedron Al12X(±z) clusters (X = Al, Be, Zn, Ni, Cu, B, P; z = 0, 1) was investigated by the density functional PW91 and PWC methods. Optimized configurations corresponding to physisorption and chemisorption of CO2 were identified. The adsorption energies, activation barriers, and binding energies involving both the physisorption (Al12X(±z)·CO2-I) and chemisorption (Al12X(±z)·CO2-II) for CO2 were determined. The chemisorption of a CO2 molecule on the Al12X clusters (X is a metallic doping element) requires relatively low activation barriers. The lowest barrier was found to be with the Al12Be cluster. For the Al12X(-) clusters, the barriers are all higher than those of the neutral analogues. For the Al12X(+) clusters, two corresponding configurations are linked by a low-energy barrier, and CO2 molecule chemisorption on the Al12Be(+) cluster has the lowest barrier. The adsorption energies are larger than the energy barriers, which facilitates the chemisorption. The results show that carbon dioxide adsorbed on the Al12X(±z) clusters can be tuned by controllable X doping and the total number of valence electrons and suggest the potential application of Al12X(±z) nanostructures for carbon dioxide capture and activation.

  9. Barriers to Building Energy Efficiency (BEE) promotion: A transaction costs perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian Kun, Queena

    Worldwide, buildings account for a surprisingly high 40% of global energy consumption, and the resulting carbon footprint significantly exceeds that of all forms of transportation combined. Large and attractive opportunities exist to reduce buildings' energy use at lower costs and higher returns than in other sectors. This thesis analyzes the concerns of the market stakeholders, mainly real estate developers and end-users, in terms of transaction costs as they make decisions about investing in Building Energy Efficiency (BEE). It provides a detailed analysis of the current situation and future prospects for BEE adoption by the market's stakeholders. It delineates the market and lays out the economic and institutional barriers to the large-scale deployment of energy-efficient building techniques. The aim of this research is to investigate the barriers raised by transaction costs that hinder market stakeholders from investing in BEES. It explains interactions among stakeholders in general and in the specific case of Hong Kong as they consider transaction costs. It focuses on the influence of transaction costs on the decision-making of the stakeholders during the entire process of real estate development. The objectives are: 1) To establish an analytical framework for understanding the barriers to BEE investment with consideration of transaction costs; 2) To build a theoretical game model of decision making among the BEE market stakeholders; 3) To study the empirical data from questionnaire surveys of building designers and from focused interviews with real estate developers in Hong Kong; 4) To triangulate the study's empirical findings with those of the theoretical model and analytical framework. The study shows that a coherent institutional framework needs to be established to ensure that the design and implementation of BEE policies acknowledge the concerns of market stakeholders by taking transaction costs into consideration. Regulatory and incentive options

  10. The effect of ligand substitution and water co-adsorption on the adsorption dynamics and energy level matching of amino-phenyl acid dyes on TiO2.

    PubMed

    Manzhos, Sergei; Segawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-02-01

    We perform a comparative theoretical analysis of adsorption of dyes NK1 (2E,4E-2-cyano-5-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)penta-2,4-dienoic acid) and NK7 (2E,4E-2-cyano-5-(4-diphenylaminophenyl)penta-2,4-dienoic acid) on clean and water-covered anatase (101) surfaces of TiO(2). Ligand substitution away from the anchoring group changes the energy level matching between the dye's LUMO and the oxide's conduction band. Monodentate binding and bidentate binding configurations of the dyes to TiO(2) are found to have similar adsorption energies even though the injection from the bidentate mode is found to dominate. Water has a strong effect on adsorption, inducing deprotonation and affecting strongly and differently between the dyes the energy level matching, leading to a shut-off of the injection from NK7 of bidentate adsorption configuration. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show a strong effect of nuclear motion on energy levels, specifically, increasing the driving force for injection in the monodentate regime.

  11. Disintegration locations in 7Li→8Be transfer-triggered breakup at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. C.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; Kalkal, Sunil; Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Williams, E.

    2016-02-01

    Background: At above-barrier energies, complete fusion cross sections in collisions of light weakly bound nuclei with heavy target nuclei are suppressed when compared to well-bound nuclei. Breakup of the projectilelike nucleus was proposed to be the cause. In addition to direct breakup, breakup following transfer was shown to be substantial. Purpose: We investigate breakup in reactions with 7Li, triggered by sub-barrier proton pickup to unbound states in 8Be, which subsequently separate into two α particles. Method: Measurements of sub-barrier disintegration of 7Li on a 58Ni target were made using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University. Combining the experimental results with classical simulations of post-breakup acceleration, we study the sensitivity of α -α energy and angle correlations to the proximity of disintegration to the target (proton donor) nucleus. Results: The simulations indicate that disintegration as the colliding nuclei approach each other leads to large angular separations θ12 of the α fragments. The detectors allow for a maximum opening angle of θ12=132∘ , such that the present experiment is largely insensitive to breakup occurring when the collision partners approach each other. The data are consistent with disintegration of (a) the 0+8Be ground state far from the targetlike nucleus, and (b) the 2+8Be resonance near the targetlike nucleus when the 8Be is receding from the targetlike nucleus. Conclusions: The present results shed light on the near-target component of transfer-induced breakup reactions. The distribution of events with respect to the opening angle of the α particles, and the orientation of their relative velocity with respect to the velocity of their center of mass, gives insights into their proximity to the target at the moment of breakup. Further measurements with larger angular coverage and more complete simulations are required to fully understand the influence of breakup on fusion.

  12. Electrostatic energy barriers from dielectric membranes upon approach of translocating DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-02-01

    We probe the electrostatic cost associated with the approach phase of DNA translocation events. Within an analytical theory at the Debye-Hückel level, we calculate the electrostatic energy of a rigid DNA molecule interacting with a dielectric membrane. For carbon or silicon based low permittivity neutral membranes, the DNA molecule experiences a repulsive energy barrier between 10 kBT and 100 kBT. In the case of engineered membranes with high dielectric permittivities, the membrane surface attracts the DNA with an energy of the same magnitude. Both the repulsive and attractive interactions result from image-charge effects and their magnitude survive even for the thinnest graphene-based membranes of size d ≈ 6 Å. For weakly charged membranes, the electrostatic energy is always attractive at large separation distances but switches to repulsive close to the membrane surface. We also characterise the polymer length dependence of the interaction energy. For specific values of the membrane charge density, low permittivity membranes repel short polymers but attract long polymers. Our results can be used to control the strong electrostatic energy of DNA-membrane interactions prior to translocation events by chemical engineering of the relevant system parameters.

  13. Effect of topographic barriers on the rates of available potential energy conversion of the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, K. D.; Saenz, J. A.; Hogg, A. McC.; Hughes, G. O.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2014-04-01

    Determining the energy budget of the oceans requires evaluating the rates of available potential energy conversion in the circulation. Calculating these conversion rates depends upon the definition of an appropriate “reference” state of the density field, but this definition is complicated in the oceans by the presence of bottom topography. The trapping of dense fluid by topographic barriers means that there are multiple definitions for the reference state. The approach taken in this paper is to examine the sensitivity of the available potential energy budget to several methods for defining the reference state. The first method makes allowances for restrictions imposed on the flow by topography, however it is computationally intensive. The second method is proposed as an inexpensive alternative to the first. These new methods are used to evaluate the energy budget of a model overturning circulation maintained by surface buoyancy forcing. The results are compared with those obtained from two existing methods; one which employs an adiabatic resorting procedure ignoring topography, and one which uses a reference profile developed from the horizontal average of the density field. In our model, the rates of available potential energy conversion are insensitive to the reference state definition providing the reference state is developed from an adiabatic resorting of the domain. These results suggest that any of the adiabatic resorting methods proposed here would be sufficient to evaluate the rates of energy conversion in the ocean.

  14. Efficient dynamical correction of the transition state theory rate estimate for a flat energy barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Jónsson, Hannes

    2016-09-01

    The recrossing correction to the transition state theory estimate of a thermal rate can be difficult to calculate when the energy barrier is flat. This problem arises, for example, in polymer escape if the polymer is long enough to stretch between the initial and final state energy wells while the polymer beads undergo diffusive motion back and forth over the barrier. We present an efficient method for evaluating the correction factor by constructing a sequence of hyperplanes starting at the transition state and calculating the probability that the system advances from one hyperplane to another towards the product. This is analogous to what is done in forward flux sampling except that there the hyperplane sequence starts at the initial state. The method is applied to the escape of polymers with up to 64 beads from a potential well. For high temperature, the results are compared with direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as forward flux sampling and excellent agreement between the three rate estimates is found. The use of a sequence of hyperplanes in the evaluation of the recrossing correction speeds up the calculation by an order of magnitude as compared with the traditional approach. As the temperature is lowered, the direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as the forward flux simulations become computationally too demanding, while the harmonic transition state theory estimate corrected for recrossings can be calculated without significant increase in the computational effort.

  15. Electrical Characterization of High Energy Electron Irradiated Ni/4 H-SiC Schottky Barrier Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradzah, A. T.; Omotoso, E.; Legodi, M. J.; Auret, F. D.; Meyer, W. E.; Diale, M.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of high energy electron irradiation on Ni/4 H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes was evaluated by current-voltage ( I- V) and capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurements at room temperature. Electron irradiation was achieved by using a radioactive strontium source with peak emission energy of 2.3 MeV. Irradiation was performed in fluence steps of 4.9 × 1013 cm-2 until a total fluence of 5.4 × 1014 cm-2 was reached. The Schottky barrier height determined from I- V measurements was not significantly changed by irradiation while that obtained from C- V measurements increased with irradiation. The ideality factor was obtained before irradiation as 1.05 and this value did not significantly change as a result of irradiation. The series resistance increased from 47 Ω before irradiation to 74 Ω after a total electron fluence of 5.4 × 1014 cm-2. The net donor concentration decreased with increasing irradiation fluence from 4.6 × 1014 cm-3 to 3.0 × 1014 cm-3 from which the carrier removal rate was calculated to be 0.37 cm-1.

  16. Efficient dynamical correction of the transition state theory rate estimate for a flat energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Jónsson, Hannes

    2016-09-01

    The recrossing correction to the transition state theory estimate of a thermal rate can be difficult to calculate when the energy barrier is flat. This problem arises, for example, in polymer escape if the polymer is long enough to stretch between the initial and final state energy wells while the polymer beads undergo diffusive motion back and forth over the barrier. We present an efficient method for evaluating the correction factor by constructing a sequence of hyperplanes starting at the transition state and calculating the probability that the system advances from one hyperplane to another towards the product. This is analogous to what is done in forward flux sampling except that there the hyperplane sequence starts at the initial state. The method is applied to the escape of polymers with up to 64 beads from a potential well. For high temperature, the results are compared with direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as forward flux sampling and excellent agreement between the three rate estimates is found. The use of a sequence of hyperplanes in the evaluation of the recrossing correction speeds up the calculation by an order of magnitude as compared with the traditional approach. As the temperature is lowered, the direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as the forward flux simulations become computationally too demanding, while the harmonic transition state theory estimate corrected for recrossings can be calculated without significant increase in the computational effort. PMID:27609008

  17. Condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces: the role of local energy barriers and structure length scale.

    PubMed

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Thompson, Carl V; Wang, Evelyn N

    2012-10-01

    Water condensation on surfaces is a ubiquitous phase-change process that plays a crucial role in nature and across a range of industrial applications, including energy production, desalination, and environmental control. Nanotechnology has created opportunities to manipulate this process through the precise control of surface structure and chemistry, thus enabling the biomimicry of natural surfaces, such as the leaves of certain plant species, to realize superhydrophobic condensation. However, this "bottom-up" wetting process is inadequately described using typical global thermodynamic analyses and remains poorly understood. In this work, we elucidate, through imaging experiments on surfaces with structure length scales ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm and wetting physics, how local energy barriers are essential to understand non-equilibrium condensed droplet morphologies and demonstrate that overcoming these barriers via nucleation-mediated droplet-droplet interactions leads to the emergence of wetting states not predicted by scale-invariant global thermodynamic analysis. This mechanistic understanding offers insight into the role of surface-structure length scale, provides a quantitative basis for designing surfaces optimized for condensation in engineered systems, and promises insight into ice formation on surfaces that initiates with the condensation of subcooled water.

  18. Adsorption energy of small molecules on core-shell Fe@Au nanoparticles: tuning by shell thickness.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Magali; Tarrat, Nathalie; Morillo, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    The adsorption of several small molecules on different gold surfaces, Au(001), strained Au(001) and Au(001) epitaxied on Fe(001), has been characterized using density functional theory. The surface strain leads to a less energetically favourable adsorption for all studied molecules. Moreover, the presence of the iron substrate induces an additional decrease of the binding energy, for 1 and 2 Au monolayers. For carbon monoxide (CO), the structural and energetic variations with the number of Au monolayers deposited on Fe have been analyzed and correlated with the distance between the carbon atom and the gold surface. The effect of the subsurface layer has been evidenced for 1 and 2 monolayers. The other molecules show different quantitative behavior depending on the type of their interaction with the gold surface. However, the iron substrate weakens the interaction, either for the chemisorbed species or for the physisorbed species. 2 Au monolayers seem to be the best compromise to decrease the reactivity of the gold surface towards adsorption while preventing the Fe oxidation. PMID:26971708

  19. Linear solvation energy relationship for the adsorption of synthetic organic compounds on single-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    PubMed

    Ding, H; Chen, C; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    The linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was applied to predict the adsorption coefficient (K) of synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A total of 40 log K values were used to develop and validate the LSER model. The adsorption data for 34 SOCs were collected from 13 published articles and the other six were obtained in our experiment. The optimal model composed of four descriptors was developed by a stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) method. The adjusted r(2) (r(2)adj) and root mean square error (RMSE) were 0.84 and 0.49, respectively, indicating good fitness. The leave-one-out cross-validation Q(2) ([Formula: see text]) was 0.79, suggesting the robustness of the model was satisfactory. The external Q(2) ([Formula: see text]) and RMSE (RMSEext) were 0.72 and 0.50, respectively, showing the model's strong predictive ability. Hydrogen bond donating interaction (bB) and cavity formation and dispersion interactions (vV) stood out as the two most influential factors controlling the adsorption of SOCs onto SWCNTs. The equilibrium concentration would affect the fitness and predictive ability of the model, while the coefficients varied slightly. PMID:26854726

  20. Resonance energy-transfer studies of the conformational change on the adsorption of oligonucleotides to a silica interface.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Colin A; Millar, David P; Gee, Michelle L; Smith, Trevor A

    2011-05-19

    Time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence studies have been carried out on a series of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide sequences adsorbed to a silica surface from solution. The fluorescence decay profiles of a fluorescent energy donor group undergoing resonance energy transfer to a nonemissive energy-acceptor molecule have been analyzed in terms of a distribution of donor-acceptor distances to reveal the conformational changes that occur in these oligonucleotides upon adsorption. Evanescent wave-induced time-resolved Förster resonance energy-transfer (EW-TRFRET) measurements indicate that at a high electrolyte concentration, there is localized separation of the oligonucleotide strands, and the helical structure adopts an "unraveled" conformation as a result of adsorption. This is attributed to the flexibility within the oligonucleotide at high electrolyte concentration allowing multiple segments of the oligonucleotide to have direct surface interaction. In contrast, the EW-TRFRET measurements at a lower electrolyte concentration reveal that the oligonucleotide retains its helical conformation in a localized extended state. This behavior implies that the rigidity of the oligonucleotide at this electrolyte concentration restricts direct interaction with the silica to a few segments, which correspondingly introduces kinks in the double helix conformation and results in significant oligonucleotide segmental extension into solution.

  1. Investigation of contribution of incomplete fusion in the total fusion process induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharab, Rajesh; Chahal, Rajiv; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the relative contribution of incomplete fusion (ICF) and complete fusion (CF) in total fusion (TF) induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at energies in the vicinity of Coulomb barrier using classical dynamical model and Wong's formula in conjugation with energy dependent Woods-Saxon formula. It is found that at above barrier energies ICF contributes almost 30% in TF while at energies below the barrier qualitatively its contribution is much more than thirty percent.

  2. Energy level broadening of defects causing nonideality in nearly ideal Si Schottky barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Keiji

    2004-10-01

    We have proposed a mechanism of the local Schottky barrier height (SBH) lowering to explain the nonideal characteristics in Si SBs. Positively charged defects close to the M/S interface induce image charge in the metal-induced gap states (MIGS) and lower the SBH. Based on this mechanism, the inhomogeneous potential distributions in the proximity of the MIGS are calculated in agreement with the I- V characteristics. The energy level of the defect, identified with Si self-interstitial, is in agreement with the theoretical value. The energy width of the defect is nearly equal to the standard deviation in the Gaussian distribution describing the SBH inhomogeneity. Thus, the propriety of the model is confirmed.

  3. The {sup 6}He Optical Potential at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Moro, A. M.

    2010-04-26

    We present an Optical Model (OM) study of {sup 6}He on {sup 208}Pb elastic scattering data, measured at laboratory energies around the Coulomb barrier (E{sub lab} = 14, 16, 18, 22, and 27 MeV)[1]. For the projectile-target bare interaction, we use the microscopic Sao Paulo Potential (SPP). This bare interaction is supplemented with a Coulomb Dipole Polarization (CDP) potential, as well as a diffuse complex Woods-Saxon potential. Four-body Continuum-Discretized-Coupled-Channels (CDCC) calculations have been performed in order to support the optical model analysis. We have also studied the alpha channel, which is the dominant reaction process. In the analysis of this channel, we compare the angular and energy distributions of the alpha particles measured at 22 MeV, with Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) calculations.

  4. Determining the energy balance in barrier-discharge Xe2 excilamp by the pressure jump method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnin, E. A.; Panarin, V. A.; Skakun, V. S.; Pikulev, A. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-08-01

    The energy redistribution in barrier-discharge Xe2 excilamp in various excitation regimes is investigated using the pressure jump method. Analytic expressions are derived for calculating power W dissipated in the excilamp discharge plasma in the form of heat and for calculating total discharge heat power P T spent on heating the excilamp. It is shown that the mechanism of the thermal energy dissipation gradually changes upon an increase in the xenon pressure in the excilamp. The conditions for generating the maximal radiation power of the excilamp are determined. It is shown that the maximum of the average radiation power is attained for an excitation pulse duration of 500 ns and the maximal pulse power is attained for a pulse duration of 100 ns. It is found that the optimal operation regime for the excilamp corresponds to the maximal values of the P T- W difference.

  5. Theoretical study of the elastic breakup of weakly bound nuclei at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otomar, D. R.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Canto, L. F.; Hussein, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) calculations for collisions of 7Li projectiles on 59Co,144Sm, and 208Pb targets at near-barrier energies, to assess the importance of the Coulomb and the nuclear couplings in the breakup of 7Li, as well as the Coulomb-nuclear interference. We have also investigated scaling laws, expressing the dependence of the cross sections on the charge and the mass of the target. This work is complementary to that previously reported by us on the breakup of 6Li. Here we explore the similarities and differences between the results for the two lithium isotopes. The relevance of the Coulomb dipole and quadrupole strengths at low energy for the two-cluster projectile is investigated in detail.

  6. Final report. Renewable energy and energy efficiency in Mexico: Barriers and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Ashford, Mike

    2000-09-28

    The report describes the prospects for energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions reductions in Mexico, along with renewable energy potential. A methodology for developing emissions baselines is shown, in order to prepare project emissions reductions calculations. An application to the USIJI program was also prepared through this project, for a portfolio of energy efficiency projects.

  7. Permeation of low-Z atoms through carbon sheets: Density functional theory study on energy barriers and deformation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Stefan E. E-mail: Michael.probst@uibk.ac.at; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael E-mail: Michael.probst@uibk.ac.at

    2013-12-15

    Energetic and geometric aspects of the permeation of the atoms hydrogen to neon neutral atoms through graphene sheets are investigated by investigating the associated energy barriers and sheet deformations. Density functional theory calculations on cluster models, where graphene is modeled by planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), provide the energies and geometries. Particularities of our systems, such as convergence of both energy barriers and deformation curves with increasing size of the PAHs, are discussed. Three different interaction regimes, adiabatic, planar and vertical, are investigated by enforcing different geometrical constraints. The adiabatic energy barriers range from 5 eV for hydrogen to 20 eV for neon. We find that the permeation of oxygen and carbon into graphene is facilitated by temporary chemical bonding while for other, in principle reactive atoms, it is not. We discuss implications of our results for modeling chemical sputtering of graphite.

  8. Permeation of low-Z atoms through carbon sheets: Density functional theory study on energy barriers and deformation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Stefan E.; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Energetic and geometric aspects of the permeation of the atoms hydrogen to neon neutral atoms through graphene sheets are investigated by investigating the associated energy barriers and sheet deformations. Density functional theory calculations on cluster models, where graphene is modeled by planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), provide the energies and geometries. Particularities of our systems, such as convergence of both energy barriers and deformation curves with increasing size of the PAHs, are discussed. Three different interaction regimes, adiabatic, planar and vertical, are investigated by enforcing different geometrical constraints. The adiabatic energy barriers range from 5 eV for hydrogen to 20 eV for neon. We find that the permeation of oxygen and carbon into graphene is facilitated by temporary chemical bonding while for other, in principle reactive atoms, it is not. We discuss implications of our results for modeling chemical sputtering of graphite.

  9. Adsorption of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) by amphiphilic polypropylene nonwoven from aqueous solution: the study of hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Wei, Junfu; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Kai; Wang, Han

    2014-05-30

    A kind of amphiphilic polypropylene nonwoven with hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain was prepared through electron beam induced graft polymerization and subsequent ring opening reaction and then utilized in the adsorption of phthalic acid esters (PAEs). To elucidate the superiority of such amphiphilic microdomain, a unique structure without hydrophilic part was constructed as comparison. In addition, the adsorption behaviors including adsorption kinetics, isotherms and pH effect were systematically investigated. The result indicated that the amphiphilic structure and the synergy between hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain could considerably improve the adsorption capacities, rate and affinity. Particularly the existence of hydrophilic microdomain could reduce the diffusion resistance and energy barrier in the adsorption process. These adsorption results showed that the amphiphilic PP nonwoven have the potential to be used in environmental application.

  10. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Munira, Kamaram; Visscher, P. B.

    2015-05-07

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(−E{sub eff}/k{sub B}T). Here, the effective energy barrier E{sub eff} scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  11. A Review of Barriers to and Opportunities for the Integration of Renewable Energy in the Southeast

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Ben W; Hadley, Stanton W; Xu, Yan

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to prepare a summary report that examines the opportunities for and obstacles to the integration of renewable energy resources in the Southeast between now and the year 2030. The report, which is based on a review of existing literature regarding renewable resources in the Southeast, includes the following renewable energy resources: wind, solar, hydro, geothermal, biomass, and tidal. The evaluation was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Energy Foundation and is a subjective review with limited detailed analysis. However, the report offers a best estimate of the magnitude, time frame, and cost of deployment of renewable resources in the Southeast based upon the literature reviewed and reasonable engineering and economic estimates. For the purposes of this report, the Southeast is defined as the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. In addition, some aspects of the report (wind and geothermal) also consider the extended Southeast, which includes Maryland, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. A description of the existing base of renewable electricity installations in the region is given for each technology considered. Where available, the possible barriers and other considerations regarding renewable energy resources are listed in terms of availability, investment and maintenance costs, reliability, installation requirements, policies, and energy market. As stated above, the report is a comprehensive review of renewable energy resources in the southeastern region of United States based on a literature study that included information obtained from the Southern Bio-Power wiki, sources from the Energy Foundation, sources available to ORNL, and sources found during the review. The report consists of an executive summary, this introductory chapter describing report objectives, a chapter on analysis methods and

  12. Effect of 2450-MHz microwave energy on the blood-brain barrier to hydrophilic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Microwave energy at 2450 MHz 120 Hz AM was found ineffective in increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to the hydrophilic tracers HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose. Furthermore, a diminished permeability to HRP and sodium fluorescein was apparent after 180 minutes of exposure to microwaves at an incident power density of 20 mW/cm/sup 2/. Colonic temperature, as well as temperature within the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, cerebellum and medulla, were elevated by less than 1/sup 0/C over those of sham-exposed rats. A significant decrease in the permeability to HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose occurred after exposure to an incident power density of 65 mW/cm/sup 2/ for 30 minutes. The reduction in permeability to HRP correlated with a suppressed incorporation of the tracer by pinocytosis in cerebral microvessels. Suppression of blood-brain barrier permeability to hydrophilic tracers was most pronounced at brain temperatures exceeding approx. 40/sup 0/C and is demonstrated to be temperature dependent.

  13. Single-Chain Magnets Based on Octacyanotungstate with the Highest Energy Barriers for Cyanide Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rong-Min; Cao, Fan; Li, Jing; Yang, Li; Han, Yuan; Zhang, Xiu-Ling; Zhang, Zaichao; Wang, Xin-Yi; Song, You

    2016-01-01

    By introducing large counter cations as the spacer, two isolated 3, 3-ladder compounds, (Ph4P)[CoII(3-Mepy)2.7(H2O)0.3WV(CN)8]·0.6H2O (1) and (Ph4As)[CoII(3-Mepy)3WV(CN)8] (2, 3-Mepy = 3-methylpyridine), were synthesized and characterized. Static and dynamic magnetic characterizations reveal that compounds 1 and 2 both behave as the single-chain magnets (SCMs) with very high energy barriers: 252(9) K for 1 and 224(7) K for 2, respectively. These two compounds display the highest relaxation barriers for cyano-bridged SCMs and are preceded only by two cobalt(II)-radical compounds among all SCMs. Meanwhile, a large coercive field of 26.2 kOe (1) and 22.6 kOe (2) were observed at 1.8 K. PMID:27071451

  14. Single-Chain Magnets Based on Octacyanotungstate with the Highest Energy Barriers for Cyanide Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Rong-Min; Cao, Fan; Li, Jing; Yang, Li; Han, Yuan; Zhang, Xiu-Ling; Zhang, Zaichao; Wang, Xin-Yi; Song, You

    2016-04-01

    By introducing large counter cations as the spacer, two isolated 3, 3-ladder compounds, (Ph4P)[CoII(3-Mepy)2.7(H2O)0.3WV(CN)8]·0.6H2O (1) and (Ph4As)[CoII(3-Mepy)3WV(CN)8] (2, 3-Mepy = 3-methylpyridine), were synthesized and characterized. Static and dynamic magnetic characterizations reveal that compounds 1 and 2 both behave as the single-chain magnets (SCMs) with very high energy barriers: 252(9) K for 1 and 224(7) K for 2, respectively. These two compounds display the highest relaxation barriers for cyano-bridged SCMs and are preceded only by two cobalt(II)-radical compounds among all SCMs. Meanwhile, a large coercive field of 26.2 kOe (1) and 22.6 kOe (2) were observed at 1.8 K.

  15. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex.

    PubMed

    Vanston, C R; Kearley, G J; Edwards, A J; Darwish, T A; de Souza, N R; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Gardiner, M G

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)2CH2}2Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model for the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique. PMID:25652724

  16. Cross sections and barriers for nuclear fission induced by high-energy nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Yavshits, S. G.

    2013-03-15

    The cross sections for the fission of {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu target nuclei that was induced by 20- to 1000-MeV neutrons and protons were calculated. The respective calculations were based on the multiconfiguration-fission (MCFx) model, which was used to describe three basic stages of the interaction of high-energy nucleons with nuclei: direct processes (intranuclear cascade), equilibration of the emerging compound system, and the decay of the compound nucleus (statistical model). Fission barriers were calculated within the microscopic approach for isotopic chains formed by 15 to 20 nuclei of the required elements. The calculated fission cross sections were compared with available experimental data. It was shown that the input data set and the theoretical model used made it possible to predict satisfactorily cross section for nuclear fission induced by 20- to 1000-MeV nucleons.

  17. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex.

    PubMed

    Vanston, C R; Kearley, G J; Edwards, A J; Darwish, T A; de Souza, N R; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Gardiner, M G

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)2CH2}2Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model for the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique.

  18. The Three Possible 2-(Pyrenylethynyl) Adenosines: Rotameric Energy Barriers Govern the Photodynamics of These Structural Isomers.

    PubMed

    Reuss, Andreas J; Grünewald, Christian; Braun, Markus; Engels, Joachim W; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2016-05-01

    This article presents a comprehensive study of the photophysics of 2-(2-pyrenylethynyl) adenosine and 2-(4-pyrenylethynyl) adenosine, which are structural isomers of the well-established fluorescent RNA label 2-(1-pyrenylethynyl) adenosine. We performed steady-state and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy studies along with time-resolved fluorescence emission experiments in different solvents to work out the interplay of locally excited and charge-transfer states. We found the ultrafast photodynamics to be crucial for the fluorescence decay behavior, which extends up to tens of nanoseconds and is partially multi-exponential. These features in the ultrafast dynamics are indicative of the rotational energy barriers in the first excited state.

  19. Spectral and energy parameters of multiband barrier-discharge KrBr excilamps

    SciTech Connect

    Avdeev, S M; Erofeev, M V; Skakun, V S; Sosnin, E A; Suslov, A I; Tarasenko, V F; Schitz, D V

    2008-07-31

    The spectral and energy characteristics of multiband barrier-discharge coaxial KrBr excilamps are studied experimentally at pressures from a few tens of Torr to 0.4 atm. It is shown that an increase in the Br{sub 2} concentration reduces the emission intensity of KrBr* molecules with respect to the emission intensity of Br{sub 2}* molecules and reduces the total emission power of the excilamp. This can be explained by the nonradiative decay of exciplex KrBr* molecules caused by their quenching by molecular bromine. The emission power and efficiency in the Kr:Br{sub 2} = 400:1 mixture at a pressure of {approx}230 Torr and a discharge gap of 8.5 mm were 4.8 W and 2.4%, respectively. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Role of Codeposited Impurities in Growth: Dependence of Morphology on Binding and Barrier Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, A. Bh.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2010-03-01

    The previous talk showed that codeposition of impurity atoms during epitaxial growth could be used for nanostructuring of surfaces. Based on their lateral nearest-neighbor binding energies (ENN) to Cu and their diffusion barriers (Ed) on Cu(001), we classify the candidate impurity atoms into four sets. We find that codeposition of impurities from different sets produce qualitatively different surface morphologies both in the step-flow and the submonolayer (θ<= 0.7 ML) regimes. In the submonolayer regime, we characterize these differences through variations of the number of islands (Ni) and the average island size with coverage (θ). Further, we compute the critical nucleus size (i) for all of these cases from the distribution of capture-zone areas using the generalized Wigner distribution.footnotetextA. Pimpinelli, T. L. Einstein, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 226102 (2007).

  1. Rotational energy barrier of 2-(2',6'-dihydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole: a case study by NMR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weihua; Twum, Eric B; Li, Linlin; Wright, Brian D; Rinaldi, Peter L; Pang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    2-(2'-Hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) derivatives represent an important class of luminescent materials, as they can undergo excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The material's ESIPT properties are dependent on the ratio of two different rotamers, whose interconversion is poorly understood. By using HBO derivative 4, the rotational energy barrier of 2- (2',6'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole is determined to be 10.5 kcal/mol by variable-temperature NMR. Although a HBO derivative typically exhibits two rotamers with O···H-O (e.g., 1a) and N···H-O bonding (e.g., 1b), correlation of NMR with fluorescence data reveals that the rotamer with N···H-O bonding is predominant in the solution.

  2. Adsorption and growth morphology of rare-earth metals on graphene studied by ab initio calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, C. Z.; Hupalo, M.; Yao, Y. X.; Tringides, M. C.; Lu, W. C.; Ho, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Adsorption of rare-earth (RE) adatoms (Nd, Gd, Eu, and Yb) on graphene was studied by first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory. The calculations show that the hollow site of graphene is the energetically favorable adsorption site for all the RE adatoms studied. The adsorption energies and diffusion barriers of Nd and Gd on graphene are found to be larger than those of Eu and Yb. Comparison with scanning tunneling microscopy experiments for Gd and Eu epitaxially grown on graphene confirms these calculated adsorption and barrier differences, since fractal-like islands are observed for Gd and flat-topped crystalline islands for Eu. The formation of flat Eu islands on graphene can be attributed to its low diffusion barrier and relatively larger ratio of adsorption energy to its bulk cohesive energy. The interactions between the Nd and Gd adatoms and graphene cause noticeable in-plane lattice distortions in the graphene layer. Adsorption of the RE adatoms on graphene also induces significant electric dipole and magnetic moments.

  3. Contact angle and adsorption energies of nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface determined by neutron reflectivity and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reguera, Javier; Ponomarev, Evgeniy; Geue, Thomas; Stellacci, Francesco; Bresme, Fernando; Moglianetti, Mauro

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how nanomaterials interact with interfaces is essential to control their self-assembly as well as their optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. We present here an experimental approach based on neutron reflectivity (NR) that allows the in situ measurement of the contact angles of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid interfaces. Because our method provides a route to quantify the adsorption and interfacial energies of the nanoparticles in situ, it circumvents problems associated with existing indirect methods, which rely on the transport of the monolayers to substrates for further analysis. We illustrate the method by measuring the contact angle of hydrophilic and hydrophobic gold nanoparticles, coated with perdeuterated octanethiol (d-OT) and with a mixture of d-OT and mercaptohexanol (MHol), respectively. The contact angles were also calculated via atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) computations, showing excellent agreement with the experimental data. Our method opens the route to quantify the adsorption of complex nanoparticle structures adsorbed at fluid interfaces featuring different chemical compositions.Understanding how nanomaterials interact with interfaces is essential to control their self-assembly as well as their optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. We present here an experimental approach based on neutron reflectivity (NR) that allows the in situ measurement of the contact angles of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid interfaces. Because our method provides a route to quantify the adsorption and interfacial energies of the nanoparticles in situ, it circumvents problems associated with existing indirect methods, which rely on the transport of the monolayers to substrates for further analysis. We illustrate the method by measuring the contact angle of hydrophilic and hydrophobic gold nanoparticles, coated with perdeuterated octanethiol (d-OT) and with a mixture of d-OT and mercaptohexanol (MHol), respectively. The contact angles were

  4. Influence of rotational energy barriers to the conformational search of protein loops in molecular dynamics and ranking the conformations.

    PubMed

    Tappura, K

    2001-08-15

    An adjustable-barrier dihedral angle potential was added as an extension to a novel, previously presented soft-core potential to study its contribution to the efficacy of the search of the conformational space in molecular dynamics. As opposed to the conventional soft-core potential functions, the leading principle in the design of the new soft-core potential, as well as of its extension, the soft-core and adjustable-barrier dihedral angle (SCADA) potential (referred as the SCADA potential), was to maintain the main equilibrium properties of the original force field. This qualifies the methods for a variety of a priori modeling problems without need for additional restraints typically required with the conventional soft-core potentials. In the present study, the different potential energy functions are applied to the problem of predicting loop conformations in proteins. Comparison of the performance of the soft-core and SCADA potential showed that the main hurdles for the efficient sampling of the conformational space of (loops in) proteins are related to the high-energy barriers caused by the Lennard-Jones and Coulombic energy terms, and not to the rotational barriers, although the conformational search can be further enhanced by lowering the rotational barriers of the dihedral angles. Finally, different evaluation methods were studied and a few promising criteria found to distinguish the near-native loop conformations from the wrong ones. PMID:11455590

  5. Elastic scattering of 17O+208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Strano, E.; Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Molini, P.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Toniolo, N.; Filipescu, D.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lay, J. A.; Miyatake, H.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Stroe, L.; Vitturi, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Zerva, K.

    2016-05-01

    Within the frame of the commissioning of a new experimental apparatus EXPADES we undertook the measurement of the elastic scattering angular distribution for the system 17O+208Pb at energy around the Coulomb barrier. The reaction dynamics induced by loosely bound Radioactive Ion Beams is currently being extensively studied [4]. In particular the study of the elastic scattering process allows to obtain direct information on the total reaction cross section of the exotic nuclei. In order to understand the effect of the low binding energy on the reaction mechanism it is important to compare radioactive weakly bound nuclei with stable strongly-bound nuclei. In this framework the study of the 17O+208Pb elastic scattering can be considered to be complementary to a previous measurement of the total reaction cross section for the system 17F+208Pb at energies of 86, 90.4 MeV [5, 6]. The data will be compared with those obtained for the neighboring systems 16,18O+208Pb and others available in literature.

  6. Alterations of gut barrier and gut microbiota in food restriction, food deprivation and protein-energy wasting.

    PubMed

    Genton, L; Cani, P D; Schrenzel, J

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence shows that gut microbiota composition is related to changes of gut barrier function including gut permeability and immune function. Gut microbiota is different in obese compared to lean subjects, suggesting that gut microbes are also involved in energy metabolism and subsequent nutritional state. While research on gut microbiota and gut barrier has presently mostly focused on intestinal inflammatory bowel diseases and more recently on obesity and type 2 diabetes, this review aims at summarizing the present knowledge regarding the impact, in vivo, of depleted nutritional states on structure and function of the gut epithelium, the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), the gut microbiota and the enteric nervous system. It highlights the complex interactions between the components of gut barrier in depleted states due to food deprivation, food restriction and protein energy wasting and shows that these interactions are multidirectional, implying the existence of feedbacks.

  7. Metals on graphene: correlation between adatom adsorption behavior and growth morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lu, Wencai; Tringides, Michael C.; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-05-19

    We present a systematic study of metal adatom adsorption on graphene by ab initio calculations. The calculations cover alkali metals, sp-simple metals, 3d and group 10 transition metals, noble metals, as well as rare earth metals. The correlation between the adatom adsorption properties and the growth morphology of the metals on graphene is also investigated. We show that the growth morphology is related to the ratio of the metal adsorption energy to its bulk cohesive energy (E(a)/E(c)) and the diffusion barrier (ΔE) of the metal adatom on graphene. Charge transfer, electric dipole and magnetic moments, and graphene lattice distortion induced by metal adsorption would also affect the growth morphologies of the metal islands. We also show that most of the metal nanostructures on graphene would be thermally stable against coarsening.

  8. Hyperosmolar opening of the blood-brain barrier in the energy-depleted rat brain. Part 1. Permeability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.; Luthert, P.J.; Pratt, O.E.; Lantos, P.L.

    1988-02-01

    A simple saline perfusion system was used to investigate the effects of hyperosmolar solutions of arabinose and mannitol upon the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. The small, polar molecule (/sup 14/C)mannitol and the larger, visual marker Evans blue were used as indicators of barrier integrity in the perfused energy-depleted brain. One-minute perfusion of hyperosmolar solutions consistently opened the barrier suggesting that the mechanism of osmotic barrier opening is independent of energy-producing metabolism. The accumulation of radiolabel in the brain was expressed as the ratio of tissue to perfusate radioactivity (Rt/Rp) and, for cerebrum, this increased from a control value of 0.0022 +/- 0.0007 (mean +/- SEM; n = 4) to a value of 0.0124 +/- 0.0008 (n = 4) following 0.9 M arabinose and to 0.0495 +/- 0.0072 (n = 4) following 1.8 M arabinose. There was a significant reduction of water content of hyperosmolar perfused brains. These findings support the hypothesis that osmotic barrier opening is the result of the passive shrinkage of endothelial cells and the surrounding tissue.

  9. Imaging the radical channel in acetaldehyde photodissociation: Competing mechanisms at energies close to the triplet exit barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, G. A.; Arregui, A.; Rodriguez, J. D.; Banares, L.; Rubio-Lago, L.

    2010-08-14

    The photodissociation of acetaldehyde in the radical channel has been studied at wavelengths between 315 and 325 nm using the velocity-map imaging technique. Upon one-photon absorption at 315 nm, the molecule is excited to the first singlet excited state S{sub 1}, which, in turn, undergoes intersystem crossing to the first excited triplet state T{sub 1}. On the triplet surface, the molecule dissociates into CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals with large kinetic energy release (KER), in accordance with the well characterized exit barrier on T{sub 1}. However, at longer wavelengths (>320 nm), which correspond to excitation energies just below the triplet barrier, a sudden change in KER is observed. At these photolysis wavelengths, there is not enough energy to surpass the exit barrier on the triplet state, which leaves the possibility of unimolecular dissociation on S{sub 0} after internal conversion from S{sub 1}. We have characterized the fragments' KER at these wavelengths, as well as determined the energy partitioning for the radical fragments. A new accurate estimate of the barrier height on T{sub 1} is presented.

  10. Influence of hydrodynamic energy on Holocene reef flat accretion, Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechnik, Belinda; Webster, Jody M.; Nothdurft, Luke; Webb, Gregory E.; Zhao, Jian-xin; Duce, Stephanie; Braga, Juan C.; Harris, Daniel L.; Vila-Concejo, Ana; Puotinen, Marji

    2016-01-01

    The response of platform reefs to sea-level stabilization over the past 6 ka is well established for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), with reefs typically accreting laterally from windward to leeward. However, these observations are based on few cores spread across reef zones and may not accurately reflect a reef's true accretional response to the Holocene stillstand. We present a new record of reef accretion based on 49 U/Th ages from Heron and One Tree reefs in conjunction with re-analyzed data from 14 reefs across the GBR. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic energy is the main driver of accretional direction; exposed reefs accreted primarily lagoon-ward while protected reefs accreted seawards, contrary to the traditional growth model in the GBR. Lateral accretion rates varied from 86.3 m/ka-42.4 m/ka on the exposed One Tree windward reef and 68.35 m/ka-15.7 m/ka on the protected leeward Heron reef, suggesting that wind/wave energy is not a dominant control on lateral accretion rates. This represents the most comprehensive statement of lateral accretion direction and rates from the mid-outer platform reefs of the GBR, confirming great variability in reef flat growth both within and between reef margins over the last 6 ka, and highlighting the need for closely-spaced transects.

  11. Transient effects of drying creep in nanoporous solids: understanding the effects of nanoscale energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinko, Robert; Vandamme, Matthieu; Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Keten, Sinan

    2016-07-01

    The Pickett effect is the phenomenon of creep enhancement during transient drying. It has been observed for many nanoporous solids, including concrete, wood and Kevlar. While the existing micromechanical models can partially explain this effect, they have yet to consider nanoscale dynamic effects of water in nanopores, which are believed to be of paramount importance. Here, we examine how creep deformations in a slit pore are accelerated by the motion of water due to drying forces using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the drying that drives water flow in the nanopores lowers both the activation energy of pore walls sliding past one another and the apparent viscosity of confined water molecules. This lowering can be captured with an analytical Arrhenius relationship accounting for the role of water flow in overcoming the energy barriers. Notably, we use this model and simulation results to demonstrate that the drying creep strain is not linearly dependent on the applied creep stress at the nanopore level. Our findings establish the scaling relationships that explain how the creep driving force, drying force and fluid properties are related. Thus, we establish the nanoscale origins of the Pickett effect and provide strategies for minimizing the additional displacements arising from this effect.

  12. Understanding {sup 6}He induced reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A. M.; Arias, J. M.; Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Escrig, D.; Tengblad, O.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.

    2009-06-03

    Recent developments aimed to understand the observed features arising in the scattering of the Borromean nucleus {sup 6}He on heavy targets are discussed and compared with recent data for {sup 6}He+{sup 208}Pb measured at the RIB facility at Louvain-la-Neuve at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The analysis of the elastic scattering data in terms of the optical model, reveals the presence of a long range absorption mechanism, that manifests in the form of a large value of the imaginary diffuseness parameter. The elastic data have been also compared with three--body CDCC calculations, based on a di-neutron model of {sup 6}He, and four--body CDCC calculations, based on a more realistic three-body model of this nucleus. Finally, the angular and energy distribution of {alpha} particles emitted at backward angles are discussed and compared with different theoretical approaches. We find that these {alpha} particles are produced mainly by a two-neutron transfer mechanism to very excited states in the residual nucleus.

  13. Role of codeposited impurities during growth. II. Dependence of morphology on binding and barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    In an accompanying article we showed that surface morphologies obtained through codeposition of a small quantity (2%) of impurities with Cu during growth (step-flow mode, θ = 40 ML) significantly depends on the lateral nearest-neighbor binding energy (ENN) to Cu adatom and the diffusion barrier (Ed) of the impurity atom on Cu(0 0 1). Based on these two energy parameters, ENN and Ed, we classify impurity atoms into four sets. We study island nucleation and growth in the presence of codeposited impurities from different sets in the submonolayer (θ⩽ 0.7 ML) regime. Similar to growth in the step-flow mode, we find different nucleation and growth behavior for impurities from different sets. We characterize these differences through variations of the number of islands (Ni) and the average island size with coverage (θ). Further, we compute the critical nucleus size (i) for all of these cases from the distribution of capture-zone areas using the generalized Wigner distribution.

  14. I. Gas adsorption properties and porosity of transition metal-based cyanogels. II. Novel energy transfer processes in organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rahul Shrikant

    The gas adsorption properties and porosity of cyanide-bridged transition metal-based gels are investigated in the first part of this dissertation. The cyanide bridges, connecting two transition metal centers, are characteristic of these gels; hence, these gels are termed cyanogels. Aerogel versus xerogel structures have a profound effect, both, on the thermodynamics and kinetics of gas adsorption on these cyanogels. Carbon dioxide is selectively adsorbed on palladium-cobalt-based cyanogels; the adsorption is fully reversible on both types of gels discussed. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the gas adsorption processes on these gels are analyzed here. From the ease and reproducibility of the CO2 desorption and the associated enthalpy values, it is concluded that CO2 is physisorbed on these gels. Both the adsorption and desorption processes are first-order in the gels. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on the palladium-cobalt cyanogels is also investigated. Unlike CO 2 physisorption, carbon monoxide is chemisorbed on these gels. An uptake of CO brings about a profound change in the xerogel morphology. The palladium-cobalt-based aerogels possess both micro- and mesoporosity; the xerogels are predominantly microporous with a narrow microporosity. The aerogel surfaces are found to be fractal as analyzed by gas adsorption. Unlike the aerogels, the xerogels do not possess surface fractality. The mechanism of adsorption of different gases on these gels is analyzed based on the gel morphologies. These transition metal-based gels are promising for a variety of applications such as heterogeneous catalysts, gas filters and magnetic materials. The porosity of these gels can be exploited to make gel-embedded filters to separate mixtures of gases based on the their differential adsorption propensities. The reversible adsorption of CO2 can be harnessed practically by using these gels as CO2 storage reservoirs. In the second part of this dissertation, the first, balanced, white

  15. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  16. Triangular tessellation scheme for the adsorption free energy at the liquid-liquid interface: Towards nonconvex patterned colloids.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Joost; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2009-11-01

    We present a numerical technique, namely, triangular tessellation, to calculate the free energy associated with the adsorption of a colloidal particle at a flat interface. The theory and numerical scheme presented here are sufficiently general to handle nonconvex patchy colloids with arbitrary surface patterns characterized by a wetting angle, e.g., amphiphilicity. We ignore interfacial deformation due to capillary, electrostatic, or gravitational forces, but the method can be extended to take such effects into account. It is verified that the numerical method presented is accurate and sufficiently stable to be applied to more general situations than presented in this paper. The merits of the tessellation method prove to outweigh those of traditionally used semianalytic approaches, especially when it comes to generality and applicability. PMID:20364983

  17. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  18. Molecular origin of high free energy barriers for alkali metal ion transfer through ionic liquid-graphene electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ivaništšev, Vladislav; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M; Cabeza, Oscar; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2016-01-14

    In this work we study mechanisms of solvent-mediated ion interactions with charged surfaces in ionic liquids by molecular dynamics simulations, in an attempt to reveal the main trends that determine ion-electrode interactions in ionic liquids. We compare the interfacial behaviour of Li(+) and K(+) at a charged graphene sheet in a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, and its mixtures with lithium and potassium tetrafluoroborate salts. Our results show that there are dense interfacial solvation structures in these electrolytes that lead to the formation of high free energy barriers for these alkali metal cations between the bulk and direct contact with the negatively charged surface. We show that the stronger solvation of Li(+) in the ionic liquid leads to the formation of significantly higher interfacial free energy barriers for Li(+) than for K(+). The high free energy barriers observed in our simulations can explain the generally high interfacial resistance in electrochemical storage devices that use ionic liquid-based electrolytes. Overcoming these barriers is the rate-limiting step in the interfacial transport of alkali metal ions and, hence, appears to be a major drawback for a generalised application of ionic liquids in electrochemistry. Some plausible strategies for future theoretical and experimental work for tuning them are suggested. PMID:26661060

  19. Excitonic binding energies in diffused-intermixed GaAs/AlAs/AlGaAs double barrier quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, R. K.; Chen, Y.

    1995-03-01

    We report a detailed study of the exciton properties in thermally diffused GaAs/AlAs/AlxGa1-xAs double barrier quantum wells (DBQW). The interband transition energies have been calculated with a standard transfer matrix method, while the exciton binding energy is obtained by a variational approach with an elliptic exciton envelope function. It is found that the inserted thin AlAs layer between the GaAs well and the AlGaAs barriers has a substantial effect on the exciton confinement and the intermixing properties. For thin enough AlAs barriers, the exciton binding energy increases for increasing diffusion lengths, reaches a maximum and then decreases gradually. The results show that a DBQW mixes faster than a single QW, due to the additional AlAs layers. Thick AlAs barriers enable the formation of an indirect AlGaAs intermixed well region, and the effects which stem from the indirect band line up are discussed.

  20. Molecular origin of high free energy barriers for alkali metal ion transfer through ionic liquid-graphene electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ivaništšev, Vladislav; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M; Cabeza, Oscar; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2016-01-14

    In this work we study mechanisms of solvent-mediated ion interactions with charged surfaces in ionic liquids by molecular dynamics simulations, in an attempt to reveal the main trends that determine ion-electrode interactions in ionic liquids. We compare the interfacial behaviour of Li(+) and K(+) at a charged graphene sheet in a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, and its mixtures with lithium and potassium tetrafluoroborate salts. Our results show that there are dense interfacial solvation structures in these electrolytes that lead to the formation of high free energy barriers for these alkali metal cations between the bulk and direct contact with the negatively charged surface. We show that the stronger solvation of Li(+) in the ionic liquid leads to the formation of significantly higher interfacial free energy barriers for Li(+) than for K(+). The high free energy barriers observed in our simulations can explain the generally high interfacial resistance in electrochemical storage devices that use ionic liquid-based electrolytes. Overcoming these barriers is the rate-limiting step in the interfacial transport of alkali metal ions and, hence, appears to be a major drawback for a generalised application of ionic liquids in electrochemistry. Some plausible strategies for future theoretical and experimental work for tuning them are suggested.

  1. Free-Energy Barrier of Filling a Spherical Cavity in the Presence of Line Tension: Implication to the Energy Barrier between the Cassie and Wenzel States on a Superhydrophobic Surface with Spherical Cavities.

    PubMed

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2016-09-20

    The free-energy barrier of filling a spherical cavity having an inner wall of various wettabilities is studied. The morphology and free energy of a lens-shaped droplet are determined from the minimum of the free energy. The effect of line tension on the free energy is also studied. Then, the equilibrium contact angle of the droplet is determined from the generalized Young's equation. By increasing the droplet volume within the spherical cavity, the droplet morphology changes from spherical with an equilibrium contact angle of 180° to a lens with a convex meniscus, where the morphological complete drying transition occurs. By further increasing the droplet volume, the meniscus changes from convex to concave. Then, the lens-shaped droplet with concave meniscus spreads over the whole inner wall, resulting in an equilibrium contact angle of 0° to leave a spherical bubble, where the morphological complete wetting transition occurs. Finally, the whole cavity is filled with liquid. The free energy shows a barrier from complete drying to complete wetting as a function of droplet volume, which corresponds to the energy barrier between the Cassie and Wenzel states of the superhydrophobic surface with spherical cavities. The free-energy maximum occurs when the meniscus of the droplet becomes flat, and it is given by an analytic formula. The effect of line tension is expressed by the scaled line tension, and this effect is largest at the free-energy maximum. The positive line tension increases the free-energy maximum, which thus increases the stability of the Cassie superhydrophobic state, whereas the negative line tension destabilizes the superhydrophobic state.

  2. Free-Energy Barrier of Filling a Spherical Cavity in the Presence of Line Tension: Implication to the Energy Barrier between the Cassie and Wenzel States on a Superhydrophobic Surface with Spherical Cavities.

    PubMed

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2016-09-20

    The free-energy barrier of filling a spherical cavity having an inner wall of various wettabilities is studied. The morphology and free energy of a lens-shaped droplet are determined from the minimum of the free energy. The effect of line tension on the free energy is also studied. Then, the equilibrium contact angle of the droplet is determined from the generalized Young's equation. By increasing the droplet volume within the spherical cavity, the droplet morphology changes from spherical with an equilibrium contact angle of 180° to a lens with a convex meniscus, where the morphological complete drying transition occurs. By further increasing the droplet volume, the meniscus changes from convex to concave. Then, the lens-shaped droplet with concave meniscus spreads over the whole inner wall, resulting in an equilibrium contact angle of 0° to leave a spherical bubble, where the morphological complete wetting transition occurs. Finally, the whole cavity is filled with liquid. The free energy shows a barrier from complete drying to complete wetting as a function of droplet volume, which corresponds to the energy barrier between the Cassie and Wenzel states of the superhydrophobic surface with spherical cavities. The free-energy maximum occurs when the meniscus of the droplet becomes flat, and it is given by an analytic formula. The effect of line tension is expressed by the scaled line tension, and this effect is largest at the free-energy maximum. The positive line tension increases the free-energy maximum, which thus increases the stability of the Cassie superhydrophobic state, whereas the negative line tension destabilizes the superhydrophobic state. PMID:27564853

  3. Sucrose Increases the Activation Energy Barrier for Actin-Myosin Strong Binding

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Del R.; Webb, Milad; Stewart, Travis J.; Phillips, Travis; Carter, Michael; Cremo, Christine R.; Baker, Josh E.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the mechanism by which sucrose slows in vitro actin sliding velocities, V, we used stopped flow kinetics and a single molecule binding assay, SiMBA. We observed that in the absence of ATP, sucrose (880 mM) slowed the rate of actin-myosin (A-M) strong binding by 71 ± 8% with a smaller inhibitory effect observed on spontaneous rigor dissociation (21 ± 3%). Similarly, in the presence of ATP, sucrose slowed strong binding associated with Pi release by 85 ± 9% with a smaller inhibitory effect on ATP-induced A-M dissociation, kT (39 ± 2%). Sucrose had no noticeable effect on any other step in the ATPase reaction. In SiMBA, sucrose had a relatively small effect on the diffusion coefficient for actin fragments (25 ± 2%), and with stopped flow we showed that sucrose increased the activation energy barrier for A-M strong binding by 37 ± 3%, indicating that sucrose inhibits the rate of A-M strong binding by slowing bond formation more than diffusional searching. The inhibitory effects of sucrose on the rate of A-M rigor binding (71%) are comparable in magnitude to sucrose’s effects on both V (79 ± 33% decrease) and maximal actin-activated ATPase, kcat, (81 ± 16% decrease), indicating that the rate of A-M strong bond formation significantly influences both kcat and V. PMID:24370736

  4. Protein misfolding occurs by slow diffusion across multiple barriers in a rough energy landscape

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Dee, Derek R.; Liu, Xia; Brigley, Angela M.; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The timescale for the microscopic dynamics of proteins during conformational transitions is set by the intrachain diffusion coefficient, D. Despite the central role of protein misfolding and aggregation in many diseases, it has proven challenging to measure D for these processes because of their heterogeneity. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to overcome these challenges and determine D for misfolding of the prion protein PrP. Observing directly the misfolding of individual dimers into minimal aggregates, we reconstructed the energy landscape governing nonnative structure formation. Remarkably, rather than displaying multiple pathways, as typically expected for aggregation, PrP dimers were funneled into a thermodynamically stable misfolded state along a single pathway containing several intermediates, one of which blocked native folding. Using Kramers’ rate theory, D was found to be 1,000-fold slower for misfolding than for native folding, reflecting local roughening of the misfolding landscape, likely due to increased internal friction. The slow diffusion also led to much longer transit times for barrier crossing, allowing transition paths to be observed directly for the first time to our knowledge. These results open a new window onto the microscopic mechanisms governing protein misfolding. PMID:26109573

  5. Protein misfolding occurs by slow diffusion across multiple barriers in a rough energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Dee, Derek R; Liu, Xia; Brigley, Angela M; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T

    2015-07-01

    The timescale for the microscopic dynamics of proteins during conformational transitions is set by the intrachain diffusion coefficient, D. Despite the central role of protein misfolding and aggregation in many diseases, it has proven challenging to measure D for these processes because of their heterogeneity. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to overcome these challenges and determine D for misfolding of the prion protein PrP. Observing directly the misfolding of individual dimers into minimal aggregates, we reconstructed the energy landscape governing nonnative structure formation. Remarkably, rather than displaying multiple pathways, as typically expected for aggregation, PrP dimers were funneled into a thermodynamically stable misfolded state along a single pathway containing several intermediates, one of which blocked native folding. Using Kramers' rate theory, D was found to be 1,000-fold slower for misfolding than for native folding, reflecting local roughening of the misfolding landscape, likely due to increased internal friction. The slow diffusion also led to much longer transit times for barrier crossing, allowing transition paths to be observed directly for the first time to our knowledge. These results open a new window onto the microscopic mechanisms governing protein misfolding.

  6. The role of vdW interactions in coverage dependent adsorption energies of atomic adsorbates on Pt(111) and Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, Hari; Kitchin, John R.

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption, a fundamental process in heterogeneous catalysis is known to be dependent on the adsorbate-adsorbate and surface-adsorbate bonds. van der Waals (vdW) interactions are one of the types of interactions that have not been examined thoroughly as a function of adsorbate coverage. In this work we quantify the vdW interactions for atomic adsorbates on late transition metal surfaces, and determine how these long range forces affect the coverage dependent adsorption energies. We calculate the adsorption energies of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, fluorine, bromine and chlorine species on Pt(111) and Pd(111) at coverages ranging from 1/4 to 1 ML using the BEEF-vdW functional. We observe that adsorption energies remain coverage dependent, and this coverage dependence is shown to be statistically significant. vdW interactions are found to be coverage dependent, but more significantly, they are found to be dependent on molecular properties such as adsorbate size, and consequently, correlate with the adsorbate effective nuclear charge. We observe that these interactions account for a reduction in the binding energy of the system, due to the destabilizing attractive interactions between the adsorbates which weaken its bond with the surface.

  7. Changes in the size of the apparent surface area and adsorption energy of the rye roots by low pH and the presence of aluminium ions induced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatanik-Kloc, Alicja

    2016-07-01

    The plant reactions on Al-stress include i.a. change of the surface area of the roots, which in the physicochemistry of plants characterizes the transport of water and ions through the root. The object of this study is the specific surface area of the roots of plants which are tolerant to aluminium, such as rye. Plants of rye were grown in a nutrient solution for 14 days at pH 4.5 in the presence of Al3+ ions of concentration 10, 20, and 40 mg dm-3. The control plants were grown continuously at pH 7 or pH 4.5 without Al3+. The apparent surface area and adsorption energy of the plants roots were determined from water vapour adsorption - desorption data. The apparent surface area of roots growing in the aluminium was (with respect to control) statistically significantly lower. There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent surface area of the roots which grew in pH 7, pH 4.5 without Al3+. The average water vapour adsorption energy of the root surface, under stress conditions decreased. In the roots grown in the presence of Al+3, there was a slight decrease in high energy adsorption centres and an increase in the amount of low-energy centres.

  8. Highly selective CO2 adsorption accompanied with low-energy regeneration in a two-dimensional Cu(II) porous coordination polymer with inorganic fluorinated PF6(-) anions.

    PubMed

    Noro, Shin-ichiro; Hijikata, Yuh; Inukai, Munehiro; Fukushima, Tomohiro; Horike, Satoshi; Higuchi, Masakazu; Kitagawa, Susumu; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takayoshi

    2013-01-01

    High selectivity and low-energy regeneration for adsorption of CO(2) gas were achieved concurrently in a two-dimensional Cu(II) porous coordination polymer, [Cu(PF(6))(2)(4,4'-bpy)(2)](n) (4,4'-bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine), containing inorganic fluorinated PF(6)(-) anions that can act as moderate interaction sites for CO(2) molecules.

  9. Numerical determination of the interfacial energy and nucleation barrier of curved solid-liquid interfaces in binary systems.

    PubMed

    Kundin, Julia; Choudhary, Muhammad Ajmal

    2016-07-01

    The phase-field crystal (PFC) technique is a widely used approach for modeling crystal growth phenomena with atomistic resolution on mesoscopic time scales. We use a two-dimensional PFC model for a binary system based on the work of Elder et al. [Phys. Rev. B 75, 064107 (2007)PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.75.064107] to study the effect of the curved, diffuse solid-liquid interface on the interfacial energy as well as the nucleation barrier. The calculation of the interfacial energy and the nucleation barrier certainly depends on the proper definition of the solid-liquid dividing surface and the corresponding nucleus size. We define the position of the sharp interface at which the interfacial energy is to be evaluated by using the concept of equimolar dividing surface (r^{e}) and the minimization of the interfacial energy (r^{s}). The comparison of the results based on both radii shows that the difference r^{e}-r^{s} is always positive and has a limit for large cluster sizes which is comparable to the Tolman length. Furthermore, we found the real nucleation barrier for small cluster sizes, which is defined as a function of the radius r^{s}, and compared it with the classical nucleation theory. The simulation results also show that the extracted interfacial energy as function of both radii is independent of system size, and this dependence can be reasonably described by the nonclassical Tolman formula with a positive Tolman length.

  10. Numerical determination of the interfacial energy and nucleation barrier of curved solid-liquid interfaces in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, Julia; Choudhary, Muhammad Ajmal

    2016-07-01

    The phase-field crystal (PFC) technique is a widely used approach for modeling crystal growth phenomena with atomistic resolution on mesoscopic time scales. We use a two-dimensional PFC model for a binary system based on the work of Elder et al. [Phys. Rev. B 75, 064107 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.064107] to study the effect of the curved, diffuse solid-liquid interface on the interfacial energy as well as the nucleation barrier. The calculation of the interfacial energy and the nucleation barrier certainly depends on the proper definition of the solid-liquid dividing surface and the corresponding nucleus size. We define the position of the sharp interface at which the interfacial energy is to be evaluated by using the concept of equimolar dividing surface (re) and the minimization of the interfacial energy (rs). The comparison of the results based on both radii shows that the difference re-rs is always positive and has a limit for large cluster sizes which is comparable to the Tolman length. Furthermore, we found the real nucleation barrier for small cluster sizes, which is defined as a function of the radius rs, and compared it with the classical nucleation theory. The simulation results also show that the extracted interfacial energy as function of both radii is independent of system size, and this dependence can be reasonably described by the nonclassical Tolman formula with a positive Tolman length.

  11. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  12. Nucleation and interfacial adsorption in ternary systems.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T

    2015-03-01

    Nucleation is studied in incompressible ternary fluids by examining the topology of the overall landscape of the energy surface. Minimum free energy paths for nucleation (MFEPs) of a single nucleus in an infinite matrix are computed with the string method in the framework of the continuum theory of nucleation for the regular solution. Properties of the critical nucleus are compared with the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. MFEPs are found to exhibit complex nucleation pathways with non-monotonic variations of compositions in the interfacial region, specifically adsorption of a component. In the symmetric regular solution, the minority component is found to segregate at the interface during nucleation with a concomitant depletion of the nucleus core, resulting in unpredicted partition of the non-selective component. Despite increasing the gradient energy, such inhomogeneity in composition is shown to lower the nucleation barrier. PMID:25747088

  13. Effects of Alloyed Metal on the Catalysis Activity of Pt for Ethanol Partial Oxidation: Adsorption and Dehydrogenation on Pt3M (M=Pt, Ru, Sn, Re, Rh, and Pd)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen-Feng; Wang, Yixuan

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption and dehydrogenation reactions of ethanol over bimetallic clusters, Pt3M (M = Pt, Ru, Sn, Re, Rh, and Pd), have been extensively investigated with density functional theory. Both the α-hydrogen and hydroxyl adsorptions on Pt as well as on the alloyed transition metal M sites of PtM were considered as initial reaction steps. The adsorptions of ethanol on Pt and M sites of some PtM via the α-hydrogen were well established. Although the α-hydrogen adsorption on Pt site is weaker than the hydroxyl, the potential energy profiles show that the dehydrogenation via the α-hydrogen path has much lower energy barrier than that via the hydroxyl path. Generally for the α-hydrogen path the adsorption is a rate-determining-step because of rather low dehydrogenation barrier for the α-hydrogen adsorption complex (thermodynamic control), while the hydroxyl path is determined by its dehydrogenation step (kinetic control). The effects of alloyed metal on the catalysis activity of Pt for ethanol partial oxidation, including adsorption energy, energy barrier, electronic structure, and eventually rate constant were discussed. Among all of the alloyed metals only Sn enhances the rate constant of the dehydrogenation via the α-hydrogen path on the Pt site of Pt3Sn as compared with Pt alone, which interprets why the PtSn is the most active to the oxidation of ethanol. PMID:22102920

  14. Effects of Alloyed Metal on the Catalysis Activity of Pt for Ethanol Partial Oxidation: Adsorption and Dehydrogenation on Pt(3)M (M=Pt, Ru, Sn, Re, Rh, and Pd).

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Feng; Wang, Yixuan

    2011-10-27

    The adsorption and dehydrogenation reactions of ethanol over bimetallic clusters, Pt(3)M (M = Pt, Ru, Sn, Re, Rh, and Pd), have been extensively investigated with density functional theory. Both the α-hydrogen and hydroxyl adsorptions on Pt as well as on the alloyed transition metal M sites of PtM were considered as initial reaction steps. The adsorptions of ethanol on Pt and M sites of some PtM via the α-hydrogen were well established. Although the α-hydrogen adsorption on Pt site is weaker than the hydroxyl, the potential energy profiles show that the dehydrogenation via the α-hydrogen path has much lower energy barrier than that via the hydroxyl path. Generally for the α-hydrogen path the adsorption is a rate-determining-step because of rather low dehydrogenation barrier for the α-hydrogen adsorption complex (thermodynamic control), while the hydroxyl path is determined by its dehydrogenation step (kinetic control). The effects of alloyed metal on the catalysis activity of Pt for ethanol partial oxidation, including adsorption energy, energy barrier, electronic structure, and eventually rate constant were discussed. Among all of the alloyed metals only Sn enhances the rate constant of the dehydrogenation via the α-hydrogen path on the Pt site of Pt(3)Sn as compared with Pt alone, which interprets why the PtSn is the most active to the oxidation of ethanol. PMID:22102920

  15. On the hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on Cu surfaces and nanorows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Falcón, Leny; Viñes, Francesc; Notario-Estévez, Almudena; Illas, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Here we present a thorough density functional theory study, including and excluding dispersive forces interaction description, on the adsorption and dissociation of H2 molecule on the low-index Miller Cu (111), (100), and (110) surfaces and two different surface Cu nanorows, all displaying a different number of surface nearest neighbors, nn. The computational setup has been optimized granting an accuracy below 0.04 eV. Surface and nanorow energies-for which a new methodology to extract them is presented- are found to follow the nn number. However, the adsorption strength is found not to. Thus, the adsorption energies seem to be governed by a particular orbital ↔ band interaction rather than by the simple nn surface saturation. The van der Waals (vdW) forces are found to play a key role in the adsorption of H2, and merely an energetic adjustment on chemisorbed H adatoms. Neither clear trends are observed for H2 and H adsorption energies, and H2 dissociation energy with respect nn, and nor Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi, making H2 adsorption and dissociation a trend outlier compared to other cases. H2 is found to adsorb and dissociate on Cu(100) surface. On the Cu(111) surface, the rather small H2 adsorption energy would prevent H2 dissociation, regardless if it is thermodynamically driven. On Cu(110) surface, the H2 dissociation process would be endothermic and achievable if adsorption energy is released on surpassing the dissociation energy barrier. On low-coordinated sites on Cu nanorows, vdW plays a key role in the H2 dissociation process, which otherwise is found to be endothermic. Indeed, dispersive forces turn the process markedly exothermic. Nanoparticle Cu systems must display Cu(100) surfaces or facets in order to dissociate H2, vital in many hydrogenation processes.

  16. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  17. Simulations about self-absorption of tritium in titanium tritide and the energy deposition in a silicon Schottky barrier diode.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Liu, Yebing; Hu, Rui; Yang, Yuqing; Wang, Guanquan; Zhong, Zhengkun; Luo, Shunzhong

    2012-11-01

    Simulations on the self-absorption of tritium electrons in titanium tritide films and the energy deposition in a silicon Schottky barrier diode are carried out using the Geant4 radiation transport toolkit. Energy consumed in each part of the Schottky radiovoltaic battery is simulated to give a clue about how to make the battery work better. The power and energy-conversion efficiency of the tritium silicon Schottky radiovoltaic battery in an optimized design are simulated. Good consistency with experiments is obtained. PMID:22935439

  18. SCC-DFTB Energy Barriers for Single and Double Proton Transfer Processes in the Model Molecular Systems Malonaldehyde and Porphycene

    SciTech Connect

    Walewski, L.; Krachtus, D; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C; Bala, P.; Lesyng, B.

    2005-09-01

    Self-consistent charge-density functional tight-binding SCC-DFTB is a computationally efficient method applicable to large (bio)molecular systems in which (bio)chemical reactions may occur. Among these reactions are proton transfer processes. This method, along with more advanced ab initio techniques, is applied in this study to compute intramolecular barriers for single and double proton transfer processes in the model systems, malonaldehyde and porphycene, respectively. SCC-DFTB is compared with experimental data and higher-level ab initio calculations. For malonaldehyde, the SCC-DFTB barrier height is 3.1 kcal/mol in vacuo and 4.2 kcal/mol in water solution. In the case of porphycene, the minimum energy pathways for double intramolecular proton transfer were determined using the conjugate peak refinement (CPR) method. Six isomers of porphycene were ordered according to energy. The only energetically allowed pathway was found to connect two symmetrical trans states via an unstable cis-A isomer. The SCC-DFTB barrier heights are 11.1 kcal/mol for the trans-cis-A process, and 7.4 kcal/mol for the reverse cis-A-trans one with the energy difference of 3.7 kcal/mol between the trans- and cis-A states. The method provides satisfactory energy results when compared with reference ab initio and experimental data.

  19. Thermodynamics of interfacial energy in binary metallic systems: influence of adsorption on dihedral angles

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, I. . E-mail: ichiko@eps.s.u-tiokyo.ac.jp; Takei, Y.

    2005-02-01

    The solid-liquid interfacial energy (or interfacial tension) was investigated by the lattice-liquid statistical calculation and by the Cahn-Hilliard theory of interface. Interfacial energies in binary metallic systems were estimated from a few bulk thermodynamic properties, i.e., melting temperature, entropy of fusion, and the critical temperature of the liquid phase. In eutectic systems, interfacial energy gradually increases with decreasing concentration of the solid species in the liquid. In monotectic systems, interfacial thickening occurs and interfacial energy is reduced around the liquid immiscibility gap. The results of calculation explain the experimental data of dihedral angles fairly well.

  20. Influence of low-energy argon implantation on gallium arsenide Schottky barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.G.; Ashok, S.

    1989-03-15

    The influence of ion bombardment damage on the properties of Au/GaAs Schottky barriers has been studied with 10-keV Ar implanted into both n-type and p-type GaAs over the dose range 10/sup 12/--10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/. Electrical characteristics determined over a wide temperature range (77--360 K) reveal a number of phenomena dictating barrier modification and carrier transport across the Au/GaAs interface: Change in Schottky barrier height due to defect levels introduced by ion damage, the very low threshold dose for barrier modification, increased series resistance, and creation of a shunt conducting path. Partial dynamic annealing of defects is also observed under high-temperature (approx. =200 /sup 0/C) implantation.

  1. A four-coordinate cobalt(II) single-ion magnet with coercivity and a very high energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Rechkemmer, Yvonne; Breitgoff, Frauke D; van der Meer, Margarethe; Atanasov, Mihail; Hakl, Michael; Orlita, Milan; Neugebauer, Petr; Neese, Frank; Sarkar, Biprajit; van Slageren, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets display magnetic bistability of molecular origin, which may one day be exploited in magnetic data storage devices. Recently it was realised that increasing the magnetic moment of polynuclear molecules does not automatically lead to a substantial increase in magnetic bistability. Attention has thus increasingly focussed on ions with large magnetic anisotropies, especially lanthanides. In spite of large effective energy barriers towards relaxation of the magnetic moment, this has so far not led to a big increase in magnetic bistability. Here we present a comprehensive study of a mononuclear, tetrahedrally coordinated cobalt(II) single-molecule magnet, which has a very high effective energy barrier and displays pronounced magnetic bistability. The combined experimental-theoretical approach enables an in-depth understanding of the origin of these favourable properties, which are shown to arise from a strong ligand field in combination with axial distortion. Our findings allow formulation of clear design principles for improved materials. PMID:26883902

  2. A four-coordinate cobalt(II) single-ion magnet with coercivity and a very high energy barrier

    PubMed Central

    Rechkemmer, Yvonne; Breitgoff, Frauke D.; van der Meer, Margarethe; Atanasov, Mihail; Hakl, Michael; Orlita, Milan; Neugebauer, Petr; Sarkar, Biprajit; van Slageren, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets display magnetic bistability of molecular origin, which may one day be exploited in magnetic data storage devices. Recently it was realised that increasing the magnetic moment of polynuclear molecules does not automatically lead to a substantial increase in magnetic bistability. Attention has thus increasingly focussed on ions with large magnetic anisotropies, especially lanthanides. In spite of large effective energy barriers towards relaxation of the magnetic moment, this has so far not led to a big increase in magnetic bistability. Here we present a comprehensive study of a mononuclear, tetrahedrally coordinated cobalt(II) single-molecule magnet, which has a very high effective energy barrier and displays pronounced magnetic bistability. The combined experimental-theoretical approach enables an in-depth understanding of the origin of these favourable properties, which are shown to arise from a strong ligand field in combination with axial distortion. Our findings allow formulation of clear design principles for improved materials. PMID:26883902

  3. Localized Opto-Mechanical Control of Protein Adsorption onto Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Dakota; Serey, Xavier; Kang, Pilgyu; Erickson, David

    2014-01-01

    Chemical reactions can be described by an energy diagram along a reaction coordinate in which an activation barrier limits the rate at which reactants can be transformed into products. This reaction impedance can be overcome by reducing the magnitude of the barrier through the use of catalysis, increasing the thermal energy of the system, or through macroscopic mechanical processes. Here, we demonstrate direct molecular-scale control of a reaction through the precise application of opto-mechanical work. The method uses optical gradient forces generated in the evanescent field surrounding hybrid photonic-plasmonic structures to drive an otherwise unlikely adsorption reaction between proteins and carbon nanotubes. The adsorption of immunoglobulins on carbon nanotubes is used as a model reaction and investigated with an extended DLVO theory. The technique is also used to force a Förster resonance energy transfer between fluorophores on mismatched immunoglobulin proteins and is expected to lead to novel forms of chemical synthesis. PMID:25330911

  4. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2011-06-23

    Consumers regularly forgo purchases of high efficiency appliances that appear to be cost effective at a reasonable rate of return. While some argue that this is a true revelation of preferences for appliance features, this 'efficiency gap' can be largely explained by a combination of market and behavioral failures that reduce consumers ability to evaluate the relative value of appliances and skew preferences toward initial cost savings, undervaluing future reductions in operating costs. These failures and barriers include externalities of energy use, imperfect competition between manufacturers, asymmetric information, bounded rationality, split incentives, and transaction costs (Golove 1996). Recognizing the social benefit of energy conservation, several major methods are used by policymakers to ensure that efficient appliances are purchased: minimum efficiency standards, Energy Star labeling, and rebates and tax credits. There is no single market for energy services; there are hundreds of uses, thousands of intermediaries, and millions of users, and likewise, no single appropriate government intervention (Golove 1996). Complementary approaches must be implemented, considering policy and institutional limitations. In this paper, I first lay out the rationale for government intervention by addressing the market and behavioral failures and barriers that arise in the context of residential energy efficiency. I then consider the ways in which some of these failures and barriers are addressed through major federal programs and state and utility level programs that leverage them, as well as identifying barriers that are not addressed by currently implemented programs. Heterogeneity of consumers, lack of financing options, and split incentives of landlords and tenants contribute significantly to the under-adoption of efficient appliances. To quantify the size of the market most affected by these barriers, I estimate the number of appliances, and in particular the number

  5. EFFECTS OF NUCLEAR INDUCED BREAKUP ON THE FUSION OF 6Li+12C AND 6He+12C SYSTEMS AROUND BARRIER ENERGIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhan, Sukhvinder S.; Singh, Manjeet; Kharab, Rajesh

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the effects of nuclear induced breakup channel coupling on the fusion cross-section for 6Li+12C and 6He+12C systems in the near barrier energy regime using the dynamic polarization potential (DPP) approach. It has been found that there is enhancement in the fusion cross-section with respect to standard one-dimensional barrier penetration model in the below barrier energy regime while at energies above the barrier there is suppression of fusion cross-section with respect to simple barrier penetration model is observed. The agreement between data and predictions for 6Li+12C system improves significantly as a result of the inclusion of nuclear induced DPP.

  6. Irreversible adsorption-driven assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces revealed by a dynamic surface tension probe.

    PubMed

    Bizmark, Navid; Ioannidis, Marios A; Henneke, Dale E

    2014-01-28

    Adsorption-driven self-assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces is a promising bottom-up approach for the preparation of advanced functional materials and devices. Full realization of its potential requires quantitative understanding of the parameters controlling the self-assembly, the structure of nanoparticles at the interface, the barrier properties of the assembly, and the rate of particle attachment. We argue that models of dynamic surface or interfacial tension (DST) appropriate for molecular species break down when the adsorption energy greatly exceeds the mean energy of thermal fluctuations and validate alternative models extending the application of generalized random sequential adsorption theory to nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces. Using a model colloidal system of hydrophobic, charge-stabilized ethyl cellulose nanoparticles at neutral pH, we demonstrate the potential of DST measurements to reveal information on the energy of adsorption, the adsorption rate constant, and the energy of particle-interface interaction at different degrees of nanoparticle coverage of the interface. These findings have significant implications for the quantitative description of nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces.

  7. Adsorption and reactivity of CO(2) on defective graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa

    2009-01-15

    Density-functional calculations have been performed to investigate the adsorption of CO(2) on defected graphite (0001) represented by a single graphene sheet. The interaction with a vacancy defect gives a computed molecular binding energy of approximately 136 meV in a strong physisorbed state. Subsequently, chemisorption by lactone group formation will occur after overcoming a barrier of approximately 1 eV relative to the gas phase, with an exothermicity of about 1.4 eV. Further reaction paths from this chemisorbed state lead to dissociation of the CO(2) through the formation of epoxy groups followed by oxygen recombination and desorption of O(2), after overcoming successive energy barriers of approximately 0.9 and approximately 1.0 eV. The global minimum ("O(2) desorbed + graphene sheet") entails an energy release of about 3.4 eV with respect to the initial state.

  8. Specific Barriers and Drivers in Different Stages of Decision-Making about Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Private Homes

    PubMed Central

    Klöckner, Christian A.; Nayum, Alim

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency upgrades of privately owned homes like adding to the insulation layers in the walls, roof or floor, or replacing windows with more efficiently insulated versions can contribute significantly to reducing the energy impact of the building sector and thus also the CO2 footprint of a household. However, even in countries like Norway that have a rather high rate of renovation, energy upgrades are not always integrated into such a refurbishment project. This study tests which structural and internal psychological barriers hinder and which drivers foster decision-making to implement such measures, once a renovation project is planned. With a theoretical background in stage-based models of decision-making 24 barriers and drivers were tested for their specific effect in the stages of decision-making. The four stages of decision-making assumed in this study were (1) “not being in a decision mode,” (2) “deciding what to do,” (3) “deciding how to do it,” and (4) “planning implementation.” Based on an online survey of 3787 Norwegian households, it was found that the most important barriers toward deciding to implement energy efficiency upgrades were not owning the dwelling and feeling the right time had not come yet. The most important drivers of starting to decide were higher expected comfort levels, better expected living conditions, and an expected reduction of energy costs. For the transition from deciding what to do to how to do it, not managing to make a decision and feeling the right point in time has not come yet were the strongest barriers, easily accessible information and an expected reduction of energy costs were the most important drivers. The final transition from deciding how to do the upgrades to planning implementation was driven by expecting a payoff within a reasonable time frame and higher expected comfort levels; the most important barriers were time demands for supervising contractors and—again—a feeling that the right

  9. Specific Barriers and Drivers in Different Stages of Decision-Making about Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Private Homes.

    PubMed

    Klöckner, Christian A; Nayum, Alim

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency upgrades of privately owned homes like adding to the insulation layers in the walls, roof or floor, or replacing windows with more efficiently insulated versions can contribute significantly to reducing the energy impact of the building sector and thus also the CO2 footprint of a household. However, even in countries like Norway that have a rather high rate of renovation, energy upgrades are not always integrated into such a refurbishment project. This study tests which structural and internal psychological barriers hinder and which drivers foster decision-making to implement such measures, once a renovation project is planned. With a theoretical background in stage-based models of decision-making 24 barriers and drivers were tested for their specific effect in the stages of decision-making. The four stages of decision-making assumed in this study were (1) "not being in a decision mode," (2) "deciding what to do," (3) "deciding how to do it," and (4) "planning implementation." Based on an online survey of 3787 Norwegian households, it was found that the most important barriers toward deciding to implement energy efficiency upgrades were not owning the dwelling and feeling the right time had not come yet. The most important drivers of starting to decide were higher expected comfort levels, better expected living conditions, and an expected reduction of energy costs. For the transition from deciding what to do to how to do it, not managing to make a decision and feeling the right point in time has not come yet were the strongest barriers, easily accessible information and an expected reduction of energy costs were the most important drivers. The final transition from deciding how to do the upgrades to planning implementation was driven by expecting a payoff within a reasonable time frame and higher expected comfort levels; the most important barriers were time demands for supervising contractors and-again-a feeling that the right point in time has

  10. Specific Barriers and Drivers in Different Stages of Decision-Making about Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Private Homes

    PubMed Central

    Klöckner, Christian A.; Nayum, Alim

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency upgrades of privately owned homes like adding to the insulation layers in the walls, roof or floor, or replacing windows with more efficiently insulated versions can contribute significantly to reducing the energy impact of the building sector and thus also the CO2 footprint of a household. However, even in countries like Norway that have a rather high rate of renovation, energy upgrades are not always integrated into such a refurbishment project. This study tests which structural and internal psychological barriers hinder and which drivers foster decision-making to implement such measures, once a renovation project is planned. With a theoretical background in stage-based models of decision-making 24 barriers and drivers were tested for their specific effect in the stages of decision-making. The four stages of decision-making assumed in this study were (1) “not being in a decision mode,” (2) “deciding what to do,” (3) “deciding how to do it,” and (4) “planning implementation.” Based on an online survey of 3787 Norwegian households, it was found that the most important barriers toward deciding to implement energy efficiency upgrades were not owning the dwelling and feeling the right time had not come yet. The most important drivers of starting to decide were higher expected comfort levels, better expected living conditions, and an expected reduction of energy costs. For the transition from deciding what to do to how to do it, not managing to make a decision and feeling the right point in time has not come yet were the strongest barriers, easily accessible information and an expected reduction of energy costs were the most important drivers. The final transition from deciding how to do the upgrades to planning implementation was driven by expecting a payoff within a reasonable time frame and higher expected comfort levels; the most important barriers were time demands for supervising contractors and—again—a feeling that the right

  11. Specific Barriers and Drivers in Different Stages of Decision-Making about Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Private Homes.

    PubMed

    Klöckner, Christian A; Nayum, Alim

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency upgrades of privately owned homes like adding to the insulation layers in the walls, roof or floor, or replacing windows with more efficiently insulated versions can contribute significantly to reducing the energy impact of the building sector and thus also the CO2 footprint of a household. However, even in countries like Norway that have a rather high rate of renovation, energy upgrades are not always integrated into such a refurbishment project. This study tests which structural and internal psychological barriers hinder and which drivers foster decision-making to implement such measures, once a renovation project is planned. With a theoretical background in stage-based models of decision-making 24 barriers and drivers were tested for their specific effect in the stages of decision-making. The four stages of decision-making assumed in this study were (1) "not being in a decision mode," (2) "deciding what to do," (3) "deciding how to do it," and (4) "planning implementation." Based on an online survey of 3787 Norwegian households, it was found that the most important barriers toward deciding to implement energy efficiency upgrades were not owning the dwelling and feeling the right time had not come yet. The most important drivers of starting to decide were higher expected comfort levels, better expected living conditions, and an expected reduction of energy costs. For the transition from deciding what to do to how to do it, not managing to make a decision and feeling the right point in time has not come yet were the strongest barriers, easily accessible information and an expected reduction of energy costs were the most important drivers. The final transition from deciding how to do the upgrades to planning implementation was driven by expecting a payoff within a reasonable time frame and higher expected comfort levels; the most important barriers were time demands for supervising contractors and-again-a feeling that the right point in time has

  12. Formaldehyde adsorption and decomposition on rutile (110): A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the adsorption and decomposition of formaldehyde (HCHO) molecule on stoichiometric rutile TiO2(110) surface using first principles-calculations. By comparing the adsorption energy of one bidentate and two monodentate configurations, we found the bidentate configuration is the most stable one because of an additional C-O bond formation. The monodentate configuration can change into the bidentate configuration by overcoming a small barrier less than 0.1 eV. Then, we investigated the decomposition of HCHO which involves two deprotonation processes starting from different adsorption structures. The energy barrier of the first deprotonation is 1.3 eV and 1.1 eV for bidentate and monodentate configurations. After the first deprotonation, an adsorbed formate HCOO specie is formed. The second deprotonation needs 1.74 eV and 1.64 eV for bidentate and monodentate configurations, respectively. After that, an adsorbed CO2 is formed. It can desorb from the surface after overcoming a small barrier of 0.12 eV. In principle, it is also possible to obtain a CO molecule from the surface. Yet a large energy barrier higher than 1.74 eV needs to be overcome. By analyzing the energy level alignment of molecular orbitals with TiO2 energy band edges, we discussed the photocatalytic activity of the reactants and intermediates during the decomposition process. Our results give a clear description of the adsorption structure and thermal decomposition process of HCHO on rutile TiO2(110) surface. The discussion of photocatalytic reactivity based on energy level alignment provides valuable insights to understand the combined photocatalytic and thermally catalytic reactions.

  13. Adsorption of methylchloride on Si(100) from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Aldo H.; Sbraccia, Carlo; Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    The chemisorption of methylchloride (CH3Cl) on Si(100) is studied from first principles. We find that, among a number of possible adsorption configurations, the lowest-energy structure is one in which the methylchloride molecule is dissociated into CH3 and Cl fragments which are bound to the two Si atoms of the same surface dimer. Our calculations show that dissociative chemisorption of methylchloride on Si(100) may proceed along different reaction paths characterized by different energy barriers that the system must overcome: some dissociation processes are mediated by a molecular precursor state and, at least in one case, we find that the dissociation process is nonactivated, in agreement with recent experimental findings. We have also generated, for many possible adsorption structures, theoretical scanning tunneling microscopy images which could facilitate the interpretation of experimental measurements.

  14. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  15. Fusion cross sections for {sup 6,7}Li + {sup 24}Mg reactions at energies below and above the barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Kshetri, Ritesh; Sarkar, M. Saha; Dasmahapatra, B.

    2008-12-15

    Measurement of fusion cross sections for the {sup 6,7}Li + {sup 24}Mg reactions by the characteristic {gamma}-ray method has been done at energies from below to well above the respective Coulomb barriers. The fusion cross sections obtained from these {gamma}-ray cross sections for the two systems are found to agree well with the total reaction cross sections at low energies. The relatively large difference between total cross sections and measured fusion cross sections at higher energies is consistent with the fact that other channels, in particular breakup, open up with an increase of bombarding energy. The breakup channel, however, appears not to have any influence on fusion cross sections. The critical angular momenta (l{sub cr}) deduced from the fusion cross sections are found to have an energy dependence similar to other Li-induced reactions.

  16. Metal-organic frameworks for upgrading biogas via CO2 adsorption to biogas green energy.

    PubMed

    Chaemchuen, Somboon; Kabir, Nawsad Alam; Zhou, Kui; Verpoort, Francis

    2013-12-21

    In the midst of the global climate change phenomenon, mainly caused by fossil fuel burning to provide energy for our daily life and discharge of CO2 into the atmosphere, biogas is one of the important renewable energy sources that can be upgraded and applied as a fuel source for energy in daily life. The advantages of the production of hybrid materials, metal-organic framework (MOF) adsorbents, expected for the biogas upgrading, rely on the bulk separation of CO2 under near-ambient conditions. This review highlights the challenges for MOF adsorbents, which have the greatest upgrading abilities for biogas via selective passage of methane. The key factors improving the ideal MOF materials for these high CO2 capture and selectivity uses for biogas upgrading to produce bio-methane and reduce fossil-fuel CO2 emission will be discussed.

  17. Nuclear rainbow in the 16O + 27AL system: The role of couplings at energies far above the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, D.; Linares, R.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Lubian, J.; Chamon, L. C.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Carbone, D.; Foti, A.

    2012-04-01

    High precision elastic and inelastic angular distributions have been measured for the 16O + 27Al system at a beam energy of 100 MeV. The data analysis confirms a rainbow formation as already predicted by parameter-free Coupled Channel calculations. It also helps to reveal the crucial role of inelastic couplings in the rainbow formation for heavier systems even at energies far above the Coulomb barrier. This feature, well known in atomic/molecular scattering, is experimentally studied for the first time in Nuclear Physics.

  18. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Wei, Guodan

    2010-07-06

    A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.

  19. Numerical determination of the interfacial energy and nucleation barrier of curved solid-liquid interfaces in binary systems.

    PubMed

    Kundin, Julia; Choudhary, Muhammad Ajmal

    2016-07-01

    The phase-field crystal (PFC) technique is a widely used approach for modeling crystal growth phenomena with atomistic resolution on mesoscopic time scales. We use a two-dimensional PFC model for a binary system based on the work of Elder et al. [Phys. Rev. B 75, 064107 (2007)PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.75.064107] to study the effect of the curved, diffuse solid-liquid interface on the interfacial energy as well as the nucleation barrier. The calculation of the interfacial energy and the nucleation barrier certainly depends on the proper definition of the solid-liquid dividing surface and the corresponding nucleus size. We define the position of the sharp interface at which the interfacial energy is to be evaluated by using the concept of equimolar dividing surface (r^{e}) and the minimization of the interfacial energy (r^{s}). The comparison of the results based on both radii shows that the difference r^{e}-r^{s} is always positive and has a limit for large cluster sizes which is comparable to the Tolman length. Furthermore, we found the real nucleation barrier for small cluster sizes, which is defined as a function of the radius r^{s}, and compared it with the classical nucleation theory. The simulation results also show that the extracted interfacial energy as function of both radii is independent of system size, and this dependence can be reasonably described by the nonclassical Tolman formula with a positive Tolman length. PMID:27575196

  20. Fractional Statistical Theory of Adsorption of Polyatomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardo, J. L.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Romá, F.

    2004-10-01

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane’s statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory.

  1. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption of polyatomics.

    PubMed

    Riccardo, J L; Ramirez-Pastor, A J; Romá, F

    2004-10-29

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane's statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory. PMID:15525184

  2. Applying Risk Science and Stakeholder Engagement to Overcome Environmental Barriers to Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea E.; Anderson, Richard M.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-09-20

    The production of electricity from the moving waters of the ocean has the potential to be a viable addition to the portfolio of renewable energy sources worldwide. The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry faces many hurdles, including technology development, challenges of offshore deployments, and financing; however, the barrier most commonly identified by industry, regulators, and stakeholders is the uncertainty surrounding potential environmental effects of devices placed in the water and the permitting processes associated with real or potential impacts. Regulatory processes are not well positioned to judge the severity of harm due to turbines or wave generators. Risks from MHK devices to endangered or protected animals in coastal waters and rivers, as well as the habitats that support them, are poorly understood. This uncertainty raises concerns about catastrophic interactions between spinning turbine blades or slack mooring lines and marine mammals, birds and fish. In order to accelerate the deployment of tidal and wave devices, there is a need to sort through the extensive list of potential interactions that may cause harm to marine organisms and ecosystems, to set priorities for regulatory triggers, and to direct future research. Identifying the risk of MHK technology components on specific marine organisms and ecosystem components can separate perceived from real risk-relevant interactions. Scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are developing an Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) to assess environmental effects associated with MHK technologies and projects through a systematic analytical process, with specific input from key stakeholder groups. The array of stakeholders interested in the development of MHK is broad, segmenting into those whose involvement is essential for the success of the MHK project, those that are influential, and those that are interested. PNNL and their partners have engaged these groups, gaining

  3. Fabrication of Low Adsorption Energy Ni-Mo Cluster Cocatalyst in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Visible Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Wenlong; Gao, Haibo; Tian, Bin; Ma, Jiantai; Lu, Gongxuan

    2016-05-01

    An effective cocatalyst is crucial for enhancing the visible photocatalytic performance of the hydrogen generation reaction. By using density-functional theory (DFT) and frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory calculation analysis, the hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) of Ni-Mo alloy (458 kJ·mol(-1)) is found to be lower than that of Ni itself (537 kJ·mol(-1)). Inspired by these results, the novel, highly efficient cocatalyst NiMo@MIL-101 for photocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was fabricated using the double solvents method (DSM). In contrast with Ni@MIL-101 and Mo@MIL-101, NiMo@MIL-101 exhibited an excellent photocatalytic performance (740.2 μmol·h(-1) for HER), stability, and high apparent quantum efficiency (75.7%) under 520 nm illumination at pH 7. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst also showed a higher transient photocurrent, lower overpotential (-0.51 V), and longer fluorescence lifetime (1.57 ns). The results uncover the dependence of the photocatalytic activity of HER on the ΔGH of Ni-Mo (MoNi4) alloy nanoclusters, i.e., lower ΔGH corresponding to higher HER activity for the first time. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst could be a promising candidate to replace precious-metal catalysts of the HER.

  4. Band-Filling Correction Method for Accurate Adsorption Energy Calculations: A Cu/ZnO Case Study.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Matti; Spångberg, Daniel; Hermansson, Kersti; Broqvist, Peter

    2013-11-12

    We present a simple method, the "band-filling correction", to calculate accurate adsorption energies (Eads) in the low coverage limit from finite-size supercell slab calculations using DFT. We show that it is necessary to use such a correction if charge transfer takes place between the adsorbate and the substrate, resulting in the substrate bands either filling up or becoming depleted. With this correction scheme, we calculate Eads of an isolated Cu atom adsorbed on the ZnO(101̅0) surface. Without the correction, the calculated Eads is highly coverage-dependent, even for surface supercells that would typically be considered very large (in the range from 1 nm × 1 nm to 2.5 nm × 2.5 nm). The correction scheme works very well for semilocal functionals, where the corrected Eads is converged within 0.01 eV for all coverages. The correction scheme also works well for hybrid functionals if a large supercell is used and the exact exchange interaction is screened. PMID:26583386

  5. Applications of hierarchically structured porous materials from energy storage and conversion, catalysis, photocatalysis, adsorption, separation, and sensing to biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Hui; Huang, Shao-Zhuan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Yu; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Yuan, Zhong-Yong; Su, Bao-Lian

    2016-06-13

    Over the last decade, significant effort has been devoted to the applications of hierarchically structured porous materials owing to their outstanding properties such as high surface area, excellent accessibility to active sites, and enhanced mass transport and diffusion. The hierarchy of porosity, structural, morphological and component levels in these materials is key for their high performance in all kinds of applications. The introduction of hierarchical porosity into materials has led to a significant improvement in the performance of materials. Herein, recent progress in the applications of hierarchically structured porous materials from energy conversion and storage, catalysis, photocatalysis, adsorption, separation, and sensing to biomedicine is reviewed. Their potential future applications are also highlighted. We particularly dwell on the relationship between hierarchically porous structures and properties, with examples of each type of hierarchically structured porous material according to its chemical composition and physical characteristics. The present review aims to open up a new avenue to guide the readers to quickly obtain in-depth knowledge of applications of hierarchically porous materials and to have a good idea about selecting and designing suitable hierarchically porous materials for a specific application. In addition to focusing on the applications of hierarchically porous materials, this comprehensive review could stimulate researchers to synthesize new advanced hierarchically porous solids.

  6. Fabrication of Low Adsorption Energy Ni-Mo Cluster Cocatalyst in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Visible Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Wenlong; Gao, Haibo; Tian, Bin; Ma, Jiantai; Lu, Gongxuan

    2016-05-01

    An effective cocatalyst is crucial for enhancing the visible photocatalytic performance of the hydrogen generation reaction. By using density-functional theory (DFT) and frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory calculation analysis, the hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) of Ni-Mo alloy (458 kJ·mol(-1)) is found to be lower than that of Ni itself (537 kJ·mol(-1)). Inspired by these results, the novel, highly efficient cocatalyst NiMo@MIL-101 for photocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was fabricated using the double solvents method (DSM). In contrast with Ni@MIL-101 and Mo@MIL-101, NiMo@MIL-101 exhibited an excellent photocatalytic performance (740.2 μmol·h(-1) for HER), stability, and high apparent quantum efficiency (75.7%) under 520 nm illumination at pH 7. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst also showed a higher transient photocurrent, lower overpotential (-0.51 V), and longer fluorescence lifetime (1.57 ns). The results uncover the dependence of the photocatalytic activity of HER on the ΔGH of Ni-Mo (MoNi4) alloy nanoclusters, i.e., lower ΔGH corresponding to higher HER activity for the first time. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst could be a promising candidate to replace precious-metal catalysts of the HER. PMID:27070204

  7. Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas.

    PubMed

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2014-06-01

    Despite its many favorable properties as a sample support for biological electron microscopy, graphene is not widely used because its hydrophobicity precludes reliable protein deposition. We describe a method to modify graphene with a low-energy hydrogen plasma, which reduces hydrophobicity without degrading the graphene lattice. Use of plasma-treated graphene enables better control of protein distribution in ice for electron cryo-microscopy and improves image quality by reducing radiation-induced sample motion.

  8. Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas.

    PubMed

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2014-06-01

    Despite its many favorable properties as a sample support for biological electron microscopy, graphene is not widely used because its hydrophobicity precludes reliable protein deposition. We describe a method to modify graphene with a low-energy hydrogen plasma, which reduces hydrophobicity without degrading the graphene lattice. Use of plasma-treated graphene enables better control of protein distribution in ice for electron cryo-microscopy and improves image quality by reducing radiation-induced sample motion. PMID:24747813

  9. Hindrance of complete fusion in the {sup 8}Li+{sup 208}Pb system at above-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, E. F.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Rosales, P.; Kolata, J. J.; DeYoung, P. A.; Peaslee, G. F.; Mears, P.; Guess, C.; Becchetti, F. D.; Lupton, J. H.; Chen, Yu

    2009-10-15

    The {sup 211,212}At yields resulting from the interaction of the radioactive projectile {sup 8}Li with a {sup 208}Pb target have been measured at energies between 3 and 8.5 MeV above the Coulomb barrier. They are signatures for fusion of the whole charge but not necessarily the whole mass of the projectile, so they are included in a corresponding operational definition of complete fusion. Within this definition, a fusion suppression factor of 0.70{+-}0.02 (stat.) {+-}0.04 (syst.) is deduced from a comparison to a one-dimensional barrier-penetration-model calculation using parameters extrapolated from values for {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 209}Bi and {sup 9}Be+{sup 208}Pb taken from the literature. Possible incomplete fusion processes are discussed and the results are fitted with a phenomenological model assuming breakup prior to fusion followed by capture of a {sup 7}Li fragment.

  10. Insights on finite size effects in ab initio study of CO adsorption and dissociation on Fe 110 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Aurab; Bouhali, Othmane; Mousseau, Normand; Becquart, Charlotte S.; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption and dissociation of hydrocarbons on metallic surfaces represent crucial steps on the path to carburization, eventually leading to dusting corrosion. While adsorption of CO molecules on Fe surface is a barrier-less exothermic process, this is not the case for the dissociation of CO into C and O adatoms and the diffusion of C beneath the surface that are found to be associated with large energy barriers. In practice, these barriers can be affected by numerous factors that combine to favour the CO-Fe reaction such as the abundance of CO and other hydrocarbons as well as the presence of structural defects. From a numerical point of view, studying these factors is challenging and a step-by-step approach is necessary to assess, in particular, the influence of the finite box size on the reaction parameters for adsorption and dissociation of CO on metal surfaces. Here, we use density functional theory (DFT) total energy calculations with the climbing-image nudged elastic band method to estimate the adsorption energies and dissociation barriers for different CO coverages with surface supercells of different sizes. We further compute the effect of periodic boundary condition for DFT calculations and find that the contribution from van der Waals interaction in the computation of adsorption parameters is important as they contribute to correcting the finite-size error in small systems. The dissociation process involves carbon insertion into the Fe surface causing a lattice deformation that requires a larger surface system for unrestricted relaxation. We show that, in the larger surface systems associated with dilute CO-coverages, C-insertion is energetically more favourable, leading to a significant decrease in the dissociation barrier. This observation suggests that a large surface system with dilute coverage is necessary for all similar metal-hydrocarbon reactions in order to study their fundamental electronic mechanisms, as an isolated phenomenon, free from

  11. Thermodynamics of downhill folding: multi-probe analysis of PDD, a protein that folds over a marginal free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Athi N; Muñoz, Victor

    2014-07-31

    Downhill folding proteins fold in microseconds by crossing a very low or no free energy barrier (<3 RT), and exhibit a complex unfolding behavior in equilibrium. Such unfolding complexity is due to the weak thermodynamic coupling that exists between the various structural segments of these proteins, and it is manifested in unfolding curves that differ depending on the structural probe employed to monitor the process. Probe-dependent unfolding has important practical implications because it permits one to investigate the folding energy landscape in detail using multiprobe thermodynamic experiments. This type of thermodynamic behavior has been investigated in depth on the protein BBL, an example of extreme (one-state) downhill folding in which there is no free energy barrier at any condition, including the denaturation midpoint. However, an open question is, to what extent is such thermodynamic behavior observed on less extreme downhill folders? Here we perform a multiprobe spectroscopic characterization of the microsecond folder PDD, a structural and functional homologue of BBL that folds within the downhill regime, but is not an example of one-state downhill folding; rather at the denaturation midpoint PDD folds by crossing an incipient free energy barrier. Model-free analysis of the unfolding curves from four different spectroscopic probes together with differential scanning calorimetry reveals a dispersion of ∼9 K in the apparent melting temperature and also marked differences in unfolding broadness (from ∼50 to ∼130 kJ mol(-1) when analyzed with a two-state model), confirming that such properties are also observed on less extreme downhill folders. We subsequently perform a global quantitative analysis of the unfolding data of PDD using the same ME statistical mechanical model that was used before for the BBL domain. The analysis shows that this simple model captures all of the features observed on the unfolding of PDD (i.e., the intensity and temperature

  12. Thermodynamics of downhill folding: multi-probe analysis of PDD, a protein that folds over a marginal free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Athi N; Muñoz, Victor

    2014-07-31

    Downhill folding proteins fold in microseconds by crossing a very low or no free energy barrier (<3 RT), and exhibit a complex unfolding behavior in equilibrium. Such unfolding complexity is due to the weak thermodynamic coupling that exists between the various structural segments of these proteins, and it is manifested in unfolding curves that differ depending on the structural probe employed to monitor the process. Probe-dependent unfolding has important practical implications because it permits one to investigate the folding energy landscape in detail using multiprobe thermodynamic experiments. This type of thermodynamic behavior has been investigated in depth on the protein BBL, an example of extreme (one-state) downhill folding in which there is no free energy barrier at any condition, including the denaturation midpoint. However, an open question is, to what extent is such thermodynamic behavior observed on less extreme downhill folders? Here we perform a multiprobe spectroscopic characterization of the microsecond folder PDD, a structural and functional homologue of BBL that folds within the downhill regime, but is not an example of one-state downhill folding; rather at the denaturation midpoint PDD folds by crossing an incipient free energy barrier. Model-free analysis of the unfolding curves from four different spectroscopic probes together with differential scanning calorimetry reveals a dispersion of ∼9 K in the apparent melting temperature and also marked differences in unfolding broadness (from ∼50 to ∼130 kJ mol(-1) when analyzed with a two-state model), confirming that such properties are also observed on less extreme downhill folders. We subsequently perform a global quantitative analysis of the unfolding data of PDD using the same ME statistical mechanical model that was used before for the BBL domain. The analysis shows that this simple model captures all of the features observed on the unfolding of PDD (i.e., the intensity and temperature

  13. Ordering of Self-Diffusion Barrier Energies on Pt(110)-1x2

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, Peter J.

    1999-06-01

    Bond-counting arguments, supported by ab-initio calculations, predict a lower barrier for "leapfrog" diffusion of Pt addimers on Pt(llO)-lx2 than for adatom dif- fusion or addimer dissociation. This conflicts with experiment, possibly signaling contaminant influence.

  14. Adsorption of Iodine and Potassium on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ Investigated by Low Energy Alkali Ion Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, G.D.; Gann, R.D.; Cao, J.X.; Wu, R.Q.; Wen, J.; Xu, Z.; Gu, G.D.; Yarmoff, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of K and I on the surface of the high-T{sub c} cuprate BSCCO-2212 is investigated with low-energy (0.8 to 2 keV) Na{sup +} ion scattering and density functional theory (DFT). Samples were cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum and charge-resolved spectra of the scattered ions were collected with time-of-flight. The spectra contain a single peak representing Na scattered from Bi, as the clean surfaces are terminated by BiO. The neutralization of scattered Na depends on the local potential above the target site, and the angular dependence indicates that the clean surface has an inhomogeneous potential. Neutralization is dependent on the coverage of I, but independent of K adsorption. DFT suggests high-symmetry sites for the adsorption of both I and K, and that the potential above the Bi sites is altered by I by an amount consistent with the experimental findings, while the potential is not affected by K adsorption. DFT also enables an experimental determination of the 'freezing distance,' which is the effective point beyond which charge exchange does not occur, to be 1.6 {+-} 0.1 {angstrom} from the outermost Bi layer.

  15. Density function theory study of the adsorption and dissociation of carbon monoxide on tungsten nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meng-Hsiung; Ju, Shin-Pon; Chen, Hsin-Tsung; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lu, Jian-Ming; Lin, Ken-Huang; Lin, Jenn-Sen; Hsieh, Jin-Yuan; Yang, Hsi-Wen

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption and dissociation properties of carbon monoxide (CO) molecule on tungsten W(n) (n = 10-15) nanoparticles have been investigated by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The lowest-energy structures for W(n) (n = 10-15) nanoparticles are found by the basin-hopping method and big-bang method with the modified tight-binding many-body potential. We calculated the corresponding adsorption energies, C-O bond lengths and dissociation barriers for adsorption of CO on nanoparticles. The electronic properties of CO on nanoparticles are studied by the analysis of density of state and charge density. The characteristic of CO on W(n) nanoparticles are also compared with that of W bulk.

  16. Density function theory study of the adsorption and dissociation of carbon monoxide on tungsten nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meng-Hsiung; Ju, Shin-Pon; Chen, Hsin-Tsung; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lu, Jian-Ming; Lin, Ken-Huang; Lin, Jenn-Sen; Hsieh, Jin-Yuan; Yang, Hsi-Wen

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption and dissociation properties of carbon monoxide (CO) molecule on tungsten W(n) (n = 10-15) nanoparticles have been investigated by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The lowest-energy structures for W(n) (n = 10-15) nanoparticles are found by the basin-hopping method and big-bang method with the modified tight-binding many-body potential. We calculated the corresponding adsorption energies, C-O bond lengths and dissociation barriers for adsorption of CO on nanoparticles. The electronic properties of CO on nanoparticles are studied by the analysis of density of state and charge density. The characteristic of CO on W(n) nanoparticles are also compared with that of W bulk. PMID:23646573

  17. Complementing the adsorption energies of CO2, H2S and NO2 to h-BN sheets by doping with carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagynbaeva, Myskal; Hussain, Tanveer; Panigrahi, Puspamitra; Johansson, Borje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-03-01

    We predict the adsorption proficiency of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheets to toxic gas molecules like CO2, H2S and NO2 on the basis of first-principles density functional theory calculations. The computed energies predict the pristine h-BN sheet to have very little affinity towards the mentioned gas molecules. However, while doping C at the N site of the h-BN sheet brings a significant enhancement to the estimated adsorption energies, doping C at B site of the sheet is found to be energetically not so favorable. To have a higher coverage effect, the concentration of C doping on the h-BN sheet is further increased which resulted in upsurging the adsorption energies for the mentioned gas molecules. Among the three, CO2, H2S are found to be physisorbed to the C-doped h-BN sheets, where as the C-doped sheets are found to have strong affinity towards NO2 gas molecules.

  18. Differential adsorption of CHON isomers at interstellar grain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattelais, M.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The CHON generic chemical formula covers different isomers such as isocyanic acid (HNCO), cyanic acid (HOCN), fulminic acid (HCNO), and isofulminic acid (HONC); the first three have been identified in a large variety of environments in the interstellar medium (ISM). Several phenomena could be at the origin of the observed abundances, such as different pathways of formation and destruction involving gas phase reactions with different possible activation barriers and/or surface processes depending on the local temperature and the nature of the support. Aims: The scope of this article is to shed some light on the interaction of the CHON isomers with interstellar grains as a function of the nature of the surface and to determine the corresponding adsorption energies in order to find whether this phenomenon could play a role in the abundances observed in the ISM. Methods: The question was addressed by means of numerical simulations using first principle periodic density functional theory (DFT) to represent the grain support as a solid of infinite dimension. Results: Regardless of the nature of the model surface (water ice, graphene, silica), two different classes of isomers were identified: weakly bound (HNCO and HCNO) and strongly bound (HOCN and HONC), with the adsorption energies of the latter group being about twice those of the former. The range of the adsorption energies is (from highest to lowest) HOCN > HONC > HNCO > HCNO. They are totally disconnected from the relative stabilities, which range from HNCO > HOCN > HCNO > HONC. Conclusions: The possibility of hydrogen bonding is the discriminating factor in the trapping of CHON species on grain surfaces. Whatever the environment, differential adsorption is effective and its contribution to the molecular abundances should not be ignored. The theoretical adsorption energies provided here could be profitably used for a more realistic modeling of molecule-surfaces interactions.

  19. Computational Molecular Simulation of the Oxidative Adsorption of Ferrous Iron at the Hematite (001)-Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-04-30

    The interaction of Fe(II) with ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide phases is central to the biogeochemical redox chemistry of iron. Molecular simulation techniques were employed to determine the mechanisms and quantify the rates of Fe(II) oxidative adsorption at the hematite (001)-water interface. Molecular dynamics potential of mean force calculations of Fe(II) adsorbing on the hematite surface revealed the presence of three free energy minima corresponding to Fe(II) adsorbed in an outersphere complex, a monodentate innersphere complex, and a tridentate innersphere complex. The free energy barrier for adsorption from the outersphere position to the monodentate innersphere site was calculated to be similar to the activation enthalpy for water exchange around aqueous Fe(II). Adsorption at both innersphere sites was predicted to be unfavorable unless accompanied by release of protons. Molecular dynamics umbrella sampling simulations and ab initio cluster calculations were performed to determine the rates of electron transfer from Fe(II) adsorbed as an innersphere and outersphere complex. The electron transfer rates were calculated to range from 10^-4 to 10^2 s-1, depending on the adsorption site and the potential parameter set, and were generally slower than those obtained in the bulk hematite lattice. The most reliable estimate of the rate of electron transfer from Fe(II) adsorbed as an outersphere complex to lattice Fe(III) was commensurate with the rate of adsorption as an innersphere complex suggesting that adsorption does not necessarily need to precede oxidation.

  20. Unraveling the interplay between hydrogen bonding and rotational energy barrier to fine-tune the properties of triazine molecular glasses.

    PubMed

    Laventure, Audrey; De Grandpré, Guillaume; Soldera, Armand; Lebel, Olivier; Pellerin, Christian

    2016-01-21

    Mexylaminotriazine derivatives form molecular glasses with outstanding glass-forming ability (GFA), high resistance to crystallization (glass kinetic stability, GS), and a glass transition temperature (Tg) above room temperature that can be conveniently modulated by selection of the headgroup and ancillary groups. A common feature of all these compounds is their secondary amino linkers, suggesting that they play a critical role in their GFA and GS for reasons that remain unclear because they can simultaneously form hydrogen (H) bonds and lead to a high interconversion energy barrier between different rotamers. To investigate independently and better control the influence of H bonding capability and rotational energy barrier on Tg, GFA and GS, a library of twelve analogous molecules was synthesized with different combinations of NH, NMe and O linkers. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed that these compounds form, with a single exception, kinetically stable glasses with Tg values spanning a very broad range from -25 to 94 °C. While variable temperature infrared spectroscopy combined to chemometrics reveals that, on average, around 60% of the NH groups are still H-bonded as high as 40 °C above Tg, critical cooling rates obtained by DSC clearly show that molecules without H-bond donating linkers also present an outstanding GFA, meaning that H bonding plays a dominant role in controlling Tg but is not required to prevent crystallization. It is a high interconversion energy barrier, provoking a distribution of rotamers, that most efficiently promotes both GFA and resistance to crystallization. These new insights pave the way to more efficient glass engineering by extending the possible range of accessible Tg, allowing in particular the preparation of homologous glass-formers with high GS at ambient temperature in either the viscous or vitreous state.

  1. Efficient sampling over rough energy landscapes with high barriers: A combination of metadynamics with integrated tempering sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. Isaac; Zhang, Jun; Che, Xing; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-01

    In order to efficiently overcome high free energy barriers embedded in a complex energy landscape and calculate overall thermodynamics properties using molecular dynamics simulations, we developed and implemented a sampling strategy by combining the metadynamics with (selective) integrated tempering sampling (ITS/SITS) method. The dominant local minima on the potential energy surface (PES) are partially exalted by accumulating history-dependent potentials as in metadynamics, and the sampling over the entire PES is further enhanced by ITS/SITS. With this hybrid method, the simulated system can be rapidly driven across the dominant barrier along selected collective coordinates. Then, ITS/SITS ensures a fast convergence of the sampling over the entire PES and an efficient calculation of the overall thermodynamic properties of the simulation system. To test the accuracy and efficiency of this method, we first benchmarked this method in the calculation of ϕ - ψ distribution of alanine dipeptide in explicit solvent. We further applied it to examine the design of template molecules for aromatic meta-C—H activation in solutions and investigate solution conformations of the nonapeptide Bradykinin involving slow cis-trans isomerizations of three proline residues.

  2. Spin-unrestricted random-phase approximation with range separation: Benchmark on atomization energies and reaction barrier heights

    SciTech Connect

    Mussard, Bastien; Reinhardt, Peter; Toulouse, Julien; Ángyán, János G.

    2015-04-21

    We consider several spin-unrestricted random-phase approximation (RPA) variants for calculating correlation energies, with and without range separation, and test them on datasets of atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. We show that range separation greatly improves the accuracy of all RPA variants for these properties. Moreover, we show that a RPA variant with exchange, hereafter referred to as RPAx-SO2, first proposed by Szabo and Ostlund [J. Chem. Phys. 67, 4351 (1977)] in a spin-restricted closed-shell formalism, and extended here to a spin-unrestricted formalism, provides on average the most accurate range-separated RPA variant for atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. Since this range-separated RPAx-SO2 method had already been shown to be among the most accurate range-separated RPA variants for weak intermolecular interactions [J. Toulouse et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 084119 (2011)], this works confirms range-separated RPAx-SO2 as a promising method for general chemical applications.

  3. Analysis of heavy-ion fusion reactions at extreme sub-barrier energies using the proximity formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsi, O. N.; Gharaei, R.

    2013-11-01

    The recent measured values of the fusion excitation functions of the heavy-ion colliding systems 28Si+100Mo, 58Ni+54Fe, and 64Ni+64Ni are investigated using the original version of the proximity formalism. The fusion cross sections are calculated based on the coupled-channels approach, including couplings to the low-lying 2+ and 3- states in both target and projectile nuclei. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the potential Prox.77 needs to be modified considerably at sub-barrier energies. In the present study, the role of the surface energy coefficient γ and also the temperature T of the compound nucleus in nuclear potential and fusion cross section has been explored for our colliding systems. Moreover, the mutual and the multiphonon excitations of the lowest 2+ and 3- states are considered in the coupled-channels calculations. It is demonstrated that the potential Prox.77 with these corrective effects can reproduce the experimental data of the fusion cross section, the S factor and the logarithmic derivative for fusion reactions 28Si+100Mo, 58Ni+54Fe, and 64Ni+64Ni with good accuracy especially at below-barrier energies.

  4. Anionic polyelectrolyte adsorption on mica mediated by multivalent cations: a solution to DNA imaging by atomic force microscopy under high ionic strengths.

    PubMed

    Pastré, David; Hamon, Loïc; Landousy, Fabrice; Sorel, Isabelle; David, Marie-Odile; Zozime, Alain; Le Cam, Eric; Piétrement, Olivier

    2006-07-18

    Adsorption of DNA molecules on mica, a highly negatively charged surface, mediated by divalent or trivalent cations is considered. By analyzing atomic force microscope (AFM) images of DNA molecules adsorbed on mica, phase diagrams of DNA molecules interacting with a mica surface are established in terms of concentrations of monovalent salt (NaCl) and divalent (MgCl2) or multivalent (spermidine, cobalt hexamine) salts. These diagrams show two transitions between nonadsorption and adsorption. The first one arises when the concentration of multivalent counterions is larger than a limit value, which is not sensitive to the monovalent salt concentration. The second transition is due to the binding competition between monovalent and multivalent counterions. In addition, we develop a model of polyelectrolyte adsorption on like-charged surfaces with multivalent counterions. This model shows that the correlations of the multivalent counterions at the interface between DNA and mica play a critical role. Furthermore, it appears that DNA adsorption takes place when the energy gain in counterion correlations overcomes an energy barrier. This barrier is induced by the entropy loss in confining DNA in a thin adsorbed layer, the entropy loss in the interpenetration of the clouds of mica and DNA counterions, and the electrostatic repulsion between DNA and mica. The analysis of the experimental results provides an estimation of this energy barrier. We then discuss some important issues, including DNA adsorption under physiological conditions.

  5. Energy barriers for bit-encoding states based on 360° domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, C. B.; Osipov, V. V.; Vanden-Eijnden, E.

    2015-05-01

    A numerical thermal stability study of the bit-encoding states in a proposed multi-level magnetic storage element based on an ultrathin ferromagnetic nanoring is presented. The material parameters and the ring dimensions for which there are five distinct metastable magnetization configurations separated by energy barriers exceeding 50kBT at room temperature are identified. The results are obtained, using the string method for the study of rare events to locate the transition states separating the metastable states and to identify the most likely thermally activated pathways.

  6. OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT APPROACHES: CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.

    2009-05-29

    Engineered barriers including cementitious barriers are used at sites disposing or contaminated with low-level radioactive waste to enhance performance of the natural environment with respect to controlling the potential spread of contaminants. Drivers for using cementitious barriers include: high radionuclide inventory, radionuclide characteristics (e.g., long half-live, high mobility due to chemical form/speciation, waste matrix properties, shallow water table, and humid climate that provides water for leaching the waste). This document comprises the first in a series of reports being prepared for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The document is divided into two parts which provide a summary of: (1) existing experience in the assessment of performance of cementitious materials used for radioactive waste management and disposal and (2) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approaches that have been applied for assessments. Each chapter is organized into five parts: Introduction, Regulatory Considerations, Specific Examples, Summary of Modeling Approaches and Conclusions and Needs. The objective of the report is to provide perspective on the state of the practice for conducting assessments for facilities involving cementitious barriers and to identify opportunities for improvements to the existing approaches. Examples are provided in two contexts: (1) performance assessments conducted for waste disposal facilities and (2) performance assessment-like analyses (e.g., risk assessments) conducted under other regulatory regimes. The introductory sections of each section provide a perspective on the purpose of performance assessments and different roles of cementitious materials for radioactive waste management. Significant experience with assessments of cementitious materials associated with radioactive waste disposal concepts exists in the US Department of Energy Complex and the commercial nuclear sector. Recently, the desire to close legacy facilities has created

  7. Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago-Rodríguez, Yohaselly; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Curet-Arana, María C.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-09-01

    Periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations were used to study the adsorption of several atomic species, molecular species and molecular fragments on the Au(111) surface with a coverage of 1/4 monolayer (ML). Binding geometries, binding energies, and diffusion barriers were calculated for 27 species. Furthermore, we calculated the surface deformation energy associated with the binding events. The binding strength for all the analyzed species can be ordered as follows: NH3 < NO < CO < CH3 < HCO < NH2 < COOH < OH < HCOO < CNH2 < H < N < NH < NOH < COH < Cl,< HCO3 < CH2 < CN b HNO < O < F < S < C < CH. Although the atomic species preferred to bind at the three-fold fcc site, no tendency was observed in site preference for the molecular species and fragments. The intramolecular and adsorbate-surface vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the adsorbates on their most energetically stable adsorption site. Most of the theoretical binding energies and frequencies agreed with experimental values reported in the literature. In general, the values obtained with the PW91 functional are more accurate than RPBE in reproducing these experimental binding energies. The energies of the adsorbed species were used to calculate the thermochemical potential energy surfaces for decomposition of CO, NO, N2, NH3 and CH4, oxidation of CO, and hydrogenation of CO, CO2 and NO, giving insight into the thermochemistry of these reactions on gold nanoparticles. These potential energy surfaces demonstrated that: the decomposition of species is not energetically favorable on Au(111); the desorption of NH3, NO and CO are more favorable than their decomposition; the oxidation of CO and hydrogenation of CO and NO on Au(111) to form HCO and HNO, respectively, are also thermodynamically favorable.

  8. Atomic and Molecular Adsorption on Re(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Konstanze; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-02-01

    Using periodic, self-consistent density functional theory calculations, the adsorption of several atomic (H, S, N, O and C) and molecular (CO2, N2, NH3, HCN, CO and NO) species and molecular fragments (NH2, NH, CN, CNH2, HNO, NOH, CH3, CH2, CH and OH) on the (0001) facet of rhenium at a coverage of 0.25 ML has been studied. Preferred binding sites with their corresponding binding energy and deformation energy of the surface, as well as an estimated diffusion barrier of each species have been determined. Atomic species and molecular fragments tend to bind to threefold sites, whereas molecular species tend to bind to top sites. The binding strength, with respect to the corresponding gas phase species and in increasing order for all species studied, is: CO2 < N2 < NH3 < CO < CH3 < HCN < NO < H < NH2 < OH < CH2 < CNH2 < CN < HNO < NH < NOH < S < N < O < CH < C. The vibrational frequencies of all species in their most energetically favorable adsorbed configuration have been calculated. Finally, the thermochemistry of adsorption and decomposition of NO, NO + H, NH3, N2, CO2, CO and CH4 on Re(0001) has been analyzed.

  9. A seven-degree-of-freedom, time-dependent quantum dynamics study on the energy efficiency in surmounting the central energy barrier of the OH + CH3 → O + CH4 reaction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Pengxiu; Wang, Yuping; Li, Yida; Wang, Dunyou

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent, quantum reaction dynamics calculation with seven degrees of freedom was carried out to study the energy efficiency in surmounting the approximate center energy barrier of OH + CH3. The calculation shows the OH vibration excitations greatly enhance the reactivity, whereas the vibrational excitations of CH3 and the rotational excitations hinder the reactivity. On the basis of equal amount of total energy, although this reaction has a slight early barrier, it is the OH vibrational energy that is the dominate force in promoting the reactivity, not the translational energy. The studies on both the forward O + CH4 and reverse OH + CH3 reactions demonstrate, for these central barrier reactions, a small change of the barrier location can significantly change the energy efficacy roles on the reactivity. The calculated rate constants agree with the experimental data.

  10. A seven-degree-of-freedom, time-dependent quantum dynamics study on the energy efficiency in surmounting the central energy barrier of the OH + CH{sub 3} → O + CH{sub 4} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pengxiu; Wang, Yuping; Li, Yida; Wang, Dunyou

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent, quantum reaction dynamics calculation with seven degrees of freedom was carried out to study the energy efficiency in surmounting the approximate center energy barrier of OH + CH{sub 3}. The calculation shows the OH vibration excitations greatly enhance the reactivity, whereas the vibrational excitations of CH{sub 3} and the rotational excitations hinder the reactivity. On the basis of equal amount of total energy, although this reaction has a slight early barrier, it is the OH vibrational energy that is the dominate force in promoting the reactivity, not the translational energy. The studies on both the forward O + CH{sub 4} and reverse OH + CH{sub 3} reactions demonstrate, for these central barrier reactions, a small change of the barrier location can significantly change the energy efficacy roles on the reactivity. The calculated rate constants agree with the experimental data.

  11. Benzene adsorption on Ir{100} studied by low-energy electron diffraction I-V analysis: Evidence for formation of tilted benzyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K.; Sauerhammer, B.; Titmuss, S.; King, D. A.

    2001-06-01

    In order to increase understanding of the structure and bonding of aromatic molecules and their fragments on transition metal surfaces, a low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) study of benzene adsorption on Ir{100} has been carried out. Following benzene adsorption at 465 K, a c(2×4) LEED pattern is observed. Its formation is accompanied by the loss of two hydrogen atoms as H2, indicating that benzyne (C6H4) is formed. This is the first time an ordered overlayer of benzyne has been observed on a transition metal surface. It makes the structure accessible to LEED I-V analysis, providing the most reliable structural information for benzyne adsorbed on a transition metal surface to date. The benzyne species was found to be di-σ bonded to the bridge site with a 47° tilt angle to the surface normal.

  12. Effective coordination as a predictor of adsorption energies: A model study of NO on Rh(100) and Rh/MgO(100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpa, Raghani; Gironcoli, Stefano de; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2009-04-15

    We have studied the adsorption of NO, and the coadsorption of N and O, on four physical and hypothetical systems: unstrained and strained Rh(100) surfaces and monolayers of Rh atoms on strained and unstrained MgO(100) surfaces. We find that as we go from Rh(100) to Rh/Mg0(100), via the other two hypothetical systems, the effective coordination progressively decreases, the d band narrows and its center shifts closer to the Fermi level, and the strength of adsorption and coadsorption increases. Both the strain and the presence of the oxide substrate contribute significantly to this. However, charge transfer is found to play a negligible role due to a canceling out between donation and back-donation processes. Our results suggest that lowering the effective coordination of Rh catalysts by strain, roughening, or the use of inert substrates might lower activation energies for the dissociation of NO.

  13. Binding Energy and Dissociation Barrier: Experimental Determination of the Key Parameters of the Potential Energy Curve of Diethyl Ether on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Reutzel, Marcel; Lipponer, Marcus; Dürr, Michael; Höfer, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    The key parameters of the potential energy curve of organic molecules on semiconductor surfaces, binding energy of the intermediate state and dissociation barrier, were experimentally investigated for the model system of diethyl ether (Et2O) on Si(001). Et2O adsorbs via a datively bonded intermediate from which it converts via ether cleavage into a covalently attached final state. This thermally activated conversion into the final state was followed in real-time by means of optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) at different temperatures and the associated energy barrier ϵa = 0.38 ± 0.05 eV and pre-exponential factor νa = 10(4±1) s(-1) were determined. From molecular beam experiments on the initial sticking probability, the difference between the desorption energy ϵd and ϵa was extracted and thus the binding energy of the intermediate state was determined (0.62 ± 0.08 eV). The results are discussed in terms of general chemical trends as well as with respect to a wider applicability on adsorbate reactions on semiconductor surfaces.

  14. SOLPLAN report: An assessment of barriers and incentives to conservation and alternative-energy use in the residential sector in Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulenwider, C. K.; Weiss, L. S.; Pfefferkorn, C.; Wiener, D. E.; Feldmam, S. L.

    1981-03-01

    The Alternative Energy Policy Project of the Wisconsin Center for Public Policy focused upon two principle objectives: gathering and analyzing data on energy conservation and alternative energy commercialization; and building consensus around alternative energy policy to develop guidelines for alternative energy policy for the state. Particular attention was paid to public involvement in the policy process and to assessing barriers and incentives from as many key sectors of the energy field as possible. Data were gathered from the general public, alternative energy users, the heating industry generally, the alternative-energy industry specifically, and key decision makers.

  15. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  16. Through-thickness determination of phase composition and residual stresses in thermall barrier coatings using high- energy x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Weyant, , C. M.; Almer, J. D.; Faber, K. T.; Stony Brook Univ.

    2009-01-01

    High-energy X-rays were used to determine the local phase composition and residual stresses through the thickness of as-sprayed and heat-treated plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings consisting of a NiCoCrAlY bond coat and an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) topcoat produced with through-thickness segmentation cracks. The as-sprayed residual stresses reflected the combined influence of quenching stresses from the plasma spray process, thermal expansion mismatch between the topcoat, bond coat and substrate, and stress relief from the segmentation cracks. Heat treatments led to the formation of a thermally grown oxide (TGO) which was in compression in the plane, as well as relief of quenching stresses and development of a stress gradient in the YSZ topcoat. The high-energy X-ray technique used in this study revealed the effects that TGO and segmentation cracks have on the in-plane stress state of the entire coating.

  17. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  18. Method of local increments for the calculation of adsorption energies of atoms and small molecules on solid surfaces. 2. CO/MgO(001).

    PubMed

    Staemmler, Volker

    2011-06-30

    The method of local increments is used in connection with an embedded cluster approach and wave function based quantum chemical ab initio methods to describe the adsorption of a single CO molecule on the MgO(001) surface. The first step in this approach is a conventional Hartree-Fock calculation. The occupied orbitals are then localized by means of the Foster-Boys localization procedure, and the full system is decomposed into several "subunits" that consist of the orbitals localized at the CO molecule and at the Mg and O atoms of the MgO cluster. The correlation energy is expanded into a series of local n-body increments that are evaluated separately and independently. In this way, big savings in computer time can be achieved because (a) the treatment of a large system is replaced with a series of much faster calculations for small subsystems and (b) the big basis sets necessary for describing dispersion effects are only needed for the atoms in the respective subsystem while all other atoms can be treated by medium size Hartree-Fock type basis sets. The coupled electron pair approach, CEPA, an approximate coupled cluster method, is used to calculate the correlation energies of the various subsystems. For the vertical adsorption of CO on top a Mg atom of the MgO(001) surface with the C atom toward Mg, the individual one- and two-body increments are calculated as functions of the CO-MgO separation and a full potential energy curve is constructed from them. A very shallow minimum with an adsorption energy of 0.016 eV at a Mg-C distance of 3.04 Å is found at the Hartree-Fock level, while inclusion of correlation (dispersion) effects shortens the Mg-C distance to 2.59 Å and yields a much larger adsorption energy of 0.124 eV. This is in very good agreement with the best experimental value of 0.14 eV. The basis set superposition error, BSSE, was fully corrected for by the counterpoise method and the bonding mechanism was analyzed at the Hartree-Fock level by means of

  19. Method of local increments for the calculation of adsorption energies of atoms and small molecules on solid surfaces. 2. CO/MgO(001).

    PubMed

    Staemmler, Volker

    2011-06-30

    The method of local increments is used in connection with an embedded cluster approach and wave function based quantum chemical ab initio methods to describe the adsorption of a single CO molecule on the MgO(001) surface. The first step in this approach is a conventional Hartree-Fock calculation. The occupied orbitals are then localized by means of the Foster-Boys localization procedure, and the full system is decomposed into several "subunits" that consist of the orbitals localized at the CO molecule and at the Mg and O atoms of the MgO cluster. The correlation energy is expanded into a series of local n-body increments that are evaluated separately and independently. In this way, big savings in computer time can be achieved because (a) the treatment of a large system is replaced with a series of much faster calculations for small subsystems and (b) the big basis sets necessary for describing dispersion effects are only needed for the atoms in the respective subsystem while all other atoms can be treated by medium size Hartree-Fock type basis sets. The coupled electron pair approach, CEPA, an approximate coupled cluster method, is used to calculate the correlation energies of the various subsystems. For the vertical adsorption of CO on top a Mg atom of the MgO(001) surface with the C atom toward Mg, the individual one- and two-body increments are calculated as functions of the CO-MgO separation and a full potential energy curve is constructed from them. A very shallow minimum with an adsorption energy of 0.016 eV at a Mg-C distance of 3.04 Å is found at the Hartree-Fock level, while inclusion of correlation (dispersion) effects shortens the Mg-C distance to 2.59 Å and yields a much larger adsorption energy of 0.124 eV. This is in very good agreement with the best experimental value of 0.14 eV. The basis set superposition error, BSSE, was fully corrected for by the counterpoise method and the bonding mechanism was analyzed at the Hartree-Fock level by means of

  20. Republic of Korea Reduction of Financing Barriers for Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, D. L.

    2005-11-01

    This paper discusses the findings developed for strengthening the role of performance contracting in improving energy efficiency in the Republic of Korea. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored development of this paper by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), as a part of the Korean-U.S. Climate Technology Partnerships (CTP) program. The results and recommendations outlined in this paper together with other efforts are designed to assist other countries striving to improve their efficient use of energy.

  1. Simulation study of free-energy barriers in the wetting transition of an oily fluid on a rough surface with reentrant geometry.

    PubMed

    Savoy, Elizabeth S; Escobedo, Fernando A

    2012-11-20

    When in contact with a rough solid surface, fluids with low surface tension, such as oils and alkanes, have their lowest free energy in the fully wetted state. For applications where nonwetting by these phillic fluids is desired, some barrier must be introduced to maintain the nonwetted composite state. One way to create this free-energy barrier is to fabricate roughness with reentrant geometry, but the question remains as to whether the free-energy barrier is sufficiently high to prevent wetting. Our goal is to quantify the free-energy landscape for the wetting transition of an oily fluid on a surface of nails and identify significant surface features and conditions that maximize the wetting free-energy barrier (ΔGfwd*). This is a departure from most work on wetting, which focuses on the equilibrium composite and wetted states. We use boxed molecular dynamics (BXD) (Glowacki, D. R.; Paci, E.; Shalashilin, D. V. J. Phys. Chem. B2009, 113, 16603-16611) with a modified control scheme to evaluate both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the transition over a range of surface affinities (chemistry). We find that the reentrant geometry of the nails does create a free-energy barrier to transition for phillic chemistry whereas a corresponding system on straight posts wets spontaneously and, that doubling the nail height more than doubles ΔGfwd*. For neutral to phillic chemistry, the dewetting free-energy barrier is at least an order of magnitude higher than that for wetting, indicating an essentially irreversible wetting transition. Transition rates from BXD simulations and the associated trends agree well with those in our previous study that used forward flux sampling to compute transition rates for similar systems.

  2. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  3. Depositional response to seagrass mortality along a low-energy, barrier-island coast: west-central Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.W.; Hine, A.C.; David, R.A.; Belknap, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of aerial photographs and surficial sediment samples from the northern islands of the west-central barrier system of Florida indicates that: (1) seagrass beds in the nearshore zone have controlled onshore/longshore sand transport, and (2) resulting sedimentary accumulations within nearshore seagrass beds make differentiation of nearshore and backbarrier facies difficult. Between 1957 and 1973, an extensive seagrass community occupying the nearshore zone off Anclote Key disappeared, thus allowing the sudden and rapid onshore and longshore transport of sand. The 1000 year old barrier island lengthened 30% by recurved spit growth in this very short period of time. Although there are not direct observations, four possible causes of seagrass mortality have been postulated, and of these overgrazing as a result of the accelerated population growth of sea urchins (Lytechinus variegatus) seems to be the most likely cause. Because of the ability of seagrasses to trap fine-grained sediments, contribute organic matter, and provide for low-energy, sheltered, molluscan biocoenosis, there is little depositional difference between these nearshore and backbarrier/lagoonal facies. This work indicates that the development and destruction of benthic floral communities should be considered as a process that generates or accentuates episodicity/cyclicity in the sedimentary record. Additionally, such changes in these communities should be expected to present a blurred distinction between certain types of coastal sedimentary facies.

  4. Negligible suppression of the complete fusion of Li,76 on light targets, at energies above the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, M. F.; Zhang, G. L.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Ferioli, E.

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by a recent work performed at Australian National University by S. Kalkal et al. [Phys. Rev. C 93, 044605 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.93.044605] on breakup and its time scale, where it was shown that the prompt (or near-target) breakup of Li,76 is almost negligible and consequently the near-barrier complete fusion cross section induced by these weakly bound Li isotopes on light targets should not be suppressed by the breakup, as it is for heavier targets, we estimated the contributions of complete and incomplete fusion in the measured total fusions for several light systems available in the literature. The chosen systems were those for which the fusion cross sections had been measured using the γ -ray spectroscopy method and all evaporation channel cross sections were reported. For the estimation, we used, apart from the data, the predictions of the evaporation code cascade. The results show that, indeed, the complete fusion suppression is negligible for such systems at energies slightly above the barrier, in agreement with the above-mentioned recent measurements of breakup time scales.

  5. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    PubMed Central

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias; Huson, Vincent; Mamer, Lauren; Kalogreades, Lawrence; ter Veer, Mirelle; Ruiter, Marvin; Brose, Nils; Rosenmund, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The energy required to fuse synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane (‘activation energy’) is considered a major determinant in synaptic efficacy. From reaction rate theory, we predict that a class of modulations exists, which utilize linear modulation of the energy barrier for fusion to achieve supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by hypertonic solutions. We show that complexinI/II deficiency or phorbol ester stimulation indeed affects responses to hypertonic solution in a supralinear manner. An additive vs multiplicative relationship between activation energy and fusion rate provides a novel explanation for previously observed non-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca2+-dependent release. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05531.001 PMID:25871846

  6. Scattering, Adsorption, and Langmuir-Hinshelwood Desorption Models for Physisorptive and Chemisorptive Gas-Surface Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Brook I.

    Surface effects limit the performance of hypersonic vehicles, micro-electro-mechanical devices, and directed energy systems. This research develops methods to predict adsorption, scattering, and thermal desorption of molecules on a surface. These methods apply to physisorptive (adsorption and scattering) and chemisorptive (thermal desorption) gas-surface systems. Engineering and design applications will benefit from these methods, hence they are developed under the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo construct. The novel adsorption and scattering contribution, the Modified Kisliuk with Scattering method, predicts angular and energy distributions, and adsorption probabilities. These results agree more closely with experiment than the state-of-the-art Cercignani-Lampis-Lord scattering kernel. Super-elastic scattering is predicted. Gas-adlayer interactions are included for the first time. Accommodation coefficents can be determined by fitting simulations to experimental data. The new thermal desorption model accurately calculates angular, translational, rotational, and vibrational distributions, and the rotational alignment parameter. The model is validated by comparing with experiments. Multiple transition states are considered in a set of non-dimensionalized equations of motion, linked with temporally-accurate event timing. Initial conditions are chosen from a new truncated Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Run times are improved by eliminating the Gaussian Weighting of desorbing products. The absorption energy barrier is shown to significantly contribute only to the translational energy of desorbing molecules by contributing energy to each adatom in a similar manner.

  7. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  8. Surface free energies and elemental surface compositions of human enamel after application of commercially available mouthrinses and adsorption of salivary constituents.

    PubMed

    Perdok, J F; Van Der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; Genet, M J; Rouxhet, P G

    1990-01-01

    The adsorption of active agents from six commercially available mouthrinses to ground and polished enamel, with and without adsorbed salivary constituents, was monitored by contact angle measurements and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Human enamel samples were treated with mouthrinses containing chlorhexidine (Peridex), stannous fluoride/amine fluoride (Meridol), thymol/benzoic acid (Listerine), sanguinarine (Veadent), sodium fluoride (Prodent), or cetylpyridinium chloride (Merocet). XPS indicated a sizeable adsorption of both active and non-active components for all products. After treatment, all enamel surface free energies increased except for the stannous fluoride/amine fluoride containing mouthrinse. It is suggested that non-active components in the products cause an increase in surface free energy. Despite this thermodynamically unfavorable increase in surface free energy, all rinses have plaque reducing effects, indicating that this unfavorable surface characteristic is overruled by the antibacterial properties of the components. Replacement of non-active components by less adsorbing surfactants could increase the efficiency of the products tested. PMID:2090159

  9. Single-crystal adsorption calorimetry and density functional theory of CO chemisorption on fcc Co{110}.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kristine; Fiorin, Vittorio; Gunn, David S D; Jenkins, Stephen J; King, David A

    2013-03-21

    Using single-crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC) and density functional theory (DFT), the interaction of carbon monoxide on fcc Co{110} is reported for the first time. The results indicate that adsorption is consistent with molecular chemisorption at all coverages. The initial heat of adsorption of 140 kJ mol(-1) is found in the range of heat values calorimetrically measured on other ferromagnetic metal surfaces, such as nickel and iron. DFT adsorption energies are in good agreement with the experimental results, and comparison between SCAC and DFT for CO on other ferromagnetic surfaces is made. The calculated dissociation barrier of 2.03 eV implies that dissociation at 300 K is unlikely even at the lowest coverage. At high coverages during the adsorption-desorption steady state regime, a pre-exponential factor for CO desorption of 1.2 × 10(17) s(-1) is found, implying a localised molecular adsorbed state prior to desorption in contrast to what we found with Ni surfaces. This result highlights the importance of the choice of the pre-exponential factor in evaluating the activation energy for desorption.

  10. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  11. Nucleon-nucleon correlations in heavy ion transfer reactions: Recent investigations at energies far below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Corradi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-15

    Excitation functions of one- and two-neutron transfer channels have been measured for the {sup 96}Zr+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 116}Sn+{sup 60}Ni systems at bombarding energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to ∼25% below. Target-like recoils have been identified in A, Z and velocity with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. The experimental transfer probabilities have been compared, in absolute values and in slope, with semiclassical microscopic calculations which incorporate nucleon-nucleon pairing correlations. For the first time in a heavy ion collision, one was able to provide a consistent description of one and two neutron transfer reactions by incorporating, in the reaction mechanism, all known structure information of entrance and exit channels nuclei. In particular, there is no need to introduce any enhancement factor for the description of two neutron transfer, of course very important are the correlations induced by the pairing interaction.

  12. DFT study of [2.2]-, [3.3]-, and [4.4]paracyclophanes: strain energy, conformations, and rotational barriers.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Steven M

    2011-03-24

    The three smallest symmetrical paracyclophanes, having tethers with two, three, or four methylene groups, have been examined with four density functional methods (B3LYP, M06-2x, B97-D, ωB97X-D). The geometries predicted by functionals accounting for medium-range correlation or long-range exchange and/or dispersion are in close agreement with experiment. In addition, these methods provide similar estimates of the strain energy of the paracylcophanes, which decrease with increasing tether length. [4.4]Paracyclophane is nearly strain-free, reflecting the small out-of-plane distortion of its phenyl rings. Lastly, the barrier for interconversion of the conformers of [3.3]paracylcophane is computed in close agreement with experiment, and an estimate for phenyl rotation in [4.4]paracyclophane of about 19 kcal mol(-1) is predicted by the DFT methods employed.

  13. Total and partial capture cross sections in reactions with deformed nuclei at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyakin, R. A. Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2013-06-15

    Within the quantum diffusion approach, the capture of a projectile nucleus by a target nucleus is studied at bombarding energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The effects of deformation of interacting nuclei and neutron transfer between them on the total and partial capture cross sections and the mean angular momentum of the captured system are studied. The results obtained for the {sup 16}O + {sup 112}Cd, {sup 152}Sm, and {sup 184}W; {sup 19}F +{sup 175}Lu; {sup 28}Si +{sup 94,100}Mo and {sup 154}Sm; {sup 40}Ca +{sup 96}Zr; {sup 48}Ca+ {sup 90}Zr; and {sup 64}Ni +{sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 92,96}Zr, and {sup 100}Mo reactions are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  14. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  15. Ab initio calculations of free energy barriers for chemical reactions in solution: proton transfer in [FHF]-.

    PubMed

    Muller, R P; Warshel, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method for calculating activation free energies of chemical reactions in solution, using molecular mechanics force fields for the solvent and an ab initio technique that incorporates the potential from the solvent in its Hamiltonian for the solute. The empirical valence bond (EVB) method is used as a reference potential for the ab initio free energy calculation, and drives the reaction along the proper coordinate, thus overcoming problems encountered by direct attempts to use molecular orbital methods in calculations of activation free energies. The utility of our method is illustrated by calculating the activation free energy for proton transfer between fluoride ions in the [FHF]-system, in both polar and nonpolar solution.

  16. Grafting derivatives of Mn6 single-molecule magnets with high anisotropy energy barrier on Au111 surface.

    PubMed

    Moro, F; Corradini, V; Evangelisti, M; De Renzi, V; Biagi, R; del Pennino, U; Milios, C J; Jones, L F; Brechin, E K

    2008-08-14

    We study the magnetic properties of two new functionalized single-molecule magnets belonging to the Mn 6 family (general formula [Mn (III)6O2(R-sao)6(O2C-th)2L(4-6)], where R=H (1) or Et (2), HO2C-th=3-thiophene carboxylic acid, L=EtOH, H2O and saoH2 is salicylaldoxime) and their grafting on the Au(111) surface. Complex 1 exhibits spin ground-state S=4, as the result of ferromagnetic coupling between the two antiferromagnetic Mn (III) 3 triangles, while slight structural changes in complex 2, switch the dominant magnetic exchange interactions from anti- to ferromagnetic, enhancing the spin ground-state to S=12 and, consequently, the effective energy barrier for the relaxation of magnetization. Direct-current and alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the functionalized complexes preserve the main magnetic properties of the corresponding not-functionalized Mn 6 clusters (i.e., total spin value and magnetic behavior as a function of temperature), though a reduction of the anisotropy barrier is observed in complex 2. For both complexes, the -O2C-th functionalization allows the direct grafting on Au(111) surface by liquid-phase deposition. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy demonstrates that the stoichiometry of the molecular cores is preserved after grafting. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) reveals a sub-monolayer distribution of isolated clusters with a slightly higher coverage for complex 1. The cluster stability in the STM images and the S-2p energy positions demonstrate, for both derivatives, the strength of the grafting with the gold surface.

  17. Density functional theory (DFT) study of Zn, O2 and O adsorption on polar ZnO(0001) and ZnO (0001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sołtys, Jakub; Piechota, Jacek; Łopuszyński, Michał; Krukowski, Stanisław

    2013-07-01

    Ab initio DFT simulations of Zn and O atoms and O2 molecules adsorption on polar 2H-ZnO(0001) and 2H-ZnO(0001) surfaces elucidated the principal processes, important for growth of zinc oxide from the vapour. It was shown that a zinc atom is adsorbed at both ZnO surfaces without any energy barrier but with ultimately different adsorption energies: 0.34 eV for the metallic and 3.37 for the non-metallic surface. Oxygen atoms are attached very strongly at both polar surfaces, with energies equal to 5.47 eV and 2.47 eV. The difference between both polar surfaces is the largest for adsorption of molecular oxygen, the O2 molecule is adsorbed on the Zn-face with the energy 2.45 eV while it is not adsorbed at the oxygen face of zinc oxide.

  18. Physical adsorption strength in open systems.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, M Todd; Stuart, Steven J; Cooper, Alan C; Pez, G P; Cheng, Hansong

    2006-11-23

    For a physical adsorption system, the distances of adsorbates from the surface of a substrate can vary significantly, depending on particle loading and interatomic interactions. Although the total adsorption energy is quantified easily, the normalized, per-particle adsorption energies are more ambiguous if some of these particles are far away from the surface and are interacting only weakly with the substrate. A simple analytical procedure is proposed to characterize the distance dependence of the physisorption strength and effective adsorption capacity. As an example, the method is utilized to describe H2 physisorption in a finite bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17107125

  19. First-principles study of oxygen adsorption and diffusion on the UN(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. L.; Ao, L.; Zu, X. T.; Huang, H.; Liu, K. Z.

    2015-12-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to study the interaction of oxygen with UN(001) surface. The molecule oxygen was found to dissociate spontaneously on all considered adsorption sites on the surface. Atomic oxygen (O) preferred to adsorb on a hollow site or the top of uranium ions, which were energetically degenerate. Adsorption on top of nitrogen (N) ion was found to be unstable which may be attributed to the repulsion of negatively charged O with the N anions. In comparison with those on α-U(001)surface at the same coverage, the adsorption of O on UN(001) surface was found to be less stable, being about 0.7 eV higher in adsorption energy. The diffusion barrier for O on the surface was found to be ∼0.5 eV, similar to those of α-U(001)surface. The penetration of O into the substrate was difficult with a high barrier of 2.86 eV. Analysis on the density of states (DOS) has shown that the adsorbed oxygen has strong chemical interaction with surface ions, characterized by the hybridization of O 2p states with N 2p and U 6d, U 5f states.

  20. High Penetration of Renewable Energy in the Transportation Sector: Scenarios, Barriers, and Enablers; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Brown, A.; Heath, G.; Mai, T.; Ruth, M.; Melaina, M.; Simpkins, T.; Steward, D.; Warner, E.; Bertram, K.; Plotkin, S.; Patel, D.; Stephens, T.; Vyas, A.

    2012-06-01

    Transportation accounts for 71% of U.S. petroleum use and 33% of its greenhouse gases emissions. Pathways toward reduced greenhouse gas emissions and petroleum dependence in the transportation sector have been analyzed in considerable detail, but with some limitations. To add to this knowledge, the U.S. Department of Energy has launched a study focused on underexplored greenhouse-gas-abatement and oil-savings opportunities related to transportation. This Transportation Energy Futures study analyzes specific issues and associated key questions to strengthen the existing knowledge base and help cultivate partnerships among federal agencies, state and local governments, and industry.

  1. Elastic scattering for the system {sup 6}Li+p at near barrier energies with MAGNEX

    SciTech Connect

    Soukeras, V.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bondi, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Acosta, L.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Alamanos, N.; De Napoli, M.; Foti, A.; and others

    2015-02-24

    Elastic scattering measurements have been performed for the {sup 6}Li+p system in inverse kinematics at the energies of 16, 20, 25 and 29 MeV. The heavy ejectile was detected by the large acceptance MAGNEX spectrometer at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania, in the angular range between ∼2{sup 0} and 12{sup 0} in the laboratory system, giving us the possibility to span almost a full angular range in the center of mass system. Results will be presented and discussed for one of the energies.

  2. First principles study of nanoscale mechanism of oxygen adsorption on lanthanum zirconate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingye; Wu, Linmin; Zhang, Yi; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) is a rare-earth pyrochlore material, which has been proposed as a promising thermal barrier coating (TBC) material due to its low thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability. At elevated temperatures, degradation of La2Zr2O7 may occur due to adsorption of oxygen (O2) on La2Zr2O7 surfaces. This paper investigates nanoscale mechanism of O2 adsorption on La2Zr2O7 coating surfaces using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. La2Zr2O7 surface energies on (001), (011) and (111) planes are calculated. The surface free energy of (011) plane is lower than those of (001) and (111) planes. On (001), (011) and (111) planes of La2Zr2O7, the lowest adsorption energy occurs at 4-fold site, bridge site, and 3-fold-FCC site, respectively. Among all calculated cases, the lowest adsorption energy site is 3-fold-FCC on (111) plane, which is confirmed by the Bader charge transfer analyses. Charge density difference analyses show that the 3-fold-FCC site on (111) surface has the largest charge density, suggesting the strongest interaction between O2 and La2Zr2O7 surface.

  3. Defect-Mediated Lithium Adsorption and Diffusion on Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhiguo; Fu, Y. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its high capacities. In this work, first principle calculations based on spin density functional theory were performed to investigate adsorption and diffusion of lithium on monolayer MoS2 with defects, such as single- and few-atom vacancies, antisite, and grain boundary. The values of adsorption energies on the monolayer MoS2 with the defects were increased compared to those on the pristine MoS2. The presence of defects causes that the Li is strongly bound to the monolayer MoS2 with adsorption energies in the range between 2.81 and 3.80 eV. The donation of Li 2s electron to the defects causes an enhancement of adsorption of Li on the monolayer MoS2. At the same time, the presence of defects does not apparently affect the diffusion of Li, and the energy barriers are in the range of 0.25–0.42 eV. The presence of the defects can enhance the energy storage capacity, suggesting that the monolayer MoS2 with defects is a suitable anode material for the Li-ion batteries. PMID:26692345

  4. Adsorption and dehydrogenation mechanism of methane on clean and oxygen-covered Pd (1 0 0) surfaces: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhao; Wang, Bin; Fang, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT) together with periodic slab models, the adsorption and dehydrogenation mechanisms of methane on clean and oxygen-covered Pd (1 0 0) surfaces have been studied systematically. Different adsorption geometries were investigated for CH4 and related intermediates (CH3, CH2, CH, C, H, O and OH). It was found that CH4 and CH3 prefer to adsorb on the top site, CH2 and OH are favorable on the bridge site, while CH, C, O and H species adsorb preferentially on the hollow site. In addition, this work identified the stable co-adsorption configurations for the relevant co-adsorption groups. It was concluded that the effect of co-adsorbed oxygen atom tends to weaken the adsorbate-substrate interaction on the Pd (1 0 0) surface. Finally, transition states, energy barriers and reaction energies were determined to confirm the mechanism of dehydrogenation of CH4 on clean and oxygen-covered Pd (1 0 0) surfaces. The existence of oxygen atom increases the energy barriers obviously and inhibits the dissociation of CHx (x = 1, 2 and 4) except for CH3 group.

  5. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  6. The role of couplings in nuclear rainbow formation at energies far above the barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, D.; Linares, R.; and others

    2012-10-20

    A study of the {sup 16}O+{sup 28}Si elastic and inelastic scattering is presented in the framework of Coupled Channel theory. The Sao Paulo Potential is used in the angular distribution calculations and compared with the existing data at 75 MeV bombarding energy. A nuclear rainbow pattern is predicted and becomes more clear above 100 MeV.

  7. First-principles calculations of the indigo encapsulation and adsorption by MgO nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ochoa, F.; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Canto, Gabriel I.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2014-06-01

    We have performed ab-initio calculations to investigate the structural and electronic properties of (m,m) chiral magnesium oxide nanotubes, (m,m)MgONTs, to explore the encapsulation, inclusion, and adsorption of dyes (organic molecules) such as Indigo (IND). Studies start by determining the structural parameters of the MgO nanotubes with different diameters and the IND. The indigo encapsulation into the MgONT is studied considering four (m,m) chiralities which yield 4 different NT diameters. In the endohedral functionalization, the indigo is within the NT at a tilt angle as in previous theoretical studies of organic molecules inside carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes. Results show that the encapsulation is a strong exothermic process with the m = 6 case exhibiting the largest encapsulation energy. It is also explored the indigo adsorption on the NT surface in the parallel and perpendicular configurations. The perpendicular configuration of the IND adsorption on the (8,8)MgONT exhibits the largest energy. The indigo inclusion within the NTs meets a potential barrier when m < 6, however this barrier diminishes as the index increases. Additionally, we have determined the total density of states (DOS), partial DOS, electron charge redistributions, and the highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels for the NTs with m = 6. Very strong binding energies and electron charge transfer from the IND to NTs is present in the atomic structures.

  8. First-principles calculations of the indigo encapsulation and adsorption by MgO nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Ochoa, F. Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Canto, Gabriel I.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2014-06-07

    We have performed ab-initio calculations to investigate the structural and electronic properties of (m,m) chiral magnesium oxide nanotubes, (m,m)MgONTs, to explore the encapsulation, inclusion, and adsorption of dyes (organic molecules) such as Indigo (IND). Studies start by determining the structural parameters of the MgO nanotubes with different diameters and the IND. The indigo encapsulation into the MgONT is studied considering four (m,m) chiralities which yield 4 different NT diameters. In the endohedral functionalization, the indigo is within the NT at a tilt angle as in previous theoretical studies of organic molecules inside carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes. Results show that the encapsulation is a strong exothermic process with the m = 6 case exhibiting the largest encapsulation energy. It is also explored the indigo adsorption on the NT surface in the parallel and perpendicular configurations. The perpendicular configuration of the IND adsorption on the (8,8)MgONT exhibits the largest energy. The indigo inclusion within the NTs meets a potential barrier when m < 6, however this barrier diminishes as the index increases. Additionally, we have determined the total density of states (DOS), partial DOS, electron charge redistributions, and the highest occupied molecular orbital–lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels for the NTs with m = 6. Very strong binding energies and electron charge transfer from the IND to NTs is present in the atomic structures.

  9. Edge energy transport barrier and turbulence in the I-mode regime on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Churchill, R. M.; Cziegler, I.; Dominguez, A.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Bespamyatnov, I.; Greenwald, M. J.; Howard, N.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.; Reinke, M. L.; Rowan, W. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    We report extended studies of the I-mode regime [Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)] obtained in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Marmar et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. This regime, usually accessed with unfavorable ion B × ∇B drift, features an edge thermal transport barrier without a strong particle transport barrier. Steady I-modes have now been obtained with favorable B × ∇B drift, by using specific plasma shapes, as well as with unfavorable drift over a wider range of shapes and plasma parameters. With favorable drift, power thresholds are close to the standard scaling for L-H transitions, while with unfavorable drift they are ˜ 1.5-3 times higher, increasing with Ip. Global energy confinement in both drift configurations is comparable to H-mode scalings, while density profiles and impurity confinement are close to those in L-mode. Transport analysis of the edge region shows a decrease in edge χeff, by typically a factor of 3, between L- and I-mode. The decrease correlates with a drop in mid-frequency fluctuations (f ˜ 50-150 kHz) observed on both density and magnetics diagnostics. Edge fluctuations at higher frequencies often increase above L-mode levels, peaking at f ˜ 250 kHz. This weakly coherent mode is clearest and has narrowest width (Δf/f ˜ 0.45) at low q95 and high Tped, up to 1 keV. The Er well in I-mode is intermediate between L- and H-mode and is dominated by the diamagnetic contribution in the impurity radial force balance, without the Vpol shear typical of H-modes.

  10. One-dimensional free-energy profiles of complex systems: progress variables that preserve the barriers.

    PubMed

    Krivov, Sergei V; Karplus, Martin

    2006-06-29

    We show that the balanced minimum-cut procedure introduced in PNAS 2004, 101, 14766 can be reinterpreted as a method for solving the constrained optimization problem of finding the minimum cut among the cuts with a particular value of an additive function of the nodes on either side of the cut. Such an additive function (e.g., the partition function of the reactant region) can be used as a progress coordinate to determine a one-dimensional profile (FEP) of the free-energy surface of the protein-folding reaction as well as other complex reactions. The algorithm is based on the network (obtained from an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation) that represents the calculated reaction behavior. The resulting FEP gives the exact values of the free energy as a function of the progress coordinate; i.e., at each value of the progress coordinate, the profile is obtained from the surface with the minimal partition function among the surfaces that divide the full free-energy surface between two chosen end points. In many cases, the balanced minimum-cut procedure gives results for only a limited set of points. An approximate method based on p(fold) is shown to provide the profile for a more complete set of values of the progress coordinate. Applications of the approach to model problems and to realistic systems (beta-hairpin of protein G, LJ38 cluster) are presented. PMID:16800603

  11. Free energy barrier in the growth of sulfuric acid-ammonia and sulfuric acid-dimethylamine clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olenius, T.; Kupiainen-Määttä, O.; Ortega, I. K.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2013-08-01

    The first step in atmospheric new particle formation involves the aggregation of gas phase molecules into small molecular clusters that can grow by colliding with gas molecules and each other. In this work we used first principles quantum chemistry combined with a dynamic model to study the steady-state kinetics of sets of small clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and ammonia or sulfuric acid and dimethylamine molecules. Both sets were studied with and without electrically charged clusters. We show the main clustering pathways in the simulated systems together with the quantum chemical Gibbs free energies of formation of the growing clusters. In the sulfuric acid-ammonia system, the major growth pathways exhibit free energy barriers, whereas in the acid-dimethylamine system the growth occurs mainly via barrierless condensation. When ions are present, charged clusters contribute significantly to the growth in the acid-ammonia system. For dimethylamine the role of ions is minor, except at very low acid concentration, and the growing clusters are electrically neutral.

  12. Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Control of Electron Energy Distribution of Dielectric Barrier Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyo Won; Yel Lee, Jung; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2011-10-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure plasmas attract lots of interests for the useful applications such as surface modification and bio-medical treatment. In this study, a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulation was adopted to investigate the discharge characteristics of a planar micro dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a driving frequency from 1 MHz to 50 MHz and with a gap distance from 60 to 500 micrometers. The variation of control parameters such as the gap distance, the driving wave form, and the applied voltage results in the change in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Through the relation between the ionization mean free path and the gap size, a significant change of EEDFs is achievable with the decrease of gap distance. Therefore, it is possible to categorize the operation range of DBDs for its applications by controlling the interactions between plasmas and neutral gas for the generation of preferable radicals. This work was supported by the Human Resources Development of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 20104010100670).

  13. Adsorption removal of pollutants by active cokes produced from sludge in the energy recycle process of wastes.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Naozumi; Mitomo, Aki; Itaya, Yoshinori; Mori, Shigekatsu; Yoshida, Shuichi

    2002-01-01

    This study proposes a recycling system of sludge into active cokes and the fundamental examinations for the application were carried out. In the system, active cokes were produced by carbonizing pellets of sludge in a steam stream. Pyrolysis gas yielded by carbonization can be available to a fuel for a steam generation boiler. The exhaust heat from the boiler is used sequentially for drying of sludge. The active cokes are applied to the adsorbent for dioxin removal in exhaust gas from incinerators of wastes, or for purification of gas obtained in a gasification process of wastes, particularly removal of H2S. The used adsorbent is not recycled, but incinerated in the furnace without a desorption process to decompose adsorbed dioxin or to oxidize H2S for a sequential desulfurization process of SO2. Dry pellets of sludge were carbonized in a quartz tube reactor under various atmospheres. The micro pore structure and the adsorption performance of the cokes produced without activation process were examined. The micro pore structure was influenced by the temperature, the sort of flow gas (N2, CO2 and steam) and carbonization time, and the active cokes produced under the condition of the temperature 823 K for 60 min in the steam atmosphere had a largest specific surface area in the diameter less than 5 nm. The amount of benzene adsorption as an alternative substance of dioxin into the active cokes had a similar quality to a commercial active char produced from coal if it was evaluated by adsorption per a unit specific surface area. This fundamental knowledge must be reflected to an optimum design for development of a simple continuous process to produce the active cokes by a fluidized bed type of the carbonization furnace.

  14. Crystal Structures, Surface Stability, and Water Adsorption Energies of La-Bastnäsite via Density Functional Theory and Experimental Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Srinivasan, Sriram Goverapet; Shivaramaiah, Radha; Kent, Paul R. C.; Stack, Andrew G.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Riman, Richard; Anderko, Andre; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2016-07-11

    Bastnasite is a fluoro-carbonate mineral that is the largest source of rare earth elements such as Y, La and Ce. With increasing demand for REE in many emerging technologies, there is an urgent need for improving the efficiency of ore beneficiation by froth flotation. In order to design improved flotation agents that can selectively bind to the mineral surface, a fundamental understanding of the bulk and surface properties of bastnasite is essential. Density functional theory calculations using the PBEsol exchange correlation functional and the DFT-D3 dispersion correction reveal that the most stable form of La bastnsite is isomorphic to themore » structure of Ce bastnasite belonging to the P2c space group, while the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database structure in the P2m space group is ca. 11.3 kJ/mol higher in energy per LaFCO3 formula unit. We report powder X-ray diffraction measurements on synthetic of La bastnasite to support these theoretical findings. Six different surfaces are studied by DFT, namely [100], [0001], [101], [102], [104] and [112]. Among these, the [100] surface is the most stable with a surface energy of 0.73 J/m2 in vacuum and 0.45 J/m2 in aqueous solution. We predicted the shape of a La bastnasite nanoparticle via thermodynamic Wulff construction to be a hexagonal prism with [100] and [0001] facets, chiseled at its ends by the [101] and [102] facets. The average surface energy of the nanoparticle in the gas phase is estimated to be 0.86 J/m2, in good agreement with a value of 1.11 J/m2 measured by calorimetry. The calculated adsorption energy of a water molecule varies widely with the surface plane and specific adsorption sites on a given surface. Moreover, the first layer of water molecules is predicted to adsorb strongly on the La-bastnasite surface, in agreement with water adsorption calorimetry experiments. Our work provides an important step towards a detailed atomistic understanding of the bastnasite water interface and designing

  15. Quasi-Elastic Transfer Reactions in SULFUR-32 + MOLYBDENUM-92,98,100 and NIOBIUM-93 Systems at Energies Near the Coulomb Barrier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junjien Felix

    Angular distributions of the few-nucleon transfer reactions in ^{32}S + ^{92,98,100}Mo and ^{93}Nb were measured at laboratory energies of 109, 116, and 125 MeV. Beams of ^ {32}S were accelerated by the Stony Brook tandem-linac accelerator. The charge of the projectile -like transfer products was identified by E - Delta E gas telescopes. The mass identification was achieved by measuring the energy and time-of-flight, using Si surface barrier detectors, where the linac RF signals provided master time references. The timing width of the beam was between 150 and 200 ps. Up to three nucleons pickup and four nucleons stripping were observed. The pickup channels are primarily neutron pickup and the stripping channels are dominated by proton stripping which agrees with the Q-matching condition predictions. The elastic scattering data were fitted by the optical model to obtain optical model potential parameters. The transfer angular distributions are bell-shaped. The peak of the angular distribution shifts toward 180 ^circ, in the center-of-mass frame, as energies approach the Coulomb barrier. Distorted-wave Born approximation calculations were performed to compare with the one- and two-nucleon transfer data. Good agreement was seen, particularly at energies below the barrier. The one-nucleon transfer cross sections are among 60 to 70% of the total transfer cross sections. The sum of the total transfer and fusion cross sections made up the total reaction cross sections. Large transfer cross sections were measured in ^{98,100 }Mo and ^{93}Nb targets while small transfer cross sections were measured in ^{92}Mo target, particularly at energies near the barrier. This is consistent with the large sub-barrier fusion enhancement observed in ^{32}S + ^{98,100 }Mo, ^{93}Nb but no enhancement in ^{32}S + ^{92}Mo. The transfer probability for one- and two-nucleon transfer was compared with the DWBA predictions at large reaction distances, d_0 >= 1.6 fm. The transfer probability for

  16. Inner Products of Energy Eigenstates for a 1-D Quantum Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julve, J.; Turrini, S.; de Urríes, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    The features of the standard inner products between all the types of real and complex-energy solutions of the Schrödinger equation for 1-dimensional cut-off quantum potentials are worked out using a Gaussian regularization. A general Master Solution is introduced which describes any of the above solutions as particular cases. From it, a Master Inner Product is obtained which yields all the particular products. We show that the Outgoing and the Incoming Boundary Conditions fully determine the location of the momenta respectively in the lower and upper half complex plane even for purely imaginary momenta (anti-bound and bound solutions).

  17. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution.

  18. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution. PMID:18715021

  19. Production of unknown neutron-rich isotopes in 238U collisions at near-barrier energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Li, Zhuxia; Zhang, Yingxun; Wang, Ning; Li, Qingfeng; Shen, Caiwan; Wang, Yongjia; Wu, Xizhen

    2016-08-01

    The production cross sections for primary and residual fragments with charge number from Z =70 to 120 produced in the collision of 238U at 7.0 MeV/nucleon are calculated by the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model incorporated with the statistical evaporation model (hivap code). The calculation results predict that about 60 unknown neutron-rich isotopes from elements Ra (Z =88 ) to Db (Z =105 ) can be produced with the production cross sections above the lower bound of 10-8 mb in this reaction. And almost all of the unknown neutron-rich isotopes are emitted at the laboratory angles θlab≤60°. Two cases, i.e., the production of the unknown uranium isotopes with A ≥244 and that of rutherfordium with A ≥269 , are investigated to understand the production mechanism of unknown neutron-rich isotopes. It is found that for the former case the collision time between two uranium nuclei is shorter and the primary fragments producing the residues have smaller excitation energies of ≤30 MeV and the outgoing angles of those residues cover a range of 30°-60°. For the latter case, a longer collision time is needed for a large number of nucleons being transferred and thus it results in higher excitation energies and smaller outgoing angles of primary fragments, and eventually results in a very small production cross section for the residues of Rf with A ≥269 which have a small interval of outgoing angles of θlab=40°-50°.

  20. Theory of quasicrystal surfaces: Probing the chemical reactivity by atomic and molecular adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajčí, M.; Hafner, J.

    The adsorption of oxygen and carbon atoms and of carbon monoxide molecules on a fivefold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals has been investigated using ab initio density-functional calculations. The quasicrystalline surface has been modeled by periodically repeated slabs cut from rational approximants to the quasicrystalline structure. Atomic and molecular adsorption have been studied for a large number of possible adsorption sites by performing three-dimensional static relaxations of the adsorbate/substrate complex. Four different scenarios for the dissociative adsorption of the CO molecule have been investigated via nudged-elastic band calculations of the transition states. Al and Mn-metal atoms present at the surface bind C and O atoms rather strongly, while Pd atoms are unstable adsorption sites: during relaxation, the adsorbate drifts to the nearest strong-binding site. The chemical reactivity with respect to a CO molecule varies very strongly across the surface. The adsorption close to Mn sites is promoted by rather strong covalent effects, but CO is only physisorbed at Al sites via weak polarization forces. On the basis of the observed local variations of the adsorption strength, we develop scenarios for dissociation and determine the potential energy barriers for this processes. We find that CO adsorbed close to a transition-metal atom can dissociate via an activated process, but the dissociation rate is expected to be rather low because of a high dissociation barrier and a "late" transition state. CO adsorbed close to Al atoms will desorb before dissociation. Surface vacancies present as a consequence of the irregular coordination of the Mackay cluster in the quasiperiodic structure will act as strongly attractive traps for diffusing molecules. Mn surface atoms are located in the center of truncated Mackay clusters. In scanning tunneling electron microscopy (STM) these truncated clusters are imaged as "white flowers". Surface vacancies are

  1. Combined experimental and quantum chemical study on the adsorption mechanism of phosphorous anions on the hydrotalcite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Kenji; Zhang, Shuang; Minagawa, Sho; Kano, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, the hydrotalcite-like compound [Mg6Al2(OH)16]CO3ṡ nH2O (shorted as MgAl-CO3) is synthesized and the adsorption of phosphorous anions, their adsorption performance on the surface of hydrotalcites, and its mechanism are analyzed. To theoretically clarify the adsorption mechanism and adsorption structures, we perform quantum chemistry calculations of reactants, locally stable states, transition states, and products among phosphorous anion, water, and hydrotalcite in a variety of pH ranges. The experimental result shows that the efficiency of phosphate removal does not depend on pH of the solution, with which the numerical results are consistent. In particular, we identify the factors of influencing the adsorption ratio in different pH ranges from the quantum chemistry calculations: the stability of locally stable states, and the energies and locations of potential barriers along the reaction pathway relative to those of the locally stable states. The results suggest that hydrotalcites synthesized in this work are suitable as sorbent materials for the adsorption and removal of phosphorous anions from aqueous solutions.

  2. Comparisons between adsorption and diffusion of alkali, alkaline earth metal atoms on silicene and those on silicane: Insight from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Xu; Huan-Sheng, Lu; Bo, Liu; Gang, Liu; Mu-Sheng, Wu; Chuying, Ouyang

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption and diffusion behaviors of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on silicane and silicene are both investigated by using a first-principles method within the frame of density functional theory. Silicane is staler against the metal adatoms than silicene. Hydrogenation makes the adsorption energies of various metal atoms considered in our calculations on silicane significantly lower than those on silicene. Similar diffusion energy barriers of alkali metal atoms on silicane and silicene could be observed. However, the diffusion energy barriers of alkali-earth metal atoms on silicane are essentially lower than those on silicene due to the small structural distortion and weak interaction between metal atoms and silicane substrate. Combining the adsorption energy with the diffusion energy barriers, it is found that the clustering would occur when depositing metal atoms on perfect hydrogenated silicene with relative high coverage. In order to avoid forming a metal cluster, we need to remove the hydrogen atoms from the silicane substrate to achieve the defective silicane. Our results are helpful for understanding the interaction between metal atoms and silicene-based two-dimensional materials. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 20152ACB21014, 20151BAB202006, and 20142BAB212002) and the Fund from the Jiangxi Provincial Educational Committee, China (Grant No. GJJ14254). Bo Xu is also supported by the Oversea Returned Project from the Ministry of Education, China.

  3. Measurement of the fusion excitation function for 19O + 12C at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Steinbach, T. K.; Vadas, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; Desouza, R. T.; Baby, L. T.; Tripathi, V.; Kuvin, S. A.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei in the outer crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as responsible for triggering X-ray super-bursts. The underlying hypothesis in this proposition is that the fusion of neutron-rich nuclei is enhanced as compared to stable nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis, an experiment has been performed to measure the fusion excitation function for 18O and 19O nuclei incident on a 12C target. A beam of 19O was produced by the 18O(d,p) reaction at Florida State University and separated using the RESOLUT mass spectrometer. The resulting 19O beam bombarded a 100 μg/cm2 12C target at an intensity of 2-4 × 103 p/s. Evaporation residues resulting from the de-excitation of the fusion product were distinguished by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. Using silicon detectors, micro-channel plate detectors, and an ionization chamber, evaporation residues were detected in the angular range θlab <= 23° with high efficiency. Initial experimental results including measurement of the fusion cross-section to approximately the 100 mb level will be presented. The measured excitation function will be compared to theoretical predictions. Supported by the US DOE under Grand No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  4. Understanding adsorption-induced structural transitions in metal-organic frameworks: From the unit cell to the crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triguero, Carles; Coudert, François-Xavier; Boutin, Anne; Fuchs, Alain H.; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2012-11-01

    Breathing transitions represent recently discovered adsorption-induced structural transformations between large-pore and narrow-pore conformations in bi-stable metal-organic frameworks such as MIL-53. We present a multiscale physical mechanism of the dynamics of breathing transitions. We show that due to interplay between host framework elasticity and guest molecule adsorption, these transformations on the crystal level occur via layer-by-layer shear. We construct a simple Hamiltonian that describes the physics of host-host and host-guest interactions on the level of unit cells and reduces to one effective dimension due to the long-range elastic cell-cell interactions. We then use this Hamiltonian in Monte Carlo simulations of adsorption-desorption cycles to study how the behavior of unit cells is linked to the transition mechanism at the crystal level through three key physical parameters: the transition energy barrier, the cell-cell elastic coupling, and the system size.

  5. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  6. Interfacial adsorption in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Cruz, M.O. de la; Voorhees, P.W.

    1999-11-26

    Interfaces of A-B-C ternary alloys decomposed into two and three phases are studied. The effect of the gradient energy coefficients {bar {kappa}}{sub II}, I = A, B, C, on the interface composition profiles of ternary alloys is examined. The adsorption of component C in ternary alloys is obtained numerically by finding steady-state solutions of the nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard equations and by solving the two Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from minimizing the interfacial energy, and analytically near the critical point. It is found that the solutions from both numerical methods are identical for a two-phase system. In symmetric ternary systems (equal interaction energy between each pair of components) with a minority component C, the gradient energy coefficient of C, {bar {kappa}}{sub CC}, can have a very strong influence on the degree of adsorption. In the {alpha} and {beta} two-phase regions, where {alpha} and {beta} are the phases rich in the majority components A and B, respectively, as {bar {kappa}}{sub CC} increases, the adsorption of the minority component C in the {alpha} and {beta} interfaces decreases. Near a critical point, however, the degree of adsorption of minority component C is independent of the gradient energy coefficient.

  7. Applicability of colloid filtration theory in size-distributed, reduced porosity, granular media in the absence of energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Pazmino, Eddy F; Ma, Huilian; Johnson, William P

    2011-12-15

    The vast majority of colloid transport experiments use granular porous media with narrow size distribution to facilitate comparison with colloid filtration theory, which represents porous media with a single collector size. In this work we examine retention of colloids ranging in size from 0.21 to 9.1 μm in diameter, in columns packed with uniform and size-distributed borosilicate glass bead porous media with porosity ranging from 0.38 to 0.28. Conditions were favorable to attachment (absent a significant energy barrier). The goal was to determine the applicability of colloid filtration theory to colloid retention in these media. We also directly observed deposition at the pore scale in packed flow cells. The pore domain was characterized via high resolution computerized X-ray micro tomography (HRXMT). The flow field was examined using Lattice-Boltzmann flow simulation methods (LBM). The influence of preferential flow paths on colloid retention in the lowest porosity media was accounted for by correcting the fluid velocity. Straining in pore throats too small to pass was not a significant contributor to colloid retention despite colloid-to-collector size ratios up to 0.05. Mechanistic simulations via the Ma-Pedel-Fife-Johnson correlation equation (MPFJ) for colloid filtration predicted the experimentally observed trends in deposition with porosity when a number-based mean grain size was used.

  8. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-02-27

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money.

  9. Evaluation of the energy barrier for failure of Au atomic contact based on temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Akira; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the mechanical stability of single gold atomic contacts at an applied bias voltage of 0-1 V using a nano-fabricated mechanically controllable break junction technique at 300-400 K under ambient conditions. The single atomic contact shows the quantized conductance (G0 = 2e(2)/h) and can carry considerably large current, which results in the current-induced failure of the contact. The contact failure behaviour under the applied bias conditions was studied by statistical analysis of the current-voltage (I-V) curves of the single Au contacts. We demonstrated that, at the elevated temperature of 300-400 K, the current-induced local heating effect is negligibly small and current-induced forces in the contact are responsible for the observed failure of the single gold contacts under the high bias voltage conditions (>0.4 V). Furthermore, based on the temperature dependence of the contact failure behaviour in the I-V curves, the energy barrier of the contact-failure was evaluated to be ca. 0.1 V. PMID:27427285

  10. Vibrational analysis on the revised potential energy curve of the low-barrier hydrogen bond in photoactive yellow protein.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) has a characteristic hydrogen bond (H bond) between p-coumaric acid chromophore and Glu46, whose OH bond length has been observed to be 1.21 Å by the neutron diffraction technique [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 106, 440-4]. Although it has been expected that such a drastic elongation of the OH bond could be caused by the quantum effect of the hydrogen nucleus, previous theoretical computations including the nuclear quantum effect have so far underestimated the bond length by more than 0.07 Å. To elucidate the origin of the difference, we performed a vibrational analysis of the H bond on potential energy curve with O…O distance of 2.47 Å on the equilibrium structure, and that with O…O distance of 2.56 Å on the experimental crystal structure. While the vibrationally averaged OH bond length for equilibrium structure was underestimated, the corresponding value for crystal structure was in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental values. The elongation of the O…O distance by the quantum mechanical or thermal fluctuation would be indispensable for the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond in PYP.

  11. Vibrational analysis on the revised potential energy curve of the low-barrier hydrogen bond in photoactive yellow protein.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) has a characteristic hydrogen bond (H bond) between p-coumaric acid chromophore and Glu46, whose OH bond length has been observed to be 1.21 Å by the neutron diffraction technique [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 106, 440-4]. Although it has been expected that such a drastic elongation of the OH bond could be caused by the quantum effect of the hydrogen nucleus, previous theoretical computations including the nuclear quantum effect have so far underestimated the bond length by more than 0.07 Å. To elucidate the origin of the difference, we performed a vibrational analysis of the H bond on potential energy curve with O…O distance of 2.47 Å on the equilibrium structure, and that with O…O distance of 2.56 Å on the experimental crystal structure. While the vibrationally averaged OH bond length for equilibrium structure was underestimated, the corresponding value for crystal structure was in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental values. The elongation of the O…O distance by the quantum mechanical or thermal fluctuation would be indispensable for the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond in PYP. PMID:27274362

  12. Microbial barriers.

    PubMed

    Gutwein, Luke G; Panigrahi, Mousumee; Schultz, Gregory S; Mast, Bruce A

    2012-07-01

    Barrier wound therapy is commonplace in the health care environment and functions to limit bacterial colonization and infection in both acute wounds and recalcitrant chronic wounds. This article reviews the nature of acute and chronic wounds and their available adjunctive barrier therapies.

  13. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-28

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C{sub 6}-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ∼0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. This in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001)

  14. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom inmore » the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).« less

  15. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).

  16. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp.) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catf...

  17. Adsorption kinetics of methyl violet onto perlite.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Mehmet; Alkan, Mahir

    2003-01-01

    This study examines adsorption kinetics and activation parameters of methyl violet on perlite. The effect of process parameters like contact time, concentration of dye, temperature and pH on the extent of methyl violet adsorption from solution has been investigated. Results of the kinetic studies show that the adsorption reaction is first order with respect to dye solution concentration with activation energy of 13.2 kJ mol(-1). This low activation energy value indicates that the adsorption reaction is diffusion controlled. The activation parameters using Arrhenius and Eyring equations have been calculated. Adsorption increases with increase of variables such as contact time, initial dye concentration, temperature and pH.

  18. Investigation of the energy barrier to the rotation of amide CN bonds in ACE inhibitors by NMR, dynamic HPLC and DFT.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallah, S; Ben Dhia, M T; Driss, M R; Touil, S

    2016-09-01

    The isomerizations of Enalapril, Perindopril, Enalaprilat and Lisinopril have been investigated using NMR spectroscopic, dynamic chromatographic, unified equation and DFT theoretical calculations. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) were determined by varying the temperature in the NMR experiments. At the coalescence temperature, we can evaluate the isomerization barrier to the rotation (ΔG(≠)) around the amide bond. Using dynamics chromatography and an unified equation introduced by Trap, we can determine isomerization rate constants and Gibbs activation energies. Molecular mechanics calculations also provided evidence for the presence of low energy conformers for the ACE due to restricted amide rotation. With the value of barriers (ΔE) between them of the order of (20kJmol(-1)), which is in agreement with the dynamic NMR results and DFT calculations.

  19. Investigation of the energy barrier to the rotation of amide CN bonds in ACE inhibitors by NMR, dynamic HPLC and DFT.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallah, S; Ben Dhia, M T; Driss, M R; Touil, S

    2016-09-01

    The isomerizations of Enalapril, Perindopril, Enalaprilat and Lisinopril have been investigated using NMR spectroscopic, dynamic chromatographic, unified equation and DFT theoretical calculations. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) were determined by varying the temperature in the NMR experiments. At the coalescence temperature, we can evaluate the isomerization barrier to the rotation (ΔG(≠)) around the amide bond. Using dynamics chromatography and an unified equation introduced by Trap, we can determine isomerization rate constants and Gibbs activation energies. Molecular mechanics calculations also provided evidence for the presence of low energy conformers for the ACE due to restricted amide rotation. With the value of barriers (ΔE) between them of the order of (20kJmol(-1)), which is in agreement with the dynamic NMR results and DFT calculations. PMID:27344631

  20. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided.

  1. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-06-15

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided. 5 figs.

  2. Gravitational settling effects on unit cell predictions of colloidal retention in porous media in the absence of energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huilian; Pazmino, Eddy F; Johnson, William P

    2011-10-01

    Laboratory column experiments for colloidal transport and retention are often carried out with flow direction oriented against gravity (up-flow) to minimize retention of trapped air. However, the models that underlie colloidal filtration theory (e.g., unit cell models such as the Happel sphere-in-cell and hemispheres-in-cell) typically set flow in the same direction as gravity (down-flow). We performed unit model simulations and experimental observations of retention of colloids with different size and density in porous media in the absence of energy barriers under both up-flow and down-flow conditions. Unit cell models predicted very different deposition (e.g., for large or dense colloids with gravity number N(G) > 0.01 at pore water velocity of 4 m/day) under down-flow versus up-flow conditions, which reflect underlying influences of gravity and flow on simulated colloid trajectories that resulted in very different distributions of attached colloids over the model surfaces. The Happel sphere-in-cell model showed greater sensitivity to flow orientation relative to gravity than the hemispheres-in-cell model. In contrast, experimental results were relatively insensitive to orientation of flow with respect to gravity, as a result of the variety of orientations of flow relative to gravity and to the porous media surface that exist in actual porous media. Notably, the down-flow simulations corresponded most closely to the experimental results (for near neutrally buoyant colloids); which justifies the common practice of comparing up-flow experiments to theoretical predictions developed for down-flow conditions.

  3. One-Dimensional Barrier-Preserving Free-Energy Projections of β-sheet Miniprotein: New Insights into the Folding Process

    PubMed Central

    Krivov, Sergei V.; Muff, Stefanie; Caflisch, Amedeo; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The conformational space of a 20-residue three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet peptide (double hairpin) was sampled by equilibrium folding/unfolding molecular dynamics simulations for a total of 20 µs. The resulting one-dimensional free-energy profiles (FEPs) provide a detailed description of the free-energy basins and barriers for the folding reaction. The similarity of the FEPs obtained using the probability of folding before unfolding (p fold) or the mean first passage time supports the robustness of the procedure. The folded state and the most populated free-energy basins in the denatured state are described by the one-dimensional FEPs, which avoid the overlap of states present in the usual one- or two-dimensional projections. Within the denatured state, a basin with fluctuating helical conformations and a heterogeneous entropic state are populated near the melting temperature at about 11% and 33%, respectively. Folding pathways from the helical basin or enthalpic traps (with only one of the two hairpins formed) reach the native state through the entropic state, which is on-pathway and is separated by a low barrier from the folded state. A simplified equilibrium kinetic network based on the FEPs shows the complexity of the folding reaction and indicates, as augmented by additional analyses, that the basins in the denatured state are connected primarily by the native state. The overall folding kinetics shows single-exponential behavior because barriers between the non-native basins and the folded state have similar heights. PMID:18590307

  4. Computing the Free Energy Barriers for Less by Sampling with a Coarse Reference Potential while Retaining Accuracy of the Target Fine Model.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, Nikolay V

    2014-08-12

    Proposed in this contribution is a protocol for calculating fine-physics (e.g., ab initio QM/MM) free-energy surfaces at a high level of accuracy locally (e.g., only at reactants and at the transition state for computing the activation barrier) from targeted fine-physics sampling and extensive exploratory coarse-physics sampling. The full free-energy surface is still computed but at a lower level of accuracy from coarse-physics sampling. The method is analytically derived in terms of the umbrella sampling and the free-energy perturbation methods which are combined with the thermodynamic cycle and the targeted sampling strategy of the paradynamics approach. The algorithm starts by computing low-accuracy fine-physics free-energy surfaces from the coarse-physics sampling in order to identify the reaction path and to select regions for targeted sampling. Thus, the algorithm does not rely on the coarse-physics minimum free-energy reaction path. Next, segments of high-accuracy free-energy surface are computed locally at selected regions from the targeted fine-physics sampling and are positioned relative to the coarse-physics free-energy shifts. The positioning is done by averaging the free-energy perturbations computed with multistep linear response approximation method. This method is analytically shown to provide results of the thermodynamic integration and the free-energy interpolation methods, while being extremely simple in implementation. Incorporating the metadynamics sampling to the algorithm is also briefly outlined. The application is demonstrated by calculating the B3LYP//6-31G*/MM free-energy barrier for an enzymatic reaction using a semiempirical PM6/MM reference potential. These modifications allow computing the activation free energies at a significantly reduced computational cost but at the same level of accuracy compared to computing full potential of mean force.

  5. Barriers and opportunities for improving energy efficiency in the social housing sector: Case study of E4C's Division of Housing and Mental Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand-Smith, Patrick

    Energy efficiency improvements in the social housing sector have the potential to produce a range of environmental and social benefits. These improvements can be produced through retrofits that deliver energy savings or new construction built to a high standard of energetic efficiency. However, implementation of these approaches is hindered by economic and organizational constraints affecting the agencies that provide society with social housing and the governments that support the provision of these services. This thesis builds on the work of other researchers studying these constraints by supplying an in-depth case study from Alberta and a discussion based on its findings. The case study focuses on E4C, a social service agency with several housing projects. Overall, findings matched important themes identified in the academic literature. The in-depth nature of the case study added additional insight to many of these themes. Most barriers are economic in nature and related to a lack of sufficient funding or the up-front costs of energy-saving retrofits. The recommendations presented are based on consideration of the multiple barriers and opportunities faced. Most of these require a considerable investment of time on the part of agencies and would be followed up by capital investments to implement energy-saving changes. Therefore it is important to note that the most significant barrier is commitment, which is one of E4C's central values. This thesis showed that commitment cannot exceed capacity to act. Greater commitment on the part of governments, agencies or society at large could have significant impacts in improving the energy efficiency of buildings in the Albertan, and Canadian, social housing sector.

  6. Mechanisms of Polyelectrolyte Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption at the Air-Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Patrick C.; Palazoglu, Omer A.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan, a naturally occurring cationic polyelectrolyte, restores the adsorption of the clinical lung surfactant Survanta to the air-water interface in the presence of albumin at much lower concentrations than uncharged polymers such as polyethylene glycol. This is consistent with the positively charged chitosan forming ion pairs with negative charges on the albumin and lung surfactant particles, reducing the net charge in the double-layer, and decreasing the electrostatic energy barrier to adsorption to the air-water interface. However, chitosan, like other polyelectrolytes, cannot perfectly match the charge distribution on the surfactant, which leads to patches of positive and negative charge at net neutrality. Increasing the chitosan concentration further leads to a reduction in the rate of surfactant adsorption consistent with an over-compensation of the negative charge on the surfactant and albumin surfaces, which creates a new repulsive electrostatic potential between the now cationic surfaces. This charge neutralization followed by charge inversion explains the window of polyelectrolyte concentration that enhances surfactant adsorption; the same physical mechanism is observed in flocculation and re-stabilization of anionic colloids by chitosan and in alternate layer deposition of anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes on charged colloids. PMID:19366599

  7. Adsorption and dissociation of H2O on the (001) surface of uranium mononitride: energetics and mechanism from first-principles investigation.

    PubMed

    Bo, Tao; Lan, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Juan; Zhao, Yao-Lin; He, Chao-Hui; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2016-05-21

    The interfacial interaction of uranium mononitride (UN) with water from the environment unavoidably leads to corrosion of nuclear fuels, which affects a lot of processes in the nuclear fuel cycle. In this work, the microscopic adsorption behaviors of water on the UN(001) surface as well as water dissociation and accompanying H2 formation mechanisms have been investigated on the basis of DFT+U calculations and ab initio atomistic thermodynamics. For adsorption of one H2O monomer, the predicted adsorption energies are -0.88, -2.07, and -2.07 eV for the most stable molecular, partially dissociative, and completely dissociative adsorption, respectively. According to our calculations, a water molecule dissociates into OH and H species via three pathways with small energy barriers of 0.78, 0.72, and 0.85 eV, respectively. With the aid of the neighboring H atom, H2 formation through the reaction of H* + OH* can easily occur via two pathways with energy barriers of 0.61 and 0.36 eV, respectively. The molecular adsorption of water shows a slight coverage dependence on the surface while this dependence becomes obvious for partially dissociative adsorption as the water coverage increases from 1/4 to 1 ML. In addition, based on the "ab initio atomistic thermodynamic" simulations, increasing H2O partial pressure will enhance the stability of the adsorbed system and water coverage, while increasing temperature will decrease the H2O coverage. We found that the UN(001) surface reacts easily with H2O at room temperature, leading to dissolution and corrosion of the UN fuel materials.

  8. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  9. Ab initio calculations of stationary points on the benzene-Ar and p-difluorobenzene-Ar potential energy surfaces: barriers to bound orbiting states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulds, Rebecca J.; Buntine, Mark A.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2004-09-01

    The potential energy surfaces of the van der Waals complexes benzene-Ar and p-difluorobenzene-Ar have been investigated at the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) level of theory with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. Calculations were performed with unconstrained geometry optimization for all stationary points. This study has been performed to elucidate the nature of a conflict between experimental results from dispersed fluorescence and velocity map imaging (VMI). The inconsistency is that spectra for levels of p-difluorobenzene-Ar and -Kr below the dissociation thresholds determined by VMI show bands where free p-difluorobenzene emits, suggesting that dissociation is occurring. We proposed that the bands observed in the dispersed fluorescence spectra are due to emission from states in which the rare gas atom orbits the aromatic chromophore; these states are populated by intramolecular vibrational redistribution from the initially excited level [S. M. Bellm, R. J. Moulds, and W. D. Lawrance, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 10709 (2001)]. To test this proposition, stationary points have been located on both the benzene-Ar and p-difluorobenzene-Ar potential energy surfaces (PESs) to determine the barriers to this orbiting motion. Comparison with previous single point CCSD(T) calculations of the benzene-Ar PES has been used to determine the amount by which the barriers are overestimated at the MP2 level. As there is little difference in the comparable regions of the benzene-Ar and p-difluorobenzene-Ar PESs, the overestimation is expected to be similar for p-difluorobenzene-Ar. Allowing for this overestimation gives the barrier to movement of the Ar atom around the pDFB ring via the valley between the H atoms as ⩽204 cm-1 in S0 (including zero point energy). From the estimated change upon electronic excitation, the corresponding barrier in S1 is estimated to be ⩽225 cm-1. This barrier is less than the 240 cm-1 energy of 302¯, the vibrational level for which the anomalous "free p

  10. Al atom on MoO3(010) surface: adsorption and penetration using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong-Zhang; Bandaru, Sateesh; Wang, Da; Liu, Jin; Lau, Woon Ming; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Li-Li

    2016-03-14

    Interfacial issues, such as the interfacial structure and the interdiffusion of atoms at the interface, are fundamental to the understanding of the ignition and reaction mechanisms of nanothermites. This study employs first-principle density functional theory to model Al/MoO3 by placing an Al adatom onto a unit cell of a MoO3(010) slab, and to probe the initiation of interfacial interactions of Al/MoO3 nanothermite by tracking the adsorption and subsurface-penetration of the Al adatom. The calculations show that the Al adatom can spontaneously go through the topmost atomic plane (TAP) of MoO3(010) and reach the 4-fold hollow adsorption-site located below the TAP, with this subsurface adsorption configuration being the most preferred one among all plausible adsorption configurations. Two other plausible configurations place the Al adatom at two bridge sites located above the TAP of MoO3(010) but the Al adatom can easily penetrate below this TAP to a relatively more stable adsorption configuration, with a small energy barrier of merely 0.2 eV. The evidence of subsurface penetration of Al implies that Al/MoO3 likely has an interface with intermixing of Al, Mo and O atoms. These results provide new insights on the interfacial interactions of Al/MoO3 and the ignition/combustion mechanisms of Al/MoO3 nanothermites.

  11. Adsorption and dissociation of O 2 on CuCl(1 1 1) surface: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Riguang; Liu, Hongyan; Wang, Baojun; Ren, Jun; Li, Zhong

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of O 2 on CuCl(1 1 1) surface have been systematically studied by the density functional theory (DFT) slab calculations. Different kinds of possible modes of atomic O and molecular O 2 adsorbed on CuCl(1 1 1) surface and possible dissociation pathways are identified, and the optimized geometry, adsorption energy, vibrational frequency and Mulliken charge are obtained. The calculated results show that the favorable adsorption occurs at hollow site for O atom, and molecular O 2 lying flatly on the surface with one O atom binding with top Cu atom is the most stable adsorption configuration. The O-O stretching vibrational frequencies are significantly red-shifted, and the charges transferred from CuCl to oxygen. Upon O 2 adsorption, the oxygen species adsorbed on CuCl(1 1 1) surface mainly shows the characteristic of the superoxo (O 2-), which primarily contributes to improving the catalytic activity of CuCl, meanwhile, a small quantity of O 2 dissociation into atomic O also occur, which need to overcome very large activation barrier. Our results can provide some microscopic information for the catalytic mechanism of DMC synthesis over CuCl catalyst from oxidative carbonylation of methanol.

  12. Identifying perceived barriers and benefits to reducing energy consumption in an affordable housing complex using the Community-Based Social Marketing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaves, Daniel

    Energy production and consumption has a negative impact on both environmental and human health. Energy consumption can be directly impacted by human behavior, especially in the residential sector. As a result, this sector has been studied significantly; however, energy reducing behavior change research focusing on the affordable housing sector has not been studied thoroughly to date. This study seeks to implement the first two phases of the Community Based Social Marketing (CBSM) framework in an affordable housing setting. The goals were to identify the optimal behaviors for energy reduction based on phase one survey results and to identify the perceived benefits and barriers associated with those behaviors. Additionally, this study identified nuances in the CBSM process that researchers should take into consideration when implementing CBSM in an affordable housing environment.

  13. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-09-13

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. Overall, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). As an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses.

  14. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-09-13

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. Overall, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). As an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses. PMID:27537680

  15. Adsorption and decomposition of formamide over zigzag (n,0) silicon-carbide nanotubes (n = 5-7): Investigation of curvature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye; Masumi, Vahideh

    2015-07-01

    The adsorption and decomposition of formamide (FM) on the surface of zigzag silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The structures of monomers and complexes are optimized and characterized by frequency calculations at the M06-2X/6-31G** computational level. The calculated adsorption energies (Eads) for the formation of FM/SiCNT complexes are all exothermic. The energy barriers for the dehydrogenation, decarbonylation, and dehydration processes are found to be in the range of 0.1-53 kcal/mol. Our results indicate that dehydrogenation and decarbonylation pathways are possible routes to get gaseous HNCO, H2, NH3 and CO molecules. In contrast, the reaction of HCONH → CONH + H needs a large activation energy which makes the FM dehydration an unfavorable reaction compared to dehydrogenation and decarbonylation pathways. The DFT calculations reveal that both the adsorption energies and reaction energy-barriers display a curvature effect and small-diameter SiCNTs with large curvature would be beneficial for capture and decomposition of FM.

  16. Method and apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Drost, Kevin; Vishwanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2004-06-08

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. In another aspect, the apparatus or methods utilize heat exchange channels of varying lengths that have volumes controlled to provide equal heat fluxes. Methods of fuel cell startup are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  17. Method for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  18. Apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  19. Oxygen adsorption at noble metal/TiO2 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Babaei, F.; Alaei-Sheini, Navid; Lajvardi, Mehdi M.

    2016-03-01

    Electric conduction in titanium dioxide is known to be oxygen sensitive and the conductivity of a TiO2 ceramic body is determined mainly by the concentration of its naturally occurring oxygen vacancy. Recently, fabrications and electronic features of a number of noble metal/TiO2-based electronic devices, such as solar cells, UV detectors, gas sensors and memristive devices have been demonstrated. Here, we investigate the effect of oxygen adsorption at the noble metal/TiO2 junction in such devices, and show the potentials of these junctions in chemical sensor fabrication. The polycrystalline, poly-phase TiO2 layers are grown by the selective and controlled oxidation of titanium thin films vacuum deposited on silica substrates. Noble metal thin films are deposited on the oxide layers by physical vapor deposition. Current-voltage (I-V) diagrams of the fabricated devices are studied for Ag/, Au/, and Pt/TiO2 samples. The raw samples show no junction energy barrier. After a thermal annealing in air at 250° C, I-V diagrams change drastically. The annealed samples demonstrate highly non-linear I-V indicating the formation of high Schottky energy barriers at the noble metal/TiO2 junctions. The phenomenon is described based on the effect of the oxygen atoms adsorbed at the junction.

  20. Polarization Energies at Organic-Organic Interfaces: Impact on the Charge Separation Barrier at Donor-Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ryno, Sean M; Fu, Yao-Tsung; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2016-06-22

    We probe the energetic landscape at a model pentacene/fullerene (C60) interface to investigate the interactions between positive and negative charges, which are critical to the processes of charge separation and recombination in organic solar cells. Using a polarizable force field, we find that polarization energy, i.e., the stabilization a charge feels due to its environment, is larger at the interface than in the bulk for both a positive and a negative charge. The combination of the charge being more stabilized at the interface and the Coulomb attraction between the charges results in a barrier to charge separation at the pentacene/C60 interface that can be in excess of 0.7 eV for static configurations of the donor and acceptor locations. However, the impact of molecular motions, i.e., the dynamics, at the interface at room temperature results in a distribution of polarization energies and in charge separation barriers that can be significantly reduced. The dynamic nature of the interface is thus critical, with the polarization energy distributions indicating that sites along the interface shift in time between favorable and unfavorable configurations for charge separation.

  1. Simultaneous optical model analysis of elastic scattering, fusion, and breakup for the {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm system at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Camacho, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Padron, I.

    2008-05-15

    A simultaneous optical model calculation of elastic scattering, complete fusion, and breakup cross sections for energies around the Coulomb barrier is presented for reactions involving the weakly bound projectile {sup 9}Be on the medium size target {sup 144}Sm. In the calculations, the nuclear polarization potential U is split into a volume part U{sub F}, which is responsible for fusion reactions, and a surface part U{sub DR}, which accounts for direct reactions. A simultaneous {chi}{sup 2} analysis of elastic and complete fusion data shows that the extracted optical potential parameters of the real V{sub F} and imaginary W{sub F} parts of U{sub F} and the corresponding parts V{sub DR} and W{sub DR} of U{sub DR} satisfy separately the dispersion relation. Energy-dependent forms for the fusion and direct reaction potentials indicate that, at the strong absorption radius, the direct reaction potentials dominate over the fusion potentials. Moreover, the imaginary direct reaction potential results in a rather smooth function of E around the barrier energy. These findings show that the threshold anomaly, usually present in reactions with tightly bound projectiles, is not exhibited for the system {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm. Within this formalism, the effect of breakup reactions on complete fusion is studied by turning on and off the potentials responsible for breakup reactions.

  2. Overcoming Rapid Inactivation of Lung Surfactant: Analogies Between Competitive Adsorption and Colloid Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Stenger, Patrick C.; Shieh, Ian; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2009-01-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a mixture of lipids and proteins that line the alveolar air-liquid interface, lowering the interfacial tension to levels that make breathing possible. In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inactivation of LS is believed to play an important role in the development and severity of the disease. This review examines the competitive adsorption of LS and surface-active contaminants, such as serum proteins, present in the alveolar fluids of ARDS patients, and how this competitive adsorption can cause normal amounts of otherwise normal LS to be ineffective in lowering the interfacial tension. LS and serum proteins compete for the air-water interface when both are present in solution either in the alveolar fluids or in a Langmuir trough. Equilibrium favors LS as it has the lower equilibrium surface pressure, but the smaller proteins are kinetically favored over multi-micron LS bilayer aggregates by faster diffusion. If albumin reaches the interface, it creates an energy barrier to subsequent LS adsorption that slows or prevents the adsorption of the necessary amounts of LS required to lower surface tension. This process can be understood in terms of classic colloid stability theory in which an energy barrier to diffusion stabilizes colloidal suspensions against aggregation. This analogy provides qualitative and quantitative predictions regarding the origin of surfactant inactivation. An important corollary is that any additive that promotes colloid coagulation, such as increased electrolyte concentration, multivalent ions, hydrophilic non-adsorbing polymers such as PEG, dextran, etc. or polyelectrolytes such as chitosan, added to LS, also promotes LS adsorption in the presence of serum proteins and helps reverse surfactant inactivation. The theory provides quantitative tools to determine the optimal concentration of these additives and suggests that multiple additives may have a synergistic effect. A variety of physical and chemical

  3. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  4. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane. PMID:23684695

  5. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  6. The process of dissociative adsorption of fluorine on Ge(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, B.; Mikołajczyk, P.

    2016-10-01

    The process of dissociation of a fluorine molecule on the (001) surface of germanium has been analyzed using density functional theory. Initial orientations of the F2 molecule with respect to the substrate leading to its dissociative adsorption have been identified. Reaction paths at p(1 × 2) and c(2 × 4) reconstructed Ge(001) surfaces are different, but final configurations of the adsorbate/substrate system are found qualitatively the same. Adsorption energy of around 5 eV per molecule depends on the final arrangement of adatoms, being always higher for the p(1 × 2) substrate reconstruction. The energy barrier for dissociative adsorption of F2 on Ge(001) is always less than 0.2 eV. The structural and electronic properties of distinct final adsorbate configurations have been examined, indicating that the surface density of states is metallic at Ge dimers with one adsorbed F atom and non-metallic at Ge dimers with two F adatoms.

  7. Growth of Ammonium Bisulfate Clusters by Adsorption of Oxygenated Organic Molecules

    DOE PAGES

    DePalma, Joseph W.; Wang, Jian; Wexler, Anthony S.; Johnston, Murray V.

    2015-10-21

    Quantum chemical calculations were employed to model the interactions of the [(NH4+)4(HSO4-)4] ammonium bisulfate cluster with one or more molecular products of monoterpene oxidation. A strong interaction was found between the bisulfate ion of the cluster and a carboxylic acid, aldehyde or ketone functionality of the organic molecule. Free energies of adsorption for carboxylic acids were in the -70 to -73 kJ/mol range, while those for aldehydes and ketones were in the -46 to -50 kJ/mol range. These values suggest that a small ambient ammonium bisulfate cluster, such as the [(NH4+)4(SO4-)4] cluster, is able to adsorb an oxygenated organic molecule.more » Although adsorption of the first molecule is highly favorable, adsorption of subsequent molecules is not, suggesting that sustained uptake of organic molecules does not occur, and thus is not a pathway for continuing growth of the cluster. This result is consistent with ambient measurements showing that particles below ~1 nm grow slowly, while those above 1 nm grow at an increasing rate presumably due to a lower surface energy barrier enabling the uptake of organic molecules. This work provides insight into the molecular level interactions which affect sustained cluster growth by uptake of organic molecules.« less

  8. Growth of Ammonium Bisulfate Clusters by Adsorption of Oxygenated Organic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    DePalma, Joseph W.; Wang, Jian; Wexler, Anthony S.; Johnston, Murray V.

    2015-10-21

    Quantum chemical calculations were employed to model the interactions of the [(NH4+)4(HSO4-)4] ammonium bisulfate cluster with one or more molecular products of monoterpene oxidation. A strong interaction was found between the bisulfate ion of the cluster and a carboxylic acid, aldehyde or ketone functionality of the organic molecule. Free energies of adsorption for carboxylic acids were in the -70 to -73 kJ/mol range, while those for aldehydes and ketones were in the -46 to -50 kJ/mol range. These values suggest that a small ambient ammonium bisulfate cluster, such as the [(NH4+)4(SO4-)4] cluster, is able to adsorb an oxygenated organic molecule. Although adsorption of the first molecule is highly favorable, adsorption of subsequent molecules is not, suggesting that sustained uptake of organic molecules does not occur, and thus is not a pathway for continuing growth of the cluster. This result is consistent with ambient measurements showing that particles below ~1 nm grow slowly, while those above 1 nm grow at an increasing rate presumably due to a lower surface energy barrier enabling the uptake of organic molecules. This work provides insight into the molecular level interactions which affect sustained cluster growth by uptake of organic molecules.

  9. Adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose onto cellulose model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoja, Johannes; Maurer, Reinhard J; Sax, Alexander F

    2014-07-31

    Reliable simulation of molecular adsorption onto cellulose surfaces is essential for the design of new cellulose nanocomposite materials. However, the applicability of classical force field methods to such systems remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we present the adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose on model surfaces of crystalline cellulose Iα and Iβ. The adsorption of the two large carbohydrates was simulated with the GLYCAM06 force field. To validate this approach, quantum theoretical calculations for the adsorption of glucose were performed: Equilibrium geometries were studied with density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion-corrected DFT, whereas the adsorption energies were calculated with two standard density functional approximations and five dispersion-containing DFT approaches. We find that GLYCAM06 gives a good account of geometries and, in most cases, accurate adsorption energies when compared to dispersion-corrected DFT energies. Adsorption onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iα is, in general, stronger than onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iβ. Contrary to intuition, the adsorption energy is not directly correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds; rather, it is dominated by dispersion interactions. Especially for bigger adsorbates, a neglect of these interactions leads to a dramatic underestimation of adsorption energies.

  10. Adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose onto cellulose model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoja, Johannes; Maurer, Reinhard J; Sax, Alexander F

    2014-07-31

    Reliable simulation of molecular adsorption onto cellulose surfaces is essential for the design of new cellulose nanocomposite materials. However, the applicability of classical force field methods to such systems remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we present the adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose on model surfaces of crystalline cellulose Iα and Iβ. The adsorption of the two large carbohydrates was simulated with the GLYCAM06 force field. To validate this approach, quantum theoretical calculations for the adsorption of glucose were performed: Equilibrium geometries were studied with density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion-corrected DFT, whereas the adsorption energies were calculated with two standard density functional approximations and five dispersion-containing DFT approaches. We find that GLYCAM06 gives a good account of geometries and, in most cases, accurate adsorption energies when compared to dispersion-corrected DFT energies. Adsorption onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iα is, in general, stronger than onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iβ. Contrary to intuition, the adsorption energy is not directly correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds; rather, it is dominated by dispersion interactions. Especially for bigger adsorbates, a neglect of these interactions leads to a dramatic underestimation of adsorption energies. PMID:25036217

  11. Adsorption of catechol from aqueous solution by aminated hypercrosslinked polymers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Li, Xiao-Tao; Xu, Chao; Chen, Jin-Long; Li, Ai-Min; Zhang, Quan-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption of catechol from aqueous solution with the hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent NDA-100 and its derivatives AH-1, AH-2 and AH-3 aminated by dimethylamine, the commercial resin Amberlite XAD-4 and weakly basic anion exchanger resin D301 was compared. It was found that the aminated hypercrosslinked resins had the highest adsorption capacities among the tested polymers. The empirical Freundlich equation was successfully employed to describe the adsorption process. Specific surface area and micropore structure of the adsorbent, in company with tertiary amino groups on matrix affected the adsorption performance towards catechol. In addition, thermodynamic study was carried out to interpret the adsorption mechanism. Kinetic study testified that the tertiary amino groups on the polymer matrix could decrease the adsorption rate and increase the adsorption apparent activation energy.

  12. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-conditioning electricity savings from standard energy conservation measures, radiant barriers, and high-efficiency window air conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.

    1992-08-01

    A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this typo of housing.

  13. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-07

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  14. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Erikat, I A; Hamad, B A

    2013-11-01

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir-C and Ir-Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  15. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H-Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Janke, Svenja M; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Kandratsenka, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H-Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  16. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H–Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Svenja M.; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H–Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  17. Subunit treadmilling of microtubules or actin in the presence of cellular barriers: possible conversion of chemical free energy into mechanical work.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, T L; Kirschner, M W

    1982-01-01

    Free microtubule or actin filaments, along with the monomeric forms of the protein, hydrolyze GTP or ATP to produce a flux of subunits through the polymer. This flux, called treadmilling, produces no useful work. In the cell, however, these filaments are likely to be constrained between nucleating sites and other barriers that will limit polymer growth. We study here the effects of a small compression of the filaments resulting from polymerization against such barriers. If subunits can still exchange at the two ends, treadmilling will take place here as well. Under these conditions, the filament system can do useful work. The free energy of NTP hydrolysis can be used to transport materials, attached to the filament, against a resisting force. This process can in principle take place at high efficiency and bears a resemblance in a bioenergetic sense to the utilization of ATP free energy in muscle contraction. The same general principles apply to a polymer in which one end is anchored and one end is free. PMID:6952202

  18. Influence of chlorine substitution on intramolecular hydrogen bond energy and ESIPT barrier: Experimental and theoretical measurements on the photophysics of 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Samanta, Anuva; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2010-08-01

    The effect of chlorine atom on the intramolecular hydrogen bond strength and excited state proton transfer barrier in pharmaceutically important chloro-substituted derivative of salicylic acid viz., 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid (3,5DCSA) has been explored through steady-state absorption, emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Stokes shifted emission band with negligible solvent polarity dependency corresponds to the spectroscopic signature of excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction. The spectral signature was compared with its parent molecule salicylic acid (SA) and 5-chlorosalicylic acid (5ClSA). Quantum chemical calculations by ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods have been fruitfully employed to correlate experimental findings. Calculated S0 and S1 states potential energy surfaces across the proton transfer co-ordinate substantiates the experimental evidence for the occurrence of ESIPT process and negates the ground state intramolecular proton transfer (GSIPT) reaction. Weakening of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) energy and subsequent enhancement of barrier to ESIPT reaction in 3,5DCSA as compared to SA and 5ClSA appears to be a reflection of conjugate impact of electron withdrawing inductive and electron donating resonance effects of chlorine substitutions depending on its location on the aromatic benzene nucleus.

  19. Initial adsorption of O 2 on Si(1 0 0): Non-adiabaticity originating both from a discrete and a continuous set of electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The initial adsorption of O2 on Si(1 0 0) is investigated by density-functional theory calculations. The potential energy surface shows strong corrugations which can be interpreted as precursor states, however, there are also large areas where adsorption proceeds without a barrier. Furthermore, the initial sticking probability as a function of translational energy using first-principles molecular dynamics is calculated. The result is in disagreement with measurements of sticking probability which vary from high-low-high values as the translational energy of the oxygen molecules increase. A simple non-adiabatic model is put-forth that explains not only the measured sticking probability, but also have a novel interpretation of the increased sticking probability owing to tensile stress. The model deals with non-adiabatic effects originating both from a discrete and continuous set of electronic excitations. The implications are general and can be applied to other systems.

  20. Development of Simultaneous Corrosion Barrier and Optimized Microstructure in FeCrAl Heat-Resistant Alloy for Energy Applications. Part 1: The Protective Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Chao, J.; González-Carrasco, J. L.; Capdevila, C.

    2015-09-01

    Coarse-grained Fe-based oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are a class of advanced materials for combined cycle gas turbine systems to deal with operating temperatures and pressures of around 1100°C and 15-30 bar in aggressive environments, which would increase biomass energy conversion efficiencies up to 45% and above. This two-part paper reports the possibility of the development of simultaneous corrosion barrier and optimized microstructure in a FeCrAl heat-resistant alloy for energy applications. The first part reports the mechanism of generating a dense, self-healing α-alumina layer by thermal oxidation, during a heat treatment that leads to a coarse-grained microstructure with a potential value for high-temperature creep resistance in a FeCrAl ODS ferritic alloy, which will be described in more detail in the second part.

  1. Thermodynamic effects of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins on the early adsorption of pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Schram, V; Hall, S B

    2001-09-01

    We determined the influence of the two hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, on the thermodynamic barriers that limit adsorption of pulmonary surfactant to the air-water interface. We compared the temperature and concentration dependence of adsorption, measured by monitoring surface tension, between calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE) and the complete set of neutral and phospholipids (N&PL) without the proteins. Three stages generally characterized the various adsorption isotherms: an initial delay during which surface tension remained constant, a fall in surface tension at decreasing rates, and, for experiments that reached approximately 40 mN/m, a late acceleration of the fall in surface tension to approximately 25 mN/m. For the initial change in surface tension, the surfactant proteins accelerated adsorption for CLSE relative to N&PL by more than ten-fold, reducing the Gibbs free energy of transition (DeltaG(O)) from 119 to 112 kJ/mole. For the lipids alone in N&PL, the enthalpy of transition (DeltaH(O), 54 kJ/mole) and entropy (-T. DeltaS, 65 kJ/mole at 37 degrees C) made roughly equal contributions to DeltaG(O). The proteins in CLSE had little effect on -T. DeltaS(O) (68 kJ/mole), but lowered DeltaG(O) for CLSE by reducing DeltaH(O) (44 kJ/mole). Models of the detailed mechanisms by which the proteins facilitate adsorption must meet these thermodynamic constraints.

  2. On colloid retention in saturated porous media in the presence of energy barriers: The failure of α, and opportunities to predict η

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William P.; Tong, Meiping; Li, Xiqing

    2007-12-01

    This contribution reviews recent findings that illuminate the processes governing colloid retention in porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. In the environment, colloids act as conveyors of contaminants, or even as contaminants themselves; however, despite decades of research, we are unable to accurately predict the retention of colloids in granular aquifer media under environmental conditions, where repulsion exists between colloids and surfaces. This failure cannot be blamed solely on the complexities of the subsurface, since colloid filtration theory (CFT) works well in the absence of colloid-collector repulsion despite its idealization of porous media as consisting of spherical grains completely surrounded by fluid envelopes. Rather, the failure of CFT stems from failure to incorporate the correct mechanisms of retention when repulsion exists. Recent observations implicate wedging in grain-to-grain contacts and retention in secondary energy minima as dominant mechanisms of colloid retention in the presence of an energy barrier. Mechanistic simulations in unit cells containing grain-to-grain contacts corroborate these mechanisms of colloid retention. The resulting concept for colloid retention in the presence of an energy barrier involves translation of colloids across the collector surfaces until they become wedged within grain-to-grain contacts, or are retained via secondary energy minima (without attachment) in zones where the balance of fluid drag, diffusion, gravitational, and colloid-collector interaction forces allow retention. The above findings highlight the pore domain geometry as a dominant governor of colloid retention in so far as the geometry gives rise to grain-to-grain contacts and zones of relatively low fluid drag.

  3. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  4. Bonneville Power Administration and the Industrial Technologies Program Leverage Support to Overcome Energy Efficiency Barriers in the Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-18

    Through its Energy Smart Industrial program, BPA is informing and assisting utilities and industries to have a better understanding of the benefits that come from participating in energy-savings programs. Read about how BPA is encouraging energy efficiency projects through its utilities.

  5. Unusual dissociative adsorption of H2 over stoichiometric MgO thin film supported on molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhenjun; Xu, Hu

    2016-03-01

    The dissociation of a hydrogen molecule on perfect MgO(0 0 1) films deposited on Mo(0 0 1) surface is investigated systematically using periodic density-functional theory (DFT) method. The unusual adsorption behavior of heterolytic dissociative hydrogen molecule at neighboring surface oxygen and surface magnesium, is clarified here. To our knowledge, this heterolytic dissociative state has never been found before on bulk MgO(0 0 1) or metal supported perfect MgO(0 0 1) surfaces (without low coordination sites). The results confirm that, in all cases, the heterolytic dissociation is much more favorable that homolytic dissociation both energetically and kinetically. The energy differences between two dissociative states are very large, in the range of 1.1 eV-1.5 eV for Mo supported 1 ML-3 ML oxide films, which inhibits, to a great extent, the homolytic dissociation in the respect of reaction thermodynamics. The energy barriers of heterolytic dissociation are about 0.5 eV, much lower that the barrier of homolytic dissociation. The transformation reaction on thick films will be more endothermic. Passing through heterolytic dissociation state has significantly lowered the reaction heat and the energy barrier for obtaining homolytic dissociative structure, which makes the homolytic splitting of H2 easier on 2 ML oxide films. The results provide a useful strategy for enhancing the reactivity of the nonreducible metal oxide.

  6. CO adsorption on the Ni2Pb/Ni(1 1 1) surface alloy: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kośmider, K.; Kucharczyk, R.; Jurczyszyn, L.

    2013-02-01

    Structural and electronic properties of the Pb/Ni(1 1 1) overlayer and the Ni2Pb/Ni(1 1 1) surface alloy have been investigated within a DFT-PBE approach in order to determine its reactivity towards adsorption of CO molecules. This work has been motivated by a photoemission study of CO adsorption on Pb/Ni(1 1 1) surface phases [V. Matolín et al., Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 075416] indicating that Pb adatoms inhibit CO adsorption in a purely geometrical way by site blocking at Ni(1 1 1), whereas surface alloying has a poisoning effect of the Ni-CO bond weakening. In general, our DFT computations confirm experimental findings for the Pb/Ni(1 1 1) overlayer, as the very high activation barrier of about 2 eV due to the presence of Pb adatoms makes the CO chemisorption virtually impossible. For the Ni2Pb/Ni(1 1 1) surface alloy, we show that CO can bind to Ni atoms in the on-top position, and this process occurs to be exothermic with the energy gain of 0.35 eV per CO molecule. Dramatic reduction of the computed adsorption energy with respect to the pure Ni(1 1 1) substrate is in apparent agreement with experiment. However, it follows from our simulations that the CO adsorption process is accompanied by a substantial rearrangement of Ni atoms within the Ni2Pb surface alloy layer. Taking into account the associated deformation energy in the overall energetic balance yields nearly the same interaction energy between the CO molecules and the Ni atoms for the alloyed and the pure Ni(1 1 1) substrate, so the Ni-CO bond appears not to be weakened. The experimentally observed suppression of CO adsorption upon the alloy formation can be explained by a notable increase of the activation barrier for CO chemisorption from about 0.1 eV for the pure Ni(1 1 1) to roughly 0.5 eV for the Ni2Pb/Ni(1 1 1) surface alloy, affecting the corresponding reaction rate.

  7. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  8. Adsorption of gas molecules on Cu impurities embedded monolayer MoS2: A first- principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; Li, C. Y.; Liu, L. L.; Zhou, B.; Zhang, Q. K.; Chen, Z. Q.; Tang, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Adsorption of small gas molecules (O2, NO, NO2 and NH3) on transition-metal Cu atom embedded monolayer MoS2 was investigated by first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory (DFT). The embedded Cu atom is strongly constrained on the sulfur vacancy of monolayer MoS2 with a high diffusion barrier. The stable adsorption geometry, charge transfer and electronic structures of these gas molecules on monolayer MoS2 embedded with transition-metal Cu atom are discussed in detail. It is found that the monolayer MoS2 with embedded Cu atom can effectively capture these gas molecules with high adsorption energy. The NH3 molecule acts as electron donor after adsorption, which is different from the other gas molecules (O2, NO, and NO2). The results suggest that MoS2-Cu system may be promising for future applications in gas molecules sensing and catalysis, which is similar to those of the transition-metal embedded graphene.

  9. Adsorption behavior of beryllium(II) on copper-oxide nanoparticles dispersed in water: A model for (7)Be colloid formation in the cooling water for electromagnets at high-energy accelerator facilities.

    PubMed

    Bessho, Kotaro; Kanaya, Naoki; Shimada, Saki; Katsuta, Shoichi; Monjushiro, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Be(II) on CuO nanoparticles dispersed in water was studied as a model for colloid formation of radioactive (7)Be nuclides in the cooling water used for electromagnets at high-energy proton accelerator facilities. An aqueous Be(II) solution and commercially available CuO nanoparticles were mixed, and the adsorption of Be(II) on CuO was quantitatively examined. From a detailed analysis of the adsorption data measured as a function of the pH, it was confirmed that Be(II) is adsorbed on the CuO nanoparticles by complex formation with the hydroxyl groups on the CuO surface (>S-OH) according to the following equation: n > S-OH + Be(2+) ⇔ (>S-O)n Be((2-n)+) + nH(+) (n = 2, 3) S : solid surface. The surface-complexation constants corresponding to the above equilibrium, β(s,2) and β(s,3), were determined for four types of CuO nanoparticles. The β(s,2) value was almost independent of the type of nanoparticle, whereas the β(s,3) values varied with the particle size. These complexation constants successfully explain (7)Be colloid formation in the cooling water used for electromagnets at the 12-GeV proton accelerator facility.

  10. Methylamine adsorption and decomposition on B12N12 nanocage: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye

    2014-08-01

    Density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and decomposition of methylamine (CH3NH2) on the surface of a B12N12 fullerene-like nanocage. Two adsorption types and two reaction channels are identified. It is found that the electrical conductivity of the nanocage can be modified upon the adsorption of CH3NH2. The pathways of CH3NH2 decomposition via bond scission of the Csbnd N and Nsbnd H bonds are examined. The results indicate that Nsbnd H bond scission is the most favorable pathway on the B12N12 surface. The side reaction that generates CH3 and NH2 fragments is endothermic by 15.6 kcal/mol with an energy-barrier height of 81.5 kcal/mol. For the CH3NH2 decomposition on the B12N12 surface, the rate-determining step appears to be as the following reaction: CH3NH → CH3N + H.

  11. Substrate-induced structures of bismuth adsorption on graphene: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yang; Chang, Shen-Lin; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Su, Shu-Hsuan; Huang, Jung-Chun; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2016-07-28

    The geometric and electronic properties of Bi-adsorbed monolayer graphene, enriched by the strong effect of a substrate, are investigated by first-principles calculations. The six-layered substrate, corrugated buffer layer, and slightly deformed monolayer graphene are all simulated. Adatom arrangements are thoroughly studied by analyzing the ground-state energies, bismuth adsorption energies, and Bi-Bi interaction energies of different adatom heights, inter-adatom distance, adsorption sites, and hexagonal positions. A hexagonal array of Bi atoms is dominated by the interactions between the buffer layer and the monolayer graphene. An increase in temperature can overcome a ∼50 meV energy barrier and induce triangular and rectangular nanoclusters. The most stable and metastable structures agree with the scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. The density of states exhibits a finite value at the Fermi level, a dip at ∼-0.2 eV, and a peak at ∼-0.6 eV, as observed in the experimental measurements of the tunneling conductance. PMID:27354143

  12. Adsorption and solvation of ethanol at the water liquid-vapor interface: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1997-01-01

    The free energy profiles of methanol and ethanol at the water liquid-vapor interface at 310K were calculated using molecular dynamics computer simulations. Both alcohols exhibit a pronounced free energy minimum at the interface and, therefore, have positive adsorption at this interface. The surface excess was computed from the Gibbs adsorption isotherm and was found to be in good agreement with experimental results. Neither compound exhibits a free energy barrier between the bulk and the surface adsorbed state. Scattering calculations of ethanol molecules from a gas phase thermal distribution indicate that the mass accommodation coefficient is 0.98, and the molecules become thermalized within 10 ps of striking the interface. It was determined that the formation of the solvation structure around the ethanol molecule at the interface is not the rate-determining step in its uptake into water droplets. The motion of an ethanol molecule in a water lamella was followed for 30 ns. The time evolution of the probability distribution of finding an ethanol molecule that was initially located at the interface is very well described by the diffusion equation on the free energy surface.

  13. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, A.; Bi, X. T.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challengingmore » due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.« less

  14. Electrical properties of bulk-barrier diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, H.

    1982-11-01

    Like Schottky-barrier diodes, bulk-barrier diodes (BBD's) are majority-carrier devices and can, therefore, be used up to very high frequencies. In both types of diodes, charge-carrier transportation is determined by an energy barrier. In Schottky-barrier diodes the barrier is located at the metal/semiconductor boundary, whereas in BBD's it is found inside the semiconductor and is the result of a space-charge zone in a three-layered n-p-n or p-n-p structure with a very thin base region. The height of the barrier is determined by technological parameters such as doping density and layer thickness. As the current in BBD's, just as in Schottky-barrier diodes, is an exponential function of barrier height, the current-voltage characteristic can be adjusted by technological means.

  15. Quantum chemical ab initio prediction of proton exchange barriers between CH{sub 4} and different H-zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Tuma, Christian; Sauer, Joachim

    2015-09-14

    A hybrid MP2:DFT (second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory–density functional theory) method that combines MP2 calculations for cluster models with DFT calculations for the full periodic structure is used to localize minima and transition structures for proton jumps at different Brønsted sites in different frameworks (chabazite, faujasite, ferrierite, and ZSM-5) and at different crystallographic positions of a given framework. The MP2 limit for the periodic structures is obtained by extrapolating the results of a series of cluster models of increasing size. A coupled-cluster (CCSD(T)) correction to MP2 energies is calculated for cluster models consisting of three tetrahedra. For the adsorption energies, this difference is small, between 0.1 and 0.9 kJ/mol, but for the intrinsic proton exchange barriers, this difference makes a significant (10.85 ± 0.25 kJ/mol) and almost constant contribution across different systems. The total values of the adsorption energies vary between 22 and 34 kJ/mol, whereas the total proton exchange energy barriers fall in the narrow range of 152–156 kJ/mol. After adding nuclear motion contributions (harmonic approximation, 298 K), intrinsic enthalpy barriers between 134 and 141 kJ/mol and apparent energy barriers between 105 and 118 kJ/mol are predicted for the different sites examined for the different frameworks. These predictions are consistent with experimental results available for faujasite, ferrierite, and ZSM-5.

  16. The impact of energy barrier height on border traps in the metal insulator semicondoctor gate stacks on III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shinichi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Minari, Hideki; Lin, Dennis; Ivanov, Tsvetan; Watanabe, Heiji; Nakazawa, Masashi; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effect of a thin interfacial layer (IL) made of silicon or germanium between high-k dielectrics and III-V semiconductors on the frequency dispersion of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves in detail. We demonstrated experimentally that the frequency dispersion at accumulation voltage is strongly dependent on the energy barrier height (ΦB) between high-k dielectrics and semiconductors. It was revealed that the improvement of frequency dispersion for n-type III-V semiconductors with IL is attributed to the increase in ΦB realized by inserting Ge IL. Moreover, the border trap density did not necessarily decrease with IL through the assessment of border trap density using a distributed bulk-oxide trap model. Finally, we proved that it is important to increase ΦB to suppress the carrier exchange and improve high-k/III-V gate stack reliability.

  17. The impact of energy barrier height on border traps in the metal insulator semicondoctor gate stacks on III–V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shinichi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Minari, Hideki; Lin, Dennis; Ivanov, Tsvetan; Watanabe, Heiji; Nakazawa, Masashi; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effect of a thin interfacial layer (IL) made of silicon or germanium between high-k dielectrics and III–V semiconductors on the frequency dispersion of the capacitance–voltage (C–V) curves in detail. We demonstrated experimentally that the frequency dispersion at accumulation voltage is strongly dependent on the energy barrier height (ΦB) between high-k dielectrics and semiconductors. It was revealed that the improvement of frequency dispersion for n-type III–V semiconductors with IL is attributed to the increase in ΦB realized by inserting Ge IL. Moreover, the border trap density did not necessarily decrease with IL through the assessment of border trap density using a distributed bulk-oxide trap model. Finally, we proved that it is important to increase ΦB to suppress the carrier exchange and improve high-k/III–V gate stack reliability.

  18. Structural anisotropy of cyanido-bridged {CoII9WV6} single-molecule magnets induced by bidentate ligands: towards the rational enhancement of an energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Chorazy, Szymon; Rams, Michał; Hoczek, Anna; Czarnecki, Bernard; Sieklucka, Barbara; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Podgajny, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Pentadecanuclear {CII9[W(V)(CN)8]6} clusters were combined with bidentate 2,2'-bipyridine N,N'-dioxide (2,2'-bpdo) ligands resulting in two distinct molecules, {Co9W6(2,2'-bpdo)7} (cluster A) and {Co9W6(2,2'-bpdo)6} (cluster B), capped by seven and six 2,2'-bpdo ligands, respectively. They crystallize within a single {Co9W6(2,2'-bpdo)7}·{Co9W6(2,2'-bpdo)6}·solvent (1) supramolecular network, and reveal single-molecule magnet behaviour with an enhanced energy barrier, a ΔE/kB of 30.0(8) K, which was tentatively ascribed to seven-capped axially deformed cluster A. PMID:26933695

  19. Barrier infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  20. Probing Adsorption / Desorption Processes at the Liquid / Solid Interface: Thiols and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles; Jung, Linda S.; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer; Nelsen, K. E.; Stayton, P. S.; Gelb, M. H.; Aebersold, R.

    2001-03-01

    The adsorption of molecules from liquid solutions onto solid surfaces can be monitored with high sensitivity and fast time response by following changes in the angle or wavelength at which the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a thin metal film is optically excited. Simple methods convert these measured changes into adsorbate concentrations. We report here the adsorption and desorption kinetics and equilibrium coverages of a variety of species on well-characterized surfaces as determined by SPR techniques. When the diffusion constant of the adsorbing species is known in the liquid phase, the intrinsic rate constants can be determined from the kinetic results. The sticking probability, defined as the rate of adsorption per molecular collision with the surface, directly expresses the difficulty encountered by a molecule in scaling the barrier to adsorption. Its prior use has been restricted to adsorption of gases. A method extending this concept to adsorption from liquid solutions is applied to transient measurements of alkylthiol adsorption onto gold from ethanol solutions. The initial sticking probability increases from 10-8 to 10-6 with alkyl chain length, implying a stabilization of the transition state by 0.65 kJ/mol per CH_2. Since their sticking probabilities in gas phase are 1.0, the solvent increases the activation free energy by 40 kJ/mol. Applications of gold-thin-film SPR sensors in quantifying biological interactions will be described also. A gold surface containing a few biotin headgroups in a self assembled alkylthiolate monolayer of mainly oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) headgroups selectively adsorbs the protein streptavidin with a structure that depends on the biotin / OEG ratio. The free biotin sites in the resulting streptavidin monolayer have been used as strong linker sites for further attachment of intact, biotinylated lipid vesicles and biotinylated, double-stranded oligonucleotides to the surface. These complex biological films then provide a

  1. PLATYPUS: A code for reaction dynamics of weakly-bound nuclei at near-barrier energies within a classical dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2011-04-01

    A self-contained Fortran-90 program based on a three-dimensional classical dynamical reaction model with stochastic breakup is presented, which is a useful tool for quantifying complete and incomplete fusion, and breakup in reactions induced by weakly-bound two-body projectiles near the Coulomb barrier. The code calculates (i) integrated complete and incomplete fusion cross sections and their angular momentum distribution, (ii) the excitation energy distribution of the primary incomplete-fusion products, (iii) the asymptotic angular distribution of the incomplete-fusion products and the surviving breakup fragments, and (iv) breakup observables, such as angle, kinetic energy and relative energy distributions. Program summaryProgram title: PLATYPUS Catalogue identifier: AEIG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 332 342 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 344 124 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran-90 Computer: Any Unix/Linux workstation or PC with a Fortran-90 compiler Operating system: Linux or Unix RAM: 10 MB Classification: 16.9, 17.7, 17.8, 17.11 Nature of problem: The program calculates a wide range of observables in reactions induced by weakly-bound two-body nuclei near the Coulomb barrier. These include integrated complete and incomplete fusion cross sections and their spin distribution, as well as breakup observables (e.g. the angle, kinetic energy, and relative energy distributions of the fragments). Solution method: All the observables are calculated using a three-dimensional classical dynamical model combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of probability-density distributions. See Refs. [1,2] for further details. Restrictions: The

  2. Adsorption of Ar on individual carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyubenko, Boris; Kahn, Joshua; Vilches, Oscar; Cobden, David

    2015-03-01

    We compare and contrast results of adsorption measurements of Ar on single-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite. Adsorption isotherms on individual suspended nanotubes were obtained using both the mechanical resonance frequency shift (sensitive to mass adsorption) and the electrical conductance. Isotherms on graphene mounted on hexagonal boron nitride were obtained using only the conductance. New volumetric adsorption isotherms on bulk exfoliated graphite were also obtained, paying special attention to the very low coverage region (less than 2% of a monolayer). This allowed us to compare the degree of heterogeneity on the three substrate types, the binding energies, and the van der Waals 2D parameters. Research supported by NSF DMR 1206208.

  3. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  4. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  5. [Adsorption kinetics of reactive dyes on activated carbon fiber].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yue, Qin-Yan; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yang, Jing; Zheng, Yan

    2007-11-01

    The adsorption capability of activated carbon fiber (ACF) to four reactive dyes (reactive brilliant red K-2BP, reactive turquoise blue KN-G, reactive golden yellow K-3RP, reactive black KN-B) in aqueous solution was studied, and adsorption mechanism was focused on from kinetics point of view. The results show that the equilibrium adsorbing capacity (q(e)) of each dye increases with the addition of initial concentration or temperature. On the same condition, the order of q(e) is: reactive brilliant red > reactive golden yellow > reactive black > reactive turquoise blue. The adsorption processes follow a pseudo second-order kinetic rate equation, and the steric structure, size and polarity of dyes are important influence factors to initial adsorption rate. The adsorption activation energy of each dye is low (16.42, 3.56, 5.21, 26.38 kJ x mol(-1) respectively), which indicates that it belongs to physics adsorption.

  6. Communication: Thermodynamic analysis of critical conditions of polymer adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Cimino, R.; Neimark, A. V.; Rasmussen, C. J.

    2013-11-28

    Polymer adsorption to solid surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon, which has attracted long-lasting attention. Dependent on the competition between the polymer-solid adsorption and polymer-solvent solvation interactions, a chain may assume either 3d solvated conformation when adsorption is weak or 2d adsorbed conformation when adsorption is strong. The transition between these conformations occurring upon variation of adsorption strength is quite sharp, and in the limit of “infinite” chain length, can be treated as a critical phenomenon. We suggest a novel thermodynamic definition of the critical conditions of polymer adsorption from the equality of incremental chemical potentials of adsorbed and free chains. We show with the example of freely jointed Lennard-Jones chains tethered to an adsorbing surface that this new definition provides a link between thermodynamic and geometrical features of adsorbed chains and is in line with classical scaling relationships for the fraction of adsorbed monomers, chain radii of gyration, and free energy.

  7. A theoretical study of nitric oxide adsorption and dissociation on copper-exchanged zeolites SSZ-13 and SAPO-34: the impact of framework acid-base properties.

    PubMed

    Uzunova, Ellie L; Mikosch, Hans

    2016-04-28

    The adsorption of nitric oxide as dinitrosyls and the deNOx proton-mediated reaction mechanism are assessed using electronic structure methods and transition state theory. Dinitrosyls bind to copper cations either via a N-atom or via an O-atom, with N-binding being more stable. In their ground states, dinitrosyls reach a planar configuration with the metal cation. The two nitric oxide molecules are kept together in O-bonded dinitrosyls by the N-N bond and the adsorption complex obtains a cyclic planar structure, while N-bonded dinitrosyls have out-of-plane conformations with low energy barriers. An asymmetric structure ZCu(ON)(NO) with one N-bonded nitrosyl and the other O-bonded is of the lowest stability. The cyclic hyponitrite ZCu(ON)2 adsorption complex undergoes O-N bond breaking upon protonation of one oxygen atom and this lowers the energy barrier of the first reaction step of nitric oxide dissociation to yield N2O and a hydroxylated copper site ZCu(OH) by 45 kJ mol(-1) for Cu-SAPO-34 and by 46 kJ mol(-1) for Cu-SSZ-13. The more stable N-bonded dinitrosyl ZCu(NO)2 provides less favorable reaction which passes through the asymmetric ZCu(ON)(NO) intermediate structure. Brønsted acid sites facilitate the reversal of one nitrosyl group. The role of proton transfer from a Brønsted acid site to dinitrosyls is not limited to the initial step of facilitating the N-O bond cleavage, but it also contributes to the stabilization of intermediate oxygen species formed at the copper site as hydroxide ZCu(OH) and hydroperoxide, ZCuOOH. Without protonation, the unstable ZCuO intermediate causes structural deformation with strongly lengthened T-O bonds in the framework. The rate determining step is N2O decomposition to N2 and O2, whether starting with a ZCu(NO)2 or a ZCu(ON)2 adsorption complex, and Cu-SSZ-13 has a clear advantage with an energy barrier of 195 kJ mol(-1)vs. 265 kJ mol(-1) for Cu-SAPO-34. In the final step the Brønsted acid site is restored by proton

  8. A theoretical study of nitric oxide adsorption and dissociation on copper-exchanged zeolites SSZ-13 and SAPO-34: the impact of framework acid-base properties.

    PubMed

    Uzunova, Ellie L; Mikosch, Hans

    2016-04-28

    The adsorption of nitric oxide as dinitrosyls and the deNOx proton-mediated reaction mechanism are assessed using electronic structure methods and transition state theory. Dinitrosyls bind to copper cations either via a N-atom or via an O-atom, with N-binding being more stable. In their ground states, dinitrosyls reach a planar configuration with the metal cation. The two nitric oxide molecules are kept together in O-bonded dinitrosyls by the N-N bond and the adsorption complex obtains a cyclic planar structure, while N-bonded dinitrosyls have out-of-plane conformations with low energy barriers. An asymmetric structure ZCu(ON)(NO) with one N-bonded nitrosyl and the other O-bonded is of the lowest stability. The cyclic hyponitrite ZCu(ON)2 adsorption complex undergoes O-N bond breaking upon protonation of one oxygen atom and this lowers the energy barrier of the first reaction step of nitric oxide dissociation to yield N2O and a hydroxylated copper site ZCu(OH) by 45 kJ mol(-1) for Cu-SAPO-34 and by 46 kJ mol(-1) for Cu-SSZ-13. The more stable N-bonded dinitrosyl ZCu(NO)2 provides less favorable reaction which passes through the asymmetric ZCu(ON)(NO) intermediate structure. Brønsted acid sites facilitate the reversal of one nitrosyl group. The role of proton transfer from a Brønsted acid site to dinitrosyls is not limited to the initial step of facilitating the N-O bond cleavage, but it also contributes to the stabilization of intermediate oxygen species formed at the copper site as hydroxide ZCu(OH) and hydroperoxide, ZCuOOH. Without protonation, the unstable ZCuO intermediate causes structural deformation with strongly lengthened T-O bonds in the framework. The rate determining step is N2O decomposition to N2 and O2, whether starting with a ZCu(NO)2 or a ZCu(ON)2 adsorption complex, and Cu-SSZ-13 has a clear advantage with an energy barrier of 195 kJ mol(-1)vs. 265 kJ mol(-1) for Cu-SAPO-34. In the final step the Brønsted acid site is restored by proton

  9. Adsorption of nicotine from aqueous solution onto hydrophobic zeolite type USY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarevic, Natasa; Adnadjevic, Borivoj; Jovanovic, Jelena

    2011-07-01

    The isothermal adsorption of nicotine from an aqueous solution onto zeolite type USY was investigated. The adsorption isotherms of nicotine onto the zeolite at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 322 K were determined. It was found that the adsorption isotherms can be described by the model of Freundlich adsorption isotherm. Based on the adsorption isotherms the changes of adsorption heat, free energy and entropy with adsorption degree were determined. The determined decrease of adsorption heat with adsorption degree can be explained by the presence of the adsorption centers of different energy and concentration on interface of zeolite-nicotine solution. It was found that the probability function of density distribution of the heat of adsorption (DDF) has exponential form. It was concluded that the possibility of fitting the adsorption isotherms of nicotine onto the zeolite by Freundlich adsorption isotherm was a direct consequence of that. The determined increase in entropy with the increase in adsorption degree can be explained with the change of phase state of adsorbed nicotine.

  10. Applications and limits of theoretical adsorption models for predicting the adsorption properties of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ju; Nguyen, Duc Canh; Na, Choon-Ki; Kim, Chung-il

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the applicability of adsorption models for predicting the properties of adsorbents. The kinetics of the adsorption of NO3- ions on a PP-g-AA-Am non-woven fabric have been investigated under equilibrium conditions in both batch and fixed bed column processes. The adsorption equilibrium experiments in the batch process were carried out under different adsorbate concentration and adsorbent dosage conditions and the results were analyzed using adsorption isotherm models, energy models, and kinetic models. The results of the analysis indicate that the adsorption occurring at a fixed adsorbate concentration with a varying adsorbent dosage occur more easily compared to those under a fixed adsorbent dosage with a varying adsorbate concentration. In the second part of the study, the experimental data obtained using fixed bed columns were fit to Bed Depth Service Time, Bohart-Adams, Clark, and Wolborska models, to predict the breakthrough curves and determine the column kinetic parameters. The adsorption properties of the NO3- ions on the PP-g-AA-Am non-woven fabric were differently described by different models for both the batch and fixed bed column process. Therefore, it appears reasonable to assume that the adsorption properties were dominated by multiple mechanisms, depending on the experimental conditions.

  11. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    A method was established for measuring the adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution to unmodified and modified peanut hulls at constant temperature and pH. Modification of the hulls was performed by oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. During the modification process, the hydrogen peroxide solubilizes the lignin component, making the surface more porous which increases the availability of binding sites, while simultaneously oxidizing the cellulose. The oxidation of alcohol groups creates more binding sites by creating functional groups such as COO-, which increases chelation to metal ions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms delignification of the peanut hulls by the disappearance of carboxyl peaks of the modified hulls, which were originally produced from the lignin content. Although, oxidation is not fully confirmed, it is not ruled out because the expected carboxylate peak (1680 cm-1) maybe overshadowed by a broad peak due to OH bending of water adsorbed to the hulls. Hulls adsorbed copper from solutions in the concentration range of 50-1000 ppm of CuCl2. Concentrations of pre- and post-adsorption solutions were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms were fit to known two and three-parameter models, evaluated and the binding mechanism was inferred. Maximum surface coverage was 3.5 +/- 0.6 mg Cu2+ /g hull for unmodified hulls and 11 +/- 1 mg Cu2+/g hull for modified hulls. The adsorption for the hulls is best described by the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer, homogeneous adsorption. With a free energy of adsorption of 10.5 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for unmodified hulls and 14.5 +/-0.4 kJ/mol for modified hulls, the process is categorized as chemisorption for both types of hulls. The adsorption for both hulls is also described by the Redlich-Peterson model, giving beta nearer to 1 than 0, which further suggests homogeneous adsorption described by the Langmuir model. After rinsing the hulls

  12. Over the Barrier in Wave Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burge, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the transmission of incident energies at a one-dimensional square barrier when energies are greater than the barrier height and the region accommodates a whole number of half wavelengths of psi. Describes sketching the probability density curve, physical interpretation, and special cases. An appendix develops the mathematics in greater…

  13. A first-principles study of sodium adsorption and diffusion on phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Wen, Yanwei; Chen, Zhengzheng; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-07-01

    The structural, electronic, electrochemical as well as diffusion properties of Na doped phosphorene have been investigated based on first-principles calculations. The strong binding energy between Na and phosphorene indicates that Na could be stabilized on the surface of phosphorene without clustering. By comparing the adsorption of Na atoms on one side and on both sides of phosphorene, it has been found that Na-Na exhibits strong repulsion at the Na-Na distance of less than 4.35 Å. The Na intercalation capacity is estimated to be 324 mA h g(-1) and the calculated discharge curve indicates quite a low Na(+)/Na voltage of phosphorene. Moreover, the diffusion energy barrier of Na atoms on the phosphorene surface at both low and high Na concentrations is as low as 40-63 meV, which implies the high mobility of Na during the charge/discharge process.

  14. Unusual adsorption site behavior in PCN-14 metal-organic framework predicted from Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Sebastião M P; Mileo, Paulo G M; Silvino, Pedro F G; Cavalcante, Célio L

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption equilibrium of methane in PCN-14 was simulated by the Monte Carlo technique in the grand canonical ensemble. A new force field was proposed for the methane/PCN-14 system, and the temperature dependence of the molecular siting was investigated. A detailed study of the statistics of the center of mass and potential energy showed a surprising site behavior with no energy barriers between weak and strong sites, allowing open metal sites to guide methane molecules to other neighboring sites. Moreover, this study showed that a model assuming weakly adsorbing open metal clusters in PCN-14, densely populated only at low temperatures (below 150 K), can explain published experimental data. These results also explain previously observed discrepancies between neutron diffraction experiments and Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Adsorption of imidazole on Au(111) surface: Dispersion corrected density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzaouihda, Safia; Mahjoubi, Khaled; Abou El Makarim, Hassna; Komiha, Najia; Benoit, David M.

    2016-10-01

    We use density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation to study the adsorption of imidazole on the Au(111) surface and account for dispersion effect using Grimme's empirical dispersion correction technique. Our results show that the adsorption energy of imidazole depends on the slab size and on the adsorption site. In agreement with other studies, we find the largest adsorption energy for imidazole on a top site of Au(111). However, we also note that the adsorption energy at other sites is substantial.

  16. Circularly polarized antennas for active holographic imaging through barriers

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L; Severtsen, Ronald H; Lechelt, Wayne M; Prince, James M

    2011-07-26

    Circularly-polarized antennas and their methods of use for active holographic imaging through barriers. The antennas are dielectrically loaded to optimally match the dielectric constant of the barrier through which images are to be produced. The dielectric loading helps to remove barrier-front surface reflections and to couple electromagnetic energy into the barrier.

  17. Field study of moisture damage in walls insulated without a vapor barrier. Final report for the Oregon Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsongas, G.A.

    1980-05-01

    Considerable uncertainty has existed over whether or not wall insulation installed without a vapor barrier causes an increased risk of moisture damage (wood decay) within walls. This report describes the results of one of the first major studies in the country aimed at finding out if such a moisture problem really exists. The exterior walls of a total of 96 homes in Portland, Oregon were opened, of which 70 had retrofitted insulation and 26 were uninsulated and were a control group. The types of insulation included urea-formaldehyde foam (44), mineral wool (16), and cellulose (10). In each opened wall cavity the moisture content of wood was measured and insulation and wood samples were taken for laboratory analysis of moisture content and for the determination of the presence of absence of decay fungi. Foam shrinkage was also measured. To evaluate the possible influence of the relative air tightness of the homes, fan depressurization tests were run using a door blower unit. The field and laboratory test results indicating the lack of a moisture damage problem in existing homes with wood siding in climates similar to that of western Oregon are described along with results of a statistical analysis of the data. Related problems of interest to homeowners and insulation installers are noted. The standard operating procedures used throughout the study are discussed, including the home selection process, quantitative and qualitative techniques used to identify wall locations with the highest moisture content, wall opening and data/sample collection methodology, laboratory analysis of samples, data processing and analysis, and applicability of the results. Recommendations for furutre tests are made. Finally, the potential and desirability for future retrofitting of wall insulation is explored.

  18. DFT modelling of hydrogen sulphide adsorption on α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Frank; Stashans, Arvids

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory has been used to predict properties of hydrogen sulphide, H2S, adsorption on the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface. Five energetically most favourable adsorption configurations have been selected for the study. Our work reveals adsorption geometries as well as discusses electronic and magnetic properties of the adsorbate on chromium oxide surface. It is shown that two different adsorption types, namely molecular adsorption and dissociative adsorption, can take place leading to two sets of adsorption energies. The most favourable arrangement is found to correspond to the case of dissociative adsorption with molecular hydrogen forming OH group at the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface. Initial geometry for the adsorption configurations

  19. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-Conditioning Electricity Savings from Standard Energy Conservation Measures, Radiant Barriers, and High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    A field test involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The average measured pre-weatherization air-conditioning electricity consumption was 1664 kWh/year ($119/year). Ten percent of the houses used less than 250 kWh/year, while another 10% used more than 3000 kWh/year. An average reduction in air-conditioning electricity consumption of 535 kWh/year ($38/year and 28% of pre-weatherization consumption) was obtained from replacement of one low-efficiency window air conditioner (EER less than 7.0) per house with a high-efficiency unit (EER greater than 9.0). For approximately the same cost, savings tripled to 1503 kWh/year ($107/year and 41% of pre-weatherization consumption) in those houses with initial air-conditioning electricity consumption greater than 2750 kWh/year. For these houses, replacement of a low-efficiency air conditioner with a high-efficiency unit was cost effective using the incremental cost of installing a new unit now rather than later; the average installation cost for these houses under a weatherization program was estimated to be $786. The

  20. Synthetic Eelgrass Oil Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, T. G.

    2013-05-01

    surface of filaments because the physical, van der Waals, forces, the basis for their adhesion to the surface, are weak and act over only a short distance. SE can be deployed in a fashion similar to a demersal fishing "longline". Oil can be "caught" by replacing baited hooks and snoods with closely spaced filaments of EMA. Adsorption of floating oil requires the filaments be long enough to reach the surface, and float, as eelgrass at low tide, on the surface for some distance. Laying multiple, parallel, lines of SE offshore, makes it possible to recover each, one at a time, and replace it without breeching the barrier to oil that they form. As EMA is tough and elastic, with a large surface area to volume ratio, by virtue of being formed as an open-cell foam, considerable oil is adsorbed and can be recovered by squeezing the oil out of the filaments. Lines of SE can be redeployed and do not have to be discarded.

  1. The method of local increments for the calculation of adsorption energies of atoms and small molecules on solid surfaces. Part I. A single Cu atom on the polar surfaces of ZnO.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Ilka; Fink, Karin; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-12-21

    The method of local increments is used in connection with the supermolecule approach and an embedded cluster model to calculate the adsorption energy of single Cu atoms at different adsorption sites at the polar surfaces of ZnO. Hartree-Fock calculations for the full system, adsorbed atom and solid surface, and for the fragments are the first step in this approach. In the present study, restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) calculations are performed since the Cu atom possesses a singly-occupied 4s orbital. The occupied Hartree-Fock orbitals are then localized by means of the Foster-Boys localization procedure. The correlation energies are expanded into a series of many-body increments which are evaluated separately and independently. In this way, the very time-consuming treatment of large systems is replaced with a series of much faster calculations for small subunits. In the present application, these subunits consist of the orbitals localized at the different atoms. Three adsorption situations with rather different bonding characteristics have been studied: a Cu atom atop a threefold-coordinated O atom of an embedded Zn(4)O(4) cluster, a Cu atom in an O vacancy site at the O-terminated ZnO(000-1) surface, and a Cu atom in a Zn vacancy site at the Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface. The following properties are analyzed in detail: convergence of the many-body expansion, contributions of the different n-body increments to the adsorption energy, treatment of the singly-occupied orbital as "localized" or "delocalized". Big savings in computer time can be achieved by this approach, particularly if only the localized orbitals in the individual increment under consideration are described by a large correlation adapted basis set, while all other orbitals are treated by a medium-size Hartree-Fock-type basis set. In this way, the method of local increments is a powerful alternative to the widely used methods like DFT or RI-MP2. PMID:20024388

  2. O2 adsorption on AunRh n = 1-5 neutral and charged clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendía, Fernando; Beltrán, Marcela R.

    2016-04-01

    Theoretical evidence is presented for the molecular and dissociative adsorption of O2 on free AunRh neutral, anionic and cationic clusters with 1 to 5 gold atoms, indicating that the stabilization of the activated di-oxygen species is a key factor for the unusual catalytic activities of Au-based catalysts. The structure, stability, for both molecular and dissociative O2 adsorption on AunRh n = 1-5 clusters has been investigated using density-functional theory. To find the transition states, the minimum energy paths have been explored for a few clusters. In general, lower values for the activation energy have been found when compared with the barriers that occur on pure Aun based clusters. The higher binding energies in the AuRh mix favor oxygen dissociation among any other possible reaction paths. The anionic clusters being the most reactive of all. The molecular bonding mechanism to these complexes involves charge transfer to the oxygen molecule with a concomitant activation of the O-O bond to a superoxo-like state. The characteristic planar structures of both pure gold and AuRh clusters prevail for most of the cases here studied. The odd-even characteristic catalytic activation of pure gold clusters is not observed once even a single rhodium atom has been added to the cluster.

  3. The formation of correlated states and the increase in barrier transparency at a low particle energy in nonstationary systems with damping and fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Vysotskii, V. I.; Adamenko, S. V.; Vysotskyy, M. V.

    2012-10-15

    We consider peculiarities in the formation of a coherent correlated state (CCS) of a particle in a periodically modulated harmonic oscillator with damping for various types of stochastic perturbation. It is shown that in the absence of stochastic perturbation, an optimal relation exists between the damping parameter (damping coefficient) and the modulation depth, for which the 'extrinsic' characteristics of the oscillator (amplitudes of 'classical' oscillation and the momentum of a particle) remain unchanged, while the correlation coefficient rapidly increases from |r| = 0 to |r|{sub max} Almost-Equal-To 1; this corresponds to a completely correlated coherent state. Under nonoptimal conditions, the formation of the CCS with a simultaneous increase in is accompanied by damping or excitation of the oscillator. It is shown that for a certain relation between the damping coefficient and the modulation depth, the presence of a stochastic external force acting on the nonstationary oscillator does not prevent the formation of a CCS with |r|{sub max} {yields} 1. A fundamentally different effect is observed under a stochastic influence on the nonstationary frequency of the oscillator; this effect always limits the value of vertical bar r vertical bar at a level |r|{sub max} < 1; a CCR cannot be formed with an unlimited increase in its intensity, and |r|{sub max} {yields} 0. The influence of the CCS formation on the averaged probability Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket D Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket of the tunnel effect (transparency of the potential barrier) is considered for a particle in an oscillator with damping both in the absence and in the presence of a stochastic force. It is shown using a specific example that complete clearing of the potential barrier and the increase in the barrier transparency from the initial value Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket D{sub r=0} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 10{sup -80} to Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket D Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket Almost

  4. Ammonia Production Using Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system that integrates reaction to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production.

  5. Adsorption of H2, Cl2, and HCl molecules on α-Cr2O3(0001) surfaces: A density functional theory investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigussa, K. N.; Nielsen, K. L.; Borck, Ø.; Støvneng, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations show that H2, Cl2, and HCl molecules chemisorb dissociatively on the Cr2O3(0001) surface, which can be terminated by Cr atoms, Chromyl groups (Cr=O), or O atoms. It is investigated that these molecules energetically prefer to adsorb dissociatively than in molecular form. Several dissociative adsorption sites have been considered for all the molecules on all the differently terminated surfaces and the corresponding adsorption energies are calculated. Dissociation energy barriers are estimated with the nudged elastic band method. Notable results from the dissociative adsorptions of Cl2 and H2 are the formation of a CrCl2 complex on the Cr terminated surface, and H2O complex on the O and the Cr=O terminated surfaces, and a H2O layer on the Cr=O terminated surface. Dissociative adsorption of HCl is less favored on the Cr=O and O terminated surfaces than on the Cr terminated surface.

  6. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  7. Ion energy and angular distributions onto polymer surfaces delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments in air: II. Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure streamers intersecting particles are of interest in the context of plasma aided combustion, where the particle may be a fuel aerosol droplet, or in sterilization of air, where the particle may be a bacterium. The ion energy and angular distributions (IEADs) incident on the particles, small curved dielectric surfaces, then in part determine the propensity for activating chemical reactions or, in the case of bacteria, the plasma's sterilization capability. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of IEADs on small particles (45 µm radius) produced by atmospheric pressure discharge. Streamers intersecting a particle momentarily generate a large sheath potential as the streamer passes by as the particle charges towards the plasma floating potential. During that time, ions of energies up to 3-10 eV can strike the particle. The permittivity of the particle and the streamer polarity in part determine the character of the IEAD.

  8. Observations of Surface Energy Fluxes and Boundary-Layer Structure Over Heron Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKellar, Mellissa C.; McGowan, Hamish A.; Phinn, Stuart R.; Soderholm, Joshua S.

    2013-02-01

    Over warm, shallow coral reefs the surface radiation and energy fluxes differ from those of the open ocean and result in modification to the marine atmospheric boundary layer via the development of convective internal boundary layers. The complex interrelationships between the surface energy balance and boundary-layer characteristics influence local weather (wind, temperature, humidity) and hydrodynamics (water temperature and currents), as well as larger scale processes, including cloud field properties and precipitation. The nature of these inter-relationships has not been accurately described for coral reef environments. This study presents the first measurements of the surface energy balance, radiation budget and boundary layer thermodynamics made over a coral reef using an eddy-covariance system and radiosonde aerological profiling of the lower atmosphere. Results show that changes in surface properties and the associated energetics across the ocean-reef boundary resulted in modification to the marine atmospheric boundary layer during the Austral winter and summer. Internal convective boundary layers developed within the marine atmospheric boundary layer over the reef and were found to be deeper in the summer, yet more unstable during the winter when cold and drier flow from the mainland enhances heat and moisture fluxes to the atmosphere. A mixed layer was identified in the marine atmospheric boundary layer varying from 375 to 1,200 m above the surface, and was deeper during the summer, particularly under stable anticyclonic conditions. Significant cloud cover and at times rain resulted in the development of a stable stratified atmosphere over the reef. Our findings show that, for Heron Reef, a lagoonal platform reef, there was a horizontal discontinuity in surface energy fluxes across the ocean-reef boundary, which modified the marine atmospheric boundary layer.

  9. Energy Systems Based on Polyacetylene: Rechargeable Batteries and Schottky Barrier Solar Cells. Final Report, March 1, 1981-February 29, 1984

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    MacDiarmid, A. G.

    1984-02-01

    The chief thrust of the research has been directed towards the evaluation of polyacetylene (CH){sub x}, the prototype conducting polymer as an electrode- active material in novel, rechargeable batteries employing nonaqueous electrolytes. The p-doped material, [(CH{sup +y})A{sub y}{sup -}]{sub x}, (where A{sup -} is an anion) in conjunction with a Li anode, shows excellent discharge characteristics, e.g., very little change in discharge voltage with change in discharge current and a high power density. Its energy density is also good but it shows poor shelf life. When (CH){sub x} is used as a cathode (Li anode), which results in the formation of the n-doped polymer, [Li{sub y} {sup +}(CH/sup -y/)]{sub x}, during discharge, good discharge plateaus and power densities are obtained together with excellent shelf life and good recyclability. The energy density is, however only moderate. Cells employing an [M{sub y}{sup +}(CH/sup -y/)]{sub x} (where M = Li, Na) anode and a TiS{sub 2} cathode show very good discharge and recycling characteristics but their energy density is poor.

  10. A theoretical study of CO adsorption on FeCo(100) and the effect of alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochana, Panithita; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    FeCo catalysts are modeled for optimizing the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process since they can be tuned to enhance CO activity and resist poisoning. The electronic properties associated with CO adsorption are studied using plane-wave density functional theory (DFT). The range of computed adsorption energies from this work falls between the CO adsorption energies on pure Fe and Co surfaces. It was found that CO prefers to adsorb on the top site of the Co surface of FeCo alloys, whereas CO has stronger adsorption on pure Fe rather than pure Co surface. The trend in adsorption energy is top-Co > hollow-Fe > top-Fe > hollow-Co > bridge-Co > bridge-Fe. This change in preferable metal for adsorption ( i.e., from Fe in a pure system to Co in the FeCo alloy surface in the current investigation) is due to the shift in the d-band center of the alloyed material. It implies that alloying Fe with Co changes the properties of the pure metal and ultimately affects the CO adsorption energy; however, the mechanism of adsorption remains similar and can be explained using the Nilsson-Pettersson model. Additional CO configurations consisting of hollow-site adsorption with a tilted geometry, was also investigated. The corresponding adsorption energy was found to be slightly higher than the adsorption energy when CO is adsorbed on the top-Co site.

  11. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L; Emelko, Monica B

    2015-12-11

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or "sag effect" was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition.

  12. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte. PMID:25411566

  13. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition. PMID:26658159

  14. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition.

  15. The Langmuir isotherm: a commonly applied but misleading approach for the analysis of protein adsorption behavior.

    PubMed

    Latour, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    The Langmuir adsorption isotherm provides one of the simplest and most direct methods to quantify an adsorption process. Because isotherm data from protein adsorption studies often appear to be fit well by the Langmuir isotherm model, estimates of protein binding affinity have often been made from its use despite that fact that none of the conditions required for a Langmuir adsorption process may be satisfied for this type of application. The physical events that cause protein adsorption isotherms to often provide a Langmuir-shaped isotherm can be explained as being due to changes in adsorption-induced spreading, reorientation, clustering, and aggregation of the protein on a surface as a function of solution concentration in contrast to being due to a dynamic equilibrium adsorption process, which is required for Langmuir adsorption. Unless the requirements of the Langmuir adsorption process can be confirmed, fitting of the Langmuir model to protein adsorption isotherm data to obtain thermodynamic properties, such as the equilibrium constant for adsorption and adsorption free energy, may provide erroneous values that have little to do with the actual protein adsorption process, and should be avoided. In this article, a detailed analysis of the Langmuir isotherm model is presented along with a quantitative analysis of the level of error that can arise in derived parameters when the Langmuir isotherm is inappropriately applied to characterize a protein adsorption process.

  16. Origin of translocation barriers for polyelectrolyte chains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Muthukumar, M

    2009-11-21

    For single-file translocations of a charged macromolecule through a narrow pore, the crucial step of arrival of an end at the pore suffers from free energy barriers, arising from changes in intrachain electrostatic interaction, distribution of ionic clouds and solvent molecules, and conformational entropy of the chain. All contributing factors to the barrier in the initial stage of translocation are evaluated by using the self-consistent field theory for the polyelectrolyte and the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann description for ions without radial symmetry. The barrier is found to be essentially entropic due to conformational changes. For moderate and high salt concentrations, the barriers for the polyelectrolyte chain are quantitatively equivalent to that of uncharged self-avoiding walks. Electrostatic effects are shown to increase the free energy barriers, but only slightly. The degree of ionization, electrostatic interaction strength, decreasing salt concentration, and the solvent quality all result in increases in the barrier.

  17. Functionalized mesoporous silica materials for molsidomine adsorption: Thermodynamic study

    SciTech Connect

    Alyoshina, Nonna A.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2013-09-15

    A series of unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials was prepared. The unmodified mesoporous silica was synthesized via sol–gel synthesis in the presence of D-glucose as pore-forming agent. The functionalized by phenyl, aminopropyl and mercaptopropyl groups silica materials were prepared via grafting. The fabricated adsorbent materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and elemental analysis methods. Then their adsorption properties for mesoionic dug molsidomine were investigated at 290–313 K and physiological pH value. Thermodynamic parameters of molsidomine adsorption on the synthesized materials have been calculated. The obtained results showed that the adsorption process of molsidomine on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. The unmodified and mercaptopropyl modified silica materials exhibit significantly higher adsorption capacities and energies for molsidomine than the aminopropyl modified sample. The effects are discussed from the viewpoint of nature of specific interactions responsible for the adsorption. - Graphical abstract: Comparative analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of molsidomine adsorption showed that the adsorption process on mesoporous silica materials is controlled by chemical nature of surface functional groups. Molsidomine adsorption on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. Taking into account ambiguous nature of mesoionic compounds, it was found that molsidomine is rather aromatic than dipolar. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials were prepared. • Molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials was studied. • Phenyl modified silica shows the highest adsorption capacity and favorable energy. • Molsidomine exhibits the lowest affinity to aminopropyl modified silica.

  18. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].

  19. Adsorption of small organic molecules on graphene.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Petr; Karlický, František; Jurečka, Petr; Kocman, Mikuláš; Otyepková, Eva; Šafářová, Klára; Otyepka, Michal

    2013-04-24

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical quantification of the adsorption enthalpies of seven organic molecules (acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane, ethanol, ethyl acetate, hexane, and toluene) on graphene. Adsorption enthalpies were measured by inverse gas chromatography and ranged from -5.9 kcal/mol for dichloromethane to -13.5 kcal/mol for toluene. The strength of interaction between graphene and the organic molecules was estimated by density functional theory (PBE, B97D, M06-2X, and optB88-vdW), wave function theory (MP2, SCS(MI)-MP2, MP2.5, MP2.X, and CCSD(T)), and empirical calculations (OPLS-AA) using two graphene models: coronene and infinite graphene. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations indicated that the interactions were governed by London dispersive forces (amounting to ∼60% of attractive interactions), even for the polar molecules. The results also showed that the adsorption enthalpies were largely controlled by the interaction energy. Adsorption enthalpies obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics employing non-local optB88-vdW functional were in excellent agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the functional can cover physical phenomena behind adsorption of organic molecules on graphene sufficiently well.

  20. Ubiquitous human 'master' origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-18

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The 'master' origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs encoded in

  1. Ubiquitous human ‘master’ origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-01

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The ‘master’ origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs

  2. Investigation of complete and incomplete fusion dynamics of {sup 20}Ne induced reactions at energies above the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Ali, R.; Kumar, Harish; Ansari, M. Afzal; Rashid, M. H.; Guin, R.

    2014-08-14

    Experiment has been performed to explore the complete and incomplete fusion dynamics in heavy ion collisions using stacked foil activation technique. The measurement of excitation functions of the evaporation residues produced in the {sup 20}Ne+{sup 165}Ho system at projectile energies ranges ≈ 4-8 MeV/nucleon have been done. Measured cumulative and direct cross-sections have been compared with the theoretical model code PACE-2, which takes into account only the complete fusion process. The analysis indicates the presence of contributions from incomplete fusion processes in some α-emission channels following the break-up of the projectile {sup 20}Ne in the nuclear field of the target nucleus {sup 165}Ho.

  3. Atomic hydrogen adsorption and incipient hydrogenation of the Mg(0001) surface: a density-functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfang; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Bo; Yang, Yu; Wei, Yinghui

    2009-07-21

    We investigate the atomic hydrogen adsorption on Mg(0001) by using density-functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation and a supercell approach. The coverage dependence of the adsorption structures and energetics is systematically studied for a wide range of coverage Theta [from 0.11 to 2.0 monolayers (ML)] and adsorption sites. In the coverage range 0 < Theta < 1.0, the most stable among all possible adsorption sites is the on-surface fcc site followed by the hcp site, and the binding energy increases with the coverage, thus indicating the higher stability of on-surface adsorption and a tendency to the formation of H islands (clusters) when increasing the coverage within the region 0 < Theta < 1.0. The on-surface diffusion path energetics of atomic hydrogen as well as the activation barriers for hydrogen penetration from the on-surface to the subsurface sites are also presented at low coverage. At high coverage of 1.0 < Theta < or = 2.0, it is found that the coadsorption configuration with 1.0 monolayer of H residing on the surface fcc sites and the remaining (Theta-1.0) monolayer of H occupying the subsurface tetra-I sites is most energetically favorable. The resultant H-Mg-H sandwich structure for this most stable coadsorption configuration displays similar spectral features to the bulk hydride MgH(2) in the density of states. The other properties of the H/Mg(0001) system including the charge distribution, the lattice relaxation, the work function, and the electronic density of states are also studied and discussed in detail. It is pointed out that the H-Mg chemical bonding during surface hydrogenation displays a mixed ionic/covalent character.

  4. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  5. Thermal barrier research

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, K.G.

    1990-03-07

    The thermal barrier region in the TARA device is a complex arrangement combining ion-plugging by sloshing ions with an ECRH-generated thermal barrier plasma. An axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio magnetic field, adjacent to the central cell, provides the confinement of the thermal barrier plasma and sloshing ions. This paper discusses research being done in this thermal barrier region.

  6. DFT characterization of adsorption and diffusion mechanisms of H, As, S, and Se on the zinc orthotitanate(0 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Rees B.; Hao, Shiqiang; Sholl, David S.; Johnson, J. Karl

    2008-05-01

    Zinc orthotitanate (ZTO) is a promising material for removal of multiple contaminant species from fuel gas streams. The ZTO(0 1 0) surface, which consists of both oxygen rich and metal rich sides, was previously predicted to be the lowest energy ZTO surface. We present density functional theory calculations examining adsorption and diffusion of atomic S, Se, As, and H on the oxygen rich and metal rich ZTO(0 1 0) surfaces. S and Se share similar bonding and diffusion mechanisms on the metal rich ZTO(0 1 0) surface, whereas As and H bind in similar ways to the oxygen rich surface. S and Se have adsorption sites involving Zn:Zn bridges whereas As and H prefer to bind at sites involving O:O bridges on the surface. H forms a hydroxyl-like bond with length of 1.0 Å. Se and S have small activation energy barriers for atomic diffusion from the lowest energy adsorption site to the nearest low energy site. At temperatures around 800 K we predict from our results that Se and S are approximately equal in diffusivity while being far more mobile on the surface than either H or As.

  7. Design of Protein Multi-specificity Using an Independent Sequence Search Reduces the Barrier to Low Energy Sequences.

    PubMed

    Sevy, Alexander M; Jacobs, Tim M; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2015-07-01

    Computational protein design has found great success in engineering proteins for thermodynamic stability, binding specificity, or enzymatic activity in a 'single state' design (SSD) paradigm. Multi-specificity design (MSD), on the other hand, involves considering the stability of multiple protein states simultaneously. We have developed a novel MSD algorithm, which we refer to as REstrained CONvergence in multi-specificity design (RECON). The algorithm allows each state to adopt its own sequence throughout the design process rather than enforcing a single sequence on all states. Convergence to a single sequence is encouraged through an incrementally increasing convergence restraint for corresponding positions. Compared to MSD algorithms that enforce (constrain) an identical sequence on all states the energy landscape is simplified, which accelerates the search drastically. As a result, RECON can readily be used in simulations with a flexible protein backbone. We have benchmarked RECON on two design tasks. First, we designed antibodies derived from a common germline gene against their diverse targets to assess recovery of the germline, polyspecific sequence. Second, we design "promiscuous", polyspecific proteins against all binding partners and measure recovery of the native sequence. We show that RECON is able to efficiently recover native-like, biologically relevant sequences in this diverse set of protein complexes. PMID:26147100

  8. Ab initio studies on the adsorption and implantation of Al and Fe to nitride materials

    SciTech Connect

    Riedl, H.; Zálešák, J.; Arndt, M.; Polcik, P.; Holec, D.; Mayrhofer, P. H.

    2015-09-28

    The formation of transfer material products on coated cutting and forming tools is a major failure mechanism leading to various sorts of wear. To describe the atomistic processes behind the formation of transfer materials, we use ab initio to study the adsorption energy as well as the implantation barrier of Al and Fe atoms for (001)-oriented surfaces of TiN, Ti{sub 0.50}Al{sub 0.50}N, Ti{sub 0.90}Si{sub 0.10}N, CrN, and Cr{sub 0.90}Si{sub 0.10}N. The interactions between additional atoms and nitride-surfaces are described for pure adhesion, considering no additional stresses, and for the implantation barrier. The latter, we simplified to the stress required to implant Al and Fe into sub-surface regions of the nitride material. The adsorption energies exhibit pronounced extrema at high-symmetry positions and are generally highest at nitrogen sites. Here, the binary nitrides are comparable to their ternary counterparts and the average adhesive energy is higher (more negative) on CrN than TiN based systems. Contrary, the implantation barrier for Al and Fe atoms is higher for the ternary systems Ti{sub 0.50}Al{sub 0.50}N, Ti{sub 0.90}Si{sub 0.10}N, and Cr{sub 0.90}Si{sub 0.10}N than for their binary counterparts TiN and CrN. Based on our results, we can conclude that TiN based systems outperform CrN based systems with respect to pure adhesion, while the Si-containing ternaries exhibit higher implantation barriers for Al and Fe atoms. The data obtained are important to understand the atomistic interaction of metal atoms with nitride-based materials, which is valid not just for machining operations but also for any combination such as interfaces between coatings and substrates or multilayer and phase arrangements themselves.

  9. Modulation of Dirac points and band-gaps in graphene via periodic fullerene adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Wen, Yanwei; Chen, Zhengzheng; Lin, Hao; Chen, Rong; Cho, Kyeongjae; Shan, Bin

    2013-05-01

    The structural, energetic and electronic properties of periodic graphene nanobud (PGNB) with small-diameter fullerenes (C20, C34, C42, and C60) adsorbed have been investigated by first-principles plane wave method. The bond-to-ring cycloaddition is found to be energetically most stable among various configurations and the minimum energy paths of different-sized fullerenes attaching to graphene indicate that smaller fullerene shows lower energy barriers due to its larger surface curvature. For perfectly ordered adsorption, band structures analyses by both density functional theory (DFT) and tight binding (TB) methods show that the Dirac cone of graphene can be generally preserved despite the sp2 to sp3 bond hybridization change for selected carbon atoms in graphene sheet. However, the position of the Dirac points inside the Brillouin zone has a shift from the hexagonal corner and can be effectively modulated by changing the fullerenes' concentration. For practical applications, we show that a considerable band gap (˜0.35 eV) can be opened by inducing randomness in the orientation of the fullerene adsorption and an effective order parameter is identified that correlates well with the magnitude of the band gap opening.

  10. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  11. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  12. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  13. Reduction of the potential energy barrier and resistance at wafer-bonded n-GaAs/n-GaAs interfaces by sulfur passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael J.; Jackson, Biyun L.; Goorsky, Mark S.

    2011-11-01

    Sulfur passivation and subsequent wafer-bonding treatments are demonstrated for III-V semiconductor applications using GaAs-GaAs direct wafer-bonded structures. Two different sulfur passivation processes are addressed. A dry sulfur passivation method that utilizes elemental sulfur vapor activated by ultraviolet light in vacuum is compared with aqueous sulfide and native-oxide-etch treatments. The electrical conductivity across a sulfur-treated 400 - °C-bonded n-GaAs/n-GaAs interface significantly increased with a short anneal (1-2 min) at elevated temperatures (500-600 °C). Interfaces treated with the NH4OH oxide etch, on the other hand, exhibited only mild improvement in accordance with previously published studies in this area. TEM and STEM images revealed similar interfacial microstructure changes with annealing for both sulfur-treated and NH4OH interfaces, whereby some areas have direct semiconductor-semiconductor contact without any interfacial layer. Fitting the observed temperature dependence of zero-bias conductance using a model for tunneling through a grain boundary reveals that the addition of sulfur at the interface lowered the interfacial energy barrier by 0.2 eV. The interface resistance for these sulfur-treated structures is 0.03 Ω.cm at room temperature. These results emphasize that sulfur-passivation techniques reduce interface states that otherwise limit the implementation of wafer bonding for high-efficiency solar cells and other devices.

  14. Preparation and characterization of nanocrystalline ZrO2-7%Y2O3 powders for thermal barrier coatings by high-energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Zhao, Lidong; Schlaefer, Thomas; Warda, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    High-energy ball milling is an effective method to produce nanocrystalline oxides. In this study, a conventional ZrO2-7%Y2O3 spray powder was ball-milled to produce nanocrystalline powders with high levels of crystalline disorders for deposition of thermal barrier coatings. The powder was milled both with 100Cr6 steel balls and with ZrO2-3%Y2O3 ceramic balls as grinding media. The milling time was varied in order to investigate the effect of the milling time on the crystallite size. The powders were investigated in terms of their crystallite sizes and morphologies by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that under given milling conditions the powder was already nanostructured after 40 min milling. The crystallite size decreased significantly with increasing milling time within first 120 min. After that, a further increase of milling time did not lead to a significant reduction of the crystallite size. Ball-milling led to lattice microstrains. Milling with the steel balls resulted in finer nano-sized crystal grains, but caused the contamination of the powder. The nano-sized crystal grains coarsened during the heat-treatment at 1250°C.

  15. Adsorptive separation in bioprocess engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.W.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The invention and development of an energy-efficient separation technique for recovery of desired chemicals from biomass conversion would greatly enhance the economic viability of this bioprocess. Adsorptive separation of several chemicals from aqueous solution was studied in this thesis. The desired species were recovered from the dilute aqueous solution by using crosslinked polyvinylpyridine resin to effect selective sorption. The sorbed chemicals were then removed from the resin by either thermal regeneration or elution with some appropriate desorbents. The effects of temperature, pH value, and solute concentration on resin swelling were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms, resin capacities and resin selectivities of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, isopropanol, glycerol, acetone, 1-butanol, tert-butanol, and 2,3-butanediol were determined to study the homologies. Furthermore, acetic acid, butyric acid, hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and sulfuric acid were recovered from very dilute aqueous solutions. The concentration of the sorbed chemical in the stationary phase can be many times higher than in the mobile phase for some acids. Finally, different types of equilibrium isotherms were used to fit the experimental data. A mathematical model was developed by using the theory of interference to predict the breakthrough curves and the process efficiency to provide information for large-scale process design and development.

  16. Temperature dependent adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on the Si(001)- (2 × 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja-Yong; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kim, Hanchul; Yu, Sang-Yong

    2011-03-01

    The dissociative adsorption of water molecules on the Si(001)- (2 × 1) surface was studied up to 850 K by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A water molecule is dissociated into on-dimer (OD) and inter-dimer (ID) configurations and the population ratio nID / nOD changes from ~ 5 at room temperature to ~ 0.5 above 500 K. A quantitative analysis was made by considering the flipping motion of Si dimers to overcome the discrepancy between the experiment and theoretical estimations from the model of simple energy barrier. The flipping motion of Si dimers plays a dominant role in the dissociation of water molecules on the Si (001)- (2 × 1) surface.

  17. Hydrogen adsorption on sulphur-doped SiC nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevak Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is an energy carrier and clean fuel that can be used for a broad range of applications that include fuel cell vehicles. Therefore, development of materials for hydrogen storage is demanded. Nanotubes, in this context, are appropriate materials. Recently, silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNTs) have been predicted as potential nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, and atomic doping into the nanotubes improves the H2 adsorption. Here, we report H2 adsorption properties of sulphur-doped (S-doped) SiCNTs using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The H2 adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of energy band structures, density of states (DOS), adsorption energy and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that, compared to the intrinsic SiCNT, S-doped SiCNT is more sensitive to H2 adsorption. H2 gas adsorption on S-doped C-sites of SiCNT brings about significant modulation of the electronic structure of the nanotube, which results in charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas, and dipole-dipole interactions cause chemisorptions of hydrogen. However, in the case of H2 gas adsorption on S-doped Si-sites of the nanotube, lesser charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas results in physisorptions of the gas. The efficient hydrogen sensing properties of S-doped SiCNTs, studied here, may have potential for its practical realization for hydrogen storage application.

  18. Hydrogen adsorption on sulphur-doped SiC nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevak Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is an energy carrier and clean fuel that can be used for a broad range of applications that include fuel cell vehicles. Therefore, development of materials for hydrogen storage is demanded. Nanotubes, in this context, are appropriate materials. Recently, silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNTs) have been predicted as potential nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, and atomic doping into the nanotubes improves the H2 adsorption. Here, we report H2 adsorption properties of sulphur-doped (S-doped) SiCNTs using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The H2 adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of energy band structures, density of states (DOS), adsorption energy and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that, compared to the intrinsic SiCNT, S-doped SiCNT is more sensitive to H2 adsorption. H2 gas adsorption on S-doped C-sites of SiCNT brings about significant modulation of the electronic structure of the nanotube, which results in charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas, and dipole–dipole interactions cause chemisorptions of hydrogen. However, in the case of H2 gas adsorption on S-doped Si-sites of the nanotube, lesser charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas results in physisorptions of the gas. The efficient hydrogen sensing properties of S-doped SiCNTs, studied here, may have potential for its practical realization for hydrogen storage application.

  19. Study of Methylene Blue adsorption on keratin nanofibrous membranes.

    PubMed

    Aluigi, A; Rombaldoni, F; Tonetti, C; Jannoke, L

    2014-03-15

    In this work, keratin nanofibrous membranes (mean diameter of about 220nm) were prepared by electrospinning and tested as adsorbents for Methylene Blue through batch adsorption tests. The adsorption capacity of the membranes was evaluated as a function of initial dye concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage, time and temperature. The adsorption capacity increased with increasing the initial dye concentration and pH, while it decreased with increasing the adsorbent dosage and temperature, indicating an exothermic process. The adsorption results indicated that the Langmuir isotherm fitted the experimental data better than the Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. A mean free energy evaluated through the Dubinin-Radushkevich model of about 16kJmol(-1), indicated a chemisorption process which occurred by ion exchange. The kinetic data were found to fit the pseudo-second-order model better than the pseudo-first-order model. The obtained results suggest that keratin nanofibrous membranes could be promising candidates as dye adsorption filters.

  20. Predictions of adsorption equilibria of nonpolar hydrocarbons onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Do, D.D.; Wang, K.

    1998-12-08

    This paper presents a new approach to analyze the adsorption equilibria of nonpolar hydrocarbons onto activated carbon. The kinetic theory of gases and the 10-4-3 potential energy were employed to describe the adsorption process inside micropores. On the basis of this theory, a general isotherm model was proposed which possesses the potential capability of predicting the adsorption equilibria of an adsorbent by using the knowledge of its microporous structure and molecular properties of adsorbates. Experimental data of gases and vapors on Ajax activated carbon were employed to examine the model. Adsorption equilibria of binary mixtures were also investigated with the model, and it is shown that the model is capable of simulating the nonideal, or azeotropic, adsorption behaviors resulting from the structural heterogeneity of the adsorbent.

  1. First-principles investigation of methanethiol adsorption and dissociation mechanisms on the high-Miller-index vicinal surface Cu(4 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, Faycal; Seydou, Mahamadou; Lassoued, Karima; Taleb, Abdelhafed; Diawara, Boubakar

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present detailed investigations of methanethiol adsorption on a Cu(4 1 0) surface within the framework of the self-consistent first-principles calculations as implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). In particular, the adsorption sites, the surface coverage rate and electronic properties have been determined and compared to experimental values. The results indicate that the favorable adsorption site in the case of low coverage rate is a bridge on the step followed by the hollow site on the terrace. The adsorption significantly affects the outermost layer of the surface mainly for a higher coverage rate in a (2  ×  2) supercell. The nature of the chemisorption process on the surface is analyzed by means of the density of states which, combined with charge density difference and atomic charge calculations, confirms the ionic character of the S-Cu bond. The specific effect of the presence of steps is highlighted by comparing the adsorption on the (1 0 0) terrace to the adsorption on the extended Cu(1 0 0) surface. Compared to the flat Cu(1 0 0), it is found here that while the stability is almost the same at p(2  ×  2) coverage, the CH3S/Cu(4 1 0) becomes more stable than CH3S/Cu(1 0 0) at c(2  ×  2) coverage with 0.30 eV per molecule. The mechanism of methanethiol dissociation is explored by the nudged elastic band method and demonstrates that the most favorable path is dissociation followed by migration of hydrogen from the step to its most stable position (hollow on the terrace) with energy barriers less than 0.5 eV.

  2. First-principles investigation of methanethiol adsorption and dissociation mechanisms on the high-Miller-index vicinal surface Cu(4 1 0).

    PubMed

    Raouafi, Faycal; Seydou, Mahamadou; Lassoued, Karima; Taleb, Abdelhafed; Diawara, Boubakar

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present detailed investigations of methanethiol adsorption on a Cu(4 1 0) surface within the framework of the self-consistent first-principles calculations as implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). In particular, the adsorption sites, the surface coverage rate and electronic properties have been determined and compared to experimental values. The results indicate that the favorable adsorption site in the case of low coverage rate is a bridge on the step followed by the hollow site on the terrace. The adsorption significantly affects the outermost layer of the surface mainly for a higher coverage rate in a (2 × 2) supercell. The nature of the chemisorption process on the surface is analyzed by means of the density of states which, combined with charge density difference and atomic charge calculations, confirms the ionic character of the S-Cu bond. The specific effect of the presence of steps is highlighted by comparing the adsorption on the (1 0 0) terrace to the adsorption on the extended Cu(1 0 0) surface. Compared to the flat Cu(1 0 0), it is found here that while the stability is almost the same at p(2 × 2) coverage, the CH3S/Cu(4 1 0) becomes more stable than CH3S/Cu(1 0 0) at c(2 × 2) coverage with 0.30 eV per molecule. The mechanism of methanethiol dissociation is explored by the nudged elastic band method and demonstrates that the most favorable path is dissociation followed by migration of hydrogen from the step to its most stable position (hollow on the terrace) with energy barriers less than 0.5 eV. PMID:27028163

  3. Adsorption of nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds on bamboo charcoal: kinetics, thermodynamics, and microwave regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liao, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Xie, Wenjing; Zhang, Wenbiao; Tong, Man; Wang, Kun

    2013-01-15

    The adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds (NHCs), pyridine, indole and quinoline, in aqueous solutions on bamboo charcoal (BC), as well as the regeneration of spent BC by microwave radiation, are investigated. BC is produced by incomplete combustion of moso bamboo at high temperature and nitrogen atmosphere. Adsorption kinetics is analyzed using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order as well as Weber-Morris model. The results show that NHC adsorption on BC is predominantly regulated by surface diffusion in initial 1h followed by intraparticle diffusion in later stage. BC exhibits a strong adsorption affinity to NHCs, and the adsorption isotherms are well described by Freundlich model. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is spontaneous and endothermic. Adsorption site energy analysis illustrates a distribution of adsorption energy, which indicates the heterogeneous sites on BC for NHC adsorption. Furthermore, spent BC with NHC adsorption can be effectively regenerated by MW radiation. The adsorption capacity becomes even higher than that of virgin BC after five times of adsorption-regeneration cycles. This study proves BC is a promising adsorbent for NHC removal in wastewater.

  4. Carbonaceous materials for adsorptive refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2012-06-01

    Carbon monoliths prepared from hard coal precursors were obtained. The porous structure of the monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption — desorption equilibrium data. The investigated monoliths have a well-developed microporous structure with significant specific surface area (S BET ). Equilibrium studies of methanol vapour adsorption were used to characterize the methanol adsorptive capacity that was determined using a volumetric method. The heat of wetting by methanol was determined in order to estimate the energetic effects of the adsorption process. The results of the investigations show that all monoliths exhibit high adsorption capacity and high heat of wetting with methanol.

  5. Adsorption of benzene, cyclohexane and hexane on ordered mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Dou, Baojuan; Zhang, Zhongshen; Wang, Junhui; Liu, Haier; Hao, Zhengping

    2015-04-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) with high specific surface area and large pore volume was synthesized and tested for use as an adsorbent for volatile organic compound (VOC) disposal. Benzene, cyclohexane and hexane were selected as typical adsorbates due to their different molecular sizes and extensive utilization in industrial processes. In spite of their structural differences, high adsorption amounts were achieved for all three adsorbates, as the pore size of OMC is large enough for the access of these VOCs. In addition, the unusual bimodal-like pore size distribution gives the adsorbates a higher diffusion rate compared with conventional adsorbents such as activated carbon and carbon molecular sieve. Kinetic analysis suggests that the adsorption barriers mainly originated from the difficulty of VOC vapor molecules entering the pore channels of adsorbents. Therefore, its superior adsorption ability toward VOCs, together with a high diffusion rate, makes the ordered mesoporous carbon a promising potential adsorbent for VOC disposal. PMID:25872710

  6. [Adsorption of Congo red from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hui; Lin, Jian-Wei

    2013-08-01

    The adsorption of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite was investigated using batch experiments. The hydroxyapatite was effective for CR removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics of CR on hydroxyapatite well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of CR on hydroxyapatite could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and showed that the adsorption of CR on hydroxyapatite was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The CR adsorption capacity for hydroxyapatite decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Thermal regeneration showed that hydroxyapatite could be used for six desorption-adsorption cycles with high removal efficiency for CR in each cycle. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value below the pH at point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) include electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value above its pH(PZC) include hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. Results of this work indicate that hydroxyapatite is a promising adsorbent for CR removal from aqueous solution.

  7. Adsorption of oleic acid at sillimanite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T V Vijaya; Prabhakar, S; Raju, G Bhaskar

    2002-03-15

    The interaction of oleic acid at sillimanite-water interface was studied by adsorption, FT-IR, and zeta potential measurements. The isoelectric point (IEP) of sillimanite obtained at pH 8.0 was found to shift in the presence of oleic acid. This shift in IEP was attributed to chemisorption of oleic acid on sillimanite. Adsorption experiments were conducted at pH 8.0, where the sillimanite surface is neutral. The adsorption isotherm exhibited a plateau around 5 micromol/m2 that correspond to a monolayer formation. Adsorption of oleic acid on sillimanite, alumina, and aluminum hydroxide was studied by FT-IR. Chemisorption of oleic acid on the above substrates was confirmed by FT-IR studies. Hydroxylation of mineral surface was found to be essential for the adsorption of oleic acid molecules. These surface hydroxyl sites were observed to facilitate deprotonation of oleic acid and its subsequent adsorption. Thus protons from oleic acid react with surface hydroxyl groups and form water molecules. Based on the experimental results, the mechanism of oleic acid adsorption on mineral substrate was proposed. Free energy of adsorption was estimated using the Stern-Graham equation for a sillimanite-oleate system. PMID:16290466

  8. [Adsorption of Congo red from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hui; Lin, Jian-Wei

    2013-08-01

    The adsorption of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite was investigated using batch experiments. The hydroxyapatite was effective for CR removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics of CR on hydroxyapatite well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of CR on hydroxyapatite could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and showed that the adsorption of CR on hydroxyapatite was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The CR adsorption capacity for hydroxyapatite decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Thermal regeneration showed that hydroxyapatite could be used for six desorption-adsorption cycles with high removal efficiency for CR in each cycle. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value below the pH at point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) include electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value above its pH(PZC) include hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. Results of this work indicate that hydroxyapatite is a promising adsorbent for CR removal from aqueous solution. PMID:24191561

  9. Adsorption of mercury from water by modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes: adsorption behaviour and interference resistance by coexisting anions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Paris Honglay; Hsu, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, David Dah-wei; Lu, Yen-Ming; Huang, Winn-Jung

    2014-08-01

    This investigation reports the use of modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with various functional groups for adsorbing inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) from water samples. To elucidate the behaviours and mechanisms of Hg(II) adsorption by modified MWCNTs, their adsorption capacity was studied by considering adsorption isotherms and kinetics. Particular attention was paid to interference of coexisting inorganic ions with Hg(II) adsorption. The results reveal that functionalization with oxygen-containing groups improved the Hg(II) adsorption capacity of the MWCNTs. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the adsorption of Hg(II) by MWCNTs was closely described by the pseudo-second-order and Elovich models, suggesting that the adsorption of Hg(II) by MWCNTs was significantly affected by chemical adsorption. The kinetic results were also analysed using the intraparticle diffusion model, which revealed that intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling mechanism. The adsorption of Hg(II) on MWCNTs fell drastically as the ionic strength increased from 0 to 1.0mol/L chloride ions, and declined significantly as the pH increased from 2.2 to 10.5. The elemental maps obtained by energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed the formation of surface complexes of chloride ions with functional groups on MWCNTs, which reduced the number of available sites for the adsorption of Hg(II) and strengthened the repulsive forces between Hg(II) and MWCNTs. The EDS results suggest that chloride ions are important in controlling Hg(II) speciation and adsorption on the surfaces of MWCNTs.

  10. Adsorption and ring-opening of lactide on the chiral metal surface Pt(321)S studied by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    We study the adsorption and ring-opening of lactide on the naturally chiral metal surface Pt(321)S. Lactide is a precursor for polylactic acid ring-opening polymerization, and Pt is a well known catalyst surface. We study, here, the energetics of the ring-opening of lactide on a surface that has a high density of kink atoms. These sites are expected to be present on a realistic Pt surface and show enhanced catalytic activity. The use of a naturally chiral surface also enables us to study potential chiral selectivity effects of the reaction at the same time. Using density functional theory with a functional that includes the van der Waals forces in a first-principles manner, we find modest adsorption energies of around 1.4 eV for the pristine molecule and different ring-opened states. The energy barrier to be overcome in the ring-opening reaction is found to be very small at 0.32 eV and 0.30 eV for LL- and its chiral partner DD-lactide, respectively. These energies are much smaller than the activation energy for a dehydrogenation reaction of 0.78 eV. Our results thus indicate that (a) ring-opening reactions of lactide on Pt(321) can be expected already at very low temperatures, and Pt might be a very effective catalyst for this reaction; (b) the ring-opening reaction rate shows noticeable enantioselectivity.

  11. Influence of breakup on fusion barrier distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, D.; Nayak, B. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Biswas, D. C.; Mirgule, E. T.; John, B. V.; Gupta, Y. K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Prajapati, G.; Danu, L. S.; Rath, P. K.; Desai, V.; Deshmukh, N.; Saxena, A.

    2013-04-01

    Fusion barrier distributions have been extracted from the quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions, measured at backward angle θlab = 160° in reactions of 6,7Li+209Bi. The present results have been compared with the barrier distributions obtained from the fusion excitation function measurements for the above mentioned systems. The fusion barrier distributions from the quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions have been analyzed with simplified Coupled Channels calculations using Fresco. Inclusions of resonant states for both 6,7Li projectiles improve the predictions to describe the measured quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions and barrier distributions. For both the reactions peak positions of fusion barrier distributions are shifted towards a lower energy side in comparison to that obtained from the fusion excitation function measurements. The observed discrepancy in peak positions of barrier distributions obtained from quasi-elastic scattering and fusion excitation function measurements has been discussed in terms of total reaction threshold distribution.

  12. Groundwater protection from cadmium contamination by permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, F; Di Natale, M; Greco, R; Lancia, A; Laudante, C; Musmarra, D

    2008-12-30

    This work studies the reliability of an activated carbon permeable reactive barrier in removing cadmium from a contaminated shallow aquifer. Laboratory tests have been performed to characterize the equilibrium and kinetic adsorption properties of the activated carbon in cadmium-containing aqueous solutions. A 2D numerical model has been used to describe pollutant transport within a groundwater and the pollutant adsorption on the permeable adsorbing barrier (PRB). In particular, it has been considered the case of a permeable adsorbing barrier (PAB) used to protect a river from a Cd(II) contaminated groundwater. Numerical results show that the PAB can achieve a long-term efficiency by preventing river pollution for several months.

  13. Sub-ambient carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Tamilarasan, P.; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2015-04-14

    Carbon dioxide adsorption on carbon surface can be enhanced by doping the surface with heterogeneous atoms, which can increase local surface affinity. This study presents the carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene at low pressures (<100 kPa). Graphene was exposed to nitrogen plasma, which dopes nitrogen atoms into carbon hexagonal lattice, mainly in pyridinic and pyrrolic forms. It is found that nitrogen doping significantly improves the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at all temperatures, due to the enrichment of local Lewis basic sites. In general, isotherm and thermodynamic parameters suggest that doped nitrogen sites have nearly same adsorption energy of surface defects and residual functional groups. The isosteric heat of adsorption remains in physisorption range, which falls with surface coverage, suggesting the distribution of magnitude of adsorption energy. The absolute values of isosteric heat and entropy of adsorption are slightly increased upon nitrogen doping.

  14. How strong is the edge effect in the adsorption of anticancer drugs on a graphene cluster?

    PubMed

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Chanajaree, Rungroj; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Hannongbua, Supot; Kungwan, Nawee; Wolschann, Peter; Karpfen, Alfred; Parasuk, Vudhichai

    2016-04-01

    The adsorption of nucleobase-analog anticancer drugs (fluorouracil, thioguanine, and mercaptopurine) on a graphene flake (C54H18) was investigated by shifting the site at which adsorption occurs from one end of the sheet to the other end. The counterpoise-corrected M06-2X/cc-pVDZ binding energies revealed that the binding stability decreases in the sequence thioguanine > mercaptopurine > fluorouracil. We found that adsorption near the middle of the sheet is more favorable than adsorption near the edge due to the edge effect. This edge effect is stronger for the adsorption of thioguanine or mercaptopurine than for fluorouracil adsorption. However, the edge effect reduces the binding energy of the drug to the flake by only a small amount, <5 kcal/mol, depending on the adsorption site and the alignment of the drug at this site. PMID:26994019

  15. High coverage adsorption and co-adsorption of CO and H2 on Ru(0001) from DFT and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; He, Yurong; Cao, Dong-Bo; Wen, Xiaodong; Xiang, Hongwei; Li, Yong-Wang; Wang, Jianguo; Jiao, Haijun

    2015-07-15

    The adsorption and co-adsorption of CO and H2 at different coverages on p(4 × 4) Ru(0001) have been computed using periodic density functional theory (GGA-RPBE) and atomistic thermodynamics. Only molecular CO adsorption is possible and the saturation coverage is 0.75 ML (nCO = 12) with CO molecules co-adsorbed at different sites and has a hexagonal adsorption pattern as found by low energy electron diffraction. Only dissociative H2 adsorption is possible and the saturation coverage is 1 ML (nH = 16) with H atoms at face-centered cubic sites. The computed CO and H2 desorption patterns and temperatures agree reasonably with the experiments under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. For CO and H2 co-adsorption (nCO + mH2; n = 1-6 and m = 7, 6, 5, 5, 3, 1), CO pre-coverage affects H adsorption strongly, and each pre-adsorbed CO molecule blocks 2H adsorption sites and H2 does not adsorb on the surface with CO pre-coverage larger than 0.44 ML (nCO = 7); all these are in full agreement with the experiments under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Our results provide the basis for exploring the mechanisms of catalytic conversion of synthesis gas. PMID:26143808

  16. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  17. The molecular dynamics of adsorption and dissociation of O{sub 2} on Pt(553)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobse, Leon Dunnen, Angela den; Juurlink, Ludo B. F.

    2015-07-07

    Molecular adsorption and dissociation of O{sub 2} on the stepped Pt(553) surface have been investigated using supersonic molecular beam techniques and temperature programmed desorption. The initial and coverage-dependent sticking probability was determined with the King and Wells technique for various combinations of incident kinetic energy, surface temperature, incident angle, and surface coverage. A comparison with similar data for Pt(533) and Pt(110)(1 × 2) shows quantitatively the same high step-induced sticking at low incident energies compared to Pt(111). The enhancement is therefore insensitive to the exact arrangement of atoms forming surface corrugation. We consider energy transfer and electronic effects to explain the enhanced sticking. On the other hand, dissociation dynamics at higher incident kinetic energies are strongly dependent on step type. The Pt(553) and Pt(533) surfaces are more reactive than Pt(111), but the (100) step shows higher sticking than the (110) step. We relate this difference to a variation in the effective lowering of the barrier to dissociation from molecularly adsorbed states into atomic states. Our findings are in line with results from experimental desorption studies and theoretical studies of atomic binding energies. We discuss the influence of the different step types on sticking and dissociation dynamics with a one-dimensional potential energy surface.

  18. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  19. Adsorption of water monomer and clusters on platinum(111) terrace and related steps and kinks II. Surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Árnadóttir, Líney; Stuve, Eric M.; Jónsson, Hannes

    2012-02-01

    Surface diffusion of water monomer, dimer, and trimer on the (111) terrace, (221) and (322) stepped, and (763) and (854) kinked surfaces of platinum was studied by density functional theory using the PW91 approximation to the energy functional. Monomer diffusion on the terrace is facile, with an activation barrier of 0.20 eV, while dimer and trimer diffusions are restricted due to their high activation barriers of 0.43 and 0.48 eV, respectively. During monomer diffusion on the terrace the O-Pt distance increases by 0.54 Å, about 23% of the initial distance of 2.34 Å. The calculated rate of monomer diffusion hops is in good agreement with the onset temperature of diffusion measurements of Daschbach et al., J. Chem. Phys., 120 (2004) 1516. Alternative monomer diffusion pathways, in which the molecule rolls or flips, were also found. These pathways have diffusion barriers of 0.22 eV. During dimer diffusion on the terrace, the donor molecule rises 0.4 Å at the saddle point, while the acceptor rises by only 0.03 Å. Monomer diffusion up to steps and kinks, with activation barriers of 0.11-0.13 eV, facilitate chain formation on top of step edges. The energy landscape of monomer diffusion from terrace to step to kink sites is downhill with a maximum activation barrier of 0.26 eV. A model for water adsorption is presented in which monomer diffusion leads to concurrent formation of terrace clusters and population of steps/kinks, the latter consistent with the STM measurements of Morgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 77 (1996) 703.

  20. Adsorption of Water Monomer and Clusters on Platinum(111) Terrace and Related Steps and Kinks II. Surface Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Arnadottir, Liney; Stuve, Eric M.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2012-02-01

    Surface diffusion of water monomer, dimer, and trimer on the (111) terrace, (221) and (322) stepped, and (763) and (854) kinked surfaces of platinum was studied by density functional theory using the PW91 approximation to the energy functional. Monomer diffusion on the terrace is facile, with an activation barrier of 0.20 eV, while dimer and trimer diffusions are restricted due to their high activation barriers of 0.43 and 0.48 eV, respectively. During monomer diffusion on the terrace the O–Pt distance increases by 0.54 Å, about 23% of the initial distance of 2.34 Å. The calculated rate of monomer diffusion hops is in good agreement with the onset temperature of diffusion measurements of Daschbach et al., J. Chem. Phys., 120 (2004) 1516. Alternative monomer diffusion pathways, in which the molecule rolls or flips, were also found. These pathways have diffusion barriers of 0.22 eV. During dimer diffusion on the terrace, the donor molecule rises 0.4 Å at the saddle point, while the acceptor rises by only 0.03 Å. Monomer diffusion up to steps and kinks, with activation barriers of 0.11–0.13 eV, facilitate chain formation on top of step edges. The energy landscape of monomer diffusion from terrace to step to kink sites is downhill with a maximum activation barrier of 0.26 eV. A model for water adsorption is presented inwhichmonomer diffusion leads to concurrent formation of terrace clusters and population of steps/kinks, the latter consistent with the STMmeasurements ofMorgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 77 (1996) 703.